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All grown up SaoirSe ronan takeS the lead September 2013 Customer magazine of the year

All grown up

SaoirSe ronan takeS the lead

September 2013

Customer magazine of the year

Green shoots The new breed of Irish farmer

Running wild

On the trail of Irish adventure races

West Coast wonder

Filmmaker John Butler revisits San Francisco

Mamma Mia!

Stockholm’s ABBA moment

Free-wheeling

holidays

Cycle the

South Downs

complimentary copy

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Contents

September 2013

46 Spirit of adventure
46
Spirit of adventure
72 West coast cool
72
West coast cool
34 The good life – farmer Pat Lalor
34
The good life
– farmer Pat Lalor

Check in

04

ARRIVALS We meet passengers fresh off the plane at Dublin’s T2

07

CHECK IN Ideas on where to stay, eat and visit this September

18

WHAT’S IN MY SUITCASE Jetsetter Jemma Cassidy’s travel essentials

22

SMART TRAVELLER Gaëlle Humbert on Budapest, plus business lunching in Barcelona

24

SHELF LIFE Bridget Hourican marvels at The Modern Explorers, and shortlists new Irish debuts

20

ON MY TRAVELS Into the wild with cameraman Doug Allan

26

SHOW TIME Daragh Reddin’s Dublin fringe and theatre festival edits

Features

28

34

46

60

72

84

98

Regulars

104

48 HOURS IN MANCHESTER Lucy White is mad for it

107

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO TORONTO Linn Vizard’s top tip-offs

111

AER LINGUS INFLIGHT The latest films, TV, music and flight information

136

TRIP OF A LIFETIME Donncha O’Callaghan visits Lebanon with UNICEF

RISE OF THE RONAN EMPIRE Actor Saoirse Ronan holds court with Tony Clayton-Lea

BACK TO THE LAND The new radicals of Irish farming by Emily Hourican

WACKY RACES Ben Webb survives adventure racing in Connemara

TAKE A CHANCE ON STOCKHOLM Brian Finnegan in ABBA heaven

BAY DREAMS San Francisco casts a spell on John Butler

UPS AND DOWNS Sophie “Pedal Power” Davies saddles up in the South Downs

5 BEST SPAS Pampering paradises by Lucy White

Power” Davies saddles up in the South Downs 5 BEST SPAS Pampering paradises by Lucy White

18 What’s In My Suitcase

editorial editor Frances Power deputy editor Lucy White editorial assistant Niamh Wade Contributors Sive
editorial editor Frances Power deputy editor Lucy White editorial assistant Niamh Wade Contributors Sive

editorial editor Frances Power deputy editor Lucy White editorial assistant Niamh Wade Contributors Sive O’Brien, Amanda Cochrane, Liz Dwyer

Group editorial director Laura George

art art director Clare Meredith

adVertiSinG Commercial director Clodagh Edwards +353 (0)1 271 9634, clodagh.edwards@image.ie advertising Manager Noëlle O’Reilly +353 (0)1 271 9621, noelle.oreilly@image.ie advertising Copy Contact Derek Skehan +353 (0)1 855 3855, dereks@typeform.ie

Publisher Richard Power

adMiniStration head of Pr & Promotions Linda McEvitt, +353 (0)1 271 9643, linda.mcevitt@image.ie events Manager Roisin Finnegan Financial Controller Olga Gordeychuk Credit Controller Lisa Dickenson

Board oF direCtorS Managing director Richard Power, richard.power@image.ie Chairman Robert Power directors Ann Reihill, Gina Traynor, Patrick Dillon-Malone, Laura George PrintinG Boylan Print Group oriGination Typeform

Cara magazine is published on behalf of Aer Lingus by Image Publications, 22 Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin, Ireland, +353 (0)1 280 8415; advertising sales, +353 (0)1 271 9625; fax +353 (0)1 280 8309; image.ie, email info@image.ie. Company registration number 56663

© Image Publications Ltd. All rights reserved. Editorial material and opinions expressed in Cara magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of Aer Lingus or IMAGE Publications Ltd. Aer Lingus and IMAGE Publications Ltd do not accept responsibility for the advertising content. Please note that unsolicited manuscripts or submissions will not be returned. All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Production in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from IMAGE Publications Ltd.

without prior permission from IMAGE Publications Ltd. Contributors Sophie Davies is a freelance journalist who
without prior permission from IMAGE Publications Ltd. Contributors Sophie Davies is a freelance journalist who

Contributors

Sophie Davies is a freelance journalist who lives and works in rural West Sussex, writing about gardening and all things outdoor-related from her garden shed. She cycled the South Downs Way for Cara this summer, see page 84 , and has become somewhat obsessed with mountain biking ever since. “I see a hill now and I want to cycle up it,” she says. Sophie especially loved the literary aspects of the trip – lingering in Much Ado Books in Alfriston and stopping off to admire the wonderful paintings at Charleston Farmhouse. This, and the sheer achievement of reaching the finishing post at the end.

ac hi evement of reac hin g the finis hin g post at the end. Kevin
ac hi evement of reac hin g the finis hin g post at the end. Kevin

Kevin Waldron is an Irish children’s book writer and illustrator. Born in Dublin

he now lives in New York. His latest book is

c called Pandamonium at Peek Zoo (2013), by

Templar Publishing. For Cara, he created

a a quirky map to run with a feature on Aer Lingus’ new destination, San Francisco, see

page 72. “I’m flying to San Francisco in two weeks to visit a friend, so this map came up

at a the perfect time. I have a dreadful sense of

direction, drawing maps is the only way for me

to t commit it to memory. I’m always scribbling

directions and sticking them in my pocket.”

Brian Finnegan is a Dublin-based author and magazine editor, who has translated the obsessive love he had for ABBA during his youth into his second novel, Knowing Me Knowing You. “The most pleasurable parts of my research for the book were my trips to Stockholm,” he says. “I immersed myself in all aspects of the city, and I instantly fell in love with its contradictions. It’s a place that’s at once as clinically functional as an IKEA flatpack kitchen, and as warm and homely as a cinnamon bun and coffee.” He visits Stockholm for Cara on page 60.

and coffee.” He visits Stockholm for Cara on page 60. Cara magazine is a member of

Cara magazine is a member of Magazines Ireland. IMAGE Publications Ltd is a member of the Press Council of Ireland and supports the Office of the Press Ombudsman. To contact the Press Ombudsman, visit pressombudsman.ie or presscouncil.ie

IMAGE Publications Ltd –

PUBLISHING COMPANY OF THE YEAR 2010 to adVertiSe PLEA SE CALL NOËLLE O’ REILLY ON +3 53 (0) 1 27 1 9621 OR EMAIL NOELLE .O REILLY@I MAGE .IE

September 2013 Customermagazineof theyear Green shoots The new breed of Irish farmer Running wild On
September 2013
Customermagazineof theyear
Green
shoots
The new breed
of Irish farmer
Running wild
On the trail of Irish
adventure races
West Coast
wonder
Filmmaker John Butler
revisits San Francisco
Mamma Mia!
Stockholm’s
ABBA moment
All grown up
All grown up
Free-wheeling
holidays
SaoirSe ronan takeS the lead
Cycle the
South Downs
complimentary copy

on the CoVer

Actor Saoirse Ronan photographed by Fabrizio Maltese.

Celebrating luxury, creativity, service and the very best Irish and international brands since 1849. WELCOME
Celebrating luxury, creativity, service and the very best Irish and international brands since 1849. WELCOME
Celebrating luxury, creativity, service and the very best Irish and international brands since 1849. WELCOME
Celebrating luxury, creativity, service and the very best Irish and international brands since 1849. WELCOME
Celebrating luxury, creativity, service and the very best Irish and international brands since 1849. WELCOME

Celebrating luxury, creativity, service and the very best Irish and international brands since 1849.

WELCOME

TO

BROWN THOMAS

GRAFTON STREET DUBLIN, PATRICK STREET CORK, O’CONNELL STREET LIMERICK, EGLINGTON BUILDINGS GALWAY

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STREET DUBLIN, PATRICK STREET CORK , O’CONNELL STREET LIMERICK, EGLINGTON BUILDINGS GALWAY WWW.BROWNTHOMAS.COM
who? Wendy Read Flying in From London Heathrow here For Wendy has popped across the
who? Wendy Read Flying in From
London Heathrow here For
Wendy has
popped across the water to enjoy some time
visiting family in Ireland.
who? From left, Freya and Elise Reilly
who? Julius Cervo and Savannah
who?
Flying in From Faro here For
These
Duggan Flying in From Glasgow
here For
This Canadian duo are
hoping to bump into Colin Farrell while
holidaying around Ireland!
smiley sisters have just had twelve days of fun
in Portugal, but are excited to be home for
their new cousin’s christening.
Arrivals
The sun shone on Dublin’s T2
th this summer, where Cara magazine
w
welcomed Aer Lingus passengers
on their holidays and ahead
of family gatherings.
who? From left, Rory Draper and
Stephen Donovan Flying in From Berlin
here For
The boys in green live in Madrid
who From left, Zara Rocks and Rebecca
Seed Flying From Zurich here For
Rebecca is staying with Zara’s family in Cork
for a whole week. This lucky young lady was
met by her pal who travelled up especially to
help Rebecca begin her Irish adventure.
and are home for the first time in six months.
They roamed around Berlin for two weeks but
can’t wait to see friends and family.
who? Kevin
Keane Flying in
From Geneva
here For
This
happy chap is back
home after a few
days in France.
Kevin spent his time e
cheering on his
friend who was
cycling in the Tour
de France.
who? Olivia and Ruairi
Moriarty Flying in From
who? From left, Tara Murphy, Gianna
Brussels here For
Olivia
Eigenmann and Lucy Murphy Flying in From
and Ruairi are home after
holidaying in Belgium. Ruairi is
very pleased to come back to
sunshine.
Zurich here For
Gianna is thrilled to be in
Ireland on an exchange programme for three
weeks. The Murphy family are looking forward
to showing Gianna the picks of Ireland and
Dublin, including the Phoenix Park.
4 |
september 2013
WORDS By NIaMH WaDE/PHOTOGRaPHS By aNTHONy WOODS
 

Clodagh’s Kitchen

Orla Kiely

Orla Kiely

Appleby

 

Coach

Whatever’s next, since 1843.

This iconic building on Dublin’s Henry Street is Ireland’s largest and longest established department store.
This iconic building on Dublin’s Henry Street is Ireland’s largest and longest
established department store. Arnotts is home to the world’s best in beauty,
fashion for men and women, homewares, all the latest in technology and Ireland’s
largest and loveliest shoe department, The Shoe Garden. There are several
places to eat, including Clodagh’s Kitchen, in which everything is homemade
by celebrity chef Clodagh McKenna. In other words, Arnotts is more than just
shopping. It is an experience.
Shop online www.arnotts.ie
Like us on Facebook!
‘Arnotts Department Store’
Follow us on Twitter!
‘@arnottsdublin’
Arnotts, 12 Henry Street, Dublin 1 / 01 805 0400
Blarney Castle & Gardens Renowned for bestowing the gift of eloquence See and feel Irelands

Blarney Castle & Gardens

Renowned for bestowing the gift of eloquence See and feel Irelands heritage, built nearly six hundred years ago by one of Ireland’s greatest chieftains. Spend the day exploring the extensive grounds and gardens.

