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Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Dr. Malek Mouhoub

Computer Science Department University of Regina Fall 2010

1. Algorithm Analysis

1. Algorithm Analysis

1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis
1. Algorithm Analysis 1. Algorithm Analysis • 1.1 Mathematics Review • 1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis

1.1 Mathematics Review

1.2 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

1.4 Case Study

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

1.1 Mathematics Review

1.1 Mathematics Review
1.1 Mathematics Review

1.1 Mathematics Review

1.1 Mathematics Review
1.1 Mathematics Review
1.1 Mathematics Review
1.1 Mathematics Review
1.1 Mathematics Review
1.1 Mathematics Review

Exponents

X A X B

X

A

X

B

( X A ) B

X N + X N

2 N + 2 N

X A + B

X A B

=

=

= X AB

= 2 X N = X 2 N

=

2 N +1

Logarithms

1.1 Mathematics Review

By default, logarithms used in this course are to the base 2.

X A = B log X B = A

log A B = log C B A , A, B, C > 0 , A = 1

log C

log AB = log A + log B ; A, B > 0

log A/B = log A log B

log

log X < X X > 0

log 1 = 0 , log 2 = 1 , log 1 , 024 =

( A B ) = B log A

, log 1 , 048 , 576 =

Summations


i=1 N a i = a 1 + a 2 + · · · + a N

lim N

Linearity

N i=1 a i =

i=1 a i = a 1 + a 2 + · · · (infinite sum)

=1 ( ca i + db i ) = c =1 a i + d

i

N

i

=1 Θ( f ( i )) = Θ( =1 f ( i ))

i

i

N

N

N

N

i =1 b i

General algebraic manipulations :

N

=1 f ( N ) = Nf ( N )

i

= n 0 f ( i) =

i

N

N

i=1 f ( i ) n 0 1

i

=1

f ( i )

1.1 Mathematics Review

Geometric series :

N

i

=0 A i =

Summations

A N +1 1

A

1

if 0 < A < 1 then

N

i =0 A i

1

1

A

Arithmetic series :

=1 i = N (N +1) = N 2 + N

N

i

2

2

N 2

2

N

=1 i 2 = N ( N +1)(2 N +1)

i

6

N 3

3

=1 i k N k +1

N

i

|k +1 |

k

= 1

if k = 1 then H N =

N 1

i =1

i

log e N

error in approx : γ 0 , 57721566

1.1 Mathematics Review

Products

N

i =1 a i = a 1 × a 2 × ··· × a N

N

N

log( =1 a i ) = i=1 log a i

i

1.1 Mathematics Review

Proof by induction

Proving statements

1.1 Mathematics Review

1. Proving a base case : establishing that a theorem is true for some small values.

2. Inductive hypothesis : the theorem is assumed to be true for all cases up to some limit

k .

3. Given this assumption, show that the theorem is true for k + 1

Proof by Counter example : find an example showing that the theorem is not true.

Proof by Contradiction : Assuming that the theorem is false and showing that this assumption implies that some known property is false, and hence the original assumption was erroneous.

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis
1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis
1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis
1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis
1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis
1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis
1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

Boss gives the following problem to Mr Dupont, a fresh hired BSc in

computer science (to test him

or may be just for fun) :

T (1) = 3 T (2) = 10 T ( n ) = 2 T ( n 1) T ( n 2)

What is T (100) ?

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

Mr Dupont decides to directly code a recursive function tfn, in Java, to solve the problem :

if (n==1) { return 3; } else if (n==2) {return 10;} else { return 2 tfn(n-1) - tfn(n-2); }

1. First mistake : no analysis of the problem

risk to be fired !

2. Second mistake : bad choice of the programming language

increasing the risk to be fired !

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

n

= 1

3

n

= 2

10

n

= 3

17

n = 35

it takes 4.19 seconds

n = 100

waits

and then kills the program !

Mr Dupont decides then to use C :

if (n==1) return 3; if (n==2) return 10; return 2 tfn(n-1) - tfn(n-2);

n

= 35

it takes only 1.25 seconds

n

= 50

waits and then kills the program !

seconds

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

Finally, Mr Dupont decides to (experimentally) analyze the problem : he times both programs and plots the results.

