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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 80
Stubborn Fat?
Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Dr. Carie Chui, M.D.
ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER
280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo
(650)344-1121
PRESIDENTIAL RUN?
NATION PAGE 5
ROBOTIC EXPLORER
HEADED TO MARS
NATION PAGE 18
OUTSIDE POLITICAL GROUPS COALESCING AROUND CLINTON
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Technology and poetry are colliding
at one Burlingame elementary school.
Christy Novack and Julie Jancs
third grade class at Roosevelt
Elementary School just embarked on a
new project to spread poetry through
QR codes those little black square
barcodes you see all over the place
that they will place in the community.
Now when community members pass
the codes, they can scan the work with
their smartphones and capture the
poem. This year, all of the students at
the school have been asked to make
their mark in the community.
We want to make sure kids under-
stand using technology is not some-
thing you take and use alone, said
Roosevelt Principal Matthew Pavao.
Its an artistic way of using technolo-
gy on site.
Using iPads and the app Haiku Deck,
the students have created and illustrat-
ed original poems. The QR codes now
appear in windows of shops in the
city, including some on Broadway. The
school purchased 60 iPads last year
and the project began at the beginning
of this school year.
Teachers have used the new technol-
ogy as a tool to expand learning,
Pavao said.
With the new Common Core curricu-
lum, which shifts to more project-
based and team collaborative learning,
and more of an emphasis on students
using technology in classrooms,
Novack said its going to be more
important to use technology in cre-
ative and effective ways.
Its going to become more impor-
tant over the next couple years, she
said. The principal is very supportive
Writing and tech come together at Burlingame school
Foster City
OKs15-acre
site project
Long-vacant site to become
senior housing, retail, offices
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Foster City reached a signicant milestone last night as
its council voted to sell and develop its long-vacant 15-acre
site at the citys center into senior housing and retail.
The site now known as Foster Square was once envisioned
to be home for a high school, but its new primary use will
be senior housing with 16 buildings, about 14 of which will
be made up of four-story buildings with 200 for-sale condos
and ground-oor parking garages. There will be one build-
ing with approximately 134 to 155 assisted living units
and another building with 66 affordable housing units. Both
are likely to be more than four stories, but can be no more
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
State Sen.Jerry Hill,D-San Mateo,helps commemorate outgoing Burlingame Councilwoman Cathy Baylock for her 12 years
of service at a recognition ceremony during last nights council meeting. Baylock opted not to run for re-election and
Ricardo Ortiz won her seat in the Nov. 5 election.
COMMEMORATING CATHY BAYLOCK
Students from Roosevelt Elementary School in Burlingame
are spreading their poems through QR codes.
Students use codes to spread poetry project work to community
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo County School Boards
Association released its rst in a series of
education position papers planned for the
2013-14 school year aimed to inform the
public about education policy and the state
of public education in California and the
county.
The first paper, released yesterday, is
called Californias New School Funding
System Is Only The First (Small) Step:
Inadequacy And Inequity Continue To Burden
Californias Public Education System. It
outlines the basic structure of Californias
current education funding system and the
impact of recent changes like the new Local
Control Funding Formula and Proposition
30. The new formula sends $2.1 billion
more to school districts with high numbers
of disadvantaged students, while
Association releases series on education policy
First paper focuses on California public school funding
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Iliana Rodriguez, the countys director of
child support services, will take over as
director of the Human Services Agency fol-
lowing the upcoming retirement of Beverly
Beasley Johnson, the county announced
yesterday.
In her new position, Rodriguez, 49, will
head a safety net agency of 750 employees
and $180 million annual budget. The agency
is the umbrella organization for programs
and services including
foster youth, homeless-
ness, job training, child
abuse prevention and
economic self-sufficien-
cy.
Rodriguez, of Redwood
City, has worked for San
Mateo County since
1989 and been director of
Child Support Services
New HSA director named
See PROJECT, Page 23
See POLICY, Page 18
Iliana
Rodriguez
See HSA, Page 18
See POETRY, Page 23
HUDSON SIGNS
WITH S.F. GIANTS
SPORTS PAGE 11
Man says Google Maps
image shows slain son
RICHMOND ASan Francisco Bay
Area man says a Google Maps satellite
image near a rail line shows the body of
his teenage son, who was shot and
killed in 2009.
Richard Barrea is asking the Internet
giant to take down the image out of
respect for his son, Kevin. The 14-
year-olds body was found on a path
near railroad tracks that separate North
Richmond from San Pablo on Aug. 15,
2009.
Richard Barrea told KTVU-TV over
the weekend the image brings back
memories of his sons death. He said he
became aware of it earlier in the week.
The image shows what appears to be
a body on the ground with several other
people, presumably investigators,
around it. It was up on Monday.
An e-mail to Google was not immedi-
ately returned.
Kevins slaying remains unsolved.
California student
earns perfect score on exam
LOS ANGELES More than
104,000 students worldwide took the
Advanced Placement Calculus exam
this year. Only 11 got a perfect score.
California 17-year-old Nathan Chou is
one of them.
The Arcadia High School senior
learned of the rare achievement from
the College Board, the nonprot group
that oversees the AP tests.
Chou told the Los Angeles Times in a
story Sunday that he spent about four
hours studying for the calculus exam,
with help from class-made study guides
and practice tests.
That was helpful, Nathan said. But
I almost ran out of time on the multi-
ple-choice section. I was nervous that
my memory would suddenly blank out.
The test was offered in 59 countries
in the 2012-2013 school year. The 11
students who earned perfect scores are
all from the United States. At least two
other students in California earned per-
fect scores on the exam, said Deborah
Davis, the boards director of college
readiness communications.
CHP: Hotshot
firefighter runs over colleague
CAMPTONVILLE A wildre re-
ghter lying in a road was run over and
killed by a colleague in a sparely popu-
lated stretch of Northern California in a
bizarre early morning trafc incident
involving alcohol, authorities said
Monday.
California Highway Patrol investiga-
tors said a driver in Yuba County early
Saturday spotted a man, Michael
Patrick Kelly, 32, lying in the road
about 3 miles from Camptonville
which is about 80 miles north of
Sacramento.
The unidentied driver ashed his
high-beams in a failed attempt to warn
an approaching vehicle that it was on a
collision course with the man in the
road.
The small car with six passengers,
driven by Andrew Gruenberg, 26, struck
Kelly, who was pronounced dead at the
scene with head and torso injuries, the
CHP said.
Toxic waste declines
in California ocean area
LOS ANGELES The
Environmental Protection Agency has
suspended planned cleanup efforts at a
California site where industrial waste
on the ocean oor appears to be declin-
ing naturally.
Scientists are at a loss to explain the
rapid drop of toxic chemical levels
across the 17-square-mile site about
200 feet below the ocean surface and
two miles off the Los Angeles County
coast, the Los Angeles Times reported
Sunday.
Samples taken from sediment sug-
gest more than 100 metric tons of the
banned pesticide DDT and industrial
compounds known as PCBs have
dropped by nearly 90 percent in just
ve years.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actress-director
Jodie Foster is 51.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1863
President Abraham Lincoln delivered
the Gettysburg Address as he dedicated
a national cemetery at the site of the
Civil War battleeld in Pennsylvania.
My theology, briey, is that the
universe was dictated but not signed.
Christopher Morley, American author (1890-1957)
Actress Meg Ryan
is 52.
TV chef Rocco
DiSpirito is 47.
Birthdays
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo Equinox staff participating in Movember,shown here on Nov.14,are (clockwise from bottom center) Equinox Fitness
Personal Trainer David Clawson (with arms crossed),Zach Hylton,Brian Tschida,Don Lee,Chris Warburton,Chris Schoephoerster,
Julian Buttler, Nam Huynh, Jonathan Kuiter, Conrad Sherby, Jack Ryan, Mario Flaherty, Marcellus Green, Paul Beech, Zoey
Sandlin, Brook Seaman, Dil Sahota, Gabe Bruen, and Philip Levi.
Tuesday: Rain. Highs in the upper 50s.
Southeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday night: Rain. Lows in the lower
50s. Southeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday: Rain likely. Highs in the
upper 50s. South winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming southwest in the after-
noon. Chance of rain 70 percent.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. Achance of showers in
the evening...Then a slight chance of showers after mid-
night. Lows in the upper 40s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Chance of showers 40 percent.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Thursday night and Friday: Clear. Lows in the upper
40s. Highs around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1600, King Charles I of England was born in
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.
I n 1794, the United States and Britain signed Jays Treaty,
which resolved some issues left over from the
Revolutionary War.
I n 1831, the 20th president of the United States, James
Gareld, was born in Orange Township, Ohio.
I n 1887, American poet Emma Lazarus, whod written The
New Colossus to help raise money for the Statue of
Libertys pedestal, died in New York at age 38.
I n 1919, the Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles by a
vote of 55 in favor, 39 against, short of the two-thirds
majority needed for ratication.
I n 1942, during World War II, Russian forces launched their
winter offensive against the Germans along the Don front.
I n 1959, Ford Motor Co. announced it was halting produc-
tion of the unpopular Edsel.
I n 1969, Apollo 12 astronauts Charles Conrad and Alan
Bean made the second manned landing on the moon.
I n 1977, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat became the rst
Arab leader to visit Israel.
I n 1985, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail S. Gorbachev met for the rst time as they began
their summit in Geneva.
I n 1990, the pop duo Milli Vanilli were stripped of their
Grammy Award because other singers had lent their voices to
the Girl You Know Its True album.
I n 1997, Iowa seamstress Bobbi McCaughey gave birth to
septuplets, four boys and three girls. The space shuttle
Columbia zoomed into orbit on a two-week science mis-
sion.
I n 2001, President George W. Bush signed legislation to
put airport baggage screeners on the federal payroll.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
HIKER DECAY KNIGHT MINGLE
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The Army general who played in the tennis
tournament was HIGHLY RANKED
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
FEHTT
NALTS
RAPYAL
DEMLID
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, inrst place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in
second place; and Whil Win, No. 6, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:42.06.
2 2 7
25 44 49 54 63 8
Mega number
Nov. 15 Mega Millions
10 29 37 44 59 10
Powerball
Nov. 16 Powerball
3 8 15 22 29
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 1 5 6
Daily Four
7 2 7
Daily three evening
18 19 27 29 45 15
Mega number
Nov. 16 Super Lotto Plus
Actor Alan Young is 94. Talk show host Larry King is 80.
Former General Electric chief executive Jack Welch is 78. Talk
show host Dick Cavett is 77. Broadcasting and sports mogul
Ted Turner is 75. Singer Pete Moore (Smokey Robinson and
the Miracles) is 74. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, is 74. TVjour-
nalist Garrick Utley is 74. Actor Dan Haggerty is 72. Former
Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson is
72. Fashion designer Calvin Klein is 71. Sportscaster Ahmad
Rashad is 64. Actor Robert Beltran is 60. Actress Kathleen
Quinlan is 59. Actress Glynnis OConnor is 58. Broadcast
journalist Ann Curry is 57.
3
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. Fireworks
were found on North Bayshore Boulevard
and Poplar Avenue before 10:48 a.m.
Monday, Nov. 4.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. A man was
ranting and yelling about violence against
children on the 1600 block of South El
Camino Real before 9:41 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 4.
Fire. Agarage was on re at the 800 block
of Rand Street before 10:56 a.m. Sunday,
Nov. 3.
Burglary. Aman in a San Francisco Giants
hat took a large amount of merchandise and
ran toward the train station at Hillsdale
Shopping Center before 3:06 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 3.
MILLBRAE
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
rst block of Millbrae Avenue before 11
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12.
Vandal i sm. A vehicle was vandalized on
the rst block of Millbrae Avenue before 11
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12.
Burglary. A vehicle was reported burglar-
ized on the 400 block of El Camino Real
before 9:10 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11.
Vandalism. Property was reported vandal-
ized on the 200 block of Hillcrest Boulevard
before 9 a.m. Monday, Nov. 11.
Police reports
Everything is half off
Aman was running around a parking lot
in a bra and pants disturbing patrons on
the 1200 block of El Camino Real in
Redwood City before 1:32 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 10.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Peninsula Conict Resolution Center
will be hosting a workshop today to address
methods to combat bullying in schools and
at home by encouraging compassion and
understanding.
Beyond Bullying Behaviors: Promoting
Empathy and Respect Among Youth will be
held today from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in
Redwood City.
PCRC provides mediation services and
hosts a variety of community-based work-
shops to educate people of all ages on non-
adversarial problem solving techniques.
Our mission is to foster collaborative
engagement by bringing people together,
facilitating conversations and to build these
skills in our community, said Sara
Randazzo, director of communications and
training services for PCRC.
PCRC offers services to families, schools,
businesses and individuals throughout San
Mateo County. After receiving many requests
for seminars related to bullying, the PCRC
decided to open up this particular workshop
to the public, Randazzo said.
We have an afnity for schools and young
people. For a number of years, weve really
been at the forefront of addressing bullying
type behavior to help young people
address conict in a different way, said
Michelle Vilchez, executive director of
PCRC.
Bullying is a long-standing issue, but
theres been an increase in attention due to
the high number of school-related suicides
and deaths throughout the nation, Randazzo
said.
Students should feel safe at school in an
environment that fosters open dialogue and
respect. Bullying distracts from a students
ability to focus on their education.
We know that emotional well-being and
health, all of those things play into a stu-
dents ability to learn, Randazzo said.
Combating bullying means not only
teaching them about conict resolution, its
about providing youth with an opportunity
to show compassion and respect to each
other, Vilchez said. Its very important to
teach young people that there doesnt have
to be a victim and an aggressor while address-
ing conict, Vilchez said.
Todays meeting is geared toward teachers,
parents, service providers and adults who
work or have regular contact with young peo-
ple. High school students from a local peer
mediators group who work with elementary
and middle school students may also partici-
pate.
Teaching people how to see beyond the
appearance of bullying and get at the core
root of why a person acts out is critical.
Children need adults or peers that they feel
comfortable opening up to, Randazzo said.
Educating students and children about the
importance of being empathetic and respect-
ing one another will deter bullying and foster
environments for youth to support one
another, she added.
Trainers John Yap and Aida Negron will be
facilitating the meeting. Yap is the director
of empowering youth initiative at PCRC and
has a background in social work, Randazzo
said. Negron has a background in public
health and experience in working with par-
ents and families as well as providing spaces
for parents and families to talk about bully-
ing.
PCRC does not place blame on the
aggressor. We take into consideration the
experience of everyone impacted. Many
times bullying behavior may be viewed as
normal by the aggressor and is based on an
unmet need, Negron wrote in an email.
Providing a space for all parties involved
in bullying to ask each other questions in a
safe environment will help people see
beyond the appearance of an action and get at
the core of the problem, Randazzo said.
PCRC tries and make sure everyone is given
an opportunity to be heard and trainers facil-
itate to ensure those involved stay on a track,
Randazzo said.
We believe differences are assets. When
there are different perspectives at the table
you get more lasting solutions to whatever
conict youre trying to address, Randazzo
said.
Workshop attendees will have time to dis-
cuss their individual experiences and relay
techniques theyve found useful, Randazzo
said.
We believe that through information and
education, people can have the ability to
grow and advocate for themselves,
Randazzo said.
