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FCE TEST A

Reading Part 1
Question 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 You are going to read an article about racing driver Lewis Hamilton. For questions 18, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the text.

On the move: Lewis Hamilton


1 Lewis Hamilton is beginning to understand that winning motor races is only one part of the job for a modern Formula One (F1) driver. As well as personal appearances there are the advertisements, photo shoots, press interviews, and autograph sessions. At the Goodwood Festival last month a 65,000-strong crowd cheered him in the rain while he stood, like royalty, on the balcony of Goodwood House, and he is preparing for a heros welcome at this weekends British Grand Prix race at Silverstone. 2 So how is he coping with being the most famous sportsman in Britain? Its a bit weird, he says. I first noticed it after the Grand Prix in Bahrain. Simple things like going out for dinner, to the cinema or the petrol station are not the same and I get more people coming up to me. Ive been working for thirteen years and now Im winning races but its a lot more than I expected. The worst thing about it is losing your privacy. I am trying to deal with it at the moment, but I dont know the best way to do it. I am just trying to keep my head down, keep myself to myself and not do anything silly. He claims not really to read the newspaper coverage of himself except to check out the pictures, make sure I still look good. 3 With a salary reported to be 340,000 a year (modest compared with that of his teammate, but not bad for a 22-year-old) he has upgraded his off-duty car from a Smart Brabus to a rather more luxurious Mercedes GL 4x4 and there is speculation that he is thinking of moving from Hertfordshire to Monaco. Still, he remains relatively careful in his spending. I dont seem to carry any money in my wallet, I dont know why. I always have to borrow money from my dad, he says. I dont like to waste money. For instance the last money I spent was on a remote-control car so I could play with my brother and that was about 200, so even that wasnt so expensive. 4 His success and possibly the fact that he is the first black F1 driver has created a group of celebrity admirers such as Pharrell Williams, the rapper and producer. Thats got to be one of the coolest things, getting to meet people like him, says Hamilton. He was a guest of mine for the weekend at the US Grand Prix and I had dinner with him on the Saturday night. I met Beyonc recently, too. Shes fantastic, she invited me to her concert at Wembley, phenomenal. 5 If all these things are not to fade, however, Hamilton will have to continue to dominate on the racetrack. Last week Sir Jackie Stewart, the three-time F1 champion, warned against relaxing too much: Three months ago I was asked if Lewis could win the championship and I said that it was possible but unlikely. Now I say its possible but its more likely. The one thing that all upand-coming stars have in common is potential. Whether they deliver over the long term is what counts and thats still to be proven. 6 Ever since he famously approached Ron Dennis, head of the McLaren team, as a nine-year-old kart racer and told him he would one day race for him, Hamilton has been raised through the teams system. In many ways he is the embodiment of a new era in racing: Hamilton says that he rarely drinks and would rather go out for dinner than hit a nightclub. 7 The intensity of his training is astonishing. High-tech computer read-outs enable the driver and engineers to reduce lap times by fractions of a second, while racing simulators and 3-D virtual reality cars mean drivers can know a circuit off by heart without having driven it for real.

8 The thoroughness of the training reveals itself not only in Hamiltons spectacular start to his first season, but also in his quiet confidence. Every racing driver has a great deal of self-belief, he says, adding that he is not bothered by the Formula One circus. The big transition is from karts to single-seaters. Thats the biggest step up.

1 What, according to the writer, has Hamilton started to realize?

A The results of the races do not matter very much these days. B He has many other duties apart from driving a racing car. C Members of the royal family are interested in motor racing. D The public can quickly turn against successful drivers.

2 What does Hamilton find surprising?

A The kind of places where he now has his meals. B The amount of attention he gets from the public. C The length of time it took him to become famous. D The fact that he has already won a number of races.

3 What has Hamilton done with some of his money?

A He has bought a more expensive car. B He has bought a house in Monaco. C He has lost it. D He has lent it to his father.

4 How does Hamilton feel about meeting famous people?

A He is only interested in talking to other drivers. B It is something that he very much enjoys. C He likes to invite them to his house. D It is not as exciting as it was at first.
5 What does Jackie Stewart say about Hamilton?

A He is certain to become champion one day. B He will never become champion. C He has less chance of becoming champion than other young drivers. D His chances of becoming champion have improved.
6 When he first met the McLaren boss, Hamilton said

A he wanted to become the boss of McLaren himself. B he was already very well known as a racer. C he was sure he was going to be a McLaren driver. D he would never go out to nightclubs.
7 By using the training equipment,

A the engineers can go round the racetrack with the drivers. B drivers can practise racing against each other on the track.

C the team can decide if a driver is good enough to race in Formula One. D Hamilton can learn about a racetrack that he has not been on.
8 What effect has his training had on Hamilton?

A It has made him believe in his ability. B He worries more about Formula One racing. C He now drives single-seaters. D It has made him think he is better than other drivers. Feedback
1A The text says that winning motor races is only one part of the job, but this does not mean it is unimportant. 1B The first two sentences explain that winning motor races is only one part of the job and list his other duties: personal appearances ... advertisements, photo shoots, press interviews and autograph sessions. (paragraph 1) 1C Hamilton stood, like royalty on the balcony, i.e. in the same way as members of the British Royal Family stand and wave from the balcony of a palace; it does not mean that anyone royal was there. 1D Neither the crowds at Goodwood nor at Silverstone are described as having turned against him.

2A The experience of things like going out for dinner is not the same because he gets more people coming up to him, not because the places he goes to are different. 2B He says its a bit weird, referring to being the most famous sportsman in Britain and I get more people coming up to me and its a lot more than [he] expected. (paragraph 2) 2 C and D He mentions, but does not express any surprise at, working for 13 years or winning races.

3A He has upgraded his ... car ... to a rather more luxurious Mercedes GL 4x4. (paragraph 3) 3B There is speculation that he is thinking of moving ... to Monaco, but he has not actually done it. 3C He remains relatively careful in his spending and does not carry any money in [his] wallet, but he has not lost it. 3D He frequently borrow[s] money from [his] dad, which is the opposite of lending it to him.

4A He does not mention other drivers, and he enjoys meeting celebrity admirers, so this cannot be correct. 4B He says that meeting Pharrell Williams has got to be one of the coolest things, and describes meeting Beyonc as fantastic and phenomenal.(paragraph 4) 4C Pharrell Williams was a guest for the weekend at the US Grand Prix, but this means at the racetrack, not at his house. 4D The statement in the first sentence of paragraph 5, if all these things are not to fade, is conditional on future actions, so D is also incorrect.

5A He describes Hamiltons chance of winning as possible, not certain. 5B He describes Hamiltons chance of winning as possible, not impossible. 5C He says that what all up-and-coming stars have in common is potential; he does not compare them with each other. 5D Stewart describes the likelihood three months ago of Hamilton winning the championship as possible but unlikely and now as possible and more likely. (paragraph 5)

6A He talked about racing for McLaren, not about becoming the boss. 6B The word famously refers to Hamilton approaching Dennis when he was nine years old; it does not mean he was famous at that time. 6C As a child, Hamilton told him he would one day race for him. (paragraph 6) 6D He mentions nightclubs with reference to his behaviour today, not when he met Dennis in the past.

