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FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE
PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION
PREFACE TO THIRD EDITION
LIST OF WORKS MOST OFTEN REFERRED TO
ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY TO THIRD EDITION
I. INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER I. New Material Material
The Ideal Grammar?
I. The Pre-Winer Period
II. The Service of Winer
(a) Winers Inconsistencies
(b) Winer Epoch-Making
(c) Schmiedel
(d) Buttmann
(e) Blass
III. The Modern Period
(a) Deissmann
(b) Thumb
(c) Moulton
(d) Other Contributions
(e) Richness of Material
IV. The New Grammatical Equipment
(a) Comparative Philology
1. The Linguistic Revolution
2. A Sketch of Greek Grammatical History
3. The Discovery of Sanskrit
4. From Bopp to Brugmann
(b) Advance in General Greek Grammar
(c) Critical Editions of Greek Authors
(d) Works on Individual Writers
(e) The Greek Inscriptions
(f) Fuller Knowledge of the Dialects
(g) The Papyri and Ostraca
(h) The Byzantine and the Modern Greek
(i) The Hebrew and Aramaic
1. The Old View
2. A Change with Kennedy
3. Deissmanns Revolt
4. The Language of Jesus
(j) Grammatical Commentaries
V. The New Point of View
CHAPTER II. The Historical Method
I. Language as History
(a) Combining the Various Elements
(b) Practical Grammar a Compromise
II. Language as a Living Organism
(a) The Origin of Language

(b) Evolution in Language


(c) Change Chiefly in the Vernacular
III. Greek Not an Isolated Language
(a) The Importance of Comparative Grammar
(b) The Common Bond in Language
(c) The Original Indo-Germanic Speech
(d) Greek as a Dialect of the Indo-Germanic Speech
IV. Looking at the Greek Language as a Whole
(a) Descriptive Historical Grammar
(b) Unity of the Greek Language
(c) Periods of the Greek Language
(d) Modern Greek in Particular
V. The Greek Point of View
CHAPTER III. The
I. The Term
II. The Origin of the
(a) Triumph of the Attic
(b) Fate of the Other Dialects
(c) Partial Koines
(d) Effects of Alexanders Campaigns
(e) The March toward Universalism
III. The Spread of the
(a) A World-Speech
(b) Vernacular and Literary
1. Vernacular
2. Literary
(c) The Atticistic Reaction
IV. The Characteristics of the Vernacular
(a) Vernacular Attic the Base
(b) The Other Dialects in the
(c) Non-Dialectical Changes
(d) New Words, New Forms, or New Meanings to Old Words
(e) Provincial Influences
(f) The Personal Equation
(g) Rsum
Phonetics and Orthography
Vocabulary
Word-Formation
Accidence
Syntax
V. The Adaptability of the to the Roman World
CHAPTER IV. The Place of the New Testament in the
I. The New Testament Chiefly in the Vernacular
(a) Not a Biblical Greek
(b) Proof that N. T. Greek is in the Vernacular
Lexical
Grammatical
II. Literary Elements in the New Testament Greek
III. The Semitic Influence
(a) The Tradition

(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
IV.
V.
VI.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
VII.

I.
II.
III.
(a)
1.
2.
(b)
1.
2.
()
()
()
(c)
1.
2.
()
()
()
()
(d)
IV.
(a)
(b)
(c)
1.
2.
3.
4.
V.
VI.

The View of Deissmann and Moulton


Little Direct Hebrew Influence
A Deeper Impress by the Septuagint
Aramaisms
Varying Results
Latinisms and Other Foreign Words
The Christian Addition
Individual Peculiarities
Mark
Matthew
Luke
James
Jude
Peter
Paul
Writer of Hebrews
John
N. T. Greek Illustrated by the Modern Greek Vernacular
II. ACCIDENCE
CHAPTER V. Word-Formation
Etymology
Roots
Words with Formative Suffixes
Verbs
Primary or Primitive Verbs
Secondary or Derivative Verbs
Substantives
Primary or Primitive Substantives
Secondary or Derivative Substantives
Those from verbs
Those from substantives
Those from adjectives
Adjectives
Primary or Primitive Adjectives
Secondary or Derivative Adjectives
Those from verbs
Those from substantives
Those from adjectives
Those from adverbs
The Adverb
Words Formed by Composition (Composita)
Kinds of Compound Words in Greek
Inseparable Prefixes
Agglutinative Compounds (Juxtaposition or Parathesis)
Verbs
Substantives
Adjectives
Adverbs
Personal Names Abbreviated or Hypocoristic
The History of Words

