Sunteți pe pagina 1din 44
Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services 1 2 6 15 19 22 24 29
Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services 1 2 6 15 19 22 24 29
Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services 1 2 6 15 19 22 24 29

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

1 2 6 15 19 22 24 29 34 37
1
2
6
15
19
22
24
29
34
37

Contents

Overview

Introduction to Terminal Services

Planning the Terminal Services Installation

Installing Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client Software

Configuring Terminal Services for Clients

Establishing a Terminal Session

Lab A: Installing Terminal Services

Installing Applications on a Terminal Server

Lab B: Installing an Application

Review

Lab A: Installing Terminal Services Installing Applications on a Terminal Server Lab B: Installing an Application

Information in this document is subject to change without notice. The names of companies, products, people, characters, and/or data mentioned herein are fictitious and are in no way intended to represent any real individual, company, product, or event, unless otherwise noted. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation. If, however, your only means of access is electronic, permission to print one copy is hereby granted.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property.

2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Active Desktop, Active Directory, ActiveX, BackOffice, FoxPro, JScript, Outlook, PowerPoint, Visual Basic, Windows, and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.

Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

Project Leads: Mark Johnson, Gerry Lang, H. James Toland III (ComputerPREP, Inc.) Instructional Designers: Jeanie Decker (Write Stuff), Chris Slemp (ComputerPREP, Inc.), Victoria Fodale (ComputerPREP, Inc.), Jose Mathews (NIIT Inc.), Barbara Pelletier (S&T OnSite), Rick Selby, H. James Toland III (ComputerPREP, Inc.) Lead Program Managers: Jim Clark, Paul Adare (FYI TechKnowlogy Services) Program Managers: Jeff Clark, Rodney Miller, Andy Ruth (Infotec), Thomas Willingham (Infotec) Testing Leads: Sid Benavente, Keith Cotton Testing Developer: Greg Stemp (S&T OnSite) Courseware Test Engineers: Jeff Clark, H. James Toland III (ComputerPREP, Inc.) Lab Simulations Developers: Wai Chan (Meridian Partners Ltd.), David Carlile (Independent Contractor), Tammy Stockton (S&T OnSite) Graphic Artists: Julie Stone (Independent Contractor), Kimberly Jackson (Independent Contractor) Editing Manager: Lynette Skinner Editors: Kelly Baker (Write Stuff), Jennifer Kerns (S&T OnSite) Copy Editor: Patricia Neff (S&T Consulting) Online Program Manager: Debbi Conger Online Publications Manager: Arlo Emerson (Aditi) Online Support: Eric Brandt (S&T OnSite) Multimedia Development: Kelly Renner (Entex) Courseware Testing: Data Dimensions, Inc. Production Support: Irene Barnett (S&T Consulting) Manufacturing Manager: Rick Terek (S&T OnSite) Manufacturing Support: Laura King (S&T OnSite) Lead Product Manager, Development Services: Bo Galford Lead Product Manager: Gerry Lang Group Product Manager: Robert Stewart

Manager: Gerry Lang Group Product Manager: Robert Stewart Simulations and interactive exercises were built by using

Simulations and interactive exercises were built by using Macromedia Authorware

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

iii

Instructor Notes

Presentation:

80 Minutes

Lab:

25 Minutes

This module introduces Terminal Services in Microsoft® Windows® 2000. The module covers planning tasks, installation and configuration of the server and client, and how to establish a Terminal session. The module also examines using Terminal Services for remote administration.

At the end of the module, students will be able to:

Describe the purpose and use of Terminal Services.

Plan a Terminal Services installation.

Install Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client software.

Configure Terminal Services for a multiple session environment.

Establish a Terminal session.

Install applications on a Terminal server.

Materials and Preparation

This section provides you with the required materials and preparation tasks that are needed to
This section provides you with the required materials and preparation tasks that
are needed to teach this module.
Required Materials
To teach this module, you need the following materials:
• Microsoft PowerPoint® file 1560B_10.ppt
Preparation Tasks
To prepare for this module, you should:
Read all the materials for this module.
Complete the labs.

iv

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Module Strategy

Use the following strategy to present this module:

Introduction to Terminal Services

This topic introduces Terminal Services for Windows 2000. Briefly describe the features and benefits of Terminal Services in the business context.

Planning the Installation

This topic describes the planning tasks for installation. Explain each task and discuss the issues that are associated with client applications, client hardware, server configuration, and licensing requirements.

Installing Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client Software

This topic describes the two options for installing Terminal Services. Demonstrate the steps for installing Terminal Services after Windows 2000 setup. Next, explain how to install Terminal Services Client by creating client installation disks and by downloading client software over a network.

Configuring Terminal Services for Clients

This topic presents procedures for configuring user access. Explain the use of user profiles and home directories. Then, explain the options for distributing the Terminal Services Client software and the procedures for creating client installation disks and installing the Terminal Services Client. Explain the configuration options for limiting sessions.

Establishing a Terminal Session This topic presents procedures that a user follows during a Terminal
Establishing a Terminal Session
This topic presents procedures that a user follows during a Terminal session.
Explain the procedure and options for connecting to a Terminal server. Then
explain the difference between disconnecting and logging off from a
session.
Installing Applications on a Terminal Server
This topic presents the procedure for installing applications on a Terminal
server and running compatibility scripts. Describe the two options for
installing an application on a Terminal server. Then explain application
compatibility scripts and describe the procedure for running the scripts.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

v

Customization Information

This section identifies the lab setup requirements for a module and the configuration changes that occur on student computers during the labs. This information is provided to assist you in replicating or customizing Microsoft Official Curriculum (MOC) courseware.

Important

The labs in this module are also dependent on the classroom

configuration that is specified in the Customization Information section at the

end of the Classroom Setup Guide for course 1560B, Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows 2000.

Lab Setup

The labs in this module require each pair of student computers to be domain controllers in a child domain of the nwtraders.msft domain, configured with a static Internet Protocol (IP) address. To prepare student computers to meet this requirement, perform one of the following actions:

Complete module 1, “Installing Microsoft Windows 2000,” and module 3, “Installing Active Directory,” of course 1560B, Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows 2000.

From the Trainer Materials compact disc, run the script for configuring the multiple maximum domain
From the Trainer Materials compact disc, run the script for configuring the
multiple maximum domain classroom configuration.
Lab Results
Performing the labs in this module introduces the following configuration
changes:
Addition of the TSUserx@domain.nwtraders.msft user account.
Addition of the Tsprofiles and Tshomes folders on drive C.
Installation of the Microsoft Windows 2000 Resource Kit.
Important
Windows 2000 Terminal Services may adversely affect subsequent
labs. As a result, you must uninstall Terminal Services from all classroom
computers after completion of the last lab in this module.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

1

Overview

Slide Objective

To provide an overview of the module topics and objectives.