100

10

1

0.1

: he times both programs and plots the results. 100 10 1 0.1 Java C 25
Java C
Java
C
both programs and plots the results. 100 10 1 0.1 Java C 25 30 35 40
both programs and plots the results. 100 10 1 0.1 Java C 25 30 35 40

25

30

35

40

N

and plots the results. 100 10 1 0.1 Java C 25 30 35 40 N It

It seems that each time n increases by 1 the time increases by 1.62. At n = 40

the C program took 13.79 seconds, so for n = 100 he estimates :

13 .79 × 1 .62 60 1 , 627 , 995 years !!!

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

Mr Dupont remembers he has seen this kind of problem in one of the courses he has taken (data structures course).

After consulting his course notes, Mr Dupont decides to use Dynamic Programming :

int t[n+1];

t[1]=3;

t[2]=10;

for(i=3;i¡=n;i++)

t[i] = 2 t[i-1] - t[i-2]; return t[n];

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

This solution provides a much better complexity in time but despite of the space complexity :

n = 100 takes only a fraction of a second,

but for n = 10 , 000 , 000 (a test that may make the boss happy if it succeeds) a segmentation fault occurs. Too much memory required.

Mr Dupont analyses the problem again :

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

there is no reason to keep all the values, only the last 2 :

if (n==1) return 3; last = 3; current = 10; for (i=3;i< = n;i++) { temp = current; current = 2current - last; last = temp; } return current;

At n = 100,000,000 it takes 3.00 seconds

At n = 200,000,000 it takes 5,99 seconds

at n = 300,000,000 it takes 8.99 seconds

How to solve such problems ?

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

1. Analyze the problem on paper in order to find an efficient algorithm in terms of time and memory space complexity.

(a)

First look at the problem :

 

T

(1)

=

3

T

(2)

=

10

T

(3)

=

17

T

(4)

=

24

T

(5)

=

31

 

Each step increases the result by 7.

 

(b)

Guess : T ( n) = 7 n 4

(c)

Proof by induction

2. Code :

return 7n-4

An algorithm analyst might ask :

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

1. What makes the first program so slow ?

2. How fast are the 3 programs asymptotically ?

3. Is the last version really the ultimate solution ?

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

Let us look at the recursion tree for the first program at n=4.

4 3 2 2 1
4
3
2
2
1

Here each circle represents one call to the routine tfn. So, for n=4 there are 5 such calls.

In general, a call to tfn(n) requires a recursive call to tfn(n-1)(represented by the

shaded region on the left) and a call to tfn(n-2)(shaded region on the right).

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

If we let f ( n ) represent the number of calls to compute T ( n ) , then :

f ( n)

=

f ( n 1) + f ( n 2) + 1

f (1)

=

f (2) = 1

This is a version of the famous Fibonacci recurrence.

It is known that f ( n) 1 . 618 n .

This agrees very well with the times we presented earlier where each increase of n by 1 increases the time by a factor of a little under 1.62.

We say such growth is exponential with asymptotic growth rate O (1 . 618 n ) .

This answers question (1).

In the second and third program there was a loop

for (i=3;i<=n;i++)

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

This loop contained two or three assignments, a multiplication and a subtraction.

We say such a loop takes O (n ) time.

This means that running time is proportional to n.

Recall that increasing n from 100 million to 300 million increased the time from approximately 3 to approximately 9 seconds.

The last program has one multiplication and one subtraction and takes O (1) or constant time.

This answers question (2).

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

The answer to the last question is also NO. If the boss asked for

T (123456789879876543215566340014733134213)

we would get integer overflow on most computers.

Switching to a floating point representation would be of no value since we need to maintain all the significant digits in our results.

The only alternative is to use a method to represent and manipulate large integers.

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

A natural way to represent a large integer is to use an array of integers, where each array slot stores one digit.

The addition and subtraction require a linear-time algorithm.

A simple algorithm for multiplication requires a quadratic-time cost.

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

The third question, “is the last program the ultimate solution”, is more of a computer science question.

A Computer Scientist might ask :

1. How do you justify counting function calls in the first case, counting array assignments in the second case, counting variable assignments in the third, and counting arithmetic operations in the last ?