VII. The Kinship of Greek Words


VIII. Contrasts in Greek Words or Synonyms
CHAPTER VI. Orthography and Phonetics
I. The Uncertainty of the Evidence
(a) The Ancient Literary Spelling
(b) The Dialect-Coloured Vernacular
(c) The Uncials
(d) The Papyri
II. Vowel-Changes
(a) The Changes (Interchanges) with
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
(b) The Changes with
and
and
and
and
and
(c) The Changes with
and
and
and
and
and
(d) The Changes with
and
and
and
and
and
(e) The Changes with
and
and
and
and
(f) The Changes with
and
and
(g) The Changes with
and
and
(h) Contraction and Syncope

(i)
(j)
(k)
(l)
III.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
IV.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
V.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
VI.
VII.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
I.
1.
2.
(a)
(b)
(c)
3.
4.
(a)
(b)

Diphthongs and Diresis


Aphresis and Prothetic Vowels
Elision
Crasis
Consonant-Changes
Origin and Character of the Consonants
The Insertion of Consonants
The Omission of Consonants
Single or Double Consonants
Assimilation of Consonants
Interchange and Changing Value of Consonants
Aspiration of Consonants
Variable Final Consonants
Metathesis
Breathings
Origin of the Aspirate
Increasing De-aspiration (Psilosis)
Variations in the MSS. (Aspiration and Psilosis)
Transliterated Semitic Words
The Use of Breathings with and
The Question of
Accent
The Age of Greek Accent
Significance of Accent in the
Signs of Accent
Later Developments in Accent
N. T. Peculiarities
Shortening Stem-Vowels
Separate Words
Difference in Sense
Enclitics (and Proclitics)
Proper Names
Foreign Words
Pronunciation in the
Punctuation
The Paragraph
Sentences
Words
The Editors Prerogative
CHAPTER VII. The Declensions
The Substantive
History of the Declensions
The Number of the Cases
The History of the Forms of the Cases
The Blending of Case-Endings
Origin of Case-Suffixes
Number in Substantives
Gender in Substantives
Variations in Gender
Interpretation of the LXX

(c)
5.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
6.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
7.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
8.
II.
1.
2.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
3.
(a)
(b)
(c)
III.
1.
2.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
IV.
1.

Variations Due to Heteroclisis and Metaplasm


The First or Declension
The Doric Genitive-Ablative Singular
The Attic Genitive-Ablative Singular
Vocative in of masc. nouns in
Words in and Participles in
The Opposite Tendency to (d)
Double Declension
Heteroclisis and Metaplasm
Indeclinable Substantives
The Second or Declension
The So-Called Attic Second Declension
Contraction
The Vocative
Heteroclisis and Metaplasm
The Mixed Declension
Proper Names
The Third Declension (consonants and close vowels and )
The Nominative as Vocative
The Accusative Singular
The Accusative Plural
Peculiarities in the Nominative
The Genitive-Ablative Forms
Contraction
Proper Names
Heteroclisis and Metaplasm
Indeclinable Words
The Adjective
The Origin of the Adjective
Inflection of Adjectives
Adjectives with One Termination
Adjectives with Two Terminations
Adjectives with Three Terminations
The Accusative Singular
Contraction in Adjectives
Indeclinable Adjectives
Comparison of Adjectives
The Positive
The Comparative
The Superlative
Numerals
The Origin of Numerals
Variety among Numerals
Different Functions
The Cardinals
The Ordinals
Distributives in the N. T.
Numeral Adverbs
Pronouns
Idea of Pronouns

2.
3.
4.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
V.
1.
2.
(a)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
3.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
4.
(a)
(b)
(c)
5.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
I.
II.
(a)
(b)
(c)
III.
IV.
(a)

