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EVENT PREVIEW: THE

UPCOMING CHEFS &


INGREDIENTS AND BARS
& NIGHTLIFE FORUMS
P14
Learn more about
Kanpais FoH and BoH

p46
Is the popularity of
German cuisine on
the rise?
p38
How the new
Jumeirah Messilah
Beach Hotel & Spa
aims to offer the best
F&B in Kuwait
p22
Burning Issue:
Chefs and restaurants
need to take a stand
against overfishing
p32
Top trends:
Dair y predictions,
from camel milk, low-
fat cheese, and more
p40
Serving the regions catering professionals October 2013 Vol 09 Issue 10
An ITP Business Publication
I N
T ER
VI EW
C
eleb chef V
ineet B
hatia discusses w
hy D
ubai is M
ichelin-
ready and how
he creates unforgettable experiences for his guests
Created for that genuine, made-from-scratch experience,
Knorr Hollandaise Sauce provides an authentic touch to your
gourmet recipe, all the while reducing wastage and improving
efficiency in your kitchen.
Discover more innovative kitchen solutions today at www.ufs.com.
The Authentic
Recipe Made
Simple
Volume 9 Issue 10
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
Contents
October 2013 | Caterer Middle East /01
Contents
OCTOBER 2013
For the latest news and stories go to www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
32
24
46
60
26
03 News
UAE to get its rst restaurant by Jean-Georges
Vongerichten; US pizza giant to open 100 GCC
restaurants in 10 years; Dubai to soon rival Lon-
don F&B scene; Standalone competition causes
F&B rethink; Argo Tea opens second caf in Abu
Dhabi; Hotel F&B priced out of the market.
14 Event preview: Caterer forums
What to expect at the Caterer Middle East Bars &
Nightlife and Chefs & Ingredients forums: who
is speaking, and what the discussion points are
going to be at the back-to-back industry events.
24 Interview: Breaking boundaries
Bandar Al Balawi on being the rst Saudi na-
tional to be appointed restaurant manager.
26 Cover Story: Weaver of memories
Celeb chef Vineet Bhatia reveals the ethos be-
hind his restaurants and menu creation.
32 Burning Issue: Fishing sustainably
Is the F&B industry actually ghting overshing?
38 Cuisine Focus: German
Caterer investigates its rising popularity.
40 Ingredient Focus: Dairy
The top 10 trends inuencing the market.
46 Outlet 360
0
Caterer nds out more about the fusion Japanese
restaurant, Kanpai, in Souk Al Bahar.
50 Supplier News
Keep on top of new trends and sup-
ply issues with our in-depth review.
58 Products
A round-up of this months best buys.
60 Appointments
Find out who has climbed up the career ladder
this month.
64 Last Bite
Celeb ptissier Eric Lanlard explains why hes
going to be the rst chef to go to space.
52
58
Download now
for iOS,
Android &
Kindle
Behind every
excellent dish
is an excellent
cream.
Sole meunire with parsley
jus and shiso
By Pascal Barbot,
Astrance, Paris
3* Michelin
Prsident HALF CREAM
FOR THICKENING & COOKING
Product made in France
Excellent holding quality in reduction sauces.
Consistent and stable for cooking.
Makes smooth and creamy sauces every time.
Used by top French chefs.
Hit
the
Top
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October 2013
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
News
/03 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
French chef to create menu for new international dining restaurant at the Le Royal Mridien Abu Dhabi
A rendering of Market Kitchen in Le Royal Mridien Abu Dhabi where the menu will focus on fresh, local, and seasonal ingredients found in the region, which will be created by the French chef himself.
UAE to get its first restaurant by Vongerichten
As part of the Le Royal Mridien Abu Dhabi F&B
redevelopment, a restaurant by Jean-Georges
Vongerichten is set to open in Q1 2014.
With the rst phase of the hotels renovation
already open, next year will see the launch of Mar-
ket Kitchen, a new international dining concept
with the menu created by Vongerichten.
In an interview with Caterer Middle East, Le
Royal Mridien general manager Shaun Parsons
said it will be a Vongerichten concept so the in-
volvement will be via a consultative partnership
with Culinary Concepts Hospitality Group (CCHG)
out of New York City.
The Market Kitchen concept of the hotel as a
home extends to the restaurant as a casual family
kitchen. The brand was born in November 2009
when Vongerichten opened Market in Bostons W
Hotel. The concept was exported to W Doha with
Market by Jean-Georges and Spice Market.
The Abu Dhabi restaurant will have its own
general manager and chef who will have dual re-
sponsibility and reporting lines back to the hotel
management and CCHG.
The key personnel will be hired with strong
input from CCHG and training for these two as-
sociates will take place in the US within already
established similar venues, Parsons added.
The menu will emphasise fresh and locally pro-
duced ingredients. It will reinvent classic dishes
with eclectic air, allowing guests to try new a-
vour combinations and explore spices from other
regions. The plan is to craft dishes with seasonal
market ingredients and local sh.
Parsons added that the new outlet forms part
of a complete transformation underway in the
hotel to make all the F&B venues accessible and
relevant to the market and consumer demands.
He said: We have focused on interactive and
engaging concepts that are fun and contempo-
rary. LW Design Group has been given a clean
palette to develop sexy new venues that will be
places consumers want to come back to more
than two or three times per week. All designs are
modern and fresh, some would say a 360 trans-
formation from where we were before.
He continued: Ultimately in a hotel environent
it is fair to say that rooms are the heart of the ho-
tel, but F&B is always the true soul and life of the
property, and this is what we are trying to capture
in everything we do.
This is reected in the number of new venues
we are adding with concepts driven by the need
to innovate and oer dierent experiences to con-
sumers within the city.
Restaurants which have been rolled out in
phase one include: the hotel lobby, Le Mridien
Hub; all-day dining Caf Palmier; casual dining
outlet Bistro; and a bakery called Wheat.
Phase two, which is scheduled for Q1 2014, has
the following outlets: the only revolving lounge
bar and grill in Abu Dhabi, Stratos; revamp of the
Italian venue Amal; signature bar Latitude 24;
and Vongerichtens Market Kitchen.
News
October 2013
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 04/
US pizza giant to open 100
GCC restaurants in 10 years
US pizza chain Papa Murphys will
open 100 of its restaurants across
the GCC, the rms CEO revealed.
Papa Murphys, which specialises
in fresh pizzas that the customer
then cooks themselves at home, will
stagger the openings over the next
10 years, Ken Calwell said.
It has signed a franchise agree-
ment with Dubai-based Mam Food-
co. Just with Mam Foodco were
Take N Bake concept starts off with two branches in the UAE
At the opening of the rst UAE Papa Murphys.
planning on putting in 100 stores in
the next ten years across the GCC.
Were thinking about half of that in
the UAE. It will probably be just ve
stores this year alone, Calwell said.
Washington-based Papa Mur-
phys has more than 1,300 restau-
rants across the US and Canada and
is anticipating revenues of around
$800mn this year, said Calwell.
Its expansion into the Middle
East, starting with two restaurants
in Dubai, marks the rms rst in-
ternational foray. We chose the
Middle East, and specically Dubai,
because of the business-friendly en-
vironment here. What Ive seen and
researched is that people from all
over the world live here, so its one
of those places where you can get a
lot of experience very quickly with a
very diverse audience, he said.
Hilton F&B vice president reveals the
line-up of Conrad Dubai restaurants
Calling it a fantastic operation,
Lazarus said: One of our agship
concepts is Izel, which is a South
American supper club.
We also have the rst urban
beach club in Dubai called Puro-
beach Urban Oasis, which is a 7,000
square metres deck with a pool.
That is going to be very exciting.
He reiterated the partnership
with Marco Pierre White for the
Marco Pierre White Steakhouse
& Grill, which was exclusively re-
vealed to Caterer Middle East at the
end of last year.
Lazarus continued: We also
have our own overall concept called
Suga which is a private club for
members. The hotel also features
Cave, the wine bar, and Ballar, the
Sicilian market. The latter venue
is headed by two-starred Michelin
chef Massimo Mantarro. Simon Lazarus expands on the hotels F&B.
Seven restaurants unveiled at Hotelier Great GM Debate 2013
At the Hotelier Middle East Great
GM Debate 2013, Hilton Worldwide
vice president of food & beverage
for Middle East & Africa Simon
Lazarus revealed the six restaurants
which will feature in the now-open
Conrad Dubai property. Speaking
about its F&B, Lazarus said the hotel
has varied concepts in its oering,
including the hotel lobby.
1.KSA: Americana has opened its frst
LongHorn Steakhouse in the Middle East
in Saudi Arabias Riyadh city, according
to the Kuwait Food Company. LongHorn
Steakhouse chain opened its frst restaurant
in Atlanta, US, 29 years ago and has grown
steadily. Darden Restaurants, Inc, LongHorn
Steakhouses parent company, has entered
into an agreement with Kuwait Food Com-
pany, Americana, for franchise rights to open
10 LongHorn restaurants in the region.
2.OMAN: The Cave, a $16.88mn restau-
rant complex, will open in November. The
complex, which offcials call the frst of its
kind in the Middle East due to its architec-
ture, is a project by Falcon Tourism company
in cooperation with the Ministry of Tourism.
Located in Darsait overlooking Qurm Heights,
the two-level complex is constructed from
soft rocks. There will be three restaurants on
each level and two outdoors. The restaurants
will offer Italian, Brazilian, South American,
Asian, Omani and continental dishes, as well
as Mediterranean seafood.
3.BAHRAIN: Bahrain has become the frst
country in the Gulf to lift restrictions on food
imports from Japan imposed following the
Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, a re-
port said. It triggered a ban on food imports
due to fears they could be contaminated.
Key agreements were signed to enhance
co-operation between Manama and Tokyo,
said Japanese Foreign Affairs Ministry press
secretary Kuni Sato during a press confer-
ence at the Ritz-Carlton Bahrain.
4.QATAR: The Qatar National Food Secu-
rity Programme (QNFSP) has submitted the
countrys frst comprehensive National Food
Security Plan before the higher authorities for
approval. It aims to boost Qatars domestic
production of agriculture from the current
estimated 8% of the countrys total demand
to 40-60% in short to mid-term. The National
Plan recommends Qatar making a paradigm
shift from its current farming practices, with
the active support of private sector.
5.UAE: Spice Mela, a modern restaurant
that serves classical Pan-Indian dishes with
a twist, has opened in the new Rosewood
Abu Dhabi hotel at Sowwah Square on Al
Maryah Island. Heading the kitchen is chef
Siddharth Krishna, who has worked in the
past eight years in the UK, with his latest
experience being the Chutney Mary in Lon-
don. He said: Offering an array of textures,
colours and spices, Spice Mela will have a
selection of dishes for every palate, from the
best meats, to the most succulent fsh, to a
delicious selection of vegetarian dishes.
6.KUWAIT: Tim Hortons offcially opened
its frst restaurant in Kuwait, marking the
companys 32
nd
location in the GCC. The
Canadian Minister of International Trade, the
Honourable Ed Fast, served the restaurants
frst cup of coffee after shooting a ceremoni-
al puck onsite at The Avenues Mall in Kuwait
City. The expansion is part of the companys
international strategic plan announced in
2011, to open 120 restaurants in the GCC
by the end of 2015.
CATERER AROUND THE GCC
THE LATEST F&B HAPPENINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
PARTNERS
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Operations
Creating a cleaner, healthier future for all the world begins at our own doorstep.
At Diversey, we have made a public commitment to challenging, measurable
reductions in our environmental impact. We know that the kind of innovative
thinking that drives success is what will also drive continuous improvement in our
operational profle, for profts, for people and for the environment.
Customers
We help our customers examine and reduce the environmental and operational
impact of their businesses. With our expertise in cleaning and hygiene and our
superior products, we help customers save water and energy and reduce labor
costs while making their facilities safer, cleaner and more hygienic.
Our innovations in product packaging, dispensing and dosing reduce waste,
protect workers and improve the efficiency of product transport.
Weve reformulated products to remove chemicals that harm aquatic life
or damage the environment and to provide solutions that contribute to better
indoor air quality than conventional products.
Partners
We collaborate with other industry and thought leaders around the globe to
promote a sustainability mindset within our industry and to advocate for a
cleaner, healthier future. Around the globe, weve established vital partnerships
with government agencies, non governmental organizations and industry
groups. We share our expertise and draw on the value that results when creative,
passionate people unite their talents toward common goals.
Workforce
It is through our employees talent, creativity and passion that Diversey is creating
a cleaner, healthier future. We invest in our employees safety, well-being, training
and career development. And we engage them actively in continuously
improving our operational efectiveness and reducing our environmental impact.
They are our companys greatest asset.
Communities
We believe every place in the world that we do business should be better because
we are there. Our emphasis on volunteerism and our employees generosity with
their time and talent are helping Diversey create a cleaner, healthier future for the
people whom we are privileged to serve as our customers customers. We
encourage volunteerism through our Global Childrens Initiative to help children
who live in poverty and through a host of regional and local eforts organized and
implemented by employees who want to improve lives in their communities.
Governance
At Diversey, we hold ourselves to the highest standard of ethical and legal
behavior in everything we do - because we believe the right way is the only way
to do business. We follow our detailed Code of Ethics and Business Conduct. The
governing principle and theme of all our ethics training and compliance
programs, "Ethics is Good Business," expresses our view of the fundamental role
those high standards play in everything we do. We audit all our business practices
regularly and rigorously, and engage a practice of continuous improvement.
For more information please contact:
Diversey Gulf FZE - P. O. 8ox: 61485, 1ebeI AIi Iree 7one, Dubai, United Arab mirates - 7eI: +971 4 8819470 - Iax: +971 4 8819488
customerservice.uae@seaIedair.com - www.seaIedair.com
Sustainability is also about social responsibility and the global community
GOVERNANCE
COMMUNITIES
CUSTOMERS
WORKFORCE
OPERATIONS
News
October 2013
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 06/
What is it? A French-Canadian
bistro launched by a banker-
turned-restaurateur Yousef
Barqawi. Its menu comprises
starters, salads, sandwiches,
mains and sides with the
Canadian poutine also making
an appearance. A favourite is
the ox-cheek pie.
FRAICHE CAF &
BISTRO FRENCH-
CANADIAN DISHES
IN INDUSTRIAL CHIC
OUTLET
Licensed venue to open
in Lakes town centre
Dubai will soon rival
London F&B scene
Gates Hospitality has signed a deal to bring Londons Re-
form Social & Grill to The Lakes, Dubai, with the opening
date set for October.
Gates Hospitality CEO Naim Maadad said: The Lakes is
a fantastic location for Reform to open up here in Dubai
as it is right in the heart of a thriving community of thou-
sands of families not only in The Lakes but in nearby
neighbourhoods such as The Springs and The Meadows.
We have taken the lease on the venue from Emaar and will
be using not only the brand of Reform in London but also
the expertise in terms of senior management and sta.
Tadgh Ryan from Reform Social & Grill in London is the
new GM in Dubai and will lead a team made up of man-
agement and sta from both Britain and the UAE. "We are
taking the very best of what we have to oer in London
from the food right through to the dcor and service stan-
dards and giving it a Dubai twist, said Ryan.
Maadad explained that bringing Reform to the UAE
from London continues the trend of international brands
nding a second home in Dubai. In an interview with Ca-
terer Middle East, he said: The only people who are doing
something similar is The Rivington Grill. The venue will
focus on families, and as the day progresses, the audience
we target changes.
According to Hilton Worldwide vice president of
food & beverage for Middle East & Africa Simon
Lazarus, Dubai will soon rival the likes of London and
Singapore with its F&B scene.
Dubai is really coming up as a food and beverage
city, its not quite there yet but in a matter of one to
two years we will be rivalling London and rivalling
Singapore in terms of food, so the future is ours and
I think we have a tremendous opportunity, he told
Caterer Middle East.
He continued: Food and beverage is, in many
cases, the deciding factor for people coming into
hotels. They will choose their room based on the
variety of the concepts that you have. So its really
important for us to make sure that we cover all the
bases and give a great balance of [venues].
Hakkasan director operations Middle East and
China Henk Bruggeman agreed but pointed out that
standalone and casual dining outlets are equally im-
portant. He said: I think for any tourist or anybody
coming from outside Dubai, its important to develop
choice like any other big city in the world. And the
oering we have at the moment in Dubai is extend-
ing more and more. Not only with hotels and exciting
F&B concepts in them, but with standalone restau-
rants like Hakkasan, Zuma, La Petite Maison, and The
Meat Co. That makes it more attractive for guests to
visit Dubai because theres plenty of choice.
Londons Reform Social & Grill in Dubai to be li-
censed and plans for British cuisine on the menu
Giving tourists ample choice will drive the
F&B scene in the Middle East
Dubai outlet will have a team whose members also come from London.
There is plenty of choice in Dubai with the rise of varied outlets.
NEW
OPENING
Where is it? Podium level of the
Swiss Tower, Cluster Y, Jumeirah
Lakes Towers, Dubai.
Whats cool about it? The
home-cooked vibe plus the
stripped down and chic indus-
trial interiors. The restaurant also
features an affordable AED55
all-you-can-eat breakfast offer.
Expansion plans? There are
no expansion plans at present
time. Barqawi said the team
is focusing all its efforts and
energy into Fraiche for the
moment, and towards making
it a success.
IN SEASON
JAMEEL NABTITI FROM
WYNDHAM GRAND
REGENCY DOHA
LOOKS AT MUSSELS,
OCTOBERS PRODUCT
OF THE MONTH
Whats great about this ingredient?
Mussels have a high percentage of
phosphorus, iodine and vitamins. They
contain multiple amino acids, enzymes
and essential elements. They activate the
proper functionality of the cardiovascular,
lymphatic and endocrine system, eyes
and connective tissues and mucous mem-
branes. It alleviates infammation, pain
and stiffness in cases of arthritis. It also
activates the healing of wounds and burns.
How readily available is it?
The living ones are found in the Atlantic
beaches: French, Spanish and Portugal.
What are the things to look out for when
buying this ingredient?
The mussels must be closed completely.
Smell the sea fragrance on the mussels to
know it is fresh.
Whats the best way youd recommend
using this ingredient?
My recommendation is to use it mostly in
soups and Spanish cuisine such as paella.
Which supplier would you recommend?
Any local supplier but it should come from
French, Spanish or Portugal.
October 2013
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
News
/07 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
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Standalone competition causes F&B rethink
The casual dining sector in the region is rising quickly,
and Euromonitor research shows that the UAEs fast
casual dining sector alone is expected to grow from US
$6.4bn in 2011 to US $8.7bn by 2015.