Spend the day exploring the extensive grounds and gardens. Open all year round c 5 miles
Spend the day exploring the extensive grounds and gardens. Open all year round c 5 miles
Spend the day exploring the extensive grounds and gardens. Open all year round c 5 miles
Spend the day exploring the extensive grounds and gardens. Open all year round c 5 miles
Check in Fi nd ou t wh at ’s on, wh ere an d wh
Check in Fi nd ou t wh at ’s on, wh ere an d wh en in Se pt em ber
The green and the good
Kilkenny may be best known for its annual comedy festival, however, this month it’s a magnet for
Kilkenny may be best known for its annual comedy festival, however, this month it’s a magnet for
hikers, bikers and walkers, gourmands, artisans, foragers and all-round inquisitive types. Trail
Kilkenny is a September-long festival designed to prevent folk from premature hibernation; gently
coaxing us out on to craft, heritage, nature and food trails, moonlit strolls and dog walks, hill hikes
– even Canadian canoeing. Meanwhile, Mount Juliet golf and spa resort invites the green-fingered
to meet horticultural and food experts, gillie Eddie Collins, executive chef Cormac Rowe and
gardener Paddy Daly, above, in its verdant walled garden. September 1-29; trailkilkenny.ie

Check in

Check in

STay
STay
4
4

tree house hotels

Branch out before the weather turns, at one of these leafy lodges …

before the weather turns, at one of these leafy lodges … Chewton Glen Hotel & Spa

Chewton Glen Hotel & Spa

New Milton, New Forest, Hampshire, England The very height of luxury, Chewton Glen’s twelve deluxe, stilted suites have the most amazing panoramic forest views. Glass-framed decks mean you can even enjoy the great outdoors from your double Villeroy and Boch bathtub, while the main house and spa are just a golf buggy’s drive away. Bliss. Suites from £820 B&B and dinner. +44 1425 282212; chewtonglen.com

£820 B&B and dinner. +44 1425 282212; chewtonglen.com Teapot Lane Tawley, Co Leitrim, Ireland Teapot La

Teapot Lane

Tawley, Co Leitrim, Ireland Teapot Lane was Ireland’s first glamping destination, introducing yurt accommodation to the tentpegphobic public. It has since added a cute vintage caravan, and in May, branched out with a tree house – a plush pad three metres above ground level for two to three guests, resplendent with a pot belly stove for those autumnal nights, a kitchen area – and even a wine fridge. B&B from €150. glampingireland.ie

a wine fridge. B&B from €150. gl am pingirel an d.ie La Cabane en l’Air France,

La Cabane en l’Air

France, nationwide Environmentally-conscious families with a sense of adventure will love La Cabane en l’Air, a network of some 200, all-year- round tree house campsites all across France. With heights ranging from four metres to 22, there’s a cabin for everyone – although, in the spirit of sustainable tourism, many lack electricity. Shower blocks are the name of the game. B&B from €115 for two. lacabaneenlair.com

the game. B&B from €115 for two. lacabaneenlair.com Disney’s Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa 1960 Broadway,

Disney’s Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa

1960 Broadway, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, US Channel the Swiss Family Robinson at one of these 60 three-bedroomed tree house villas. Positioned about three metres above ground, each ample suite (they can fit up to nine guests) has a kitchen, private decking and even its own driveway. Villas from $797. disneyworld.disney.go.com/ resorts

Villas from $797. disneyworld.disney.go.com/ resorts MUSIC She’s in fashion This September 19-22, Irish style
MUSIC
MUSIC

She’s in fashion

This September 19-22, Irish style maven Angela Scanlon is hosting main stage catwalk shows at London Fashion Weekend. “I’m very excited,” she admits, of a vast programme that also includes pop-up shops and beauty sideshows. “The Vodafone Live Lounge is always fun so I’ll

be legging it there to catch some talks. I’ll also be sneaking off to buy some JW Anderson clothes, Linda Farrow shades, maybe some

Dominic Jones jewellery

based, does she ever miss Ireland? “I miss the craic, and the bacon. But not the public transport!” she laughs. londonfashionweekend. co.uk / @angelascanlon

” Now London

dIary
dIary

Cardiac arrest

Branching out

US brand Proof Eyewear has crossed the Atlantic, its lacewood, ebony and mahogany glasses made from sustainably sourced, 100 per cent biodegradable materials. Prices from £85. iwantproof.co.uk

“When we marry the sexiness of salsa to the thunder of Irish dance, the lyricism of tango to the yearning of sean-nós, what a night of storytelling we shall have,” ponders Irish author Joseph O’Connor, who wrote the narrative and lyrics to Heartbeat of Home, the latest from the Riverdance stable. From September 25 to October 12 at Dublin’s Bord Gáis Energy Theatre, a 28-strong cast, a ten-piece band and 3D technology combine for a world premiere of music by Brian Byrne and choreography by David Bolger. heartbeatofhome.com

for a world premiere of music by Brian Byrne and choreography by David Bolger. heartbeatofhome.com 8
for a world premiere of music by Brian Byrne and choreography by David Bolger. heartbeatofhome.com 8

8 |

for a world premiere of music by Brian Byrne and choreography by David Bolger. heartbeatofhome.com 8

september 2013

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ANDY WARhOL, TROY DIPTYCH, 1962. COLLECTION MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART ChICAGO, GIFT OF MRS. ROBERT B. MAYER.

Check in CULTURE
Check in
CULTURE

Pop go the artists

Andy Warhol is a household name, but Marisol Escobar? Well known, certainly, around New York during the swinging sixties, the Venezuelan artist has largely been overshadowed by her male Pop Artist pals. But MCA:

DNA Warhol & Marisol at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art addresses the imbalance somewhat, juxtaposing the friends’ different approaches to portraiture, and their mutual fondness of motifs and found objects. Warhol’s silk-screen paintings are shown alongside Marisol’s wooden sculptures and plaster castings from September 21 until June 15, 2014. mcachicago.org.

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SUEDE SHOE €67 at Marks & Spencer LEATHER ADMIRAL SHOE €100 at Dubarry, College Green,
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10 |

SHOE €100 at Dubarry, College Green, Dublin 2 10 | september 2013 Another is It’s All

september 2013

at Dubarry, College Green, Dublin 2 10 | september 2013 Another is It’s All About The

Another is It’s All About The Meat Baby (meatbaby.at), based on the Danube Canal, near Schwedenplatz. The beef is imported directly from Irish butchers, FX Buckley’s, who mince three different cuts of meat combined to make burgers cooked on a coal barbecue. All cocktails are bespoke and the house draft beer is the unpasteurised Czech beer Kozel served from a 500-litre tank. Meatbaby leaves this location at the end of September but should pop up somewhere else soon …”

FOOD
FOOD

What’s cooking in Vienna?

This month, Dubliner Brian Patton, right, of Vienna’s Irish pub Charlie P’s, takes Eoin Higgins on a whirl through Austria’s capital.

“September signifies “sturmtime”, when wine bars serve the early fermenting grape juice, sturm, for just a couple of weeks to celebrate the start of the wine harvest. Wieninger in Stammersdorf (heuriger-wieninger.at) is popular with the locals, and their cold plates are also highly recommended. A must

for any food lover is a visit to Vienna’s main food market, Naschmarkt. Or, stop for

a bite at its Market Café,

which sources ingredients

from the stalls. A DJ starting at 4pm, and the best coffee in town, make this the perfect spot to while away an evening. Weather permitting, an afternoon dip in the pool based on the ship Badeschiff

is highly recommended, as is

its casual dining restaurant Holy Moly run by Michelin- starred chef Christian Petz

(badeschiff.at). Popular pop-ups are Love Kitchen (lovekitchen.at) and Guerilla Bakery (guerillabakery.at). The former’s an invite-only vegetarian lunch spot open on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, from which the owner hangs a tea towel outside her window to identify her location. The latter offers a modern take

on a Viennese patisserie.

ChRISTINA KARAGIANNIS
ChRISTINA KARAGIANNIS

© Kildare Village 2013

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Check in

Check in Culture Plane sailing On September 15, Dublin’s skies will play host to FlightFest, a

CultureCheck in Plane sailing On September 15, Dublin’s skies will play host to FlightFest, a once-in-a-lifetime,

Plane sailing

On September 15, Dublin’s skies will play host to FlightFest, a once-in-a-lifetime, two-hour flypast as part of the Gathering Ireland 2013. Organised by the Irish Aviation Authority and Dublin City Council, more than 30 civilian, military and historic aircraft – Aer Lingus among them – will follow the course of the River Liffey from Dublin Port to the Custom House, with participating aeroplanes including a B-17 Flying Fortress, a Vulcan delta wing bomber, a Strikemaster jet and a Superjumbo A380. And it’s a free event. What’s not to love? flightfest.ie

Food Fiesta Gastronomes unite: From September 9-15, Waterford City hosts its sixth annual Waterford Harvest Festival. Loosen those waistbands to enjoy barbecues, banquets, artisan beerfests, cooking demos, celebrity cook-offs, masterclasses and more. waterfordharvestfestival.ie.

sport
sport

The Munster mash

Clare or Cork – who will win the GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championships 2013?

The deciding clash of the ash

is on September 8 at Dublin’s

Croke Park, the Banner Men meeting the Rebels in the first all-Munster final since 1997. On August 18, Limerick were knocked out of the championship, Clare effortlessly acing a seven point defeat, 1-22 to 0-18. But as one of the most successful hurling counties, the Corkonians are a tough nut to crack – and with both counties having bounced back superbly since being beaten in their provincial summer championship, expect white knuckles this month. Less fraught will be Galway’s

Aer Lingus International Hurling Festival,

global celebration of the game from September 18-21. gaa.ie / aerlingushurling.com

a

12 |

from September 18-21. gaa.ie / aerlingushurling.com a 12 | september 2013 Food Aw, shucks Eoin Higgins

september 2013

Food
Food

Aw, shucks

Eoin Higgins dives into the Galway Oyster Festival.

What’s it all about? It’s the annual love-in for the opulent Irish oyster. Gregarious Galwegians, bivalve blow-ins, and mollusc maniacs converge on Galway city for the world’s longest running oyster festival. The shucking shindig heralds the Irish oyster eating season: September to

April, or, any month with an “r” in it. What to expect? The festival opens in Galway Harbour with

a marquee party that

reception reception and and
reception reception and and

traditional music, before parading to the next stop for a lush seafood banquet, then on to a third venue for desserts and entertainment

till the small hours. Another must-see, on day two, is the World Oyster Opening Championship, which features international contestants competing for the world title.

the details

Oyster Festival runs

from September 27-29. galwayoysterfest.com.

The Galway

includes food tastings from the city’s top restaurants; the national oyster shucking competition; and jiving to The Papazitas, the festival’s eight-piece band. Highlights? Aside from the glitzy opening ceremony, where the newly-crowned Oyster Pearl presents the season’s first oyster to

Galway’s mayor – a tradition since 1954 – the Oyster Masquerade street party

is also a must-do. The

night starts with an oyster

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fooD DiaRy When size is everything Expecting the würst Tapas and mezze are so last
fooD
DiaRy
When size is everything
Expecting the würst
Tapas and mezze are so last season . Eoin Higgins rounds up the three
best small-plate restaurants, the latest culinary trend.
A tattooed and bearded
chef enfant terrible, Jesse
Schenker, above, sharpened
his knives at Gordon
Ramsay’s The London, in
New York City, before
setting up his own amped-
up small-plate offering in
the West Village. Recette
(328 West 12th Street,
Greenwich Village, +1 212
414 3000; recettenyc.com)
So what happens when
Michelin stars meet
Grammys? Cleaver East
(East Essex Street, Temple
Bar, Dublin 2, 01 531 3500;
cleavereast.ie), the latest
offering from Michelin star-
spangled duo, Oliver Dunne
and Rory Carville, who have
set up shop at The Clarence
Hotel in Dublin city. The
room is dark, yet somehow
The groovy folks behind the
Dairy (15 The Pavement,
Clapham Old Town,
London, +44 207 622 4165;
the-dairy.co.uk) work
alongside the seasons,
sourcing the finest produce,
as well as growing a
selection of ingredients in
their urban garden. How
Ja – it’s Lederhosen and Dirndl time. For
despite the name, Munich’s Oktoberfest
kicks off this September 21, marking 16
days of wheat beer, würst, fairgrounds
and oompah (oktoberfest.de). Attracting
more than six million people every year,
Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair.
It’s also one of Bavaria’s biggest
exports, with eponymous
offshoots popping up
across the globe this
month, including in
Ireland: George’s
Dock in Dublin, from
September 19 to October
6 (oktoberfest-dublin.de),
and Cork’s Oktoberfest
Beag at the Old
Beamish and
Crawford Brewery
September 5-14
(oktoberfest
beag.ie).
very contemporary
Such
is an atmospheric joint
aER LiNGUS FLIES FROM
DUBLIN TO MUNiCH DAILY,
AND FROM CORK ON TUE,
THU AND SAT.
where young profs and old
pros chow down and chat
up with NYC verve.
airy, with a strong industrial
feel, the menu holds
interest, the price is right,
and the talent is apparent.
an ethos is buttressed
with a link to tradition
that produces exquisitely
balanced small-plate
masterpieces.
BEaUTy
SPATIAL
the AWARENESS
The third
Architecture
Triennale
September
its multifaceted
Long-haul
skin savers
programme
city opens entitled
Closer.
Cue
experimental
exhibitions,
performances
and 15. debates Lisbon 12,
happening
By Liz Dwyer.
across
until on December Close,
trienaldelisboa.com
Keep skin dewy
fresh with
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disembark, €16.50.
Homegrown talent
at Brown Thomas
€43.
Past and present collide at Dublin department
store Brown Thomas this month, with archival
pieces by Ireland’s first couturier, Sybil Connolly
(1921-1998), displayed alongside items made by
the nation’s new generation for an exhibition
entitled CREATE. In her heyday, Connolly dressed
Jackie Kennedy and Elizabeth Taylor. Now, it ’s
the likes of participating jeweller Merle O’Grady,
who embellish the stars – Beyoncé and Kylie have
worn her designs, while milliner Martha Lynn
trained under Philip Treacy, and Emma Manley
(her work pictured right) at Alexander McQueen.
More fledgling talent includes knitwear ace Honor
Fitzsimons. CREATE runs instore until
September 24. brownthomas.com
14 |
september 2013

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Check in 16 | September 2013
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16 |

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September 2013

Wish you were here

Wish you were here Nicola N Carey , left , is a full- teacher in Holywood,

Nicola N

Carey, left, is a full-

teacher in Holywood,

time ti

Co C Down. She’s been taking

as a hobby

photographs p

for f nearly two years, with

a keen interest in travel,

and landscape

street s

photography (see her edit at flickr.

com/photos/necarey).