Beyond Bullying Behaviors: Promoting
Empathy and Respect Among Youth is being
held at the San Mateo County Ofce of
Education at 101 Twin Dolphin Drive in
Redwood City. Registration is $50 per par-
ticipant. For more information about PCRC
visit www.pcrcweb.org
Workshop aims to halt school bullying
Comment on
or share this story at
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4
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
BART, unions meet over
contract provision dispute
Bay Area Rapid Transit ofcials
and its two largest unions were
meeting on Monday to go over the
agencys estimates of how much a
disputed contract provision would
cost.
BART and the unions, SEIU
Local 1021 and ATU Local 1555,
did not plan to hold negotiations
over the provision. Instead, the
meeting was to focus on BARTs
accounting.
At issue is a medical leave provi-
sion that BART says was erro-
neously included in the contract
language by an unnamed tempo-
rary employee in July. The agency
says it could cost $44 million
over the four-year life of the tenta-
tive contract deal. That deal was
reached last month and ended a
second transit strike.
BART wants the unions to rene-
gotiate that provision.
BARTs board is set to vote on
the contract on Thursday.
Bicyclist seriously
injured when hit by car
Abicyclist was seriously injured
when he was hit by a vehicle in
Menlo Park near the Dumbarton
Bridge Monday morning, police
said.
The collision was reported at
Bayfront Expressway and Marsh
Road at 8:23 a.m., police said.
Officers arrived to find the
injured bicyclist, a 33-year-old
man, police said. He was taken to
Stanford Hospital.
The driver of the vehicle, a 33-
year-old Union City woman,
remained at the scene and cooper-
ated with investigators, police
spokeswoman Nicole Acker said.
A preliminary investigation
indicated that she was not under
the inuence of drugs or alcohol,
according to police.
Anyone with information about
the collision is asked to call
Menlo Park police at (650) 330-
3600.
Local briefs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 19-year-old Belmont man
who ashed two separate women
walking earlier this year was sen-
tenced to a 15 days in jail and
must register as a sex offender.
Spencer Aaron Kinsey must also
spend three years on probation
and complete a sex offender pro-
gram. He has
credit of one
day served.
K i n s e y
pleaded no con-
test in
September to
one count of
indecent expo-
sure in return
for the dismissal of another mis-
demeanor.
Prosecutors say on the after-
noon of Jan. 13, Kinsey pulled
his car up to a 30-year-old woman
walking with her baby on Hiller
Street in Belmont and asked for
directions. When she looked in
the car, he reportedly exposed
himself and was masturbating. At
5:40 p.m. Jan. 19, he similarly
pulled up to a woman walking her
dog on Hill Street and masturbat-
ed. As he drove off, he doubled
back and yelled at her crudely to
orally copulate him, according to
the District Attorneys Ofce.
Police located the suspect vehi-
cle based on the victims descrip-
tions and a security camera image.
Indecent exposure brings jail, sex offender registration
Spencer Kinsey
By Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON As Hillary
Rodham Clinton privately weighs a
second White House run, pieces of
the Democratic establishment are
beginning to fall into place pub-
licly to help her possible candida-
cy.
Several super political action
committees are collectively acting
as an early de facto campaign
organization to ensure Clinton is
ready to compete vigorously if she
decides to try again to become the
rst female president.
Theyre building a network with-
out her direct consent. But shes not
objecting either, and some
Democrats are interpreting that as
encouragement to push forward in
anticipation of a campaign.
Theres a lot of energy out there
and it would be a mistake not to
channel and use it as an opportuni-
ty to organize, said Craig Smith,
an adviser to Ready for Hillary.
The super PAC American Bridge
21st Century has launched Correct
the Record, a group staffed by for-
mer Clinton aides who intend to
defend the former secretary of state
and other potential 2016 candidates
against Republican critics.
Priorities USA Action, which ran
searing ads against rivals of
President Barack Obama to support
his re-election, is discussing bring-
ing onboard a former White House
chief of staff under her husband.
Ready for Hillary, formed after
the 2012 elections, is working to
keep grass-roots supporters around
the country energized. And EMILYs
List, a group that has 3 million
members and supports women can-
didates who back abortion rights,
has been holding forums promot-
ing the need to elect the Americas
rst female president.
Democrats have highlighted
polls showing that Clinton would
be an early favorite for the partys
nomination if she sought the White
House again.
While this work goes on behind
the scenes, Clinton has been stay-
ing in the public eye by traveling
the country to speak before trade
groups and to party supporters. She
also plans to release a book next
year about her time at the State
Department, giving her a platform
to tour the nation before the 2014
midterm elections.
On Tuesday, American Bridge
and the liberal-leaning Media
Matters plan to hold a daylong
conference on in San Francisco,
where about 80 prospective donors
and financial backers will hear
from Smith, former Vice President
Al Gore and Democratic strategists
James Carville and Paul Begala,
longtime advisers to former
President Bill Clinton. Carville
has promoted a potential Hillary
Clinton candidacy, and Begala is a
consultant to Priorities USA
Action.
An organizer of the San
Francisco conference is Susie
Tompkins Buell, a co-founder of the
Esprit clothing company and a
longtime friend of the Clintons
who is also a nance co-chair of
Ready for Hillary.
Outside political groups
coalescing around Clinton
REUTERS
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks at a symposium on
advancing Afghan women at Georgetown University.
T
he San Mateo County
Ofce of Education and
the Council of Math and
Science Educators of San Mateo
County invite local students in
grades four to eight to the Julia
Robi nson Mathemati cs Festi val
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
23 at district ofces, 101 Twin
Dolphin Drive in Redwood City.
***
Woodsi de Hi gh School will be
holding its annual Alumni
Basketball Game 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 26 for the girls varsity team
versus alumni and 7:30 p.m. for the
boys varsity team versus alumni at
the schools new gym at 199
Churchill Ave. in Woodside. There
will be entertainment, food and a
drawing. Admission is $5 and pro-
ceeds go to Woodside basketball pro-
grams.
***
The Leyla Beban Young
Authors Foundation announced it
is now accepting submissions to the
$1, 000 f or 1 , 0 0 0 Words c-
tion-writing contest.
The contest is open through Feb. 1,
2014. Two $1,000 scholarships will
be awarded, one each in grades 6-8
and 9-12, as well as cash prizes of
$100 to the best work in each grade
level. All contest winners and select
honorable mentions will be pub-
lished in the upcoming journal
Bl uere and winners will be recog-
nized at a celebration in April 2014.
To nd out more visit
blue4beban.org.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
6
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
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Starting this week, Aragon High School will put on Chicago as its fall musical. Chicago runs 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21 to
Saturday, Nov. 23 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24. Online ticket prices are $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors at
aragondrama.com.Tickets will be sold at the theater for $17 for adults and $10 for students and seniors.There will also be a
preview performance 7 p.m.Wednesday, Nov. 2 for $8. For more information email info@aragondrama.com.
CalPERS loses round in San
Bernardino bankruptcy fight
RIVERSIDE Californias biggest public pension sys-
tem has lost its appeal of the ruling that allowed the city of
San Bernardino to le for bankruptcy.
The San Bernardino Sun reports a bankruptcy judge reject-
ed the request by the California Public Employees
Retirement System to challenge the citys bankruptcy eligi-
bility at the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
Fridays decision is the latest round in the bankruptcy bat-
tle between the cash-strapped city and CalPERS. The city
owes the pension fund $14 million in overdue payments.
Last month the San Bernardino City Council adopted a
tentative plan to deal with all its creditors, including
CalPERS.
Around the state
Girlfriend says Zimmerman pointed shotgun at her
APOPKA, Fla. George Zimmerman was charged with
assault Monday after his girlfriend called deputies to the home
where they were living and claimed he
pointed a shotgun at her during an argu-
ment, authorities said. The girlfriend,
Samantha Scheibe, called 911 in the early
afternoon to say that Zimmerman had
smashed a glass table, threatened her with
the shotgun and ultimately pushed her out
of the house, according to an arrest report.
After pushing her out, Zimmerman barri-
caded the door with furniture and refused to
leave, saying that he would talk to police
by phone, authorities said.
The arrest was the latest legal problem for Zimmerman since
he was acquitted last summer of criminal charges in the fatal
shooting of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen. The trial
stoked a discussion on racial proling across the country.
You point your gun at my fricking face, Samantha Scheibe
is heard telling Zimmerman on a 911 call. Get out of my
house. Do not push me out of my house. Please get out of my
house.
Around the nation
George
Zimmerman
NATION 7
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The following
information is to
address common
concerns about the
Reverse Mortgage
product.
We do NOT take
your home.
You and your
estate will continue to retain ownership
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The reverse mortgage is a non-recourse
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Any balance owed above and beyond
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You do NOT have to make monthly
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We are in the business of helping you
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However, at any time you decide to sell
your home, the outstanding balance
would need to then be repaid.
Frequently Asked Questions
Below is a list of Frequently Asked
Questions by category.
Do I have to own my home free and clear
to qualify?
You can payoff your existing mortgage
with the proceeds from the reverse
mortgage. Many people get a reverse
mortgage to eliminate their monthly
payments permanently.
If something happens to me, can my
spouse continue to receive the benefts
from a Reverse Mortgage?
Yes they can. As long as you were joint
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Mortgage and your spouse wants to
remain in the home.
Can I still leave my home to my kids?
Yes you can leave your home to your
heirs. Your home will always remain
your home. You may leave it to whom-
ever you wish. When you pass away your
heirs will have options for paying off the
loan. After the debt is repaid, any
remaining equity (if they choose to sell
it) will go to your heirs.
Why Security 1 Lending is the Right
Choice?
Security 1 Lending provides the
homeowner with an educational and
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ence. The complete process is a no
pressure, ethical and honest relationship
with trust serving as the foundational
principal.
Our approach is simple; we have
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believe that each of our clients should be
treated with the same level of care and
service that we would provide our own
family.
At Security 1 Lending its not about a
mortgage transaction; its about allow-
ing each and every client the opportu-
nity to live with a better quality of life.
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Myths & Misconceptions of Reverse Mortgages
Advertisement
By David Mercer
and Don Babwin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON, Ill. When a
cluster of violent thunderstorms
began marching across the
Midwest, forecasters were able to
draw a bright line on a map show-
ing where the worst of the weather
would go.
Their uncannily accurate predic-
tions combined with television
and radio warnings, text-message
alerts and storm sirens almost
certainly saved lives as rare late-
season tornadoes dropped out of a
dark autumn sky. Although the
storms howled through 12 states
and flattened entire neighbor-
hoods within a matter of minutes,
the number of dead stood at just
eight.
By Monday, another, more pro-
saic reason for the relatively low
death toll also came to light: In
the hardest-hit town, many fami-
lies were in church.
I dont think we had one church
damaged, said Gary Manier,
mayor of Washington, Ill., a com-
munity of 16,000 about 140 miles
southwest of Chicago.
The tornado cut a path about an
eighth of a mile wide from one
side of Washington to the other
and damaged or destroyed as many
as 500 homes. The heavy weather
also battered parts of Michigan,
Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri,
Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky,
Tennessee, West Virginia,
Pennsylvania and western New
York.
Back in Washington, Daniel
Bennett was officiating Sunday
services before 600 to 700 people
when he heard an electronic warn-
ing tone. Then another. And
another.
Id say probably two dozen
phones started going off in the
service, and everybody started
looking down, he said.
What they saw was a text mes-
sage from the National Weather
Service cautioning that a twister
was in the area. Bennett stopped
the service and ushered everyone
to a safe place until the threat
passed.
A day later, many townspeople
said those messages helped mini-
mize deaths and injuries.
Thats got to be connected,
Bennett said. The ability to get
instant information.
In Indiana, Taylor Glenna heard
emergency sirens go off and
received an alert on his cellphone.
A friend also called to warn him
the storm was nearly upon him.
Glenna went outside, saw hail
and heard a loud boom. He ran to
his basement just in time.
On Monday, he was surveying
the damage on crutches after suf-
fering a leg injury when the wind
knocked his home off its founda-
tion.
I would say we had pretty good
warning, Glenna said. We just
didnt listen to it.
Forecasting has steadily
improved with the arrival of
faster, more powerful computers.
Scientists are now better able to
replicate atmospheric processes
into mathematical equations.
In the last decade alone, fore-
casters have doubled the number of
days in advance that weather
experts can anticipate major
storms, said Bill Bunting of the
National Weather Service.
But Bunting, forecast opera-
tions chief of the services Storm
Prediction Center in Norman,
Okla. said it was not until Saturday
that the atmospheric instability
that turns smaller storm system
into larger, more menacing ones
came into focus.
Thats when information from
weather stations, weather bal-
loons, satellite imagery and radar
suggested there was plenty of
moisture fuel for storms
making its way northeast from the
Gulf of Mexico.
Warnings spared lives fromtornadoes
REUTERS
An aerial view shows the path of destruction caused by a tornado that
touched down in Washington, Ill.
White House pushes to
loosen Gitmo transfer rules
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama is pushing to over-
come obstacles
to closing the
Gu a n t a n a mo
Bay prison, set-
ting the White
House on a col-
lision course
with Congress
in its bid to
loosen restric-
tions for mov-
ing out detainees.
Administration officials say a
Senate defense policy bill coming
up for debate within days would
allow them to move out prisoners
who have long been cleared for
transfer overseas but are still held,
in part because of a complicated
Pentagon certification process.
The bill would ease those restric-
tions and lift a ban on bringing
suspected terrorist prisoners from
Guantanamo to the United States
for detention, trial or emergency
medical treatment.
Hyundai to market
hydrogen vehicle next year
DETROIT For years, the joke
in the auto industry was that a
mass-produced car that runs on
hydrogen was always a decade
away.
That will change next year when
Hyundai starts selling a Tucson
SUV powered by a hydrogen fuel
cell. It will be the rst mass-mar-
ket vehicle of its type to be sold or
leased in the U.S.
These things are now ready for
prime time, John Krafcik,
Hyundais North American CEO,
said last week.
Around the nation
Barack Obama
WORLD 8
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS
People help a man injured when Libyan militiamen opened
re into a crowd of protesters in Tripoli, Libya.
Libyan army deploys in
capital against militias
By Esam Mohamed and Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRIPOLI, Libya Libyas military swept into the capital
Monday with dozens of pickup trucks mounted with anti-air-
craft guns in an operation to drive out militiamen, met by a
warm welcome from Libyans seething with anger against the
numerous armed groups running rampant in the country.
Libya is seeing its strongest public uproar yet against mili-
tias, which have fueled lawlessness nationwide since the
2011 fall of longtime leader Moammar Gadha. The heavily
armed groups, some of them led by Islamic extremist com-
manders, have deed control by the weak central govern-
ment, carving out efdoms, acting as a law unto themselves,
and imposing their control.
But the move to rein in militias risks detonating an explo-
sive backlash leading to outright battles between rival mili-
tias. Since many of the militias are rooted in specic cities
and act as arms of political groups, any violence could pit
city against city in this already fragmented nation.
By David Crary and Rob Giles
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO Amid cries of Shame!
Shame! scandal-plagued Toronto
Mayor Rob Ford was stripped of the last
of his meaningful powers Monday after
a heated City Council debate in which
he argued with members of the public,
charged hecklers and knocked a council-
woman down.
Ford called the move a coup detat
and vowed an outright war in next
years mayoral election.