Le Meridien Al Aqah beach resort and Al Maha Desert
Resort general manager Patrick Antaki, said to Caterer
Middle East: Theres some pretty tough competition
coming up. I think hotels need to be innovative and need
to treat their restaurants, or the restaurants that they
want to compete with ... they need to treat them as a
standalone restaurant, and not the classical way of deal-
ing with hotel restaurants. Some people dont like to walk
into a hotel they like to walk into a restaurant. And I
think thats key to many places but some of the big hotels
would have problems dealing with that.
Jumeirah Group senior vice president food & bever-
age Gert Kopera said: We dont necessarily design hotel
restaurants anymore, we design restaurants in hotels. In
the old days, a restaurant hotel was an amenity, a place
where guests could get food. That has morphed into truly
exciting freestanding concepts within a hotel.
Rosewood Abu Dhabi GM Luigi Romaniello admitted
hotels can learn a lot from freestanding operations. and
Hotel restaurants morph into freestanding outlets within properties to deal with changing landscape
Antaki says hotel F&B needs to rise to the standalone challenge.
HOW TO:
INNOVATE IN F&B
DEVELOPMENT
BY MANAGING
DIRECTOR
JUMEIRAH
RESTAURANTS AND
GENERAL MANAGER
OPERATIONS, JUMEIRAH
HOTELS & RESORTS,
JASON MYERS
The six steps to bear in mind while creat-
ing a new F&B concept are:
1. Idea once you have an idea, it then
has to move on and become a concept
2. Gap in the market identify it and
have a point of difference/USP
3. Innovation, environment and culture
as an organisation you have to have an
innovative culture and an environment
that allows you to grow and develop
4. Passion and creativity this is
needed to move the idea forward
5. Knowledge and experience use this
to make a connection with the customer
to make it happen
6. Delivery and method
advocated creating a separate entrance for hotel F&B.
Bypass the lobby so people feel like they are entering a
private venue, I would really recommend it.
JW Marriott Marquis Hotel Dubai GM Rupprecht
Queitsch said it is important to create a destination.
I have restaurants that just happen to be in our hotel.
Each individual restaurant has its own life, its own mis-
sion, its own story, its ownership.
News
October 2013
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 10/
Argo Tea opens second caf in
Abu Dhabi, charts expansion
Chicago chain, Argo Tea, opened its
newest outlet in Abu Dhabi, oering
a wide selection of teas with diversi-
ty for all tastes, and blends tailored
for tea lovers.
The brand which rst opened
its doors in 2003 in Chicago is fran-
Further plans for Chicago tea brand in the Middle East outlined
Argo Tea plans to open more outlets soon.
What or who inspired you to join the
F&B industry?
My mother said youve got
to eat ... and she had
started a restaurant
before I did. Not PF
Changs her own
restaurant called
The Mandarin in San
Francisco. Im not the
typical kind of business
person. I wanted to create
restaurants that serve the kind of food
that I like, with the ambience I like and
also to attract a certain crowd. For me,
personally, it was always about a small,
niche for my artsy friends. So, thats
what I wanted to do. But I didnt expect
to reach this far.
What do you like about working in the
F&B industry?
I think its the people. Its everyone
involved from the customers to the
employees. I enjoy creating new
relationships and meeting people
from all walks of life. That
is the major beneft I can
think of. If you are not a
people person, do not
get into this business. But
I love people, so this is a
wonderful business for me
to be in.
What advice would you give to anyone
looking to join the F&B industry?
Just keep it simple, and do the simple
things really well.
If not in the founder of PF Changs,
what would you have liked to have
been instead?
Oh my ... not the founder? Well, my
other passion is painting, so defnitely
a painter.
60-SECOND INTERVIEW
PF CHANGS FOUNDER PHILIP CHIANG DISHES OUT HIS THOUGHTS ON THE
BEST THINGS IN THE F&B INDUSTRY AND HIS ADVICE FOR NEWCOMERS
chised in the Middle East by Azadea
Group/Kareem trading LLC, and
has plans to expand its operations
in the region.
In addition to the two existing
venues in Abu Dhabi, a third outlet
is planned for Yas Mall, Abu Dhabi
scheduled for September 2014, with
other venues slotted for Riyadh,
Kuwait and Jordan. It already has
stores in Doha and Beirut.
Argo Teas signature blends are
completely natural and free of any
articial avours, enhanced only
with real pieces of fruit and owers.
A spokesperson for Argo Tea
said: We are committed to being
a sustainable business by working
with the best local and global tea,
coee, and food artisans and by
contributing back to our communi-
ties to promote a healthy lifestyle.
Our In-Room
Coffee Solutions
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News
October 2013
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 12/
Hotel F&B priced out of the market
GMs and F&B directors from across the region
admitted that hotels are pricing themselves
out of the market in the F&B industry.
Hakkasan Dubai director of operations
for Middle East and China Henk Bruggeman
played devils advocate and said that from his
perspective, some hotels do price themselves
out of the market.
Jumeirah Group senior vice president food
& beverage Gert Kopera said the F&B indus-
try could learn from the airline industry and
that we need to learn to yield food & bever-
age, we need to learn to yield pricing from our
restaurants. When we remain stagnant with
our pricing and ... with our oer throughout a
full year, where the market in Dubai changes
dramatically from season to season room
rates change, airfares change but F&B pric-
ing remains stable. So the short answer is that
partially we out-price ourselves but if we start
yielding that would be a possible solution.
JW Marriott Marquis Hotel Dubai general
manager Rupprecht Queitsch disagreed: I
dont think so, I think theres a market for ev-
erything and at the end of the day the custom-
er decides where to go.
Rosewood Abu Dhabi managing director
Luigi Romaniello said it was important to val-
ue what outlets provide appropriately. He said:
You nd that its not necessary that people are
willing to spend the money so you have to
price things according to what they are worth.
GMs from Dubai hotels consider adopting airline pricing strategy to combat issue
While hotel F&B in Dubai may out-price themselves, it is also important to price items accurately and according to worth.
THE MEDIA HAS PICKED
UP AND MADE A BIG THING
ABOUT MOLECULAR
GASTRONOMY ... A LOT
OF CHEFS ARE NOW
FOLLOWING THAT
BUT VERY FEW CAN
IMPLEMENT IT
PROPERLY.
Vineet Bhatia, celebrity chef
WE ARE GOING
TO INTRODUCE
A STEAKHOUSE
IN THE NEXT 12
MONTHS; WE KNOW
WE ARE MISSING
THAT OVERALL
CONCEPT.
Stephan Schupbach,
general man-
ager, Jumeirah
Zabeel
Saray
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
INNOVATION, FOR US,
HAS TO BE BASED ON
CONCEPT DESIGN,
INTERIOR DESIGN
AND OPERATIONAL
DESIGN.
Jason Myers, managing
director, Jumeirah
Restaurants
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Most Popular
One of the revelations contained in Caterer
Middle East's fourth annual Head Chef Survey
include the fact that average spends per
head have fallen in 2013, with 4.5% of chefs
admitting that diners spend an average of
more than US $1000 per head at their outlets, compared to
13.7% in 2012. This fgure is even lower than Caterers frst
survey in 2010 where 5.8% chefs said the average spend
per person at their outlet surpassed $1000. To fnd out the
full results see the September issue of Caterer Middle East.
PHOTO OF THE MONTH:
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MIDDLE EASTS ONLINE HOME
Napoli pizza making class at Brandi Pizzeria in Dubai Mall.
I N QUOT ES
Opening Hours
Saturday 16
th
November 11:00 to 22:00
Sunday 17
th
& Monday 18
th
November 09:00 to 22:00
CONTINUING
THE LEGACY
OF EMIRATI
HOSPITALITY
The Dubai Government and Zaabeel Palace Hospitality invite
you to the inaugural Dubai World Hospitality Championship
which is set to take the centre-stage this November. The three-
day event will witness professional and amateur chefs from
around the world converging in Dubai to craft a memorable,
first-of-its-kind culinary experience.
Participate in this traditional gastronomic journey to explore:
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16 -18th November 2013
Supported by Organised by
Under |he d|rec||ves o
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Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
14/
Event preview
Caterer conferences
The latest trends and challenges facing the fast-rising nightlife scene in the region will be dis-
cussed by experts from the industry who look forward to putting the sector on the world map
The Caterer Middle East
Bars & Nightlife Forum
T
he InterContinental Hotel, Dubai Festival City, will see
members of the bars and nightlife industry discussing the
state of the sector on October 7, 2013.
The event tasted success last year, and bar managers,
beverage managers and GMs will return to interact in a number of panel
discussions and workshops.
The event will start o by talking about the evolving nature of the
industry. With the competitive nature of the UAE nightlife scene, it is the
survival of the ttest. This panel will discuss what it takes for bar and
nightclub operators to achieve longevity and reveal how the scene has
changed in the last 12 months. Media One Hotel director of operations
Luke James, Jumeirah Beach Hotel bar manager 360 Heathcli Motorga,
and Societe manager Gary Holliday will discuss the issue.
Then its time to talk about bar workforces. While nightlife venues
seem to mushroom overnight, some will have more staying power
than others. This panel will discuss breaking the homogeneity of the
UAE nightlife scene, and what it takes to shape the identity of outlets.
Expect debate aplenty from Hakkasan Dubai beverage manager Angus
McGregor, Atlantis beverage director Jean Marc A. Vettesi, and, The Act
Dubai general manager Jean Marc.
Delivering excellent customer experiences is the dening factor of
a bar or nightclub. It is important to oer quality services, products
and entertainment in order to attract and retain clientele. This session
will focus on creating distinctive customer experiences that drive
protability. It will be led by Music Hall manager Selim Zaarour, Okku and
Claw American BBQ co-founder Markus Thesle, Embassy & Buddha Bar
Luxury Collection F&B manager Lorenzo Marras.
Just before lunch a showcase on the latest technologies available to suit
dierent venues and budgets in order to increase sales, productivity and
customer experience will be displayed.
Two workshops will be on oer post-lunch. The rst will discuss
how to boost a competitive edge with spirit trends, and what the way
forward is for cocktails in the region. This workshop will explore the
latest avours and those which have lost their shine. Delegates can learn
about trending spirits, how they can boost a bar or nightclubs beverage
programme and how to then communicate these new products and
concepts to consumers.
The second workshop is topical and deals with social media. Social
media marketing for the nightlife industry has well and truly shifted from
a nice to have, to a marketing standard that must be implemented and
maintained for long-term success. This workshop aims to help delegates
make the most of their interaction with customers online and through
social networking platforms in order to manage the businesss online and
mobile presence and reputation on local listing and review websites like
Yelp, Foursquare and Google, and assess the value of social commerce
and daily deal websites.
Motorga, also an advisory panellist for the event, said from his point
of view, the industry has, and will grow exponentially in the next couple
Heathcliff Motorga believes the nightlife industry will rocket upwards exponentially.
THEY SAID WHAT?
Panellists tell us why they are attending:
By participating this year, I see it as a good opportunity to meet all the
nightlife leaders and to discuss present and future opportunities and
challenges we face day -to -day .
Heathcliff Motorga, bar manager 360, Jumeirah Beach Hotel
I am looking forward to seeing if and how the industry has developed
within Dubai, and looking to see what more can be done to make us an
internationally recognised player in this sector.
Angus McGregor, beverage manager, Hakkasan Dubai
By having a presence at the Caterer Bar & Nightlife event we will be
able to support this group of individuals by highlighting the benefts of
our product and allow bar and nightlife outlets to lower their cost but not
compromise on the quality of their drinks.
Amal Akbar, Unilever
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /15
October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
The EXPERTS in FOODSERVICE
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Okku and Claw co-founder Markus Thesleff is one of the confrmed speakers for the event.
of years which results in greater competition. He added: This can be
a challenge for those who underestimate the competition/market and
therefore it is essential to be particular when starting up new concepts
for clubs, lounges and big events. As I mentioned last year, the ascending
trend will come from festivals, concerts and events.
Associate sponsor Ronais managing director Gavin Dodd said that
while there are many valid topics raised during the forums, for 2013,
with the increased competition across all sectors creativity will be an
important area of focus.
He adds: We very much believe in supporting the great industry
that we are a part of and events as professional as this are a great way
of achieving our aim. With the expected increase in properties and
visitors to Dubai in the coming years, its important for all related
companies to stay ahead of the game, while building and retaining
crucial relationships with hospitality industry professionals.
Unilevers Amal Akbar said: The forum is a targeted event bringing
together bar managers, F&B directors, head bartenders and mixologists.
One of our products this year Knorr Lime Seasoning, has been
very successful with chefs, and the feedback we have had is that this
ingredient is being used a lot in beverages, so we thought this event is the
perfect opportunity to showcase this product to bartenders as lime juice
is one of the most important juices in a bar.
SPONSORS:
THE FORUM IS SUPPORTED BY:
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
16/
Event preview
Caterer conferences
The second annual industry-specifc event will run this month, with the agenda fxed, speakers
lined up and sponsors confrmed for a bout of trend talks, riveting discussions and debates
The Caterer Middle East
Chefs & Ingredients Forum
T
he second annual
Caterer Middle East
Chefs & Ingredients
forum is being held at
the InterContinental Hotel, Dubai
Festival City, on October 8, 2013.
Getting straight into the thick
of it is the rst panel discussion
on quality, whether diners care
that the chefs are sourcing the
best ingredients possible, and
putting the spotlight on the local
supplier market. Gates Hospitality
CEO Naim Maddad will moderate
the illustrious speaker line-up:
Jumeirah Hotels & Resorts group
culinary director Christian
Gradnitzer, Yas Viceroy Abu Dhabi
Much of the limelight in the
UAE foodservice sector goes to
the 5-star hotel and ne dining
markets but what of the other
sectors? Large-scale catering
presents a series of challenges
not faced by typical chefs. From
supply chain issues and setting
up remote kitchens, to creating
avour with reheated food, and
health and safety regulations, the
next panel will explore what the
hotel sector can learn from mass-
catering, and vice versa.
Recruitment and training is
a continuing issue for the food
industry and The Crystal Group
(which co-owns Sake No Hana)
area operations manager Patrice
Gouty and Atlantis The Palm
VP culinary Sascha Triemer
will discuss empowerment,
engagement and retention.
Other panels include
discussions on prot margins Okkus Hugh Sato is looking forward to raising awareness of Japanese ingredients.
executive chef Michael Jost, and
Fairmont Bab Al Bahr executive
chef Cladys Magagna.
Trends are also in focus
this year, with the next panel
discussion debating whether
organic and local ingredients
drive diner decisions, and
whether chefs are responsible for
setting the healthy agenda. Mango
Tree brand chef Paul Kennedy
(also an advisory panellist), Okku
executive chef Hugh Sato, Capital
Club executive chef Cyrille
Troesch, and chef-for-hire Paul
Frangie, will debate the issue
moderated by Ultra Brasserie
executive chef Emily Herbert.
with Capital Club Dubai general
manager Emma Cullen; and
reinventing F&B concepts with The
Cutting Agency founder Duncan
Fraser Smith and Jumeirah
Restaurants MD Jason Myers.
After lunch, Meat & Livestock
Australia executive chef Tarek
Ibrahim returns with the red
meat masterclass after the
popularity of his workshop last
year, along with a hygiene and
food care workshop with tips and
tricks to keep food safe.
The forum aims to be an
informative experience, and
advisory panellist Jost looks
forward to discussing the issue
of fresh ingredients. He says: I
would say our biggest concern
for chefs in this region today is
sourcing fruits and vegetables
of a high quality, which can be
challenging. If we obtain produce
from the main markets in Europe,
SPONSORS
THE FORUM IS SUPPORTED BY:
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /17
October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
Jason Myers will be one of the panel members at the event discussing prot management.
THEY SAID WHAT?
I think it is a great opportunity to meet other people in the industry
and make new connections with suppliers.
Emily Herbert, executive chef, Ultra Brasserie
In particular I relish the chance to discuss and share amongst peers
the many challenges faced in large industrial or commercial catering
ventures; this is an area often overlooked in the region when so much
focus is directed at star properties and their F&B outlets.
Colin Campbell, corporate chef, Abela & Co
Besides being in the company of local industry heavyweights, Chef
Cyrille and I believe we will bring a different hospitality perspective
by way of the private business club experience and the different
challenges we work through in our operation.
Emma Cullen, general manager, Capital Club Dubai
I am frstly delighted to support the event and network with my peers,
but also to raise awareness of the work Okku and myself are doing in
order to make authentic Japanese produce more readily available in
the UAE.
Hugh Sato, executive chef, Okku
It is a great chance to exchange ideas and discuss the industrys
hottest topics. I look forward to catching up with friends and colleagues
who are all working hard to put Dubai on the world culinary map!
Paul Frangie, chef-for-hire
I am looking forward to have the opportunity to interact with like-
minded industry professionals and discuss key issues facing the
hospitality sector as a whole.
Patrice Gouty, area operations manager, The Crystal Group
due to our location they have
already lost two or three days
worth of quality. One way to
overcome this is to give our local
farmers greater support to help
grow and develop high quality
produce available in the region.
Free demonstration :
international@robot-coupe.com
Watch
the video
Automatic Juicer
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Ultra Fresh Juices
Workshop sponsor Meat and
Livestock Australia says its
vital to support leading chefs
and establishments through
knowledge-sharing to maintain
the rate of growth in excellence
the UAE is famous for.
Editors comment
Volume 09 Issue 10
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 18/
L
ast month, I was given the opportunity
to join a focus group and go on a tour
of the Deira fish market, organised by
casual dining restaurant Seamood and
Dubai-based food tour company Frying Pan Ad-
ventures. Interested in returning to practising
my photography, and knowing I had a seafood
sustainability feature coming up, I said yes.
It was one of most insightful food experi-
ences I have had in a while. As I walked through
the stinking rows of dead (and in some cases,
barely alive) fish, I spotted baby sharks you
can see the photo on page 36 of the Burning Is-
sue, which deals with overfishing in the region.
Thats when I got really angry.
According to the UN Food and Agricultural
Organisation (FAO), the UAE is the fifth largest
exporter of shark fins to Hong Kong. This is in
spite of the fact that finning of live sharks was
banned in September 2008 by the UAE Minis-
try of Environment and Water. The practice
involves chopping off fins of live sharks caught
at sea and releasing them back into the waters
which leaves them vulnerable to predators,
leading to an inevitable death.
Bear in mind there is absolutely nothing stop-
ping fishermen from killing sharks, hacking off
their fins, and subsequently lining their pockets.
Another law passed in the country banned
fishermen from catching sharks during breed-
ing season from January 1 to April 30 every
year. Experts have since said this rule is ignored
and hardly ever enforced.
A quick search on restaurant listing app Zom-
ato for shark will list all the outlets offering
shark-based dishes in Dubai 13 of them. Too
many for my liking. You can find shark mince
dishes, shark fin soups, and yes, baby shark. I
have actually visited two of these outlets in the
past. I dont think I will be going back.
Its all very well to launch legislation, but
what about actually following through? Regula-
tions are not meant for paper, they are meant
for enforcement. Lack of the same is just killing
off a proud and regal marine animal.