Antiquity of Pronouns
Pronominal Roots
Classification
The Personal Pronouns
The Intensive Pronoun
Reflexive Pronouns
Possessive Pronouns
Demonstrative Pronouns
Relative Pronouns
Interrogative Pronouns
Indefinite Pronouns
Distributive and Reciprocal Pronouns
Adverbs
Neglect of Adverbs
Formation of the Adverb
Fixed Cases
The Accusative
The Ablative
The Genitive
The Locative
The Instrumental
The Dative
Suffixes
Compound Adverbs
Analogy
The Comparison of Adverbs
Adverbial Stems
Substantives
Adjectives
Numerals
Pronouns
Verbs
Use of Adverbs
Adverbs of Manner
Adverbs of Place
Adverbs of Time
Scope of Adverbs
Relation between Adverbs and Prepositions
Adverbs and Conjunctions
Adverbs and Intensive Particles
Adverbs and Interjections
CHAPTER VIII. Conjugation of the Verb
Difficulty of the Subject
Nature of the Verb
Verb and Noun
Meaning of the Verb
Pure and Hybrid Verbs
The Building of the Verb
The Survival of Verbs
A Cross Division

(b)
(c)
(d)
1.
2.
3.
V.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
VI.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)
VII.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
()

The Oldest Verbs


Gradual Disappearance
N. T. Usage as to Verbs
The Second Aorists (active and middle)
Some Presents
Some Perfects
The Modes
The Number of the Moods or Modes (Modi)
The Distinctions between the Moods
The Indicative
The Subjunctive
The Optative
The Imperative
The Non-Thematic Stem
The Thematic Stem
The Suffix
The Suffix
The Old Injunctive Mood
Forms in
The Form in
First Person
Prohibitions
Perfect Imperative
Periphrastic Presents
Circumlocutions
The Voices
Transitive and Intransitive
The Names of the Voices
The Relative Age of the Voices
The So-Called Deponent Verbs
The Passive Supplanting the Middle
The Personal Endings
Cross-Divisions
The Active Endings
The Middle Endings
Passive Endings
Contract Verbs
The Tenses
The Term Tense
Confusion in Names
The Verb-Root
The Aorist Tense
The Present Tense
The Root Class
The Non-Thematic Reduplicated Present
The Non-Thematic Present with and
The Simple Thematic Present
The Reduplicated Thematic Present
The Thematic Present with a Suffix
The class

() The class
() The class
() The class
() The class
(f) The Future Tense
(g) The Perfect Tenses
1. The Name
2. The Original Perfect
3. The Perfect
4. The Aspirated Perfects
5. Middle and Passive Forms
6. The Decay of the Perfect Forms
7. The Perfect in the Subjunctive, Optative, Imperative
8. The Perfect Indicative
9. in Perfect Middle and Passive and Aorist Passive
(h) Reduplication
1. Primitive
2. Both Nouns and Verbs
3. In Three Tenses in Verbs
4. Three Methods in Reduplication
5. Reduplication in the Perfect
(i) Augment
1. The Origin of Augment
2. Where Found
3. The Purpose of Augment
4. The Syllabic Augment
5. The Temporal Augment
6. Compound Verbs
7. Double Augment
VIII. The Infinitive
1. No Terminology at First
2. Fixed Case-Forms
3. With Voice and Tense
4. No Personal Endings
5. Dative and Locative in Form
6. The Presence of the Article
7. The Disappearance of the Infinitive
8. Some N. T. Forms
IX. The Participle
1. The Name
2. Verbal Adjectives
3. True Participles
4. In Periphrastic Use
III. SYNTAX
CHAPTER IX. The Meaning of Syntax
I. Backwardness in the Study of Syntax
II. New Testament Limitations
III. Recent Advance by Delbrck
IV. The Province of Syntax
(a) The Word Syntax