2. Is it really true that you can multiply two arbitrary large numbers together in constant time ?

3. Is the last program really the ultimate one ?

1.2 Introduction to algorithm analysis

CS questions with an engineering orientation :

What general techniques can we use to solve computational problems ?

What data structures are best, and in what situations ?

Which models should we use to analyze algorithms in practice ?

When trying to improve the efficiency of a given program, which aspects should we focus on first ?

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions
1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions
1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions
1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions
1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions
1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions
1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Running time of an algorithm almost always depends on the amount of input : more inputs means more time. Thus the running time T , is a function of the amount of input, N , or T ( N ) = f ( N ) where N is in general a natural number.

The exact value of the function depends on :

the speed of the machine;

the quality of the compiler and optimizer;

the quality of the program that implements the algorithm;

the basic fundamentals of the algorithm

Typically, the last item is most important.

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Worst-case versus Average-case
Worst-case versus Average-case

Worst-case versus Average-case

Worst-case versus Average-case
Worst-case versus Average-case
Worst-case versus Average-case
Worst-case versus Average-case
Worst-case versus Average-case

Worst-case running time is a bound over all inputs of a certain size N . (Guarantee)

Average-case running time is an average over all inputs of a certain size N . (Prediction)

Θ

Θ -notation
Θ -notation
Θ -notation
Θ -notation
Θ -notation

-notation

Θ -notation
Θ -notation
Θ -notation
Θ -notation

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

For a given function g ( n), we denote by Θ( g (n )) the set of functions

Θ( g ( n)) = {f (n ) : c 1 , c 2 , and n 0 such that 0 c 1 g (n ) f (n ) c 2 g (n ) for all n n 0 }

We say that g (n ) is an asymptotically tight bound for f (n ).

Example : The running time of insertion sort is T (n ) = Θ( n 2 ).

-notation

Ω -notation
Ω -notation
Ω -notation
Ω -notation
Ω -notation
Ω -notation
Ω -notation

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

For a given function g ( n ) , we denote by Ω( g ( n )) the set of functions :

Ω( g ( n )) = { f ( n ) : c and n 0 such that 0 cg ( n ) f ( n ) for all n n 0 }

We say that g ( n) is an asymptotic lower bound for f ( n ) .

Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation

Big-Oh notation

Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

For a given function g ( n ) , we denote by O ( g ( n )) the set of functions :

O ( g ( n )) = { f ( n ) : c and n 0 such that 0 f ( n ) cg ( n ) for all n n 0 }

We say that g ( n) is an asymptotic upper bound for f ( n ) .

Note that O -notation is, in general, used informally to describe asymptotically tight bounds (Θ -notation).

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation

Big-Oh notation

Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation
Big-Oh notation

Exponential : dominant term is some constant times 2 N .

Cubic : dominant term is some constant times N 3 . We say O (N 3 ).

Quadratic : dominant term is some constant times N 2 . We say O (N 2 ) .

O (N log N ) : dominant term is some constant times N log N .

Linear : dominant term is some constant times N . We say O (N ).

Logarithmic : dominant term is some constant times log N.

Constant : c .

Note : Big-Oh ignores leading constants.

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Dominant Term Matters
Dominant Term Matters

Dominant Term Matters

Dominant Term Matters
Dominant Term Matters
Dominant Term Matters
Dominant Term Matters
Dominant Term Matters
Dominant Term Matters

Suppose we estimate 35N 2 + N + N 3 .

For N=10000 :

Actual value is 1,003,500,010,000

Estimate is 1,000,000,000,000

Error in estimate is 0.35%, which is negligible.

For large N , dominant term is usually indicative of algorithm’s behavior.

For small N , dominant term is not necessarily indicative of behavior, BUT, typically programs on small inputs run so fast we don’t care anyway.

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Example 1 : Computing the Minimum
Example 1 : Computing the Minimum

Example 1 : Computing the Minimum

Example 1 : Computing the Minimum
Example 1 : Computing the Minimum
Example 1 : Computing the Minimum
Example 1 : Computing the Minimum
Example 1 : Computing the Minimum
Example 1 : Computing the Minimum

Minimum item in an array

Given an array of N items, find the smallest.

Obvious algorithm is sequential scan.