Of this stunning photograph taken in Italy’s Burano, an island on the Venetian Lagoon: “My family and I flew to Venice from Dublin at the start of July and stayed in the nearby resort of Lido Di Jeslo. Our final stop was the beautiful island of Burano, famous for its lacework and brightly coloured houses. I wanted to capture the colourful houses and their reflections in the water, which was quite tricky to compose without a tripod and at the end of a very tiring and hot day. But I managed to get this shot before having to quickly run back to the boat!”

Have you a stunning photograph of your trip to an Aer Lingus destination to share? Send it to us at cara.wishyouwerehere@image.ie and we’ll publish our favourite shot in the October/ November issue.

The technicals Photographs must be a 300-dpi high resolution file and accompanied by a portrait of yourself and 100 words about the story behind the shot. The editor’s decision is final.

september 2013

of yourself and 100 words about the story behin d the shot. The editor’s decision is

| 17

teardrop earringS €58 at Loulerie, 14b Chatham Street, Dublin 2 printed SCarf kDk, €220 at
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What’s
in my
suitcase
oTTSCkMArBYPHgrAoToPH

Jemma Cassidy is a hip chick, in so many ways – she runs hiphip.ie, an Irish event styling company while working as a buyer for cool fashion and lifestyle company URBN (think Free People and Anthropologie) in Philadelphia. As Jemma jets off to Mexico on holidays via Tokyo and New York , Sive O’Brien checks her bag.

tweezerS Tweezerman, €14.95 at millies.ie
tweezerS
Tweezerman,
€14.95 at
millies.ie

Bikini Mara Hoffman, €234 at asos.com

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Bikini Mara Hoffman, €234 at asos.com Check in MaSCara YSL, €32.50 at Brown Thomas Silk dreSS

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CleanSer Eve Lom, €68 at Harvey Nichols, Dundrum Town Centre, Dundrum, Dublin 16

at Harvey Nichols, Dundrum Town Centre, Dundrum, Dublin 16 eau de parfuMe Stella by Stella McCartney,

eau de parfuMe Stella by Stella McCartney, €69 at Boots pharmacies nationwide

leather BootS Acne, €511 at acnestudios.com
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Body MoiSturiSer kiehl’s Crème de Corps, €54.50 at kiehl’s, 35 Wicklow Street, Dublin 2

lipStiCk MAC Lady Danger, €19 at Brown Thomas

18 |

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Check in On my travels Wildlife and documentary cameraman Doug Allan shares his polar pursuits with

On my travels

Wildlife and documentary cameraman Doug Allan shares his polar pursuits with Sive O’Brien.

Over the past 35 years, Doug Allan has been involved in 60 films for the BBC, Discovery Channel and National Geographic (The Blue Planet, Planet Earth and Human Planet); has won seven Emmys; four BAFTAs, and many other awards. This month he tours his live show Doug Allan – A Life Behind the Lens across Ireland from September 19 to October 4, and the UK from October 11-28, for more details, visit dougallan.com, or read about his adventures in the book Freeze Frame (Tartan Dragon).

I
I

t all began with … diving, which led to a marine biology

degree, which took me to the Antarctic in 1976. Photography was a big thing at the research station; it was the best way to show people the wonders of the place. A film

crew briefly visited and I helped the cameraman, which made me realise this was something that encompassed all my interests. On my next contract south,

I took a film camera and one

thing led to another The best trip … was when we captured killer whales watching

the seals off the ice floes for Frozen Planet – we knew it happened but exactly where and when were big unknowns.

I was with Scottish cameraman Doug Anderson, accompanied

by two of the best killer whale

biologists in the world, on a boat skippered by men I’ve known for 20 years – it doesn’t get more special than that. The most influential place in my life … has been Antarctica. Over an eleven-year period, I spent five-and-a-half years there

– diving, working with scientists, climbing and isolated for many months over the winters. I’ve been back every year since; it still holds the allure.

The most dangerous situation … was when I was grabbed by

a walrus in the water – that was

hairy. If he’d held on when I hit him rather than let go, I wouldn’t be here. Also, diving under ice; being near polar bears; edging on crampons across steep snow;

filming at minus 40 degrees –

they’re all potentially dangerous

but the exciting satisfaction lies in being able to walk to the edge and bring back the shots. Most memorable filming … was the time spent in the water with big marine mammals like the humpback whales in Tonga, or Weddell seals under the ice in the Antarctic. Being eye-to-eye

with them in their environments, creating a genuine relationship with them, is true magic. The polar bear … is the most charismatic animal I’ve ever filmed; the greatest predator in the most challenging habitat on

earth – the frozen sea ice. The most interesting place I’ve stayed … is a hotel built entirely of blocks of salt on the Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia. Not exactly five star! My ultimate escape … is the west coast of Ireland, where

I’ve a cottage on the Renvyle

peninsula. One day I’ll live there for longer than just a couple of weeks at a time. My greatest adventure … was summiting Shishapangma mountain in China at 8014 metres – the 14th highest mountain in the world. It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. And that was for pleasure! Time away is never wasted … even when the animal I seek

is ultra elusive. I spent eleven

weeks in Ladakh, India, for only

an hour in the company of a snow leopard, and for 50 of those 60 minutes, she was asleep. Places on my wish list … the New Caledonia islands in the Pacific Ocean; the summit of Aconcagua in the Andes, and

a deep sea visit, around 4,000 metres below water.

and a deep sea visit, around 4,000 metres below water. 20 | september 2013 3 best

20 |

and a deep sea visit, around 4,000 metres below water. 20 | september 2013 3 best

september 2013

3 best wildlife tours

1 The Irish need not travel

to Alaska to spot whales

– how about West Cork?

As commander of Whale Watching Cork, zoologist Nic Slocum takes passengers out on his purpose-built mammal- chasing vessel in search of minke sharks, bottlenose dolphins, left, and fin whales. whalewatchwestcork.com

2 Rural Spain teems with diverse flora and fauna, and naturalist Julian

Sykes knows exactly where to find them. As well as all- year-round nature trails, this month the Yorkshireman is offering bespoke Andalucían Mammals and Birds tours from September 28 to October 12. juliansykeswildlife.com

3 Oyster and salt farms, wineries, navigating the crystalline waters

of Soline Bay, the UNESCO- protected Durmitor National Park, and the deepest gorges … there’s much to see and do on Natural Habitat Expeditions’ Sea Kayaking and Hiking tours in Croatia and Dubrovnik. nathab.com

21-26 South Anne Street, Dublin 2 HACKETT.COM
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Smart Traveller|

Networking in Budapest, or business lunching in Barcelona? Lisa Hughes scouts the hotspots.

LittLe BLack Book BudAPeST

Gaëlle Humbert, managing director of Renault Finance, travels for work frequently and her favourite city for doing business is Budapest.

“Budapest is great for business travel because… it’s compact and so easy to get around, but has all the advantages of a capital city. It offers good value for money, and the hotels’ great business rates make it an ideal destination for conferences and meetings. Best place

for business meetings … Historic locations, such as the Corinthia Hotel (Erzsébet körút 43-49, +36 1 479 4000; corinthia.com), one of the first major palaces in Europe, and the Four Seasons Hotel Gresham Palace (Széchenyi István tér 5-6, +36 1 268 6000; fourseasons.com), located at the end of the Chain Bridge, are exquisite places to hold a meeting. Business lunch … You can eat traditional Hungarian food in a very typical Hungarian atmosphere in Paprika Vendéglo (Dózsa György Way 72, +36 20 294 7944; paprikavendeglo.hu). I also like the mix of French Provençal cuisine and native gastronomy in the Abszint Café and Restaurant (Andrássy út 34), which has a budget-friendly two-course lunch menu

with a glass of wine for about €20. Best for business drinks … I like Liszt Ferenc Ter, which is a very pretty square with lots of cafés and restaurants to choose

square with lots of cafés and restaurants to choose from. Try one of Budapest’s specialities –

from. Try one of Budapest’s specialities – The Kerts, vintage open-air bars. My personal favourite is Szimpla Kert (Kazinczy St 14, +36 20 261 8669; szimpla.hu). Best business hotel … In the Buda part of the city, the Hotel Gellért (Szent Gellért tér 1, +36 1 889 5500; danubiushotels.

hu) and in the Pest part, The Meridien (Erzsébet tér 9-10, +36 1 429 5500; lemeridienbudapest.com) are both highly recommended. However, if I’m visiting for at least three nights I prefer to rent an apartment which offers home comforts, like free internet and your own kitchen facilities. Wi-Fi … Budapest developed very quickly with the latest technology, and you can easily find bars and cafés and of course hotels with free Wi-Fi. On your downtime … If you’re in the city around Christmas time, don’t miss the festive fairs, especially the famous one on the Place Vörösmarty. And do go ice- skating on the lake of the City Park near Heroes’ Square, or, “Hosök tere”, and eat the kurtos kalacs (a type of brioche). Or if you’re in the city during spring/summer, spend some time on Margitsziget, an island in the middle of the Danube.

Must-have travel gadget Noise-cancelling headphones

these Harman kardon headphones may be on the pricey side, but for frequent flyers, their digital noise cancellation is a must. the comfy, over-ear fit blocks out any chatter – perfect for getting some work done – they fold flat for added convenience, and a built-in mic for cellphone calls offers impressive sound quality. ($299.95, harmankardon.com).

22 |

sound quality. ($299.95, harmankardon.com ). 22 | SEPTEmbEr 2013 4 business lunches in barcelona 1 MOMeNTS

SEPTEmbEr 2013

4
4

business lunches in barcelona

). 22 | SEPTEmbEr 2013 4 business lunches in barcelona 1 MOMeNTS Michelin-starred chef Carme Ruscalleda

1 MOMeNTS Michelin-starred chef Carme Ruscalleda and her son reinterpret Catalan favourites at

this sophisticated hotspot, above. The restaurant décor is awash with honey, gold and amber hues contrasted with pristine white tables and chairs. The seasonal Mediterranean dishes are loaded with flavour to match the stylish ambience. (Passeig de Gràcia 38, +34 931 51 87 81; mandarinoriental.com)

2 ABAC If modern Catalan cuisine

in a slick, minimalist dining space

is what you’re after, ABaC is your

spot. Chef Jordi Cruz, the youngest in Spain to win a Michelin star, is at the helm, and it’s location in a five-star hotel ensures a five-star gourmet experience. Groups can book an intimate dining room for up to 60 diners for extra privacy. (Avinguda del Tibidabo 1, +34 93 319 6600; abacbarcelona.com)

3 CINC SeNTITS Local and mostly

organic ingredients are used to full

effect to create Catalan cuisine

infused with flavour at Cinc Sentits. With its central location, this restaurant

is a popular choice for lunch meetings. Menu-wise, it offers competitively priced tasting options and fresh seafood. (Carrer d’Aribau 58, +34 93 323 9490; cincsentits.com)

4 eLS PeSCAdORS Catalan for "the fishermen", Els Pescadors is traditional and unfussy in style,

with long windows and wood-lined panels on walls. Dine outside on the patio, or inside the old tavern but don't let the humble decor fool you; this upmarket seafood restaurant is considered one of the best in Barcelona. (Plaça Prim 1, +34 93 225 2018, elspescadors.com)

Chris Quinn

Partner

Head of Aviation Finance

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Shelf Life| Bridget Hourican follows some of the world’s greatest adventures, and also discovers some new Irish debuts.