Whats happening here today is not
a democratic process, its a dictatorship
process, the 44-year-old mayor
declared.
The council lacks the power to
remove Ford from ofce unless he is
convicted of a crime. Instead, members
sought the strongest recourse available
after recent revelations that Ford
smoked crack cocaine and his repeated
outbursts of erratic
behavior.
The council voted
overwhelmingly in
favor of slashing
Fords ofce budget
by 60 percent and
allowing his staff to
move to the deputy
mayor, who now
takes on many of
the mayors former powers. Ford now
effectively has no legislative power and
no longer chairs the executive commit-
tee, although he retains his title and
ability to represent Toronto at ofcial
functions.
The debate became raucous after Ford
paced around the council chamber and
traded barbs with members of the pub-
lic. The speaker asked security to clear
the gallery and a recess was called, but
not before Ford barreled toward his
detractors, mowing into Councilor Pam
McConnell.
Another councilor asked Ford to
apologize. Ford said he was rushing to
the defense of his brother, Councilor
Doug Ford, and accidentally knocked
McConnell down.
I picked her up, he said. I ran
around because I thought my brother
was getting into an altercation.
Visibly shaken after Ford ran her
over, McConnell, a petite woman in her
60s, said she never expected the chaos
that broke out.
This is the seat of democracy. It is
not a football eld. I just wasnt ready.
Fortunately, the mayors staff was in
front. They stopped me from hitting my
head against the wall. I just need to sit
down, McConnell said.
The motion to strip Ford of his pow-
ers was revised from a tougher version
to ward off potential legal challenges
by letting Ford keep his title and repre-
sent the city at ofcial functions.
Toronto council strips mayor of powers
By Monika Scislowska
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WARSAW, Poland The top U.N.
climate diplomat on Monday told the
coal industry it should leave most of
the worlds remaining coal reserves in
the ground and start investing in
renewable energy sources.
Speaking at a coal summit on the
sidelines of a U.N. climate conference
in Warsaw, Christiana Figueres said
the coal industry needs to change radi-
cally to help reduce the carbon emis-
sions that scientists say are warming
the planet.
The world is rising to meet the cli-
mate challenge as risks of inaction
mount, and it is in your best interest to
make coal part of the solution,
Figueres said.
The coal event was seen as a provo-
cation by climate activists, who used a
crane to reach the ministrys roof,
where they unfurled banners criticizing
Polands and the worlds reliance
on coal and other fossil fuels. Police
used another crane to take them down,
as panelists at the coal summit said
that the people in the room, not the
people on the roof, have the possibil-
ity to change the coal industry.
Coal industry ofcials at the event
didnt directly address her remarks but
said the world cannot do without coal
because in many countries its the only
available energy source.
Amajor aim of the summit has been
to encourage open and constructive
dialogue on the climate challenge
were not going to meet our climate
objectives if we are not all part of the
solution, the World Coal
Association, which organized the
event, said in a statement.
Polish Economy Minister Janusz
Piechocinski, whose country gener-
ates about 90 percent of its electricity
from coal, said: You cannot have a
low-emissions energy transformation
without talking about coal.
Coal accounts for less than 30 per-
cent of the worlds energy supply but
more than 40 percent of energy emis-
sions, according to the International
Energy Agency.
U.N. climate chief calls on coal industry to change
Rob Ford
OPINION 9
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Faulty minutiae everywhere
Editor,
Michelle Durands hilarious column
(Faulty minutiae, in the Nov. 14
edition of the Daily Journal) reminded
me of a funny incident in my family.
As you know, all non-U.S. citizens
are nger-printed when arriving in the
United States.
My parents, who fall in that catego-
ry, arrived for one of their many visits
a few years ago. I went to pick them
up at the airport and almost three
hours went by with no sign of them. I
assumed I had mistaken their ight for
the earlier of two ights by the same
airline that day and left for home. I
soon received a call from them saying
that they had just been cleared by
security to enter the United States.
It so happened that my mothers n-
gerprints were just not easy to get.
While all the attempts (lotion, scan,
repeat) were made, they were not
allowed to place any phone calls to
anyone waiting. Anyways, she was
asked to moisturize for several days
before arriving in the United States
the next time.
Rahul Bahadur
San Mateo
Obamacare reply
Editor,
What is scarier? That conservative
writers such as Harry Roussard
(Obamacare the laughing stock
in the Nov. 16 edition of the Daily
Journal) or Chuck McDougald (Who
is exempted from Obamacare in the
same edition) write their drivel about
Obamacare, or that they believe what
they write?
Letter writer Roussard writes the
wrong people are signing up the
old, sick and poor to get the bene-
ts. Yes, how dare we let those who
need it, use it? How dare we have the
well and better off take care of the less
fortunate? What were we thinking?
Columnist Chuck McDougald writes:
The purpose of Obamacare was never
to provide you with affordable health
care. The objective was to take over
your life. Oh really? Silly us, think-
ing the purpose of the Affordable Care
Act (based on a Republican model) is
to prevent outside forces such as
insurance companies, nancial insti-
tutions, emergency rooms et al, from
taking over our lives from lack of
good care.
Harry, Chuck, and others of your
ilk, here is news for you: Obamacare
is here to stay. Get over it. It will suc-
ceed because, at its base, Obamacare
has millions of people with meaning-
ful coverage they didnt have previ-
ously, and the old, sick and poor will
have care and dignity they need when
they need it. One nal request: How
about you do a truly patriotic thing
use your energy to make Obamacare a
better plan to the betterment of all
rather than ripping it at every oppor-
tunity. Obamacare, imperfect as it may
be, surely beats your alternative plan
(wait, you dont have one?), or the
plans we had previously (zero).
Rel Kempf
San Mateo
What good is
the presidents word?
Editor,
Sen. Dianne Feinstein is co-spon-
soring a bill to give people a choice
to keep their existing health insur-
ance plans. In other words, she is
attempting to pass a law which will
support exactly what President Obama
promised as he was promoting his
signature legislation. Senator
Feinstein understands the importance
of honesty. She is attempting to avert
an injustice to the nearly 1 million
Californians in the individual market
who received insurance cancellation
notices. Many of these policy holders
have discovered that the new and most
affordable plan is often more than
twice as expensive as their present
plan with an even higher deductible.
As someone who nds himself in
this exact situation, I can testify as to
the anger engendered when hearing
the president say over and over again,
if you like your present health insur-
ance plan, you can keep it. Period.
The president is now asking the insur-
ance companies to extend the can-
celled plans for one year. That is a far
cry from what he promised me and
other policy holders.
Please support Sen. Feinsteins
efforts by emailing or calling her
ofce today. President Obama, Sen.
Feinstein, Sen. Boxer and U.S. Rep.
Speier all made a promise they must
keep.
Ethan Jones
San Bruno
Obama cares
Editor,
In the United States, we have a wide
variety of ways to think about things.
We have people in jail cells who are
presumed to be innocent. Then we
have health insurance that is bought
and sold like a new car or a fur coat.
That is private health insurance. Any
attempt to change this is foolishly
called socialism, fascism, commu-
nism or a collection of scary words.
Medicare and Medicaid have served
this country well for almost 50 years.
If the Affordable Care Act (maliciously
referred to as Obamacare) were allowed
to work, it would help shore up and
strengthen these programs. People
have this choice or they can go back
to the Republican plan that lines the
pockets of health insurance compa-
nies, and keeps them rich. All while
the holders of these plans are basical-
ly taken advantage of. It is also help-
ful to deliberately sabotage others
when you dont agree with them. One
way to do this is by causing the web-
site people are using to keep failing.
When you think like this you are des-
tined to fail at what you would like to
achieve.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Obamas dilemma
Editor,
Obamacare equals friends without
benets. What happened to his con-
stituency that were going to be friends
with benets? What happened to best
friends forever?
Jack Kirkpatrick
Redwood City
Compromise
Editor,
As members of Congress resume
their debate over the federal budget,
the future of Social Security and
Medicare take center stage in their dis-
cussions.
Republicans charge that unless huge
cuts and revisions are made in benet s
being paid out by the two programs,
their funding will dry up in a few
years.
Democrats charge that under current
law, the federal government is com-
mitted to continuing those payments
to those now receiving them. Funding
for the two programs was provided by
taxes paid into the programs by those
now receiving those benets, with the
promise they would receive part of
them back for nancial security during
their years in retirement.
Acompromise between the two par-
ties could be reached if both changed
their rhetoric from I am right and you
are wrong to we are both right, let
us compromise and get the job done.
Compromise is a word of strength,
not of weakness. Many have been
made before, which have kept our
government strong and progressive.
Jack Rogers
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
When yes means no
N
o. No, no, no. When San Carlos Councilman Matt
Grocott started oating the idea of seeking a new
vote on the controversial Transit Village project,
the only word that went through my mind (not counting the
groaning sound, ugh) was no.
In the day or two after the 4-1 approval of a much-scaled
down project, Grocott said he was hesitant to vote at all and
felt the process was rushed. Makes sense. Heading into the
meeting, both he and Vice Mayor Mark Olbert said they
wanted to wait until after incoming councilman Cameron
Johnson was sworn in and able to chime in. Grocott also
wanted story poles and had a laundry list of unanswered
questions at the last council meeting.
So his solution is to vote yes and nearly immediately ask
for a do over?
The council has previously
traveled this ground, this fake turf
covered ground to be exact. Way
back in 2006, with Grocott still
on the council, the body capped
years of bickering over the use of
synthetic turf by voting for the
articial stuff at Tierra Linda and
Central middle schools and natu-
ral elds at Highlands Park and
Heather School. With the ink
barely dry on a marathon two-part
meeting, then-councilwoman
Inge Tiegel Doherty, who actually
ran for re-election earlier this month, sought a new poll on
Heather School. Doherty at the time said it was not a do
over but she would have voted differently with more infor-
mation.
Both sides wrinkled their nose at reopening the matter.
Direct from the residents I quoted at the time: a natural sod
proponent said the decision was made and I accept it. One
man compared the situation to a parent and child, telling
the council to make a decision and stick to it. Another urged
the council to begin the healing between the divided
sides. Another woman asked something pretty applicable
to the Transit Village situation why did the council both-
er to vote if members felt unprepared?
And Grocott? He was one of two minority councilmem-
bers who opposed reconsideration. He even said at the time
new consideration sent the message of revisiting contro-
versial facets like eld lights.
Why were revisiting this, I cant give you an answer,
Grocott said at the time.
Fast-forward seven years and Grocott is now on the other
side of the spectrum in regards to the mixed-use project
around the existing Caltrain station. This time he has an
answer the council barely talked amongst itself over the
course of two evenings, the vote was moving too fast, he
wanted to continue the discussion and he thought the rules
of order would only allow for reconsideration if he voted in
the afrmative.
In comparison to the turf war which included hours of
council discussion on top of public comment and presenta-
tions, the Transit Village vote came with little back and
forth on anything other than the below-market rate unit
component, he said.
Now, Grocott believes the zoning component of the vote
was an ordinance which requires a second reading sort of
a mandatory second vote anyway. If there are substantial
changes, the ordinance may need a new introduction, too,
he said.
Grocott might need that if he really does want to start
over because theres not guarantee a council majority will
agree. Even residents who long fought against the project
as proposed say the vote should stand, particularly as it was
for a much smaller project than they had even hoped for.
Bottom line, Grocotts yes means no answer was a way
to buy time but it feels like a twisted and covert way to get
there. Its also a worrisome precedent, especially when a
new vote could theoretically be made to accommodate the
installation of a new member who might change the bal-
ance of opinion. On the ip side, lets hope the process
wasnt rushed simply to ensure that the sitting member cast
a vote before the reorganization.
Acouncil is elected to make honest decisions and appar-
ently a majority felt it was ready to pull the trigger. Yet how
solid is a decision if multiple members say they still need
more information? Believe me, Im in no rush to spend
more nights sitting in the council chamber corner, hoping
a decision comes before the battery on my laptop dies and
the sun comes up. And just maybe Grocott and Olbert have
all the data they need whether they realize it or not. Maybe
they needed to stop beating around the bush and choose.
At least Olbert for his part voted no. Although I do under-
stand Grocotts reasoning, he should have done so, too. Or,
better yet, perhaps the others could have decided that if two
members arent ready, the council as a whole isnt ready. As
much as it pains me to say, when asked if anybody wanted
to make a motion, the answer should have been no.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every Tuesday
and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,976.02 +14.32 10-Yr Bond 2.678 -0.031
Nasdaq 3,949.07 -36.90 Oil (per barrel) 93.00
S&P 500 1,791.53 -6.65 Gold 1,275.20
By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The stock market
broke through two milestones Monday
before giving up nearly all its gains
late in the day.
Stocks rose from the opening bell,
lifting the Dow Jones industrial aver-
age above 16,000 for the rst time and
the Standard & Poors 500 index past
1,800, two big markers in a historic
bull market. But by the end of day, both
indexes had fallen below those levels.
The market is always a little hesitant
when it gets to round numbers, says Ed
Cowart, managing director at Eagle
Asset Management. You dont want to
be the rst guy buying at 16,000 on the
Dow.
The Dow managed to eke out a gain
over Fridays close with a late push
higher, ending just 24 points shy of
16,000. Both the Dow and the S&P500
are on track for their best year in a
decade and have soared more than 140
percent since bottoming out in the
Great Recession more than four years
ago.
Investors have pushed stocks up
sharply this year as the U.S. economy
improves, companies report record
prots and the Federal Reserve keeps up
its easy-money policies.
The Fed is still pumping money into
the system, which is helping fuel the
market, says Frank Fantozzi, CEO of
Planned Financial Services, a wealth
manager. Theres much more con-
dence in the market.
The Dow has risen for six weeks
straight and is up 22 percent so far this
year. The market hasnt risen that much
in a whole year since 2003.
The Dow has closed above round-
number milestones two times this year:
14,000 in early February and 15,000 in
early May. The quick climb has led
some experts to wonder whether stocks
are too high and set to tumble.
Brad McMillan, chief investment
ofcer for Commonwealth Financial,
says hes not worried yet, but notes
three ingredients of market froth are
already present: investors borrowing
record amounts to buy stock, more com-
panies going public for the rst time
and Main Street investors putting
money into the market after years of
pulling out.
Greed is taking over from fear,
McMillan says.
Its not clear whether stocks have
become expensive yet or are just fairly
priced. One measure of value, the ratio
of stock prices to forecast earnings, is
at 15 for S&P 500 companies. That is
slightly below the 15-year average of
16.2, according to FactSet, a data
provider.
Including this years gains, the S&P
500 is up 165 percent from the start of
the current bull market in March 2009,
56 months ago.
Bull markets dating back to the Great
Depression have averaged 57 months,
according to S&P Capital IQ, a research
rm, however the duration of bull mar-
kets has varied greatly over time. The
bull market of the 1990s lasted 113
months, for instance.
Investors have been betting that Fed
stimulus policies are not likely to
change soon. Janet Yellen, the nominee
to succeed Ben Bernanke as Fed chair-
man, indicated in congressional testi-
mony last week that she was prepared to
keep interest rates low to help the econ-
omy.
Investors were also encouraged by a
Chinese government announcement
late Friday that it plans to open state
industries to greater competition and
allow more foreign investment. Many
big U.S. companies have come to rely
on emerging markets like China to
boost revenue. About half of the rev-
enue in the S&P 500 comes outside the
U.S.