7A High-tech computer read-outs enable ... the drivers and engineers to improve performance; they are not actually driving while using this equipment. 7B High-tech computer read-outs enable ... the drivers and engineers to improve performance; they are not actually driving while using this equipment. 7C The equipment is designed to reduce lap times and help drivers know a circuit off by heart in order to improve performance, not to test the drivers. 7D The equipment allows drivers to know a circuit off by heart without having driven it for real. (paragraph 7)

8A The thoroughness of his training reveals itself ... in his quiet confidence. (paragraph 8) 8B He says he is not bothered by the Formula One circus, i.e. being famous. 8C He mentions the transition from karts to single-seaters as the biggest step up, which was earlier in his career path and not connected with his training. 8D He says that every racing driver has a great deal of self-belief; he does not compare himself with them.

Reading Part 2
Question 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 You are going to read an article in which the writer questions the widespread use of mobile phones in society. Seven sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences AH the one which fits each gap (915).

Is it OK to use a mobile phone?


An important event went largely unnoticed earlier this month when the worlds two billionth mobile phone user was connected. There are now 1,000 new users per minute buying phones around the world, according to the Global System for Mobile Communication Association. But what makes this so interesting is not just the number of users around one third of the planets population but that the one billion mark was only passed two years ago. Nokia, the worlds largest phone manufacturer, predicts that by 2015, four billion people will be using a mobile. 9 But such a rapid take-up has left us hardly any time to think about the pros and cons of living in a world where we can rarely escape these devices. 10 These include faster responses to emergencies, an easier and quicker flow of information (particularly in developing nations where growth is at its strongest), and reduced pollution through less need to travel. 11 Perhaps the most serious of these is the health risk of being constantly exposed to the electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones and their masts. We are now at the point where the evidence seems to suggest that mobile phones are safe to use, but that more research is needed and, as a precaution, children should not be needlessly exposed to mobile phone systems. For many parents, this is hardly reassuring. 12 The understandable fear, of course, is that the public are being used in experiments to help with the further research that most agree is still needed, but without actually being asked if they want to take part. In fact, children seem to be a constant factor in many of the other concerns linked to mobile phones. The industry itself has recognized this by promising not to target children under sixteen in its advertising. 13 It has been predicted by the phone consultants Mobile Youth that by the end of this year a third of five- to nine-year-olds in the UK will have a phone. But we must stop to consider the problems that this growth in phone ownership may bring. 14 Ringtones, gaming, texting and calls all add to ever-increasing phone bills. And despite the industrys efforts to prevent the accidental targeting of children, they still have the means to access the many unsuitable services now offered. In addition, children are among the most endangered by those users who still drive while holding a mobile phone, even though it is illegal in most countries. The importance of fashion in mobile phones, which means we change our phones every 24.2 months on average, has led to a huge number of unwanted phones being thrown away. 15 Thankfully, there have been efforts to do something about it, with some countries introducing recycling schemes and charity drop-off points in town centres. There are even ways to

reduce the energy waste caused by phone chargers being left plugged in all the time. For example, there are now solar-powered chargers and, for those with strong wrists, wind-up chargers are also available

There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A Already, children are five times more likely than adults to have their phone stolen. B It is important for the environment that we begin to reduce this unnecessary waste. C Mobile phones are now much smaller than they used to be. D It is unlikely that any other technology has entered the global market so fast in history. E As a result, they are now fighting to stop the placing of mobile phone masts near schools. F However, the list of worries is long. G The advantages are easy to identify. H Despite this, under-10s are the fastest growing part of the market. Feedback
9D The second paragraph describes the speed with which the number of phone users has risen, with references to future time. Sentence D reflects this, and uses similar language: global describes the world, so fast reflects such a rapid take-up in the following sentence. 10 G The third paragraph refers to pros, which are advantages, and after the gap introduces a list of clearly positive effects of mobile phone use: These include ... 11 F The fourth paragraph focuses on the cons, or disadvantages, and therefore begins with a contrast link However. The sentence after the gap mentionsthe most serious of these, referring to the worries in sentence F. 12 E The fourth paragraph mentions masts and that children should not be ... exposed to mobile phone systems, and the fifth continues this theme. As a result links to hardly reassuring and is followed by what they, the parents, are doing. 13 H Despite this refers back to the previous sentence which mentions the promise of the mobile phone industry not to target children under sixteen, and under-10s refers back to this, and also forward to five to nine-year-olds in the following sentence. 14 A Sentence A is an example of one of the problems caused by the growth in phone ownership mentioned in the previous sentence, and is followed by other problems in the following sentence particularly affecting children. 15 B Sentence B describes the huge number of ... phones being thrown away in the previous sentence as this unnecessary waste, and begin to reduce links forward to efforts to do something about it in the following sentence.

Reading Part 3
Question 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 30 You are going to read about types of accommodation organized by the Youth Hostel Association (YHA). For questions 1630, choose from the types of accommodation (AE). The types of accommodation may be chosen more than once.

Holiday accommodation
A Camping Barns Also known as stone tents, there are around 40 Camping Barns in the YHA network owned and operated by farmers in fantastic rural locations. Facilities vary from barn to barn but they provide great value and great fun especially if you take over the whole property with a group of family or friends. Barns are also regularly used by schools and walking groups and typically offer sleeping platforms, spaces to prepare food and eat, cold running water, a flush toilet and parking. Prices start from just 5 per person per night and its essential to bring a good sleeping bag, a torch, warm clothes and good walking boots or wellingtons. You may also need cooking utensils, a camping stove and fuel. B Bunkhouses YHAs Bunkhouses provide a great budget option offering accommodation in spectacular rural locations at great value for money prices. They can be found throughout England and Wales and new locations are being added all the time. All bunkhouses are self-catering and must be booked in advance with the keys provided from an address nearby. Access by car may not be possible. Bedrooms are mainly dormitory-style with bunk beds, although there are private family rooms, sleeping four, available at most locations. Prices start at 10 per person per night and all properties come with basic facilities including hot showers, drying room and self-catering kitchen. C Escape to Fantastic for birthday celebrations or family reunions, Escape to allows you to enjoy exclusive hire of superb, unique buildings in unbeatable locations in bustling towns and near mountains, forests or beaches. Find out all you need to know about the fantastic places available for exclusive hire, on our special website. This makes it easy to find the ideal property for your special occasion quickly, by selecting criteria such as the desired region and approximate number of guests. It also includes information on facilities and what to do nearby. Venues range from a small 10-bed farmhouse to a Victorian mansion which can accommodate nearly 100 people. Prices start at 8 per person and YHA members receive a 30 discount on all properties. D Activity Centres Try out adrenalin-fuelled activities, or fine-tune your existing skills on the range of all-inclusive packages offered at our dedicated activity centres. Based in spectacular locations they offer everything from climbing, kayaking and surfing to sailing and ponytrekking. Whatever you choose, our fully qualified instructors will ensure you have a great time. All centres are licensed by the Health and Safety Executive and operate to the highest safety standards. You can stay for as long as you like at YHAs Activity Centres and prices include all meals, transport, specialist equipment and accommodation. Prices at YHA Activity Centres are very competitive and can vary depending on age of participants, chosen location, time of year and programme, but can start from about 33 per night for under-18s, slightly more for adults. E Do it 4 Real If you are between 10 and 17 years old, love to have fun and enjoy trying something new, you can Do it 4 Real at one of our fantastic summer camps. Places are limited so fill out a booking form now! Weve got camps in 23 different locations, offering all of our most popular activities from previous years, and packed with more excitement and entertainment than ever before. Do it 4 Real summer camps offer five nights and four days of action and adventure between Sunday afternoon and Friday morning for an all-inclusive cost of 299. The cost for young people resident outside England is 399. A certain number of places are also available at 199: applications for these will be processed on a first come, first served basis. Make this year a summer to remember choose Do it 4 Real!

16 Which type of accommodation is the cheapest to stay in?

17 Which type of accommodation is recommended for special occasions?

18 Which type of accommodation often has somewhere you can leave your car?

19 Which type of accommodation organizes water sports for guests?

20 Which type of accommodation is becoming more widely available?

21 Which type of accommodation is cheaper if you belong to the association?

22 Which type of accommodation can be rented for private parties?

23 Which type of accommodation is not available on Saturdays?

24 Which type of accommodation has further information on the Internet?

25 Which type of accommodation has a place where you can leave wet clothes?

26 Which type of accommodation provides food for guests?

27 Which type of accommodation may vary in price according to where you live?

28 Which type of accommodation does not always provide a cooker?

29 Which type of accommodation may charge younger people less?

30 Which type of accommodation has a minimum and maximum age limit?

Feedback
16 A Prices start from just 5 per night ... (10 for B, 8 for C, 33 for D; the lowest price for E is 199 for 5 nights). 17 C Fantastic for birthday celebrations or family reunions .. 18 A Barns ... typically offer ... parking. 19 D they offer everything from ... kayaking and surfing to sailing ... , ... our fully qualified instructors will ensure you have a great time. 20 B ... new locations are being added all the time. 21 C ... YHA members receive a 30 discount on all properties. 22 C ... birthday celebrations or family reunions ... , ... find the ideal property for your special occasion ... , approximate number of guests. 23 E ... five nights and four days of action and adventure between Sunday afternoon and Friday morning ... 24 C Find out all you need to know ... on our special website.

25 B ... all properties come with basic facilities including ... drying room ... 26 D prices include all meals ... 27 E ... an all-inclusive cost of 299. The cost for young people resident outside England is 399. 28 A ... you may also need ... a camping stove and fuel. (B has a self-catering kitchen, which implies that a cooker is provided.) 29 D ... Prices at YHA Activity Centres ... can vary depending on age of participants ... but can start from about 33 per night for under-18s, slightly more for adults. 30 E If you are between 10 and 17 years old ...

Writing Part 1
Question 1 Time allowed 01:15 You must answer this question. Write your answer in 120150 words in an appropriate style in the text box. 1 You have received an email from your English-speaking friend, Chris, who has just moved into a new house. Read Chriss email and the notes you have made. Then write an email to Chris, using all your notes.

email From: Sent: Subject: Chris Ryan 12th October New house Address? Which bus? I could help on Saturday What time? Who? Great!

Well, here we are in our new house on the other side of town. Theres still a lot of work to do, but its already starting to feel like home. So Im wondering whether youd like to come over for dinner next Friday? Ive also invited a few other people and Im sure well have a great evening together. Weve got two spare bedrooms at the moment and you would be welcome to stay overnight. Looking forward to hearing from you. Chris

Write your email. You must use grammatically correct sentences with accurate spelling and punctuation in a style appropriate for the situation.

Writing Part 2
Question 2 - 5 Time allowed 01:15 Write an answer to one of the questions 25 in this part. Write your answer in 120180 words in an appropriate style in the text box. 2-5 2 A school in an English-speaking country is going to send a group of students to stay in the area where you live for a month. Your teacher has asked you to write a report describing the entertainment, sports and transport facilities in the area. Write your report. 3 You have seen this notice in an international magazine.

My school trip Tell us about where you went and what you enjoyed most and least! about it. We will publish the best letter next month.

Write your letter. Do not write any postal addresses. 4 You have been asked to write a story for a magazine published in English. The story must begin with the following words: One day, Sam received that text message and life was never the same again. Write your story. 5 Answer one of the following two questions based on one of the titles below. (a) Great Expectations by Charles Dickens Choose an important relationship between two characters in Great Expectations. Write an essay, describing this relationship and saying why it is important to the story. Write your essay. (b) The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux A college magazine has asked you to write a review of The Phantom of the Opera. Write your review, saying whether or not you like the story, and why. Write your review.

Feedback
2 The answer should address these points. Content The report should describe entertainment, sports and transport facilities. Organisation and cohesion Clear organisation and paragraphing, with use of linking words where appropriate. Appropriacy of register and format Informal language. Report layout. Range Describing, recommending, giving information. Target reader An English-speaking student.

Sample Answer In this report I would like to tell you about Almaty. And describe 3 main things which can be interesting for foreghn student. First entertainment. In the Almaty there are a lots of interesting places for all groups of age. For students there are many pubs, restorants wich are open hole day. Most of them are in the city center. For elderly people we have 10 museums and theatres. Now Ill tell you about sports. For those who are interested in sports, we have a lots of Gym classes. Also Almaty is one of the best place for those who like ice-skating, since there is a big skating rink not far from the city. Almaty surrounded by mountains so for those like skiing it is takes only 20 min to get there. Almaty is very crowdy city and the streets are very small, so most of time it is very hard to drive. To travel by bus is not comfortable, because usually there are more people on the bus than it should be. There fastes and the most comfortable transport is a taxi. Examiners commentary Content All parts of the question are addressed. Some good examples are given and there is plenty of relevant expansion. Accuracy Simple sentences are accurate, with errors tending to occur when more complex structures are attempted. The writing has a natural flow and the errors, although numerous (spelling errors, minor slips), do not prevent understanding Range An adequate range of grammar and vocabulary is used appropriately. Organisation and cohesion A limited range of cohesive devices is used. The writing is coherent, however headings are not used, and paragraphs tend to be short and disjointed at times. Awareness of audience Register is consistently appropriate throughout. Target reader

Would be informed. Marks awarded This answer would probably achieve a Band 3. 3 The answer should address these points. Content The letter should describe a school trip, giving details of the positive and negative aspects. Organisation and cohesion Clear organisation and paragraphing, with use of linking words where appropriate. Appropriacy of register and format Neutral language. Letter format. Range Giving an account of a journey. Describing positive and negative experiences. Target reader Readers of an international magazine. Sample Answer I still remember when I was 14 years old and I went to Rome with my parents. I visited some cities in Italy as Venice, Rome and Pisa. It was incredible because that was the first time I traveled without my parents. We get some problems, when we were in Rome, my friend Emilio was robbered. She lost her valet and her passport. We had go to Police, in Italy is called carabinieri and later went to the Spanish Embassy to get a new passport for Emilio. But this wasnt the only problem that we founded in our first travel without our parents. When we were at the airport to check in our luggage, Emilio showed her passport to the [???], and we dont know why but it wasnt valid. Finally we would spoke with the Ambasador and resolved this problem to come back to Spain. Examiners commentary Content All points are addressed with some examples and a reasonable amount of expansion. Accuracy Simple sentences are well controlled, but more complex structures lack accuracy and verb patterns are erratic. Range A reasonably good range of relevant vocabulary and structures is generally used. Organisation and cohesion Cohesion is variable. A range of simple cohesive devices is employed but flexibility is limited. Awareness of audience Register is appropriate throughout.

Target reader Would be informed. Marks awarded This answer would probably achieve a Band 3. 4 The answer should address these points. Content The story must follow on from the prompt. Organisation and cohesion Clear organisation and paragraphing, with use of linking words where appropriate. Appropriacy of register and format Neutral language. Story format. Range Narrative tenses, direct or reported speech, description. Target reader A magazine reader. Sample Answer One day, Sam received a text message that changed his life There was written: Murder on Navigation Way, Thursday 27th of December, good luck! And Marry Christmas! Oh my god, its my little child schools street! he tought. He absolutely had to something, in a hurry! At first, he decided not to tell anyone about it: not the police, not his best friend and above all not his wife: she would panic surely! The 27th of December would have been just in 5 days, and that day he received the test was the last day of school for the little Henry. What would have happened then? He tought it could be not the only text: maybe hed be receiving another one in few hours ... He waited for, but no text arrived on his mobile. The only text he received was by an anonymous, so he couldnt recover the sender. He decided his family will have had their Christmas holiday in Canada at his grandparents house and hed be back in Oxford on the 26th Dec, and hed have gone to the school to see what would have been happened. So, his wife and the child went to Toronto on 23rd Dec, than Sam went on 24th after his work and they had a wonderful Christmas all together. I can stay here and simply forget everything he tought, but it wasnt fair: some child would have died, he knew it and he couldnt not to care. He flew to Oxford the 26th and on the 27th in the morning was driving his car towards Navigation Way. He stopped in a car park, and waited for something to happen. It wasnt easy to see a suspected person because the street was very crowd, and there was also much fog. Anyway he waited, and waited Suddenly the schools fire alarm went on, and he saw a covered man running away. He didnt know why but he knew a child was inside. He jumped out of his car, ran towards the school looking for a child but he couldnt see anyone. He was shouting help! and some people went, but no children were inside. Finally the police came, and arrested him. His wife believed in what the police said: Why did he wanted to go home from Canada so hardly on 26th?! He planned everything! How could I not to notice anything till now? she tought. The police found his car, his notes about the place and when: his plan! But not his wallet 10 years later its found out that a mad man did everything just to let Sam leave his car without locking it, so he could quietly steal his rich wallet! For a wallet and for money a man lost his family and 10 years of his life. But he didnt lose the most important thing proud and honesty.

Examiners commentary Content The story follows on logically from the prompt and includes a lot of descriptive detail, but is extremely long. Accuracy Errors occur due to ambition (several very complex structures are attempted, with varying degrees of success). Language is generally very well controlled and natural in style. Range There is a wide range of relevant vocabulary, used appropriately. A number of less common lexical items are used with skill and flexibility. Organisation and cohesion The narrative is easy to follow and cohesion and coherence are well managed. Awareness of audience Register is consistently appropriate. Target reader Would be informed. Marks awarded This answer would probably achieve a Band 4. 5 (a) The answer should address these points. Content The first paragraph should give some information about the subject and setting of the story. The second paragraph should introduce the two characters chosen, describe them and explain where they first meet. There should be some description of the characters events, and narrative tenses are likely to be used. The third paragraph should describe how the relationship between the characters develops and how the relationship influences the events or other characters in the story. Organisation and cohesion Clear organisation and paragraphing, with use of linking words where appropriate. Appropriacy of register and format Neutral language. Essay format. Range Describing how a relationship begins and develops and its importance within a story. Target reader Class teacher/examiner. 5 (b) The answer should address these points. Content The first paragraph should give some details about the setting, subject and main characters. The second paragraph should evaluate the book as a whole and say what the candidate likes or does not like about it, giving reasons and examples from the story. The third paragraph should summarise the candidates overall impression of the book. A book review does not usually give away the ending of the story! Organisation and cohesion Clear organisation and paragraphing, with use of linking words where appropriate. Appropriacy of register and format

Neutral language. Review format. Range Describing a story, giving a personal opinion. Target reader Readers of college magazine, i.e. fellow students.

Use of English Part 1


Question 1 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Time allowed 00:45 For questions 112, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

Changes in the countryside


Back in my childhood days, summer was always the time we stayed at my grandparents house, usually 1 weeks or even longer. six

It wasnt particularly hot, but there seemed to be endless sunshine all the time we were there. Most days, we used to go swimming with the 2 kids. They had made a large pool in the river that 3 of snow on top until early July. from the nearby

mountains, which in those days still had a thick 4

Nowadays the temperatures seem higher and we rarely have any 5 6 any water in the river. Possibly for the same 7

rain, so that in summer there is , the countryside seemed much greener then,

with thick grass and wild flowers 8 9 10

everywhere. Today, sadly, everything looks brown and lifeless,

for the valleys and the higher ground. In fact, some areas are completely black and burnt, because of the common wildfires that destroy everything in their path.

All this, people say, has been brought 11 many parts of our planet.

by climate change, which is now 12

a terrible effect on

1/ by, during, for, since. 2/ district, close, local, nearby. 3/ flowed, leaked, washed, streamed. 4/ sheet, slice, layer, band. 5/ strong, deep, heavy, extreme. 6/ nearly, really, simply, hardly. 7/ causes, reasons, purposes, methods. 8/ shooting, growing, planting, rising. 9/ except, apart, other, besides. 10/ greatly, increasingly, largely, progressively. 11/ over, up, in, about. 12/ making, doing, having, causing.

Feedback
1 for All four prepositions are used to talk about time, but only for is used to indicate how long something lasts, in the structure for + time period. 2 local Local means of that area, and is the only one of the four options that can be used here to refer to people. 3 flowed The verb that collocates with river is flow. 4 layer Only layer collocates with thick ... snow. Sheet could go with ice, slice with cake, and band with gold or other metal. 5 heavy The adjective which collocates with rain is heavy; deep can be used for standing water, and strong for the current of moving water. 6 hardly The adverb hardly means barely, and the complete expression is hardly any, meaning almost none. 7 reasons The expression for the same reason(s) is used after a statement of fact (temperatures used to be higher and there was more rain) to indicate that what follows (the countryside used to be greener) has the same explanation as the statement.

8 growing The verb that collocates with grass and flowers in this context is grow. Planting is used to describe putting them in the ground, and shooting for the beginning of the growing process. 9 except The structure except for + noun is used after a general statement to indicate an exception. The other options are used in the structures apart from + noun, other than + noun and besides + noun. 10 increasingly The adverb which collocates with common is increasingly. 11 about The word about completes the phrasal verb bring about, meaning make happen.

12 having The only verb that collocates here with effect is have.

Use of English Part 2


Question 13 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Time allowed 00:45 For questions 1324, read the text below and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only one word in each gap.

Emailing is good for you


Recent research in the United States appears to show that sending emails can be good 13 peoples mental and

physical health. The study, carried out by a team of psychologists on a university campus, looked at the cases of students 14 lives had been affected by serious events, including accidents and exam failure.

They discovered that individuals who wrote emails describing their experiences were much 15 These individuals missed far fewer classes 16

likely to fall ill.

of illness than students who wrote no emails. The researchers also their problems.

found that reporting feelings by email improved peoples mood, enabling them to cope better 17

Significantly, the amount of change in mood does not seem to depend 18 19

who will read the emails. keeping

, it appears, shows that the benefit comes from expressing ones emotions, rather 20

them to oneself and allowing them to cause greater stress.

Some will say that the study tells us nothing new, that it has 21 reduce stress. Other forms of communication, such 22 23 well be true, but sending an email is 24

known for a long time that sharing feelings helps writing letters, can make people feel better, too. This quick and easy that maybe the positive effect on our

emotions is more immediate.

Feedback
13 for This preposition often follows adjectives like good or bad. In this context the phrase means have a good effect on. 14 whose A relative pronoun is needed here; the lives are those of students. 15 less Likely is often preceded by more or less, and the phrase much less likely to fall ill parallels missing far fewer classes. 16 because The expression because of is used to introduce the cause of something, in this case illness. 17 with / despite The intransitive verb cope is followed by with + noun to mean deal successfully with a problem or difficulty. Here it could also be followed by despite to mean manage successfully even though they had problems. 18 on The verb depend takes the preposition on (not of or in) and is followed by a noun or noun phrase, in this case who will read the emails. 19 This / That A reference word is needed here. It links back to the meaning of the entire previous sentence, not to emails, so it cannot be these or those. 20 than The sentence consists of two contrasting ideas, linked by rather than to indicate that the first idea is better in some way than the second. 21 been The word required here is the past participle of be to complete the present perfect passive form of the verb. 22 as The expression such as is used to introduce an example of what comes before it; in this case writing letters is an example of forms of communication. 23 may / might / could A modal verb is required here, to indicate that something is possible. The use of well emphasizes that it is possible.

24 so The expression so + adjective + that means to such an extent that ... .

Use of English Part 3


Question 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 Time allowed 00:45 For questions 2534, read the text below. Use the word given in capitals at the end of some of the lines to form a word that fits in the gap in the same line.

Staying safe in the gym


Gyms are fun, but they can also be quite dangerous in places. All too often, it is only after you have paid to join a health club or gym that you notice the 25 discover that the staff have not had proper 26 So before you hand over any money, have a good look around. First, make sure that the place is not too 27 You dont want to be bumping into other people doing different 28 , or queueing up to use equipment. ACTIVE . CROWD equipment, or . FAULT TRAIN

Check there is enough ventilation from open windows or air conditioning to 29 that the air remains cool. SURE

Otherwise, with all those people hard at work, the place can quickly become 30 and unpleasant. HEATED

Also, check how clean the gym is, and take note of 31 in general. Weights left lying around on the floor if they are TIDY BELONG

can be a danger, as can other peoples 32

too close to where you are exercising.

Finally, remember that gyms are great places for building up your strength and 33 thing is your 34 , but the most important , and that of other people there. FIT SAFE

Feedback
25 faulty An adjective is required here, formed by adding -y to the noun. 26 training A noun is needed after the adjective proper, so the -ing form of the verb is used here. 27 crowded /overcrowded An adjective is required to follow too. This is form by adding -ed to the noun crowd. 'Overcrowded' is also acceptable. 28 activities The adjective different must be followed by a noun; the noun form of active is activity, which in this context is countable and must be plural as there is no article. Note that the singular ends -y, but the plural -ies. 29 ensure The adjective sure becomes a verb meaning to make sure by adding the prefix en-. 30 overheated The meaning here contrasts with cool in the previous sentence, so the prefix over- is added, giving the meaning excessively heated. 31 tidiness Although clean is an adjective, tidy must change to a noun to follow of. Note the spelling change y to i before the suffix -ness. 32 belongings The use of they are after the gap indicates that the noun needed here must be plural. 33 fitness The adjective fit must become a noun, like strength. The suffix -ness is used. 34 safety The adjective changes to a noun following possessive your.

Use of English Part 4


Question 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Time allowed 00:45 For questions 3542, complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words, including the word given. 35 Two detectives questioned the suspects. INTERVIEWED The suspects two detectives.

36 We havent been to this part of the country before. TIME This is the been to this part of the country.

37 Where did you buy your coat?, my friend asked me. WHERE My friend asked me coat.

38 Although the traffic was heavy, we arrived on time. SPITE We arrived on time, traffic

39 Theyre going to mend my computer at the shop. REPAIRED Im going at the shop.

40 You were supposed to be here half an hour ago! OUGHT You here half an hour ago!

41 I suggest thinking very carefully before you decide. HAD You very carefully before you decide.

42 I hadnt walked that far before, so I was very tired. USED I was very tired because I that far.

Feedback
35 were interviewed ][ by This involves a change of verb and verb form from active to passive, plus the necessary inclusion of the agent. 36 first time (that) ][ weve / we have After the expression Its / This is the first (second etc.) time (that) ..., a perfect form of the verb is needed, in this case the present perfect. 37 where I had / Id bought ][ my When direct speech becomes reported speech the verb moves back a tense, with no inversion in the second sentence as it is not a direct question. 38 in spite of ][ the heavy The expression in spite of means although, but is followed by a noun or noun phrase instead of a verb. 39 to have / to get ][ my computer repaired This requires the use of the causative in the structure have something done, with future meaning indicated by going to. 40 ought to ][ have been The second sentence needs a past modal form. 41 had better ][ think The form you had better has a similar meaning to I suggest you ... . Both are followed by an infinitive without to. 42 was not / wasnt used ][ to walking The form not used to + -ing means not accustomed to doing something, or hadnt ... before.

Listening Part 1
Question 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Time allowed 00:40 You will hear people talking in eight different situations. For questions 18, choose the best answer, (A, B or C). 1 You hear a man reading the travel news on the radio. Why is he speaking?

A to report an accident B to warn of dangers C to suggest another route


2 You hear a woman talking. What does she do?

A Shes a medical student. B She studies history. C Shes a doctor.


3 You hear a salesman talking. What is he trying to sell?

A a television B a piano C a computer


4 You hear two people talking. Where are they?

A an airport B a bus station

C a railway station
5 You hear a woman talking about her new flat. Which room is she describing?

A the kitchen B the bedroom C the bathroom


6 You hear a young man talking about his work. How does he feel when he is speaking in public?

A confident B nervous C bored


7 You hear an interview on the radio. Why did the woman decide to become a pianist?

A Her mother was also a musician. B She had a very good music teacher. C She liked playing for other people.
8 You hear a man talking about a film he has just watched. What is his opinion of the film?

A It is boring. B It is exciting. C It is frightening

Feedback
1A There is a risk of accidents, but there has not actually been an accident. 2 A Correct. The woman spends a lot of time visiting hospital patients and meeting the staff, and she talks about when she is qualified and has patients ... to look after, so we know that her work is medical and that she is a student. 3A It has a big, flat screen and speakers, but it also has a keyboard and memory, so it is not a television. 4 A Correct. The man says that it took off ten minutes ago, which refers to an aeroplane, and suggests they go to the ticket desk opposite check-in. 5 A Correct. The woman says she wont be spending all that much time there because she usually eat[s] out, and will probably just be popping in to make cups of coffee. 6A He has been told that he looks a natural public speaker and full of self-confidence, but this is only an impression and he does not feel confident. 7A Both her parents liked good music, but neither of them played any instruments. 8A Some people who saw the film said it was so long and dull they couldnt stay awake, but he disagree[s].

1 B Correct. Reports are coming in of difficult driving conditions and drivers are advised to take care if they are heading that way. 2B She says she sometimes feels like giving this course up and doing history or something like that instead, so we know she is not studying history. 3B He refers to the keyboard, but it is the keyboard of a computer, not a piano. 4B The man says it wouldnt have been any quicker on the bus, so they are not at a bus station. 5B She says the hot water is very hot indeed, so she is not talking about the bedroom. 6 B Correct. The man says I spend the whole time worrying that Ill make some awful mistake, or that someone will ask me a question I cant deal with. As a result he can never relax for a single moment. 7B Her parents wanted her to have lessons, but they just couldnt afford it. 8 B Correct. The man says that The action never stops, and he spent the whole time wondering what could possibly happen next.

1C The newsreader advises that there is no alternative way through the mountains.

2C She refers to the future when she is qualified, and talks about giving this course up, so we know she is still training to be a doctor. 3 C Correct. The salesman says that the keyboard is designed to help users who write a lot of emails or like to chat online, and the unit has loads of memory. 4C The woman thinks they should have ... taken the train, which means that they did not travel by train and are therefore not at a railway station. 5C She mentions the hot water, but she is going to be popping in for cups of coffee and quick sandwiches, so she is not talking about the bathroom. 6C People say he looks as if hes done it a hundred times before, but he spends his time worrying and can never relax, so we know he is not bored. 7 C Correct. The woman used to play the piano at friends parties and they seemed to like it, and it was then that she knew it was what she wanted to do. 8C Some people who saw the film said it was incredibly scary and would terrify anyone who went to see it, but he disagree[s].

Audio Script
1 Reports are coming in of difficult driving conditions on the high mountain pass north of Oldfield. Freezing fog combined with icy patches have increased the risk of accidents on this stretch of road which is well-known for the beautiful countryside, but also in need of repair in several sections. Unfortunately, there is no alternative way through the mountains for over forty miles, and the weather is forecast to get worse before it gets better. So if youre heading that way, do take care. 2 Well I never manage to get any free time. Nothing. Everyone else I know seems to be out every night and all weekend, but I have so much to read and so many things to do that I dont have any social life at all. Next week, for instance, were visiting hospital patients and meeting the staff, and that all has to be prepared. What itll be like when Im qualified and I actually have patients of my own to look after I dont know, but sometimes I feel like giving this course up and doing history or something like that instead, but I wont. 3 I think youll really like this one, its the biggest-selling model of its kind this year. As you can see its got a big, flat screen and the very latest design in keyboards, which helps prevent your hands and arms getting tired if you write a lot of emails or like to chat online. The unit itself is very powerful, with loads of memory, so you can save and watch as many films or games or videos as you want. And the speakers, even though theyre so small, always give you clear, high-quality sound - no matter how loud you turn it up. 4 Man: After all that, weve missed it. There it is on the screen. It took off ten minutes ago. Woman: I knew that would happen if we tried to get here on time in the car. Man: It wouldnt have been any quicker in the bus not in that traffic. Woman: Well we should have left the house much earlier then, or taken the train. Its only an hour from Central Station. Man: Anyway, were here now so lets go to the ticket desk opposite check-in and see if theres another one leaving this morning. 5

Its not very big really, though for one person I suppose theres enough space as long as you dont have too many things to put away. I thought of having some more cupboards put in, but that might make it look even smaller. Still, it has all the main things you need, and the hot water is very hot indeed. Though in actual fact I dont think Ill be spending all that much time there because I usually eat out anyway during the week. So Ill probably just be popping in for cups of coffee and quick sandwiches. 6 Part of my job involves talking to large groups, maybe fifty or sixty people at a time. From what Ive been told I give the impression Im a natural public speaker, that I find the whole thing easy, that Im full of self-confidence and look as if Ive done it a hundred times before, and so on. But actually, I spend the whole time worrying that Ill make some awful mistake, or someone will ask me a question I cant deal with. So the reality is I can never relax for a single moment. 7 Interviewer: So, does a love of music run in the family? Woman: Well, my parents liked good music but neither of them played any instruments. They wanted me to have lessons, but they just couldnt afford it. Interviewer: Didnt you do music at school? Woman: No, there werent any music classes at all. So I had to teach myself really, once I realized I could play a bit. Interviewer: And when did you become aware of that? Woman: When I was in my early teens. Id play the piano at friends parties and they seemed to like it. I enjoyed it, too, and somehow I knew even then that that was what I wanted to do. 8 Well, Id heard and read a lot about it before I saw it, of course. On the one hand some people said it was incredibly scary and would terrify anyone who went to see it. On the other hand, some people claimed it was just a copy of much better movies and that theyd seen it all before and it was so long and dull they couldnt stay awake. I disagree with both those points of view. The action never stops and it kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time, wondering what could possibly happen next.

Listening Part 2
Question 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Time allowed 00:40 You will hear an interview with a woman called Kate Harris who advises consumers on how to save money. For questions 918, complete the sentences.

SUPERMARKET SHOPPING
Decide how much you can afford while you are still at 9 Buy only things that are on your 10 . . . .

Its often cheaper to buy the supermarkets own 11 The less expensive items are often displayed on the 12 Dont buy things that are on 13 Never go to the supermarket when youre 14 If you buy too much 15

if you dont actually need them. .

food, you dont have long to eat it.

Before you buy food, check the date on the 16 You can save money by buying a lot of 17 Before you leave the supermarket, always check the 18

of the product. food.

Feedback
9 ... there are a couple of things you need to do before you leave home and go to the shops, like working out what you can afford. 10 make a shopping list ... dont even bother looking at items that you havent put on your list. 11 The brand made by the supermarket themselves tend to be less expensive than well-known ones ... 12 ... you can save money by forgetting about the things higher up and looking only at the items on the lower shelves. 13 ... you have to be careful not to buy something youve no real necessity for just because theres an offer on. 14 ... I always avoid going shopping ... When Im hungry. 15 Particularly fresh food youd then be left with a load of stuff to eat in a short period of time. 16 look for the date on the outside of the packaging or container 17 Prices are often much lower for food sold in large quantities, so its a good idea to buy it frozen, by the kilo.

18 ... dont go until youve had a very good look at the receipt.

Audio Script
Interviewer: So, Kate, whats the first thing to do when you get to the supermarket? Kate: Well actually there are a couple of things you need to do before you leave home and go to the shops, like working out what you can afford altogether. Its best always to try to keep to that when you get to the shops, and in fact some people only take that much money with them. The other thing is to make a shopping list.

Interviewer: Yes, thats important. Kate: Now when you get to the supermarket, dont even bother looking at items that you havent put on your list. You dont want to be tempted by attractive labels into buying things you dont really need. And its quicker, too, if you go straight to the sections where you know youll find what you want. Interviewer: But how do you know which to choose? Kate: The brand made by the supermarket themselves tend to be less expensive than well-known ones because the costs of producing their own ones are lower. They dont spend as much on advertising or packaging so they can keep prices down, but the quality of the product can be just as good. Oh, by the way, many supermarkets have found that products sell faster when theyre at the customers eye level, and thats exactly where they put the more expensive items. So you can save money by forgetting about the things higher up and looking only at the items on the lower shelves. Interviewer: What about special offers, though? Dont they sometimes put them where people can see them, and arent they a good way of saving money? Kate: Yes, that does sometimes happen. But you have to be careful not to buy something youve no real necessity for just because theres an offer on. Id suggest looking at the supermarkets advertising before you go shopping, and deciding then which of their offers interest you. Interviewer: Yes, it makes sense not to buy things on impulse, doesnt it? Kate: Definitely. Thats the reason I always avoid going shopping just before lunch, or dinner. Interviewer: Sorry? Kate: When Im hungry. Thats the worst possible time to be surrounded by all that supermarket food. Its just too easy to buy and buy! Interviewer: Particularly fresh food, I would think. And youd then be left with a load of stuff to eat in a short period of time. Kate: Yes, theres nothing worse than getting a lot of fruit and veg, or fish and meat, only for most of it to be thrown out as waste. Interviewer: I suppose, in general, you can make that less likely by only buying things that will keep, particularly in the fridge, for

quite some time. Kate: Yes, I was going to mention that. You need to know when items have to be used by, or are best before, and you should choose those that will last the longest. So you need to look for the date on the outside of the packaging or container. Interviewer: Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Its awful having to throw food out. Kate: Of course, with fresh food, you can avoid this problem altogether if you have a good freezer at home. Prices are often much lower for food sold in large quantities, so its a good idea to buy it frozen, by the kilo. Interviewer: Fine. Well, thats about all we have time for now. Is there any final piece of advice youd like to give us? Kate: Yes. At the checkout, make sure they include any price reductions special offers, 2 for 1 and so forth and dont go until youve had a very good look at the receipt. Interviewer: Thank you.

Listening Part 3
Question 19 20 21 22 23 Time allowed 00:40 You will hear five different people talking about forms of transport. For questions 1923, choose from the list (AF) the form of transport each person is talking about. Use the letters only once. There is one extra letter which you do not need to use. Type the appropriate letter (AF) in the box. 19 Speaker 1 20 Speaker 2 21 Speaker 3 22 Speaker 4 23

Speaker 5

A coach B car C train D motorbike E lorry F plane

Feedback
19 C Jonathan had to change at the next stop and asked the ticket inspector ... which platform he needed for the express to London. 20 E The man says that there are very strict limits on how many hours he can spend behind the wheel. He likes doing a single longdistance run that takes all day because it avoids moving a vehicle this size around town, and loading and unloading. 21 F The woman talks about restricted legroom and not having much space to get past people to go to the toilets, which can be a problem because it may be a very long time before you land. 22 B The man wasnt surprised that it broke down because the engines running far too hot and theres oil all over the place. It also needs new tyres on three of the wheels, maybe four. 23 A The woman says that it turns off the main road a few times to pick up passengers, and uses motorways. She also enjoys the company and says you never know who you might meet sitting next to you!

Audio Script
Speaker 1 Jonathan sat back in his seat in the first class carriage and watched the fields, the forests and the villages race by the window. He would have to change at the next stop, though he wasnt sure which platform to go to. Just then, the ticket inspector appeared, and he asked him where he should take the express to London. To his surprise, the inspector told him it had been cancelled. Jonathan thought about this for a moment, and came to the conclusion that he should have taken the coach instead. It would have been cheaper, too. Speaker 2 Most days Im on the move from dawn until early in the evening, although of course nowadays there are very strict limits on how many hours we can actually spend behind the wheel. Sometimes I have to do a number of local deliveries, but quite often I do a single long-distance run that takes all day, there and back. I prefer those, really, because then you dont have all the problems of

getting a vehicle this size around town, and you dont spend half your time loading and unloading either. Speaker 3 A big problem for passengers travelling economy on these intercontinental journeys is legroom. This is determined by the space between seats and can vary from 86 centimetres down to just 73 centimetres. That doesnt give you much room to stretch out or get past people to go to the toilets, and it may be a very long time before you land. Thats what makes this different from a long railway journey, say, where at least you can walk up and down the aisle whenever you feel like it, and go to the bar or restaurant for a change. Speaker 4 Well to be quite honest Im not at all surprised it broke down. When was the last time you had it properly checked over, or even put any water in it? The engines running far too hot and theres oil all over the place. Thats whats causing all that smoke. Then theres the state of the tyres: you need new ones on three of the wheels, maybe four. It wont get you home in that state, so I suggest you leave it with me and Ill see what I can do. Speaker 5 Its by far the best way to get there. The seats are comfortable and you get a great view of the countryside from those big windows, much better than looking down from the air. I know it turns off the main road a few times to pick up passengers in the bigger towns, but it moves along pretty quickly, using motorways wherever possible. I sometimes used to drive all the way there and back, but I got really fed up with spending all that time on my own. This way, you never know who you might meet sitting next to you!

Listening Part 4
Question 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Time allowed 00:40 You will hear an interview with Sarah Williams about the sport of grass skiing. For questions 2430, choose the best answer (A, B or C).

24 Sarah says you may see people grass skiing in

A city parks. B special grass skiing areas. C snow skiing resorts.


25 Why is it best to wear safety pads when grass skiing?

A Grass skiers go faster than snow skiers. B Grass surfaces are harder than snow. C Grass slopes are steeper than snow slopes.
26 Compared to the clothes you need for snow skiing, grass skiing clothes are

A less heavy. B very expensive. C more fashionable.


27 What feature of grass slopes makes them different to snow slopes?

A They are usually much less straight. B There may be objects lying on them. C The grass is sometimes very long.
28 What explanation is given for the previous low interest in grass skiing?

A A lot of people had accidents while grass skiing. B Many people went to man-made ski slopes instead. C Cheap flights made it easier to go snow skiing.
29 Why do some snow skiers practise grass skiing?