Tough decisions and concrete moves need
to be taken to actually make the laws on paper
work in reality. Yes, it might lead to an initial loss
of income for those who thrive on the trade, but
so what? One day these horrific acts will lead to
a complete decimation of various fish species,
and soon there will be nothing left.
And as rightly pointed out in the Burning Is-
sue, this deplorable practice still happens be-
cause chefs cater to consumer demand. When
are any of you going to say no?
Devina Divecha. Editor.
Email: devina.divecha@itp.com
SO LONG, AND THANKS FOR ALL THE FISH:
APATHY IS KILLING MANY ENDANGERED SPECIES
EDITORS LETTER
Devina
Divecha
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Tel: +971 4 444 3568 email: diarmuid.omalley@itp.com
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DATES FOR THE DIARY...
7 OCTOBER
Bars & Nightlife Forum
InterContinental DFC
http://www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/
8 OCTOBER
Chefs & Ingredients Forum
InterContinental DFC
http://www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/
18 OCTOBER
Host Fieramilano
Milan, Italy
http://www.host.feramilano.it/en/
30 OCTOBER
Hotelier Middle East Awards
JW Marriott Marquis, Dubai
http://www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/
Comment
Philippe Agnese
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b Caterer Middle East | October 2013 20/
A
Although cheesecake is not our
oldest known cheese product, its
diversity, old history and varied
processing method makes you
wonder why we consume such
few types of this dessert.
As much as this cake can be intriguing while
opening a world of eating options, I can only re-
call and this is just thinking at the top of my
head that most of the global understanding of
cheesecake today revolves around the baked
and unbaked forms, along with the fact (and it
would be safe for me to say this) that an incredi-
bly high percentage of them are made using only
and mostly cream cheese.
Huh? France has merely 542 o cially rec-
ognised cheeses, Swiss people can talk about
cheese all day and still wrestle on clarifying
what is the right fondue, Italians use as many
cheeses as they eat pasta and so on I should
stop here and not even dare mention the rest
of the European, Arabic and Latin countries. It
is with despair and sorrow that somehow I feel
deprived, but eager to nd out more about the
unique source behind such a wonderful, old and
traditional product.
Therefore, considering all the above, I would
like to discuss the vast options, if not only just
scratch the surface and explore the various cat-
egories, processing methods and origins of the
baked cheesecake.
The earliest period of cheesecake-making goes
back a good 4,000 years in Greece. The rst re-
called method is as easy as pounding the cheese,
adding our and honey and cooking the cake on
wood re or under heated bricks.
Besides being a great way to preserve soft
cheese, it would serve as an eminent source of
GTEAU AU FROMAGE BLANC: OUR GUEST COLUMNIST TALKS ABOUT
HIS ASSOCIATION WITH CHEESECAKE AND DELVES INTO ITS HISTORY
COLUMNIST
Philippe
Agnese
energy, and in fact, it is said to have been served
to the athletes of the rst Olympic game in 776
BC. At that time, the cheesecake is still our based
with yeasty aroma that would develop over an ex-
tended shelf-life.
As it spread from Greece to other part of Eu-
rope, rst via the Romans using it for various oc-
casions such as religious oerings and good long
storable source of energy for the soldiers at war,
the method changed slightly as we noticed the in-
troduction of beaten eggs in the mixture, slowly
resulting in the fading of the yeast cake our-
based method.
The natural progression eventually would see
the creation entering an oven chamber to make
the rst baked cheesecake.
By the 18
th
century, most Europeans would
pass on their family recipe. Therefore, New York
benetted from various kind of cheesecakes dur-
ing the wave of European migration to America.
Textures and avours are quite extended as
Switzerland sees lighter cheesecake using quark;
Italy using ricotta; England, Ireland and the rest
of the Kingdom using soft cheese such as cot-
tage cheese or other sort of fresh clotted cheese.
France on the other hand uses few sweetened
THE EARLIEST PERIOD OF
CHEESECAKE-MAKING GOES
BACK A GOOD 4,000 YEARS IN
GREECE. THE FIRST RECALLED
METHOD IS AS EASY AS
POUNDING THE CHEESE,
ADDING FLOUR AND HONEY
AND COOKING THE CAKE
ON WOOD FIRE OR UNDER
HEATED BRICKS.
cheesecake recipes as beside the white cheese /
Fromage Blanc, cheese is strongly implanted in
the French gastronomy as a savoury ingredient.
Nonetheless, we see quite signicant varieties
and techniques using stronger cheeses.
So as you can gather, using dierent meth-
ods, avours and textures are not new to people
and nothing stops us from experimenting with
cheesecake as long as cheese exists.
In a basic cheesecake recipe you would have
approximately the following ratio: 60-65%
cream cheese, 20-25% sugar, 12-15% egg. By tak-
ing the above ratio and playing with dierent
mixing methods, baking styles and diverse
cheese textures and strengths, you will see some
exciting and unique results.
Some of the mixing methods include: knead-
ing; pte bombe; sabayon; creaming; chion;
sou ; using French meringue; and, using Ital-
ian meringue. I just wish to trigger an interest
for cheesecake lovers in seeking their personal
favourite in terms of taste, texture and aspects.
Keeping in mind that there are many more
kinds of cheeses being made which are not
mentioned here, that many other ingredients
such as fruits, nuts, berries, chocolate, and cof-
fee combine and blend fantastically with cheese,
it would be easy to say that there is a universe
ahead of just playing with what started as just
curdled milk!
So much more could be said on this topic, but
the important thing is to enjoy and to keep on
saying Cheese!
Philippe Agnese is the executive pastry chef
at Atlantis The Palm, Dubai, and won the
title of Pastry Chef of the Year at the Caterer
Middle East Awards 2013.
Head-to-head
Jumeirah Messilah Beach Hotel & Spa
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 22/
We have the vision of being Kuwaits number one food & beverage opera-
tion through quality, product and service that we have. Not in terms of the
price. We are going to place an F&B landmark in the country.
I made sure there is a team especially for F&B. In the old days, there were
two areas the kitchen and service. Things are changing for the better. I
implemented a system called Food & Beverage Connection from day one.
That is our daily communication brieng, which starts every morning with
the head chef, me, my assistant and other key members.
We had a clear strategy not to be over-priced. What we are charging is the
same that the market charges, but we have the better product. And its not
me who is saying that, but thats the feedback of the guests.
We need to make sure they are attractive, that the revenue is coming in.
Then is the cost aspect. There is a transparency throughout the team. I
make sure they know revenue doesnt mean prot.
I think the biggest challenge in general is getting the talent. As we open new
outlets and develop the business, we always need new colleagues, new tal-
ents and this is challenging, especially in Kuwait because it is a destination
with a certain lifestyle and not everybody appreciates that lifestyle. Once
we have them, its no problem. But to attract them, its an ongoing work.
In 12 months, the outlets will have settled down and then its the time to
build on that. We are going to be active in food promotions and new ideas.
The rst year you build up, and in the second year, start activities.
What is unique about the hotels F&B?
How do front-of-house and back-of-house support each other?
How is the pricing strategy justified?
How do you ensure the outlets are profitable?
What are the biggest challenges you face?
What does the future for the hotels F&B look like?
The concepts are pretty solid. The opening was very smooth; its my fourth
opening and the smoothest one Ive done. The team is very good. We are
very particular about making sure we have the best quality ingredients.
We are really on the same page. The most important thing is the commu-
nication between the front and back-of-house. We just really promote the
philosophy that its one team its not kitchen versus service. The main
thing that I am really very passionate about is making the team one, where
people understand each others role. And that seems to really work well.
I work very closely with the F&B director and Albert on this, and for every
menu we do a pricing survey in the market, and costing for recipes. We set
the prices together. Its always a communication between both parties.
We came in quite conservative and then did a solid market survey. If I want
to charge a certain amount for a dish, I need to be condent its worth the
money. We are on par, if not below the market, in some of our pricing.
I think the main thing is suppliers the constant follow-up with suppliers.
We have a very good supportive purchasing team and were working very
hard with that. But it is a constant challenge, just being on top of products
not coming in. Its one challenge thats ongoing, but its pretty normal for
pre-opening. But it is getting better.
If we continue the trend, the hotel F&B will be well-known in town. We are
here to be the best F&B in Kuwait. There are a lot of restaurants, but we
want our guests to walk away with an experience they really enjoy.
The best mix
HEAD
TO

HEAD
Albert Ettinger, EAM Christopher Curtis, executive chef
David Edgcumbe reports back on the F&B outlook at the Jumeirah Messilah Beach Hotel & Spa, Kuwait
Interview
Bandar Mohammad Al Balawi
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 24/
Rosewood Corniche, Jeddahs Habsburg restaurant manager Bandar Mohammad Al Balawi is the frst
KSA national to be appointed to the role; he tells Parinaaz Navdar why he chose the F&B industry
When did you join Rosewood
Corniche, Jeddah and what is
your career background?
In October 2011, I moved to Rose-
wood Corniche as the lobby lounge
manager and within a few months
was promoted to main dining
manager. As restaurant manager for
the hotels agship outlet Habsburg,
I oversee all areas of guest services.
I have been in the hospitality in-
dustry for over 13 years. I moved
to the UK at the age of 22 to pursue
an electronic engineering career,
but didnt take long to realise that
my part time job as a waiter for UK-
based Toorak Hotel made me much
happier than long hours of studying
at university. Therefore, I decided
to quit my studies and pursue a
career in the hospitality industry.
You are the frst Saudi Arabian
national to hold the position
of restaurant manager in the
hotel what attracted you to
the F&B industry?
I am the rst Saudi national to hold
this position and also the most
senior F&B Saudi national within all
of Jeddahs hotels. I fought against
the norms of accepting F&B service
as a full-time career and succeeded
in achieving my goal. Since then, I
have been successful in changing
many peoples point of view about
the hotel industry in Saudi Arabia
and am very happy to say that now
30% of restaurant employees at
Rosewood Corniche, Jeddah, are
Saudi nationals. Interacting with
guests from dierent corners of the
world was what initially attracted
me to the F&B industry. I think it
is very important to love your job
in order to achieve success and
satisfaction. And I dont think there
is a better profession than this for
an extrovert and ardent food lover
like me.
How do you ensure the success
of your outlet?
At Rosewood Corniche, we make
sure to deliver our promise of of-
fering exceptional service to guests,
which is the secret of our success.
We have also realised that you cant
have a service business without
the right kind of people who know
how to manage it. So we have been
spending a lot of time teaching and
training our sta members.
What are the biggest challeng-
es of the role?
The biggest challenge by far is at-
tracting young Saudis to work in the
hospitality industry. Given the rate
at which the industry is progressing
in Saudi Arabia, the demand for
local manpower remains high to
full necessary requirements. The
hospitality business is unpredict-
able since there is no guarantee that
customers will continue eating the
same menu items. As a restaurant
Breaking boundaries
I AM VERY HAPPY TO SAY THAT NOW 30%
OF RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES AT ROSEWOOD
CORNICHE ARE SAUDI NATIONALS
Habsburg restaurant manager Bandar Mohammad Al Balawi, Rosewood Corniche, Jeddah.
manager it is important to constant-
ly plan new marketing proposals
and increase visitor footfall. Building
sales is challenging as well. People
continue to dine out, but they are
more value driven, so keeping that
business going has been a challenge.
What do you enjoy most about
your job?
I love partnering with the sta to
create an incredible experience
for our guests and building lasting
relationships with them. It is also
very satisfying and rewarding to
witness year-on-year sales growth
and see the team take on larger
responsibilities.
What is your approach to excel-
lent guest service?
Our aim is to always cater to the
distinctive needs of our guests and
ensure they enjoy their time at our
hotel and restaurants. Our approach
to guest service is building good
HOW TO:
KEEP CUSTOMERS
Al Balawis fve tips for
achieving repeat customers in
a restaurant:
r Make your dishes your
strength good food is
the most effective way to
achieve repeat customers
in a restaurant. Work on
diversifying your menus to
ensure guests always have
countless options.
r Its very important to keep
in touch with customers to
ensure top-of-mind recall.
Customising menus for them
on special occasions or
sending greetings via email
will make them feel special.
r Customer satisfaction a
well-versed staff coupled
with a strong sense of
knowing customer needs will
create an environment that
draws people in and leaves
them with a positive and
lasting impression.
r Well-trained staff the
employees conduct and
their interaction with clients
can cement relationships
that will bring them back to
your business.
r It is important to know your
customers and keep the
relationship as personal as
possible. Addressing them
by name is also a good way
to connect with them on a
personal level.
relationships with our customers.
Small gestures like thanking them
for visiting our restaurant and creat-
ing a positive and friendly environ-
ment will ensure they return.
Authorized UAE distributor
Showroom 3,Sh. Ahmed Bin Juma Bldg. / Sh. Zayed Rd.,Dubai U.A.E.
Phone: +971 4 3433478 Fax: +971 3433498 / E-mail: info@lamarquise.ae
www.lamarquise.ae
CREATED FOR CATERI NG NEEDS
DEDI CATED TO EXCELLENT TASTE
ww
w
ww
.o
nn
ee
-o
nn
lly.ee
u
Cover Story
Vineet Bhatia
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 26/
YOU HAVE GOT TO LOOK AFTER THE
GUEST. IF YOU ARE COOKING FOR YOUR
EGO THEN YOU BETTER CLOSE SHOP.
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 26/ Caterer Middle East | October 2013
Vineet Bhatia
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
Cover Story
/27 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
WEAVER OF
MEMORIES
Celebrity chef Vineet Bhatia on leaving a legacy, creating mem-
orable experiences and whether Dubai is Michelin-ready
By Devina Divecha
Photography by Mosh Lafuente
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /27
W
hen Vineet Bhatia looked at my business card
and said he remembered my name, it was dif-
cult not to react like a fan-girl. I had rst met
this celebrity chef two-and-a-half years ago
at a food festival in Dubai; I interviewed him
and volunteered to be his cooking assistant for a live demo, where
I whisked ingredients to help him create a chicken dish with kadi
and pink upma (a semolina-based Indian breakfast item).
While Bhatia recognised my name, he did not remember my
actual triumph on stage, but attributed it to the number of people
he meets on a regular basis on his travels.
Interacting with his guests and fans is an important part of his
life, he says. The two-time Michelin starred chef can be found
on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram where he often replies to
people who tag him in posts. When I ask whether he handles his
social media himself, he conrms he does. My Facebook page
was rst started by my sta in London, I was never into it. But
now I dont leave it to anyone to run my Twitter, Instagram or
Facebook. I do it myself, and try and reply where I can.
I think personal interaction is important; there is no point
in posting on social media and then not replying. You have to
interact with your guests and fans, especially if you are at a cer-
tain status where you are recognised. Its nice to reply, its a basic
courtesy in life. And whether its good or bad [comments], I will
reply, says Bhatia.
PERSONAL TOUCH
Its this one-to-one interaction Bhatia prefers in all spheres of life.
He grins and admits to me his team doesnt know hes actually a
shy person, who prefers intimate interactions as opposed to large
groups. When it comes to work, however, Bhatia is a team player.
He says: Im very sensitive about our restaurants and our team. I
try to look after both the guests and the team. But it comes down
to hard work.
Bhatia reveals his employees are constantly communicating to
ensure his restaurants across the world are consistent. We keep
a strong tab on the team phone, Skype or email just to ensure
they learn the right things and the guest gets the right product. If
they both go back happy every day then I am very happy.
One of the uglier sides of the F&B industry, Bhatia admits, is
the practice of poaching, which he abhors. He asserts: We do not
poach anybody; we only train in-house and promote. Fortunately
with 10 dierent restaurants we can do that. You will nd all our
chefs only come from our team.
He says he receives a lot of CVs from chefs in other restaurants,
but rst asks if they are willing to start from scratch with his com-
pany. As expected, there are no takers.
We will never pick somebody from X restaurant and put him
as a head chef, it doesnt work. They dont know us and we dont
know them. The element of trust for me is very important. When
I trust someone, I know in my absence the food is delivered to
Cover Story
Vineet Bhatia
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 28/
and remember what they get. I want them to say,
wow, I had an amazing meal, he adds.
He says this only happens when food is
cooked with passion. You have got to look after
the guest. If you are cooking for your ego then
you better close shop.
And while ne dining restaurants dont often
see the presence of young children, Bhatias
Indego by Vineet does have families dining out
from time to time.
He welcomes this trend and says: A lot of
young children now are coming to our restau-
rant, which I think is very attering because they
feel quite comfortable. They are the future of
our restaurants when they are used to eating
good food, they will go back. They are memories
you can never take away, and that is why, we as
adults crave for the food our mom used to make
at home, or me craving the chaat I used to have
on Mumbais streets. Those are the avours we
try and create in our restaurants with our own
twist and style.
MAKING A MENU
And indeed, Bhatias restaurants are known for
their unexpected twists with traditional Indian
food. He reveals that a new tasting and dessert
menu has been worked on for Indego by Vineet
at Grosvenor House Dubai, and will be a good
eye opener for everybody in Dubai on what can
be done and adds: But one thing we will never
compromise on is our authentic avour and style
of cooking.
A hands-on chef, Bhatia cooks the dishes
for his teams before letting them try it out
themselves. Nothing will change on the menu
without me trying it out or trialling it myself
rst, he says.
On the menu for his only restaurant in Dubai,
Indego by Vineet, you will nd intriguing items
like cinnamon panna cotta paired with regular
desserts instead of the trademark kul (ice
cream), or butterscotch popcorn. Not just your
regular high-end Indian restaurant then.
Bhatia smiles and says: I dont want to oer
something which you can get in your normal
restaurant or household. Everybody makes a
halwa at home, but a halwa can also be modied,
and thats what we do. We add barley in them, we
add apple in them, and apples go well with cin-
namon, so the rst thought is to put cinnamon
in some form, so you add the cinnamon panna
WHEN I TRUST SOMEONE,
I KNOW IN MY ABSENCE THE
FOOD IS DELIVERED TO THE
STANDARDS WHICH I NEED,
OR WHICH I THINK THE
GUESTS DESERVE TO GET.
Vineet Bhatia in the kitchen of his restaurant at Grosvenor House Dubai. He takes a hands-on approach when it comes to changing menus, ensuring that his team delivers the standard he desires.
the standards which I need, or which I think the
guests deserve to get.
Lots of people poach, it is rampant in our
industry unfortunately. But then you realise that
people who leave are not really your core team
members. Our core team members have stayed
with us and grown with us. Eventually they will
y away and set up their own stu and we will be
very happy with that. But when they do it nicely,
rather than backbiting, we will be happier.
HAPPY TIMES
Bhatia is interested in keeping his guests happy
as well, and is always imagining dierent ways to
do just that.
He says: The last thing I want is for people to
come and say they didnt have a good meal at my
restaurant. That will hurt me.