Who’s reading what? Irish author Catherine Catherine Dunne Dunne on on writing and travels. YOUR
Who’s reading what?
Irish author Catherine Catherine Dunne Dunne on on
writing and travels.
YOUR LATEST
BOOK IS SET IN AN
UNSPECIFIED PLACE.
DID YOU HAVE AN
ACTUAL PLACE IN
MIND? The location is
deliberately non-specific.
Complex Complex family family situations situations
arise arise everywhere everywhere – – even even in in
the most idyllic of locations.
YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE TO WRITE? My
office at home – I love it. But writing travels
well – that’s one of its many joys.
WHAT’S THE BEST – AND WORST –
BOOK YOU’VE TAKEN ON A JOURNEY?
Timing is so important with the books we
read and, on that basis, I choose as the best
The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields. I no
longer remember the journey: but
I still love the book. On the other hand,
still remember glorious Croatia – but have
forgotten every word of The Da Vinci Code.
Is that telling me something?
YOUR BOOKS HAVE BEEN TRANSLATED
INTO NUMEROUS LANGUAGES.
WHO’S YOUR FAVOURITE AUTHOR
IN TRANSLATION? My favourite is
always the author I have most recently
discovered! Right now it’s Italian writer
Dacia Maraini.
SPEAKING OF WHICH, YOU’RE
OFF TO ITALY TO RECEIVE THE
BOCCACCIO PRIZE. ANY MUST-SEES?
Pisa. Certaldo Alto. Tuscany …
I
Catherine Dunne’s latest novel, The Things We
Know Now, is published in paperback by Pan
Macmillan, €15.99.
Now, is published in paperback by Pan Macmillan, €15.99. ON THE HOOF In The Modern Explorers

ON THE HOOF

In The Modern Explorers by Robin Ha nbur y-Tenison and Robert Tw igger (Th ames & Hudson, £24), 39 contemporary explorers, ranging from the famous and experienced (Ranulph Fiennes, Tim Severin) to the young and yet- known, are featured exploring some of the least visited, most challenging places in the world. Sections of the book are divided into terrains – Polar, Desert, Rainforest, Mountain, Ocean, River, and, Lost Worlds, which sees Mark Norell dinosaur-hunting in Mongolia and Ta hir Shah in search of King Solomon’s Mines. These men and

women are conservationists

and ethnologists at heart,

if not professionally,

seeking to cherish and preserve, not commercialise or alter, the places they traverse. They ski solo to the South Pole,

sail the Atlantic in

a leather boat and go

READ ZONE The 13th International Literary Festival Berlin (literaturfestival.com) returns this September 4-15, its
READ ZONE
The 13th International
Literary Festival Berlin
(literaturfestival.com) returns
this September 4-15, its 200-odd
programme including readings
by Irish authors John Boyne
and Anne Enright, a Graphic
Novel Day, and kids
events.

caving in Borneo. An excellent match of great photos with vivid text reminds us that there’s always something new under the sun.

Best new Irish debuts

€ a d f ih
a
d
f ih

Malarky by Anakana

Malarky

S

Schofield

(Oneworld,

€13.99). In this winner of

amazon.ca’s First Novel

Award, the narrator is a Mayo farmer’s wife with

a a gay son in Afghanistan

and an unfaithful husband. Constant

shifts in time, location and voice keep

this lively and unexpected. Assured, humorous and a surprising debut.

1
1

Ghost Moth by Michèle

Ghost Moth

F Forbes (Weidenfeld &

Nicolson, £12.99). Set in

Belfast, its main character, Katherine, is a talented

y young opera singer in

1949 and 20 years later a h housewife if and mother of four. A

subtle, passionate story of private grief

set against public crisis – and the debut novel of short story writer Forbes.

£ D l N
£
D
l N

Red Sky in Morning

Red Sky in Morning

by b Paul Lynch (Quercus,

£14.99). Set in Ireland

America in the

1800s, this follows

a

and

e

early

Donegal-man, Coll Coyle,

b being stalked across

Donegal, New York and Pennsylvania

after he has murdered his landlord.

There are as many film influences here as

literary (Cormac McCarthy, Jim Crace).

24 |

his landlord. There are as many film influences here as literary (Cormac McCarthy, Jim Crace). 24

September 2013

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Star turns

Dublin becomes a performance hub this month, its annual theatre and fringe festivals offering something for everyone, reports Daragh Reddin.

G

iven that this year’s Dublin Theatre Festival (September 26 to October 13,

dublintheatrefestival. com) arrives with the decidedly puckish invitation to “come out and play”, it’s fitting that one of its signal shows is a farrago of circus skills, dance and comedy. Wunderkammer (September 25-29, Gaiety Theatre) is a mischievous blend of awe-inspiring derring-do and offbeat vaudeville, courtesy of Australia’s acrobatic troupe Circa. A sextet of suitably lithe performers will wow audiences with gasp-inducing aerial rope tricks, white-knuckle balancing acts and don’t-try-this-at-home contortion. If that sounds far too intoxicating/frivolous for your tastes, rest assured there’s plenty of chin-strokingly serious theatre taking place on terra firma. The Gare St Lazare Players have been lauded across the globe for their scrupulous Beckett’s prose; however, to celebrate the 60th anniversary of its publication, they’ll be taking on the Nobel laureate’s existentially charged tragicomedy Waiting For Godot (October 2-6, Gaiety Theatre). Two great Fr anco -I ri sh performers will also be hoping to

make their mark as part of this year’s programme, with works they’ve adapted themselves. In the one-woman riverrun, Olwen Fouéré, in association with Rough Magic, will give voice to celebrated extracts from James Joyce’s redoubtable Finnegans Wake (October 2-6, Project Arts Centre). Elsewhere, with recourse to song and storytelling, renaissance woman Camille O’Sullivan, right, takes on Shakespeare’s narrative poem The Rape of Lucrece (October 10-12, O’Reilly Theatre) in a show that has already garnered effusive reviews during a UK run. In a programme that’s disappointingly light in terms of new Irish drama, it’s likely that The Hanging Gardens, Frank McGuinness’s latest play, and his first for the National Theatre in 14 years, should foment a considerable degree of attention (October 3-12, Abbey Theatre). Chasing at the heels of the Dublin Theatre Festival is its giddy and impetuous little sister, the Dublin Fringe (September 5-22, fringefest.com). Despite waving farewell to Absolut this year, it remains as varied and vast a programme as ever – and wouldn’t be the Fringe without at least one

ever – and wouldn’t be the Fringe without at least one Renaissance woman Camille O’Sullivan takes

Renaissance woman Camille O’Sullivan takes on Shakespeare’s Rape of Lucrece.

ukulele-toting performance artist renowned for searing polemic. Step up New York ’s Taylor Mac (September 17-21, Smock Alley Theatre) whose abridged version of a 24-hour concert will feature at least one song from each decade of the 20th centur y. If you fancy seeing contemporary dance, physical theatre and performance art coalesce, then make time for Fatherland (September 17-21, The Lir) from Scotland ’s Nic Green. Its female protagonist examines paternal relationships, masculinity and family relationships – if that sounds forbiddingly po-faced, keep in mind that in one show-stopping set-piece she invites fellas from the audience to get their equine groove on and gallop about like horses. Well this is the Fringe, after all.

about like horses. Well this is the Fringe, after all. 26 | September 2013 3 cultural
about like horses. Well this is the Fringe, after all. 26 | September 2013 3 cultural

26 |

about like horses. Well this is the Fringe, after all. 26 | September 2013 3 cultural

September 2013

3 cultural showcases

1 CU LTURE NIGHT September 20 The concept is a simple but effective one: Ireland’s arts

centres, museums and historical sites leave their doors open until well into the night for one day only – and culture vultures as well as the curious can take advantage of free tours, talks and performances off the clock. It’s always a convivial affair. culturenight.ie

2 THE NEW YORKER

FESTIVAL October 4-6

Arguably The Big Apple’s most

erudite publication, The New Yorker plays host to an annual literature festival featuring a Who’s Who of the world’s buzziest intellectuals. It’s by no means a sombre affair, last year’s guests included Vampire Weekend and Girls creator Lena Dunham. newyorker.com

3 FESTIVAL NUMBER 6, September 13-15 Wales’ Portmeirion is the backdrop

for this thoughtfully curated shindig that places as much emphasis on literature as culture. This year sees live performances from Manic Street Preachers and My Bloody Valentine, alongside spoken word events from Caitlin Moran and DBC Pierre. festivalnumber6.com

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is authorised by The Danish FSA in Denmark and is regulated by the Central Bank of
is authorised by The Danish FSA in Denmark and is regulated by the Central Bank of
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Rise of the Ronan empiRe

Irish actor Saoirse Ronan is all grown up – and taking the lead role in a clutch of new movies this year. She tells Tony Clayton-Lea what it’s like to step out front.

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Tony Clayton-Lea what it’s like to step out front. 28 | september 2013 W ell, that

september 2013

W

ell, that didn’t take too long, did it? We’ve been wondering just how much time it would take for

19-year-old Saoirse Ronan to inch her way up movie credits lists to the point where she would be, quite literally, the lead actor. She was almost there with 2008’s City of Ember, but was trumped by Bill Murray; she was close with 2009’s The Lovely Bones, but was beaten to the punch by Rachel Weisz and Mark Wahlberg; she was a hair’s breadth away with 2010’s The Way Back, but Colin Farrell (darn that handsome man!), got there first. It started to change with 2011’s Hanna, but Ronan’s titular teenage assassin character was slightly blinded by the co-star wattage of Eric Bana and Cate Blanchett. This year, however, is all-change for the Carlow woman. In the first six months of 2013, she has taken the leads in The Host, Byzantium and Violet & Daisy, while her

forthcoming movie, How I Live Now, fully establishes her as an actor who can appear in every scene and leave an imprint of her character’s identity on your mind long after the film is over. The way she tells it, Ronan has sensed the difference in billing since Hanna, but realises that from this year onwards there are probably only two options to take:

depending on the movie and the director, she will either lead from the front or work as part of an ensemble. “With a film such as How I Live Now, it’s great to head it, and to lead a brilliant group of actors, too. It’s lovely to be seen as that, but that’s only par for the course because the movie has such high standards, anyway.” In the film, which is directed by Kevin Macdonald, Ronan plays Daisy, a conflicted, sometimes bitter American teenager whose father packs her off to live with relatives in rural England. There will be, as the old song has it, trouble ahead – not only with Daisy and her cousins but also with the world.

photograph by FabrIZIo MaLtESE / CoNtoUr by gEtty

september 2013

photograph by FabrIZIo MaLtESE / CoNtoUr by gEtty september 2013 | 29

| 29

IntervIew

IntervIew Set in a not-too-distant future, How I Live Now (based on the young adult novel

Set in a not-too-distant future, How I Live Now (based on the young adult novel of the same name

by Meg Rosoff ) riffs on the premise of nuclear war, the breakdown of civilisation as we know it, and

– amidst such no-rules chaos –

the blossoming of love between teenage cousins. Not only is the film an intelligent treatment of the aforementioned subject matter but it’s also Ronan’s first real adult role and, as such, a genuine remove from her previous work. “I guess it is,” she accedes.