(b) Scope of Syntax


(c) Construction of Words and Clauses
(d) Historical Syntax
(e) Irregularities
V. The Method of this Grammar
(a) Principles, not Rules
(b) The Original Significance
(c) Form and Function
(d) Development
(e) Context
(f) Translation
(g) Limits of Syntax
CHAPTER X. The Sentence
I. The Sentence and Syntax
II. The Sentence Defined
(a) Complex Conception
(b) Two Essential Parts
(c) One-Membered Sentence
(d) Elliptical Sentence
(e) Only Predicate
(f) Only Subject
(g) Verb not the Only Predicate
(h) Copula not Necessary
(i) The Two Radiating Foci of the Sentence
(j) Varieties of the Simple Sentence
III. The Expansion of the Subject
(a) Idea-Words and Form-Words
(b) Concord and Government
(c) The Group around the Subject
1. Subordinate Clause
2. With the Article
3. The Adverb
4. The Adjective
5. The Substantive
() By an oblique case
() Apposition
IV. The Expansion of the Predicate
(a) Predicate in Wider Sense
(b) The Infinitive and the Participle
(c) The Relation between the Predicate and Substantives
(d) The Pronoun
(e) Adjectives
(f) The Adverb
(g) Prepositions
(h) Negative Particles and
(i) Subordinate Clauses
(j) Apposition with the Predicate and Looser Amplifications
V. Subordinate Centres in the Sentence
VI. Concord in Person
VII. Concord in Number

(a) Subject and Predicate


1. Two Conflicting Principles
2. Neuter Plural and Singular Verb
3. Collective Substantives
4. The Pindaric Construction
5. Singular Verb with First Subject
6. The Literary Plural
(b) Substantive and Adjective
(c) Representative Singular
(d) Idiomatic Plural in Nouns
(e) Idiomatic Singular in Nouns
(f) Special Instances
VIII. Concord in Gender
(a) Fluctuations in Gender
(b) The Neuter Singular
(c) Explanatory and
(d) The Participle
(e) Adjectives
IX. Concord in Case
(a) Adjectives
(b) Participles
(c) The Book of Revelation
(d) Other Peculiarities in Apposition
(e) The Absolute Use of the Cases (nominative, genitive, ablative and accusative)
X. Position of Words in the Sentence
(a) Freedom from Rules
(b) Predicate often First
(c) Emphasis
(d) The Minor Words in a Sentence
(e) Euphony and Rhythm
(f) Prolepsis
(g) Hysteron Proteron
(h) Hyperbaton
(i) Postpositives
(j) Fluctuating Words
(k) The Order of Clauses in Compound Sentences
XI. Compound Sentences
(a) Two Kinds of Sentences
(b) Two Kinds of Compound Sentences
(c) Paratactic Sentences
(d) Hypotactic Sentences
XII. Connection in Sentences
(a) Single Words
(b) Clauses
1. Paratactic Sentences
2. Hypotactic Sentences
3. The Infinitive and Participle as Connectives
(c) Two Kinds of Style
(d) The Parenthesis
(e) Anacoluthon

1. The Suspended Subject


2. Digression
3. The Participle in Anacolutha
4. Asyndeton Due to Absence of and
(f) Oratio Variata
1. Distinction from Anacoluthon
2. Heterogeneous Structure
3. Participles in Oratio Variata
4. Exchange of Direct and Indirect Discourse
(g) Connection between Separate Sentences
(h) Connection between Paragraphs
XIII. Forecast
CHAPTER XI. The Cases
I. History of the Interpretation of the Greek Cases
(a) Confusion
(b) Bopps Contribution
(c) Modern Usage
(d) Greens Classification
(e) Syncretism of the Cases
(f) Freedom in Use of Case
II. The Purpose of the Cases
(a) Aristotles Usage
(b) Word-Relations
III. The Encroachment of Prepositions on the Cases
(a) The Reason
(b) No Governing of Cases
(c) Not Used Indifferently
(d) Original Use with Local Cases
(e) Increasing Use of Prepositions
(f) Distinction Preserved in the N. T.
IV. The Distinctive Idea of Each of the Cases
(a) Fundamental Idea
(b) Cases not Used for One Another
(c) Vitality of Case-Idea
(d) The Historical Development of the Cases
(e) The Method of this Grammar
V. The Nominative Case
(a) Not the Oldest Case
(b) Reason for the Case
(c) Predicate Nominative
(d) Sometimes Unaltered
(e) The Nominative Absolute
(f) The Parenthetic Nominative
(g) In Exclamations
(h) Used as Vocative
VI. The Vocative Case
(a) Nature of the Vocative
(b) Various Devices
(c) Use of with the Vocative
(d) Adjectives Used with the Vocative