Creating food memories therefore, is Bhatias
way of making sure diners at his venues leave
satised. Its a constant thing for us, were always
constantly trying to do something dierent and
interesting, which people tend to remember and
take back with them. For me especially, restau-
rants are all about going to a venue and having
food memories, he says.
In Dubai for example, the quality is already
upmarket and classy. So what makes you stand
apart from them? I want people to come here
Vineet Bhatia
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
Cover Story
/29 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
WE HAVE NOW COME TO
THE STAGE WHERE WE ARE
PUSHING THE FOOD A LITTLE
MORE, TRYING TO BE A LOT
MORE CUTTING EDGE, A LOT
MORE ADVENTUROUS, TRYING
TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES ...
Clockwise from top left: dark chocolate-chikki delice with coconut panna cotta; coconut olive chicken tikka; spice-crusted sea bass, tandoori crushed potatoes, coconut moilee sauce and crispy okra.
cotta ... you dont want to be serving an ice cream
or kul all the time.
We have now come to the stage where we
are pushing the food a little more, trying to be a
lot more cutting edge, a lot more adventurous,
trying to push the boundaries.
He continues: Luckily I can close my eyes
and taste food, its a blessing. And fortunately its
always worked.
WORKING MODEL
And how Bhatias ventures have worked with
ve restaurants in the GCC (one in Dubai, two
in Doha, and one in Saudi Arabia with another
slated to open in February 2014) on the cards, he
isnt showing any signs of stopping.
On the international front he says nothing
is nalised yet although there are three or four
projects in the works. Bhatia adds: We are look-
ing at North America, we are looking at the Far
East, and we are looking at India very closely.
When asked specically about the region,
Bhatia reveals: We are looking at doing more
projects in the UAE. Abu Dhabi is a great place
to look at and we are very keen to do something
there down the line.
We would also like one more venture in
Dubai, with a slightly dierent kind of a setup
something more informal and casual. We already
have ne dining, so theres no point in doing a
second. We are thinking of something which
complements the ne dining, with a better price
point so you can have a larger volume of people
coming through. But we will strongly focus on
quality of product, which is paramount for us.
Speaking about new openings, will he con-
sider opening in the newly opened The Oberoi
Dubai, considering his relationship with the
group in India his highly acclaimed Indian
restaurant Ziya has tasted success in The Oberoi
Mumbai? No. I would consider whatever comes
my way but I have never in my life gone and said,
open my restaurant. The Oberoi has opened up
in Dubai and Im pretty pleased, and very happy
to note that a lot of stu they have used has been
inspired by my restaurant in Mumbai, Ziya the
table set-up and layout are nearly identical so
I must have done something right for them to
have taken that further. I wish them all the luck;
they are still friends of ours.
People always say, more Indian restaurants
are opening up, theres more competition. And
I say, yes the more the merrier ... you will always
know the masters from the boys. As long as you
have an ace up your sleeve you will do well. The
main thing is to look after your guest. As long
as you continue doing that they will come and
Dubai can take 10 more Indegos they will all
survive. There are so many people going out to
eat. Its a very buoyant industry.
DUBAI, AN F&B HUB?
Calling Dubai a second home, Bhatia is hope-
ful for the regions F&B industry. Dubai went
through a very big boom and then it got hit very
badly for a few years. But now it is on the upturn
again. He praises the vision of the ruling family,
and says he thinks their visions for the city and
the country will come to fruition in a big way.
For me as an international chef, I look for
that. Because for us, at the end of the day, it is a
business. You have to provide a service and for
the brand image it is really important to be in the
right place. You are seen with the right people,
you are seen doing the right things, and you have
very happy guests coming and going.
Bearing in mind the exponential growth of the
Emirate of Dubai, the question on many peoples
lips is: is the city Michelin-ready? Bhatia gives a
resounding yes.
Yes, now it is ready. If you had asked me the
question eight years back I would have said no.
Theres no point in one or two chefs coming and
Cover Story
Vineet Bhatia
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 30/
doing something and expecting everyone to get
stars. I think theres a lot more chefs who have
now come in, there are a lot more chefs who,
without having been recognised internationally,
are producing a lot of good, fantastic food. So I
think it is a matter of time that the Michelin will
look at Dubai at some stage.
There is so much choice here, not just with
cuisine and styles, but also the price points. It
doesnt have to be expensive to be Michelin. You
can have something of top-quality at mid-price
range that is Michelin. So it will come. It is just
for the company to see the volume of sales to
see if they can justify doing that. It is after all a
business for them.
He admits that when he rst passed through
the country in the early 90s he did not think
he would ever set up shop here. Then I came
back in 2004 when Grosvenor House was being
built and I saw the changes happening. It wasnt
100% ready but there was scope. And having said
that, in the past three or four years, there has
been so much happening. You can import lots of
produce which you could not eight or nine years
back. There is a lot of choice in supermarkets,
and there is variation. And for chefs like us its
fantastic because theres so much choose from.
LEAVING A LEGACY
Figures such as Alain Ducasse and the famed
Quraishi family of India who have produced
generations of master chefs inspire Bhatia, and
he says, like them, he wants to leave a legacy. I
want to have done something and given some-
thing back, he adds.
But while he is condent about doing so, he
says he doesnt have a plan. What the future
holds, I dont know. But we will not stop. The day
we think we cant implement, cant justify, we
will not grow anymore.
I can easily sell my soul now, make tonnes
of money and open 50 restaurants, but will that
make me happy? No. So we cherry pick our proj-
ects, we do things which we believe in. We love
to have a challenge and we only try to work with
partners who have faith in us and we have faith
in them ... life is too short to have ghts.
Karma Kafe, Q43 and Asia Asia are looking for the best in the
industry to join this dynamic and exciting group. If you would
like to know more about all the positions we are looking for
please send a full CV and photo to paul@solutions-lesiure.com www.solutions-lesiure.com
AND I SAY, YES THE MORE
THE MERRIER ... YOU WILL
ALWAYS KNOW THE MASTERS
FROM THE BOYS. AS LONG AS
YOU HAVE AN ACE UP YOUR
SLEEVE YOU WILL DO WELL.
Quick Bytes
By Vineet
On becoming a TV chef: I would love to
do a TV show within the GCC, especially with
Emirati food to showcase the overlap be-
tween Emirati food and Indian food. Theres
so much in common.
On food trends: People want to have
small portions. The whole concept of grazing
like a cow comes into the picture. People
dont want stodgy food from 15 years back.
On important ingredients for cooking:
Passion to cook. Ingredients can come and
go, but if you dont have passion it wont
work. Its not a methodical thing where we
just pick up the pan and cook anyone can
do that. If you put your heart and soul in it, it
will all come out well.
On molecular gastronomy: Is it a trend?
Im not sure... I think people use it as a gim-
mick, and make a show in a restaurant by
adding one or two things. Either you go all
out or you are careful with it.
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /31
October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
For all your OS&E needs
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AL-DIYAFA
When was your company established?
Al Diyafa was rst established 15 years ago
withshowrooms in Dubai and Abu Dhabi,
with the goal to become the largest stockist
of hospitality supplies in the UAE. Since its
inception, the company has managed to
become the leading supplier of hospital-
ity products to hotels, restaurants, cafes ,
hospitals and educational institutions.
How many people are employed by Al
Diyafa?
Together with the back oce and ware-
house sta, the company employs 21
people. The sales division is the face of Al
Diyafa to the outside world as its team of 10,
all professionally qualied with extensive
hotel backgrounds, assists our client base
with an extensive range of products .The
company is pursuing its strategy of growth
and expansion through the addition of
branded products, thetraining of its sales
force and theopening of a large outlet in
Abu Dhabi.
How has the company performed?
Al Diyafa enjoys a leading share of the UAE
market and widely is considered the one-
stop-shop for hotel and restaurant supplies.
With growth in 2011 and 2012 in the region
of 30% per annum, and given the growth
of the hospitality segment and the huge ex-
pansion of the two leading airlines and the
expected addition of hotel rooms and F&B
facilities, we expect to continue to achieve
our historical growth rate. With continued
additional investment in human resources
and physical assets we forecast that Al Diya-
fa will continue to be the premier supplier
of hospitality supplies in the UAE market.
What are your core products and services
for the hospitality industry?
As of today, Al Diyafa oers about 40
professional brands catering for the hotel
industry. For hotel openings, Al Diyafa is in
a position to supply virtually all the operat-
ing supplies and equipment required for
branded hotels including lobby and house-
keeping trolleys, outdoor furniture, kitchen
utensils, tabletop atware, hollow ware,
chinaware, glassware, janitorial supplies,
bed and bath linen, food and beverage
linen, kitchen electrical equipment, back of
house shelving and storage, thermometers
and other HACCP products, chef uniforms,
shoes and banqueting tables etc.
Our partner brands are well reputed
manufacturers and include Paderno, Abert,
Pintinox, Cigolini, Bisetti,Tognana, Fama
from Italy, De Buyer, Allafrance, Roland Vla-
myunck, Sanipousse from France, Zown and
Araven from Spain, Eurobambino andDel-
brooks from the UK, Arthur Krupp, Geisser
Messer from Germany, Libbey, Calmil,
Gourmet Display from the USA, Detay, Kapp,
Gural Porsellan, Lava, Tuart from Turkey,
Premium Uniforms from Canada, Mercura
from Belgium, Tiger from Koreaand Venus
from India. Al Diyafa is the only company in
the market that supplies ex-stock branded
professional supplies for anyonewho
wants to open a restaurant, coee shop or
F&B outlet at short notice.
What new products have you launched
recently?
We have introduced several brands, mainly
Mercura from Belgium for lobby and
housekeeping trolleys, Roland Vlamyunck
for outdoor furniture, Lava for cast iron
and Tognana for Chinaware.
What other news is there from your com-
pany this year?
We have redecorated our showroom in
Dubai by introducing a new display system
designed to showcase all the products in
stock in a more visible manner to enable
buyers to select products as per their
needs. We have also implemented a ware-
house management system to facilitate
and ease our logistics processes to respond
rapidly to customers needs.
What is your best seller?
Without a doubt, the kitchen utensils range
is one of our bestsellers, followed by our
large selection of chinaware and other
tabletop items.
What do you oer hotels above and
beyond expectation?
We are the only hospitality equipment
supplier with a showroom presence in
Dubai and Abu Dhabi so that we are close
to our customers. Secondly, we can claim
with condence that we can procure from
stock all the needs of restaurant and hotel
owners. Third and most importantly, we
apply the highest ethical standards in our
dealing with our customers. We provide
good value for money and aim to build a
lasting partnership with our clients.
Cagatay Gurevin, general manager of hospitality supplier Al Diyafa, says the companys
extensive catalogue of brands for the hospitality industry has been a key factor in its success
A Tiger chang dish.
Pots by Paderno.
Al Diyafa offers about 40 professional brands catering for the hotel
industry as well as ex-stock branded professional supplies.
Web: www.aldiyafa.com
DID YOU
KNOW?:
FIND
MORE:
Cagatay Gurevin.
Burning issue
Sustainability in shing
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 32/
E
veryone is talking about
sustainability and for
good reason. It is a global
concern, with our planet
unable to cope with the load of hu-
manitys demands on its resources.
And when it comes to seafood and
shing, the burden is fast becoming
too much to bear.
In the Middle East, certain spe-
cies of sh are struggling to survive,
with critically endangered breeds
including hammour (orange-
spotted grouper), blue n tuna and
kingsh continuing to be found on
restaurant menus.
A recent survey by YouGov
showed that 66% of the UAEs
residents are estimated to eat
hammour on a weekly basis, and
according to the Environment
Agency Abu Dhabi, overshing of
hammour has placed the species
on the endangered list. In recent
years, hammour has been over-
shed seven times above the level
that would allow the species to
naturally replenish itself.
In spite of the campaign,
consumers are still choosing to eat
hammour, restaurants still cater
to their demand for it, and the
local sh market sells it and this
doesnt even cover the equally dis-
turbing issue of shermen trying to
pass o other varieties of sh as the
orange-spotted grouper at Dubais
sh market in Deira.
WHATS ON THE MENU?
Baker & Spice Dubai food consul-
tant Yael Mejia is very passionate
about the cause, and is known
in the F&B circles for expressing
her frustration at the inability of
her colleagues to put more eort
towards eliminating the issue of
overshing. She asserts that the sh
served in Baker & Spice Dubai is
denitely sustainable.
With sustainability on the agenda, Caterer
Middle East investigates whether the F&B
industry in the Middle East has made any
progress with combating the issue of overfshing
A shy
tale
Fake hammour being
offered for sale at the
Deira sh market.
Mohamed Eid follows Choose Wisely.
PEOPLE HARDLY
THINK IN TERMS OF
SUSTAINABILITY. THE
CONSUMERS THINK
ABOUT WHAT IS
CHEAPER AND WHAT
IS FRESHER.
Mohamed Eid.
Mejia continues: Our whole
ethos is about using sustainable
produce and limiting our carbon
footprint. It would be against our
own morals and standards to oer
endangered sh and we stopped
serving hammour over three years
ago the moment the rst news
trickled out about it. We never use
farmed sh either as we consider
sh farming a dirty and dangerous
activity. However, the restaurant
does oer kingsh which is on the
banned list of the Choose Wisely
programme. When asked about
this, Mejia defends her menu and
says: Yes we use kingsh from the
Arabian sea, not from the Gulf. As
far as we know its not endangered
in the least.
The St Regis Saadiyat Island
Resort, Abu Dhabi chef de cuisine
Turquoiz Kevin Fleming says at his
restaurant there is only sustainable
sh, which is not an individual
Sustainability in shing
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
Burning issue
/33 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
outlet policy, but one Starwood
follows. The damage that oversh-
ing can do is irreplaceable and as a
company we decided to take a step
against it, he says.
And its not just hotel brands,
but casual dining outlets which
consider the problem as well.
London Business Group and
London Fish & Chips founder and
director Gary Arnold asserts that
it is in his brands values to work
with sustainable sheries and never
employ any kind of endangered sh
species into the menu. Currently
our menu is made up of Atlantic
cod (gadus morhua) and haddock
(melanogrammus aeglenus),
both of which make up for the best
tasting sh and chips and are very
much sustainable species.
Casual dining outlet Seamood
founder Mohamed Eid is another
restaurateur passionate about the
cause. He says emphatically: All the
Kevin
Fleming.
WHAT IS CHOOSE
WISELY?
HOW TO TELL IF YOU
CAN EAT THAT FISH
Choose Wisely is a campaign
to protect the future of UAE
fsheries. According to its
handy guide, overfshing
is the practice of catching
more fsh than the oceans
can sustain, depleting fsh
populations. In the UAE many
species are being taken out
beyond sustainable levels.
Studies show that the overall
number of commercial fsh
in the country has declined
by 80% in the last 30 years.
Operated by EWS-WWF, it has
also, in collaboration with
the Environment Agency, Abu
Dhabi (EAD), created up-to-
date lists of sustainable and
unsustainable fsh choices.
The consumer guide to UAE
fsh is meant for diners to
make informed decisions
it classifes fsh into three
colour categories (red, amber
or green) based on the
status of the stock. This is
determined based on scientifc
assessments carried out for
fsheries experts at the EAD.
GO FOR IT!
Some stock not experiencing
heavy fshing pressure:
IWo-bar seabrear
\e||oW bar arge|fs|
l|r| ear erperor
Sord|d sWeet||ps
0|art sea catfs|
THINK AGAIN!
Stock is heavily overfshed,
avoid eating these:
0rarge-spotted grouper
(hammour)
Sparg|ed erperor (s|aar|)
K|rgfs|
0o|der trea||]
0o|d||red seabrear
menu items in my restaurant are
sustainable; we follow the Choose
Wisely campaign guidelines regard-
ing sustainable and unsustainable
sh. For example we have shaari
eskhaly (pink ear emperor) instead
of shaari (emperor).
He says farmed sh is nor-
mally not a major part of the
menu, but in very special cases it
does feature with the presence of
farmed shrimps and sweet water
mullet, when available. Farmed
king prawns however, have come
into the ring range recently with
unethical farming practices slave
labour and unhygienic conditions
revealed in warm-water farms such
as in Thailand.
So where the sh comes from
is another factor that needs to be
considered as cold water prawns
for example, are sustainable, but
obviously more expensive.
REVEALING THE SOURCE
It comes down to sourcing as
MORE AWARENESS
NEEDS TO COME
FROM THE MEDIA
OF THE EFFECT OF
OVERFISHING AND
QUOTAS.
Kevin Fleming.
Burning issue
Sustainability in shing
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 34/
well, which is a problem the F&B
industry faces even with non-
seafood ingredients. Restaurants
can choose to get their sh directly
from the source i.e. the shermen,
or go through suppliers whether
locally or for imports. But does this
mean they get the right sh?
Arnold says his QSR brand takes
sustainability of sh so seriously, it
works with suppliers with creden-
tials to support its internal policy.
a mix of local and imported sea-
food at Turquoiz. The selection we
receive from Europe can be a mix
of wild and farmed sh however
we have complete condence in
the suppliers as we know that they
personally visit European suppliers
to check the conditions.
Eid reveals there are three ways
his restaurants source his sh:
going to the market; dealing with
a supplier; or, having a sherman
sending it directly to the restaurant.
In all cases my sta members
and I know what we serve and
what we source very well. We have
been in the market for a year now,
so almost every supplier knows our
particular items, says Eid. In fact,
shermen at the Deira sh market
have even had sh sent back when
Eid discovered he had been given
unsustainable items clearly tak-
ing a stand on the matter.
MAKE THE CALL
Mejia is rm about the fact that
chefs and restaurants need to make
these tough decisions themselves.
We work closely with renowned
suppliers in the market, such as
F. Smales & Son Fish Merchants
which has received the Marine
Stewardship Council (MSC) Certi-
cation for sustainable shing.
And this certication is
something London Fish & Chips
is now working on as well. Arnold
proudly reveals: Our UK branch
has recently been certied by the
Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
which is an independent, global,
non-prot organisation for auditing
sheries against environmental
standards, trace supply chains and
similarly audits restaurants. We
are the rst restaurant in London
which is the buyer of the sh or
sh products sold as MSC-certied
thus dealing only with sustainable
suppliers and using sustainable sh
on our menu. Our UAE branches
will also be audited for the certica-
tion by the MSC in October 2013, to
be the rst restaurant in the Middle
East to gain such an accreditation.
Mejia implements a no im-
ported sh policy at Baker & Spice
Dubai. All the sh used comes di-
rectly from the Arabian Sea, as she
considers the Gulf too polluted
for my liking. Her team shops in
the local sh market daily, with sh
usually from Oman.
Starwood has a vetting proce-
dure for its seafood suppliers to
ensure they comply with the hotels
policy. Fleming explains: We have
Laura Allais-Mar has found shark in venues.