“I suppose an outsider’s perspective

is different from my own, which is

why part of me thinks of the film as

a collective piece of work. But, yes,

there is a difference with this one. I’ve been in films the whole way through before, but it’s probably because I’m a little bit older here that people see a marked change.” Indeed we do – occasionally, Saoirse Ronan, you swear like

a trooper and, unless we’re very

much mistaken, you also have your inaugural intimate romance/love scene. “My character is what I am

– that of an older teenager. Yes, the role is in many respects more grown up than a lot of other things I’ve done and it’s definitely me taking

30 |

things I’ve done and it’s definitely me taking 30 | september 2013 Acting up – How

september 2013

Acting up –

How I Live Now is not only Ronan’s first adult role but her debut as a leading actor.

a step towards more adult-oriented

roles. That has been gradual but

I think I’m getting there.” Born in New York, the only child of Irish parents, Ronan and her family moved to Ireland when she was three years of age. She was inducted, you could say, into the world of filmmaking through her actor father, Paul, who has worked on films such as The Devil’s Own (1997) and Veronica Guerin (2003) as well as television shows such as Ballykissangel, The Clinic and The Tudors. Clea rly, his daughter wa s bitten by the acting bug at an early age, and it continued to bite away at her as working on movie sets graduated from exciting novelty to established lifestyle choice. She came to startling prominence at the age of 13 in Atonement, director Joe Wright’s film treatment of Ian McEwan’s acclaimed novel of the same name. Ronan’s portrayal of the young Briony Ta llis – who, in an act of betrayal, alters forever the lives of two people – is perfectly poised, her instincts natural, her cut-glass, upper-class English accent effortlessly accurate. It’s no wonder the Academy saw fit to nominate her for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar (she also received a BAFTA and a

Golden Globe Award nomination in the same category). Big oaks from small acorns grow, and so on, but was it an ambition even at that age to be where she is today? “It was never really something

I thought about, to be honest. The role I had in Atonement – which

was technically not a lead role, but was such an important character to the story – had so much to her that I could play with, even though

I hadn’t fully realised at that point

how to use the craft or, technically, knew how to use any sort of ability.

I don’t think most kids at that age

– or anyone who starts out without

any training – realise that. It’s something more about instinct than anything else. It still is, to a degree, but obviously as you get older and the more experienced you are, you know how better to use it.” And each film role is yet another valued learning experience in the

process of becoming a better actor. It is crucial, she emphasises, to work

with diff erent di re ctor s. To date, Ronan has worked with a remarkable list of quality directors, including Peter Jackson, Joe Wright, Peter Weir, Neil Jordan and Kevin Macdonald. Next year, her film releases include The Grand Budapest Hotel, directed by Wes Anderson, and How to Catch a Monster, the directorial debut of acclaimed actor Ryan Gosling. She recalls that the working relationships experienced from her first few films undoubtedly shaped her as an actor, honed her work ethic and how she behaved on set. “That’s still happening,” she affirms. “When you’re working with intelligent directors such as, to name just two, Peter Jackson and Wes Anderson – each of which is completely different – it’s pushing you to be smarter about what you’re doing. And when you have an intelligent script that you have to think about, it automatically ups your game. You learn from that and it will just make you a smarter actor.” And, if you’re really clever, a smarter person too? “Oh, yes, it isn’t like being in a class at school and reading a book about someone. In

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Dubarry Flagship Store 35 College Green, Dublin 2 Ireland The Dubarry Collection 2013 - 2014
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Dubarry Flagship Store 35 College Green, Dublin 2 Ireland

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INTERVIEw

any film, you’re given a character to portray and you’re living their life, stepping into their world. So if it’s a period film, sci-fi, rooted in reality, or whatever, you’ll take something from it. Whether it’s emotional or intellectual, there is always something you can bring with you into your next piece of work. I’ve always found that after playing a

character, it’s affected me a little bit. I’m able to walk away from it, of course, but it has kind of given me

a different perspective and added

something to my own personality,

too. It’s like if you read a great book, or see a really good film – they can change the way you view things. It’s the quality of the things you invest in that’ll add to who you are.” And the lessons learned about herself from her time and work on How I Live Now? “I suppose not to be too hard all the time.

I wouldn’t be as tough on people

as my character Daisy would be

but – while not necessarily applying this to myself – it has made me understand why other people are

a little standoffish at first or come

across as a bit cold. Obviously, there’s always a story in how people are, and just because they’re not like you or necessarily have the

same attitude towards things, or

may not be as open as you, there’s

a good reason for it. It’s about

understanding what that reason is, isn’t it?” It’s onwards and upwards for this remarkably impressive Irish actor who, in a short space of time, has managed to rack up a catalogue of

work that, quite frankly, feels as

if

who, rather strategically, has said no to supporting roles

Saoirse Ronan lends her voice to Talia, in the forthcoming animation movie, Justin and the Knights of Valour.

she has the X factor: “It’s more than just acting skill; she makes you want to watch her. It’s an incredible quality that only the very best film stars have.” If you’re doing the same sort of things, the same kind of films, playing the same sort of characters, implies Ronan, then it makes you a bit lazy. “I’d think you’d stop trying, wouldn’t you? I get a bit nervous before every job because I’m not sure if I’m going to be able to do it, but I’d certainly prefer that to feeling that everything is going to be a doddle.” There have been times, she admits, where she has thought that a particular movie will be, as she has pointed out, a doddle. “Yet it has turned out to be one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. I’ve learned it’s always important to have an attitude of upping your game and I have no plans to change that.” Message understood – Ireland’s most successful female actor (and she’s not even 20!) has spoken. The rise of the Ronan Empire continues.

20!) has spoken. The rise of the Ronan Empire continues. she’s only just starting (and in

she’s only just starting (and

the Ronan Empire continues. she’s only just starting (and in mega-budget movies with lengthy production schedules

in mega-budget movies with lengthy production schedules

The Hobbit, Anna

Karenina – in order to be cast as the lead in ones with

a lesser budget

and that didn’t take as long to make). Drama, romance, sci-fi, animation

(Ronan adds her voice to the forthcoming 3D adventure fantasy film, Justin and the Knights

of Valour), action, horror and comedy – there seems little this young woman can’t tackle. Director Peter Jackson has said of her that

Justin and the Knights of Valour is in cinemas from September 13; How I Live Now is in cinemas from October 4.

The Likes of Saoirse Ronan

MUSIC “I flick between the present and the past without any problem. Two of my favourite current bands are Beach House, an American dream-pop act, and Alt-J, from Leeds, who won the Mercury Prize last year. Older acts that I listen to include Fleetwood Mac, The Smiths and David Bowie.” BOOKS “Now that I’m no longer tutored on set, I find the time between scenes perfect for chilling out with a book, so I’ve always something on the go. I’ve just had some time off, though, and during that I read Patti Smith’s autobiography, Just Kids, top right, which focuses on her time in New York in the 1970s with the photographer Robert Mapplethorpe and her entry into music. A wonderful book …”

MOVIES “Oh, there are way too many to mention, but I just love the first two Francis Ford Coppola Godfather movies. A documentary film that I also love is The Act of Killing; it was released last year, directed by Joshua Oppenheimer, and is an incredible piece of filmmaking about former Indonesian death squad leaders.” RESTAURANTS “Travelling a lot for my work means that I get to try all kinds of food. I love Mexican, and in my opinion, the best Mexican restaurant I’ve been to in Ireland is El Paso (elpaso.ie), which is right in the centre of Howth village, Co Dublin. Earlier this year, I celebrated my 19th birthday there – a great night!” BARS “Naughtons, Quay Street,

Galway (tighneachtain.com), is

a

crannies and snugs. Sandinos, Water Street, Derry (sandinos.com),

as cool as any cool New York bar. As for Doheny & Nesbitts, below

right, Baggot Street, Dublin blin (dohenyandnesbitts.ie) – well, Dublin pubs are the e best anywhere.” CITY “Always New Dublin – it goes without saying, doesn’t it? And

I really liked Detroit –

is

great old pub full of nooks and

I visited the city earlier this year to work on the new Ryan Gosling movie, How to Catch a Monster.”

the city earlier this year to work on the new Ryan Gosling movie, How to Catch

32 |

the city earlier this year to work on the new Ryan Gosling movie, How to Catch

september 2013

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people

Back to the land

There’s nothing old world about Irish farming these days. Emily Hourican talks to innovators in the farming community – whether that means investing in robotics or going organic. Photographs by Steve Ryan.

I

t’s September, and that means the National Ploughing

Championships are putting up their tents. Producing the annual event must be

a little like staging a series of massive

weddings. Some 285 hectares of land, 190,000 visitors and 1,100 exhibitors. This is one of the biggest outdoor events in Europe – a three- day showcase of all that’s best about Irish farming, alongside all that is most innovative. The story it tells is one of imagination and a creative response to the challenges presented by weather and commodity prices, in a notoriously uncertain industry. Alongside the stated business of the championships – ploughing – are fashion shows, home and garden stalls, a food fair, craft village, bio- energy demonstrations, sheepdog trials and far, far more. The spirit of the championships

– the exuberance and energy demonstrated by those who visit and take part – is the same spirit that is emerging throughout Irish farming. “This is a huge industry,” confirms Eddie Downey, deputy president of the Irish Farmers’ Association and a farmer with land “next to Newgrange” in Co Meath. “Nine billion euro worth of exports annually, 300,000 jobs. We achieve the highest wheat yield in the world and we are the finest grass-

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wheat yield in the world and we are the finest grass- 34 | September 2013 growing

September 2013

growing countr y. We have the best traceability system and the highest animal welfare standards.” What the sector brings, however, isn’t quantifiable only in terms of yield and production. “Farming is the

It’s a case of going the extra mile,

and discovering that it will take you on a whole new journey; as Valerie Kingston of Glenilen Farm in Co Cork puts it: “This started as a way to make pin-money. Now, we have

lynchpin of the tourism industry too. The fact that our country has such a beautiful appearance, the patchwork of fields and greenery, is thanks to farmers. And the farmers are very proud of what they do.” Farming, then, is a foundation on which the entire country can continue to build, the bedrock of what we do so well. And it is currently in a good place. “There are great opportunities for Irish agriculture,” says Downey. “Three hundred million consumers in Europe who need food, and 90 per cent of what we produce going to export.” Figures released by Bord Bia show an eight per cent increase – some €370 million – in our food and

drink exports in the first six months of 2013, relative to the same period in the year before. A deeper look shows that, despite CAP reforms at EU level, which means farms are steadily getting larger and farmers now have the freedom to farm whatever they want on their land, the importance of diversification is greater than ever. Each of our featured farmers is deeply engaged in adding value to the traditional business of farming.

a

turnover of €3 million a year and

employ 30 people in our locality.”

The old days of cottage industries being just that have been replaced with much greater possibilities in

a

globalised world. That, in turn,

is

inspiring a new generation of

farmers, increasingly highly educated and motivated by choice rather than chance inheritance. “The agricultural colleges are full,” says Downey, “now we must meet the challenges to ensure young people thrive in

this industry.” Farming as an industry has been

a

solid, dependable dynamo, quietly

humming away in the background during the boom. Now, the face of Irish farming is evolving rapidly. From welcome infiltration into urban spaces provided by endeavours such as the Chocolate Factory’s rooftop farm, growing organic herbs and vegetables in the heart of Dublin city, to the many new approaches taken by today’s farmers, this is an industry that shows resilience, creativity and wonderful energy.

new approaches taken by today’s farmers, this is an industry that shows resilience, creativity and wonderful

The National Ploughing Championships run from September 24-26 at Ratheniska, Co Laois; npa.ie

and wonderful energy. The National Ploughing Championships run from September 24-26 at Ratheniska, Co Laois; npa.ie
Gwen Meredith Derrylough, Rosenallis, Co Laois “The cows adapted within a week. They picked it

Gwen Meredith

Derrylough, Rosenallis, Co Laois

“The cows adapted within a week. They picked it up a lot quicker than I did.” Gwen Meredith laughs. She’s explaining her switch to the high-tech world of farming robotics – investing in a robot to do some of the most labour- intensive work. “I diversified from beef to dairy cattle, but didn’t want to have to be tied to milking every morning and evening.” So she outsourced, spending over €100,000 on a robot to do the job for her. “It’s a lot of money but it is working 24/7, and will do for over ten years. The cows come in when they want to be milked or, when they want fresh grass, they have to pass through the shed and are milked as they go.” Gwen was born and brought up on the Portlaoise farm where she lives. She studied agriculture in the UK, then came home “with the idea that I would get an off-farm job. But you get sucked in. That was ten years ago and I’m still here full-time.” Last year, she took over the farm from her father, who is technically retired, “although he is still deeply involved,” she says, “it’s hard to retire on a farm.” What has drawn her so that she can’t let go, is that “it’s just a lovely way of life. It can be stressful, with so many variables, but to be outdoors is the main thing.” Next year, Gwen will get married. Her fiancé, Trevor Carnegie, is a farmer too and the couple will live on Gwen’s farm. “He has an automatic calf feeder,” she says, “but really, there is a limit to how much the farmer’s role can be taken over by technology. The welfare and health of the animals – it’s still me who has that responsibility.”

people

people Klaus Laitenberger Milkwood Farm, Tawley, Co Leitrim “To be out and have the freedom of

Klaus Laitenberger

Milkwood Farm, Tawley, Co Leitrim

“To be out and have the freedom of the countryside, the smells, the sounds; it ’s a sensory thing. To be with nature and work with nature, rather than just look at it, this is the joy,” says Klaus Laitenberger, who has worked in horticulture all his life, and first came to Ireland from Germany to be head gardener at the Organic Centre in Co Leitrim. These days, he runs his own farm (“mostly vegetables, also hens, ducks, geese”) and lectures at University College Cork. He is also the author of Vegetables for the Irish Garden. “What happened in Ireland was a sort of generation gap; a whole generation of people who didn’t know how to grow their own food any more. But now consumers and the general public want Irish-produced fresh vegetables.” Even so, the rate of conversion from conventional to organic farming is very slow. “Only one per cent of land is cultivated organically, and that hasn’t changed since I’ve been here. Other countries would have 5-15%.” He laughs about the unpredictability of farming – “you are not the boss, the weather is. If you are a carpenter or engineer, you can learn the job perfectly; in farming, you can never know everything. Each year is different, you become more humble that way.” For Klaus, the great strength of Ireland is the land. “There is no nuclear power or heavy industry to pollute. This could be a real green island, where land could be farmed sustainably and food would be of the best quality.”