Stocks hit round-number milestones, then slip
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New York Stock
Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
The Boeing Co., up $2.28 to $138.36
Theplanemaker is thebigwinner at theopeningdayof theDubai Airshow,landing
$100 billion in orders, twice that of Airbus.
JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd., up $3.80 to $33.30
The Chinese solar company turned in its second-consecutive protable quarter
and raised its full-year module shipments forecast.
Tyson Foods Inc., up 65 cents to $29.42
The nations biggest meat producers quarterly prot jumped 41 percent and it
issued a revenue forecast for next year above Wall Street expectations.
Consol Energy Inc., down $1.42 to $34.56
A bad stretch for coal miners with the TVA closing eight coal-red boilers and the
U.N.s chief climate diplomat ripping the sector.
Diebold Inc., up $1.56 to $32.14
KeyBanc Capital upgrades the security services company as its turnaround story
gathers momentum from extensive cost cuts.
Nasdaq
Renewable Energy Group Inc., down $1.96 to $11.42
Canaccord Genuity downgrades the companys stock following a proposal by
federal regulators to ease 2014 renewable fuel standard targets.
Cell Therapeutics Inc., up 7 cents to $1.94
In licensing agreement with Baxter, the biopharmaceutical company expects at
least $67 million in cash milestone payments.
Synchronoss Technologies Inc., down $1.13 to $32.77
R.W.Baird cuts its rating and target on the cloud services company citing concerns
over limited international visibility.
Big movers
By Kem Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Is the stock market due for
a pullback?
The Dow Jones industrial average has
surged 900 points since early October and
crossed the 16,000-point threshold
Monday. IPOs are hot again. Small
investors, stirred from their post-recession
daze, are coming back to stocks. And its
been more than two years since the market
has had a signicant slump.
Those trends have raised concerns of a
stock bubble. They shouldnt, money man-
agers say, because even with the broader
markets 26 percent jump this year, stocks
arent overpriced yet.
Stocks are not cheap, but that does not
mean that the stock market is expensive,
says Russ Koesterich, chief investment
strategist with Blackrock.
The ratio of stock prices to projected prof-
its for companies in the Standard & Poors
500 index is 15, according to data from
FactSet. Thats slightly below the average
of 16.2 over the last 15 years and far below
the peak of 25 in late 1990s and early
2000s.
Underneath the rally, most of the funda-
mentals of this market remain solid.
Corporate prot margins are near historic
highs and prots are expected to keep ris-
ing. There are no signs the U.S. economy,
which is still recovering from the 2008
nancial crisis and Great Recession, will
slip back into a downturn.
All that leaves investors with conicting
feelings. Few see the stock market as attrac-
tive as it was at the beginning of the year,
but fewer see an alternative where they
should put their money.
Bonds are down 2.1 percent this year,
according to the benchmark Barclays U.S.
Aggregate bond index. Cash has a near-zero
return in money market funds. Gold has
dropped 24 percent.
Its hard to say stocks are expensive
when you compare them to any other asset
class, says Brian Hogan, director of equi-
ties at Fidelity Investments. The other
options are simply not attractive.
Google to pay $17M to
settle Safari privacy case
SAN FRANCISCO Google is paying
$17 million to 37 states and the District of
Columbia to make amends for the Internet
search leaders snooping on millions of
people using Safari Web browsers in 2011
and 2012.
The settlement announced Monday
stems from a technological loophole that
enabled Googles DoubleClick advertising
network to shadow unwitting Safari users,
even though the browsers maker, Apple
Inc., prohibited the tracking without
obtaining a persons permission. By fol-
lowing what Safari users were doing
online, DoubleClick could gain more
insights about what types of ads were most
likely to appeal to different Safari users.
This is the second time that authorities in
the U.S. have cracked down on Google for its
secret shadowing of Safari users from June
2011 through mid-February of last year.
Despite surge, many dont see a stock bubble
Business brief
Girls Fast Pitch
14~U
2014 Summer Try~Outs
November 16 & 17, 2013
November 23 & 24, 2013
Pitchers and Catchers 9:00 am
All Players 10:00am -12:00 pm
Sequoia High School
1201 Brewster Avenue
Redwood City, CA
If you have questions, please contact
Jeff Miller ~ Head Coach
jeff@norcalblitz.com
650-280-1514
www.norcalblitz.com
Page 16, Harbaugh, Brooks
and 49ers defend the hit
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
FOOTBALL HEADS TO CCS: BUT NOT BEFORE HONOR ROLL-ESQUE PERFORMANCES IN LEAGUE FINALE >> PAGE 14
Giants sign veteran pitcher Tim Hudson
ILLUSTRATION BY JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Patrick Pauni, center, rushed for 191 yards on 15 carries in Aragons two-point win over rival Hillsdale Friday.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Tim Hudson
is headed back to the Bay Area.
The San Francisco Giants have
agreed to a $23 million, two-year
contract with the free-agent pitcher,
who began his career with Oakland.
Hudson had a physical Monday, and
the team said the deal is pending the
results of that examination.
Hudson made his major league
debut with the Athletics in 1999 and
went 92-39 in six seasons with
Oakland, where the right-hander
teamed with Mark Mulder and Barry
Zito to form a successful Big
Three.
The 38-year-old Hudson went 8-7
with a 3.97 ERA in 21 starts this
season for Atlanta. His season was
cut short by a broken right ankle
that required surgery. The Braves
earlier this month declined to make
a qualifying offer to Hudson, who
won 49 games during the previous
three seasons.
Im pumped, Giants lefty
reliever Jeremy Affeldt said by text
message. Great signing for us.
Competitor and innings eater.
Knows how to win!
Hudson was hurt July 24 in New
York when the Mets Eric Young Jr.
inadvertently stepped on the back
of the pitchers lower right leg
while Hudson covered rst base.
San Francisco, which missed the
playoffs this year after winning the
World Series in 2010 and 12, is
seeking another starter to join Matt
Cain, Madison Bumgarner and Tim
Lincecum in a rotation losing Zito
and probably also free-agent righty
Ryan Vogelsong.
Cain and Bumgarner are signed
long term, while Lincecum received
a $35 million, two-year deal last
month.
Hudson was drafted by the As in
the sixth round of the 1997 amateur
draft out of Auburn.
Oakland traded Hudson to the
Braves in December 2004 and he
pitched nine seasons in Atlanta.
The three-time All-Star earned NL
Comeback Player of the Year hon-
ors in 2010 after he returned from
elbow ligament replacement surgery
S
unday was a historic day at
the Central Coast Section
football seeding meeting.
For the rst time since the
Peninsula Athletic League was cre-
ated in its current form in 1996,
the league garnered three top seeds
in the ve
divisions of
the CCS
playoffs.
I dont
know if these
things are
cyclical
because the
WCAL (West
Catholic
Athletic
League) is
always on
top, but we
(the PAL) have been creeping up
slowly, said Terry Stogner, PAL
commissioner.
The PALdoes not get a tremen-
dous amount of respect from certain
areas of CCS (read: San Jose), but
everyone has to give up for the PAL
this season. Terra Nova (Open
Division), Burlingame (Division
III) and Sacred Heart Prep (Division
IV) all earned the No. 1 seeds in
their divisions and have a com-
bined record of 29-1, with both
Terra Nova and Burlingame posting
undefeated records. Sacred Heart
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Aragon head football coach
Steve Sell said that, in the week
leading up to the 2013 Battle of
the Fleas, his star fullback Patrick
Pauni was sick as a dog.
For a bit now, the u bug has
made its rounds in the Aragon
locker room. Sell himself has
caught it and cant help but cough
two or three times between sen-
tences. And as timing goes, the
us presence in the Dons locker
room could not have been worse.
With rival Hillsdale champing at
the bit to end its rivalry game curse
(that now stands at 22 years), a
spot in the Central Coast Section
playoffs hanging in the balance
and players like Pauni falling left
and right because of the virus,
things didnt look too healthy for
Aragon.
But come game time, under the
lights at Aragon High School and
seemingly all of San Mateo watch-
ing, big No. 35 decided to put the
Dons on his shoulders, shrug off
the illness that kept his out of
practice the entire week and leave
Hillsdale hurting with a bad case of
the Paunies.
Patrick chose the right night to
have his best game, Sell said.
Ill say that. The power running
See HUDSON, Page 14
See LOUNGE, Page 13
See ATHLETE, Page 14
PAL proves
its strength
in CCS draw
Pauni carries Aragon to CCS
SPORTS 12
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA Former NFL linebacker
Thomas Howard died early Monday morning
following a high-speed car crash on a freeway
in Oakland.
The Alameda County Coroners ofce said
the 30-year-old Howard was one of two men
who died in the crash Monday. The driver of
the other car, 64-year-old Zeng Long Liu of
Hayward, also died in the crash.
Howard was driving a speeding BMWwhen
he hit a big rig, ipped over the center divider
and went head-on into a Honda traveling on
the other side around 1 a.m., said Ofcer
Daniel Hill, a spokesman for the California
Highway Patrol.
Witnesses say the car was traveling at
speeds between 100 mph to 110 mph as the
car overturned, crossed a median and ended up
in the southbound lanes of the freeway, where
it sideswiped another car before landing on
top of the Honda, Hill said.
Hill said that alcohol is not being ruled out
as a possible cause of the accident.
Howard played eight years in the NFL after
being drafted by the Oakland Raiders in the
second round out of Texas-El Paso in 2006. He
was most recently with Atlanta before getting
released last week after playing two games
this season. Howard played his rst ve sea-
sons with the Raiders and two seasons with
Cincinnati.
Words really cant describe how Im feel-
ing right now, former Raiders teammate Kirk
Morrison wrote on his Instagram account.
To get that dreaded phone call and hear some-
one tell you that one of your best friends is no
longer with us is hard to grasp. The feeling of
shock and disbelief can be unbearable at times
but all I can remember is all the good times
that we had. ... I didnt lose a best friend or
former teammate, I truly lost a brother today
in Thomas Howard.
Howard became an almost immediate starter
when he joined the Raiders, making 62 starts
in his rst four seasons. His best season came
in 2007 when he intercepted six passes and
returned two of them for touchdowns. He also
had one sack, 11 passes defensed and one fum-
ble recovery that season.
Howard left the Raiders as a free agent in
2011 and started 15 games in his rst season
with the Bengals. Howard tore his ACL after
his rst game in 2012 and missed the rest of
the season.
Former Raider LB Thomas
Howard dies in a car crash
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON Those who were personally
and profoundly impacted by the explosions
at the Boston Marathon nish line will be
able to run in next years race under a special
invitation that event organizers extended on
Monday to those with a special connection
to the events of April 15.
Having already expanded the eld by 9,000
to accommodate those who were stopped on
the course when two bombs went off at the
nish line, as well as those who want to run
the rst race after the bombings, the Boston
Athletic Association said it has set aside up
to a few hundred additional entries for those
who can make their case in a 250-word essay
submitted to the organizations website.
We are making additional entries avail-
able by request to those who were personally
and profoundly impacted, B.A.A. Executive
Director Tom Grilk said.
Grilk said this is in addition to a special
allocation of entries for The One Fund, the
charity established to help the bombing vic-
tims, and for rst-responders and for Boston-
area hospitals where the wounded were treat-
ed. Nor is it specically for athletes with dis-
abilities, including those wounded in the
explosions; a separate process is designed
for them.
Those who would like to apply need to
make their case in 250 words or fewer and
submit it to the B.A.A. website,
www.baa.org , by Nov. 27. A committee
appointed by the B.A.A. will allocate the
entries and notify those who were successful
on Dec. 4.
Those entering must be 18 years old on
race day and be prepared to show they can
compete the 26.2-mile distance in less than
6 hours, 30 minutes.
Three people were killed and at least 260
wounded when two bombs exploded on
Boylston Street during this years race.
An expanded eld of 36,000 the second-
biggest in the races 118-year history is
expected to line up on April 21 for the run
from Hopkinton to Bostons Back Bay.
Boston Marathon invites back
those affected by bomb attacks
Preps lone loss came to the Tigers.
I think its been a really good year for
us, Stogner said. Were getting it (valida-
tion from the rest of the section).
To get the No. 1 seed in the Open
Division is quite the feather in the cap.
Terra Nova can play.
This is the third straight year Terra Nova,
as the PAL Bay Division champion, will be
playing in the Open Division. The last two
seasons as the No. 7 seed in the 2011
and the No. 8 seed last season the Tigers
have drawn WCAL power Bellarmine. This
year, the Bells are the No. 6 seed, but that
doesnt mean Terra Nova avoids a WCAL
team in the rst round. Instead, the Tigers
get to play an always strong Valley
Christian squad in the rst round.
Despite getting three No. 1 seeds,
Stogner admitted he wont be crowing
when it comes to his attending CCS meet-
ings in the future. He understands seeds are
just a number and now its up to those
teams to show they deserved the No. 1
seed.
Personally, however, Stogner is enjoy-
ing it just a little bit.
Do I feel good when I pick up the news-
paper Monday morning and see the seed-
ings? Absolutely, Stogner said.
***
In 2011, the Bay Cities Bulldogs pee-
wee squad a Pop Warner football pro-
gram based in San Mateo captured the
Best of the West Bowl in Temecula.
Now, that team is a couple years older
and better. As such, the Bulldogs Midget
squad, which is comprised of players age
12 to 15 from Burlingame, Hillsborough,
Foster City and San Mateo, will contend
for the national championship in Florida
next month. The Bulldogs qualied for the
national championship tournament with a
22-8 win over the San Jose Saints Saturday
evening, which clinched the divisional and
regional title for the Bulldogs.
The Bulldogs are currently 9-1 and are
riding a six-game winning streak.
The Bulldogs would have to win three
games to be named national champions
assuming they can get to Florida. The team
will need to raise upwards of $40,000 said
Elenie Hulman, a parent for one of the
players on the team.
Up to this point, she said, families have
been trying to raise money on their own.
Weve been reaching out to everybody
and everyone we know, Hulman said. The
boys have written letters to the 49ers. Ive
reached out to (former Hillsdale, College of
San Mateo and NFL coach) Dick Vermeil.
Right now, were doing it on a personal
level.
Now, however, there is a way for any-
body and everybody to help get the
Bulldogs to Florida. Abank account has
been set up by the Bay Cities program to
allow anyone to make a donation, which
can be sent to: Wells Fargo Bank, c/o Bay
Cities Bulldogs Travel Fund, routing
#121042882.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Warriors ONeal
has bruised knee, groin strain
OAKLAND Golden State Warriors cen-
ter Jermaine ONeal has a bruised right
knee and a strained right groin.
ONeal didnt travel with the team for
Monday nights game at Utah, and the
reserve is considered day to day. An MRI
exam confirmed the injury.
He was hurt early in the fourth quarter of
Golden States 102-88 victory over the
Jazz on Saturday night in Oakland when he
slipped along the baseline.
The Warriors signed free-agent center
Dewayne Dedmon from the franchises
NBA Development League affiliate in
Santa Cruz to help fill ONeals absence.
Dedmon played in five preseason games
with Golden State, averaging 3.4 points,
four rebounds and one block in 10.3 min-
utes. He was waived on Oct. 25.
Reserve center Ognjen Kuzmic likely
will be counted on more to fill ONeals
void as well. The Warriors also could play
power forwards David Lee and Marreese
Speights at center.