(e) Apposition to the Vocative


(f) Vocative in Predicate
(g) The Article with the Vocative
VII. The Accusative Case
(a) The Name
(b) Age and History
(c) The Meaning of the Accusative
(d) With Verbs of Motion
(e) Extent of Space
(f) Extent of Time
(g) With Transitive Verbs
(h) The Cognate Accusative
(i) Double Accusative
(j) With Passive Verbs
(k) The Adverbial Accusative
(l) The Accusative by Antiptosis
(m) The Accusative by Inverse Attraction
(n) The Accusative with the Infinitive
(o) The Accusative Absolute
(p) The Accusative with Prepositions
VIII. The Genitive (True) Case
(a) Two Cases with One Form
(b) Name Incorrect
(c) The Specifying Case
(d) The Local Use
(e) The Temporal Use
(f) With Substantives
1. The Possessive Genitive
2. Attributive Genitive
3. The Predicate Genitive
4. Apposition or Definition
5. The Subjective Genitive
6. The Objective Genitive
7. Genitive of Relationship
8. Partitive Genitive
9. The Position of the Genitive
10. Concatenation of Genitives
(g) The Genitive with Adjectives
(h) The Genitive with Adverbs and Prepositions
(i) The Genitive with Verbs
1. Very Common
2. Fading Distinction from Accusative
3. Verbs of Sensation
4. Verbs of Emotion
5. Verbs of Sharing, Partaking and Filling
6. Verbs of Ruling
7. Verbs of Buying, Selling, Being Worthy of
8. Verbs of Accusing and Condemning
9. Genitive Due to Prepositions in Composition
10. Attraction of the Relative

(j)
(k)
IX.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
X.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
XI.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)
XII.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
1.
2.
3.
4.

The Genitive of the Infinitive


The Genitive Absolute
The Ablative Case
The Name
The Meaning
Rare with Substantives
The Ablative with Adjectives
The Ablative with Prepositions
The Ablative with Verbs
Verbs of Departure and Removal
Verbs of Ceasing, Abstaining
Verbs of Missing, Lacking, Despairing
Verbs of Differing, Excelling
Verbs of Asking and Hearing
Verbs with the Partitive Idea
Attraction of the Relative
The Locative Case
The Name Locative
The Significance of the Locative
Place
Time
Locative with Adjectives
Locative with Verbs
The Locative with Substantives
The Locative with Prepositions
The Pregnant Construction of the Locative
The Instrumental Case
The Term Instrumental
Syncretistic?
Place
Time
The Associative Idea
With Words of Likeness and Identity
Manner
Degree of Difference
Cause
Means
With Prepositions
The Dative (True) Case
Syncretism
The Decay of the Dative
The Idea of the Dative
The Dative with Substantives
With Adjectives
With Adverbs and Prepositions
With Verbs
Indirect Object
Dativus Commodi vel Incommodi (Ethical)
Direct Object
The Dative with Intransitive Verbs

5.
6.
7.
8.
(h)

Possession
Infinitive as Final Dative
The Dative of the Agent
The Dative because of the Preposition
Ambiguous Examples
CHAPTER XII. Adverbs
I. Special Difficulties
(a) Nature of the Adverb
(b) The Narrower Sense of Adverb
II. Adverbs with Verbs
(a) Commonest Use
(b) N. T. Usage
(c) Predicative Uses with and
(d) With
(e) With Participles
(f) Loose Relation to the Verb
III. Adverbs Used with Other Adverbs
IV. Adverbs with Adjectives
V. Adverbs with Substantives
VI. Adverbs Treated as Substantives
VII. The Pregnant Use of Adverbs
VIII. Adverbs as Marks of Style
IX. The Adverb Distinguished from the Adjective
(a) Different Meaning
(b) Difference in Greek and English Idiom
X. Adverbial Phrases
(a) Incipient Adverbs
(b) Prepositional Phrases
(c) Participles
(d) The Verb Used Adverbially
CHAPTER XIII. Prepositions
I. The Name
(a) Some Postpositive
(b) Not Originally Used with Verbs
(c) Explanation
II. The Origin of Prepositions
(a) Originally Adverbs
(b) Reason for Use of Prepositions
(c) Varying History
III. Growth in the Use of Prepositions
(a) Once No Prepositions
(b) The Prepositions Still Used as Adverbs in Homer
(c) Decreasing Use as Adverbs after Homer
(d) Semitic Influence in N. T.
(e) In Modern Greek
IV. Prepositions in Composition with Verbs
(a) Not the Main Function
(b) Preposition Alone
(c) Increasing Use
(d) Repetition after Verb