WHAT IS SLOW
FOOD?
Slow Food Dubai is a local
organisation, which has, since
April 5 2013, offcially been
recognised and endorsed by
Slow Food International as
a local chapter, representing
members of Slow Food
International in the region.
Slow Food Dubai leader and
founder Laura Allais-Mar says
the organisation is dedicated
to promoting a society that
celebrates the regions cultural
diversity, and recognises the
link between people, plate and
planet. The organisation has
held Slow Fish campaigns in
many cities and regions across
the world. The local chapter
hopes to run similar campaigns
in October 2014.
I HAVE YET TO
SEE INSPECTORS AT
THE FISH MARKET
CHECKING ON THE
SIZE OF CATCHES
OR CONFISCATING
ILLEGAL CATCHES.
Laura Allais-Mar.
OUR UAE
BRANCHES WILL ALSO
BE AUDITED FOR THE
CERTIFICATION BY
THE MSC IN OCTOBER
2013, TO BE THE FIRST
SUCH RESTAURANT IN
THE MIDDLE EAST.
Gary Arnold.
The Loot sh, one of the sustainable items found at casual dining restaurant, Seamood.
Gary Arnold works with accredited suppliers.
We are in charge of our own des-
tiny and make our own decisions.
It is our responsibility to behave
responsibly serving sustainable
sh is part of our integrity. Our
customers come to us because they
know and respect that ethos.
Fleming agrees that the industry
should be responsible for setting
the agenda on overshing, but says
consumers also play an important
role. While we at Turquoiz can
choose our suppliers extremely
carefully and follow the Starwood
sustainability policy we also rely on
our guests to be aware of the issue
and also support our stance.
Food Dubai leader and founder
Laura Allais-Mar has only been in
the UAE for seven months, and if
she has ever seen hammour oered
at a restaurant, she has asked the
managers or owners why it is avail-
able. She reveals: And the answer
has always been: because my clients
want it at any cost.
Allais-Mar is full of praise for
Lafayette Gourmet culinary direc-
tor Russell Impiazzi as someone
Burning issue
Sustainability in shing
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 36/
who champions the cause in the
region. She points Caterer Middle
East to a recently released YouTube
video showing Impiazzis trip to the
Deira sh market, where the chef
chose to buy a pink-eared emperor
instead of hammour.
EDUCATION UPFRONT
There have been unanimous calls
over education but how does one
go about that? Choose Wisely and
Slow Food Dubai exist, but do they
have any teeth? Mejia chooses not
to comment, instead saying: We
are leading from the front and are
very happy for others to follow.
And while Fleming says he is
an avid supporter of the Choose
Wisely programme, he adds that
the noticeable impact is made by
large organisations and their eorts,
such as Starwood which has a rm
sustainability stance in place.
He explains: I feel that there are
two factors in this issue. Firstly,
people tend to stick to what they
know. If they grew up eating a
certain variety of sh then the likeli-
hood is that they will continue with
this choice rather than a less known
variety. Secondly, people are not
truly aware of their choices. More
awareness needs to come from the
media of the eect of overshing
and quotas.
Eid agrees: Habits are the
biggest issue, and people hardly
think in terms of sustainability. The
consumers will think about what
is cheaper and what is fresher, and
thats it. So we have to start with
teaching the children in school, or
trying to create local TV documen-
taries to really push people to think
before they eat or buy.
Eid is taking a step in this
direction himself: he has teamed
up with local food tour company,
Frying Pan Adventures, to launch a
seafood tour where he and the tour
rms founder Arva Ahmed will
lead people to the Deira sh market
and educate them about the dier-
ent kinds of sh available locally,
how to avoid buying endangered
species, and other tips.
It really is a buyers market for
seafood, and Allais-Mar says the
consumer is the market, and the
market dictates what producers
and shermen will provide. Until
we educate the public in the need
for sustainability in all areas and
facets of our food culture, then we
are ghting a losing battle.
Mejia agrees and adds: The
biggest issues are ignorance and
irresponsible behaviour by the in-
dustry and the population at large,
coupled with non-enforcement.
People have become so used to
buying blindly from supermarkets
and chains without thought, and
everything being available on tap all
year round, they have no real inter-
est beyond paying lip service and
pretending to do the right thing.
Vetting procedures may happen
from the side of the chef or restau-
rant, but Allais-Mar adds little else
happens in the market. Yes, there
are procedures and laws, but very
little implementation of the law or
regulations. I have yet to see inspec-
tors at the sh market checking on
the size of catches or conscating
illegal catches. On a recent visit
to the sh market, Caterer Middle
East found rows of baby sharks and
hammours laid out on display for
prospective buyers.
Recounting a personal experi-
ence, Allais-Mar continues: We
need to inform our suppliers of
what we are and are not prepared
to purchase. We have been to vari-
ous Emirati restaurants in the re-
gion, and shark and hammour was
the rst dish they suggested, with
pride. When we mentioned that we
dont want that due to them being
threatened and over-shed, we
were literally laughed at and jeered.
It was quite an experience.
THE BIGGEST
ISSUES ARE
IGNORANCE AND
IRRESPONSIBLE
BEHAVIOUR BY THE
INDUSTRY AND
THE POPULATION ...
COUPLED WITH NON-
ENFORCEMENT.
Yael Mejia.
Yael Mejia thinks farmed sh is a dirty thing.
Grilled wild prawns from Oman can be found on the Baker & Spice Dubai menu.
Baby sharks for sale found by Caterer Middle East during a recent visit to the Deira sh market.
Cuisine focus
German
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 38/
Caterer Middle East fnds out whether German cuisine has found its spot in
the heart of the regions diners and why its popularity is slowly on the rise
How popular is German cuisine
in this region?
Kevin Pohl, speciality outlet chef
Brauhaus, Beach Rotana, Abu Dhabi:
German cuisine is certainly popular
and as more and more people travel,
they are becoming further exposed
to German cuisine and realise that it
goes well beyond just the beverages
that Germany is known for.
Denis Vecchiato, executive chef,
Doha Marriott Hotel: German cuisine
in this region is still up and coming.
Currently, there is only one German
restaurant in the city despite there
being a considerable population of
German expats in Doha these days.
Steffen Assmann, head chef, Der
Keller, Jumeirah Beach Hotel, Dubai:
In the last few years German cuisine
has become more popular for tour-
ists from all over the world. In Dubai,
we have a lot of residents who come
from or have visited Germany; they
love to recreate the experience of
typical German food, drinks and
atmosphere they enjoyed when they
dined in a German Wirtshaus.
Is German cuisine here as
authentic as it gets?
Surya Joshi, executive chef, Acacia
by Bin Majid Hotels & Resorts, Ras Al
Khaimah: We cook the food with the
best handpicked local ingredients
without tweaking the cooking meth-
ods so the local audience can also get
the taste of authentic German food.
Bhavesh Rawal, director of
culinary, JW Marriott Dubai: There
are not many German restaurants
in Dubai or the region. But the ones
who specialise in this cuisine have
maintained the authentic style. Reci-
pes are not tweaked and ingredients
are not substituted. Pork is still the
main meat used.
Sunil Nautiyal, executive chef, Beach
Hotel by Bin Majid Hotels & Resorts,
Ras Al Khaimah: We have a lot of Ger-
man speciality restaurants in UAE
oering the best, fresh and authentic
food to the locals, expatriates and
German clients. These include
traditional favourites like sauerkraut,
cabbage rolls, pretzels, and more.
DV: We currently have a German
Oktoberfest!
Meet the
Experts
Surya Joshi,
executive chef, Acacia by Bin Majid
Hotels & Resorts, Ras Al Khaimah
Kevin Pohl,
speciality outlet chef Brauhaus,
Beach Rotana, Abu Dhabi
Denis Vecchiato,
executive chef, Doha Marriott Hotel
Sunil Nautiyal,
executive chef, Beach Hotel by Bin
Majid Hotels & Resorts, RAK
Steen Assmann,
head chef, Der Keller, Jumeirah
Beach Hotel, Dubai
Bhavesh Rawal, director of
culinary, JW Marriott Dubai
rBrauhaus mixed sausage dishes sold per month rLHGerman sausages used per week at Hofbrauhaus IN NUMBERS:
director of F&B who is very keen to
preserve as much authenticity in the
German cuisine as possible. Our aim
is to seamlessly combine the avour
and style of German cuisine, yet
make it in such a way that the local
Arab community feels comfortable
trying these new oerings.
KP: There is always the odd chance
that any type of cuisine is tweaked to
suit the tastes of the local audience
but considering that majority of
restaurant patrons are indeed people
from all over the world, you nd
many restaurants retaining the au-
thenticity of the cuisines they serve.
What is the supply stream like?
KP: There are some good quality
products here for basic ingredients.
However, for special ingredients like
certain types of meats, majority of
the products we use come from Ger-
many itself for their authenticity or
because they are not available here.
SN: We have the best German food
suppliers in UAE. The products are
best quality, fresh and frozen and
The German Garden at the Doha Marriott Hotel is one of the ways the hotel is increasing awareness among diners about the cuisine.
German
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
Cuisine focus
/39 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
VIENNA SCHNITZEL
Jumeirah Beach Hotels restaurant Der
Keller head chef Steffan Assmann on how to
make breaded veal escalope for four.
INGREDIENTS
4 veal escalope
2 tsp whipped cream
2 eggs
50g four
150g bread crumbs
200g clarifed butter or butter
ghee
1 lemon
Salt, pepper
METHOD:
Keep each veal escalope
between cling flm and fatten
slightly with a meat mallet
until half of a centimetre.
Season the escalope on both
sides with salt and pepper.
The breaded veal escalope is one the famous dishes of German cuisine, and is also referred to as the Vienna Schnitzel on various menus.
1368 eggs to bread crumb the veal escalope at Der Keller r200kg average consumption of beef per week in Acacia
BR: The supply chain is pretty good.
There are many suppliers who di-
rectly import good quality produces
from Germany. Even fresh sausages
and German delicatessen products
are available in the market. For pork
products, suppliers need to have a
special import license.
What challenges to do you face?
SA: Germany is quite a distance
from Dubai and we receive all our
products by air freight. To ensure
all products are fresh we need to
be well-organised and monitor the
delivery process very carefully. Con-
sequently, the biggest challenge is to
avoid any delivery delays and price
impacts when it comes to increasing
travel costs.
BR: Prices are one of the challenges.
The main one is with fresh products.
Suppliers need a minimum quantity
to import/air freight from Germany
to become cost eective. As we
do not have many German food
outlets, this minimum quantity is not
achieved and as a result the entire
freight gets cancelled or delayed.
KP: Prices are a big challenge in this
part of the world considering the
popularity and demand of German
cuisine, although a relatively new
one in Doha, is still growing.
SN: The biggest challenge is to serve
the product at reasonable prices,
and to avoid any confrontation with
the local culture as German cuisines
famous products are made with
pork. Most the products are imports
so the purchase cost is high. The
competition is high because of lot
of German restaurants are coming
every year and everyone is trying to
do their best.
KP: With having to import products
from overseas, we are certainly chal-
lenged with prices and the volatility
at which prices change.
What does the future look like
for German cuisine?
DV: The outlook for German cuisine
is very promising; it will take some
time for German cuisine to reach the
same levels of popularity as other
international cuisines, but it is be-
coming more and more sought after,
especially with the rise in German
expats moving to the region.
BR: The future is good as we do not
have many German cuisine outlets
here. But before opening too many,
we need to create an awareness
about it. One has to understand that
these restaurants do serve pork.
These are not fully halal-compliant.
SN: While the UAE relies on attract-
ing tourists from across the globe,
Germany, which is also our largest
trading partner, has consistently gen-
erated an inux of inbound visitors.
And numbers are rising. We have a
tremendous increase of European
guest staying with us and denitely
in future the German cuisine will
be very popular even with the local
guests enjoying it.
KP: The future looks bright indeed
as more and more expatriates are
moving to this region and people
travel more frequently thus exposing
them to foreign cuisines.
SA: Hopefully we will see the open-
ing of more German restaurants
across the region; Germany has
much more to show than Oktober-
fest, sausages and Sauerkraut!
Whisk the egg and mix it
together with the whipped
cream. Keep the four and bread
crumbs separate in a fat tray or
large plate.
At frst, four the escalope on
both sides and remove the
excess four, then keep it in
liquid egg and in the end add
the bread crumbs.
Heat up in a large pan the
clarifed butter and fry the
Schnitzel for around four
minutes until golden brown. After
the half time turn it, you should
turn it only once.
Keep the readymade Schnitzel
on a paper towel to remove/
drain the fat before you serve it
with the lemon.
To make the dish 100%
authentic, you can add a fresh
made cucumber salad and
sauted potatoes.
directly sourced from Germany.
By growing direct point-to-point
trac between the two cities, UAE
is looking forward to strengthening
ties between the capital of the UAE
and Germany, this will speed up the
product supply chains.
SA: There is a detailed logistics
procedure behind the scene making
sure we are able to source the best
quality products. We work closely
together with our suppliers to ensure
we receive seasonal products from
the dierent regions in Germany.
Top 10
Dairy
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 40/
LOCAL
PRODUCTION 2
When in Rome, do as the Romans
do. So when in the Middle East ...
use traditional cheeses from the re-
gion, of which there are plenty.
Hilton Dubai Jumeirah Resi-
dences new wine bar, The Grape
Escape, supervisor Axel Bertrand
says: As a lover of cheese, it is al-
ways interesting to see what char-
acteristics of a region or culture
come across in their produce.
Middle Eastern cheeses such
as jibneh arabieh or halloumi are
real products of the region with a
exibility to use sheep, goat or cow
milk, and a basic block mould or
Riding the sustainability wave, dairy
production is going local. Bertrand
says: I have also been intrigued by
camels milk cheese which is just
coming into commercial produc-
tion. Apparently it is more dicult
to make because of its composition,
but the nutritional value is much
higher in vitamin content and lower
in fat so between this and its re-
gional appeal I am sure we will see
more of camels milk cheese in the
months to come.
Rowe says: I buy most locally
produced cheeses, my most favou-
rite one has to be the local burrata.
This is an incredible achievement,
brine used to form the cheeses. I
think halloumi is very widely used
and often popular because of its
high melting point which makes it
great for grilling.
Emirates Industry for Camel
Milk & Products deputy GM Mutas-
her Al Badry says the rm produc-
es and sells three dierent kinds
of Arab cheeses using camel milk
following traditional recipes. He
says: According to the GCC Food
Report 2011, the growth of dairy
consumption in the UAE has been
prospected to grow by over 5%
until 2015. The role of traditional
cheeses such as nabulsi, halloumi
and akawi has always been strong
on the GCC markets. Even though
cheeses from other regions around
the globe have entered the regional
market, the popularity of the tradi-
tional cheeses is still unbroken.
Celeb chef Silvena Rowe who is
a fervent supporter of local dishes
says: I love akawi cheese, and one
of my favourite cheeses is jibneh
mshallaleh or Syrian string cheese.
Its slightly salty but very much
back in vogue. It is a truly dramatic
and exciting looking cheese to add
to a conventional cheese board.
when we considerer that the au-
thentic burrata comes from Puglia
in Italy. The locally made burrata is
slightly dierent in texture and a-
vour but good enough.
She may just be talking about
Italian Dairy Products and its gen-
eral manager Maria Luisa Panzica
La Manna says: Italian Dairy Prod-
ucts is capturing part of the niche
market for locally produced dairy
foods, and, since beginning of op-
erations, we have experienced a
consistent increase in the demand
for our cheeses as more restaurants
introduce them as ingredients for
dishes catering to a growing prefer-
1
TRADITIONAL ARAB CHEESES
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Grilled halloumi cheese
... back in style!
The range of drinks made
from local ingredients
by Camelicious.
ence for fresh items made locally.
Our cheeses have also attracted the
demand of airlines and you will see
dierent varieties in both Emirates
and Etihads cabins.
Al Badry adds: At EICMP, we
believe that using local ingredients
and facilities is important to bring
the UAE dairy industry forward. As
producers of the camel milk brand
Camelicious, we are dealing with
one of the most traditional local
ingredients. Camel milk has been
used by Arab Bedouins for centu-
ries, and has been an essential part
of peoples daily diet, particularly in
the Gulf region.
Dairy
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b
Top 10
/41 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
DITCH THE LACTOSE
3
Lactose intolerance is the inability of some people to digest lactose, which is
a sugar found in milk and products derived from cows milk dairy products.
A health trend in its own right, lactose-free dairy is something producers like
EICMP capitalise on as camel milk has much less lactose in comparison to
cows milk. According to its website, camel milk is an alternative for people
with lactose intolerances. Some Asian populations in particular lack lactase,
the enzyme required to break down lactose.
Providing a lactose-free option in dairy products, especially milk, can give
companies an advantage over competitors. According to Euromonitor Inter-
national, the lactose-free dairy market is dominated by Western Europe and
North America in value terms, with these two regions accounting for 70% of
the $2.8 billion industry in 2012.
Probiotic yoghurts can also be suitable for consumption by those with
lactose intolerance as the process of bacterial fermentation improves the di-
gestibility of the lactose. Yakult Honshas small bottles of well-fermented milk
are available in the UAE, and it is the Asia-Pacic region's topmost yoghurt
player with a 20% value share in 2008, and it ranks fourth in dairy overall.
T I PS ON CHEESE & WI NE PAI RI NG
The Grape Escape supervisor Axel Bertrand on pairing his favourite cheeses
Picodon, Crottin de Chavignol, Bleu dAuvergne, Comt and Ossau-Iraty with wine.
Picodon, goats milk cheese from Rhone Valley, is best matched with a Red Cotes
du Rhone. This full-bodied wine will enforce the strong goaty taste of this cheese
with the high quantity of tannins.
Crottin de Chavignol, goats milk cheese from Loire Valley, is very well-balanced by
a good Sancerre. The high acidity of the wine will relave the creamy taste of the
cheese. Another option is to pair it with champagne, especially if you serve it like
an aperitif or cocktail.
Bleu dAuvergne, cows milk cheese from Massif Central, is very well-matched
with a Malbec (a Bordeaux is not a must as Argentina is producing nowadays
wonderful Malbec wines). Lots of non-connoisseurs will appreciate this cheese
with a sweet wine (likely a Sauternes, or a sweet German Riesling for example).
Comt, cows milk cheese from Jura, is best matched with Vin Jaune du Jura. But
very few people might like this wine (which is diffcult to fnd in lots of markets). I
would recommend eating Comt while drinking a good Chenin Blanc from South
Africa or with a Gamay from Beaujolais.
Ossau-Iraty, sheeps milk cheese from Basque Country, has to be paired with a
Tempranillo from Rioja (Spain). This medium-bodied wine will make you discover the
hidden fruity aroma of the cheese. I would also recommend a white Mouton Cadet
(a Bordeaux) which will, due to its low acidity, match very well with Ossau-Iraty.