ONeal is in his 18th season in the NBA.
He has battled numerous knee injuries
throughout his career, though the most
serious have been to his left knee.
Sports Brief
was a real nice surprise much needed.
The Dons needed every bit of Paunis pres-
ence in the backeld Friday night. As stated,
Hillsdale, who came in as the Peninsula
Athletic League Lake Division champions,
did not drive two miles over to Aragon to sim-
ply lay down and lose to big brother. At the
end of the 48-minute, Alameda de la Pulgas
war, the difference was only two points, 43-
41 the closest result since 2009 when the
Knights defecit was only eight.
Big plays were the difference in the win and
none larger than Paunis 80-yard touchdown
that took Hillsdales momentum and buried it
behind a 29-21 lead in the second quarter.
The 80-yard run was part of a huge day for
No. 35, who tallied 191 yards rushing on just
15 carries. For his efforts, Pauni is the San
Mateo Daily Journal Athlete of the Week.
Maybe its the way I was raised on Aragon
football there is always a tight end, theres
always a fullback and theyre always in at the
same time, Sell said of his big bruising
back. And, I still like that brand of football.
And when you have someone like Patrick it
certainly helps. Its what ts our personality
the best and certainly its what ts my per-
sonality the best.
Pauni certainly has made the most out of his
place in the Aragon system. With his size,
hes the obvious choice in short yardage situ-
ations. But on Friday, with his 80-yard burst,
he showed hes eet-footed enough to outrun
defenses. Not to be overlooked though, is
what Pauni does for the Aragon run game as a
whole. There arent too many linebackers or
safeties in the PAL who love seeing No. 35
coming right at you to play you out and
spring Aragons slew of talented runners.
Some will argue that the other yards our
other back had, Keith Samujh (159 yards, 16
carries), were in part related to how worn
down Hillsdale got by dealing with Patrick,
Sell said. Not to mention that on a couple of
Keiths runs, Patrick was the lead blocker.
And, he can denitely be a difference-maker
and he denitely was Friday. I think when he
starts running through guys, it certainly sets
a tone. And I think the kids feed off that kind
of physicality for sure.
Aragon is denitely going to need more of
Pauni as they begin their trek through the
CCS playoffs in Division III as the No. 7
seed. Theyll travel to No. 2 Aptos Friday
night.
The most important part about Friday,
Sell said, was even though he was sick, he
didnt cough up the football. We didnt cough
up the football. Thats why we won. And
thats nothing to squeeze at.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
to go 17-9 with a 2.83 ERA. He had surgery
for a herniated disk in November 2011.
The Giants had been eager to nd an expe-
rienced starter to ll in the rotation. Zito
just nished a $126 million, seven-year
contract and had his $18 million option
declined for 2014. Vogelsongs $6.5 mil-
lion option for 2014 was declined by the
club.
Hudson is 205-111 in a 15-year career and
was coming off a $36 million, four-year
contract.
After snapping a career-worst 10-game
winless streak with a 13-4 victory July 6 at
Philadelphia, Hudson went 4-0 with a 3.10
ERAin his last four starts.
Hudson will pitch to 2012 NL MVP and
batting champion Buster Posey, who is
signed through 2021. Right elder Hunter
Pence was given a $90 million, ve-year
contract before the season ended.
Concussion expert says
players still in fear
MELBOURNE A leading concussion
expert from the United States says players
in high-level contact sports still are often
fearful of sitting out games after head
injuries because they might lose their posi-
tions on their teams.
Chris Nowinski, a Harvard graduate and
former wrestler, is a co-director of the
Center for the Study of Traumatic
Encephalopathy at Boston University, oth-
erwise known as the Brain Bank.
Continued from page 11
HUDSON
Continued from page 11
ATHLETE
Sports Brief
By Steve Reed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Cam Newton threw
a 25-yard touchdown pass to Ted Ginn Jr.
with 59 seconds left and the Carolina
Panthers held off the New England Patriots
24-20 Monday night for their sixth straight
victory when ofcials picked up a penalty
ag on the nal play.
Stephen Gostkowskis 26-yard eld goal
put the Patriots up 20-17 before Newton
drove Carolina 83 yards on 13 plays for the
go-ahead touchdown. The speedy Ginn
escaped Kyle Arrington along the left side-
line and outraced Logan Ryan to the left
pylon for his third touchdown of the sea-
son.
The Patriots appeared on the verge of
making an improbable comeback when
Brady moved New England to the Carolina
18 and fired into the end zone on the
games final play.
The pass was intercepted by safety Robert
Lester, but ofcials threw a ag after it
appeared linebacker Luke Kuechly had inter-
fered with tight end Rob Gronkowski by
grabbing him with both hands.
But ofcials quickly gathered together and
waved off the ag.
An angry Brady sprinted over to two of-
cials to argue the call as they walked off the
eld. Meanwhile, the Panthers celebrated.
We had good pressure and our safety
Robert Lester was in good position to make
the play, Panthers coach Ron Rivera said.
Brady was 29 of 40 for 296 yards and one
touchdown.
Newton completed 19 of 28 passes for
209 yards and three touchdowns. He also
ran seven times for 62 yards in what will go
down as one of his best games a pro.
Af t er t he game, Ri ver a cal l ed i t a
gut s y eff or t .
It wasnt our best defensive effort, but it
was one of our better offensive efforts,
Rivera said. It was good for our guys to win
a game like this.
Carolinas win came eight days after a 10-
9 victory over reigning NFC champion San
Francisco.
The Panthers entered the fourth quarter
with a 17-10 lead, but Stevan Ridley made
up for an earlier fumble with a 1-yard touch-
down run and the Patriots took the lead with
6:32 left in the game when Gostkowski
slipped a 26-yard eld goal just inside the
left upright.
Newton gave Carolina a 17-10 lead in the
third quarter on an 81-yard touchdown drive
that took more than 8 minutes off the clock
and featured a scramble in which the third-
year quarterback avoided four tacklers and
turned a potential 20-yard sack into a 14-
yard gain and a rst down.
Newton lifts Panthers over Patriots
SPORTS 15
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The San Mateo Daily Journal sports staff
has quite a task ahead of it.
In a couple of weeks, when the dust settles
from all the Central Coast Section champi-
onships, an all-Daily Journal Football
Team and Player of the Year will have to be
selected. And with the way the football reg-
ular season ended, lots of players have ung
themselves into that conversation.
Take for example Terra Novas Anthony
Gordon. In his rst season at the varsity
level, the junior has led the Tigers to a 10-0
season, a fifth Bay Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division title and a No. 1 seed
in the CCS Open Division. On Friday,
Gordon completely annihilated the Half
Moon Bay defense for seven (yes, seven)
touchdowns passes on 19 of 24 passing.
But hes not alone. Over at Serra, another
rst-year quarterback, Matt Faaita is also in
the running. In his rst year at the helm, the
Padres are 8-2, with the No. 2 seed in the
Open Division. Faaita is fresh off a 156-
yard, three-touchdown performance against
previously unbeaten Archbishop Mitty. All
three of those tosses (18, 24 and 69 yards)
went to Hamilton Anoai.
Woodsides Josh Holman and Menlo-
Athertons Isaiah Nash have to be in the
mix as well.
Its a shame CCS wont get to see Holman
who is as electric with the football as they
come. In a 40-33 loss to rival M-A, Holman
scored four touchdowns a 93-yard kickoff
return, a 66-yard punt return, an 80-yard
screen pass and catch and another 30-yard
beauty of a snag. In all, Holman caught
eight passes for 201 yards.
But M-Awon the game because they have
Nash whose Bears are heading to CCS
knowing their running back is clicking on
all cylinders. Nash rushed for 245 yards on
33 carries in that win. He also scored three
touchdowns including the eventual game-
winner.
Staying on the football gridiron, but in
Rivalry Week feats, the Burlingame running
game helped the Panthers capture their 50th
Paw.
At 5-10, 200 pounds, Chi Li Tang appears
to be the heir-apparent to the Panthers
backfield. Only a sophomore, Tang led
Burlingame in rushing in the 86th annual
Little Big Game, gouging San Mateo for 81
yards on just seven carries.
The man hell be replacing, Keone Keahi,
rushed for 74 yards and a pair of touchdowns
and added a 27-yard touchdown on his only
catch of the game to nish with 101 yards of
total offense in the same game.
Sacred Heart Prep won the Valparaiso
Bowl thanks to a nal-minute interception
at the 8-yard line by Riley Tinsley.
Over in South San Francisco, the
Warriors Dupra Goodman and El Caminos
Brandon Gip hooked up in a battle of run-
ning back wills. Gip has a couple of huge
runs to keep the Colts in the game. But it
was Goodmans touchdown and then his 2-
point conversion that helped South City
retain The Bell.
And Sequoias Dylan Anderson helped
take down rival Carlmont. He scored twice
in what a 51-7 beat down of the Scots.
Elsewhere in the Honor Roll, Morgan
Dressell of Menlo volleyball had 12 kills as
the top-seeded Knights swept past Notre
Dame-Belmont in the quarternal of the
Central Coast Section Division IV tourna-
ment Saturday. . . . Tatum Novitsky of
Burlingame volleyball had six kills and ve
aces as the third-seeded Panthers beat
Saratoga in three straight games in
Saturdays CCS Division III quarterfinal
match. ... Virginia Lane of Menlo-Atherton
volleyball had a monster game in the top-
seeded Bears three-game sweep of
Cupertino in the CCS Division I quarter-
nals. On a team full of hitter, Lane nished
with 24 kills. ... Chris Xi of Menlo School
has been the beneciary of teams focusing
Nick Bisconti all season. Xi scored a team-
high four goals to lead the second-seeded
Knights past No. 7 Saratoga, 7-5 Saturday.
Football stars own this weeks Honor Roll
By Matthew Coles
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY Stephen Curry scored
22 points, Klay Thompson and Harrison
Barnes had 17 apiece and the Golden State
Warriors beat the struggling Utah Jazz 98-87
on Monday night.
Curry had eight assists and made four 3-
pointers before leaving in the fourth quarter
after Utahs Marvin Williams landed on his
head in a scramble for a loose ball. After a cou-
ple of minutes to gain his bearings, Curry got
up and left the court under his own power with a
towel draped over his head.
Curry is expected to be ready for Wednesdays
home game against Memphis.
The Warriors made 12 of 22 attempts from 3-
point range and led by as
many as 28 points.
Gordon Hayward scored
18 points and Williams had
16 but the Jazz (1-11)
dropped their third straight
after earning their lone win
of the season.
In their rst game with-
out Jermaine ONeal, David
Lee had 14 points and 14
rebounds while Andrew
Bogut added 13 rebounds and three blocked
shots to neutralize Utahs inside presence.
What the Jazz lack (and the Warriors have in
spades) became apparent in the fourth quarter.
After clawing within striking distance, Utah
missed eight of its rst nine shots in the fourth
quarter.
The Jazz are among the worst shooting teams
in the league, converting less than 41 percent
of their attempts.
They were even worse against Golden State,
nishing at 39.5 percent despite an abundance
of clean looks at the rim.
On the other end, the Warriors heated up in
the nal period to put the game away.
Thompsons layup with 7:56 to play extended
the lead to 92-69.
Utah did have one strong stretch in the third
quarter. Diante Garrett, who was just signed last
week, checked in and promptly scored eight in
a 17-2 spurt. Garrett dished to Williams for a 3
that made it 70-57.
The Warriors, who had lost their previous
two road games, outrebounded Utah 57-40 and
limited the NBAs best offensive rebounding
team to just six.
Early in the second quarter, Williams made a
3-pointer to help the Jazz close to 29-27 before
Curry led a 30-9 run, fueled by 6-for-8 shooting
from beyond the arc for Golden State.
Curry had missed eight 3-pointers in a row
over the past three games before making a trio
of 3s in the second-quarter surge.
Golden State also won the front end of a
home-and-away set between the teams.
Thompson had 25 points as the Warriors held
off the Jazz 102-88 on Saturday.
Currys 22 helps Warriors silence the Jazz
Stephen Curry
16
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Jim Harbaugh still
believes Ahmad Brooks made a clean hit on
Drew Brees and should have been credited
with a game-clinching fumble.
Instead, Brooks was agged for a person-
al foul on the Saints quarterback in the wan-
ing minutes Sunday and the 49ers watched
Garrett Hartley kick a pair of late eld goals
to lift New Orleans over the reigning NFC
champions 20-17.
Another heartbreaking three-point loss
in the Superdome. Back in February, it was a
34-31 defeat to the Baltimore Ravens in the
Super Bowl.
Our interpretation was, when we grade a
player, if hes got a penalty we give him a
minus, but we did not assign a minus on that
play, Harbaugh said Monday. The play
occurred that occurred. I thought Ahmad hit
at the right level, hit at the shoulder level.
The quarterback kind of shrunk down and
thats the ofcials call to make. Im going
to see it the way I see it and thats going to
be a slanted view. I really dont know much
more to say about that.
The 49ers (6-4) are suddenly dealing with
their second two-game skid of the season
after San Francisco never lost consecutive
games in Harbaughs initial two years as
coach. The Niners also lost back-to-back
games in Weeks 2 and 3, at Seattle and at
home to the Indianapolis Colts.
Brooks said after the game that that play
was likely the difference in the 49ers leav-
ing the Big Easy with a loss.
Its very frustrating. The game could
have gone in a totally different direction,
he said. And Im mad because that was a big
call in the game, and then we lost the game,
and thats probably the reason why.
Next up is a game at Washington on
Monday Night Football. Everybody real-
izes what is at stake at this stage with
December looming, and three division
games still remaining namely, the rst-
place Seahawks visit to Candlestick Park
on Dec. 8.
Harbaugh challenged himself to do a bet-
ter job.
Im attacking the day with enthusiasm
unknown to mankind. Win or lose, thats
the approach, he said. Win, come back
and make sure that you can contribute any-
thing you can to the winning. If you lose,
you want to come back and make sure that
darn near never happens again. ... The
mindset is, you dont win the game youre
not going to feel great, and you dont feel
good. I know that as a coach. And if you
want to feel better, coach better. Thats what
I tell myself.
An offense that scored 31 or more points
in each victory of a five-game winning
streak before a home loss to Carolina on
Nov. 10 has been inconsistent since. While
Harbaugh referenced getting some new faces
up to speed, he wouldnt say whether 2012
leading wide receiver Michael Crabtree
might be ready to face the Redskins. He
returned to practice Nov. 5 for the rst time
since tearing his right Achilles tendon in
May and undergoing surgery. The 49ers
have until Nov. 26 to activate him.
Well see, Harbaugh said. I think hes
close.
For now, all involved are calling on one
another to do more to nish the regular sea-
son strong with playoff positioning or
even a spot in the playoffs on the line.
The 49ers have managed a combined 347
yards during their two recent losses, while
quarterback Colin Kaepernick has been
sacked nine times during those two games.
At the end of the day its just one loss and
weve got six weeks to keep playing for,
tight end Vernon Davis said. We know the
ultimate goal is to win as many games as
you can and get into the playoffs.
After beginning this season poised to
chase a third straight NFC West crown, the
four losses are somewhat of a surprise.
I think we are (surprised) but we still
have six more to go, Kaepernick said.
And we can still nish this season 12-4.