(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
V.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
VI.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
1.
2.
3.
4.
(i)
VII.
(a)
(b)
(c)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(d)
1.
2.
3.
4.
(e)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Different Preposition after Verb


Second Preposition Not Necessary
Effect of Preposition on Meaning of the Verb
Dropping the Preposition with Second Verb
Intensive or Perfective
Double Compounds
Repetition and Variation of Prepositions
Same Preposition with Different Cases
Repetition with Several Nouns
Repetition with the Relative
Condensation by Variation
The Functions of Prepositions with Cases
The Case before Prepositions
Notion of Dimension
Original Force of the Case
The Ground-Meaning of the Preposition
The Oblique Cases Alone with Prepositions
Original Freedom
No Adequate Division by Cases
Situation in the N. T.
Those with One Case
Those with Two Cases
Those with Three Cases
Possibly Four with
Each Preposition in a Case
Proper Prepositions in the N. T.

Original Significance
Meaning Back
Translation-Hebraism in
Comparison with
Comparison with
Compared with

The Root-Idea
By Twos or Between
Passing Between or Through
Because of

Old Use of with Accusative or Locative


Older than
Place
Expressions of Time
Among
In the Case of, in the Person of or simply in
As a Dative?
Accompanying Circumstance
Amounting to, Occasion, Sphere

10.
(f)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
(g)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
(h)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
(i)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(j)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(k)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(l)
1.

Instrumental Use of

Original Static Use


With Verbs of Motion
With Expressions of Time
Like a Dative
Aim or Purpose
Predicative Use
Compared with , and
()
Meaning
In Composition
Place
Time
Separation
Origin or Source
Cause or Occasion
The Partitive Use of
and

Ground-Meaning
In Composition in the N. T.
Frequency in N. T.
With the Accusative
With the Genitive
With the Locative
The True Dative

Root-Meaning
Distributive Sense
in Composition
With the Ablative
With the Genitive
With the Accusative

The Root-Meaning
In Composition
Compared with
Loss of the Locative Use
With the Genitive
With the Accusative

Significance
Compared with
In Composition
With the Locative
With the Ablative
With the Accusative

The Root-Meaning

2. In Composition
3. Originally Four Cases Used
4. With the Ablative
5. With the Genitive
6. With the Accusative
(m)
1. The Original Meaning
2. In Composition
3. The Cases Used with
4. Place
5. Time
6. Superiority
(n)
1. The Meaning
2. In Composition
3. Originally with Five Cases
4. The Ablative
5. With the Locative
6. With the Accusative
(o)
1. The Meaning
2. History
3. In Composition
4. N. T. Usage
(p)
1. The Meaning
2. In Composition
3. With Genitive?
4. With Ablative
5. The Accusative with
(q)
1. The Original Meaning
2. In Composition
3. The Cases Once Used with
4. With the Accusative
5. With the Ablative
VIII. The Adverbial Prepositions
1.
2.
3. ()
4.
5.
6.
7. ()
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18. -
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32. -
33. -
34.
35.
36.
37. -
38. -
39. --
40. -
41.
42.
IX. Compound Prepositions
X. Prepositional Circumlocutions
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
CHAPTER XIV. Adjectives
I. Origin of Adjectives
II. The Adjectival or Appositional Use of the Substantive
III. The Adjective as Substantive
(a) Any Gender
(b) With Masculine Adjectives
(c) With Feminine Adjectives
(d) With the Neuter
IV. Agreement of Adjectives with Substantives
(a) In Number
(b) In Gender