Probiotic yoghurt and lactose-free dairy in vogue.
NOT JUST COWS IN
THE FIELD
4
EICMPs Al Badry says that according to a recent study by global market
research organisation RTS Resource Ltd, natural ingredients accounts for
nearly one-third of the total US $39bn global food and drink ingredients
market. With this in mind, we believe that camel milk is a factual alterna-
tive for consumers, especially in the Middle Eastern and African regions, but
also for health-conscious consumers elsewhere in the world, he explains.
Our camel milk is a natural product without any articial additives and
preservatives, and its unique attributes especially with regards to health
and beauty are numerous. Apart from the fact that there are no known aller-
gies to camel milk, recent studies also suggest it to have a positive eect on
patients with Diabetes Type II, Hepatitis and autoimmune diseases. There
are plenty of relevant facts making camel milk special and we believe in the
potential of this extraordinary milk on a global scale.
The Al Ain Dairy is also home to over 1,500 camels and its facility pro-
duces approximately 3,000 litres per day.
STANDALONE!
5
Its not a cheese board! Its not a dessert! Its a ... meal? Italian
Dairy Products La Manna says cheese, of dierent types and
origins, form part of a trend which assigns greater value to
fresh and quality products. She says: Cheeses are standing
alone more and more as an appetizer or acting as a main in-
gredient of entrees.
No longer are cheeses at the dining table being relegated
to simply playing the part of a generic cheese board served as
an afterthought to a large meal, or being tossed into a salad to
add some colour.
Burrata and mozzarella are being served on their own.
Ricotta is being served cold atop a warm dish of pasta to create
a temperature and sweet and salty contrast in some dishes.
A burrata served on its own? Were down for that.
Dairy becomes a
whole meal in itself!
Camels are used to
produce high quality milk.
Top 10
Dairy
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 42/
Top 10
Desserts
Traceability and being able to
explain the source of products is
increasingly important in light of
food contamination scandals, and
organic dairy hits that trend on the
sweet spot.
Currently the selection of or-
ganic yoghurts and desserts in lo-
cal supermarkets has increased,
and producers like Rachels Or-
ganic Dairy is capitalising on the
demand for natural ingredients.
On a more local level, The Ice
GOING
ORGANIC 6
Cream Shop UAE is a local SME
and its ice cream is made only
from organic milk, cream, sugar,
eggs and fresh seasonal organic
fruit. Founder Salma Hijjawi says:
When I started making organic
ice cream, it was not because it
is a fad. In my house, we are 80%
organic and are 100% o fast and
junk food. I am a rm believer that
organic food is what makes my
family feel better and healthy.
She adds: I enjoy making ice
Working on an organic farm.
BACK TO BASICS ICE
CREAM AND GELATO
7
Ice cream and gelato is coming back
into vogue. According to research
from Euromonitor International,
the demand for value-added ice
cream products continued to grow
with momentum in 2012.
The report shows that in the UAE,
International Foodstus Co (IFFCO)
continued to lead in ice cream, ac-
counting for a retail value share of
40%, in 2012. In Saudi Arabia, IFFCO
came out on top as well, with a value
share of 31%. Saudi Ice-Cream Fac-
tory, which oers the Kwality range,
was the second leading player over-
all rounded o by Saudi Dairy &
Foodstu Co Ltd (SADAFCO).
In addition to SMEs, bigger
brands are also cashing in. The
Taste Initiative recently launched
its gelateria, and head chef Mark
Taquet says he wanted to launch a
range of ice creams with avours
not easily found elsewhere. We
have some interesting avours, Ive
got an Irish soda bread ice cream, a
raisin ice cream, and even celery. At
the moment were experimenting
with dierent avours, and plan on
bringing more in the future.
Gelatos are a favourite in the region.
CUT THE
FAT OUT?
8
Jones the Grocer education man-
ager Christian Lehmann says while
every dietary advice recommends
low-fat or non-fat dairy, a growing
number of experts are arguing that
it's healthier to eat and drink dairy
products with all the fat left in.
When looking at the supermar-
ket shelves, it is obvious that a lot
of consumers go for low fat dairy
products as it has been the trend
for a while. Unfortunately, most
people believe that fats are the di-
etary villains, even if natural fats
are good for the human body and
actually necessary for a healthy
and balanced diet. The only fats
that should be limited are the man-
made fat varieties such as trans-
Skinnylicious.
cream and I love it when someone
orders a tub or two. I add new a-
vours once in a while depending
on ingredient availability, which is
sometimes a challenge.
But I do not compromise, I do
not add anything that is articial,
coloured or processed.
fats, he explains.
He also says that while there are
a wide variety of low-fat cheeses
out there, most options are mass-
produced and vacuum-packed
cheeses where their ingredient list
is a lot longer than just milk, cheese
cultures, salt and enzyme. Namely
preservatives and taste enhancers
as the taste was taken out by the fat
reduction. In addition to that, low-
fat cheese has signicantly higher
sodium content, he cautions.
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b / October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
Kitchen & laundry King
Advertorial
Solarco Equipments LLC
When was your company established?
Solarco Equipments LLC was established
in 2007 in Dubai.
How many people are employed by your
company?
Solarco Equipments presently employs
25 full time employees and is expected to
reach 35 employees by the end of 2013 to
satisfy the requirements of new projects
region-wide and in Africa.
What achievements are you most
proud of?
Solarco Equipments LLC prides itself on
having the largest number of three-star
Michelin chef restaurants in its portfolio.
These include Alain Ducasse, Guy Savoy
and Pierre Gagnaires establishments. We
are also proud to count most of the major
hotel operators in our list of references.
What is your company vision?
Solarco Equipments has always strived to
prioritise customer support in all its proj-
ects, whereby this resulted in a majority of
recurring clients, be it contractors, hotel
operators or actual nancial investors. In
line with this vision, Solarco Equipments
is the only company in the region to have
a dedicated technical support website
which also acts as a database for useful
articles and recommended best practices
to our clients. Our support website allows
our clients to keep track of each and every
What other news is there from your
company this year?
Solarco Equipments LLC has signed an
agency agreement in Qatar and is expect-
ing to expand its activity in this market
by opening a branch in Q4, 2013. A new
showroom is also expected to open in
Deira, Dubai to give quicker and easier
access to our clients, especially for unit
sales where clients might want to see the
products on oer.
What is your best seller?
Our introduction of such brands as Cunill
(for silent coee grinders and citrus
juicers), Gam Professional (for table top
preparation equipment), Everest (for meat
mincers) and Celme (for meat and cheese
slicers) and especially Casadio by La Cim-
bali (for espresso machines) have proven
to be a success beyond our expectations
and have already taken a substantial share
of the market in those product categories.
What do you oer hotels above and
beyond expectation?
Our expertise and professionalism are
our number one asset and we leverage
them through oering design services to
complement our other sales activities. Ob-
viously our dedication to custom support
and impeccable after sales services greatly
contribute to position us as the partner of
choice for our hotel clients
Owner and managing director Philippe Bacha has a lot to celebrate with new
showrooms and new clients
technical support request they initiate all
through to the resolution and closing of
the technical ticket. It will also allow them
to have a historical view of the problem-
atic equipment especially if they imple-
ment our internal serialised numbering
approach.
What are your core products/services
for the hospitality industry?
We specialise in all the professional
kitchen and laundry equipment require-
ments for any food producing or laundry
activity such as sales and installation.
Additional services include, but are not
limited to, technical and conceptual de-
signs of kitchens and laundries as well as
annual maintenance contracts and other
support services.
What new products have you launched
recently?
We have introduced a large number of
new European brands that were unknown
in this market and helped them develop
their export activities to our clients. Those
brands have obviously had a proven track
record on the European market and there-
fore satisfy all the quality requirements in
such a competitive and demanding mar-
ket as the GCC. They were also chosen for
having a most competitive price/quality
ratio greatly beneting the end users by
reducing their capital expenditure in the
past few years during the economic crisis.
Solarco has the answers.
A cooking island.
Refrigerated cabinets. Cooking range.
Tel: +971 4 885 3335 | Email: pbacha@solarcoequipments.com
Web: www.solarcoequipments.com
FIND
MORE:
Philippe Bacha.
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 44/
Jones the Grocers Lehmann says few food and drink
combinations are as festive, exciting, and romantic as
the age-old pairing of cheese and wine. When put to-
gether, cheese and wine add up to more than just food
and drink; they are an experience.
He explains there is no rigid right or wrong match;
people should eat and drink what they like. Lehmann
adds: Nevertheless there are dierent guidelines and
approaches one might consider. The one which is de-
nitely the oldest is the terroir or the regional approach,
where local cheeses are enjoyed with local wines. Then
you can either complement or contrast the avours of
both, cheese and wine.
He says that beer is also very popular with cheese
and is an upcoming trend to pair cheese with other bev-
erages as well. Cider pairs beautifully with cheeses and
as the variety of ciders is growing, the choice of match-
ing it with dierent cheese styles is becoming more di-
verse and interesting, Lehmann adds.
In the UAE, you are able to nd quite a number of
establishments that oer regular wine and cheese din-
ners where the main focus is on the fact that people can
eat and drink as much as they want. Those will probably
never disappear but for sure more and more people are
keen to see something dierent on the market with an
additional and enhanced experience such as education-
al cheese and wine pairings.
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BUBBLES AND
CHEESE 10
9
GO VEGAN!
Dubai-based Ultra Brasserie of-
fers quinoa milk as an option
in its milk-based drinks, and it
is increasingly seen as a trend
to have it as a better alternative
compared to cows milk. Other
plant-based dairy includes soy
milk, almond milk, and even a
lesser-known te found in Or-
ganic Foods & Caf.
Lehmann says: Other prod-
ucts found in the dairy product
shelves like quinoa or almond
milk have seen a strong trend
recently. This will continue, and
even increase and expand, as
consumers look for alternatives
to products created from ani-
mal products due to their pref-
erence, allergies, beliefs, and
also due to the fact that non-
dairy milk tends to be healthier
and more nutritious.
However, the only obstacle
he sees right now is customers
being hesitant because they are
not satised with the taste as it
is in most cases very dierent
to cows milk and what they are
used to.
The trend would be even
stronger if some of the non-
dairy milks become more simi-
lar or almost identical to dairy
milk, he adds.
Using plant-based ingredi-
ents in ice cream can be dif-
cult says The Ice Cream Shop
UAEs Hijjawi: It is challenging
to develop home-made non-
dairy organic ice cream (using
coconut, soy or almond milk),
since I do not use any stabiliz-
ers or emulsiers.
Look to plants for
dairy products.
The romantic pairing of
wine and cheese.
Outlet 360
Kanpai
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 46/
SAMURAI SPIRIT
Devina Divecha ventures into the
futuristically designed fusion Japanese
restaurant, Kanpai, in Souk Al Bahar, Dubai
F
&B operators Lava Hospitality
Groups latest venture is the
Japanese fusion restaurant
and lounge located in Dubais Souk
Al Bahar Kanpai. The 5,500 square
foot space which opened in June
2013 is the brainchild of co-owners
Ahmad Atwi and Michael Gong, and
is named after the Japanese word for
cheers. Guests can choose between
signature cocktails in the lounge, or
contemporary fusion Japanese cui-
sine in the adjacent restaurant.
Atwi says: We have a good loca-
tion, so we tried to give it the right
concept. We thought this would be
suitable for a dining area and when
people nish from there, they can
go have drinks in the bar. He adds
that the founding duo conducted
research and ensured the food, the
entertainment and the service was
up to their standards.
The interior design of the 135-seat
restaurant was conceived by Dubai-
based Metrico Design Studio, and the
interiors are a mix of modern design
and traditional Japanese elements
such as larger-than-life, hand-crafted
Samurai statues and a six-metre
long onyx social bar. Atwi says: We
tried to come up with a comfortable
space. Its spacious; we dont have
too many elements, and we kept the
bar as having an exposed ceiling so
its very industrial.
The bar area features a Function
One sound system and a DJ multi-
touch emulator the rst of its kind
in the UAE, according to Atwi. The
Emulator DVS allows crowds to see
exactly what the artist is doing on a
huge transparent touch screen.
There are normally ve sta
members, plus the supervisor, man-
ning each shift at the bar, with prior
experience of these employees rang-
ing from Boudoir to Left Bank.
Atwi adds: We think of the bar as
a kitchen, where the bartender is the
chef. For entertainment, we have a
resident DJ. He plays six nights, plus
we have the emulator which is the
rst in the UAE. And we use Func-
tion One as the sound system which
is the best in the world.
Kanpai general manager Anna
Darroch, who has been in the UAE
for two years, says the aim of the
team is to make the restaurant one
of the most popular destinations in
the country. Our location and the
specically designed independent
areas gives our customers the feeling
that they dont need to go anywhere
else, but can get everything here.
The venue has plans for, and is
implementing, oers for its cus-
tomers including business lunches,
brunches, and theme nights that will
run every day of the week.
Atwi says its important to keep
innovating. If we come up with a
competitive advantage, it will soon
become obsolete. We are thinking
on a daily basis to innovate with Kan-
pai. People will see something new
whenever they return, he adds.
ELEMENTAL: The concept
of the restaurant is fusion
Japanese.
LOUNGE: Lighting/sound
by Em Tec FZ LLC.
TEAM: The Kanpai crew
come together.
CHIC: Interiors by Met-
rico Design Studio.
SYRUPS: The bar is supplied with
Monin products.
LINEN: Supplied by
Baqer Mohebi.
MASKED: Private
area in the bar.
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /47 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
SHOW OFF: The live tep-
panyaki station.
SIT DOWN: Capacity of
135 covers.
BAR CROCKERY: Supplied by Bespoke Trading.
RESTAURANT OPERATION
MANAGER: Marcin Tymosz.
MANAGER: Dave Isidoros
Moschogiannis.
ONXY: Long bar
table in focus.
GENERAL MANAGER:
Anna Darroch.
Outlet 360
Kanpai
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 48/
K
anpais fusion Japanese
dishes are presented in chic,
contemporary style, with
traditional elements, by its execu-
tive chef Athiwath Kinla. One of the
venues specialities is its dedicated
live Teppanyaki suite, where guests
can watch as their meal is prepared.
A Thai national, Kinla has worked
in the F&B industry for over 20
years, while gaining experience in
signature restaurants at ve-star ho-
tels across the globe. At Kanpai he
heads a team of nine in the kitchen,
which includes three chefs.
He started working in hotel man-
agement in Bangkok, Thailand,
while dabbling in cooking, house-
keeping and more. Soon he realised
his rst love was cooking, and de-
cided to become a chef. I love to
work in the kitchen. And I knew I
wanted to be a chef but didnt want
to cook in Thailand, he says.
Kinla soon realised his dream
by travelling the world. He moved
to the Middle East in 1987 with his
stint at the Metropolitan Group for
Al Habtoor in Dubai, UAE. He then
moved to the Royal Mridien Ju-
meirah, and also launched a Thai
restaurant for the Sheraton Deira.
After over a decade in the UAE,
Kinla went to the Sheraton Bahrain.
His next career move included Af-
rica, where he travelled from Egypt
to Tunisia to Morocca. Not stopping
there, the Caribbean was his next
step before journeying to Europe
Germany, Spain and the UK.
He continues: I came back to
Dubai in 2011 with Ramada Jumei-
rah. After that, Kanpais manage-
ment found me. They said they
liked my style and asked if I could
set up Kanpai for them. The con-
cept of the restaurant is of Japanese
its not traditional, but fusion.
Kinla says one of the important
things for him while creating the
menu is his control over what is
served to the guests. For example,
he details his insistence on having a
chef s special every day.
Finding sta members to work
with was not a major concern for
the chef, but he says he trains them
on a regular basis on how to create
his signature sauces. One of his chal-
lenges though, he says, is changing
the perception of people in the
country about Japanese food. Quite
a lot of Japanese food is raw, he
says. I have noticed that most peo-
ple in Dubai will not eat raw food, so
when I was creating the menu, I also
included items which were not raw
to cater to their tastes.
Dave Isidoros Moschogiannis
works with the chef when it comes
to procuring ingredients for the
restaurant. He says emphatically: I
nd the right suppliers because we
need to get the best for our kitchen
and the chef. The food should be
great for our customers.
When asked whether its a chal-
lenge to nd the right ingredients
for the cuisine in Dubai, he says: Its
not easy ... because were cooking
Japanese, nding good ingredients
is very hard. But thats my job. He
admits that most of the ingredients
are imported, and says: The food
is fusion but we also have original
Japanese dishes like sushi, which is
one of our best quality items.
Kinla concludes: I want people
to know about Kanpai and what
we are doing, and if we are success-
ful we can open in Abu Dhabi and
other places.
CHOP CHOP: Overlooking
the main preparation area.
UTENSILS: Kitchen
equipment on display.
EYES EVERYWHERE:
The lobster.
PRESENTATION STYLE:
Modern European look.
STATION:
Mareno oven.
GRILL: Supplied
by Mareno.
DESSERTS:
Tasting platter.
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /49 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
EXECUTIVE CHEF:
Athiwath Kinla.
BACK-END:
Cooking station.
SIGNATURE:
Beef it up.
STEEL: Al Halabi
supplies most of
the equipment.
SOUS CHEF:
Suparporn.
SHINE ON: By Al-
Halabi Refrigeration
& Kitchen Equipment.
CROCKERY: Supplied
by Restofair RAK.
HANGING: Cooking uten-
sils used by the chef.
Suppliers
Supplier News
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 50/
Emirates picks Meiko M-iQ technology
Horeca Trade signs deal with green UK packaging rm
The ocial airline of the UAE, Emirates, is ex-
panding its in-ight catering operations with tech-
nology from Meiko. A brand-new second facility at
Dubai International Airport will be equipped with
three machines from the German companys M-iQ
range of warewashers.
We have been doing business with Emirates
Flight Catering since 1988 and we are tremen-
dously proud to have this opportunity to develop
the relationship further through this major con-
tract, said Meiko head of exports Klaus Engesser.
Meiko key account manager for in-ight cater-
ing Eric Waag said: This is a customer that places
a great deal of emphasis on cutting-edge systems,
intelligent interface design and reliability. Meiko
was the best choice because Emirates Fight Cater-
ing was looking for a solution that combines intel-
ligent material ows with smooth organisation.
The key factors behind Emirates decision to
continue their long-standing business relationship
with MEIKO included the high energy eciency of
our M-iQ machines, user-friendly operation and,
in particular, sophisticated lter technology.
The new catering facility is 60,000m
2
spread
over three oors. The ecient conveyor ware-
washers are designed to minimise idle periods by
increasing the time between wash water changes.
The contract includes a longer drying zone in the
machines specially tailored to Emirates specic
requirements. The customer wanted everything
to come out completely dry even Gastronorm
containers and plastic boxes to ensure all key
hygiene parameters were met, said Waag.