Notes: The 49ers signed CB Dax Swanson
to the practice squad. ... Harbaugh had no
medical updates on LG Mike Iupati (left
knee) or CB Tarell Brown (rib contusion).
49ers deal with second two-game skid this season
USA TODAY SPORTS
This hit by ahmad rrooks on drew bress is the
talk of the NFL right now.
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA Matt McGloins rapid ascent
from undrafted rookie free agent could lead to
him becoming the regular starting quarter-
back for the Oakland Raiders.
McGloin threw three touchdown passes
against Houston in his rst career start as he
led the Raiders to their rst road victory of the
season, earning himself serious considera-
tion for a shot to take over the starting role
from Terrelle Pryor.
Coach Dennis Allen wasnt ready to
announce a decision Monday about who
would start this week against Tennessee
because he wants to talk to Pryor to determine
the status of his injured right knee.
Im not sure exactly where he is physical-
l y, but I will say this, with Matts perform-
ance, hes earned the right to be in the discus-
sion, Allen said. Thats for sure.
Tellingly, Allen would not commit to Pryor
starting Sunday if he is healthy, saying the
decision will be made on whats best for the
team.
Our job as coaches is to try to do the
things that we feel like give us the best
opportunity to win, he said. Thats what
those players in that locker room are looking
for. Now, its good to know that you have
options. Thats, obviously, a positive. I
dont look at it as a tough situation. I look at
it as a good situation.
McGloin completed 18 of 32 passes for
197 yards, the three touchdowns and no inter-
ceptions in one of the best debut starts of any
rookie, much less an undrafted one.
McGloin became the rst Raider in four
years to throw at least three touchdowns and
no interceptions in a game and joined former
Raider Todd Marinovich as the only rookies
since the 1970 merger to do that in their rst
career start.
That helped lead the Raiders (4-6) to a 28-
23 win that put them back into the thick of
the race for the nal AFC playoff spot.
Oakland is one of seven teams in the AFC
with four wins. Miami and the New York Jets
are tied at 5-5 for the sixth and nal playoff
spot with six games to play.
I thought he had great command of the
huddle, Allen said. I thought his presence
on the eld was outstanding. I thought he did
a great job communicating with the sideline.
When you watch him in the passing game,
there werent a lot of unsettledness. He was
calm in the pocket. He worked through his
progression. He threw the ball with timing
and accuracy. In particular, for the rst time
out and the rst time starting, I thought he
handled himself very well.
The performance was a stark contrast to the
way Pryor had played in recent weeks. Since a
promising start to the season, Pryor strug-
gled in recent weeks before nally being
forced to sit because of a sprained MCLin his
right knee.
McGloin makes case for Raiders starting QB gig
SPORTS 17
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Dont Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It!
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
Grand
Opening Sale
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260
Dallas 5 5 0 .500 274 258
N.Y. Giants 4 6 0 .400 192 256
Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 311
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 8 2 0 .800 288 183
Carolina 7 3 0 .700 238 137
Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 237
Atlanta 2 8 0 .200 214 292
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 253
Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 267
Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 239
Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 320
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179
San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 178
Arizona 6 4 0 .600 214 212
St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 3 0 .700 256 199
N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268
Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225
Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226
Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276
Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206
Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245
Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212
Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 255
Kansas City 9 1 0 .900 232 138
Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 246
San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 222
ThursdaysGame
Indianapolis 30,Tennessee 27
SundaysGames
Chicago 23, Baltimore 20, OT
Oakland 28, Houston 23
Buffalo 37, N.Y. Jets 14
Tampa Bay 41, Atlanta 28
Pittsburgh 37, Detroit 27
Philadelphia 24,Washington 16
Cincinnati 41, Cleveland 20
Arizona 27, Jacksonville 14
Miami 20, San Diego 16
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 5 7 .417
Toronto 4 7 .364 1/2
Boston 4 7 .364 1/2
New York 3 6 .333 1/2
Brooklyn 3 7 .300 1
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 7 3 .700
Atlanta 6 4 .600 1
Charlotte 5 6 .455 2 1/2
Orlando 4 6 .400 3
Washington 2 7 .222 4 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 9 1 .900
Chicago 6 3 .667 2 1/2
Cleveland 4 7 .364 5 1/2
Detroit 3 6 .333 5 1/2
Milwaukee 2 7 .222 6 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 9 1 .900
Houston 7 4 .636 2 1/2
Dallas 7 4 .636 2 1/2
Memphis 5 5 .500 4
New Orleans 4 6 .400 5
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 9 2 .818
Oklahoma City 7 3 .700 1/2
Minnesota 7 4 .636 2
Denver 4 6 .400 4 1/2
Utah 1 11 .083 8 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Golden State 8 3 .727
L.A. Clippers 7 3 .700 1/2
Phoenix 5 4 .556 2
L.A. Lakers 5 7 .417 3 1/2
Sacramento 2 7 .222 5
SundaysGames
Portland 118,Toronto 110, OT
Memphis 97, Sacramento 86
L.A. Lakers 114, Detroit 99
MondaysGames
Portland 108, Brooklyn 98
Chicago 86, Charlotte 81
Oklahoma City 115, Denver 113
Dallas 97, Philadelphia 94
Golden State 98, Utah 87
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
TuesdaysGames
Minnesota at Washington, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
New York at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
vs. Tampa
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/21
@Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/14
@Oilers
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/15
@Chicago
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/17
vs.L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/27
vs.Devils
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/23
vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs. Grizzlies
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/20
vs.Thunder
7:30p.m.
TNT
11/14
vs.Utah
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
@Utah
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/18
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/23
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN/ESPN
11/22
vs. St.Louis
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/29
@Pelicans
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/26
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
TUESDAY
Girls golf
State championships at Quail Run Golf Course,7:30
a.m.
Girls water polo
CCS seminals
Division II
No. 5 Soquel (22-5) vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (20-
7), 6 p.m. at Menlo-Atherton
Boys water polo
CCS seminals
Division I
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (15-10) vs. No. 2 St. Francis
(12-16), 5:30 p.m. at Serra
WEDNESDAY
Girls tennis
CCS team nals at Courtside Tennis Club,Los Gatos,
1:30 p.m.
Volleyball
CCSseminals
DivisionI
No.5 Palo Alto (23-9) vs.No.1 Menlo-Atherton (21-
9), 5:30 p.m. at Santa Clara High
DivisionIII
No. 3 Burlingame (20-11) vs. No. 2 Sacred Heart
Cathedral (27-7), 5:30 p.m. at Valley Christian
DivisionIV
No. 4 Harker (14-11) vs. No. 1 Menlo School (27-5),
7:30 p.m. at Notre Dame-Belmont
DivisionV
No. 4 Crystal Springs (14-15) v. No. 1 Mt. Madonna
(8-17), 5:30 p.m. at Thomas More High
No. 3 Pinewood (14-11) V. No. 2 Priory (14-12), 7:30
p.m. at Thomas More High
Girls water polo
CCSseminals
DivisionI
No.1 St.Francis (24-2) at No.4 Menlo-Atherton (17-
8), 7:30 p.m.
Boys water polo
CCSseminals
DivisionII
No. 3 St. Ignatius (19-7) vs. No. 2 Menlo School (22-
3), 5:30 p.m. at Serra
No. 5 Soquel (2-7) vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (24-
3), 7 p.m. at Serra
FRIDAY
Football
CCSrst round
OpenDivision
No. 8 Valley Christian (7-3) at No. 1 Terra Nova (10-
0), 7 p.m.
DivisionII
No. 6 Oak Grove (5-5) at No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (7-
3), 7 p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 7 Aragon (7-3) at No. 2 Aptos (8-2), 7 p.m.
No.8 Hillsdale (7-3) at No.Burlingame (10-0),7 p.m.
DivisionIV
No.5 Monterey (7-3) vs.No.4 Menlo School (6-4) at
Sequoia, 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Football
CCSrst round
OpenDivision
No. 7 Pioneer (7-3) at No. 2 Serra (8-2), 1 p.m.
Division IV
No. 8 Seaside (5-5) at No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (9-1),
1 p.m.
Volleyball
CCS championships at Independence High,TBD
Water polo
CCS boys/girls championships at Santa Clara In-
ternational Swim Center,TBD
WHATS ON TAP
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay 20 14 6 0 28 64 50
Boston 20 13 6 1 27 57 37
Toronto 20 12 7 1 25 57 47
Detroit 21 9 5 7 25 54 60
Montreal 21 10 9 2 22 52 45
Ottawa 20 8 8 4 20 58 62
Florida 21 5 12 4 14 46 70
Buffalo 22 5 16 1 11 41 68
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 21 13 8 0 26 59 48
Washington 21 12 8 1 25 69 59
N.Y. Rangers 20 10 10 0 20 42 50
Carolina 21 8 9 4 20 40 59
New Jersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49
N.Y. Islanders 21 8 10 3 19 61 68
Columbus 20 7 10 3 17 52 57
Philadelphia 19 7 10 2 16 35 48
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 21 14 3 4 32 78 61
Minnesota 21 13 4 4 30 55 44
St. Louis 19 13 3 3 29 66 46
Colorado 19 14 5 0 28 59 41
Dallas 20 11 7 2 24 58 56
Winnipeg 23 10 10 3 23 61 66
Nashville 20 9 9 2 20 46 63
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 23 15 6 2 32 72 59
San Jose 21 13 3 5 31 72 50
Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 66
Los Angeles 21 14 6 1 29 58 46
Vancouver 22 11 8 3 25 56 58
Calgary 21 7 11 3 17 59 79
Edmonton 22 5 15 2 12 53 83
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
SundaysGames
Columbus 4, Ottawa 1
Washington 4, St. Louis 1
Los Angeles 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Chicago 5, San Jose 1
Minnesota 2,Winnipeg 1
Dallas 2,Vancouver 1
MondaysGames
Calgary 5,Winnipeg 4, SO
Boston 4, Carolina 1
Pittsburgh 3, Anaheim 1
TuesdaysGames
St. Louis at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
18
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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REUTERS
An Atlas 5 United Launch Alliance rocket lifts off from the
Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying NASAs Mars
Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft in Cape
Canaveral, Fla.
NASA launches robotic
explorer Maven to Mars
By Marcia Dunn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. NASAs newest robotic
explorer, Maven, rocketed toward Mars on Monday on a quest
to unravel the ancient mystery of the red planets radical cli-
mate change.
The Maven spacecraft is due at Mars next fall following a
journey of more than 440 million miles.
Hey, guys, were going to Mars! Mavens principal sci-
entist, Bruce Jakosky of the University of Colorado at
Boulder, told reporters after liftoff.
Jakosky and others want to know why Mars went from
being warm and wet during its rst billion years to cold and dry
today. The early Martian atmosphere was thick enough to hold
water and possibly support microbial life. But much of that
atmosphere may have been lost to space, eroded by the sun.
Maven set off through a cloudy afternoon sky in its bid to
provide answers. An unmanned Atlas Vrocket put the space-
craft on the proper course for Mars, and launch controllers
applauded and shook hands over the success.
What a Monday at the ofce, NASA project manager
David Mitchell said. Maybe Im not showing it, but Im
euphoric.
Ten years in the making, Maven had Nov. 18, 2013, as its
original launch date, and we hit it, Mitchell said.
I just want to say, Safe travels, Maven. Were with you all
the way.
Jakosky, Mavens mastermind, said he was anxious and
even shaking as the nal seconds of the countdown ticked
away.
Proposition 30, a sales and income tax
increase initiative, raises about $6 bil-
lion annually for education and other
state programs.
Unfortunately, whats been reported
is making community members
assume schools are being fully fund-
ed, said association President Alisa
MacAvoy said, who is also a trustee on
the Redwood City Elementary School
District board. We still have a long
ways to go in other words.
Californias schools spent $2,475
less per student than the rest of the
United States in 2012-13, and spent
$4,080 less per student in 2012-13
than Illinois and nearly $6,700 less
per student than New York, according
an October 2013 report from the
California Budget Project called
School Finance Facts.
This has affected everything includ-
ing prociency rates in all grades in all
subjects, graduation rates, and college
and career readiness, states the paper,
which includes viewpoints shaped by
the collective experiences of more
than 100 school board members who
serve in the county. It is nothing
short of a public crisis that will impact
the citizens and the economy of this
state for decades to come.
The debate around public education
policy often simplies complex and
nuanced issues and often ignores the
perspective of those individuals who
are responsible for the governance of
our local school system, MacAvoy
said in the press release. The goal of
these position papers is to give con-
text and perspective to these debates
and propose impactful solutions for
the highest priority issues, she said.
A lot of people are misinformed
when it comes to the issue of public
education, said Carrie Du Bois, a
trustee on the Sequoia Union High
School District and vice president of
the association. I think this will help
in that area.
It is a good idea for the association
to take a stand on policy issues and
also educate the community, she added.
The decision to create the position
papers came from the board this sum-
mer talking about the need to have dis-
cussion about important topics in edu-
cation, said MacAvoy said. The associ-
ation represents the 22 school dis-
tricts, the Community College District
and County Ofce of Education and
many board members who had input
into the document.
Marc Friedman, a trustee for the San
Mateo Union High School District and
an association director, said there are
many inequities between districts and
this paper helps highlight them and
expand districts scopes.
Every school board sort has a
parochial view of their own district,
he said. When you look at the whole
picture theres a lot more going on.
The association looks at that bigger
picture. To me, inequity is shown in
what different districts pay their teach-
ers since theyre all juggling different
amounts of money.
Karen Schwarz, trustee on the San
Mateo County Community College
District and an association director,
said the association is trying to edu-
cate the public on whats going on in
public education.
Its for K-1mostly, she said. Its
coming from right here at home.
The paper goes on to state these lev-
els of funding inadequacy and inequity
has enormous ramications. Almost
all school districts will continue to
face problems such as large class size;
few teacher aides, undercompensated
staff; minimal professional develop-
ment and cursory evaluation systems
for staff; minimal or non-existent pro-
grams such as music, art, counseling,
library support and physical educa-
tion; lack of sufcient after-school and
summer enrichment programs; and out-
dated facilities and inadequate technol-
ogy, Internet access and other teaching
tools, even after new funding formula
implementation, the paper states.
Additionally, public schools face a
unique opportunity to provide a true
21st century education, but it will
require both sufcient resources and
regulatory and structural changes for
implementation, the paper states.
The associations board of directors
approved the paper Nov. 14. The next
paper will be focused on preschools
and there are a number of other topics
the association will explore. Other
directors include Seth Rosenblatt, a
San Carlos Elementary School District
trustee, Joe Ross of the San Mateo
County Board of Education and Lory
Lorimer Lawson, president of the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary School
District board.
Continued from page 1
POLICY
since January 2007. She has a masters
degree in public administration and in
her free time enjoys tennis, mystery
novels and spending time with two
young nephews.
Her rst day is Jan. 2, giving some
overlap with Johnson before her exit.
Her salary is $198,702 and benet s
include a transportation allowance.
Rodriguez is accepting the position
amid what she called historic
changes in the way government at all
levels delivers services and copes with
diminishing resources.
One example, she said, is realign-
ment of low-level offenders to county
jails.
If those offenders are going to suc-
ceed and we are going to make our com-
munities safer its up to us on the local
level to develop the types of programs
that will help them land jobs and
strengthen families, she said.