(c) In Case
(d) Two or More Adjectives
V. The Attributive Adjective
VI. The Predicate Adjective
VII. Adjective Rather than Adverb
VIII. The Personal Construction
IX. Adjectives Used with Cases
X. Adjectives with the Infinitive and Clauses
XI. The Adjective as Adverb
XII. The Positive Adjective
(a) Relative Contrast
(b) Used as Comparative or Superlative
(c) With Prepositions
(d) Comparison Implied by
(e) In Absolute Sense
XIII. The Comparative Adjective
(a) Contrast or Duality
(b) Degree
(c) Without Suffixes
(d) Double Comparison
(e) Without Object of Comparison
(f) Followed by
(g) Followed by the Ablative
(h) Followed by Prepositions
(i) The Comparative Displacing the Superlative
XIV. The Superlative Adjective
(a) The Superlative Vanishing
(b) A Few True Superlatives in the N. T.
(c) The Elative Superlative
(d) No Double Superlatives
(e) Followed by Ablative
(f) No Hebraistic Superlative
XV. Numerals
(a) and
(b) The Simplification of the Teens
(c) The Inclusive Ordinal
(d) The Distributives
(e) The Cardinal
(f) Substantive Not Expressed
(g) Adverbs with Numerals
(h) as Indefinite Article
(i) =
(j) The Distributive Use of
CHAPTER XV. Pronouns
I. Personal Pronouns
(a) The Nominative
1. The First Person
2. The Second Person
3. The Third Person
(b) The Oblique Cases of the Personal Pronouns

1.
2.
3.
4.
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
II.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
III.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
IV.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
V.
VI.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Originally Reflexive

Genitive for Possession


Enclitic Forms
The Frequency of the Personal Pronouns
Redundant
According to Sense
Repetition of the Substantive
The Possessive Pronouns
Just the Article
Only for First and Second Persons
Emphasis, When Used
With the Article
Possessive and Genitive Together
Objective Use
Instead of Reflexive
The Intensive and Identical Pronoun
The Nominative Use of
Varying Degrees of Emphasis
with
almost Demonstrative
In the Oblique Cases
Side by Side with the Reflexive

The Reflexive Pronoun
Distinctive Use
The Absence of the Reflexive from the Nominative
The Indirect Reflexive
In the Singular
In the Plural
Article with
Reflexive in the Reciprocal Sense
Reflexive with Middle Voice
The Use of
The Reciprocal Pronoun
Demonstrative Pronouns
Nature
Different Shades of Meaning
, ,

The Purely Deictic


The Contemptuous Use of
The Anaphoric Use
In Apposition
Use of the Article
Article Absent
in Contrast with
As Antecedent of the Relative Pronoun

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
(g)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
(h)
(i)
VII.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
()
()
()
()
()
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
(e)
1.
2.
3.
4.

Gender and Number of


The Adverbial Uses of and
The Phrase
In Combination with Other Pronouns
Ellipsis of
Shift in Reference

The Purely Deictic


The Contemptuous Use
The Anaphoric
The Remote Object (Contrast)
Emphasis
With Apposition
Article with Nouns except when Predicate
As Antecedent to Relative
Gender and Number
Independent Use

The Correlative Demonstratives


Relative Pronouns
List in the N. T.
The Name Relative
A Bond between Clauses

In Homer
Comparison with Other Relatives
With Any Person
Gender
Number
Case
Absence of attraction normal
Cognate accusative
Attraction to the case of the antecedent
Inverse attraction
Incorporation
Absence of Antecedent
Prepositions with the Antecedent and the Relative
Relative Phrases
Pleonastic Antecedent
The Repetition of
A Consecutive Idea
Causal
In Direct Questions
In Indirect Questions
The Idiom

Varied Uses
The Distinction between and
The Indefinite Use
The Definite Examples

5. Value of ?
6. Case
7. Number
8. Gender
9. Direct Questions
10. Indirect Questions
(f)
1. Relation to
2. Incorporation
3. Indirect Question
4. Number
5.
(g)
1. Qualitative
2. Double Office
3. Correlative
(h)
1. Quantitative
2. Antecedent
3. Attraction
4. Incorporation
5. Repetition
6. With
7. Indirect Questions
8. In Comparison
9. Adverbial
(i)
(j) as Relative
VIII. Interrogative Pronouns
(a)
1. Substantival or Adjectival
2. The Absence of Gender
3. =
4. Indeclinable
5. Predicate Use of with
6. In Alternative Questions
7. The Double Interrogative
8. As Relative
9. Adverbial Use
10. With Prepositions
11. With Particles
12. As Exclamation
13. Indirect Questions
14. or
(b)
1. Qualitative
2. Non-qualitative
3. In Indirect Questions
(c)

1.
2.
3.
4.
(d)
1.
2.
(e)
(f)
IX.
(a)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
(b)
(c)
(d)
X.
(a)
(b)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
(c)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
(d)
1.