Running time is O ( N ) (linear) because we repeat a fixed amount of work for each element in the array.

A linear algorithm is a good as we can hope for because we have to examine every element in the array, a process that requires linear time.

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Example 2 : Closest Points
Example 2 : Closest Points

Example 2 : Closest Points

Example 2 : Closest Points
Example 2 : Closest Points
Example 2 : Closest Points
Example 2 : Closest Points
Example 2 : Closest Points
Example 2 : Closest Points

Closest Points in the Plane

Given N points in a plane (that is, an x-y coordinate system, find the pair of points that are closest together).

Fundamental problem in graphics.

Solution : Calculate the distance between each pair of points, and retain the minimum distance.

N ( N 1) / 2 pairs of points, so the algorithm is quadratic.

Better algorithms that use more subtle observations are known.

1.3 Asymptotic notation and Growth of functions

Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane
Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane

Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane

Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane
Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane
Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane
Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane
Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane
Example 3 : Co-linear Points in the Plane

Co-linear points in the plane

Given N points in the plane, determine if any three form a straight line.

Important in graphics : co-linear points introduce nasty degenerate cases that require special handling.

Solution : enumerate all groups of three points; for each possible triplet of three points check if the points are co-linear. This is a cubic algorithm.

1.4 Case Study

1.4 Case Study
1.4 Case Study

1.4 Case Study

1.4 Case Study
1.4 Case Study
1.4 Case Study
1.4 Case Study
1.4 Case Study
1.4 Case Study

Examine a problem with several different solutions.

Will look at four algorithms

Some algorithms much easier to code than others.

Some algorithms much easier to prove correct than others.

Some algorithms much, much faster (or slower) than others.

The problem
The problem

The problem

The problem
The problem
The problem
The problem
The problem

1.4 Case Study

Maximum Contiguous Subsequence Sum Problem

Given (possibly negative integers) A 1 , A 2 ,

, A N

find (and identify the sequence corresponding to) the maximum value of (A i + A i +1 + ··· + A j ) .

The maximum contiguous subsequence sum is zero if all the integers are negative.

Examples :

-2, 11, -4, 13, -4, 2

1, -3, 4, -2, -1, 6

Brute Force Algorithm
Brute Force Algorithm

Brute Force Algorithm

Brute Force Algorithm
Brute Force Algorithm
Brute Force Algorithm
Brute Force Algorithm
Brute Force Algorithm
Brute Force Algorithm

int

{

MaxSubSum1(const vector<int> & A)

int MaxSum =0; for (int i=0; i<A.size(); i++) for (int j=i; j <A.size();j++)

{

int ThisSum = 0; for (int k=i; k<=j; k++) ThisSum += A[k]; if (ThisSum > MaxSum) MaxSum = ThisSum;

}

return MaxSum;

}

1.4 Case Study

Analysis
Analysis

Analysis

Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis

1.4 Case Study

Loop of size N inside of loop of size N inside of loop of size N means O ( N 3 ) , or cubic algorithm.

Slight over-estimate that results from some loops being of size less than N is not important.

1.4 Case Study

Actual Running time
Actual Running time

Actual Running time

Actual Running time
Actual Running time
Actual Running time
Actual Running time
Actual Running time

For N = 100 , actual time is 0.47 seconds on a particular computer.

Can use this to estimate time for larger inputs :

T

( N ) = cN 3

T

(10 N ) = c (10 N ) 3 = 1000 cN 3 = 1000 T ( N )

Inputs size increases by a factor of 10 means that running time increases by a factor of 1,000.

For N=1000, estimate an actual time of 470 seconds. (Actual was 449 seconds).

For N=10,000, estimate 449000 seconds (6 days).

How to improve
How to improve

How to improve

How to improve
How to improve
How to improve
How to improve
How to improve
How to improve

Remove a loop; not always possible.

1.4 Case Study

Here it is : innermost loop is unnecessary because it throws away information.

ThisSum for next j is easily obtained from old value of

ThisSum :

Need A i + A i+1 + ··· + A j 1 + A j

Just computed A i + A i +1 + ··· + A j 1

What we need is what we just computed + A j .