Each of the three M-iQ machines is 13.5 metres
long with a useful width of one metre and a pass-
ing height of 2.4 metres.
Airlines in-fight catering operations to use three warewasher machines from German frm
Klaus Engesser says the rm has been working with Emirates Flight Catering since 1988 and is proud to develop the relationship further.
KSAs frst international F&B show
a gateway to $70bn market
Saudi Arabias rst F&B trade show
will provide a gateway to a $70bn
market, attracting more than 20,000
industry professionals from the MENA
region. Exhibitors range from Abu Bint,
Aloha Tuna, Blue Ribbon, Indomi, Luna,
Maggi, Perfetto, Toya and Saudia to more
specialist brands like Beyti, Colavita
and Zott. From December 8-11, 2013, in
Jeddah, it also oers interactive cooking
demonstrations, seminars and appear-
ances from celebrity chefs.
UAEs Coffee Planet signs frst
export deal with Dutch chain
UAE-based coee brand Coee Planet
has signed its rst agreement with a ma-
jor retailer outside of the UAE to launch
its range of UTZ Certied coee blends
in Holland in partnership with Dutch
supermarket giant Jumbo. As part of the
six-month launch plan, Coee Planet
worked closely with strategic partner Au-
tobar Coee Roasters, who will roast the
brands blends under licence locally in
the Netherlands, with bags going on sale
in 340 stores throughout the country.
Brazil food giant inks $145m deal
for UAE factory in Kizad
The Khalifa Industrial Zone Abu Dhabi
(Kizad) signed a new agreement with Bra-
sil Foods, South Americas largest food
processing company. The agreement
with Federal Foods Company, the local
arm of Brasil Foods, will see a $145.1m
investment in the free zone areas food
manufacturing cluster. The purchased
plot of land will be used to produce meat
products, marinated processed foods
and other bread based foods, and is
expected to be fully operational by 2014.
UAE group opens $27.2mn giant
food packaging unit in Dubai
UAE-based producer and wholesaler of
disposable food packaging materials,
Hotpack Packaging Industries, will open
a $27.2 million integrated manufacturing
and logistics unit in Dubai. Hotpacks is
part of Majid Plastics Group, which has
an annual turnover of $136.13 million.
NEWS IN BRIEF
Vegwares products are compostable.
Founded in 2006, Vegware is the UKs frst and only completely compostable packaging company
Horeca Trade has signed a partner-
ship with Vegware, the UKs rst
and only completely compostable
packaging company.
Horeca Trade managing director
Hisham Al Jamil said: This collabo-
ration between us could only mean
more satised patrons who can en-
joy great tasting food while availing
proactive participation in environ-
mental conservation.
Vegware was established in the
UK in 2006. It is currently the only
completely compostable packag-
ing rm operating globally, and
specialises in the development,
manufacturing and distribution of
environmental foodservice pack-
aging. Vegwares range of over 200
plastic-free products is low-carbon
and made from recycled or renew-
able materials, including hot cup
lids, double wall cups, high-heat
cutlery, soup containers and the
gourmet hot box.
Al Jamil added: Bringing Veg-
ware on-board speaks of Ho-
recas commitment to quality
which extends to many aspects
of our business.
17 - 19
NOVEMBER 2013
DUBAI WORLD
TRADE CENTRE
SOURCE THE FINEST GOURMET
PRODUCTS AT THE SPECIALITY
FOOD FESTIVAL!
REGISTER FREE ONLINE NOW!
www.speciality.ae/register
Plus! Enjoy free entry to SEAFEX
and Sweets & Snacks Middle East.
THE SPECIALITY FOOD FESTIVAL TEAM
Tel: +971 4 308 6462 E-mail: speciality@dwtc.com www.speciality.ae
Scan the QR code to
register now!
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x
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Find
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Trufes, foie gras, quails eggs, olive oil, and
caviar are but a few of the rarities on display.
OFFICIAL
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OFFICIAL
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Suppliers
Supplier News
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 52/
Nespresso launches collection points for
its rst regional recycling programme
CSM and Masterbaker launch new product in Dubai
Nespresso has launched its rst programme to re-
cycle its used aluminium capsules in the UAE, where
Nespresso Club Members and consumers can return
used capsules for recycling in dedicated collection
points Nespresso Boutiques across the UAE.
The rm will also oer the Recycling at Home
option, which is a pick-up service that collects used
capsules directly from consumers homes when a
new order is delivered. Professional customers, such
as oces, hotels and restaurants that serve Nespresso
Grand Cru coees, will also benet.
Nespresso MEAC regional manager Pierre De-
bayle said: Nespresso is committed to continuously
improving its environmental performance across
its value chain. Our club members can now actively
contribute to sustainability by returning their used
capsules for recycling at no extra cost.
By collecting and recycling used capsules Nes-
presso reduces its environmental impact; recycling
aluminium produces only 5% of the carbon emissions
compared with primary aluminium sourcing. Nes-
presso MEAC implemented its own dedicated recy-
cling system, as the used capsules cannot be recycled
via traditional waste collection and recycling systems
in the UAE. Once collected, the used Nespresso cap-
sules will be recycled by Sharjah-based environment
and waste management company Beeah.
Nespresso started its recycling programme in Eu-
rope over 20 years ago. The UAE is the 26
th
country to
launch a used capsules recycling programme.
CSM and Masterbaker ocially
launched its range of frozen bak-
ery products at the Shangri-La
Hotel in Dubai, UAE. More than
150 customers had the chance to
see and taste products such as
donuts, muns, brownies, cook-
ies, focaccias and bagels.
The products allow people
to produce bakery foods simply,
quickly and with minimal waste.
The range is available in retail,
bakeries, supermarket in-store
bakeries, coee shops and high
street chains.
CSM and its distributor Master-
baker have a long and successful
partnership when it comes to
bakery ingredients.
Since convenient bakery prod-
ucts are more popular, both com-
panies have now established the
large variety of CSM products in
the UAE, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain
and Kuwait. The assortment in-
cludes fried specialties, cakes and
cookies, viennoisserie, bread rolls
and bread specialties.
Firm also launches pick-up service to collect used capsules from homes of its consumers
Nespresso launches recycling programme for its used aluminium capsules, inaugurated by Beeah group CEO Khaled Al Huraimel.
CSM category manager Marco Gerken, head
of business development Pruss Head, and,
regional sales director Emile Lattouf.
Frozen bakery products launch at the Shangri-La Hotel in Dubai, available in retail, bakeries and more
GT560 ICE
MACHINE
The Kold-Draft
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ice, known for its
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slower melt rate.
A Kold-Draft cube
is the only cube on the market that is a perfect
3.75cm square. This means that the ice not only
looks better and melts more evenly, but also lasts
longer in drinks, coolers, bins, salad bars, and
cocktail sinks. Kold-Draft equipment also offers
some of the best recovery rates in the industry so
you get more ice, more often.
Greeneld WorldTrade
Tel: +1 954 202 7336
E-mail: sales@greeneldworld.com
Web: www.GreeneldWorld.com
BL630
BLENDER
Omegas BL6
commercial-grade
blenders come with
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tion innity control and overload protection helps
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every time. The durable Eastman Tritan container
can handle anything from ice to hot soups. With
an Omega blender, no plunger is needed.
Greeneld WorldTrade
Tel: +1 954 202 7336
E-mail: sales@greeneldworld.com
Web: www.GreeneldWorld.com
TOP PICKS:
BAR EQUIPMENT
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17 - 19
NOVEMBER 2013
DUBAI WORLD
TRADE CENTRE
DONT MISS THE BIGGEST
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Comment
Michael Oleynikov
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 54
W
hen I was oered the op-
portunity by 4 Corners and
Grupocatala, I knew it was
going to be exciting, but I
didnt think it would be this
varied. When you stay in a hotel or eat at a restau-
rant, you just cannot begin to believe how compli-
cated and important the supply chain actually is.
From the beginning of July, I have been work-
ing as an intern for 4 Corners and Grupocatala
and it has opened my eyes to the food industry.
As Michael Kitts mentioned in last months com-
ment, I am here to learn about the supply chain
for fruit and vegetables from end-to-end.
I have had an amazing couple of months, begin-
ning with interviewing some of the leading chefs
in the UAE ... probably the world! I have had the
pleasure of meeting with 15 dierent chefs from
the hospitality industry and it has been so insight-
ful to get their opinions on how things are work-
ing (or not) today.
In the last month I met Nick Alvis from Table
9, Reif Othman from Zuma, and Christian Grad-
nitzer, the director of culinary at Jumeirah Group
to name a few. I didnt realise there was so much
involved in fruit and vegetable supply, and the
margin for error is tiny.
I also have been round the fruit and vegetable
markets of Dubai which was incredible; there is
such a variety of products and the way in which
they are treated is just so dierent from one place
to the next. In September, I was back in Spain for
the second time, and I replicated the trip to the
market here, so that I can make a direct compari-
son. In August, I was looking at the stone fruit sea-
son, now I am investigating what goes on in the
SPANISH ADVENTURE: 4 CORNERS AND GRUPOCATALA HIRES AN
INTERN FROM THE EMIRATES ACADEMY OF HOSPITALITY TO CHART
THE CHALLENGES IN THE UAE F&V MARKET OVER SIX MONTHS
Michael
Oleynikov
tomato and salad season, with a citrus focus to
follow in October.
My rst trip to Spain was so interesting; I spent
much of my time in the growing elds, packhous-
es, and processing plants of Grupocatala. They
are the largest grower of fruit and vegetables in
Spain, and it is a family-owned and run business,
which provides not only that personal service
and experience, but superb heritage as well. Ev-
ery process before delivering the product out of
the packhouse is made with the highest level of
professionalism and hygiene. When you get the
opportunity to view a company like this from the
inside, you can easily see that every person takes
so much care about the product that is going to
be delivered. They love what they are doing and
THE PRODUCT IS VERY
STRINGENTLY CHECKED BY
THE CHEFS TEAM TO MAKE
SURE THEY ONLY GET THE
BEST PRODUCE.
that is why it is easy to rely on these people. Af-
ter watching the whole supply process from the
elds to container, you can be sure that every fruit
or vegetable that you need is in safe hands with
these guys.
Before I left Dubai for Spain, I even managed to
squeeze a day on goods in at the Madinat Jumei-
rah Hotel. Wow! That was a great insight into the
what goes on at the coalface of the hotel kitchens.
The product is very stringently checked by the
chefs team to make sure they only get the best
produce coming into the hotel. Very impressive.
I had heard lots of horror stories about goods in
at hotels, but not here; it was a very slick and well-
oiled operation.
I regularly talk to my other intern friends from
the Academy and they are doing a variety of
things, but nothing as exciting as this. I am learn-
ing so much, in such a short space of time. When
I tell them what I have been up to, or show them
the photographs, I think I make them very jealous!
In between all this its been my 19
th
birthday
but I spent that packing my case for another
Spanish adventure. Hopefully Ill get the chance
to update you some more soon as long as I get
a new passport in time. Ive just lost mine! I need
it as I am supposed to be on the same aircraft as a
container of produce in a couple of weeks, so I can
track it all the way to Dubai. Oh well, they said it
would all be good experience.
Michael Oleynikov is a student at the Emirates
Academy of Hospitality. His internship is spon-
sored by food service experts 4 Corners General
Trading LLC and Spanish F&V producer
Grupocatala for the six-month-long project.
Michael Oleynikov gaining experience with warehouses.
Source new supp|iers
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Samp|e rom over 30 countries
See the |atest mar|et trends and innovations
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Supplier feature
Horeca Trade
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 56/
After 10 years in this region, what would
you say have been the biggest changes
you have seen as a major supplier in
this industry?
The food service sector as a whole has witnessed
major changes in the last 10 years. The growth in
tourism, along with the governments continuous
eorts to drive the hospitality sector has changed
the industry a great deal. Whether with import re-
strictions and measures, or warehousing and de-
livery quality assurance, the government bodies
are playing the biggest role in ensuring that the
environment in the food service sector is safe and
guaranteed for the end-consumer.
WITH GLOBAL DEMAND
FOR FOOD INCREASING ...
CUSTOMERS TEND TO EXERT
AN ENORMOUS AMOUNT
OF PRESSURE TO DRIVE
PRICES FROM SUPPLIERS
DOWNWARDS.
Soula Baroudi.
QUALITY ALL
THE WAY
Horeca Trades
marketing manager
Soula Baroudi reveals
why after-sales service
should be given more
importance in the
supplier market
What would you say are the biggest
advantages of supplying this region?
The company has seen that the biggest ad-
vantage in supplying the region is witnessing
the growth of its customers and the ability of
end-consumers to experience a huge array of
high-quality food and beverage products when
dining out-of-home. As a rm, we are very proud
to see the growth of tourism and hospitality as a
whole in the UAE. We feel that we have, and still
are, playing a major role in this development
especially by supplying our customers with the
highest quality products delivered to them with
the best possible service.
What would you say are the challenges?
Food service operators in the country, including
hotels, restaurants, cafs, caterers and institu-
tions are continuously challenged to exceed the
expectations set by the market place, while at
the same time drive protability and sustain-
ability of their business considering the extreme
competitive landscape. With global demand for
food increasing, in addition to the ever-rising
prices of raw materials, customers tend to exert
an enormous amount of pressure to drive prices
from suppliers downwards. In many cases, cus-
tomers revert to sourcing lower-quality products
in order to maintain their protability and cap
the price, which results in the consumer getting
a low-quality product.
One of the biggest groans that comes
from the industry is that while suppli-
ers supply, there is a lack of support or
after-sales service provided; what are
your thoughts on this issue, and how do
you believe suppliers and F&B outlets
need to work together to foster effec-
tive, long-lasting relationships?
The statement that after-sales service in the
marketplace is missing is absolutely true. The
majority of suppliers tend to move cases versus
oering a value proposition. On the other hand,
since the day we started operation, Horecas em-
phasis has been more on the after-sales service
than the sale itself. Our proposition stretches
beyond just taking the order and delivering it,
but more into training the customers sta when
needed, supporting with marketing initiatives,
creating menu ideas, and many more. To some
extent, customers endorse this approach but in
many cases, dont consider it when studying the
price proposal. We are condent that with time,
the operators will see this as a great added value
in the proposals.
Where do you see Horeca Trade in the
next 5-10 years?
Horecas mission is to be and always be the
leading partner to the foodservice channel. That
being said, we will embark on a journey to con-
tinue expanding our brand portfolio, drive our
distribution network to more areas and channels
within the sector, strengthen and improve our
customer service, and most importantly, con-
tribute back to the community which helps this
hospitality operators ourish.
Where do you see the MENA F&B indus-
try in the next 2-5 years?
The F&B industry in the MENA region is one of
the most promising ones. Despite the political in-
stability in many of the countries, the population
growth, promising young generation and the
tourism sector development in the GCC will have
a very positive eect on the food and beverage
industry as a whole. We at Bidvest Middle East
are equipping ourselves day after day to cope
with this growth and with the multi-dimensional
needs of customers and consumers.
COMPANY FOCUS
Horeca Trade is the frst company
fully dedicated to the distribution and
development of food and beverage brands
to the foodservice channel in the UAE. It was
established in 2003 by Hisham Al Jamil, and
then became part of Bidvest Foodservice in
2005. Later in 2010, Bidvest Middle East
was created to overlook all the subsidiaries
in the Middle East and Turkey, managed by Al
Jamil. Its regional footprint expanded to Saudi
Arabia in 2009, establishing a Saudi-based
food service distribution company under the
name Al Diyafa Co. for Catering Services. This
year, Bidvest Middle East has further expanded
into Turkey, joining hands with the leading
boutique food service distribution company,
Aktaes Holdings. Early in 2013, Horeca
Trade launched a new distribution centre in
Abu Dhabi to cater to the growing hospitality
channel in Abu Dhabi and Al Ain.
1
Soula Baroudi says
the F&B industry in
the MENA region is a
promising one.
1
For table bookings contact: tablebookings@timeoutabudhabi.com
Shortlist announced: timeoutabudhabi.com #restaurantawards
So tel Abu Dhabi Corniche
Tuesday October 8, 2013
Sponsors and Partners
The Ultimate Kitchen Accolade
An ITP Executive Event
S
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New Products
Best buys
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 58/
Asias finest
The Asia Fine Art range by Villeroy & Boch includes new
pieces specically developed to best showcase Asian
cuisine, and combines select pieces from Villeroy &
Bochs Modern Grace and Stella Hotel ranges. The ele-
gant dishes, plates and platters, with the special match-
ing Asia pieces, all made with high-quality premium bone
china, are perfect for ambitious culinary ideas.
Villeroy & Boch
Tel: +49 6864 811 344
www.villeroy-boch.com
Drink up!
The newest drink on the Middle East market, Rey,
contains biopolyphenols, magnesium, zinc, vitamin B
complex, vitamins E and C to strengthen the immune
system, promote cell regeneration and boost concen-
tration. Packaged in a handy, recyclable bottle, the
sparkling drink is fortied with magnesium and claims
to improve performance in sports.
Rey
Tel: +971 4 882 9299
www.rey.ae
Mean machine
The Excaliber Dehydrator by Bonzer uses variable heat to
draw moisture out of foods such as fruit, vegetables, nuts
and herbs. Each dehydrator features an adjustable ther-
mostat that uctuates the temperature between 35C
to 68C, keeping it low enough to preserve the active
enzymes found in fruit and vegetables, but high enough
to remove moisture quickly enough to prevent bacteria.
Bonzer
Tel: +44 1672 564 099
www.bonzer.co.uk
Cavendish bananas
Top quality Class-A bananas of the Cavendish variety
originate from the Philippines and hold premium
quality in terms of avour and aroma, with bright-yellow
and smooth-textured skin. Great precision was taken in
the handling and packing of the product in high-quality
protective boxes that come as 13.5kg net weight, and
are sized at 4/5/6 hands per box.
Yalda Trading
Tel: +971 4 333 4090
www.yaldatrading.com
Designed for dairy
Serac has launched its new line of blowing-lling and
capping machines specically designed for dairy milk
products. Designed to meet the need of emerging
markets for dairy products packed in bottles, the new
monobloc solution, called Combox, includes a H2F ller
(Highly Hygienic Filler) adapted to hygiene criteria for
commercial dairy products.
Serac
Tel: + 33 243 602 828
www.serac-group.com
Wash up!
Winterhalters all-new range of Passthrough warewash-
ers, deliver a new level of washing efciency. The PT is
the markets rst passthrough with energy-saving heat
exchange technology tted as standard. The system
extracts energy from the waste water, using it to heat
up the incoming cold water supply, reducing energy
costs by up to 10%.