Lead-in

In this module, you will learn about installing and configuring Terminal Services in Windows 2000.

Introduction to Terminal Services

Planning the Terminal Services Installation

Installing Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client Software

Configuring Terminal Services for Clients

Establishing a Terminal Session

Installing Applications on a Terminal Server

Terminal Services is an optional component of the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Server family that is
Terminal Services is an optional component of the Microsoft® Windows® 2000
Server family that is ideal for making applications available to mobile users,
branch offices, or Windows-based terminals. Because all application and data
processing takes place on the server, clients do not require significant amounts
of random access memory (RAM) or processing power. Therefore, Terminal
Services can help an organization reduce the total cost of ownership (TCO) by
using existing client hardware and lower-cost equipment, such as Windows-
based terminals or handheld personal computers. Additionally, you can
configure Terminal Services to perform remote administration on servers
running Windows 2000.
At the end of this module, you will be able to:
Describe the purpose and use of Terminal Services.
Plan a Terminal Services installation.
Install Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client software.
Configure Terminal Services for a multiple session environment.
Establish a Terminal session.

Install applications on a Terminal server.

2

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Introduction to Terminal Services

Slide Objective

To identify topics relevant to Terminal Services for Windows 2000.

Lead-in

This introduction provides an understanding of the many purposes and uses of Terminal Services in an organization.

How Terminal Services Works Features and Benefits

Terminal Services enables multiuser access to the Windows 2000 operating system, allowing several people to
Terminal Services enables multiuser access to the Windows 2000 operating
system, allowing several people to run sessions simultaneously from a single
computer. Administrators can install Windows-based applications on a server
running Terminal Services. These applications are available to all clients who
connect to the server desktop. Although users may have different hardware and
operating systems, the Terminal session that opens on the client desktop looks
and runs the same way on each device.
Terminal Services also allows you to open sessions on a remote server and
administer the server from another computer.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

3

How Terminal Services Works

Slide Objective

To illustrate how Terminal Services works.

Lead-in

Terminal Services adds multiuser system capability to Windows 2000 Server.

RDP RDP Terminal Services Server Terminal Services Server TCP/IP TCP/IP My Documents My Network Places
RDP
RDP
Terminal Services Server
Terminal Services Server
TCP/IP
TCP/IP
My Documents
My Network
Places
Client Client
My Computer
Recycle Bin
Internet Explorer
Start
12:00 PM
The multiuser system environment of Terminal Services consists of three parts: Terminal Services server. The
The multiuser system environment of Terminal Services consists of three parts:
Terminal Services server. The server manages the computing resources for
each client session and provides all users who are logged on with their own
unique environment. The server receives and processes all keystrokes and
mouse actions that the remote client performs and directs all display output
for both the operating system and applications to the appropriate client.
Client. The Terminal session opens as a window on the desktop of the client
computer. Running within that window is the remote desktop of the
Terminal server. The client computer needs only the minimum amount of
software that is necessary to establish a connection to the server and present
the user interface.
RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol). RDP supports communication between
the client and the server. RDP is optimized to move graphic interface
elements to the client. RDP is an application-layer protocol that relies on
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) to carry it across
the network. RDP is based on the International Telecommunication Union
(ITU) T.120 standard for multi-channel conferencing.

Note

employ the ITU T.120 standard. For more information about the T.120 standard, see the International Multimedia Teleconferencing Consortium Web site at http://www.imtc.org.

Many network-based applications, such as Microsoft NetMeeting ,

4

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Features and Benefits

Slide Objective

To identify the features and benefits of Terminal Services.

Lead-in

Terminal Services provides several features and benefits to meet a broad range of business needs.

Access to Windows 2000 Desktop and Applications

Increased Security and Reliability

Enhanced Administration and Support

Centralized Deployment of Line-of-Business Applications

The features of Terminal Services provide several benefits that an organization can use for a
The features of Terminal Services provide several benefits that an organization
can use for a range of business purposes.
Access to Windows 2000 Desktop and Applications
Terminal Services can be used to extend the Windows 2000 operating system
and Windows-based applications to a variety of clients. The following list
describes some of the advantages of extending access:
Run Windows applications. Windows-based applications can be made
available to a wide range of clients with little or no modification. You do
not need to rewrite applications to run on different operating systems and
hardware.
Note
With the Citrix MetaFrame add-on installed, non-Windows clients
can also connect to Terminal Services.
Extend the use of older equipment. Terminal Services can be implemented
as a transitional technology to bridge older operating systems and desktop
environments to Windows 2000 and 32-bit Windows-based applications.

Replace text-based terminals. Because many Windows-based terminals also natively support terminal emulation on the same device, organizations can replace text-based terminals with Windows-based terminals. Windows- based terminals enable users who work with data from host systems to have access to newer Windows-based applications.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

5

Increased Security and Reliability

Because no application or user data ever resides on the client, Terminal Services provides more control for security. Terminal Services also provides multilevel encryption support, which you can enable whenever there is a risk of unauthorized transmission interception on the link between the server and the client. There are three levels of encryption available: low, medium, and high. All levels of encryption use standard RSA RC4 encryption (a public-key encryption technology).

Enhanced Administration and Support

Terminal Services has several features that are useful for administrative and support tasks, which can also help reduce administration and support costs:

Remote administration. Administrators can manage Windows 2000 servers from a single desktop. Administrators have access to system management tools and can perform all administrative tasks, including software installation, as if they were performing them locally at the server.

Remote control. Using remote control, administrators can monitor the actions of a user who is logged on to a Terminal server from another client session. Remote control allows an administrator to either observe or actively control a client session. When actively controlling a client session, keyboard and mouse actions are input directly to the client session. A client session cannot remotely control the system console and the system console cannot remotely control a client session. Also, the system being used to remotely control a client session must be capable of supporting the video resolution that is being used at the remotely controlled client session. Remote control is useful for remote troubleshooting and when training remote users on new applications.

Centralized Deployment of Line-of-Business Applications Terminal Services has the lowest TCO for a single application
Centralized Deployment of Line-of-Business Applications
Terminal Services has the lowest TCO for a single application device running a
line of business application, such as a reservation system or a call center.
Organizations can deploy line of business applications in a fully server-centric
mode, where applications run entirely on the server. Terminal Services provides
the following benefits:
Less expensive hardware. Employees who perform jobs that only require
access to one line of business application can be equipped with less-
expensive terminals or computers.
Easy access to new or upgraded software. When Terminal Services is
enabled on Windows 2000 Server, administrators do not have to install
applications on each desktop computer. Instead, the application is installed
once on the server, and the clients automatically have access to the new or
upgraded software package.

6

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Planning the Terminal Services Installation

Slide Objective

To identify the issues that you must address before installing Terminal Services.