36 |

green island, where land could be farmed sustainably and food would be of the best quality.”

September 2013

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people 3 8 | September 2013 Abbeyleix, Co Laois “I’ve always loved nature. I love to

September 2013

Abbeyleix, Co Laois

“I’ve always loved nature. I love to sow things and see them growing. I love the countryside, picking wild blackberries along the ditch, mushrooms in the field; the seasons coming and going, leaves changing colour.” The simplicity and authenticity of Helen Gee’s jams is clearly reflected in her attitude towards the countryside and her life within it. “I was born and raised on a farm, and I married a farmer. We had cows, pigs, hens. We grew wheat, barley and sugar beet but, as our three children began getting older, we needed more money. There’s not that much profit in tillage, so we grew raspberries and rhubarb, and I started making jam, selling it at farmers’ markets. It just grew and grew from there.” These days, Helen’s wonderful jams, sold under two labels – Abbey Farm and G’s Gourmet Jams – regularly win Great Taste Awards, and are still made in the most traditional of ways. “In saucepans, with just two ingredients, fruit and sugar,” she says. “It’s very labour intensive – you’re stirring all day by hand, weighing out the fruit and the sugar – but I have no intention of changing it.” Helen’s love for what she does is clearly infectious; two of her three children are involved with the business. “My son was my first chef, now he’s the sales director, and my daughter has come home from Canada to work in production with me.” And she herself makes no secret of her delight in what they do together:

“I could make jam all day and still come back and have bread and jam for my tea,” she says.

people

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people 4 0 | September 2013 Johnny Lynch Toonsbri dge Dair y, Macroom, Co Cork “A

September 2013

Johnny Lynch

Toonsbri dge Dair y, Macroom, Co Cork

“A cow will walk away from you, a buffalo will walk up to you; it’s more like a friend.” Until just a couple of months ago, Johnny Lynch was the only farmer in Ireland to have buffalo. He started with 31 animals in 2009 and is now up to a herd of 125. What began as a smart business choice – “the only buffalo cheese in the country was imported, expensive and over a week old by the time it got here” – has become a labour of love. “It was an inspired moment,” he says of the decision. “The animals become like part of the family. If they get sick, as happens, that’s very upsetting. They are hardier than cattle, but vets don’t yet know how to cope, they don’t have the experience, but they are learning as we’re learning.” Initially Johnny had Friesians as well as buffalo, but a year ago he sold his last cows to concentrate solely on the more exotic herd. “This is very interesting,” he says, “I’m meeting many more people now because I go and give a hand at making the cheese; there’s more activity, more life.” It is something that cannot be dismissed in the often-lonely life of farm work. So what are the challenges of farming buffalo? “Up to a year old, they’re very temperamental; then they get very hardy. But the first year is a difficult time. When the weather is wet, they love to make ponds and wallow in them. When you’re milking them, it becomes a problem because they’re too muddy. I leave the ones not being milked to wallow. It’s intense but good, very enjoyable.”

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people Pat Lalor Ballard Farm, Kilbeggan, Co Westmeath Pat Lalor’s decision, in 1999, to move from

Pat Lalor

Ballard Farm, Kilbeggan, Co Westmeath

Pat Lalor’s decision, in 1999, to move from conventional to organic farming was a pragmatic one – “to try and make some more money,” he admits. “But I suppose since then I’ve come to enjoy the organic way of farming. When I was a conventional farmer,

I

biological farmer. My job is to nurture the soil, look after it, get it into the best possible state of health, so it will grow crops that are disease

was a scientific farmer. Now, I’m a

free.” The crucial difference is that, with conventional farming, if you encounter problems there is always a quick fix, a prescription. With organic farming, the plan is to avoid having problems, because there are no quick fixes. So what most appeals to him about the farming lifestyle? “On a wet

day, nothing appeals to me,” he says, then admits, “I like being my own boss, I like to make up my mind as I go along at my own pace. I could not be governed by a clock.” The downside, of course, is the unpredictability. “It’s very difficult to plan anything ahead; when the weather changes, your plans have to change. If you’re

a

ducks in a row, you’d go mad. It’s not for everybody,” he says. These days, Pat produces his own porridge, that breakfast staple Kilbeggan Organic oats. “That’s a very good development,” he says. “There’s more to life than making money, there’s job satisfaction as well, and there’s more of that now than there has ever been.”

very rigid person who likes all their

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and there’s more of that now than there has ever been.” very rigid person who likes

September 2013

September 2013 | 43

September 2013

September 2013 | 43

| 43

people

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people 44 | September 2013 Valerie Kingston Glenilen Farm, Drimoleague, Co Cork Innovation is the engine

September 2013

Valerie Kingston

Glenilen Farm, Drimoleague, Co Cork

Innovation is the engine of Glenilen Farm. What began as a hobby for Valerie Kingston back in 1997 – using milk from the family’s dairy herd to make cheesecake to sell at local markets – has blossomed into a viable business and yoghurts, butter and crème fraîche and other milk-based products have followed. “Consumers are more concerned about the origin, wholesomeness and flavour of their food, and Glenilen and many other quality artisan food producers can fill this gap between producers and consumers, and perhaps help us out of the economic mess we’re in.” With three children, aged 14, twelve and nine – the balance between family and work is one that needs to be carefully guarded. “Because home and workplace are the same on the farm, you need more discipline in making space for family time. We don’t want our kids to grow up thinking we were always too busy, running around like headless chickens,” she says. “For us Sunday is always a rest and family day, for practical and faith reasons. Luckily we have a wonderful team at Glenilen and have learnt to delegate, which has paid back tremendously.” Would she be happy to see her children following her? “Only if they have a passion and an interest. It is a real blessing to enjoy what you do, because then it doesn’t seem so much like work.”

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adventure | connemara

Wacky races

With its amazing variety of mountains, rivers, beaches, lakes and bogs, Ireland has become one of Europe’s most popular locations for adventure racing. Ben Webb puts his body on the starting line. Photographs by David Sciora and Peter Dybowski.

46 |

Ben Webb puts his body on the starting line. Photographs by David Sciora and Peter Dybowski

September 2013

On the run - Ben Webb and running mate Daryl Krywonis power along on the Gaelforce Connemara Adventure Challenge.

September 20 13

Ben Webb and running mate Daryl Krywonis power along on the Gaelforce Connemara Adventure Challenge. September

| 47

Adventure | connemArA

I t was like the Somme, but without the bullets. I stood in a line
I
t was like the Somme,
but without the
bullets. I stood in a
line of apprehensive
The race starts
with a mad
scramble across
bogland. Right,
our writer Ben
Webb looking
pre-race
confident.

faces waiting for the signal to go over the top and fearing the next few hours would take its toll. Ahead of us loomed a sheer peat wall, the start of the 31-kilometre race – including a run, mountain hike, cycle and kayak – through the wilds of Connemara. But I couldn’t complain. I was a volunteer. And then we were off, whooping with excitement, sliding and scrabbling in the black peat until we were up and onto the bog proper, when we began to run forward in squelching, sucking footsteps through no man’s land. A comrade ahead suddenly vanished up to his waist in the dark water of the

bog. Another’s boot vanished. The casualties were building. It was hilarious, exhilarating and already I could feel the tell-tale lactic burn in my thighs. As the ascent got steeper, the jokes faded away and we all began to find our rhythm, hearts pumping, lungs struggling. The sun broke through the rain clouds and glinted off the trees that ran along the Western Way. Our first target was the timing point four kilometres away, at the foot of the steep climb to a pe ak in the Ma am Tu rk s. The Gaelforce Connemara Adventure Challenge was well and truly under way. Adventure racing is booming in Ireland. Gaelforce is just one of the many organisations now setting up challenges across the countr y.

Many of them combine running/ hiking, cycling on and off road and kayaking in an adventure triathlon. Some add in a stage or two of sw im mi ng. To add a bit of order and spice, a selection has been chosen to create a national adventure race point series (100 points for first, 99 for second, etc) that starts at

48 |

a national adventure race point series (100 points for first, 99 for second, etc) that starts

September 2013

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Adventure | connemArA

the MonsterMAC in Cork (April 27) and ends at the Westport Sea 2 Summit (November
the MonsterMAC in Cork (April
27) and ends at the Westport Sea 2
Summit (November 9).
But it is important to point out
adventure racing is not designed
solely for nutters who dream about
climbing Everest one day and
informing their grandchildren
in hushed tones that frost bite is
damned painful. Yes, of course a
certain level of fitness is required,
but the word “race” is misleading.
You are timed, but plenty of the
competitors just want to complete
the course and have a fabulous day
out in the wilds. Some just want
to be, well, daft. You can sign up
for the Tu rf Wa rrior Ch al leng e,
for example, 10 kilometres of
“swinging, jumping and climbing”
through forests and bogs and rivers
around Killary harbour. The bumph
pulls no punches: “Please be warned
that your clothing will get extremely
wet and dirty!”
Others want a great – and
challenging – day out. A
good example is the
Oxfam Trailtrekker,
a 50-kilometre
hike through the
Mountains of
Mourne and along
the Carlingford
coastline for teams
of between three
and six. In case
it’s too far, a new
25-kilometre event
has been started.
Below, race
mementos, and
bottom, Gerry
O'Reilly leads the
way across a water
challenge.
It’s an inclusive idea, a reason to
get out and about and experience
some of Ireland’s stunning scenery
and raise money.
“From complete novices to
seasoned hill-walkers, hundreds of
people from all walks of
life will raise vital funds
for Oxfam’s work around
the world,” said David
Nixon, Oxfam Ireland’s
director of fundraising
and business development.
“With the right training
and preparation just about
anyone can complete the
50-kilometre route. It’s an
enjoyable team challenge
that will test your stamina
and fitness.” It’s not about
50 |
September 2013
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Adventure | connemArA

times for most participants; it’s about the €385 you have to raise to enter. Exactly 24 minutes and seven seconds. That was my time when

I reached the first dibbing point at the End of the Bog. Everyone has

a wristband holding a chip that is

slotted into a machine. Ahead was a

steep climb to the summit of a hill. The time was not important when

I started the race but, once you are

up and running, the clock seeps into your psyche. I wanted to go as fast as possible … but finish. I started to jog up the hill, slowly, but it was a jog, technically, I think. But not for long. With relief, I noticed that all the other racers were hiking in quickstep rather than running. It was a truly, thigh- busting climb. At times, I had to use my hands to scramble up the damp, slippery slope. A few of the racers

52 |

up the damp, slippery slope. A few of the racers 52 | September 2013 Top kit

September 2013

Top kit tips Ambrose Flynn of 53 Degrees North on what to wear. Shoes The
Top kit tips
Ambrose Flynn of 53 Degrees
North on what to wear.
Shoes The most important
part of any adventure
runners' kit is shoes. Road
runners will not suffice. Trail
runners not only provide grip
but also enhance confidence
to move over complex ground
at speed. The range of trail
runners is extensive, but if
you talk to an in-store expert
you will get the right product
and fit.
Socks A key piece of gear.
We recommend a light
merino sock with high wicking
properties, a low cuff, extra
padding on the heel and
toe-box. But get the correct
size as if they are too big,
friction is created and blisters
will occur.
the legs Depending on the
weather and time of year,
some adventure racers will
wear shorts, some will wear
compression tights. Wear
something comfortable that
can handle moisture and
doesn’t restrict movement.

Train in it before the event. You don’t want nasty surprises on race day. upper body For multidisciplinary events where you run, cycle and kayak, what you wear on your upper body is important. When running, one should go light and unrestricted, possibly with a booster layer in a small pack if necessary. When cycling the upper body can become cold so the booster layer may become a game changer. And the same applies to kayaking also. A light breathable running top is essential as the temperatures can drop by two degrees with every 200 metres ascended. Possibly look for something water resistant and with pockets that are useful. Accessories Take a light backpack, ideally with a water bladder. Something that fits your body and has little movement on the shoulder straps as you run.

Top, follow the leader – a boggy run and steep climb face the entrants. Left,
Top, follow the leader
– a boggy run and steep
climb face the entrants.
Left, the right gear
is essential in rough
terrain and, below,
picking up speed
on the road.

stopped in their tracks, turned and surveyed the scene, hands on hips. Ireland’s

only fjord, Killary Harbour,

shimmered in the sun, the waves white-topped, as a dark squall blew

up the valley and the rain began. I kept on. No stopping. I had feared the mountain climb section the most, but it was not to prove the low point. That moment when you ask the question: why the hell did I do this? That was to come later. I still felt buoyed by adrenaline. At the top I dibbed again – 43 minutes and 56 seconds

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Adventure | connemArA

– and started running down into the next valley where the bikes were Get set
– and started running down into
the next valley where the bikes were
Get set
waiting for us. Gravity, at last, was
on my side. It was downhill (in a
good way) from here
for a while
Above, scenic
route – Pine
Island in
Derryclare
Lough and, right,
Tim Enright
fords a river.
WickloW Adventure rAce
September 14 Running up the Great
Sugar Loaf; cycling over Sally Gap;

at least. As I descended – a strange combination of running, skidding and squelching in the thick bog – I was suddenly very grateful for my footwear: a pair of Salomon XA PRO 3Ds, which are specifically designed for mountain-trail running. Despite the conditions, they gripped amazingly well and were very, very comfortable. Good kit makes racing in the great outdoors a lot more enjoyable and, yes, safer. Hours stuck on a remote hillside in freezing fog with a twisted ankle is no fun. You need to be warm; on the other hand you don’t want to carry excess baggage. I had nipped into 53 Degrees North to get some kit – and

I had nipped into 53 Degrees North to get some kit – and kayaking for two

kayaking for two kilometres on the scenic Vartry Lakes and running above

the Powerscourt Wa terfall. It’s all in a day’s work when going to WAR. The seven-stage full race is about 65 kilometres while the five-stage WAR Sport race is a mere 39 kilometres.

Fee €69. wicklowadventurerace.com/ powerscourt-adventure-race-wicklow. rugged PeAkS chAllenge october 5 A picturesque challenge involving running, biking, kayaking and hiking over the 60-kilometre extreme course (1,415-metre elevation) or the 44-kilometre sprint course (777-metre elevation). The location: the amazing landscape of the Ballyliffin and Clonmany region, which is nestled into

the the most most northerly northerly peninsula peninsula of of
the the most most northerly northerly peninsula peninsula of of

Inishowen in Co Donegal. The highlight could be the two-kilometre run along the beautiful Pollan Strand. Fee €60. extremenorthevents.com. WeStPort SeA2Summit november 9 A unique combination of hiking, mountain biking, running – including a sea run through two feet of water – and an obstacle course. The 67-kilometre, supreme course takes you to the top of the iconic Croagh Patrick and a cycle up the Maum. But no one said it was easy! Even the Spirit Course for beginners is tough (although, the elite runners do it in about three-and-a-half hours). Fee €59. westportsea2summit.ie.

54 |

the elite runners do it in about three-and-a-half hours). Fee €59. westportsea2summit.ie. 54 | September 2013

September 2013

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Adventure | connemArA

Right, the course curves along forest tracks and, far right, Liam Cashman makes good time.
Right, the course
curves along
forest tracks and,
far right, Liam
Cashman makes
good time. Below,
kayakers coming
ashore due
to high winds
and, bottom,
the open road
to Kylemore
Lough.
high winds and, bottom, the open road to Kylemore Lough. advice – and was mesmerised by

advice – and was mesmerised by the variety of designs and technology on offer. Adam, the guru, nodded

sagely as I described the event. “I’d

wear this,” he sa id. “A nd this

this.” It’s all about layers, including one that wicks water away from the skin and an outer waterproof one. “The body loses heat much, much faster when it’s damp,”

Adam warned. I was drenched from the rain

and the damp bog when I hit the valley floor and very warm too.

I started the short run to the bikes, which I hit after 56.27 minutes. The eight-kilometre trail through the hills and down to the coast was beautiful, crossing rivers and curving through the trees. It was the most enjoyable section of the race, utterly pleasurable, but then

I hit the road that stretched into

and

the distance, and a soul-destroying headwind. I was slow over the nine kilometres and I knew it. A woman half my age (which isn’t saying much) whizzed by on a racer. The gamble of using a mountain bike

Where to stay

For vIeWS And SPA

After

glasses in the morning. There, a band was belting out trad music, and the rib-eye steaks were perfect. There’s no doubt this family-run hotel, which overlooks Killary Harbour, is a classic example of a good Irish welcome. Rates from €49 B&B pps.

For ActIon grouPS

Killary Adventure group (Leenane, 095 43411; killaryadventure.com), has its own dorm and private accommodation, with everything from gorge walking to water trampolining within easy range. Called K2, and with a natty grassy roof, its environmentally sensitive design overlooks Killary Harbour. Shared rooms from €21 pps, with Gaelforce event packages available.

For LuXurY
For LuXurY

Where

better to melt away those activity-induced aches and pains than in the thermal suites at castlecourt resort Hotel’s Spa Sula? (Westport, 098 55088; castlecourthotel.ie)? Furthermore, the team behind this four-star property also organise the Westport Sea2Summit race in November, with two-night packages from €378 per couple. Otherwise, rooms from €73.

the Connemara adventure race we headed to the delphi mountain resort (Leenane, Connemara, 095 42208; delphimountainresort. com), and flopped straight into a Jacuzzi with magnificent mountain views. This four-star hotel, with wonderfully friendly staff, is perfectly located for anyone who wants to enjoy Ireland’s natural beauty. And don’t miss the hearty breakfasts. Rates from €69 B&B pps.

For vIeWS And cHoWder

The view from the Seafood bar of ocean Lodge (Killadoon, 098 68605; oceanlodgekilladoon. com), across the sprawling Cross and Carrowniskey beaches to Achill Island in the distance, is wonderful. But not a patch on the bowl of chowder that came with chips for a fiver. Alan Heanue’s kitchen is not to be missed. You can also stay in the lodge with rates from €35 B&B pps.

The

barman at Gaynors in Leenane village gave us pints of Guinness with the grim news that all the local restaurants were closed for the night. He then called the Leenane Hotel (095 42249; leenanehotel.com), ordered two steaks and told us to return the

For SteAK And muSIc

(095 42249; leenanehotel.com ), ordered two steaks and told us to return the For SteAK And

56 |

(095 42249; leenanehotel.com ), ordered two steaks and told us to return the For SteAK And

September 2013

September 2013 | 57

September 2013

September 2013 | 57

| 57

Adventure | connemArA

“It’s an adventure race,” I replied. “It’s dangerous,” he said with a belittling finality. “Kayaking
“It’s an adventure race,” I replied.
“It’s dangerous,” he said with
a belittling finality. “Kayaking
cancelled.”
And so we had to run the
kayak stage, back up the hill, legs
complaining, and that was the
moment I asked the question: why?
I walked for a bit. My accomplice,
Daryl, did too. We chatted as
though on a Sunday afternoon
stroll. Rebels taking a chance to
relax. But when our legs recovered
a little we began to trot, then run
the five-kilometre stretch along the
tarmac road back to the Western
Way and the undulating four-and-a-
half kilometres home.
It was a struggle, but we crossed
nutrition
Keep it simple. Hydrate
the line together after three hours,
15 minute s and 21 second s. It
was a lovely feeling. Hot soup was
served. Everyone was smiling and
happy. We were dreaming of pints
of Guinness in Hamilton’s in
Leenane. And we weren’t
alone. We went to look at
the time sheets. The elite
was not paying off.
And so I did forget
about time, and
in advance. Use gels on longer
runs/cycles. Increase your intake
of carbs in the week leading up to
the event but not the night before.
Don’t skip breakfast! If you find it
watched the Connemara
countryside slide slowly
past as the sun came out.
I remember it now as being
calm and peaceful – Ireland’s
west coast at its sublime best.
Finally, I was back at the Killar y
racers completed the
course in just over two
hours. Paul McMahon
came second. “Some of us
are very serious and try to
hard
to eat, wake up early and
eat something you enjoy
slowly.
Adventure Centre for the run
down to the kayaks. Running
after cycling feels very strange
after cyclin
Shiny, happy
faces – from top,
at the finishing
line, Sheila Kilduff,
Siobhán Bennett
– your leg muscles feel
and, at the kayak
all a disjointed and the
stage, Thomas
Kavanagh.
w
wrong shape – but at
shave every second off our
times,” he said, “but the time
isn’t everything because every
year the conditions vary. The bog
might be wetter or the wind can be
from a different direction. And you
can’t compare races because each
race is different and offers a unique
challenge. There are many people
who just want to enjoy the experience
of getting round. There are plenty of
people still to finish
le least we could rest weary
le legs in the colourful
kayaks ka that we could see
being bei whooshed along
the the fjord by the high
wind. win
Too T
high. I ar rive d
at at the th landing station to
find find shivering, capsized
kayakers kaya who had been
I stared back across the bog and
the trail that clung to the side of the
hill. Brightly coloured splashes of hi-
tech kit were slowly moving towards
us and the relief of the finishing line.
Unlike all the brave recruits who
went over the top a century ago,
we will all live to fight another day.
Adventure racing in Ireland’s unique
landscape is here to stay.
dragged dragg from the water.
“It’s “It’ carnage out there,”
a a
mar marshal warned.
For more on Gaelforce races,
gaelforceevents.com
58
|
September 2013
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culture break | Stockholm

Street views of Södermalm, with Belén Vázquez, opposite, soaking up the atmosphere.

Music city Listen up, fans of kitsch - ABBA The Museum is open for business.
Music
city
Listen up, fans of kitsch - ABBA The
Museum is open for business. Mega
fan Brian Finnegan is Björn again on
a trip to Stockholm, the band's native
city. Photographs by Joanne Murphy.

culture break | Stockholm

W alking through the “hall of fame” at arrivals in Stockholm’s Arlanda
W
alking through
the “hall of fame”
at arrivals in
Stockholm’s Arlanda

Airport, I slowly became aware that a portrait of Sweden’s most famous exports is missing. I passed Alfred Nobel and Björn Borg, Lasse Hallström and Stieg Larsson, Alexander Skarsgård and Max von Sydow, Roxette and Robyn – but ABBA are conspicuous by their absence. For many who travel to Stockholm, ABBA have been a key draw since the height of their fame

in the late 1970s and 1980s, and this year, with the opening of ABBA The Museum (abbathemuseum.com), thousands more visitors are flocking every day to immerse themselves in all things Agnetha, Björn, Benny and Anni-Frid. According to Stockholm native Carl Magnus Palm, author of Bright Lights Dark Shadows: The Real Story of ABBA, the band have identified the city much in the same way The Beatles cast their shadow over the cultural

identity of Liverpool. “A BBA’s music is much-loved all over the world and is somehow a part of what represents

Sweden to many people,” he says.