Winterhalter
Tel: +1 908 359 000
www.winterhalter.co.uk
New products
Every month, Caterer brings you a selection of the must-buys on the Middle East market
Nestl Professional
+971 4 408 8100
npdxb@ae.nestle.com
Unilever Foodsolutions
+971 4 881 5552
mohammad.shanawani@unilever.com
HYGIENE
Diversey Gulf FZE
+971 4 881 9470
customerservice.uae@diversey.com
www.diversey.com
RESTAURANT/ HOTEL SUPPLIES
CITI PAK L.L.C.
+971 6 535 5442
+971 6 535 5446
info@citipak.ae
www.citi-pak.com
Duni AB
+46 40 10 62 00
+46 40 39 66 30
info@duni.com www.duni.com
Greenfeld World Trade
001 954-202-7336
jvadnos@greenfeldworld.com
www.greenfeldworld.com
Royal Host
+966 2 2522289
royal@binshihoun.com
www.binshihoun.com
Villeroy and Boch
+352 46821208
info.hr@villeroy-boch.com
www.villeroy-boch.com
Schaerer
+41 318 585111
info@schaerer.
www.schaerer.com


Unilever Foodsolutions
+971 4 881 5552
mohammad.shanawani@unilever.com
COOKING
Convotherm
+49 884 7670
info@convotherm.de
www.convotherm.de
MKN
+971 72041336
rac@mkn-middle-east.com
www.mkn.eu
Angelo Po Grandi Cucine S.p.A
+39 059 639 414
s.maccaferri@angelopo.it
FOODSTUFF
Atoz Foods L.L.C
+971 4 2087655
atozfoods@gmail.com
Bakemart LLC
+971 4 2675406
bakemart@emirates.net.ae
www.bakemart.ae
Boironfreres SAS
+33 (0)4 75 47 87 25
+33 (0)4 75 47 87 50
nberry@boironfreres.com
www.vergersboiron.com
CSM Deutschland GmbH
+49 421 3502 387
michael.pruss@csmglobal.com
Custom Culinary
00971 52 8953304
iabul@griffthlaboratories.com
www.customculinary.com
Soups, Bases, Marinates & Seasonings
Eurial International
0033 2 40 68 18 34
0033 2 40 68 45 49
delphine.pelfresne@eurial.eu
www.eurial-international.com
Food Point
04-8851115
fpinfo@ekfc.ae
www.foodpointdubai.com
Yalda Trading Company LLC
+9714-3334090
yalda@yaldatrading.com


J.M.Foods L.L.C. Dubai,UAE
+971-4-3386580
+971-4-3389833
karl@jmfoodgulf.com
www.jmfoodgulf.com
Lamb Weston
+971 50 6447837
info@lambweston-nl.com
www.lambweston.com
CANADA BEEF INC.
+905 821-4900
rserapiglia@canadabeef.ca
www.canadabeef.ca
Monbana
+33 (0)2 43 05 42 48
02 43 05 43 66
ml.laumaille@monbana.fr
monbana.com
CATERING EQUIPMENT
Bonnet International
+33 1 60 93 61 55
Mariana.tepavac@horis.com
www.bonnet-international.com
Koma Middle East
+9714 887 3334
marc@koma.ae
www.koma.com
Robot Coupe
0033 143 988833
turlan@robot-coupe.fr
www.robot-coupe.com
SANTOS
Tel. +33 472 146 482
Fax. +33 478 265 821
sjouan@santos.fr
santos.fr
AL HALABI
Tel. +971 4 2652002
info@al-halabi.com
www.al-halabi.com
KNIVES
Dick
+49 7 153 8170
mail@dick.de
www.dick.de
Great White Knives
+971-4-3117169
info@greatwhiteknives.com
www.greatwhiteknives.com
Victorinox AG
+41 41 818 12 64
alain.hospenthal@victorinox.ch
www.victorinox.com
Suppliers
Distributors & suppliers directory
Distributors
ARAMTEC
+971 (4) 2895444
Hossam@aramtec.com
www.ramtec.com
Baqer Mohebi
+971 4 396 9777
www.bme@mohebi.com
(Marketing & distribution of food & non
food FMCG, food ingredients & Cuban Cigars)
Elenco
+971 2 677 8880 Email:elinet@eim.ae
www.elencoemiratesgroup.ae
BEVERAGES
Boncafe
+971 4 2828742
sales.dept@boncafeme.ae
www.boncafeme.ae
Bravilor Bonamat
0031 72 57 51 751
sales@bravilor.com
www.bravilor.com
Franke
+41 6 2787 3607
www.franke-cs.com
JT Ronnefeldt
0049 69 79300531
jtarlan@ronnefeldt.de
www.ronnefeldt.com
Lavazza
+971 4 380 7899
+971 4 380 7858
info@eurocoffee.ae
www.eurocoffee.ae
Marco Beverages
+971 50 4811546
gks@marcodubai.com
www.marco.ie
Dublin Head Offce:
+353 1 295 2674
info@marco.ie
Merchant Star International General Trading LLC,
+9714-252 5533
caryl@meinl.ae
Monin
+971 50 654 7817
jcoulbeck@monin-france.com
www.monin.com
Melitta SystemService GmbH & Co. KG
+49 (0)571 5049 300
linnemann@mss.melitta.de
www.melittasystemservice.de
Polo Point International LLC.
+971 4 8837171
www.polopointinternational.com
EMF Emirates
+971 4 2861166 +971 4 2863080
www.info@emf-emirates.ae
IFFCO
+971 650 29000
info@iffco.com www.iffco.com
Gulf Trading & Refrigerating L.L.C (GULFCO)
+971 4 3371400
gulfco1@emirates.net.ae
Horeca Trade LLC
+971 4 3403330
mail@horecatrade.ae
www.horecatrade.com
Lactalis International
+971 4 3298061
pmouawad@lactalis.ae
www.lactalis-international.com
La Marquise
+971 4 343 3478
sales@lamarquise.ae
www.lamarquise.ae
M.H.Enterprises LLC
+ 9714 3470444
+9714 3470971
foodservice@mhent.ae
www.mhdubai.com
(Ambient , Frozen , Chilled , Unilever Food Solution, American
Classic range , Nezo Salt , Amul , Fragata Olives, Bavaria Non
Alcoholic drink , Highland Water ,Deceeco Pasta , Bruggen
Corn Flakes etc)
Modern General Trading
+971-4-3475727
www.hotel.div@mgtuae.com
OS & E International Limited
+971 06 557 2024
info@ose-intl.com
ose-intl.com
TSSC
+971 4 343 1100
tssc@eim.ae
www.tsscdubai.com
(Catering/kitchen equipment, chocolate/
coffee equipment, FMCG, refrigeration)
People
Appointments
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 60/
What attracted you to the position of
director of F&B at The Chedi Muscat?
The Chedi Muscat, part of GHM, is reputedly
known as one of the hotels in the Middle
East. This role oers me not just the opportu-
nity to join this incredibly iconic hotel, but
also the opportunity to return to the region,
where I have worked before with great
pleasure. Working in Oman in particular has
always been on my list because of its superb
reputation for history, culture, nature and
very friendly people.
What knowledge do you bring to the role?
Extensive international experience; I have
worked in nine dierent countries in vari-
ous 5-star hotels, ranging from resorts to
hotels. I have previously worked at Hotel
de LEurope in Amsterdam and The Jockey
Club in Hong Kong.
What are you most looking forward to as
part of this new role?
Getting to know the team and the opera-
tion behind this amazing property, and our
regular guests, as well as the country and its
people in my spare time. I look forward to
continue building on the excellent reputa-
tion, and to share the teams passion for the
industry and delivering personal, warm and
unobtrusive service to our guests.
How do you intend to make the outlets
more proftable?
Joachim Textor,
executive chef, Anantara
Dubai The Palm
Joachim Textor has joined the
newly opened Anantara Dubai
the Palm as executive chef. He
will manage a team of 95 kitch-
en sta across the resorts six
outlets Crescendo, Mekong,
Bushmans Australian Bar & Res-
taurant, The Beach House, Lotus Lounge and Mai Bar plus
room service and catering for meetings and events.
Stefan Breg, F&B concept
design director Asia Middle
East and Africa, IHG
Restaurant and bar develop-
ment expert Stefan Breg has
been appointed F&B concept
design director Asia, Middle
East and Africa for InterConti-
nental Hotels Group, based in
Bangkok. He will lead F&B concept development at more
than 200 new outlets across 134 pipeline hotels at IHG. He
will also be responsible for driving operational eciency
and creating brand-dening F&B outlets in the current IHG
portfolio, which consists of more than 800 restaurants and
bars in 231 hotels across Asia, Middle East, and Africa.
Rosalind Parsk,
chef de cuisine, Pierchic,
Madinat Jumeirah
Madinat Jumeirah has appoint-
ed Rosalind Parsk as chef de
cuisine of its signature seafood
restaurant, Pierchic. Parsk is re-
sponsible for day-to-day opera-
tions in the kitchen as well as
creating the menu and revising
dishes. Previously, Parsk was sous chef of the members-only
Capital Club in Dubai International Financial Centre, and
chef de partie at Rhodes Mezzanine by Gary Rhodes.
Marina Ostafeichuk, head
sommelier, Villa Romana
St. Tropez-Dubai
Marina Ostafeichuk has lled
the role of head sommelier at
Villa Romana St. Tropez-Dubai,
a position vacant since the res-
taurant launched in 2012. She
will be tasked with engineering
the wine menu at the restaurant. Prior to this, she was bar
restaurant manager at InterContinental Festival City, Dubai.
Michiel Lugt, F&B director, The Chedi Muscat reveals his plans
for the outlets at the Omani hotel
MOVERS & SHAKERS
THE BIG
CLIMB
Michiel Lugt, F&B director, The Chedi Muscat.
We have worked hard to gain an excellent
reputation for outstanding service levels,
innovative food and beverage concepts and
the variety of dining options on oer. We are
blessed with a steady base of loyal return
guests as well as a steady ow of new guests;
be it residents or local patronage; the prot-
ability of the F&B division has always been
high because of this. The team and I will
ensure that we continue to build on the suc-
cess by ongoing sta training and by oering
only the very best to our guests in terms of
product, experience and ambiance.
What is your favourite thing about the
F&B venues at the hotel?
The design of all of our outlets is denitely
awe-inspiring. The design factor combined
with the oering of ample space and respect
for the local culture mixed eortlessly with
the signature Asian Zen-style that is promi-
nent at all GHM hotels.
Are there any exciting changes that you
will be making that you can tell us about?
I have only just joined, hence I do not
believe I am in the position to change
anything as yet.
WE HAVE WORKED
HARD TO GAIN AN
EXCELLENT REPUTATION
FOR OUTSTANDING
SERVICE LEVELS,
INNOVATIVE FOOD AND
BEVERAGE CONCEPTS AND
THE VARIETY OF DINING
OPTIONS ON OFFER.
Michiel Lugt.
Fitness / Spa Person of the Year
HR Person of the Year
Marketing /PR Person of the Year
F&B Manager of the Year
Executive chef of the Year
Procurement Person of the Year
Concierge of the Year
Laundry Manager of the Year
Housekeeper of the Year
Hotel Engineer of the Year
IT Person of the Year
Hoteliers Unsung Hero of the Year
General Manager of the Year
Hotel Team of the Year
FIVE NEW CATEGORIES FOR 2013
Young Hotelier of the Year
CSR Champion of the Year
Hotel Manager / EAM of the Year
Sales Person of the Year
Chef de Cuisine of the Year
AWARD CATEGORIES RETURNING
BY POPULAR DEMAND
JOI N US AT THE 9TH ANNUAL HOTELI ER MI DDLE
EAST AWARDS, RECOGNI SI NG THE EFFORTS OF THE
I NDI VI DUALS MAKI NG THE MI DDLE EAST S
HOSPI TALI TY I NDUSTRY THE ENVY OF THE WORLD.
Wednesday 30th October, 2013
- jw maRriotT maRquis duBai - uae
foR morE infOrmatiOn: wWw.HotelIermiDdleeaSt.cOm/AwardS
FOR SPONSORSHIP ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:
Diarmuid OMalley
T: +971 4 444 3568
M:+971 50 559 7339
E: dom@itp.com
Nick Clowes
T: +971 4 444 3548
M:+971 50 856 7115
E: nick.clowes@itp.com
Muhon Miah
T: +971 4 444 3159
M:+971 56 690 3582
E: muhon.miah@itp.com
Charlotte Ringrose
T: +971 4 444 3207
M:+971 56 130 7753
E: charlotte.ringrose@itp.com
FOR NOMINATION ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:
Louise Oakley
T: +971 4 444 3475
E: louise.oakley@itp.com
awards
FOR TABLE BOOKING AND
FURTHER ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:
Michelle Meyrick
T: +971 4 444 3328
E: michelle.meyrick@itp.com
Events
Ronnefeldt tea ceremony
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 62/
R
onnefeldt host-
ed its first event
in the Middle
East with a tea
ceremony at the
Samovar Lounge, One&Only
Royal Mirage Dubai, UAE.
The firms manager of com-
muncation Jutta Tarlan said:
We thought that this would
be the ideal ambiance for the
launch of our new Tea Couture
and our first English tea book.
She said that while some of
the attendees already had tea
knowledge, they were surprised
with the variety of flavours and
tea growing regions.
Dubai and the Emirates are
one of the most interesting
markets worldwide for Ron-
nefeldt. Tarlan added: Dubai
sets trends and innovations and
we have been connected to this
market for14 years.
She continued: The region
is very important as UAE sets
benchmarks for the whole of the
Middle East. It is a key market
for us, it generates impulses for
products and makes them suc-
cessful in other markets.
Jan Holzapfel, the current
owner of the Ronnefeldt tea
company, started the Middle
Eastern operation. The first
team member was Parvesh
Karijambath, followed by Andr
and Manuela Biedenkopf, and
Alvin Elman who is one of the
first international Ronnefeldt
TeaMasters Gold. They are the
firms Tea Ambassadors.
Biedenkopf revealed that due
to international guests from
Asia and Russia in the region,
and many expats from South
Africa, there is also increasing
demand for other sorts such as
white tea and Rooibos.
Emirati customers have also
changed their taste and have
become very fond of blended
herbal infusions and high qual-
ity Silver Needle teas.
The United Arab Emirates is
a strategic market in the overall
international expansion plan of
the Ronnefeldt tea company.
We will further invest in this
market, which creates trends
and sets benchmarks in the
worldwide premium hospitality
industry, said Holzapfel.
Tea company starts working on its
regional expansion
Ronnefeldt
KROGVoUVWWHD
ceremony event
in the UAE
THE UAE IS A STRATEGIC MARKET IN THE
OVERALL INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION PLAN
OF THE RONNEFELDT TEA COMPANY.
Jan Holzapfel.
Showcasing the
importance of tea.
Ronnefeldt
manager of
communication
Jutta Tarlan.
Samantha
Wood.
Alvin Elman
pouring out
the teas.
Tea tasting ceremony
in progress.
Daniel Vogler and
William Everett.
Mona
Bozai.
Events
Ronnefeldt tea ceremony
www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b /63 October 2013 | Caterer Middle East
Artichoke
Basil
Pissaladire
Style
Mediterranean
Vegetables
Mini Paniers
Brand new delicious savouries
with Mediterranean veggie fillings
Tomato
Shallot
www.bridordefrance.com
Tea Couture 1st Assam and Tea
Couture Taiwan Ti Dung.
Eight different
teas showcased
from famous
origin countries.
Trying out
different blends.
At the Samovar Lounge at the
One&Only Royal Mirage, Dubai.
JT Ronnefeldt
proprietor Jan-
Berend Holzapfel.
High tea was also served
after the ceremony.
A selection of
different teas
Elisabeth
Radecki.
Tea-Caddy, Fruity White and
LeafCup Moroccan Mint.
Last bite
Eric Lanlard
Caterer Middle East | October 2013 www.hoteliermiddleeast.com/f&b 64/
Celeb ptissier Eric Lanlard on becoming the frst chef to go to space, launching
baking apps, and eyeing the Middle East market
We have heard that you are going to be the
rst chef to go to space can you tell us more
about this?
Ill blame it on the red wine. I have been going
to Richard Bransons properties for years and
we were invited to the Virgin Galactic launch. I
went along to the event with absolutely no inten-
tion of signing up to the programme several
glasses of red wine later, my signature was on the
dotted line! Its an incredible feeling that we are
going to be part of history and become a space
travel pioneer.
Getting back to earth, what are the top baking
trends you predict for the next year?
We have seen a revival of savoury baking tarts
and pies. People are also realising the joy of
bread making, particularly with artisan breads.
I think baking with chocolate is becoming more
and more popular, as cake makers become more
knowledgeable about chocolate. Using real and
quality ingredients, thank goodness, is now a
high priority for example, vanilla extract and
unrened sugars should always be in everyones
store cupboard.
Top three tips for anyone who wants to enter
the industry?
Passion you must have this. Its a hard job but
you need to put your heart and soul into baking.
Work hard and be disciplined. Listen and learn
take in every opportunity to learn from your
experienced colleagues and mentors.
Any ambitions you would like to full?
I would like to continue to build on the success
of Cake Boy, write more books and make more
television. I am about to launch the Cake Boy bak-
ing app, which will have exclusive recipes, baking
tips and techniques, a recipe nder and how
to videos. It has been an ambition of mine for a
couple of years now so it is very exciting seeing it
come to fruition.
Where do you see yourself in 10 years time?
Im not sure, the possibilities are endless! The
whole world has gone baking mad, thank good-
ness; there are a lot of incredible opportunities out
there. Most of all, I want to be happy and healthy.

Who has inspired you the most in your career?
Too many people to mention I have been very
lucky throughout my career. I have had wonder-
ful teachers, mentors and colleagues, who have
been extremely generous and supportive. Its
something that I have taken with me and share
with the trainees and apprentices that come
through my kitchen.
Whats the one piece of kitchen equipment
The Cake Boy
THE WHOLE WORLD
HAS GONE BAKING MAD,
THANK GOODNESS; THERE
ARE A LOT OF INCREDIBLE
OPPORTUNITIES OUT THERE.
you cant do without?
Weighing scales and an oven thermometer
because baking is a science and accuracy is the
key to successful baking.
What are you launching with Jumeirah Zabeel
Saray and what was the inspiration behind it?
The Orange Blossom Financier, a special cake
developed exclusively for the new Ottoman
Afternoon Tea menu. I love the concept of af-
ternoon tea, especially when it has been infused
with something unique such as this Ottoman
menu. The Orange Blossom Financier is a fusion
of a classic tea-time treat with fragrant notes of
the Middle East.
Any other plans in the Middle East at present?
We are in discussion with some potential new
partners so watch this space!
Eric Lanlard is building on the success of his company, Cake Boy, and launching a baking app for his fans to learn tips and tricks.
A shared passion for excellence

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val r honapr o.com val r honat v. com
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