1.4 Case Study

The Better Algorithm
The Better Algorithm

The Better Algorithm

The Better Algorithm
The Better Algorithm
The Better Algorithm
The Better Algorithm
The Better Algorithm

int MaxSubSum2(const vector<int> & A)

{

 

int MaxSum = 0; for (int i=0; i < A.size(); i++)

{

 

int ThisSum =0;

for (int j=i; j< A.size(); j++)

{

ThisSum += A[j]; if (ThisSum > MaxSum) MaxSum = ThisSum;

}

 

}

return MaxSum;

}

Analysis
Analysis

Analysis

Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis

1.4 Case Study

Same logic as before : now the running time is quadratic, or

O ( N 2 ) .

As we will see, this algorithm is still usable for inputs in the tens of thousands.

Recall that the cubic algorithm was not practical for this amount of input.

1.4 Case Study

Actual running time
Actual running time

Actual running time

Actual running time
Actual running time
Actual running time
Actual running time
Actual running time

For N = 100 , actual time is 0.0111 seconds on the same particular computer.

Can use this to estimate time for larger inputs :

T

( N ) = cN 2

T

(10 N ) = c (10 N ) 2 = 100 cN 2 = 100 T ( N )

Inputs size increases by a factor of 10 means that running time increases by a factor of 100.

for N = 1000 , estimate a running time of 1.11 seconds. (Actual was 1.12 seconds).

For N = 10 , 000 , estimate 111 seconds (=actual).

Linear Algorithms
Linear Algorithms

Linear Algorithms

Linear Algorithms
Linear Algorithms
Linear Algorithms
Linear Algorithms
Linear Algorithms
Linear Algorithms

Linear algorithm would be best.

1.4 Case Study

Running time is proportional to amount of input. Hard to do better for an algorithm.

If inputs increases by a factor of ten, then so does running time.

Recursive algorithm
Recursive algorithm

Recursive algorithm

Recursive algorithm
Recursive algorithm
Recursive algorithm
Recursive algorithm
Recursive algorithm
Recursive algorithm

Use a divide-and-conquer approach.

The maximum subsequence either

lies entirely in the first half

lies entirely in the second half

1.4 Case Study

starts somewhere in the first half, goes to the last element in the first half, continues at the first element in the second half, ends somewhere in the second half.

Compute all three possibilities, and use the maximum.

First two possibilities easily computed recursively.

1.4 Case Study

Computing the third case
Computing the third case

Computing the third case

Computing the third case
Computing the third case
Computing the third case
Computing the third case
Computing the third case
Computing the third case

Idea :

1. Find the largest sum in the first half, that includes the last element in the first half.

2. Find the largest sum in the second half that includes the first element in the second half.

3. Add the 2 sums together.

Implementation :

Easily done with two loops.

For maximum sum that starts in the first half and extends to the last element in the first half, use a right-to-left scan starting at the last element in the first half.

For the other maximum sum, do a left-to-right scan, starting at the first half.

Analysis
Analysis

Analysis

Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis
Analysis

1.4 Case Study

Let T ( N ) = the time for an algorithm to solve a problem of size N .

Then T (1) = 1 (1 will be the quantum time unit; constants don’t matter).

T ( N ) = 2 T ( N/ 2) + N

Two recursive calls, each of size N/ 2 . The time to solve each recursive call is T ( N/ 2) by the above definition.

Case three takes O ( N ) time; we use N , because we will throw out the constants eventually.

Bottom Line
Bottom Line

Bottom Line

Bottom Line
Bottom Line
Bottom Line
Bottom Line
Bottom Line
Bottom Line

1.4 Case Study

T

(1) =

1 = 1 1

T

(2) =

2 T (1) + 2 = 4 = 2 2 = 2 1 2

T

(4) =

2 T (2) + 4 = 12 = 4 3 = 2 2 3

T

(8) =

2 T (4) + 8 = 32 = 8 4 = 2 3 4

T (16) = T (32) = T (64) =

2 T (8) + 16 = 80 = 16 5 = 2 4 5 2 T (16) + 32 = 192 = 32 6 = 2 5 6 2 T (32) + 64 = 448 = 64 7 = 2 6 7

T ( N ) = 2 k ( k + 1) = N (1 + log N ) = O ( N log N )

N log N
N log N

N log N

N log N
N log N
N log N
N log N
N log N
N log N

1.4 Case Study

Any recursive algorithm that solves two half-sized problems and does linear non-recursive work to combine/split these solutions will always take O ( N log N ) time because the above analysis will always hold.