Rodriguez was chosen after a nation-
wide recruitment which brought in sev-
eral out-of-county contenders, said
county spokesman Marshall Wilson.
Iliana understands the needs of peo-
ple in our community, that the current
economic recovery is leaving many
people behind, County Manager John
Maltbie said in his announcement of
her hiring. She began as a case work-
er and has that passion to help others.
Her predecessor, Johnson, also
praised Rodriguezs experience, track
record and passion for public service.
Johnson is retiring in January after a
37-year career of which the last seven
were spent directing HSA.
I could not be more proud of the
team that I will transition to Iliana.
She will inherit a department that is
energized, has a commitment to cus-
tomer service and fully embraces the
countys values in outcomes and
accountability, Johnson said in a pre-
pared statement.
Continued from page 1
HSA
HEALTH 19
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The pair of lungs sits inside a clear dome,
gently inating as doctors measure how
well theyll breathe if implanted into a
patient who desperately needs a new set.
Its a little-known twist of nature your
lungs can live on for a while after you die.
The air left inside keeps them from deterio-
rating right away as other organs do.
An innovative experiment now aims to
use that hour-or-more window of time to
boost lung transplants by allowing dona-
tions from people who suddenly collapse
and die at home instead of in a hospital.
There arent enough lungs. Were bury-
ing them, said Dr. Thomas Egan of the
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
who is leading the project. It turns out your
lungs dont die when you do.
This is a new frontier for transplants.
Today, registered organ donors dont get
to fulll that last wish if they die outside of
a hospital. The U.S. doesnt have a system
to recover their organs quickly enough. It
can be an added shock to grieving families,
and a waste of potentially good organs that
might ease transplant shortages.
The general public does not understand
how hard it is to become an organ donor.
They assume if they sign their card, when
they die, then it will happen, said bioethi-
cist Arthur Caplan of New York Universitys
Langone Medical Center. Only 2 to 3 per-
cent of people die in circumstances that let
them be organ donors.
The new study in the Research Triangle
area of North Carolina is trying to change
that, focusing on lungs because Egans
research suggests they last the longest.
Heres how it works.
Someone collapses with cardiac arrest.
Emergency workers exhaust attempts at
CPR. If the drivers license lists the person
as a registered donor, the local organ recov-
ery agency tracks down next-of-kin for per-
mission to participate in the research.
If that happens within about an hour of
death, then workers pump a little air into
the lungs to preserve them while the body is
transported to an operating room for organ
recovery.
Workers wheeled a cooler bearing the rst
set of lungs donated in the experiment into
Egans lab for the next crucial step deter-
mining if theyre really healthy.
Inside the science ction-looking domed
machine, a ventilator slowly filled the
lungs. They resembled a turkey awaiting
roasting. Some black speckles on the out-
side didnt worry Egan. Theyre a sign of
city living, or maybe earlier smoking. Its
deeper inside that counts.
Egan infused them with a special uid that
ows like blood normally would. This so-
called ex vivo lung perfusion preserves the
lungs even longer. It can tell if they transfer
oxygen properly or help spot signs of dis-
ease. Egan also peeked inside with a bron-
choscope, looking for abnormalities.
These lungs didnt pass the test because
Egan found some early disease. But they did
show it was possible to get a donation in
time to try.
Lungs that do pass will be transplanted
into patients willing to take a chance on
these nontraditional organs, as part of the
study funded by the National Institutes of
Health.
That would be the greatest thing, to be
able to breathe normal, said Lisa Bowman,
51, of Union Grove, N.C.
Bowman has been on the waiting list for
new lungs for two years after a rare genetic
disease gradually damaged her own until,
she says, it became like breathing through
a pinhole. She hopes Egans research will
help her nd a match more quickly.
Some previous U.S. attempts at out-of-
hospital donation of another organ, kid-
neys, didnt pan out because of logistical
hurdles. But transplant specialists are
watching this newest experiment closely,
saying that if it works, it eventually could
open the way to many more donations
not just lungs but maybe other organs, too.
Weve had a number of very disgruntled
family members that wanted to donate (a
loved ones organs) and werent able to,
said Dr. Jeffrey Punch, transplant surgery
chief at the University of Michigan.
Spurred by that family reaction, in a few
months, his team plans to try recovering
kidneys from cardiac arrest victims who are
rushed to the emergency room but cant be
saved and turn out to be registered donors.
In North Carolina, Egans study likewise
will try to recover lungs from people who
die in the ER as well as in the community.
Today, the vast majority of donated
organs come from people who suffer a
severe injury and are hooked to a ventilator
for days, even weeks, until doctors deter-
mine they are brain-dead. Machinery keeps
blood and oxygen owing until surgeons
can collect organs deemed healthy enough.
What about registered donors who col-
lapse with cardiac arrest at home, the ofce
or the gym and efforts at CPR fail?
Experience overseas shows its possible to
take quick steps to preserve and recover
their organs. Doctors in Spain have trans-
planted kidneys, livers and lungs from
these unconventional donors. France has
reported some success with kidneys.
In the United States, more than 6,000
people died last year while awaiting one of
those organs.
Lungs are in particularly short supply.
Only 15 percent to 20 percent of donated
lungs are usable, often because complica-
tions during the donors hospitalization
damaged them. Just 1,700 lungs transplants
are performed each year, compared with
nearly 11,000 kidney transplants from
deceased donors.
Egan, a cardiothoracic surgeon, said doc-
tors dont even suggest the possibility of a
lung transplant to thousands who might
benet because there arent enough donors.
Yet the Institute of Medicine has estimat-
ed that as many as 22,000 people a year
who die outside of hospitals could be poten-
tial organ donors if scientists settle some
ethical and practical questions.
Buying time to recover those organs
means doing some things not normally
done to dead bodies, noted bioethicist
Caplan, and that can mean ventilating
lungs or ltering blood to the kidneys.
How will grieving families react? Is it
possible to tell whos a registered donor,
and nd next-of-kin, in time to try?
New York City studied kidney donations
after at-home deaths in 2011.
Dr. Stephen Wall of Bellevue Hospital
Seeking lung donors after at-home death
Its a little-known twist of nature your lungs can live on for a while after you die.The air left
inside keeps them from deteriorating right away as other organs do.
See LUNGS, Page 22
20
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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HEALTH 21
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
By Jonathan J. Cooper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Ore. With all the
problems facing the rollout of
President Barack Obamas health
care overhaul, nowhere is the situ-
ation worse or more surprising
than in Oregon, a progressive
state that has enthusiastically
embraced the federal law but has so
far failed to enroll a single person
in coverage through the states
insurance exchange.
Despite grand ambitions, an
early start, millions of dollars
from the federal government and a
tech-savvy population, Oregons
online enrollment system still
isnt ready more than a month
after it was supposed to go live.
The state has resorted to hiring or
reassigning 400 people to
process insurance applications by
hand.
Were all surprised and frustrat-
ed that were in the position that
were in now, said Jesse OBrien,
a health care advocate at the
Oregon State Public Interest
Research Group, which lobbied
for the exchange.
The state has received about
18,000 paper applications, at 19
pages each, and is scrambling to
manually le and clear them. State
ofcials have not been able to say
when they expect the online sys-
tem to launch, nor have they
established a deadline to submit
paper applications in order for
coverage to begin Jan. 1.
Meanwhile, the exchanges board
is demanding answers from the
executive director about when the
website will work and how his
team will get people enrolled on
time.
For consumers, the application
process can be long and frustrat-
i ng.
Ive been trying since the very
rst day of October just to try to
nd out the coverage I could get,
said Donna George, 43, a book-
keeper from Bend, Ore., whos
been uninsured for three years.
When the online system would-
nt work, George submitted a
paper application Oct. 7 for her-
self and her husband. Finally, on
Nov. 12, she received an enroll-
ment packet that tells her how
much of a tax credit shell receive
and lays out her coverage options.
Shes now waiting to meet with
her insurance agent to pick a plan
and return the forms.
Oregon has long prided itself on
being a leader in health policy. Its
Medicaid system has been a test-
ing ground for new innovations
since the early 1990s. The state
started laying the groundwork for
an insurance exchange a year
before Congress passed the health
care law that called for one in
every state. Gov. John Kitzhaber,
a former emergency room physi-
cian, is a respected voice on
health reform.
The state also has a large popu-
lation of young, underemployed
progressives who might provide a
burgeoning market for affordable
coverage. Its ultra-competitive
health care market led to lower-
than-expected premiums.
Lawmakers from both parties have
embraced the law. And the Portland
area is a thriving hub of technolo-
gy companies known as the
Silicon Forest.
In other words, Oregon had
everything going for it.
But its exchange, known as
Cover Oregon, became a victim of
its own lofty ambitions and the
states stubborn refusal to dial
Oregon health exchange represents biggest woe
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks about the Affordable Care Act in the Brady Press Brieng Room at the White House.
See HEALTH, Page 22
HEALTH
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them back until it was too late.
While exchanges in many states are
telling applicants who appear to qualify for
Medicaid to contact a separate agency,
Oregon insists its exchange must be a one-
stop shop for both Medicaid and private
insurance. The state also wants its exchange
to eventually be able to help enroll people
in a wide array of public-assistance pro-
grams, not just health care.
Exchange leaders stuck with their plan
even as risk consultants warned repeatedly
that they were in danger of missing the Oct.
1 deadline to launch.
We wont know whether we made the
right decisions until our system is up and
running, said Amy Fauver, chief communi-
cations ofcer for Cover Oregon. But were
going forward in the way we feel we can best
serve Oregonians.
Exchange ofcials say they havent fully
launched their website because their soft-
ware still cant accurately determine whether
applicants are eligible for Medicaid or the
Childrens Health Insurance Program, par-
ticularly for people with complex family
arrangements.
Kitzhaber, a Democrat, has pledged that
the problems wont interfere with our
objective of making sure that every
Oregonian that wants to be enrolled by the
start of the new year is, in fact, enrolled.
Oregon does have one big success to brag
about. The state has enrolled 70,000 people
in Medicaid, reducing the ranks of the unin-
sured by more than 10 percent. The large
number of Medicaid enrollments came in
large part thanks to a fast-track enroll-
ment process approved by the Obama
administration. Using income data already
on le, the state mailed a simple seven-
question Medicaid enrollment form to peo-
ple in the Supplemental Nutritional
Assistance Program who qualify for health
coverage under the federal health laws
expansion of Medicaid.
Pressure is growing on exchange ofcials
to fix the problems. U.S. Rep. Kurt
Schrader, a moderate Democrat who took
heat after voting for the health care law,
released a sharply worded statement on
Friday demanding that the exchange and its
main contractor, Oracle, make it work.
The implementation of Oregons health
insurance marketplace has been abysmal,
Schrader said. The current situation is com-
pletely unacceptable, and I expect much
more from a state with a reputation for being
an innovator in the eld of health care.
Continued from page 21
HEALTH
Center said community and religious groups
met with researchers and were interested.
But study rules restricted which deaths were
eligible, and researchers had just 20 minutes
to get initial family permission. In six
months, nine deaths were considered but
didnt qualify, often because the deceased
hadnt previously registered as an organ
donor, Wall said. New York is among states
with low donor registration rates.
Walls team is considering trying again
with lungs, because of the longer time win-
dow.
Lung cells dont depend on blood ow for
oxygen, Egan explained. When the heart
stops beating, they use what oxygen is left
in the air sacs and airways.
For how long? In a series of experiments
with animals, Egan showed lungs stay
viable for an hour, or four hours if they are
ventilated, before theyre cooled to await
transplant.
That ventilation is one key to the $4 mil-
lion, three-year study, because when emer-
gency workers exhaust attempts at CPR and
declare someone dead, they typically leave
behind the breathing tube inserted in the
persons throat. That makes it simple to
restart ventilation to preserve the lungs,
Egan said.
If we can get the lungs ventilated within
an hour, and then removed within an hour or
two and cooled, we think theyll work just
ne, he said.
Kidneys dont have as long a survival
window. But in Michigan, Punch has a sim-
ilar preservation plan: Insert a few tubes
near the kidneys to lter blood to them until
theyre recovered.
Fast retrieval isnt the only issue.
Surgeons dont know if nontraditional
organs work as well, cautioned Dr. Bryan
Meyers of Washington University School
of Medicine in St. Louis.
Chest X-rays and other in-hospital donor
testing determine the quality of todays tra-
ditionally donated lungs.
This trial is very timely and very perti-
nent, Meyers said, to see if testing in that
domed machine could substitute for that
hospital track record.
Egan notes that lung disease is the
nations third-leading killer. He says the
untapped pool of potential donors who die
outside of the hospital could expand trans-
plants signicantly.
There are huge logistical hurdles, he
said. But if were right, this would have a
profound impact on the number of lungs
that are available for transplant.
Continued from page 19
LUNGS
Princeton University to give
students meningitis B vaccine
PRINCETON, N.J. Princeton
University officials decided Monday to
make available a meningitis vaccine that
hasnt been approved in the U.S. to stop the
spread of the sometimes deadly disease on
campus.
The university said doses of the vaccine
for the type B meningococcal bacteria are to
be available in December for undergraduate
students, graduate students who live in
dorms and university employees who have
sickle cell disease and other medical condi-
tions that make them more susceptible to
meningitis. Follow-up doses then will be
available in February.
The university said the plan was recom-
mended by the U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
The vaccinations are to be paid for by the
university and arent mandatory. Ofcials
say theyre most effective in two doses.
Since March, seven cases of meningitis
have been conrmed on the New Jersey cam-
pus with six students and a visitor diag-
nosed, the most recent last week. None of
the cases has been fatal.
Last week, the federal Food and Drug
Administration approved importing the
vaccine, Bexsero, for possible use at the
Ivy League university. Princeton
spokesman Martin Mbugua said university
officials considered a number of factors
before deciding to move ahead with the
plan, but he declined to say what those fac-
tors were.
The CDC says the outbreak at Princeton is
the first in the world since the vaccine
against the type B meningococcal bacteria
was approved in Europe and Australia this
year, the only one for use against the strain.
Health brief
COMICS/GAMES
11-19-13
MONDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Elec. measure
4 Jaunty
8 Mackerel or bass
12 Camping gear vendor
13 Whodunit terrier
14 Woodwind
15 Grateful
17 Lunar valley
18 Super deal
19 Fable writer
20 Little kid
22 Really big tees
23 Hick
26 People devourer
28 Truck mfr.
31 Adage-spouting detective
32 Brothers title
33 Meadow
34 Calendar abbr.
35 Morgan le
36 Polo need
37 Univ. degree
38 Descartes name
39 Major work
40 Golly!
41 Hairstyles
43 Meditation guides
46 Narrow shelf
50 vera
51 Avian food
54 Burden
55 Jai
56 Anderson Coopers
channel
57 Back muscles
58 Give out sparingly
59 Mauna
DOWN
1 Mr. Kristofferson
2 Departed
3 Take cover
4 Picasso or Casals
5 C la vie!
6 AAA suggestion
7 Young boy
8 Golfers yells
9 Long-billed wader
10 By oneself
11 Assist
16 Consumed
19 Tavern fare
21 Molasses candy
22 Checked luggage (hyph.)
23 Dudley Do-Rights org.
24 Yikes! (hyph.)
25 Stripe
27 Moms mom
28 Unappetizing food
29 Bill of fare
30 Low-lying islands
36 Sits for a portrait
38 Thing, in law
40 Suppose
42 Vintage tune
43 Liverpool poky
44 Arm bone
45 Defeat
47 Patio cousin
48 Chromosome part
49 Ms. Ferber
51 Thud
52 Sufx for percent
53 Informer
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Opportunity knocks,
and the chance to put your skills to work for you will
result in rewards. Cover up for any emotional mishap
that might slow down the process of advancement.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Look at whats
happening around you, but think twice before you leap
into action. Stick close to home and focus on personal
options and self-improvement, not changing others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dont feel obligated
to pay for others mistakes. Put more into your own
work and take care of nancial and contractual
interests that will improve your position.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Listen, but dont
agree to do what everyone else wants. Make a
required decision based on your emotional needs. Only
you know whats best for you. Choose your destiny.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) You may face
emotional interference if you share too many of your
ideas and intentions with others. Be discreet and
determined to follow through with your plans.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) You may feel the need to
address issues that are bothering you, but be prepared
to deal with disapproval. Someone will meddle in your
affairs if you share too much information.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Do your research
and base any decision regarding money, health or
contractual issues on facts and gures. Someone with
a vested interest is likely to use emotional blackmail.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) A challenge is best left
alone. Minor mishaps or injury will occur if you arent
cautious. Realize your potential and stick to what you
are capable of doing.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Leap into action. There
is much you can accomplish if you put your mind to it.