Lead-in

When planning a Terminal Services installation, you must consider the client requirements for applications and hardware, the server resources that are required to support clients, and the required licenses.

Identifying Client Applications Identifying Client Hardware Requirements Determining Server Configuration Identifying Licensing Requirements

The key to successful Terminal Services installation is proper planning. Perform the following tasks before
The key to successful Terminal Services installation is proper planning.
Perform the following tasks before you install Terminal Services:
Identify the client applications that you need to install on the server.
Identify the hardware requirements for clients.
Determine the server configuration that is required to support clients.
Identify the license server and client licenses that are required for Terminal
Services operation.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

7

Identifying Client Applications

Slide Objective

To identify issues that are associated with client applications in a Terminal Services environment.

Lead-in

There are issues that are related to client applications that should be considered when planning a Terminal Services installation.

Windows-based Applications MS-DOS-based Applications Other Application Issues

Before you install Terminal Services, identify the applications that you intend to deploy to client
Before you install Terminal Services, identify the applications that you intend
to deploy to client desktops. Most applications that run properly on
Windows 2000 will run on a Terminal server. Some applications may require
minor modification to run successfully in a Terminal Services environment.
Install applications on a test server before you deploy these applications in your
production environment to ensure compatibility with your existing applications.
Windows-based Applications
Applications that you install on a server running Terminal Services must be
compatible with Windows 2000. If an application does not run on
Windows 2000, it will not run in the multiuser environment on a Terminal
server.
Windows-based, 32-bit applications operate more efficiently than 16-bit
applications by taking full advantage of 32-bit hardware and operating systems.
Running 16-bit applications on a Terminal server can reduce the number of
users that a processor can support by as much as 40 percent and increase the
memory required per user by 50 percent.

8

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

MS-DOS-based Applications

Because Microsoft MS-DOS®-based applications were never designed for a multitasking environment, applications can slow the performance of a system with idle processes. You may need to adjust settings to increase performance.

Caution

applications for use with Terminal Services. It is recommended that you replace

MS-DOS-based applications with 32-bit Windows-based applications.

Microsoft does not specifically test or support any MS-DOS-based

Other Application Issues

Some applications have features that may prevent them from working with Terminal Services or cause them to perform poorly. The following types of applications need careful consideration:

Single-user applications. Some applications, such as older text-based applications, were designed to run in a single-user or single-desktop environment and may not install or function properly in a Terminal Services environment.

Applications that require special hardware. Devices such as bar code scanners or smart card readers
Applications that require special hardware. Devices such as bar code
scanners or smart card readers can be used with a Terminal Services client
only if:
• The devices are connected to the computer or terminal in such a way that
the peripheral device is recognized as a keyboard-type device.
• The connecting software and hardware support the connection to the
client.
Custom applications. Custom applications may need to be modified to run
in the Terminal Services environment.
Note
For information about creating your own application compatibility
script for older applications, see
http://www.microsoft.com/ntserver/terminalserver/

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

9

Identifying Client Hardware Requirements

Slide Objective

To list the system requirements for Terminal Services Client.

Lead-in

These are the system requirements to run Terminal Services Client.

OperatingOperating Operating SystemSystem System RAMRAM RAM ProcessorProcessor Processor VideoVideo Video CardCard Card
OperatingOperating Operating SystemSystem System
RAMRAM RAM
ProcessorProcessor Processor
VideoVideo Video CardCard Card
32
Windows Windows 2000 2000
32
MB MB
Pentium Pentium
VGA VGA
16
16
MB MB
486
Windows Windows NT NT 4.0 4.0
486
VGA VGA
16
Windows Windows 98 98
16
MB MB
486
486
VGA VGA
16
MB MB
386
Windows Windows 95 95
16
386
VGA VGA
Windows Windows for for
16
16
MB MB
386
386
VGA VGA
Workgroups Workgroups 3.11 3.11
Windows Windows CE CE 3.0 3.0
Vendor Vendor
Vendor Vendor
Vendor Vendor
Clients that run Terminal Services are not required to have much processing power. Therefore, it
Clients that run Terminal Services are not required to have much processing
power. Therefore, it is very easy to integrate Terminal Services into a network
that has older computers and equipment. Terminal Services supports the
following platforms: Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows NT®,
Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft Windows for
Workgroups 3.11, Microsoft Windows CE version 3.0, and Windows-based
terminals.
In addition, there is Terminal Services Client support for the following devices:
Windows CE, Handheld PC Edition 3.0 and Windows CE, Handheld PC
Professional Edition 3.0.
Windows-based Terminals, Standard and Professional (based on Windows
NT Embedded 4.0).
There are two versions of Terminal Services Client:
The 32-bit version for Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows 98, and
Windows 95
The 16-bit version for Windows for Workgroups

Explain to students that Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition clients will be able to connect to a server running Terminal Services in Windows 2000, but new RDP features, such as remote control, will not be available.

32-Bit and 16-Bit Clients

The requirements for the 32-bit and 16-bit versions of Terminal Services Client are the system and hardware requirements for the operating system. A network adapter and TCP/IP must also be installed on the client.

10

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Extending Terminal Services for Non-Windows Clients

Citrix MetaFrame for Windows 2000 Server extends Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition and Windows 2000 Terminal Services with additional client- and server-side functionality through Citrix’s Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) in the following key areas:

Heterogeneous Computing Environments

MetaFrame delivers Windows-based application access to virtually all types of client hardware, operating platforms, network connections and local area network (LAN) protocols. As a result, organizations can keep their existing infrastructure, and deploy the most advanced, 32-bit Windows-based applications across the network.

Enterprise Scale Management

Organizations building enterprise computing solutions around Terminal Services will benefit from the powerful management tools of MetaFrame, including increased system scalability and simplified support of multiple applications for thousands of users enterprise-wide. Citrix Program Neighborhood allows administrators to quickly and easily provide access to new or updated server-based applications directly to the user without concern for client configuration. Citrix Load Balancing Services allow multiple MetaFrame servers to be grouped into a unified “server farm” to meet the needs of a growing user base. Citrix Resource Management Services provides extensive audit trail, comprehensive system monitoring, and the ability to construct detailed billing reports; and Citrix Installation Management Services automates the application installation process so that applications may be quickly and easily replicated to Citrix servers across the enterprise.

Seamless Desktop Integration MetaFrame offers an enhanced user experience by providing complete access to all
Seamless Desktop Integration
MetaFrame offers an enhanced user experience by providing complete
access to all local system resources such as full 16-bit stereo audio, local
drives, COM ports and local printers. Although applications run remotely
from the server, they look and perform as though they are running locally.
By providing this level of comfort for users, MetaFrame increases user
productivity.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

11

Determining Server Configuration

Slide Objective

To identify factors that affect server capacity in a Terminal Services environment.

Lead-in

There are several factors that impact the performance of a server running Terminal Services.

Evaluating User Characteristics Examining Server System Configurations Examining Peripheral Devices That Affect Performance

Because all application processing takes place on the server, Terminal Services normally requires more server
Because all application processing takes place on the server, Terminal Services
normally requires more server resources per user than other services such as the
Domain Name System (DNS) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP). Ensuring that your server can accommodate your user base is crucial.
To determine the hardware configuration a Terminal server requires to support
users, consider the following factors: user characteristics, server system
configurations, and peripheral devices.
Evaluating User Characteristics
The usage patterns of users can have a significant impact on the performance of
Terminal Services. Most users can be placed in one of three categories:
Light users. Light users typically run a single application that they use for
data entry (for example, business applications written in Microsoft Visual
Basic®).
Structured task users. Structured task users run one or two applications at a
time. Structured task users run applications whose data processing demands
on the system are not heavy (for example, a word processor and a browser).

Advanced users. Advanced users run three or more applications simultaneously. Advanced users may run applications whose data processing demands on the system are heavy (for example, detailed queries on large databases).

12

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Examining Server System Configurations

Before you install Terminal Services, consider the following system recommendations:

File system. It is recommended that you install Terminal Services on a partition that is formatted with the NTFS file system. NTFS provides security for users in a multiple session environment who access the same data structures.

Server type. It is recommended that you install Terminal Services on a member server but not on a domain controller. Installing Terminal Services on a domain controller can hamper the performance of the server because of the additional memory, network traffic, and processor time that it requires to perform the tasks of a domain controller.

Generally, a server running Terminal Services requires an additional 10 megabytes (MB) of RAM for each light user and up to 21 MB of RAM for each power user. Also, processor and memory requirements typically scale linearly. Doubling the number of processors and doubling the amount of RAM will allow a Terminal server to support double the number of users.

Key Point

To ensure reliability, all hardware for Terminal Services must be on the Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) for Windows 2000.

Tip Purchasing a system that supports multiple processors, even if you initially purchase only one
Tip
Purchasing a system that supports multiple processors, even if you initially
purchase only one processor, allows you to add capacity easily as your
requirements grow.
Examining Peripheral Devices That Affect Performance
Peripheral devices can also affect the performance of a server running Terminal
Services:
Hard disks. Disk speed is critical for Terminal server performance. Small
computer system interface (SCSI) disk drives have significantly better
throughput than other types of drives. For highest disk performance,
consider using a SCSI RAID controller. RAID (Redundant Array of
Independent Disks) controllers automatically place data on multiple disks to
increase disk performance and improve data reliability.
Network adapter. A high-performance network adapter is recommended,
especially if users require access to data that is stored on network servers.
Using multiple adapters can significantly increase network throughput.

Multiport asynchronous communication adapter. If a multiport asynchronous communication adapter is installed for supporting dial-up users, be sure to use an intelligent (microprocessor-based) adapter to both reduce interrupt overhead and increase throughput.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

13

Identifying Licensing Requirements

Slide Objective

To illustrate Terminal Services licensing requirements.

Lead-in

There are three types of licenses required for Terminal Services.

License Server License Server License License Types: Types: Client Client Access Access Internet Internet Connector
License Server
License Server
License License Types: Types:
Client Client Access Access
Internet Internet Connector Connector
Built-in Built-in
Temporary Temporary
Terminal Services requires each device that initiates a Terminal Services session to be licensed, either
Terminal Services requires each device that initiates a Terminal Services
session to be licensed, either with a Windows 2000 license or a Terminal
Services Client Access License. Terminal Services also requires a license
server, which is a computer on which the Terminal Services Licensing service
is enabled.
Guidelines for a License Server
A license server stores all Terminal Services licenses that have been installed
for a group of Terminal servers and tracks the licenses that have been issued.
Terminal Services Licensing allows Terminal Services to obtain and manage its
Client Access Licenses, thus simplifying the task of license management for the
system administrator.
The Terminal Services Licensing service is a component service of Windows
2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server, and Microsoft Windows 2000
Datacenter Server, and is a separate entity from Terminal Services. Terminal
Services Licensing is used only with Terminal Services in Application Server
mode.

The license server must be discoverable by the Terminal servers. For a Windows 2000 domain, this means the license server must be deployed on a domain controller. The Terminal server will discover the license server by enumerating its domain controllers and checking for Terminal Services Licensing. For a workgroup, or a Windows NT 4.0 domain, the license server may be deployed on the Terminal server or any member server. In this scenario, Terminal servers will locate the available license server through broadcast.

It is also possible to deploy a License server in a Windows 2000 network on a

site basis. This approach, known as the enterprise licensing configuration, can be selected at installation. It will allow any Terminal servers in the same

physical site to discover the Licensing service, even across domain boundaries. This configuration does not support discovery from remote sites within the network.

14

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

There are no hardware requirements for a license server other than those required to install Windows 2000 Server. Terminal Services Licensing requires approximately 5 MB of hard disk space per 6000 client licenses issued. Memory usage is under 10 MB of RAM, whether idle or active.

For more information on Terminal Services Licensing, see “Microsoft

Note

Windows 2000 Terminal Services Licensing” under Additional Reading on

the Student Materials compact disc.

Client License Types

The license server manages the following license types:

Terminal Services Client Access Licenses. These licenses are purchased for known, non-Windows 2000 devices connecting to a Terminal Server.

Terminal Services Internet Connector Licenses. This license is used to allow anonymous use of a Terminal server by non-employees across the Internet on a concurrent basis.

Built-in licenses. Clients that are running the Windows 2000 operating system are automatically licensed as Terminal Services Clients.

Temporary licenses. When a Terminal server requests a license and the license server has none
Temporary licenses. When a Terminal server requests a license and the
license server has none to give, it will issue a temporary license. The license
server will track the issuance and expiration of these.
Each client requires one of these licenses to gain access to the Terminal server.
Note that this is in addition to other licenses that might be needed, such as
application licenses, operating system licenses, and any Windows 2000 Server
or Microsoft BackOffice® Client Access Licenses.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

15

Installing Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client Software

Slide Objective

To identify topics relevant to installing Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client.

Lead-in

To run Terminal Services, you need to install Terminal Services on the server and Terminal Services Client on the client computers.

Installing Terminal Services Installing Terminal Services Client

To run Terminal Services, you need to install Terminal Services on the server and Terminal
To run Terminal Services, you need to install Terminal Services on the server
and Terminal Services Client on the client computers.

16

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Installing Terminal Services

Slide Objective

To illustrate the Terminal Services option in the Windows Component wizard.

Lead-in

There are two options for installing Terminal Services:

during Windows 2000 Setup or after Setup by using Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel.