This is a very significant improvement over quadratic.

It is still not as good as O ( N ) , but is not that far away either. There is a linear-time algorithm for this problem. The running time is clear, but the correctness is non-trivial.

1.4 Case Study

The Linear-time algorithm
The Linear-time algorithm

The Linear-time algorithm

The Linear-time algorithm
The Linear-time algorithm
The Linear-time algorithm
The Linear-time algorithm
The Linear-time algorithm

/ ** Linear-time maximum contiguous subsequence.

/

sum algorithm

*

int maxSubSum4( const vector<int> & a )

{

/ * 1 * /

int maxSum = 0, thisSum = 0;

/ * 2 * /

for( int j = 0; j < a.size( ); j++ )

{

/ * 3 * / / * 4 * / / * 5 * / / * 6 * / / * 7 * / / * 8 * /

thisSum += a[ j ]; if( thisSum > maxSum ) maxSum = thisSum; else if( thisSum < 0 ) thisSum = 0;} return maxSum;}

The Logarithm
The Logarithm

The Logarithm

The Logarithm
The Logarithm
The Logarithm
The Logarithm
The Logarithm

Formal Definition

1.4 Case Study

For any B, N > 0 , log B N = K if B K = N

If the base B is omitted, it defaults to 2 in computer science.

Examples :

log 32 = 5 (because 2 5 = 32 )

log 1024 = 10

log 1048576 = 20

log 1 billion = about 30

The logarithm grows much more slowly than N , and slower

than N .

1.4 Case Study

Examples of the Logarithm
Examples of the Logarithm

Examples of the Logarithm

Examples of the Logarithm
Examples of the Logarithm
Examples of the Logarithm
Examples of the Logarithm
Examples of the Logarithm
Examples of the Logarithm

Bits in a binary number : how many bits are required to represent

N consecutive integers ?

Repeated doubling : starting from X = 1 , how many times

˙

should X be doubled before it is at least as large as N ?

Repeated halving : Starting from X = N , if N is repeatedly

halved, how many iterations must be applied to make N smaller

than or equal to 1 ? (Halving rounds up).

Answer to all of the above is log N (rounded up).

Why log N
Why log N

Why log N

Why log N
Why log N
Why log N
Why log N
Why log N
Why log N

1.4 Case Study

B bits represents 2 B integers. Thus 2 B is at least as big as N , so B is at least log N . Since B must be an integer, round up if needed.

Same logic for the other examples.

1.4 Case Study

Repeated Halving Principle
Repeated Halving Principle

Repeated Halving Principle

Repeated Halving Principle
Repeated Halving Principle
Repeated Halving Principle
Repeated Halving Principle
Repeated Halving Principle
Repeated Halving Principle

An algorithm is O (log N ) if it takes constant time to reduce the problem size by a constant fraction (which is usually 1/2).

Reason : there will be log N iterations of constant work.

1.4 Case Study

Static Searching
Static Searching

Static Searching

Static Searching
Static Searching
Static Searching
Static Searching
Static Searching
Static Searching

Given an integer X and an array A , return the position of X in A or an indicator that it is not present. If X occurs more than once, return any occurrence. The array A is not altered.

If input array is not sorted, solution is to use a sequential search. Running times :

Unsuccessful search : O ( N ) ; every item is examined.

Successful search :

Worst case : O ( N ) ; every item is examined.

Average case :O ( N/ 2) ; half the items are examined.

Can we do better if we know the array is sorted ?

Binary Search
Binary Search

Binary Search

Binary Search
Binary Search
Binary Search
Binary Search
Binary Search
Binary Search

Yes ! use a binary search.

Look in the middle :

1.4 Case Study

Case 1: If X is less than the item in the middle, then look in the subarray to the left of the middle.

Case 2: If X is greater than the item in the middle, then look in the subarray to the right of the middle.

Case 3 : If X is equal to the item in the middle, then we have a match.

Base Case : If the subarray is empty, X is not found.

This is logarithmic by the repeated halving principle.