Getting involved in activities or events that promote
your skills will lead to an unusual proposal.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Explore areas of interest.
Dont feel you have to take care of someone elses
concerns. Let your desires dictate what you do next.
A change will do you good.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Follow through with your
plans, even if someone throws an emotional wrench
into the mix. Its up to you to stick to your laurels and
refuse to let anyone interfere with your happiness.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Check out different
cultures and philosophies. You will get peace of
mind knowing you are on the right track spiritually,
educationally or emotionally. Protect your assets.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)921-2071
THREE BELLS OF MONTARA
Immediate openings for:
F/T Activity Director
P/T Maintenance
F/T Caregiver
F/T Medication Assistant
Experienced helpful but will
train. Please apply in person.
1185 Acacia Street, Montara
Phone 650-728-5483
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
129 Cemetery Plots
TWO CEMETARY Plots, SKYLAWN,
$3700 Ea. Call (650)533-6164 for details.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258285
The following person is doing business
as: Terminus, 1370 Mills St., Apt. D
MENLO PARK, CA 94025. is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Seldon
World, LLC, CA, . The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Puru Choudhary /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13, 11/26/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524624
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jose Luis Leonardo Da Costa
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jose Luis Leonardo Da Costa
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Jose Luis Leonardo Da
Costa
Proposed name: Joseph Luis Costa
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/23/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/18/2013
(Published, 10/29/13, 11/05/2013,
11/12/2013, 11/19/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258261
The following person is doing business
as: Taqueria Sinaloense, 8 W. 25th Ave
SAN MATEO, CA, 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jose F.
Perez, 401 E. Poplar Ave., Apt #5, San
Mateo, CA 94401. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Jose F. Perez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/29/13, 11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13).
26 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journals wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
B2B sales experience is preferred
hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
work well with others
Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258264
The following person is doing business
as: Milenas Corner, 219 Elm St. Apt. 2,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: 1) Josefina
Bozovic, same address, 2) Nikola Bozov-
ic, same address, 3) Sofia Velasquez,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by Copartners. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Josefina Bozovic /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/29/13, 11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258154
The following person is doing business
as: Keller Enterprises, 234 Industrial Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: David
Keller, and Lisa Keller, 130 14th Ave.,
San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2000.
/s/ David Keller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/29/13, 11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258316
The following person is doing business
as: 840 Wine Bar & Cocktail Lounge, 840
Brewster Ave.. REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063. is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Gilbert Gonzalez, 27149 Man-
on Ave., HAYWARD, CA 94544. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/14/13.
/s/ Gilbert Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13, 11/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258164
The following person is doing business
as: Doras Psychic Readings, 215 El Ca-
mino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gary Phillips, 570 S. Van Ness Ave., Los
Angeles, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Gary Phillips /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13, 11/26/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258003
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sage Centers for Veterinary
Specialty and Emergency Care, 251
North Amphlett Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA
94401. is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: 1) Sharon Ullman Ford, 165
Garnet Ave., San Carlos CA 94070, 2)
Diane Roberts, 746 15th Ave., Menlo
Park, CA 94025, 3) Leigh Glerum, 257
Sylvan Way, Redwood City, CA 94062,
4) Heidi McClain, 746 15th Ave., Menlo
Park CA 94025. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Mike Bilby /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/05/13, 11/12/13, 11/19/13, 11/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258090
The following person is doing business
as: Ecologie, 1039 Continentals Way
#404, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: John
Hreno same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/08/2013.
/s/ John M. Hreno III /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/13, 11/1913, 11/26/13, 12/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258460
The following person is doing business
as: La Estetica Wellness Spa, 424 N San
Mateo Dr, Ste #500, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Emilia Buczkowska-Kopec ,
1002 Valota Rd, Redwood City, CA
94061. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Emilia Buczkowska-Kopec /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/13, 11/1913, 11/26/13, 12/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258131
The following person is doing business
as: Catherine Organics, 858 Coleman
Ave., Apt E, PALO ALTO, CA 94302 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Marisa Nelson, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Marisa Nelson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/12/13, 11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258548
The following person is doing business
as: The Best Care, 324 Calalpa Street
#114, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Loren-
za Ramos, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Lorenza V. Ramos/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258346
The following person is doing business
as: Fat Coda Studios, 126 Marbly Ave,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Joseph
Rayhbuck, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/Joseph Rayhbuck/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258522
The following person is doing business
as: K & K Beauty Salon, 108 W. 25th
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner:Yunlan
Hu, 2381 Sunny Vista Dr., San Jose, CA
95128. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN N/A.
/s/ Yunlan Hu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258187
The following person is doing business
as: BiX Software US, 951 Mariners Is-
land Blvd , Ste 300, SAN MATEO, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: CFOdecision, LLC 1712 Pio-
neer Ave, Ste 100, Cheyenne, WY
82001. The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/06/2013.
/s/Dr. Nigel Alastair Geary, Pres./
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
In re the Bianchi Family Trust created
June 24, 1992, by Gloria Bianchi,
Decedent.
Case No. 123889
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(PROB C 19040(b), 19052)
Notice is hereby given to the creditors
and contingent creditors of the above-
named decedent that all persons having
claims against the decedent are required
to file them with the Superior Court, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063, and mail or deliver a copy to
THOMAS E. BIANCHI, as trustee of the
trust dated June 24, 1992, of which the
Decedent was the settlor, at the law of-
fice of Walter Hitchcock, 1777 Borel
Place, Suite 100, San Mateo, CA 94402,
attorney for the trustee within the later of
4 months after November 12, 2013 or, if
notice is mailed or personally delivered
to you, 60 days after the date this notice
is mailed or personally delivered to you,
or you must petition to file a late claim as
provided in Probate Code 19103. For
your protection, you are encouraged to
file your claim by certified mail, with re-
turn receipt requested.
203 Public Notices
Dated: November 8, 2013
_______________________________
Walter P. Hitchcock,
Attorney for THOMAS E. BIANCHI, as
trustee of the Bianchi Family Trust dated
June 24, 1992.
1777 Borel Place, Suite 100
San Mateo, CA 94402
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Jour-
nal, 11/12/13, 11/19/13, 11/26/13)
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME
FOUND
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14 x 18, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, (650)345-5502
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $45 San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
27 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE INVITING BIDS
HILLSBOROUGH CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
300 EL CERRITO AVE
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 90410
Bid Deadline: 10:00 AM on the 3rd day of December 2013
Place of Bid Receipt: Hillsborough City School District
ATTN: Larry Raffo
300 El Cerrito Ave
Hillsborough, Ca 90410
All bids shall be made and presented only on the forms presented in the Contract Documents. Bids will be publicly opened and
read at 10:00 AM on the 3rd day of December, 2013 at the Hillsborough City School District Office located at 300 El Cerrito Ave.,
Hillsborough, CA 94010. Any bids received after the time specified above or after any extensions due to material changes shall be
returned unopened.
Project Identification Name: Bid Package #14-01
West School West Wing Replacement Project
Place Plans are on file: Hillsborough City School District Office
300 El Cerrito Avenue
Hillsborough, CA 94010
(650) 342-5193 (Office)
(650) 342-6964 (Fax)
lraffo@hcsd.k12.ca.us
Contractors License Classification Required: Class B
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of the Hillsborough City School District, hereinafter referred to
as DISTRICT, is calling for and will receive sealed bids for the award of a contract for the above project up to, but not later than,
the above-stated time.
Miscellaneous Information
Bids shall be received in the place identified above, and shall be opened and publicly read aloud at the above-stated
time and place.
Each bid proposal shall conform to the requirements of the Contract Documents, all of which may be obtained through
the Hillsborough City School District. No partial sets will be available.
Each bidder shall be a licensed contractor pursuant to the California Business and Professions Code, and be licensed
to perform the work called for in the contract documents.
The successful bidder must possess a valid and active Class B Contractors License at the time of award of the con-
tract. The Contractors California State License Number and Classification shall be clearly stated on the bidders proposal.
Subcontractors shall be licensed pursuant to California law for the trades necessary to perform the work called for in the Contract
Documents.
Each bid must strictly conform with and be responsive to the Contract Documents as defined in the General Conditions.
The DISTRICT reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any irregularities or informalities in any bids or in the bidding.
Each bidder shall submit with his bid, on the form furnished with the Contract Documents, a list of the designated sub-
contractors on this project as required by the Subletting and Subcontracting Fair Practices Act, California Public Contract Code
Sections 4100 et seq.
Each bidders bid must be accompanied by one of the following forms of bidders security: (1) a cashiers check made
payable to the DISTRICT; (2) a certified check made payable to the DISTRICT; or (3) a bidders bond executed by a California ad-
mitted surety as defined in the Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, made payable to the DISTRICT in the form set forth in
the Contract Documents. Such bidders security must be in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of
bid as a guarantee that the bidder will enter into the proposed contract, if the same is awarded to such bidder, and will provide the
required Performance Bond, Payment Bond and insurance certificates. In the event of failure to enter into said contract or provide
the necessary documents, said security will be forfeited.
The Department of Industrial Relations provides the general prevailing rate of per diem wages and the general prevail-
ing rate for holiday and overtime work in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of
worker needed to execute the contract. These per diem rates, including holiday and overtime work, as well as employer payments
for health and welfare, pension, vacation, and similar purposes, are available from the Director of the Department of Industrial Re-
lations. Pursuant to California Labor Code Sections 1720 et seq., it shall be mandatory upon the CONTRACTOR to whom the
contract is awarded, and upon any subcontractor under such CONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the said specified rates to all
workers employed by them in the execution of the contract.
No bidder may withdraw any bid for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the opening of bids.
Separate Performance Bond and Payment Bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the total contract amount, are re-
quired, and shall be provided to the DISTRICT prior to execution of the contract and shall be in the form set forth in the Contract
Documents.
All bonds (Bid, Performance, and Payment) must be issued by a California admitted surety as defined in California
Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120.
Where applicable, bidders must meet the requirements set forth in Public Contract Code Section 10115 et seq., Military
and Veterans Code Section 999 et seq. and California Code of Regulations, Title 2, Section 1896.60 et seq. regarding Disabled
Veteran Business Enterprise ("DVBE") Programs.
No telephone or facsimile machine will be available to bidders on the DISTRICT premises at any time.
It is each bidders sole responsibility to ensure its bid is timely delivered and received at the location designated as
specified above. Any bid received at the designated location after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids shall be returned
to the bidder unopened.
The Hillsborough City School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer
298 Collectibles
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$4.00, Steve, SC, (650)518-6614
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $7.
Steve, San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
300 Toys
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$45 OBO. Steve, (650)518-6614.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
303 Electronics
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 (650)578-9208
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 SOLD!
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31x 61 x 18 , $45. (650)592-2648
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53 x 78 wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
304 Furniture
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
SOLD
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72x 21 x39 1/2
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50, (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $350 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL Strips excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72 tall x 13
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN beige /coral
/white floral on ivory, $10 (650)574-3229
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10, 4 long
x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
28 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Trapping device
6 Official records
10 Got an A on
14 Restriction at
some fitness
clubs
15 Mark from a
healed wound
16 Fancy fabric with
metallic threads
17 Coral ring
18 Metal to melt
down
20 State
Departments
purview
22 Anxious feeling
23 Olds Cutlass
model
26 Pulp comic that
transformed Nick
Fury into a
super-spy
31 British
noblewomen
34 Soda fountain
orders
35 Try to win
36 Happy hour
pints
37 Sorceress jilted
by Jason
38 Irelands Sinn __
39 Dream state
letters
40 Suffix with
Beatle
41 Theater access
42 Entertainer with
many fans?
45 Cling wrap
brand
46 Queen of Soul
Franklin
50 War of the
Worlds attack
55 Inning-by-inning
runs summary
57 Hedren of The
Birds
58 Bldg. annex
59 Slimmest of
margins
60 Actress Falco et
al.
61 Gravy vessel
62 Very
63 Like some
populations
DOWN
1 Major mix-up
2 __ your life!
3 Passion, in Pisa
4 Issues
5 Signs up
6 Part of PGA:
Abbr.
7 Letters on a
Soviet uniform
8 Islands tuber
9 Kazakhstan
border sea
10 Keys at the keys
11 Westley
portrayer in The
Princess Bride
12 Punk rock
subgenre
13 Bear lair
19 Ancient Britons
21 Belg. neighbor
24 Do more work
on, as a
persistent
squeak
25 In unison
27 Revise
28 Gymnast
Comaneci
29 Collect bit by bit
30 LAX posting
31 Has the nerve
32 Billy Joels
musical daughter
33 Reminder notes
37 Apple computer
38 Roosevelts chat
spot
40 Short-short skirts
41 Like soda water
43 Natural ability
44 Cleveland NBAer
47 Easy basketball
score
48 Aspirations
49 Herb that tastes
like licorice
51 Reverberation
52 Ark helmsman
53 Spring flower
54 Rex Stouts
stout sleuth
Wolfe
55 Chocolate dog
56 Wedding vow
words
By David Poole
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/19/13
11/19/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
310 Misc. For Sale
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap
$75.(650)367-8146
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56 square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
316 Clothes
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5x34.5 made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1 x 8 for 8
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
318 Sports Equipment
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
29 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
513 Investment Property
REAL PROPERTY EXCHANGE - Owner
of an 8-unit apartment building with
swimming pool and on-site laundry in
quiet Gridley, California, will trade for
property in San Mateo County. All 8 of
these 2Bed/2Bath apartments are re-
cently remodeled, and provide steady in-
come. Contact (650)726-4140.
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
GMV 03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a 96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Mantels Chair Rails
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
$15 off when mention this ad
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
Construction
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTORS FENCES
and House Painting
Interior Exterior
Power Wash
Driveways Sidewalk Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
30 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chriss Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
0emo||t|on
0oncrete remova|
Fxcavat|on
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
by Greenstarr
0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
8eta|n|ng wa||s
0rnamenta| concrete
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
BANKRUPTCY
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
31
Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certied Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benet packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert ne watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specic direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
32 Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL