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Orange Level

complete lessons in order:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Simple Sentences Clauses and Phrases Compound Sentences Complex Sentences Compound-Complex Sentences Noun Clauses Using "that" before a clause Adjective Clauses Adverb Clauses The Sequence of Tenses Reported Speech or Indirect Speech The Future Conditional The Present Conditional The Past Conditional Using "wish" - present and past so / too either / neither still / anymore Tag Questions

Lesson One

Simple Sentences
A simple sentence has a subject and a verb and completes a thought.
For example: She went to the store. (subject = she / verb = went) However, some people choose not to use a subject, as in this example:

Question: Where did she go? Answer: Went to the store. "Went to the store," is not good English. If you want your English to improve, avoid making this kind of mistake. Starting with simple sentences in this level, we will study sentence structure and if you go through all of the lessons in order, hopefully, your writing and speaking will get better.

Here are some examples:

She's afraid of spiders.

She loves her baby.

He's sitting on the ground.

The bridge fell down.

The vacuum cleaner is working.

He eats rice with chopsticks.

To improve your writing, try to keep your sentences short like the ones shown above. Until you become a better writer, this is a good approach because you'll have more control over what you want to say.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about clauses and phrases.

Lesson Two

Clauses and Phrases

A clause has a subject and a verb, but it may or not be a sentence.


Some examples: Because he likes the house. This clause has a subject (he) and a verb (likes) but it lacks the main part of the sentence. However, it's okay as an answer in a conversation. Also, avoid beginning a sentence with "because" unless you put two clauses together, such as.... Because he likes the house, he decided to buy it. In the Orange Level you will learn about many different kinds of clauses. A good knowledge of clauses will help improve your writing and speaking. There are two basic kinds of clauses.

Independent Clauses Dependent Clauses

An indendent Clause has a subject and a verb and it can stand on its own, serving as a complete sentence. A Dependent Clause has a subject and a verb but it can not stand on its own. It needs an independent clause. Before I went to school, I ate some breakfast. Dependent clauses often begin with words such as before, after, while, during, when, because, if, etc. Knowing how to use clauses will provide more options for you to express yourself. You can also say.... I ate some breakfast before I went to school. ----------------------------

A phrase is a group of words that does not have a subject and a verb. For example:
in the morning This phrase tells us when something will happen, but there isn't a subject, a person or a thing, and there isn't a verb describing activity or existence. Here's how to fix it: I go to school in the morning. Phrases are very important in English because they provide necessary information, as the examples below (with phrases in blue) demonstrate:

Here are some examples of phrases:

The children are playing in the sand. "...in the sand" tells us where the children are playing. We could write the sentence like this: The children are playing. This is a good sentence but the phrase in the sand provides important information.

The table in the dining room is very long.

A: What's your favorite thing to do on the weekend? B: Playing guitar. (Playing guitar is my favorite thing to do on the weekend. A response that doesn't have a clear subject or verb is a phrase. Many people use them in conversation, and that's okay.)

In the next lesson, we'll learn about compound sentences

Lesson Three

Compound Sentences

A compound sentence is made by joining two independent clauses together with a conjunction.
Some examples: John bought some new shoes, and he wore them to a party. Lydia liked her new house, but she didn't like the front yard. We can go see a movie, or we can get something to eat. Notice that in each example, there is a subject and a verb in each independent clause. These sentences can be changed by removing the subject: John bought some new shoes and wore them to a party. Lydia liked her new house but not the front yard. We can go see a movie or get something to eat. These are still good sentences, but by removing the subject from one part of them, they are no longer compound sentences. Compound sentences are often formed with these coordinating conjunctions: and, but, for, or, nor, yet, so, and ; (the semi-colon).

Here are some more examples of complex sentences:

The two women washed the dishes, and the man dried them.

He doesn't like to get his teeth cleaned, but he knows that it's necessary.

The apples weren't selling very well, so he decided to have a sale.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about complex sentences

Lesson Three

Complex Sentences

A complex sentence is made from an independent clause and a dependent clause joined together.
Some examples: After I came home, I made dinner. (dependent clause: "After I came home") (indpendent clause: I made dinner) We visited the museum before it closed. (dependent clause: before it closed.) (independent clause: We visited the museum)

Complex sentences are often formed by putting these words at the beginning of the dependent clause: as, as if, before, after, because, lthough, though, even though, while, when, whenever, if, during, as soon as, as long as, since, until, unless, where, and wherever. These words are called subordinating

conjunctions.

Here are some examples of complex sentences:

Because the bridge wasn't properly maintained by the government, it fell down.

indpendent clause: it fell down dependent clause: because the bridge wasn't properly maintained by the government

Whenever they eat at this restaurant, they order a hamburger and fries.

He'll be able to maintain a healthy weight if he keeps exercising.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about compound-complex sentences

Lesson Five

Compound-Complex Sentences

A compound-complex sentence is made from two independent clause and one or more dependent clauses.
Some examples: 1. Although I like to go camping, I haven't had the time to go lately, and I haven't found anyone to go with. independent clause: "I haven't had the time to go lately" independent clause: "I haven't found anyone to go with" dependent clause: "Although I like to go camping... " ********** 2. We decided that the movie was too violent, but our children, who like to watch scary movies, thought that we were wrong. independent clause: "We decided that the movie was too violent" independent clause: "(but) our children thought that we were wrong" dependent clause: who like to watch scary movies

Compound-complex sentences are very common in English, but one mistake that students often make is to try to write them without having mastered the simple sentences, compound sentences, and complex sentences first. If this is a confusing lesson, return to it later after completing the next three lessons (Lessons Six, Seven, and Eight).

Here are some examples of complex sentences:

If Barack Obama is the nominee for the Democratic Party, he'll run against John McCain, but it won't be an easy contest to win.
independent cause: he'll run against John McCain independent cause: it won't be an easy contest to win. Dependent clause: If Barack Obama is the nominee for the Democratic Party

Even though he prefers to eat with a fork, he chooses to use chopsticks in Chinese restaurants; however, they aren't easy to use.
independent clause: he chooses to use chopsticks in Chinese restaurants independent clause: they aren't easy to use. dependent clause: Even though he prefers to eat with a fork

I usually use a pick whenever I play the guitar, or I just use my fingers.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about noun clauses.

Lesson Seven

Using "that" to make a clause


A noun clause is a clause (containing a subject and a verb) that can replace a noun. Examples below show how they are used:
I don't know her. (not a noun clause) I don't know who she is. I don't know where she lives. I don't know when she moved to the United States. Noun clauses often use words such as when, what, why, who and other questions words, but the speaker may or may not be making a question. A good knowledge of noun clauses will help your English, but it's important to practice their use.

Here are some examples of sentences that use noun clauses:

Do you know how old they are?

The father wonders what his son will do in the future.

I can't remember what time the flight arrives.

Because noun clauses are often used with question words, many students make mistakes.

I don't know who is that woman. (incorrect!)

I don't know who that woman is. (correct)

He wants to find out where was she born. (incorrect!)

He wants to find out where she was born. (correct)

Remember to put the subect before the verb in a noun clause.

In the next lesson, we'll learn how to use "that" at the beginning of a clause.

Lesson Seven

Using "that" to make a clause


The word "that" is often used at the beginning of a clause. Examples below show how to use "that":
I think that it's a good idea. She was angry that her friend lied to her. We heard that U2 will be here in June. Note: "That" is not necessary to use when it appears as an object in the
clause. All of the above sentences do not require "that"; however, it's important for beginning and intemediate learners of English to practice.

Do you see and hear the differences in the sentences below? I think it's a good idea. She was angry her friend lied to her. We heard U2 will be here in June.

Here are some examples of sentences that use "that":

She thinks that it's important to learn English.

I believe that organic strawberries are worth paying extra money for.

This young woman is glad that the water is warm.

Clauses using "that" often follow this pattern:

subject + verb + that + clause

The teacher noticed that the little girl didn't have a coat.

or this pattern:

subject + verb + adjective + that + clause

Mark was angry that his boss told him to work this weekend.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about adjective clauses.

Lesson Eight

Adjective Clauses
An adjective clause is a clause that describes a word or a group of words in another clause. Adjective clauses are often part of a complex sentence.
Adjective clauses use that, who, whom, and which to begin the clause--but not always: She's the person who gave me the idea. or She's the person that gave me the idea. In both sentences, the person is described by... She gave me the idea. ...but use that or who in place of "she."

Here are some examples of sentences that use "that":

This is a student who comes fromm Japan.

The highway that George travels on every day is usually very crowded during rush hour.

George is a man who likes to eat a lot of watermelon.

To practice the creation of a sentence with an adjective clause,

combine these pairs of sentences:

1. 2.

The teacher was not happy. He found gum under the desk.

The teacher who found gum under the desk was not happy.

Now you practice. I recommend that you write your answers on a piece of paper. Don't look at the answers below until you have finished trying to put these together.

1.

The students are very helpful to each other. They go to this class.

2.

Answer: ________________________________________________________.

1. 2.

The apples are rotten. I bought them today.

Answer: ________________________________________________________.

1. 2.

We really like the new car. We bought it last weekend.

Answer: ________________________________________________________.

Answers:

The students who go to this class are very helpful to each other.

The apples that I bought today are rotten. We really like the new car which we bought last weekend.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about adverbial phrases and clauses.

Lesson Nine

Adverb Clauses
Adverb clauses provide information about other parts of the sentence. They explain why, when, and under which conditions something happens. Examples help understand their use:
why: I quit my job because I didn't like the company. when: Apples are picked after they ripen. condition: He keeps eating eggs every day even though he knows they're high in cholesterol. condition: I will help you if I have time. Adverb clauses form complex sentences, so you can also reverse the order of the clause--just use a comma (,) If I have time, I will help you. After they ripen, apples are picked.

Here are some examples of sentences that use adverb clauses:

She works for a florist because she loves flowers.

I use a wine glass whenever I drink wine.

He usually washes his car if it gets dirty.

In the next lesson, we'll learn about the sequence of tenses

Lesson Ten

The Sequence of Tenses

Understanding the sequence of tenses will help you do many things:


1. 2. 3. It helps you explain what someone else said (indirect quotations) It helps you with conditional sentences (using the word "if") It helps you make sentences using the word "wish"

Here are some examples: Someone says, "I need to go to the store." She said that the needed to go to the store. You change "need" to "needed" but the situation is still in the present. This is a strange thing about about English, but many Americans do ithis properly without thinking about it. Here's another example: If you could meet me at the airport, I would be grateful. In this situation, "can" changes to "could." Why? Because "if" is present and the sentence is conditional. We will practice conditional sentences in Lessons 11, 12, and 13. Here's an example using "wish": I wish I had been at the party last night. This sentence indicates that something did not happen in the past, but it uses the past perfect to express it. Confused? Take a look at the chart below and then go on to the next three lessons.

The Sequence of Tenses

Original Tense
Present Present Continuous Past Present Perfect will can may

Changed to....
Past Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect would could might

The chart above is is also found in the yellow level, Lesson 16.

In the next lesson, we'll practice using the sequence of tenses in reported speech

Direct & Indirect Quotations


A "quotation" is the exact word or words that a person speaks. It's good to understand the difference between a direct quotation, the words you hear from someone speaking, and an indirect quotation, which are the words that someone else uses to describe another speaker. Confused? When you're confused it helps look at an example.

Direct Quotation "I need to go to the store," said my wife.

Indirect Quotation My wife said that she needed to go to the store.

Notice that "said" is in the past tense, so the verb "need" also becomes past tense. There's something called the "sequence of tenses" which is useful to look at now:

The Sequence of Tenses

Direct Speech
Present Present Continuous Past Present Perfect will can may

Indirect Speech
Past Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect would could might

There are others that can be added, but this is a good start in learning that tenses change their form when using indirect speech. See the examples below.

examples

What did he say? He said he was a beekeeper.

"I am a beekeeper."

What did he say? He said that he was reading a book.

"I'm reading a book."

What did she say? She said she had been afraid of spiders when she was a little girl.

"I was afraid of spiders when I was a little girl."

He said that he'd been in that same spot for an hour and he hadn't caught anything. (he'd been = had been)
"I have been in this same spot for an hour and I haven't

caught a thing."

The said that they enjoyed making breakfast together.

"We enjoy making breakfast together."

He said he would help her pick up the apples.

"I'll help you pick them up."

His wife said that he could eat an entire watermelon.

"He can eat an entire watermelon," his wife said.

The owner of the antique shop said that the radio might be over 70 years old.

"This radio may be over 70 years old," said the owner of

the antique shop.

Lesson Eleven

The Sequence of Tenses in Reported Speech

When someone says something, how do you describe it to another person? This lesson will focus on reported speech, or you can call it "indirect speech."
Direct speech: "This meat smells bad," said Tom. Indirect Speech: Tom said that the meat smelled bad. Notice that the spoken words are in quotation marks: "This meat smells bad." The verb "smells" is in the present tense. It changes to "smelled" -- the past tense.

The chart below shows the sequence of tenses and how verbs change when using indirect speech:
The Sequence of Tenses

Original Tense
Present Present Continuous Past Present Perfect will can may

Changed to....
Past Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect would could might

Practice. Write your answers on a piece of paper. Then look below for the correct verb choices.

1. "I will be ready by 10:00" She said that she ______ be ready by 10:00. 2. "The mail isn't here yet." He said that the mail ________here yet. 3. "They have lived here 10 years." Bill said they

_________here 10 years. 4. "Is it going to rain today?" _____________ to rain today. 5. "Joe knows a lot of people." ________ a lot of people. 6. "Can you play the guitar?" _________play the guitar.

She asked if it He said that Joe She asked me if I

Answers: 1. would; 2. wasn't; 3. had lived; 4. was going; 5. knew; 6. could Indirect speech for a question usually uses "if" or "whether" in the sentence. Notice that #4 and #6 are not written with a question mark. That's because the speaker is describing the question, not asking it.

Here are some more examples:

The mother said that she loved her baby.

"I love this baby very much," said the mother.

or The mother said she loved her baby. (In this sentence "that" is optional)

John said that his daughter had graduated from college. or

"My daughter graduated from college," said John.

John said his daughter had graduated from college. But...... John said his daughter graduated from college. (This doesn't follow the sequence of tenses, but it's a little mistake which most people won't notice.

The students asked if they could ride on the bike again. or.... The students asked whether they could ride on the bike again. Remember to use if or whether when describing a question.

"Can we ride on the bike again?" the students asked.

In the next lesson, you will learn about the future conditional

Lesson Twelve

The Future Conditional


The future conditional describes something that might happen in the future with a condition. It often uses "if."
Examples: If I go to the park tomorrow, I will bring my dog. "If I go to the park tomorrow" is in the present tense. "I will bring my dog" is in the future tense and uses a modal verb, will. You can use other modal verbs: can, might, should, must, etc. Notice the use of a comma (,) at the end of the first clause. The use of "if" creates a dependent clause. The order of the sentence may also be reversed: I will bring my dog if I go to the park tomorrow.

Here are some more examples:

If Aishwarya goes to the goes to the party, she will wear this beautiful necklace.

Pablo will be very happy if he can marry the girl he loves.

If I buy this house, I'm going to paint it a different color.

Lesson Thirteen

The Present Conditional


The present conditional describes a situation now that isn't true or isn't happening. Teachers also call this the present unreal or present contrary-to-fact.
Example: If I had a million dollars, I would give it away to all my friends. "If I had a million dollars" is in the past tense, but it describe a possible situation (or impossible) situation in the present. "I would give it away to all my friends" tells the outcome of the condition. You can use "would," "could," "might," or "should" in these kinds of sentences. This next sentence uses the verb "be" in the present conditional. I wouldn't do that if I were you. Well, I'm not you, so this describes a situation that is not true. Notice that "were" is used with "i." Isn't that strange? But it's correct.

Here are some more examples:

If she had more time today, she could meet her friend for lunch.

(The situation is present, but notice the use of "had," the past tense of "have." This means that she doesn't have time.

If I knew how to sing, I could probably make a little money playing guitar on the weekends.

(But I'm not very good at singing while playing guitar. Perhaps I'll get better with practice. The past tense of know is knew)
If this penguin could talk, he would probably tell us human beings to stop changing the climate.

(A penguin can't talk but if it could...... The past tense of can talk is could talk)

We study the past conditional in the next lesson.

Lesson Fourteen

The Past Conditional

The past conditional describes a past situation that never happened, or it did happen and the person speaking is describing the possibility of something not happening in the past. This is also called the past unreal or the past contrary-to-fact. Here's an example: If I had gone to that party, I would have had a good time. (situation: I didn't go to the party; therefore, I didn't have a good time.) "If I had gone to that party" uses the past perfect in this part of the sentence. "I would have had a good time" is the likely result. Sometimes you can do this without "if" and just use the past perfect: Had I heard the weather report, I would have taken an umbrella. or.... If I had heard the weather report, I would have taken an umbrella. These are both good sentences, but the second one is used more often.

Here are some more examples:

If she had been more careful, she wouldn't have spilled her coffee.
(She wasn't careful, and this is the result. You can't change the past, but you can talk about it.)

If Stephanie hadn't climbed up the tree, she wouldn't have fallen down and broken her arm.
(But, in fact, she climbed the tree, fell down and broke her arm)

If he had given up smoking, he wouldn't have died at such an early age.


(He didn't give up smoking, and then he died because of this fact.)

In the next lesson, you will learn to use "wish" for present and past situations

Lesson Fifteen

Using "Wish"

Similar to conditional sentences are those that use "wish" to express something isn't true now, or it wasn't true in the past. To make sentences with "wish" properly, a knowledge of the Sequence of Tenses is important. I wish I had more money.
(This describes a present situation. In fact, I don't have more money.)

She wishes he would talk to her more often.


(This also describe a present situation. Notice that the modal verb "would" is used here. "Would" and "could" are frequently used in these kinds of sentences.)

They wish they hadn't bought that house.


(This describes a past situation that can't be changed. They regret their decision, but you can't change the past. Notice the use of the past perfect after "wish.")

Here are some more examples:

Yesterday Tom moved his chair and hurt his back. Now he wishes he hadn't done that.
(The verb "do" is especially useful. You can use it for just about any kind of mistake you made in the past.)

Tony wishes he had a job as a radio announcer.


(The verb "have" is often used after "wish." In this sitation, he doesn't have this job, but you use the past tense of have: had.

"I wish I knew the answer."


(You don't know the answer, but you wish you did. Again, the past tense is used to describe a present situation.)

In the next lesson, you will learn how to use "so" and "too."

Lesson Sixteen

So and Too

"So" and "too" are useful words that can make your sentences shorter but stronger. The examples here show them used with conjunctions, but there are many applications for these words. Examples: I went to a movie, and my friend did, too. or I went to a movie, and so did my friend. Pay attention to word order. "Too" goes at the end of the sentence, and "so" goes after the conjunction, then the helping verb, and then the subject. When two situations are the same, you could write a sentence like this: I like to eat pizza, and my children like to eat pizza. But this is better: I like to eat pizza, and my children do, too. or I like to eat pizza, and so do my children.

This video might help:

Here are some more examples:

He likes to cook, and she does, too. or He likes to cook, and so does she.

Bobby went swimming yesterday, and so did Tom. or Bobby went swimming yesterday, and Tom did, too.

He has gotten all wet, and she has, too. or He has gotten all wet, and so has she.

Notice that the helping verb is used in the second part of the sentence. Now it's time for you to practice. Be sure to pay attention to the verb tenses that are used. They have to match in both sentences. After you do this exercise, you should understand. Use the subject and the connecting word in parenthesis. Write this out by hand. 1. Mary can ride a bike, and ______________________________. (John / so) 2. You like to study English, and ___________________________. (she / too) 3. They lived in Mexico a long time ago, and __________________. (I / so)

4. I have been to New York, and ____________________________. (you / so) 5. She's a student, and ___________________________________. (he / too) 6. We were late to class, and ________________________. (the teacher / so) 7. I eat lots of vegetables, and __________________________. (my kids / too) 8. My computer has a power cord, and __________________. (my printer / so) 9. Bob has finished his homework, and _____________________. (Mary / too) 10. Jerry will go to the party, and __________________________. (Sue / so)

Answers:

1. and so can John. 2. and she does too. 3. and so did I. 4. and so have you. 5. and he is too. 6. so was the teacher. 7. and my kids do too. 8. so does my printer. 9. and Mary has too. 10. so will Sue.

In the next lesson, using neither and either.

Lesson Seventeen

Either and Neither

"Either" and "neither" are used in almost the same way as "so" and "too," but they are used with negative verbs. Examples: I didn't get enough to eat, and you didn't either. or I didn't get enough to eat, and neither did you. Pay attention to word order. "Either" goes at the end of the sentence after the negative helping verb, and "neither" goes after the conjunction, then the negative helping verb, and then the subject. It's important to notice that words following "neither" are not negative. You shouldn't use double negatives in English.

When two situations are the same, you could write a sentence like this: William doesn't work there, and John doesn't work there. But this is better: William doesn't work there, and John doesn't either. or William doesn't work there, and neither does John.

This video might help you:

Here are some more examples:

Mary doesn't want to wake Tom up, and Christine doesn't either. or Mary doesn't want to wake Tom up, and neither does Christine.

He's not very good at painting walls, and she isn't either. or He's not very good at painting walls, and neither is she.

She can't wait until the baby is born, and he can't either. * or She can't wait unitl the baby is born, and neither can he.
*Modal verbs do the same thing that regular helping verbs do--just repeat from the first part of the sentence.

Now it's time for you to practice. It might be helpful to do the exercise in Lesson 16 if you haven't done so already. As in that exercise, use the subject and the connecting word in parenthesis. Write this out by hand. 1. I can't speak Spanish, and ___________________________. (you / either) 2. She doesn't eat red meat, and ________________________. (he / neither)

3. The students didn't have any books, and __________. ( the teacher / either) 4. We haven't seen that movie yet, and ___________________. (you / neither) 5. Jane doesn't drive yet, and __________________________. (Jim / neither) 6. You won't shop at that store, and ________________________. ( I / either) 7. The computer doesn't work, and ________________. ( the printer / neither) 8. You didn't do any laundry, and __________________________. ( I / either) 9. Henry isn't eating his food, and ______________________. (Zelda / either) 10. I don't have to work tomorrow, and ___________________ (you / neither)

Answers:

1. and you can't either. 2. and neither does he. 3. and the teacher didn't either. 4. and neither have you. 5. and neither does Jim. 6. and I won't either. 7. and neither does the printer. 8. and I didn't either. 9. and Zelda isn't either. 10. and neither do you.

In the next lesson, you will learn how to use "still" and "anymore.

Lesson Eighteen

Still and Anymore


"Still" indicates that something is happening or not happening up to the present. Examples: He still likes to go to that restaurant. or We are still trying to learn how to use this computer. or I still haven't seen that movie.

"Anymore" is used with negative statements and questions. It indicates that something is finished or not happening. It often appears at the end of a sentence. I don't like to go there anymore. or I don't need anymore help.
Here are some more examples:

After 35 years of marriage, they still love each other. They are both retired and don't have to work anymore.

The baby doesn't want to eat anymore. Her father is still trying to feed her.

These two puppies are still sleeping. They don't live with their mother anymore.

You can practice here. Choose "still" or "anymore." 1. We __________ live in the United States. 2. She isn't interested in him _______________. 3. Do you ____________ want to see that movie? 4. I never see them _______________. 5. The Johnsons don't want their big SUV ____________. 6. Are you _____________ angry at your husband? 7. Is it ________________ snowing outside? 8. He doesn't want to work at that company ______________. 9. Martha won't shop at Walmart ______________.

10. The car _____________ won't start.

Answers: 1. still; 2. anymore; 3. still; 4. anymore; 5. anymore; 6. still; 7. still; 8. anymore; 9. anymore; 10. still

Learn about tag questions in the next lesson.

Lesson Nineteen

Tag Questions
A tag question starts out as a statement and then becomes a question at the end. There are different reasons for using tag questions, but usually it's because you have an idea of what the answer might be. Examples: You want to learn English, don't you? We've had some really good weather, haven't we? She can help you with your homework, can't she?
Notice the subject is repeated at the end of the question, and the helping verb (auxiliary verb) is used to reinforce the tense of the verb. The first question is in the present tense; therefore, use "do" as the helping verb. In this question, I know you want to learn English: You want to learn English, don't you? The second question is in the present perfect; therefore, use "have" as the helping verb. Remember that your choice of helping verb sometimes depends on the subject. In this question, we both know that the weather has been great: We've had some really nice weather, haven't we? How about a question in which "he" is the subject and there's a contraction: He's made a lot of friends in school, hasn't he? The third question uses a modal verb, "can," so you simply make it negative before the subject. In this question, I think the person can help you, but I might not be sure: She can help you with your homework, can't she?

Tag questions can start out in the negative and then end in the affirmative: It hasn't been a very good day, has it? They don't like to eat different kinds of food, do they? You wouldn't do that, would you?

Here are some more examples:

She's very beautiful, isn't she?


(We all agree that this is a beatiful woman.)

The baby doesn't want to eat her food, does she?


(It's obvious that this baby isn't going to eat.)

She's done something really interesting to her hair, hasn't she?


(Dying your hair purple is interesting--although you may or may not like it. I like it, but you might not like it. However, I want you to agree with me.)

Quiezz

Orange Level Quiz - Tag Questions

Part A. Directions: Complete each tag question with the a negative helping verb followed by the subject. (10 points) 1. She works for a big company, _________ _________? 2. The movie started at 8:00, _________ _________? 3. This is a good apple, _________ __________?

Part C. Directions: Complete each tag questions with a negative or affirmative helping verb followed by the subject. The write the expected short answer. (20 points) 1. You should pay your credit card bill, ________ ________? Yes, ________ _________.

4. You've eaten breakfast, _________ _________? 5. The students are going to take a test today, ________ _______? 6. He'll be at the party, __________ _________? 3. Those carrots aren't very good, _______ ________? 7. Your car is working now, ________ _________? No, ________ ________. 8. John has some money, __________ _________? 4. You love me, _________ _________? 9. You made some coffee, _________ _________? Yes, _________ _________. 10. They've done that before, __________ _________? 5. You can't play the piano, ________ ________? Part B. No, _________ _________. Directions: Make each tag question with a helping verb followed by the sujbect. (10 points) 1. You don't have to work today, ________ _________? 2. She won't get here on time, _________ _________? 3. Your dog hasn't had puppies, _________ _________? Yes, _________ _________. 4. That wasn't a very good movie, _________ _________? 5. The computer isn't on, ________ ________? 6. Tracy and Bill are getting back together, _________ ________? 7. I'm not late, _________ _________? 8. The alarm didn't go off, _________ _________? 9. He can't move any heavy furniture, _________ _______? 10. It doesn't really matter, _________ _______? 8. Rob will go fishing with us this weekend, _______ ______? Yes, _______ ________. 9. You were able to find it on the interent, ________ _______? Yes, ______ ________. 10. This quiz wasn't too hard, ________ _______? No, ________ _________. 6. She has to work this evening, ________ ________? Yes, _______ ________. 7. She had to work yesterday too, _________ _________? 2. They have to drive to Chicago next week, _______ ______? Yes, ________ _________.

Vocabulary

Learn Vocabulary - Click on each picture

People

Food

Apartment

House

The Kitchen

The Living Room

The Bathroom / video

The Dining Room

Clothing

Emotions and Feelings

Transportation

Money

Colors

Community

Sports

Babies