Windows Components Wizard Windows Components You can add or remove components of Windows 2000. To
Windows Components Wizard
Windows Components
You can add or remove components of Windows 2000.
To add or remove a component, click the checkbox. A shaded box means
that only part of the component will be installed. To see what’s included in
a component, click Details.
Terminal
Services
Components:
Remote Installation Services
Remote Storage
Terminal Services
Terminal Services Licensing
To add or
remove
a
1.4
component,
MB
click
the
check
box.
A
shaded
box means that
only part of the
component
3.4
MB will
be
installed.
To
see
what’s
included in
a
component,
click Details.
14.4
MB
0.5 MB
Subcomponents of Terminal Services:
Client Creator Files
Description:
Provides a multisession environment for clients to access
14.4
MB
Windows-based programs on this computer.
Enable Terminal Services
0.0
MB
Total disk space required:
1.0MB
Details
Space available on disk:
6501.5MB
< Back
Next>
Cancel
Description:
Enables creation of installation disks for Terminal Services Clients
Details Details
Total disk space required:
1.0 MB
Space available on disk:
6501.2 MB
OK
Cancel
You can install Terminal Services on the server during Windows 2000 Server Setup, or you
You can install Terminal Services on the server during Windows 2000 Server
Setup, or you can install Terminal Services or Terminal Services Licensing
after Setup by using Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel.
When you install Terminal Services by using Add/Remove Programs, you
select either Application server mode or Remote administration mode. The two
main differences between the modes are that there are no licensing requirements
for Remote administration mode, and Remote administration mode only allows
two concurrent connections.
You can install Terminal Services Licensing with Terminal Services or you can
install it by itself on a different computer. When you install Terminal Services
licensing, you specify whether the license server will serve the domain or
workgroup, or the entire forest. Choosing enterprise licensing allows any
Terminal server in the same physical site to use the license server, even across
domain boundaries.
Several items are added to the Administrative Tools menu, depending on the
service you install. The following table describes these additions.
Item
Description

Delivery Tip

Demonstrate the steps for installing Terminal Services after Windows 2000 Setup.

Terminal Services Client Creator

Terminal Services Configuration

Terminal Services Licensing

Terminal Services Manager

Creates floppy disks for installing Terminal Services client software.

Manages Terminal Services protocol configuration and server settings.

Manages Client Access Licenses.

Manages and monitors sessions and processes on the server running Terminal Services.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

17

Installing Terminal Services Client

Slide Objective

To illustrate the two methods of installing Terminal Services Client.

Lead-in

There are two ways to install Terminal Services Client.

Terminal Services Terminal Services Systemroot/ System32/ Systemroot/ System32/ Client Creator Client Creator
Terminal Services
Terminal Services
Systemroot/ System32/
Systemroot/ System32/
Client Creator
Client Creator
Clients/Tsclient
Clients/Tsclient
Installation
Shared
Disks
Folder
Client Client
You can choose either of the following methods to install Terminal Services Client: Use an
You can choose either of the following methods to install Terminal Services
Client:
Use an installation disk or disk set to install Terminal Services Client on the
client.
Use a shared folder to install Terminal Services Client across the network.
Creating Client Installation Disks
When you install Terminal Services, Windows 2000 includes the Terminal
Services Client Creator administrative tool with which you can create
installation disks for the client software. After the software is installed on the
client, the client will be able to connect to a server running Terminal Services.
To create client installation disks, perform the following steps:
1. In the Administrative Tools menu, open Terminal Services Client Creator.
2. Select the type of Terminal Services Client software that you want to create.
There are two options:

Terminal Services for 16-bit windows (requires 4 disks)

Terminal Services for 32-bit x86 windows (requires 2 disks)

3. Insert a disk into the destination drive.

4. After copying the files to the disks, close the Create Installation Disk dialog box, or click OK to create more disks.

18

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Installing Client Software over a Network

The source files for Terminal Services Client are stored in the systemroot\System32\Clients\Tsclient folder on the Terminal server. The Tsclient folder contains the Net, Win16, and Win32 subfolders. To enable users to access Terminal Services Client over the network and install it on their computers, share the folders for the appropriate platforms. Users can then run Setup.exe from one of the shared folders.

Installing Terminal Services Client

Before installing Terminal Services Client, ensure that the client computer is properly configured and connected to the network. To install Terminal Services Client, perform the following steps:

1. Run Setup.exe.

2. Specify and confirm the user name and the organization.

3. Accept the license agreement.

4. Accept the default folder or specify another destination folder.

5. Specify whether to install client software for all users of the computer or for only the current user.

Setup copies the appropriate files from the disk or shared folder to the specified folder
Setup copies the appropriate files from the disk or shared folder to the
specified folder on the client.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

19

Configuring Terminal Services for Clients

Slide Objective

To identify the tasks for configuring user access in Terminal Services.

Lead-in

User accounts can be configured for Terminal sessions.

Configuring User Access Configuring Client Settings

After you install Terminal Services in Application server mode and Terminal Services Client, you must
After you install Terminal Services in Application server mode and Terminal
Services Client, you must ensure that users are authorized to access Terminal
Services and that the server is enabled as an application server. You can specify
user profiles and home directories for users that apply to Terminal sessions and
configure time limits for sessions.

20

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Configuring User Access

Slide Objective

To illustrate the settings for configuring user access in Terminal Services.

Lead-in

Before you can configure user access in Terminal Services, the user account must allow the user to log on to the Terminal server.

TSuser Properties General Membership Profile Environment Sessions Remote Control Terminal Services Profile
TSuser Properties
General
Membership
Profile
Environment
Sessions
Remote
Control
Terminal
Services Profile
Dial-in
Use
this
tab
to
configure
the Terminal
Services user profile.
Settings
in
this
profile
apply
to
Terminal Services.
Terminal
Services
Profile
User
Profile:
Terminal
Services
Home
Directory
Local path
Connect:
To:
Allow logon to terminal server
OK
Cancel
Apply
When Terminal Services is installed on a domain controller, all domain user accounts are allowed
When Terminal Services is installed on a domain controller, all domain user
accounts are allowed access to the terminal server by default. When Terminal
Services is installed on a member server in a workgroup, all local user accounts
on that member server are allowed access to the terminal server by default.
To enable or disable the logon process, in the Properties dialog box for the
user, click the Terminal Services Profile tab, select or clear the Allow logon to
terminal server check box, and then click Apply.
You can also specify home directories and user profiles for users on this tab.
You can assign a profile for a user that applies to Terminal sessions. This
enables you to create user profiles that are modified for the Terminal Services
environment. For example, you can disable screen savers and animated menu
effects, which can slow performance during a Terminal session.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

21

Configuring Client Settings

Slide Objective

To identify client settings to configure for Terminal sessions.

Lead-in

Setting session limits helps make system resources available for active sessions.

End a Disconnected Session Active Session Limit Idle Session Limit

To ensure that system resources are available for active Terminal sessions, you can set time
To ensure that system resources are available for active Terminal sessions, you
can set time limits for disconnected and idle sessions.
You specify time limits for sessions in Terminal Services Configuration in the
RDP-Tcp Properties dialog box on the Sessions tab. The following table
describes the settings for limiting the length of a session.
Setting
Description
End a disconnected session
Specifies the maximum duration that a disconnected
session is retained. The session will be reset and can no
longer be resumed after the time limit has expired.
Active session limit
Specifies the maximum connection duration. When the
time limit is reached, the session will be disconnected,
leaving the session active on the server, or reset.
Idle session limit
Specifies the maximum idle time (time without
connection activity) allowed before the session is
disconnected or reset.

22

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Establishing a Terminal Session

Slide Objective

To identify the procedures for establishing and ending Terminal sessions.

Lead-in

Users begin using Terminal Services by creating a new connection.

Connecting to a Terminal Server Ending a Terminal Session

After the server and client configuration is complete, a user can establish a Terminal session.
After the server and client configuration is complete, a user can establish a
Terminal session. The user can access the network and local resources,
including the hard disks and printers, from the client. When ending a session,
the user can either disconnect to rejoin the session later or log off to close the
session completely.
Connecting to a Terminal Server
When users connect to a Terminal server, they can select options to
accommodate slow networks and improve the performance of the session. To
connect to a Terminal server, perform the following steps:
1.
Start Terminal Services Client.
The Terminal Services Client dialog box appears. The following table
describes what to do with each option in the dialog box.
For this option
Do this
Server
Enter the name of a Terminal server or a TCP/IP
address.
Screen area
Select a screen resolution. This setting is not
dependent on the screen resolution of the server.

Available servers

Low-speed connection

Cache bitmaps to disk

Select a server from a list of available servers.

Click Low-speed connection if using a modem, or if you have a slow network.

Click Cache bitmaps to disk to save desktop display elements to the local cache. This option will cause the screen to refresh from the local cache and improve performance.

2. Click Connect.

3. Log on to the Terminal server.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

23

When a user connects to the Terminal server, the user environment on the client looks the same as the Windows 2000 Server and Windows 2000 Professional environments. The fact that the application is not running locally is transparent to the user. All application processing takes place on the server running Terminal Services, and the server sends the display to the client.

Ending a Terminal Session

Terminal Services provides two options for users to end a Terminal session:

Disconnecting from a session. Disconnecting leaves the session running on the server. The user can reconnect to the server and resume the session. For example, if a user is performing a time-consuming task on the server, such as running a query on a database, the user can start the task and disconnect from the session. Later, the user can log on to the server again, resume the session, and either resume the task or check results.

Logging off from a session. Logging off from a session ends the session running on the server. Any applications running within the session will be closed and unsaved data will be lost. It is important for users to log off from a session to make server resources available for new sessions.

will be lost. It is important for users to log off from a session to make

24

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Lab A: Installing Terminal Services

Slide Objective

To prepare students for the lab.

Lead-in

In this lab, you will install and configure Terminal Services.

this lab, you will install and configure Terminal Services. Objectives After completing this lab, you will
Objectives After completing this lab, you will be able to: Install Terminal Services. Install Terminal
Objectives
After completing this lab, you will be able to:
Install Terminal Services.
Install Terminal Services Client software.
Prerequisites
Before working on this lab, you must have knowledge of Terminal Services
concepts and operations.
Lab Setup
To complete this lab, you need a computer running Microsoft Windows 2000
Advanced Server that is configured as a domain controller.
Estimated time to complete this lab: 15 minutes

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

25

Exercise 1 Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Scenario

You are in the process of upgrading all of your desktop computers. In the interim, you want to allow users to gain experience with the Windows 2000 user interface and to take advantage of the new features in Windows 2000.

Goal

In this exercise, you will install Terminal Services and Terminal Services Licensing and configure a user account.

Tasks

Detailed Steps

1. Install Terminal Services and Terminal Services Licensing. Configure Terminal Services to provide application server support. Be sure to make Terminal Services available only for your domain.

a. Log on to your domain as Administrator with a password of password.

b. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components.

c. In the Windows Components wizard, under Components, select the Terminal Services and Terminal Services
c.
In the Windows Components wizard, under Components, select the
Terminal Services and Terminal Services Licensing check boxes,
and then click Next.
d.
On the Terminal Services Setup page, under Select the mode you
want to use, choose Application server mode, and then click Next.
e.
Select Permissions compatible with Windows 2000 users, and then
click Next.
The Terminal Services Setup page displays a list of programs
that may function improperly after you install Terminal Services.
f.
Click Next.
g.
On the Terminal Services Licensing Setup page, verify that Your
domain or workgroup is selected, and then click Next.
h.
If prompted, type the path, \\London\Setup\Winsrc to the source files
in the Copy files from box, and then click OK.
i.
When the file copy process is complete, click Finish, and then close all
windows.
j.
When prompted, click Yes to restart the computer.

a. Log on to your domain as Administrator with a password of password.

b. Open Active Directory Users and Computers from the Administrative Tools menu.

c. In the Users container, create a new user called TSUserx (where x is your assigned student number) with a user logon name of TSUserx@domain.nwtraders.msft (where domain is your assigned domain name), and a password of password.

2. Configure a user for

Terminal Services using the following information:

User name: TSUserx Logon name:

TSUserx@domain.nwtraders.msft Password: password

name: TSUser x @ domain .nwtraders.msft Password: password Note: Before you can complete configuration of the

Note: Before you can complete configuration of the user account, replication must occur with the domain controller in your domain.

26

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Tasks

Detailed Steps

3. Initiate replication between the domain controllers in your domain.

a. Open Active Directory Sites and Services from the Administrative Tools menu.

b. If necessary, expand Sites, expand Default-First-Site-Name, expand Servers, and then expand Server (where Server is your partner’s assigned computer name).

c. Click NTDS Settings.

d. Right-click the connection object that represents the link to your partner’s computer, and then click Replicate Now.

e. In the Replicate Now dialog box, click OK.

f. Close Active Directory Sites and Services.

4. Configure the Terminal Services Profile for TSUserx by setting the Profile and home directory paths to use the following directories:

Profile folder: C:\tsprofiles Home directory: C:\tshomes Note: You must create the directories manually before configuring the Terminal Services Profile.

a. Create the following directories at the root of drive C:

TSProfiles

TSHomes

b. In Active Directory Users and Computers, open the Properties dialog box for TSUserx, and then click the Terminal Services Profile tab.

c. In the User Profile box, type c:\tsprofiles d. e. Click OK to close the
c.
In the User Profile box, type c:\tsprofiles
d.
e.
Click OK to close the Properties dialog box, and then close Active
Directory Users and Computers.

Under Terminal Services Home Directory, verify that Local path is selected, and then type c:\tshomes

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

27

Exercise 2 Installing and Testing Terminal Services Client Software

Scenario

You want to install the Terminal Services Client software on your computer to test the installation of Terminal Services.

Goal

In this exercise, you will install the Terminal Services client software on your server, and then establish a Terminal session by using the user account that you created and configured in Exercise 1.

Tasks Detailed Steps 1. Install the Terminal Services Client software by using Add/Remove Programs. Use
Tasks
Detailed Steps
1.
Install the Terminal Services
Client software by using
Add/Remove Programs. Use
the 32-bit version available
on your hard disk at:
a.
In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, and then click
Add New Programs.
b.
Click CD or Floppy, and then click Next.
c.
c:\winnt\system32\clients\
On the Run Installation Program page, in the Open box, type
c:\winnt\system32\clients\tsclient\net\win32\setup.exe and then click
Next.
tsclient\net\win32
d.
In the Terminal Services Client Setup dialog box, click Continue.
Name and organization
information: Studentx
e.
In the Name and Organization Information dialog box, in the Name
box, type Studentx and then click OK.
f.
In the Confirm Name and Organization Information dialog box,
click OK.
g.
In the License Agreement dialog box, click I Agree.
h.
In the Terminal Services Client Setup dialog box, click the large
button to start installation.
i.
Click Yes to install the client software for all users of this computer.
j.
Click OK, click Next, and then click Finish to complete the setup
procedure.
k.
Close all open windows.

28

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Tasks

Detailed Steps

Note: Wait until your partner has completed the previous procedure before starting this procedure.

Note: Wait until your partner has completed the previous procedure before starting this procedure.

2.

Run the Terminal Services Client software and select your partner’s computer from the list of available servers. Select the Cache bitmaps to disk check box, and use the following information to start the session:

User name: TSUserx Password: password.

a. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Terminal Services Client, and then click Terminal Services Client.

b. In the Terminal Services Client dialog box, under Available servers, click Server (where Server is your partner’s computer name).

c. Select the Cache bitmaps to disk check box, and then click Connect.

d. In the Log On to Windows dialog box, specify the following:

User name: TSUserx Password: password Log on to: domain

e. Click OK.

 

f. Log off as TSUserx, and then close the Terminal Services Client window.

to: domain e. Click OK .   f. Log off as TSUser x, and then close

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

29

Installing Applications on a Terminal Server

Slide Objective

To identify the issues that are related to installing applications and running compatibility scripts.

Lead-in

Application files must be centrally located on the server for multiuser access.

Examining Installation Options Using Application Compatibility Scripts

To install an application, you must log on to the server running Terminal Services by
To install an application, you must log on to the server running Terminal
Services by using the built-in Administrator account. After installation, you can
run a compatibility script to modify the application to run on a Terminal server.

30

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Examining Installation Options

Slide Objective

To describe the issues related to installing applications and running compatibility scripts.

Lead-in

There are two methods for installing applications on a Terminal server.

Using Add/Remove Programs Using the change user Command

To make an application available for multiple users, application files need to be copied to
To make an application available for multiple users, application files need to be
copied to a central location on the server.
Note
For security purposes, all applications should be installed on an NTFS
partition.
There are two methods that you can use to install applications on a Terminal
server:
Use Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel.
Run the change user command at the command prompt before and after
installing the application.
Using Add/Remove Programs

Add/Remove Programs, which automatically runs the change user command, is the preferred method for installing applications on a Terminal server. To install a program by using Add/Remove Programs, log on to the Terminal server as Administrator and close all programs. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, and then follow the instructions in the wizard.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

31

Using the change user Command

Use the change user command only when you install an application using a method other than running a setup program. For example, when Microsoft Internet Explorer prompts you to install an add-on application, run the change user command to ensure that the add-on application is installed for multiuser access.

The change user command performs the following actions:

Before the application is installed, change user /install places the system in install mode and turns off .ini file mapping. The system then records how the Setup application programming interfaces (APIs) initially install the application.

After the application is installed, change user /execute returns the system to execute mode, restores .ini file mapping, and redirects user-specific data to the user’s home directory. When the user opens the application, user- specific registry settings are automatically propagated as needed to the user’s home directory.

the application, user- specific registry settings are automatically propagated as needed to the user’s home directory.

32

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Using Application Compatibility Scripts

Slide Objective

To identify the issues associated with application compatibility scripts.

Lead-in

Terminal Services includes application compatibility scripts to modify popular applications for use in Terminal Services.

Examining Application Compatibility Scripts Running Application Compatibility Scripts

Terminal Services includes application compatibility scripts for some applications. These scripts modify applications to
Terminal Services includes application compatibility scripts for some
applications. These scripts modify applications to function well in a multiuser
environment. The script modifies the global registry settings of the application
and disables functions that could negatively impact system performance. For
example, the Microsoft Office 97 compatibility script disables the FindFast
utility and sets a number of file attributes to read-only to ensure that multiple
users can open files simultaneously.
Examining Application Compatibility Scripts
Many commonly used applications have been tested for compatibility with
Terminal Services. For maximum application performance, some applications
require minor changes to the application installation. Scripts are available for
these applications and must be run after you complete the application
installation. The scripts are located in the systemroot\Application Compatibility
Scripts\Install folder.
Running Application Compatibility Scripts
To run application compatibility scripts, perform the following steps:

1. In the systemroot\Application Compatibility Scripts\Install folder, find the script for the application that you are installing.

2. Open the file in a text editor such as Notepad.

3. Review the script. If path names and drive letters in the files differ from those you used during application installation, edit the files to correct the path information.

4. At a command prompt, run the script for the application.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

33

The first time an application compatibility script is used, the script checks to see whether Rootdrv.cmd has been edited. Rootdrv.cmd is a script that maps a drive letter to the client's home directory. For example, if W:\ is specified as the drive letter for mapping, W:\ is mapped to %homedrive%%homepath%. By using this technique, you can specify what appears to be a shared path, such as W:\mail\mailbox.dat. The drive mapping causes each user to get a unique copy of the file in their home directory.

The application compatibility script launches Notepad and requires you to type a drive letter and then save and close the file. The application compatibility script resumes. Rootdrv.cmd is launched only if you have not already mapped a drive letter. Rootdrv.cmd stores the final drive mapping information in Rootdrv2.cmd. If you want to change the drive letter at a later time, you should complete the following tasks:

Open Rootdrv2.cmd in Notepad, edit the drive letter, and then save and close the file.

Update the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\ Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Terminal Server\RootDrive registry key with the new drive letter.

Some applications may also require logon scripts. Logon scripts set custom environmental variables for users.
Some applications may also require logon scripts. Logon scripts set custom
environmental variables for users. For example, the logon script for Microsoft
Internet Explorer establishes additional support files so users can have access to
personal bookmarks and address books. Logon scripts are located in the
systemroot\Application Compatibility Scripts\Logon folder.
Logon scripts are not executed for users who are logged on until they log off
and log back on again. Many applications do not behave correctly when they
are run before the logon script begins. For this reason, you should install
applications when no users are logged on to the system.
When you upgrade or add components to an existing installation of an
application that has an associated compatibility script, you should rerun the
script.
Note
For information about specific script capabilities and how to modify
them for custom installations, refer to the notes within the script for the
application that you are installing.

34

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Lab B: Installing an Application

Slide Objective

To prepare students for the lab.

Lead-in

In this lab, you will install an application.

Lead-in In this lab, you will install an application. Objectives After completing this lab, you will
Objectives After completing this lab, you will be able to install an application that will
Objectives
After completing this lab, you will be able to install an application that will be
accessible by all Terminal Services clients.
Prerequisites
Before working on this lab, you must have:
• A familiarity with the concepts of Windows 2000 Terminal Services.
Lab Setup
To complete this lab, you need the following:
• A computer running Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server that is
configured as a domain controller.
Estimated time to complete this lab: 10 minutes

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

35

Exercise 1 Installing an Application

Scenario

You need to have access to various Windows 2000 Support Tools utilities when troubleshooting problems at the client’s desktop. To provide access, it is necessary to install the Windows 2000 Support Tools on your Terminal server and make it available for use by Terminal Services clients.

Goal

In this exercise, you will use Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel to install the Windows 2000 Support Tools and make it available to all Terminal Services clients. To test the installation, verify that Windows 2000 Support Tools is added to the Start menu.

Tasks Detailed Steps 1. Use Add/Remove Programs to install the Windows 2000 Support Tools on
Tasks
Detailed Steps
1.
Use Add/Remove
Programs to install the
Windows 2000 Support
Tools on your partner’s
computer from the
\Support\Tools folder on the
Windows 2000 compact
disc.
a.
On the Terminal Services Client menu, click Terminal Services Client.
b.
In the Terminal Services Client window, under Available servers,
click Server (where Server is your partner’s computer name).
c.
Select the Cache bitmaps to disk check box if necessary, and then
click Connect.
d.
In the Log On to Windows dialog box, log on to your domain as
Administrator with a password of password.
Installation Type:
e.
Typical
Open Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel, click Add New
Programs, and then click CD or Floppy.
f.
Ensure Windows 2000 Advanced Server compact disc is in your
partner’s CD-ROM drive.
g.
In the Install Program From Floppy Disk or CD-ROM wizard, click
Next.
h.
On the Run Installation Program page, click Browse.
i.
In the Browse dialog box, double-click SUPPORT, double-click
Tools, double-click Setup.exe, and then click Next.
j.
On the Welcome to the Windows 2000 Support Tools Setup
Wizard page, click Next.
k.
On the User Information page, in the Name box, type Studentx
(where x is your assigned student number) if necessary, and then click
Next.
l. On the Select An Installation Type page, verify that Typical is
selected, and then click Next.
m. On the Begin Installation page, click Next.
You will see the progress of the installation process.
n. On the Completing the Windows 2000 Support Tools Setup Wizard
page, click Finish.
o. On the After Installation page, click Next.
p. On the Finish Admin Install page, click Finish.
q. Close the Add/Remove Programs window.

36

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

Tasks

Detailed Steps

2.

Verify that the Windows 2000 Support Tools are available.

a. On the Programs menu, verify that Windows 2000 Support Tools is available, and then log off the Terminal session.

b. Close the Terminal Services Client window.

 

c. Log off.

and then log off the Terminal session. b. Close the Terminal Services Client window.   c.

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

37

Review

Slide Objective

To reinforce module objectives by reviewing key points.

Lead-in

The review questions cover some of the key concepts taught in the module.

Introduction to Terminal Services

Planning the Installation

Installing Terminal Services and Terminal Services Client Software

Configuring Terminal Services for Clients

Establishing a Terminal Session

Installing Applications on a Terminal Server

1. Your management team does not want to spend the money that is necessary to
1. Your management team does not want to spend the money that is necessary
to upgrade everyone’s desktop computers to new Pentium-class computers
immediately, but they want to install new equipment over the next two
years. They want all users to become familiar with the same user interface
and to be able to use the same suite of applications. They also want to
minimize the need for the technical support staff to visit individual users,
and to enable the staff to show users how to perform tasks in the new
interface. What can you tell the management team about Terminal Services
that would address these issues?
Terminal Services allows you to provide the Windows 2000 interface to
users with a variety of hardware, such as Windows-based terminals,
and older operating systems, such as Windows for Workgroups. Clients
running Terminal Services Client software can access many Windows-
based applications, and the technical support staff can use the remote
control capabilities of Terminal Services to view the Terminal sessions
and guide users through performing tasks with the new Windows 2000
user interface.

38

Module 10: Installing and Configuring Terminal Services

2. You support a network of 100 users with computers that have 386 processors, 486 processors, and Pentium processors. The management team has decided to upgrade all of the computers to Pentium-class computers running Windows 2000. Your management team wants to provide access to the Windows 2000 user interface now so that users will be familiar with the Windows 2000 desktop environment when Windows 2000 is installed on their computers. If you were to suggest implementing Terminal Services, what issues would be involved in planning the Terminal Services deployment?

You would want to ensure that the management team knew that each client had to meet the minimum hardware requirements, that the necessary number of Client Access Licenses were purchased, and that you identified the software packages that Terminal Services supports. You would also need to ensure that the Terminal server had sufficient hardware to support the number of users you expected to access the server.

3. You have been asked to install Windows 2000 Terminal Services on a test computer and create the Terminal Services Client software for the Information Technology (IT) staff to install on their network computers for testing purposes. How would you install Terminal Services, and what is the easiest way to provide the IT staff with the client software?

You would install Windows 2000 Terminal Services by using the Windows Components wizard. You would
You would install Windows 2000 Terminal Services by using the
Windows Components wizard. You would share the appropriate folders
in systemroot\System32\Clients\Tsclient on the Terminal server and
allow the IT staff to connect to the shared folders to install the Terminal
Services client software.
4.
List two methods of making Terminal Services Client available to users.
You can create installation disks or share the folder that contains the
files on the Terminal server.
5.

You have five users who are connecting to a Terminal server. All of them are complaining that each time they connect to the server, the wallpaper and screensaver settings have changed, and sometimes their data files have been deleted. How can you resolve these problems?

You can configure the user account properties for each user to point to a different Terminal Services profile and home directory.