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ScrapBusters: Belt Pouch Holds Phone & More

Editor: Liz Johnson Tuesday, 30 April 2013 1:00

There are so many times you need two hands free (Look Ma... No hands!). So today we have a clever pouch you can slip on a belt. Anytime you need both hands to get a task done, this little organizer is great solution. It's perfect for urban walkers, Saturday antiquing adventures or just when you're trying to wrangle two toddlers down the block. Drop your smart phone in a pocket at the back and use the zippered front pocket to hold cash, change, credit cards or other necessities. We also incorporated a handy D-ring at the top to allow you to slip a key fob in place. Or, as we show above, snap on a caribiner and, rather than slipping the pouch over a belt, simply clip it to a belt loop or even onto another larger bag or pack for fast on-and-off access. Bust out some scraps to make today's fun pouch, then set your hands free for shopping, gardening, sewing, and talking my friends know I require both hands to carry on a conversation!

Sewing Tools You Need



Any Sewing Machine (we recommend the Janome Magnolia 7325) Zipper foot

Fabric and Other Supplies

The pouch finishes at approximately 6" tall (excluding the D-ring) x 3" wide.

Scrap or yard of heavy-weight fabric for the main front and back exterior; we used a scrap of 58-60" wide 100% cotton Waverly Cross Section in Charcoal - originally used in our project: Bucket Style Purse with Zipper Tape Trim Scrap or yard of medium to heavy weight fabric for the front accent triangle; we used a scrap of 45" wide Eco Twill in Charcoal - originally used in our project: Simply Color by Vanessa Christenson for Moda: Fold-over Tote Scrap or yard of quilting weight fabric for the lining; we used a scrap of 45" wide Cotton Couture in Black by Michael Miller Fabrics - originally used in our project: Janome Week: Quilted Bed Runner Scrap or yard of 20" wide lightweight fusible interfacing; we used Pellon's Shir-Tailor Scrap or yard of 1" twill tape; we used a scrap of 1" Chevron Twill Tape in Orange - originally used in our Project:Mother's Day with Fabric.com: Notepad Folder To Go ONE 1 plastic D-ring ONE 7" all-purpose zipper; we used orange 1" of " wide Velcro ONE 2" carabiner (optional) All purpose thread to match fabrics See-through ruler Fabric pen or pencil Iron and ironing board


1.

Scissors or rotary cutter and mat Tape measure Seam gauge Seam ripper Straight pins

Getting Started
Download and print the Belt Loop Pouch Pattern. IMPORTANT: This pattern download consists of ONE 8" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. Cut out each piece along the solid line. From the fabric for the main front and back exterior, cut the following: ONE 4" wide x 7" high rectangle Cut ONE, using the Pouch Bottom pattern From the fabric for the front accent triangle, cut ONE, using the Pouch Top pattern. From the fabric for the lining, cut TWO 4" wide x 7" high rectangles. From the interfacing, cut ONE 4" wide x 7" high rectangle. From the twill tape, cut ONE 8" length. Cut ONE 1" piece of Velcro.

2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board


Lining preparation
1. Find the two lining pieces and the Velcro.

2.

Place one half of the Velcro on the right side each of the lining pieces. The Velcro should be centered side to side (1" in from each side) and " down from the top raw edge. Pin in place.

3.

Edgestitch around all four sides of each piece of Velcro.

Back preparation

1.

Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the 4" x 7" interfacing piece to the wrong side of the 4" x 7" back exterior piece.

2. 3.

Place one lining piece WRONG sides together with the fused back exterior piece. This means the Velcro on the lining is facing out; it's not sandwiched between the layers. Place this pair flat on your work surface with the exterior side facing up.

4.

Using your see-through ruler, draw a vertical line down the center of the panel.

5.

Find the twill tape. Lightly fold the tape in half to find and mark its center point. Align the center of the tape with the center line of the panel. The end of the tape should be flush with the top of the panel (remember your lining is behind this panel, so the "top" is

the end with the Velcro). Pin the top end in place.

6.

Find the D-ring. Thread it onto the tape from the bottom, sliding it up towards the pin at the top.

7.

Machine baste the top end of the tape in place close to the raw edge.

8.

Now when you pull the D-ring up to the top, the raw edge kind of automatically folds back on itself... just like we'll want it to later. Good raw edge!

9.

Pin the bottom end of the tape to the bottom of the panel. NOTE: These layers should be flush just like the top. This means the tape will not lay quite flat against the panel - there will be a

little extra. This is correct. You need that extra to create the top loop and the "give" for a belt to slip into place.

10. Measure up 4" up from the bottom edge. Mark this point with a pin horizontally across the tape. Pin in place.

11. On one side of the tape, edgestitch from the bottom up to the pin, pivot and create a 2" "X-Box," pivot and edgestitch back down the opposite side of the tape.

12. Machine baste the lining to the back panel along both sides and across the bottom.

Front preparation
1. Find the the two angled front pieces you cut using the pattern.

2.

Along each angle, fold back the raw edge " and press in place.

3. 4.

Find the zipper. Place the folded edges along each side of the zipper. The top zipper stops (where the zipper pull comes to rest when closed) should be approximately " in from the left side of the panel. Pin the top and bottom sections i n place. The tail of the zipper will

extend beyond the right edge of the panel by several inches. This is fine; you'll trim away the excess when done stitching.

5.

Attach your Zipper foot.

6.

Carefully edgestitch both sides in place. You will need to open the zipper as you go in order to stay as close to the edge as possible.

7. 8.

Find the remaining lining piece. Place it wrong sides together with the front panel. As above with the back layering, make sure the Velcro is facing out. Reattach the regular presser foot.

9.

Baste layers together along both sides and across the bottom, staying within the seam allowance - or about " from the raw edge. Trim away the excess zipper when finished stitching.

Finishing
1. On both the front and back panels, fold back the top raw edge ". Press in place and lightly pin.

2.

Edgestitch in place.

3.

Here's what your finished front and back panels should look like prior to stitching them together.

4.

Pin the front and back right sides together along both sides and across the bottom.

5.

Using " seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom, remembering to pivot at the corners. Stitch another seam right next to the first seam to reinforce and finish the raw edges. We used a zig zag.

6.

Trim the seam allowance and clip the corners.

7.

Turn right side out. Push out the bottom corners with a long, blunt-end tool, such as a chopstick or knitting needle. Press flat.

8.

Turn down the top folded edge an additional " and pin.

9.

Pull the tape and D-ring up and out of the way. Topstitch all the way around the top securing the second fold. Go slowly and carefully; you want your topstitching to be nice and straight.

10. Attach the Zipper foot. Sew one additional short seam at the back across the tape at the very top edge. This helps secure and strengthen the loop for the D-ring.

Contributors Project Design: Alicia Thommas Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild 1K+

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