Sunteți pe pagina 1din 35

Scope and Sequence

2008-2009

The Humanities and Communication Magnet Program


Eastern Middle School
Montgomery County Public Schools
The Humanities and Communication Magnet Program
Montgomery County Public Schools • Montgomery County, Maryland

Introduction and Overview


Introduction to the Program......................................................... 2
A View of Excellence.................................................................. 4

Description by Grade Level


SIXTH Grade
Curriculum Summary.................................................................. 10
Scope and Sequence.................................................................... 12

SEVENth Grade
Curriculum Summary.................................................................. 18
Scope and Sequence.................................................................... 20
Matt Johnson, Coordinator
Stacey Vactor, Admissions Secretary EIGHth Grade
(301) 650-6654 • Magnet Office Curriculum Summary.................................................................. 26
Scope and Sequence.................................................................... 28
Eastern Middle School
300 University Blvd., East
Silver Spring, Maryland 20901
Charlotte Chakan Boucher, Principal
(301) 650-6650 • Main Office
The Humanities and Communication Magnet Program
An Introduction to the Program

T he Humanities and Communication Magnet Program is


one of the centers of innovation in the highly regarded
Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland. The 2008-
2009 academic year marks the twenty-third successful year
of the magnet program. This highly creative and effective
program for gifted children provides challenging learning
opportunities in a three year program for sixth, seventh, and
eighth grade students within Eastern Middle School.

THE PROGRAM
Designed around a strong interdisciplinary humanities
program, this magnet focuses on developing students’ ability
to use language and media effectively to present results of
their academic inquiry within the MCPS Program of Studies.
Students work in a creatively charged, technology-rich
environment in three areas of concentration: writing/litera-
ture, media production, and world studies.

2 Introduction
THE STAFF and forms--publication, presentation, dramatizations,
Teachers in the magnet program are selected for their prose, poetry, fiction, exposition, seminars and debate to
strong academic backgrounds, outstanding teaching skills, name representative samples. As teachers apply rigor-
and enthusiastic commitment to the concept of a humani- ous standards to student work, students develop their
ties and communication magnet program. Their expertise own high expectations for their academic achievement
is augmented by distinguished speakers, guest lecturers, and learning standards which serve them in high school
local educational field trips, and the opportunity for na- and in subsequent academic experiences.
tional and international travel.
As part of the policy on gifted and talented education
in the Montgomery County Public Schools, magnet
THE CURRICULUM: SCOPE AND SEQUENCE programs create not only innovative curricula for highly
able and motivated students but also provide opportu- “The program gave me
This booklet illustrates a year of “scope and sequence” nities for staff throughout the county and state to take the sense that I could
of the Humanities and Communication curriculum. advantage of program developments. do anything
Although this version of the current curriculum was I set my mind to.”
compiled at the beginning of the 2008-2009 academic The Humanities and Communication Magnet staff pro-
year, it is a living document. Based on the MSDE and vide training locally and nationally, and they welcome Laila Aridi,
Humanities Class of 1990
MCPS curriculum, the Humanities program extends and visitors into their classrooms to discuss curriculum and Eastern Middle School,
expands the general education program. the latest discoveries of “what works and how to make it “at the reunion” July 5, 1998
happen.”
The sixth, seventh, and eighth grade magnet teachers are
constantly seeking to enrich and refine the curriculum, From its early days in the 1980’s, the Humanities and “In middle school the
develop original instructional units, create unique experi- Communication Magnet Program led the way in Mont- Magnet Program
ential projects, and incorporate into the program new and gomery County with interdisciplinary team models, gave me the time to
effective technology-based learning methods, teaching block schedules, interdisciplinary curriculum, and the explore, challenged
techniques, and instructional materials. All students in use of technology as a tool for research and presentation. me to dream my own
the magnet program enroll in a math and a science class Today the program continues by developing, refining,
appropriate to their academic ability, and all take a grade and sharing with other educators, locally and nationally, dreams, and provided
level physical education class. techniques for creating strong integrated curriculum, me with the education
outstanding educational field experiences, and product- to make those dreams
Additionally, throughout their three years at Eastern, centered instruction which extends beyond the walls of come true.”
students have the opportunity to take foreign language the classroom and into the community. Joel Neubauer,
classes, to enroll in a variety of arts or music electives, Humanities Class of 1995
Eastern Middle School,
and to take courses in journalism, computer technology, an interview conducted
a study of Constitutional Law, and other electives. Teachers and students are a community of learners, and for Magnetic Attractions
pride in excellence imbues the magnet program; excel- when he was a senior in
high school (1998)
lence is a value students carry with them beyond their
THE VISION three years at Eastern Middle School.
Mastery of challenging information, exposure to new
ideas, delight in learning, and the satisfaction of “I get it!”
are integral to the instructional program. So too is sharing
that knowledge with an audience in many different genres
Scope and Sequence 3
A View of Excellence
Scenes from the scrapbook

The Humanities and Communication Program is experiential


and results-based. Real-world, hands-on projects use com-
puter and media technology, which act as tutor and vehicle
to enrich learning and to present the results of academic
inquiry.

The program is filled with first-hand experiences: media Students have an opportunity to learn and
production, field trips, expert guest speakers, theatre perfor- perform all of the skills involved in TV/vid-
mances, museum visits, outdoor education, environmental eo production--scripting, directing, sound
treks, and a week-long learning experience in New York. engineering, mixing and editing, floor/stu-
dio managing, lighting, camera operation,
Following are a few pages from the Humanities and as well as on-camera hosting, reporting, and
Communication Program’s scrapbook. acting in and out of the studio.

4 Scrapbook
the medium is the message...

If you ever despair of


the quality of public
education, ...stand at a
lectern and field ques-
tions from roughly 100
kids in the [sixth grade]
Humanities and Com-
munication Magnet
program. Now that’s
a pack of bright young
people.”
Steve Twomey,
columnist
The Washington Post

8th grade students interviewing NBC host, Al Roker (September 2005)

The students of the Humanities and Communication Magnet


learn professional techniques and processes in fully equipped
TV/media studios. They have won prestigious national awards
for socially aware documentaries; their productions appear
regularly on local cable television.

Scope and Sequence 5


6 Scrapbook
unique opportunities...
Magnet students go to the source. They meet
distinguished people, conduct research, and
apply and test theories learned in the class-
room. Interviews with such luminaries as
Coretta Scott King, Stevie Wonder, John
Glenn, Bob Dole, Bill Clinton, Tom Clancey,
Vernon Jordan, Stone Phillips and Al Roker
exemplify the rich experiences students glean
in the extensions of the classroom instruction.

Appreciating the concept that students actually


learn the complex and the living more easily
than the simple and the general, the faculty
provides students with a wealth of opportuni-
ties to bring their studies to life.

Scope and Sequence 7


...and reaching beyond the walls

Students create products that reach


beyond the walls of Eastern Middle School.
They report, write, edit, and publish
contributions to MCPS Cable, locally-and
nationally-distributed print publications,
and Eastern’s student-produced newspaper,
and the Eastern web site and Ed-line.

8 Scrapbook
Eastern Students have won award
after award in media production and writing.
“She [my daughter]
Among them: has learned much
from you. She has learned
One of ten Presidential Environmental Youth about writing and literature, of
Awards for documentaries on the Chesapeake course, but, just as important,
Bay and “Trash, What a Waste,” on Mont- she has learned about integrity
gomery County’s waste problem. and perseverance and dig-
nity... you have made a real
difference in our lives.”
A coveted CINE award for the documentary,
“If You Change Your Mind”-
produced for and with a grant from the
National Institute of Drug Abuse--used for Ruth Powers,
drug awareness education. a magnet parent,
in an end of the year note to
her daughter’s Humanities
Recognition by the American Film Institute English teacher
for 6th grade animation projects.

Numerous winners in the National History


Day contest.

Annual winners in the Arena Stage’s Student


Playwrights Project competition.

Scope and Sequence 9


6
The creativity, scope, depth, and rigor of this
READING

Sixth Grade The 6th grade reading class strives to build a community that
learns together. Students read both assigned and self-selected
texts purposefully and critically across many genres. The
assigned texts have interdisciplinary ties to the world stud-
ies curriculum including the elements of civilization and
the Utopian ideal, the mythologies and histories of Ancient
Greece and Rome, and an examination of ancient Chinese
culture and the more recent Cultural Revolution. Students
work on reading strategies to better understand what ques-
tions a text is asking of them as well as what questions to ask
of a text. Students develop their vocabulary through use of a
text and in the context of the reading material.

ENGLISH
The English class emphasizes writing in support of the study
of literature and critical thinking. Hallmarks of the integrated
workshop model include self-assessment and individual goal-
setting, and opportunities for frequent response from teach-
ers, parents, and peers. Students conduct research, and write
creative, narrative, and expository pieces.
Introduction & Overview Specific instruction in group dynamics, roles within a group,

T
and appropriate group problem-solving occurs in English
he sixth grade year in the Humanities and class and is practiced in all magnet classes. Group leadership
Communication Magnet Program consists of is shared among several students since they have many small
four subjects: reading, writing, media, and world group events and assignments in their magnet middle school
experience. In accordance with the MCPS policy on grading
studies. The use of technology in research, writ-
and reporting, students within groups are individually as-
ing, and presentation is integrated into the curricu- sessed.
lum using computers, the media/television studio,
and the Global Access research hub in the media
center, as well as many off-site field experiences.

10 Sixth Grade
curriculum reflect the 6th grade teachers’ commitment to enlighten, challenge, and nurture.
MEDIA A fully integrated interdisciplinary unit on Ancient Greece
and Rome culminates in a Greco-Roman festival. Students
Media classes are hands-on, process-oriented, and product-
dress in Greek or Roman costumes and portray historical
based. Students explore a variety of media-related topics
and mythological characters.
including creative dramatics, radio, film and animation,
advertising, TV/video production, the history of communica- “We can’t say enough
tion technology, and media literacy. One highlight of the year A unit on Asia includes an exploration of Asian civilizations. about the benefits
is the creation of student-produced episodes of an educational A literary analysis of The Good Earth and Red Scarf Girl offer of the Humanities
TV game show, the best of which air annually on the MCPS contrasting views of China. The first is a fictional account program for our son...
cable station. Experiences in media literacy are paramount as of China during the 1920’s; the second is an autobiogra- He was challenged
we challenge students to become savvy consumers of media phy of a young girl who recounts her experience during the and motivated in all
and reflective communicators in a technology-rich, global Cultural Revolution. academic areas. He
society. was nurtured and men-
Numerous other connections among subjects are made dur- tored by a few special
ing the year. Only a few highlights are presented here. teachers...He formed
WORLD STUDIES an incredibly close-knit
The Humanities program infuses the MCPS world studies peer group comprised
curriculum with additional depth and rigor. Students engage THE CURRICULUM: SCOPE AND SEQUENCE of a diverse group of
in reflective thinking and decision-making as they participate grounded, talented,
The scope and sequence presented here was developed by
and very special kids.
in experiential activities such as historical simulations and de- the sixth-grade Humanities teachers prior to the 2008-2009
bates. These activities and the research required of students in school year and is intended as a work in progress. The It’s not clear which is
their preparation provide a rich foundation for further study topics, concepts, skills, and activities listed are neither fully stronger, the innova-
in the social sciences and the humanities. definitive nor exhaustive. Research and development of the tive curriculum or the
sixth-grade curriculum are ongoing as teachers take advan- fantastic faculty who
tage of the availability of speakers, field trips, and other deliver it...Eastern
INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS/EVENTS
unique opportunities for enrichment with new technolo- represents the best in
While studying these individual disciplines, the students gies, techniques, and materials. public education in a
examine several thematic strands that run through all their democratic society...it
courses: the history of communication, the communication represents the future of
of history, and the role of the storyteller/historian. Major America.
interdisciplinary units focus on in-depth studies of the his-
former magnet program
torical, literary, and cultural heritage of Greece, Rome, and parent
Asia, as well as utopian literature and societies. The Utopian
unit examines works such as The Giver, by Lois Lowry, and a
comparison of leadership roles in various societies in Water-
ship Down.

Scope and Sequence 11


HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

INTERDISCIPLINARY READING ENGLISH WORLD STUDIES


ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS/CONCEPTS

SEPTEMBER
Collaboration skills Gathering Blue Reading log World Geography
Critical essays Watership Down Writing process
Presentation skills Elements of culture
Examining Literary Building a community of Six traits of writing
Elements of literature:
BCR writing Genres learners Elements of civiliza-
Characterization Summarizing
Grammar skills Plot tion
The Giver by Lois Journal writing
Setting Collaboration Ancient patterns of
Goal setting Lowry Utopian concepts
Theme settlement
and her “Newbery Categorization
Time management Award Acceptance Cultural Elements in Fahrenheit 451
Elements of litera- Sumer, Egypt, Indus
Speech” literature
Group dynamics Historical utopias ture River Valley
Literature featuring Research/writing on
characters’ names names
Significance of names in
literature
Grammar, mechanics,
usage
OCTOBER
Science Fiction/Utopia Genre study: Compare and contrast Similarities and Elements of ancient
Peer-review differences
novels Science fiction Egyptian civilization
Note-taking Hero’s journey
Writing to persuade
Outlining Compare/contrast Propaganda Economic, social, and
ECR writing Short stories & poems Informative writing political systems
“The Pedestrian” Ambiguous endings Short Stories organization, support,
Research skills “Harrison Bergeron” connotation, denota-
“Old Glory” tion Utopian concepts
Socratic seminar “The Forecast” “The Veldt”
Critical analysis
Vocabulary building Utopia & technology Revision, editing, im-
Grammar The Messenger age analysis, research
Suspension of disbelief skills

NOVEMBER
Animal Farm Analysis of literary Essay formats Oral presentation Citizenship and gover-
Peer review nance in classical and
elements: theme &
Editing descriptive language Satire modern times
Speech writing
Revision Utopian case study Students as citizens
Vocabulary in context
Vocabulary building Character speech Elements of Rights and responsibili-
reasoning ties
Grammar
Role of government

12 Sixth Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

WORLD STUDIES (Cont’d) MEDIA PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Construct and interpret Me, Middle School, & Media Team building Journal entries *(ID) Team Building at Smith Center (ID)
graphs, charts, databases, and
thematic maps using map The Media Time line Brainstorming Learning modalities (M)
elements Me and Media CD case (M)
Storytelling Problem-solving Model Classroom (E)
Analyze geographic charac- Personal flag (WS)
teristics that influence Creativity and imagery
location of human activities Personal stories (M)
Listening Naming ceremony (ID/R)
Analyze population growth Analytical essay (WS)
and settlement patterns Storytelling
Sumer simulation (WS)
Code of Hammurabi (WS)
simulation

Research The Printing Press Historical perspective of the


impact of media on society/in- Egypt research project (WS)
Identifying sources The Newspaper dividuals Journal entries (ID)
Crediting sources Types of advertising
Advertising Print Ad (M)
Note-taking Creating an ad Reading Reflections (R)
Organizing notes Introduction to radio
Short Story (R)
Oral Presentation Vocal qualities
- volume Utopia Conference (ID)
- eye contact How newspapers operate

ID rights and Radio Historical perspective Journal entries (R)


responsibilities Writing pieces (R/E)
Audio production
Class radio show (M)
Identification/use of audio produc-
tion equipment Radio ad and segment (M)
Create a class radio show Vision of Utopia Project (R/E)

Scope and Sequence 13


* subject area of product, event, or field trip: ID=Interdisciplinary, R=Reading, E=English, WS=World Studies, M=Media
HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

INTERDISCIPLINARY READING ENGLISH WORLD STUDIES


ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS/CONCEPTS

DECEMBER
Greek mythology Elements of Ancient Greek mythology Elements of Geographic characteris-
Research/organization skills tics of Greece:
Greek culture reasoning Athens and Sparta
Collaboration skills Writing for entertain-
Exposition - mythology ment Oratory Citizenship in Athens
and Sparta
Vocabulary building
Summarizing Children’s Homer Describe the decline of
Grammar prosperity and gover-
nance of Athens and
Note-taking Modern interpretations Sparta
of Greek mythology
Disunity with and among
city-states
Rise of the Roman
Republic
Describe how geograph-
ic features of Italy led to
expansion of trade routes
and rise of Rome

JANUARY
Vocabulary building Greek mythology Elements of Ancient Greek mythology Research skills Unifying the expanding
Roman Empire
(cont’d) Greek culture (cont’d)
Grammar Symbolic representations Characteristics of Concept of citizenship
Greek theater Greek oratory of characters the epic in the Roman Empire

Public services (roads,


Presentation skills Hero archetypes aqueducts, etc.)

Internet research How Rome Evolved


from Republic to
Empire
Decline of the Roman
Empire

Read to understand culture Expository writing


FEBRUARY
Vocabulary building Lady of Ch’iao Kuo Language of literary The impact of economics:
Change and continuity in
Comparative short story analysis China
Grammar analysis
Annotation Fundamental economic
Narrative structures principles

14 Sixth Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

WORLD STUDIES (Cont’d) MEDIA PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Compare political, The Beginning of Historical perspective “3 minute Myths” (R/E)


economic, and social Photography
systems
Photographic and film Camera Obscura (M)
Locate and label map principles/history
features Sun photo print (M)

Photo Essay (M)

Examine how: Film/Animation Pre-production Journal entries (R)


Political structure enabled (Scripting, storyboarding
unification art development) Writing pieces (R/E)
Unified Rome
Book review (R)

Animation design (M)

Greek and Roman (ID)


Wax Museum

Examine: scarcity, organi- Film/Animation Production/post Zoetrope, flip book, (M)


zation for production and (cont’d) production: visual editing, film and computer
distribution, interdepen- sound editing animation
dence, and role of resource Annotation (M)
allocation

Scope and Sequence 15


HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

INTERDISCIPLINARY READING ENGLISH WORLD STUDIES


ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS/CONCEPTS

MARCH
The Good Earth Literary discussion skills Chinese poetry Socratic seminar Geographic characteris-
Vocabulary building tics of China
Compare and contrast
Grammar Asian short stories Novel to film Using literature to Regional differences
Discussion formats understand culture and geographic impact
Cultural comparisons on culture
Red Scarf Girl
Shang and Zhou dynas-
Chinese philosophers ties, concept of the
Mandate of Heaven,
dynastic cycle

Confucianism, Taoism
and Legalism.

Chinese philosophies
and their relationship to
political systems

APRIL
Classic Television Narrative writing Performance skills The Silk Road expands
Vocabulary building Analysis and recitation China’s economy
Plays
Grammar Character development Poetry Close reading Relationship between
Play Structure the Han Dynasty and
the Silk Road
Playwriting conventions Diction analysis
Exchange of goods
between China, the
Middle East, Africa, and
Europe
MAY/JUNE
Miracle Worker Analysis and Recitation Twelfth Night End of year reflec- Cultural systems
Vocabulary building tion past and present

Grammar Pygmalion Collaboration Our Town Cultural synthesis of the


Acting, casting, world today
Collaboration Arsenic and Old Lace Drama skills Inherit the Wind directing, staging
Cultures in the first
millennium
Rehearsal process,
performance skills, Cultures in 2000 CE
teamwork
Cultural conflicts in
modern society

16 Sixth Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

WORLD STUDIES (Cont’d) MEDIA PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Map reading Television Philosopher letter (WS) Sackler Freer/Chinatown


Concept
Comparison/contrast Treatment Book review (E)
Format Game show set design (M)
Characterization Costume design (M)
Scripting
Advertisements (M)
Voice and movement
Socratic seminar (WS)
Shot composition
Camera movements
Storyboarding
Cooperative learning
Computer graphics

Citation of research sources TV Game Show Creation of educational TV Game shows (M)
show

Roles and responsibilities Dynasty research (ID)


project
Creativity

Organizational skills

Teamwork

Examine the relationship Me and Media: I am a savvy Application of Game shows (M)
between culture and social and
economic systems consumer of media production-process skills
One act play festival (R/E)
Define and identify seen and Production of TV Show
unseen aspects of culture Culture research (WS)
Media Literacy project
Apply the essential
question--

“How do political,
economic, and social systems
continuously influence the
culture of a region?”

Scope and Sequence 17


7
Understanding that students learn the complex

english

Seventh Grade English class provides students with a deepen-


ing understanding of literary themes, genre, and styles. We
begin the year with literature which supports the interdisciplin-
ary study of Europe at the time of World War I and World War
II. A study of the summer reading, All Quiet on the Western
Front, followed by a visit to the American Film Institute in
Silver Spring to view and discuss the film adaptation exemplify
the nature of the seventh grade magnet program. Such interdis-
ciplinary instruction is the cornerstone of our program. As the
year progresses, literature study spans many years and several
cultures, focusing on major literary texts and authors, poets, and
Seventh Grade playwrights.

Seventh grade English also affords students the unique oppor-


tunity to conduct an in-depth study of a self selected topic that
they research at the University of Maryland’s McKeldin Library.
The interdisciplinary research paper (IDRP) is a signature proj-
ect in seventh grade. The process allows students to develop
research skills that are imperative for scholarly level research.
At the end of this project, all seventh grade students will have
the tools needed to conduct original research in support of a
Introduction & Overview well defined thesis statement.

T
MEDIA
he seventh grade year in the Humanities and
Communication Magnet consists of three Media class uses a hands-on approach to further the develop-
ment of skills introduced in the 6th grade such as script writing,
subjects: English, world studies, and media. Sci- media literacy, and television production.
ence and mathematics also are represented on and
integrated with the seventh grade Humanities team. Media class includes the production of a half-hour interview
show, Personal Profiles, in which students interview a guest of
The use of technology in research, multimedia pre- their choice and practice each of the production positions such
sentation, and television production is integrated as director, audio engineer, and technical director.
into the curriculum using the computer lab, the
media/television studio, and classroom computers.

18 Seventh Grade
and the living more easily than the simple and general, the 7th grade team brings curricula to life.
Africafest is the project which brings cultures of Africa to
World Studies life in the classroom. Students choose or are assigned roles
in these dramas, and then determine from research what
The Humanities Program infuses the MCPS world stud- their characters cared about and believed in, what they did in
ies curriculum with additional depth and rigor. Students response to economic or political pressure, even what they
study the geography and history of Europe, Africa, and the wore, and how they lived. They then transform the class-
Americas focusing on the philosophical/religious founda- rooms into their time periods by creating sets and costumes.
tions of these cultures, using primary sources wherever In the final presentation, they express their characters’ ideas
possible. Parallel, literature-based units in English and through position papers, time lines, persuasive speeches, and
world studies focus on World War I, World War II, Latin narrative episodes.
America, Africa, and the Medieval and Renaissance Eu-
rope. Field trips to museums and culturally rich areas of “Three things are be-
the city add to the world studies experience. The Interdisciplinary Research Paper gives students an op-
portunity to choose a topic to research in depth, learn to write ing asked of [magnet]
clearly and appealingly, and then to collaborate with others students. One, greater
Science as they develop research papers into projects presented at responsibility for their
The goals of the science program are to create scientifically local, state, and national competition for National History own learning. Two,
literate students, make connections between science and Day. more time analyzing,
real life, foster an interest in science, and teach students synthesizing, and
the skills to teach themselves. The seventh grade curricu- evaluating. And three,
lum examines the scientific principles which serve as the to understand that
basis for the study of life. Lively and demanding projects the skills they learn
enhance students’ enjoyment and knowledge of science. in writing also apply
in science or art, for
INTerdisciplinary Programs/Events example, and con-
tribute to a mutually
The seventh grade team offers students opportunities to satisfying learning
bring their studies to life. Throughout the year, students experience.”
often work on projects which join two or more disciplines.
One of the most anticipated is the Shakespeare production Virginia Tucker,
former Humanities
in which students study Renaissance history in world stud- Program Coordinator in an
ies, television production in media, and a Shakespearean interview with the Gazette
play in English. newspapers

Another opportunity to understand complex ideas in the


context of historical time periods occurs in the Living
History unit. Here, English and world studies combine for
several weeks to bring to life a selected episode in history
e.g. World War I, the Middle Ages, or Russia: 1917.

Scope and Sequence 19


HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

ENGLISH MEDIA WORLD STUDIES


INTERDISCIPLINARY
ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS

SEPTEMBER Students design a hand-


Develop research and note- All Quiet On the Expository and out that complements WWI: nationalism,
Aesthetics of IDRP thesis
taking strategies Western Front Literary Analysis their presentation of an industrialism,
essay presentation assigned, research topic colonialism
WWI Poetry Socratic Seminar
Implement time and calendar Write an expository Communication Group constructed
All Quiet on the Western
management strategies Front
Introduction to Inter- essay effectively using model communication model
disciplinary Research the six traits of writing that shows the elements Five themes of
Practice critical thinking and Paper (IDRP) of communication and geography
reading by analyzing text for Write about All Quiet Film Analysis how they relate
multiple perspectives Portfolios and Journals on the Western Front Cultural identity,
and WWI poetry Dialectical Montage historical and contempo-
rary perspectives
Self and peer evaluation Six traits of writing exercise
Compare and contrast
work that is expressed WWII - key events
OCTOBER
Define and develop Research IDRP Architecture Graphic layout of
IDRP in both literature and and turning point,
personal and social role in group topic and create political structure
Research cards films propaganda, anti-
projects: responsibility and bibliography and Semitism, abuse of and global pow-
respect Expository writing Propose memorial power, and techno-
resource cards ers in 1939
designs to the Mary- logical advances
Research, categorize, and evalu- Holocaust land-National Capital
ate evidence for understanding of All But My Life and Organize research Park and Planning The Moon is Down
history, culture, and relationships “All My Sons” Commission

NOVEMBER
Role play IDRP rough draft Write IDRP rough Speech Write an original Cultural diffusion Africafest
Problem Solving and outlines in Africa: politi-
draft and outline suspenseful tale cal systems, tribal
Critical thinking that is presented in traditions, and oral
African folklore Africa perfor- class history
Read, respond to, and write storytelling, poetry,
art, and music mances and
about culture that is reflected Things Fall Apart
in literature/short stories persuasive essay
Cry, the Beloved Anti-apartheid
Country movement

DECEMBER
Write final draft of Students Case studies from IDRP completed
Develop diplomatic Editing and Revising Portrayal of Latin America
perspective and negotiation strategies IDRP create a multime-
minorities in the
through evaluation of evidence IDRP final draft
media dia presentation National History Day
Portfolio that details their
Latin American literature preparation
Use public speaking
Conference/
findings
Evaluation Latin America: land,
Apply abstract thinking labor, and exploitation

20 Seventh Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

MATHEMATICS SCIENCE PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

IM ALGEBRA I TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Statistical Applications: Observations Details, application and Metrics mania (S) Newseum
One variable equations design
Sampling and inequalities Scientific method Spreadsheets, graphs (X)
Data Analysis Convert SI units
Statistical Measures Solve open sentences Metrics Choose IDRP Topic (ID)
Survey Project
Recognize, formulate Chaucerfeast (E)
and solve open
sentences modeling
real world situations

IDRP Research Cards (ID)


Set Theory: Linear functions Light and sound Waves McKeldin Library
Construct scatter plots
Intro to set theory & & best fit lines Socratic Seminar: (WS)
venn diagrams Write linear equations Energy All Quiet on the Western
Number lines & rosters Relate slope and Front
Probability using intercept with
transformations Transference Create musical (S)
venn diagrams Use graphing
Venn diagrams and instruments
calculators and
number systems computers

Real Number Systems: Linear equations and Seasons-- Socratic Seminar: (WS) Holocaust Museum
Earth - space Things Fall Apart
inequalities in two
Mathematical Sun relationships
properties variables
Rational numbers Earth
Powers and exponents
Solar system

Systems of equations Cells/organelles Cellular structure and “Eggsperiment” (S) National Gallery of Art
Real Number Systems: analogies (East Gallery)
and inequalities
Microscopes Microscope labs (S)
Powers of ten Operate microscope African Art Museum
Roots and powers
Ratios and proportional Africafest (ID)
reasoning

Scope and Sequence 21


* subject area of product, event, or field trip: ID=Interdisciplinary, E=English, M=Media, WS=World Studies, X=Mathematics, S=Science
HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGLISH MEDIA WORLD STUDIES


ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS

JANUARY
Students weigh benefits and Latin American Art and culture Students tell a A symposium on the Latin America
drawbacks of group projects story through impact of explora- historical outline
short stories tion, colonialism
shape and shading and imperialism on
Research and expository indigenous people of Icons Economics
writing the Americas Simulation
(cont’d)
The Motorcycle
Diaries

Milagro Bean Field


War
FEBRUARY
Public speaking Magic Realism Creative writing: Animation Students will examine Economics: Eastern’s
short story the problem of bullying introduction to key National History Day
Analysis of Latin
through research, class terms and vocabu- competition
Analyze multiple sources and readings, discussions,
lary
explore historical interpreta- American authors play acting, and journal Demonstrate ex-
reflections.
tion and multiple perspectives pertise of research
Students will work in topic through
groups as a production display, documen-
team to produce cel tary, performance,
animated public service or web site
announcements
MARCH
Teamwork and leadership Middle Ages One Act Play Continuation of Middle Ages
skills The Canterbury Festival animation
Tales Feudalism: control of
production land and power
Community Outreach
Intro to Drama, play- Development of
Public speaking writing, dramatic nationalism throughout
structure, and acting the Middle Ages
terminology
APRIL
Integrate technology in Shakespeare Television Profiles storyboard, Renaissance and the Research paper on
research: overcome technol- research and Age of Exploration
Production confirmation of a “Age of Enlighten-
ogy fears Introduction, history,
of Globe Theatre guest ment and Reason”
Technology and media skills and world impact

Performance presentation A Midsummer


Night’s Dream

22 Seventh Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

MATHEMATICS SCIENCE PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

IM ALGEBRA I TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Geometry: Review Mitosis Differentiate mitosis Microorganism cartoon American Indian Museum
and meiosis (S)
Congruency v. Meiosis
Semester Exam 1A
similarity DNA/RNA Animal cube (ID)
Constructions Metacognition
Angles Genes (dominance/
Biography of (WS)
Pythagorean theorem recessiveness)
Volume Renaissance characters
Surface area

Patterns, Relations, and Data analysis and Hereditary material Survey distinguishing Human Genomics Van (S)
Functions: probability characteristics
DNA model (S)
Patterns and sequence Formulate theories for One Act Play (E)
Relations adaptations Festival
Functions
Applications Relate structure, func- Eastern National (WS)
tion, habitat History Day

The Language of Exponents and Genetics/Pedigrees Fuse science concepts Travel Writing (E)
Algebra: polynomials into a written and
illustrated piece Regional (WS)
History Day
Combine like terms
Linear functions Pedigrees, punnett One Act Plays (E)
Rate of change squares, karyotype
Direct and inverse Paper pet project (S)
variation Replication/mutations

Quadratic functions: National Cathedral


Lines of Fit: Disease Benefits vs. harmful Disease project (S)
effects (bacteria)
Identify zeros from a
Equations graph; Solve the cor- Viruses
Inequalities responding equation;
Ubiquity of bacteria
Literal equations Identify transformations Bacteria
Defend position
of quad. functions;
(viruses living?)
Connect real world &
quad. equations

Scope and Sequence 23


HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGLISH MEDIA WORLD STUDIES


ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS

MAY
Interpersonal skills developed, Student-selected Shakespeare “Personal Profiles” Students will rotate Continue study of Middle Ages and
speaking with adults performance through each of the European transition Renaissance fair
Shakespeare production
production positions
performance from Renaissance
to produce a thirty to 1900
minute live-to-tape
Multicultural interview show that
literature - each student has an
opportunity to host
Immigration and with the guest of
family relationships their choice.

JUNE
Multicultural Portfolio exhibition Continuation Revisit Globaliza-
Class diplomacy literature (cont’d) and final evaluation of television tion and U.S. influ-
production ence
Group work
Poetry and creative
writing

Portfolios

24 Seventh Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

MATHEMATICS SCIENCE PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

IM ALGEBRA I TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Other functions:
Other Operational Become familiar with dif- National Monuments
ferent formats for functions- Food energy Shakespeare plays (ID)
Systems:
graph, a written rule or f(x) pyramids
notation Computer (W/S)
Modular arithmetic Simulation:
Bases Different functions in real
world problems; including Latin America
exponential, absolute value
and rational

HSA - High School


Assessment

Probability: Review for semester Living History (ID) AFI - Final Conference
exam Biogeochemical
presentation
Outcomes cycles
Permutation v. Final Semester 1B
combination Exam
Odds Biomes
Simulations

Scope and Sequence 25


8
Building upon skills developed in 6th and 7th grades,

Eighth Grade
US HISTORY
Students explore early US History from the development of
America as a nation of immigrants through the various eras
to the American Civil War and Reconstruction. They go
beyond studying our history­ – they experience it and then
develop ways to apply those experiences to past and more
recent historical events. For example, students re-create
the Constitutional Convention of 1787 taking on the roles
of the participating characters following the standards of
parliamentary procedure. As they develop their powers of
observation, research, description, and analysis, students
learn to empathize with different people in different situa-
tions. In culminating activities, they then must substanti-
ate their conclusions or solutions through written or oral
presentations.

AMERICAN LITERATURE I
The study of American Literature at the 8th grade level
melds writing with the intensive, analytical study of litera-
Introduction & Overview ture. Texts cover a broad scope of topics. America’s finest
writings are a reflection of Western European culture, val-

T
ues, and style. The study continues with an examination of
he eighth grade year includes a core of United primary source documents to introduce our political writ-
States History, American Literature, and ing. The literature of the 19th century establishes Ameri-
media courses with study in integrated math and ca’s literary independence with the birth of the Romantics
science classes, creating a fully interdisciplinary ap- and the struggles faced by freed blacks after the American
proach. Elective opportunities are available, includ- Civil War. Teachers encourage students to focus on per-
ing foreign language and music classes. Courses ceiving, understanding, synthesizing, and interpreting.
Throughout the year, students work to further master skills
implement current technology by utilizing resources related to research writing, reflective journaling, persuasive
in computer labs, the media/television studio, and writing, expressive writing, poetry writing, analytical/inter-
the Global Access research hub in the pretive writing, and writing for publication.
media center and the classroom.

26 Eighth Grade
8th grade students examine the human experience firsthand from multiple perspectives.

“A significant rea-
son I love my job
MEDIA FINAL CONFERENCE is that the teach-
Students launch the eighth grade year with an intense field The final interdisciplinary highlight of the year is a stu- ers, students, and
production unit. Student teams gather video footage at a dent-developed conference: Final Conference. Students larger community
variety of key locations in New York City. Student teams work intensively in their history, literature, math, sci- of Eastern Middle
ence, and media classes to prepare for this event. In all School share an
hone production and editing skills throughout the year as underlying belief
they work together to create the informative, magazine- classes, students pose questions, develop theses, conduct that drives our
format TV show, “Media Montage.” In addition, students research, analyze data, and create original presentations work: that high
address a variety of topics throughout the year, including that revolve around the intricacies of a contemporary academic achieve-
performance and presentation and creating multimedia. issue in a historical and modern-day context. Guided ment is a worthy
Students address issues of graphic design, communication by their teachers, a student leadership group is respon- goal, that it is not,
of message, technical production, as well as media and sible for planning, organizing, and promoting the all-day nor should be
visual literacy. conference. easy, and that the
delight that true
Interdisciplinary units that take place throughout the year accomplishment
include the Great Debate, the Constitutional Convention, brings serves the
Interdisciplinary Programs/Events and the creation of original storybooks. individual and the
Students examine perspectives of the human experience larger academic
throughout history as they delve into the individual dis- community. Yes,
ciplines as writers, researchers, and communicators. The THE CURRICULUM: SCOPE AND SEQUENCE this is hard work,
year begins with a fully integrated field study of New York but it is great fun
The scope and sequence presented here was developed as well! And once
City. A literary and historical analysis of the historical fic- by the eighth-grade Humanities teachers prior to the accomplished,
tion Time and Again by Jack Finney immerses students in 2008-2009 school year and is intended as a work in prog- the student may
the process of interpreting characterization and historical ress. The topics, concepts, skills, and activities listed are look back and say,
events. Throughout the learning experience, the city comes neither fully definitive nor exhaustive. ‘Yes, I did earn
alive as students analyze the urban metropolis through that achievement!’
personal, historical, and literary experience. Students learn While the eighth grade year is built upon the academic Teachers and
that New York City has always been and continues to be a themes that thread throughout the program, we also students bring this
cultural and historical center of the United States. work to lead and challenge the students in terms of their belief to life.”
academic skills in preparation for high school and in
An in-depth analysis of antebellum America becomes a their leadership and collaboration skills. The full scope -- Brigid Hagarty,
learning experience designed to encourage students to wres- and sequence of the year reflects the teachers’ dedication former Humanities and
tle with the implications of the time immediately preceding to the academic development, stimulation, and foster- Communication
the Civil War. To prepare for this event, students read and ing of the students’ abilities and potential. We work as Magnet Program
evaluate the texts Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Narrative of the an instructional team guiding students to see their ac- Coordinator
Life of Frederick Douglass, and various primary source ma- complishments not as conclusions but as building blocks
terials. Their analysis provides an opportunity for students from which to seek higher challenges.
to further develop skills of logic and reason in relation to
historical and literary perspectives throughout time.

Scope and Sequence 27


HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

AMERICAN LITERATURE MEDIA US HISTORY


INTERDISCIPLINARY
ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS

SEPTEMBER
Time and Again Descriptive writing Media perspec- Expectations, brain- Historiography Distinguish between
immigration and
Critical reading and tives storming, interviewing emigration causes
interpretation Poetry Narrative writing techniques, research A Nation of
and text The art of skills Identify family history
Research Immigrants and the various
Preparation for the interview for - Annapolis nationalities that settled
New York City trip Figurative language, storytelling Camcorder skills, shot
Informal presentation Field Trip America
format, imagery, novel composition, teamwork
conventions, and Field production Examine New York’s
Time management poetic devices Leadership, letter- New York immigrant tradition
Collaboration with peers The art of the writing, (Culminating Determine how New York
Critical interpretation pitch with NY continually has changed
Identifying and creating ENG production educational and continues to evolve
goals Vocabulary, field trip)
etymology, grammar,
OCTOBER Assess European
New York City Writing as a mode to Post-production Working as a produc-
convey experience Colonization exploration and
Expressive writing poetry tion team, ENG colonization of Americas
production, critiquing and effect on native
Historical fiction as a Editing footage The Age of peoples
Critical reading and The Crucible reflection of society Evaluate long-term and
interpretation Revolutions
Studio production Edit techniques, short-term causes of the
Puritan Literature Interdisciplinary unit American Revolution
dubbing, logging,
Time management with Media transcribing
Consider historical events
from various
Organization perspectives
Writing and speaking Reviewing studio jobs, Assess how America’s
to persuade writing a resume/cover revolutionary ideas were
Persuasion letter, debate topic implemented in France
selection and Latin America

NOVEMBER
Examination of Script-writing, Forming the 1787 Constitutional
Constitutional Editing Convention simulation--
Reflective journaling change as exemplified rehearsal process, United States
Convention by 19th century es- ID unit with English
(w/ History) Post-production studio production Government (research, debate,
Research sayists, novelists, and roles and skills, set collaborate, and compro-
activities mise pursuant to parliamen-
Television design Solidifying the
Note-taking William and Mary tary procedures)
Research using pri- Pre-production New Republic
Threads of Change Voice quality,
Time management mary sources
Performance gesture, script Washington’s presidency
Public speaking ID unit with techniques analysis, speaking
US History: Role to an audience, Other early U.S. leaders
play, character devel- persuasive speech
opment Political precedents

28 Eighth Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

MATHEMATICS SCIENCE PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

HONORS GEOMETRY ALGEBRA TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Foundations of Equations and Weather Unit Analysis and New York (M) Annapolis Field Trip (H)
Geometry Inequalities in a Single Cloud Identification interpretation of data ENG shoot
Variable
Points, lines & planes New York City Field Trip (ID)
Solve linear equations/ Journal during NYC
Construct/draw geometric inequalities (including trip
figures using various tools absolute value problems)
Construct transforma- Describe solutions using Meteorology:
tions using compass and numbers, symbols, graphs Natural disasters
straight edge
Real World contexts
(throughout year)

Reasoning in Geometry Introduction to Meteorology Use of models to


Functions (cont’d) predict weather
Use inductive/deductive
reasoning in flow charts, Write/graph linear
two column and equations
paragraph proofs
Relate slope and intercept
with transformations

Use graphing calculators


and computers

Linear Equations and Solutions/mixtures Gather, analyze, and Magazine show: (M)
Polygons Inequalities in Two
Variables interpret data “Media Montage”
(pre-production)
Analyze properties of Direct variation
polygons Constitutional (E/H)
Write and apply the Line Convention
and Curve of Best Fit
Identify/verify properties
using slope, distance, and
midpoint formulas
Write transformations in
algebraic form

Scope and Sequence 29


* subject area of product, event, or field trip: ID=Interdisciplinary, E=English, M=Media, H=History, X=Mathematics, S=Science
HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

AMERICAN LITERATURE MEDIA US HISTORY


INTERDISCIPLINARY
ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS

DECEMBER
ID Unit w/ Media Set design/
Critical reading and The Great Debate Intro to television construction, Developing into Contrast Jefferson’s and
interpretation skills Hamilton’s competing
Analyzing great production studio production a Nation philosophies
Enlightenment speeches in history (early 1800’s)
Presentation (w/ US History)
Public speaking Interpreting classic
elements of argument
Research (pathos, logos, and
ethos)

JANUARY
William and Mary Examination of yearly The Great Debate Television War of 1812 Explain the emergence
Analytical thinking skills “Threads of Change” themes as exemplified
by 19th century
production of American national-
Intro to Individual ism
essayists, novelists, A Rapidly
Critical interpretation skills Media Project Creating personally
Literary Thesis paper and activists Changing Cul- Compose a research
significant work, tural Landscape
Time management writing
paper on a chosen
Begin Final History as an influence Television News Jacksonian era topic
on literature Show NYC about a paradoxical
Conference projects Televised news aspect of America’s
Use of literary magazine format growth
elements
FEBRUARY Print Media
Adventures of Style and voice Bookmaking, Westward expansion Determine historical causes
Storytelling
Research Huckleberry Finn illustration, layout and effects; Compare &
contrast historical eras
Realism Culminating ID
Note-taking IMP: Review by self
Assessment and Unit: Final
and peer Collaborate with peers to
meeting time frame Conference
Critical reading and writing Studio production preparation create an interdisciplinary
(cont’d) (History/Media/ analysis of yearly themes
Presentation Roll-in concepts,
timing, teamwork Literature) (Final Conference)
MARCH
Causes of the Reconstruct moral,
Uncle Tom’s Cabin Interview skills Print Media Plan for IMP Civil War economic and political ten-
Collaboration with peers
(cont’d) exhibition sions that led to Civil War
Identifying and creating goals Narrative of the Evaluating elements Civil War
Examine motivations
Life of Frederick of historical fiction IMP: Creating for and consequences of
Time management
Douglass Media for individual actions
Organization Determine historical Exhibition
Research fiction’s validity and
social impact
Analytical writing

30 Eighth Grade
2008 - 2009 SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

MATHEMATICS SCIENCE PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

HONORS GEOMETRY ALGEBRA TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Congruence Systems of Equations The Great Debate (E)


Chemical + physical
Continue analysis of polygons and Inequalities reactions
Use transformations to Describe the solutions to
demonstrate properties equations and inequalities Law of Conservation
involving congruence, of Matter
similarity and symmetry Describe the graph
of a system of linear
Identify congruent and similar relationships
figures and verify using deduc-
tive reasoning

Review for Exam Review for Exam


Chemistry Design of scientific “Media Montage” (M)
Data Analysis and Probability
Indirect Measurement experiment
Apply right-triangle to Matrices Individual Media
trigonometry; special right
Design an investigation Analyze, interpret, Project (IMP) (M)
triangles; Geometric mean
describing the method of data communicate data
Use measurement to collection and justifying
calculate and compare two Bias, simple random
and three dimensional figures sampling, central tendency,
and their parts variability; Communication
about use/misuse of Statistics
Three Dimensional Continuation of Data Analysis
Geometry and Measurement and Probability Chemistry (cont’d) Storybook project (M)
Represent and analyze Begin exponents &
geometric solids and spheres polynomials; IMP (cont’d) (M)
Description of solids rotated Operations on algebraic
expressions; Simplification
about a line using the laws of exponents;
Polynomials, +, -, x, and divi-
Similarity applied to sion of polynomial factoring
area/volume

Similarity Continue exponents Earth’s history IMP (cont’d) (M)


and polynomials
Reflections, rotations,
translations and dilations Geology

Similarity applied to parts,


area, volume and indirect
measurements

Scope and Sequence 31


HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATION MAGNET PROGRAM

AMERICAN LITERATURE MEDIA US HISTORY


INTERDISCIPLINARY
ACADEMIC SKILLS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS

Civil War
APRIL Explain what enabled
Civil War Era Analysis of his- Production of Studio production (cont’d) the north to win the war
Analytical thinking skills documents torical fiction and “Media Montage”
primary source Analysis of (includes the Determine how the pur-
Research organization pose of the war changed
documents Documentary historical films/ Civil War over time
Collaboration with peers Studies: photos field trip)
Remembering Explain Reconstruction
Leadership skills policies, reasons and
History Through Reconstruction
Media effects
April 1865
MAY
The Secret Life of Voice and perspec- Documentary Locating and Reconstruction
Critical reading and Bees tive Studies using primary (cont’d)
interpretation (cont’d) source materials to
Personal reflection Elements of create media
historical fiction
Organization of notes
Civil Rights stories
Studying skills

JUNE
Final Conference Oral presentation IMP: sharing Synthesis/ Presentation Present a Final
Leadership skills and written support- work summary of year’s Conference to peers,
Collaboration with peers ing exhibits themes County Exam teachers, MCPS staff,
Arts Alive parents and fam-
Compromise ID Culminating ily, and community
Final Conference Unit guests.
Time management
Analysis and synthesis of
research
Public speaking

32 Eighth Grade
MATHEMATICS SCIENCE PRODUCTS & EVENTS FIELD TRIPS

HONORS GEOMETRY ALGEBRA TOPICS SKILLS/CONCEPTS ALL SUBJECTS

Circles Begin Quadratic &


Rock cycle Use of scientific
Exponential Functions Print media Civil War (E/H)
Analyze parts of circles method and testing presentation at field trip
including radius, Properties of quadratic and Geology to identify and classify
diameter, chord, tangent, exponential functions Oakview ES (M)
secant, central/inscribed
rocks and minerals
Describe graphs of non-lin- Minerals/rocks,
angle, inscribed and ear functions and discuss
circumscribed; Locus of soil, weathering &
appearance erosion
points in two and three
dimensions; Arc length Compare and contrast the
and areas of segment and properties of functions
sectors

Trigonometry Continuation of Geology (cont’d) Analysis and interpre- IMP Exhibit (M)
quadratic and tation of scientific data
Law of Sines & exponential functions earthquakes and
Law of Cosines volcanoes Design of scientific
Algebra HSA experiments
Sine, cosine and tangent
for a rotational angle on Conducting scientific
the unit circle research

Vector addition

Review for exam Review for exam Plate tectonics/ Synthesis of ID Culminating (ID)
earthquakes experimental data Conference
Use of models to
communicate
information

Scope and Sequence 33