1.4 Case Study

Binary Search Continued
Binary Search Continued

Binary Search Continued

Binary Search Continued
Binary Search Continued
Binary Search Continued
Binary Search Continued
Binary Search Continued
Binary Search Continued

Binary search is an example of a data structure implementation :

– Insert : O ( N ) time per operation, because we must insert and maintain the array in sorted order.

– Delete : O ( N ) time per operation, because we must slide elements that are to the right of the deleted element over one spot to maintain contiguity.

– Find : O (log N ) time per operation, via binary search.

In this course we examine different data structures. Generally we allow Insert, Delete, and Find, but Find and Delete are usually restricted.

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
Analysis 1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space

A scalar item

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A
1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A

A sequential vector

and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A
and Algorithm Analysis A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A

A n-dimentional space

A scalar item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A h i e

A linked list

item A sequential vector A n-dimentional space A linked list A h i e r a

A hierarchical tree

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

The most important property to express of any entity in a system is its type.

In this course we used entities that are structured objects (e.g., an object that is a collection of other objects).

When determining its type, the kinds of distinguishing properties include :

Ordering :

are elements ordered or unordered ? If ordering matters, is the order partial or

total ? Are elements removed FIFO (queues), LIFO (stacks), or by priority (priority

queues) ?

Duplicates :

Boundedness :

are duplicates allowed ?

is the object bounded in size or unbounded ? Can the bound change or it

is fixed at creation time ?

Associative access :

are elements retrieved by an index or key ? Is the type of the index

built-in (e.g. as for sequences and arrays) or user-definable (e.g. as for symbol tables and hash tables) ?

Shape :

is the structure of the object linear, hierarchical, acyclic, n-dimensional, or

arbitrarily complex (e.g. graphs, forests) ?

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Abstract Data Type (ADT)
Abstract Data Type (ADT)

Abstract Data Type (ADT)

Abstract Data Type (ADT)
Abstract Data Type (ADT)
Abstract Data Type (ADT)
Abstract Data Type (ADT)
Abstract Data Type (ADT)

Set of data together with a set of operations.

Definition of an ADT : [what to do ?]

Definition of data and the set of operations (functions).

Implementation of an ADT : [how to do it ?]

How are the objects and operations implemented.

use the C++ class.

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Array Implementation of Lists
Array Implementation of Lists

Array Implementation of Lists

Array Implementation of Lists
Array Implementation of Lists
Array Implementation of Lists
Array Implementation of Lists
Array Implementation of Lists

Contiguous allocation of memory to store the elements of the list.

Estimation (overestimation) of the maximum size of the list is required

waste of memory space.

O ( N ) for find, constant time for findKth

But O ( N ) is required for insertion and deletion in the worst case.

building a list by N successive inserts would require O ( N 2 ) in the worst case.

findKth(3)=52

List

1

2

3

4

5

n

34

12

52

16

22

findKth=List[Kth]

O(C)

find(52)=3

1

2

3

4

5

n

34

12

52

16

22

find(X): O(n)

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

1

2

3

4

5

n

remove(34)

12

52

16

22

Algorithm Analysis 1 2 3 4 5 n remove(34) 12 52 16 22 removeKth: O(n) remove(X):O(n)

removeKth: O(n)

remove(X):O(n)

insert(1,34)

1

2

3

4

5

n

34

12

52

16

12

insert(1,34) 1 2 3 4 5 n 34 12 52 16 12 insert(kth,X) O(n) Figure 1:

insert(kth,X)

O(n)

Figure 1: Contiguous allocation of memory to store the elements of the list

Linked Lists
Linked Lists

Linked Lists

Linked Lists
Linked Lists
Linked Lists
Linked Lists
Linked Lists
Linked Lists

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Non contiguous allocation of memory.

O ( N ) for find

O ( N ) for findKth (but better time in practice if the calls to findKth are in sorted order by the argument).

Constant time for insertion and deletion.

Head

1 2 3 4
1
2
3
4

5

6

7

8

Data

Link

34

52

\

12

22

5

7

3

4

16

16

Head

1.5 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

12 52 34 16 22
12
52
34
16
22

List = 34 12 52 16 22

printList():O(n)

find(x):O(n)

findKth(i):O(i)

Figure 2: Non contiguous allocation of memory