A It helps them stay fit all year for snow skiing. B It offers more opportunity to compete. C It causes fewer leg injuries than snow skiing.
30 Why, according to Sarah, will grass skiing eventually become much more popular?

A People wont want to travel so far to ski. B Some people find grass skiing much easier. C There will be less snow for people to ski on.

Feedback
24 A She mentions people doing lots of new sports recently, especially in the city centre parks, but these do not include grass skiing. 25 A Sarah says that grass skiers can move really fast down the slopes, but she does not say they are faster than snow skiers. 26 A Correct. Grass skiers dont have to go where its very cold and so they can wear much lighter things, just ordinary clothes that dont cost much. 27 A Sarah does not mention the straightness of the slopes. 28 A The interviewer asks whether it was because of the number of injuries but Sarah doesnt think it was. 29 A Correct. ... quite a few snow skiers use grass skiing as a way of keeping in shape during the summer months. 30 A Flights to slopes are described as being easy to find and there is no mention of people wanting or not wanting to travel.

24 B There are no special grass skiing areas; grass skiers use the slopes at traditional skiing resort[s]. 25 B Correct. ... if you fall on snow,you will have a softer landing than on grass ... so safety pads are usually worn. 26 B The kind of gear snow skiers have to buy if they want to stay in fashion is expensive, but grass skiers can wear ordinary clothes. 27 B Correct. ... one problem you have which is much less likely on snow is that you have to watch out for branches or stones. 28 B Correct. It was at that time that a lot of artificial ski slopes were built, so people could go indoor skiing. 29 B Competitions are mentioned, but described as probably a long way off into the future. 30 B Sarah finds the interviewers question a simple one to answer, but does not mention the sport itself being easier.

24 C Correct. Sarah says that if youre in a traditional skiing resort in the warmer months when theres no snow, youre quite likely to spot grass skiers using the slopes there.

25 C They are skiing in the same places as snow skiers, and therefore You get steep slopes in both, so speeds will be similar. 26 C The interviewer mentions fashion in the context of snow skiers who want to stay in fashion, but for grass skiing theres none of that. 27 C The interviewer thinks that grass skiing cant be quite as smooth as skiing on snow, but neither of them mentions the length of the grass. 28 C The interviewer asks whether it was the cost of flying to places like the Alps suddenly coming down, but Sarah doesnt think it was. 29 C Sarah says that grass skiing uses exactly the same leg muscles as snow skiing, but she does not mention injuries. 30 C Correct. In the future climate change will make it more and more difficult to find anywhere with snow.

Audio Script
Interviewer: So what do you think will be the fastest-growing sport in the coming years, Sarah? Outdoor ones, I mean. Sarah: Well Ive seen people doing lots of new sports recently, especially in the city centre parks, but I dont think itll be any of those. Id say grass skiing. Interviewer: Really? Sarah: Yes, if youre in a traditional skiing resort in the warmer months when theres no snow, youre quite likely to spot grass skiers using the slopes there. Theyre on what look like ordinary skis from above, but underneath they have little wheels, or tracks. They can move really fast down the slopes, and it looks like fun. Kids particularly seem to like it. Interviewer: How safe is it, though? Sarah: Pretty much the same as snow skiing, from what I can gather. You get steep slopes in both, so speeds will be similar. Interviewer: But if you fall on snow, wont you have a softer landing than on grass? Sarah: Yes, thats often true, so safety pads are usually worn. Interviewer: Does that mean you have to wear a lot of special clothing, too? That would put a lot of people off, surely. Especially if it all costs a lot, like the kind of gear snow skiers have to buy if they want to stay in fashion. Sarah: No, not at all, theres none of that. In fact, because you dont have to go where its very cold you can wear much lighter things, just ordinary clothes that dont cost much. You can go grass skiing anywhere of course. Just find a hill, and off you go. Interviewer: But what about the conditions of the slopes, actually on the grass? It cant be quite as smooth as skiing on snow. Sarah: Well I suppose one problem you have which is much less likely on snow is that you have to watch out for branches or stones. You have to take care to avoid things like that, yes. Interviewer: I was wondering, actually, whether that was one of the reasons why it hadnt really taken off as a sport before. I remember reading about grass skiing from the 1960s and 70s, but then it just seemed to disappear. Was that because of the number of injuries? Or the cost of flying to places like the Alps suddenly coming down? Sarah: I dont think it was either of those. It was around then that a lot of artificial ski slopes were built, so people could go indoor skiing. And thats what a lot of them did, rather than grass ski. But thats been changing in more recent times, and nowadays quite a few people do both kinds of skiing. Interviewer: Really? I somehow thought theyd be popular with different kinds of people, like skiing and snowboarding, for instance. Sarah: Actually, quite a few snow skiers use grass skiing as a way of keeping in shape during the summer months, when theres no snow. They exercise exactly the same leg muscles, of course. That may even lead to some of them taking up grass skiing as a competitive sport, though thats probably a long way off into the future. Interviewer: But for people in general, what do you think the appeal will be? Sarah: Thats very simple, and rather sad really. With climate change already affecting many mountain areas, it will become more and more difficult to find anywhere with snow, despite flights being easy to find. So well just have to get used to skiing on grass.

Speaking Parts 1-4


Question 1-4 Time allowed 00:14 There are four parts to the test. Click on the Useful language link below to see a range of words and expressions to help you prepare for each part of the test. Go to the My Tests page if you would like to print a copy of the test.

Useful language Part 1: Useful language My name / surname is ... I live in / near ... I like living there because ... I live in a flat / apartment. I live in a detached / semi-detached / terraced house. I live in a bungalow. I like -ing at home because ... Id like to live in ... because ... Ive been studying English for ... I find ... easy / difficult because ... Its easy / difficult to practise because ... Ill use English for ... in future. I have lots of / a few / not many friends. I met ... when ... My friends live ... I like ... because ... My favourite place is ... because ... I like / dont like new places because ... Id like to ... because ... Id rather ... I prefer ... because ... Part 2: Useful language Photo 1: restaurant, smart, expensive, exclusive, fashionable, dinner, meal, formal, well-dressed people, waiter Photo 2: meal, informal, lunch, plastic tableware, fast food, relaxed, casual Photo 3: street market, flea market, open-air, stall, clothes, T-shirts, bags Photo 4: smart shop, boutique, retailer, dress shop, clothes, jeans, jackets, tops Theyre enjoying ... because ... The food is ... Theyre relaxing. People like / prefer (type of shop) ... because ... ... are cheaper / more expensive / better quality / more fashionable. You can find bargains in ... Part 3: Useful language television, computer, phone, washing machine, cooker, oven, fridge ... is useful / necessary / essential because ... ... is too ... for a holiday home. big / small / expensive to run

good for passing the time I need ... because ... I couldn't do without ... Part 4: Useful language Id like ... because I wouldnt like ... because ... People do / dont need a holiday because ... In (name of country) people usually have (type of holiday). Holidays are for ... People go / dont go abroad on holiday because ... The tourist industry is ... sightseeing / relaxing / walking / camping / beach / active / cultural holidays I agree / think so too. I disagree / dont think so either. What do you think? Whats your opinion / view?