Above, Södermalm where the vintage shops and cool cafés offer plenty of distraction. Right, our super trouper, Brian Finnegan. Left, Changing of the Guards at the Royal Palace in the old town, Gamla Stan.

their native capital, so I aimed to immerse myself in a very particular experience of the city. However, I could see very little evidence of my quarry anywhere. Stockholm gets on with its business in a particularly ABBA-free way. As with any major city, there are plenty of tacky tourist shops in the heavily visited areas, but they’re packed with Pippi Longstocking paraphernalia and plastic Viking hats, and there’s not an Agnetha wig to be seen, or an ABBA Gold CD on any shelf. Stockholm is built on 14 interconnected islands on the Baltic

S “ a c a w n re
S
a
c
a
w
n
re

“For potential visitors, their music

and their image are a part of the

cultural context of Stockholm

and Sweden.”

My visit to the Swedish city was as research for my new

novel, in which ABBA fictitiously

reunite for one concert only in

Right guaRd More than one million visitors a year are drawn to the Changing of
Right guaRd More than one million visitors
a year are drawn to
the Changing of the Guard at the Royal Palace (daily at 12.15pm,
Sundays at 1pm). It’s accompanied by
stirring music from the Military
Band – who sometimes
break into a chorus or two of Dancing Queen.

62 |

music from the Military Band – who sometimes break into a chorus or two of Dancing

September 20 13

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culture break | Stockholm

Sleep at buDGet This family-run, Södermalm’s hotel hornsgatan (Hornsgatan 66B, 11821, +46 8 658 2901;
Sleep at
buDGet
This family-run, Södermalm’s
hotel hornsgatan (Hornsgatan 66B, 11821,
+46 8 658 2901; hotelhornsgatan.se) has
rooms from SEK355 per night, but doesn’t
compromise on style, space, cleanliness or
breakfast. breakfast. Be Be warned, warned, though though – – you you might might
have have to to share share a a bathroom. bathroom.
mID-PrIce
mID-PrIce
As the official hotel partner
of of the the ABBA ABBA Museum, Museum, you’d you’d be be forgiven forgiven
for for thinking thinking that that the the clarion Sign (Östra
area, and looking out on a tiny park, berns
hotel (Näckströmsgatan 8, 11147, +46 8 5663
2200; berns.se) is a boutique hotel that aces
ergonomics. With rooms from SEK1,912, see
the Scandinavian knack for storage space
up close, and marvel at how it’s also so
comfortable. If you’re into nightlife, it’s the
place for you but, with a club attached, it can
get noisy at the weekend if you have a room
near the front.
Järnvägsgatan Järnvägsgatan 35, 35, 10126, 10126, +46 +46 8 8 676 676 9800; 9800;
SPlurGe
Owned by Benny Andersson
clarionsign.com) clarionsign.com might be awash with lamé
and and glitterballs. glitterballs. Not Not so. so. From From its its glass glass
and and granite granite Gert Gert Wingårdh-designed Wingårdh-designed
architecture, architecture, to to furniture furniture by by Arne Arne Jacobsen, Jacobsen,
Bruno Bruno Mathsson Mathsson and and Alvar Alvar Aalto, Aalto, it’s it’s a a shrine shrine
to to Nordic Nordic design. design. Clean Clean lines lines are are as as stylish stylish
as as the the heated heated rooftop rooftop pool pool is is welcome, welcome,
and and Stockholm Stockholm Central Central Station Station is is just just a a few few
minutes’ minutes’ walk walk away. away. Rooms Rooms from from SEK1,180. SEK1,180.
Located Located right right in in the the heart heart of of the the shopping shopping
of ABBA fame, hotel rival (Mariatorget 3,
Södermalm, +46 8 5457 8900; rival.se) sits on
a quiet little square in bohemian Södermalm,
ten minutes’ walk from the old town, Gamla
Stan. The rooms, from SEK2,395, range in
sizes, but an economy room is spacious
enough, and all decorated in quirky,
individual style. The service is next to none,
and the great breakfast will set you up for a
day’s sightseeing.
Th
h
f

Sea. This might seem confusing

when reading a guidebook in advance of a visit, but in truth the city couldn’t be easier to navigate. What’s more, its compact size allows you to get a real sense of its different areas and atmospheres very quickly. There’s almost nowhere from which

you can’t see water reflected by blue skies in the summer, and it gives the city a uniquely open, airy feeling. It’s a place where the teeming natural world sits very comfortably with the imposing urban landscape. The island everyone converges on to begin with is Stadsholmen,

Top, interiors at Hotel Hornsgatan and Hotel Rival respectively. Below, Stortorget, Stockholm's oldest square, in Gamla Stan, as little Viking Oscar looks on.

home of Gamla Stan, or the “Old Town”. A ma ze of cobble d st re et s lined with galleries, curio shops and typical Swedish cafés, that all converge on the terrace-lined Stor torget, or “the big square”; by midday it’s packed to bursting with tourists. A good tip is to wander its highways and byways early in the morning, coming across Baroque palaces on corners, romantic little squares and Renaissance cathedrals at your leisure. You can sit in the leafy square outside Benny and Frida’s first apartment together on a street called Baggensgatan and

square outside Benny and Frida’s first apartment together on a street called Baggensgatan and 64 |

64

|

square outside Benny and Frida’s first apartment together on a street called Baggensgatan and 64 |

September 2013

DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers.

DUBLIN INSPIRES:

CREATIVE THINKING

DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In
DUBLIN INSPIRES: CREATIVE THINKING Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers. In

Dublin has a well-deserved reputation as the birthplace of creative thinkers.

In Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift wrote about tiny peoples warring over which end of an egg to open first. Another native Dubliner, George Bernard Shaw, became the only person ever to win both a Nobel Prize and an Oscar.

Originality, imagination and fresh thinking are still very obvious in Ireland’s capital - and especially in The Convention Centre Dublin.

In just three years, 24 industry awards have confirmed

The CCD’s status as a world-class venue for conferences and events of all sizes.

This success is rooted in our relentless passion for exceptional service. By managing every last detail, we ensure delegates are free to interact, to innovate and to create.

With 18,500 hotel rooms nearby, Dublin Airport only 15 minutes away and one of Europe’s most stimulating cities on its doorstep, The CCD guarantees a positive, productive and inspiring experience.

See

www.theccd.ie today.

what

you

could

create

at The CCD by visiting
at
The
CCD
by
visiting
today. what you could create at The CCD by visiting Contact our Sales Team on: E
today. what you could create at The CCD by visiting Contact our Sales Team on: E

Contact our Sales Team on:

E: sales@theccd.ie

T: +353 1 856 0000

W: www.theccd.ie

culture break | Stockholm

culture break | Stockholm imagine their Eurovision-winning “Waterloo” being written there. Like many cities,

imagine their Eurovision-winning “Waterloo” being written there. Like many cities, Stockholm has

a north/south divide and, depending

on what you’re looking for, you’ll

probably find yourself hanging out in either. Östermalm in the north

is an upmarket borough, its tree-

lined boulevards populated with couture and Scandinavian design shops, Michelin star restaurants and the city’s top end nightspots. At its heart is Stureplan, with its landmark meeting place, nicknamed “Svampen”, or “the mushroom”, by the locals. In the evenings the beautiful people (in Stockholm, nearly everyone is beautiful) gather here before a night out on the tiles in clubs, such as Riche (riche.se) or Laroy (stureplansgruppen.se), that cater to the city’s celeb set.

According to Palm, the 1978 ABBA hit “Summer Night City” might have been written about places like this, even though in the 1970s the clubs of Östermalm didn’t exist. “I’ve always imagined ABBA out and about in Stockholm in the late 1970s when I hear that song,” he says. “It’s not a song about being at, for example, Studio 54 in New York City; it’s about romanticising big city night-life from the perspective of someone living in

Author of Bright Light Dark Shadows: The Real Story of ABBA, Carl Magnus Palm, left, and a winning vista of Östermalm. Below, sensational seafood at Sturehof.

a city that didn’t have much of a

night-life at the time.” These days you’re more likely to bump into ABBA’s grandchildren boogying to “Summer Night City” in Östermalm’s buzzing clubs. Djurgården, the city’s rambling royal gardens with its abundance of museums and the legendary Gröna Lund (gronalund.com) amusement park, are part of the area, and

a favourite haunt with most of

Stockholmian society for weekend

Eat at buDGet There are mID-PrIce bakfickan, SPlurGe Sturehof Thai restaurants all over Stockholm, but
Eat at
buDGet
There are
mID-PrIce
bakfickan,
SPlurGe
Sturehof
Thai restaurants all over
Stockholm, but koh Phanagan
(Skånegatan 57, Södermalm,
+46 8 642 5040; kohphangan.
se), with its seaside
atmosphere, complete with
beach canopies and twinkling
lights, is special. Sit in a tuk-tuk
or the “jungle area” and enjoy
a delicious Pad Thai for about
SEK165 (€20), which is cheap
for Stockholm. They don’t take
reservations, so expect to
queue on Saturday nights.
aka The Hip Pocket
(Kungliga Operan, Karl XIIs
Torg, +46 8 676 5800;
operakallaren.se) shares a
kitchen with the fine-dining
restaurant, Operakällaren at
The Opera House, but it has a
very café-like atmosphere. The
fare is unpretentious Swedish
comfort food and the meatballs
are some of the best in the
city. Be warned, the interior
only seats 26 people, so you’re
advised to book ahead.
(Stureplan 2, Östermalm,
+46 8 440 5730; sturehof.com) is
a must for traditional Swedish
seafood. The atmosphere is
buzzing and the locals love it.
In summer, book a table on
the terrace and people-watch
as you start with three or five
sorts of herring, and follow up
with a main of mouthwatering
butter-fried pike perch. Bottles
of wine cost an arm and a leg
here – it’s cheaper if you drink
by the glass.

66 |

perch. Bottles of wine cost an arm and a leg here – it’s cheaper if you

September 2013

Louis FitzgeraLd HospitaLity

City Centre Heritage Pubs

City Centre Heritage Pubs

City Centre Heritage Pubs

City Centre Heritage Pubs

Dublin & Galway

Dublin & Galway

Dublin & Galway

Dublin & Galway

& Galway Dublin & Galway Dublin & Galway GRAND CENTRAL 10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel:
& Galway Dublin & Galway Dublin & Galway GRAND CENTRAL 10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel:
& Galway Dublin & Galway Dublin & Galway GRAND CENTRAL 10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel:
& Galway Dublin & Galway Dublin & Galway GRAND CENTRAL 10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel:
& Galway Dublin & Galway Dublin & Galway GRAND CENTRAL 10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel:
& Galway Dublin & Galway Dublin & Galway GRAND CENTRAL 10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel:

GRAND CENTRAL

10/11 O’Connell St, Dublin 1 Tel: 01 8728658

Dating back to the 19th century, it was partly destroyed in the 1916 rising. Today you can still enjoy some of the original features, high dome ceilings and hand crafted stone, but now complemented with plush leather seats and dramatic chandeliers. Superb food served daily.

KEHOES

9 South Anne, Dublin 2

Tel: 01 6778312

Situated off Dublin’s premier shopping street,

Grafton Street. This is one of the finest, if not the finest, Victorian pubs in Dublin. Although it

is unchanged since 19th century, this is not a

museum, it is a buzzing vibrant pub with a fantastic atmosphere and a special place in the heart of Dubliners. This is a must see.

THE STAGS HEAD

1 Dame Court, Dublin 2 Tel: 01 6793687

Established in the 1700s, it was last renovated in 1895 and was the first pub in Dublin to change from gas lighting to electricity. A favourite haunt for those in the literary world including Joyce and Kavanagh over the years. Today it still has the authentic feel of a real Dublin pub.

THE QUAYS

11-12 Temple Bar, Dublin 2 Tel: 01 6713922

The Quays, Temple Bar situated in the heart of

Temple Bar is one of Dublin’s liveliest pubs with

a great mix of locals and tourists. Live Irish

Traditional Music everyday makes the pub a magnet for those of us looking for a bit of craic and with a restaurant on the first floor.

THE BAGGOT INN

Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2 Tel: 01 6618758

The Baggot Inn offer you the original and unique ‘Pour your own Pint’ experience. Located in the hub of Dublin’s business centre, we serve a wide variety of hot and tasty food. First Failte Ireland Approved Dublin Pub check out the Baggot Inn FREE APP.

THE QUAYS

Quay Street, Galway Tel: 091 568347

The Quays, situated in the heart of Galway city and established in the 1600s, it has kept the charm which gain