Less Frequent than


Meaning
In Indirect Questions
The Exclamatory Use

Rare
Indirect Questions

Indefinite Pronouns

The Accent
Relation to
as Substantive
With Numerals=About
With Substantives
With Adjectives
As Predicate
The Position of
As Antecedent
Alternative
The Negative Forms
Indeclinable
=
=any one

Alternative or Distributive Pronouns

Without Substantive
With Substantive
With
With Genitive
Partitive Apposition
Rare in Plural
Repetition

Used absolutely=An-other, One Other


For Two
As Adjective
With the Article
The Use of
In Contrast for SomeOthers
Ellipsis of
The Use of and Together
=Different

Absolutely

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(e)
XI.
(a)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
(b)
(c)
(d)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
I.
II.
(a)
(b)
III.
IV.
(a)
(b)
(c)
V.
(a)
1.
2.
3.
4.
(b)
1.
2.
3.
4.
(c)
(d)
(e)

With Article
Second of Pair
=Different
=Another of Three or More
In Contrast
Other Antithetic Pronouns
Negative Pronouns

History

Gender

and
With


CHAPTER XVI. The Article
Other Uses of , ,
Origin and Development of the Article
A Greek Contribution
Derived from the Demonstrative
Significance of the Article
The Method Employed by the Article
Individuals from Individuals
Classes from Other Classes
Qualities from Other Qualities
Varied Usages of the Article
With Substantives
Context
Gender of the Article
With Proper Names
Second Mention (Anaphoric)
With Adjectives
The Resumptive Article
With the Adjective Alone
The Article not Necessary with the Adjective
With Numerals
With Participles
With the Infinitive
With Adverbs

(f) With Prepositional Phrases


(g) With Single Words or Whole Sentences
(h) With Genitive Alone
(i) Nouns in the Predicate
(j) Distributive
(k) Nominative with the Article=Vocative
(l) As the Equivalent of a Possessive Pronoun
(m) With Possessive Pronouns
(n) With
(o) With Demonstratives
(p) With , ()
(q) With
(r) , , ,
(s) With and
(t)
VI. Position with Attributives
(a) With Adjectives
1. Normal Position of the Adjective
2. The Other Construction (Repetition of the Article)
3. Article Repeated Several Times
4. One Article with Several Adjectives
5. With Anarthrous Substantives
6. With Participles
(b) With Genitives
1. The Position between the Article and the Substantive
2. Genitive after the Substantive without Repetition of the Article
3. Repetition of Article with Genitive
4. The Article Only with Genitive
5. Article Absent with Both
6. The Correlation of the Article
(c) With Adjuncts or Adverbs
1. Between the Article and the Noun
2. Article Repeated
3. Only with Adjunct
4. Only with the Noun
5. When Several Adjuncts Occur
6. Phrases of Verbal Origin
7. Exegetical Questions
8. Anarthrous Attributives
(d) Several Attributives with
1. Several Epithets Applied to the Same Person or Thing
2. When to be Distinguished
3. Groups Treated as One
4. Point of View
5. Difference in Number
6. Difference in Gender
7. With Disjunctive Particle
VII. Position with Predicates
VIII. The Absence of the Article
(a) With Proper Names

(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)
IX.

With Genitives
Prepositional Phrases
With Both Preposition and Genitive
Titles of Books or Sections
Words in Pairs
Ordinal Numerals
In the Predicate
Abstract Words
Qualitative Force
Only Object of Kind
The Indefinite Article
CHAPTER XVII. Voice
I. Point of View
(a) Distinction between Voice and Transitiveness
(b) Meaning of Voice
(c) Names of the Voices
(d) History of the Voices
(e) Help from the Sanskrit
(f) Defective Verbs
II. The Active Voice
(a) Meaning of the Active Voice
(b) Either Transitive or Intransitive
(c) Effect of Prepositions in Composition
(d) Different Tenses Vary
(e) The Active as Causative
(f) Active with Reflexives
(g) Impersonal Active
(h) Infinitives
(i) Active Verbs as Passives of Other Verbs
III. The Middle Voice
(a) Origin of the Middle
(b) Meaning of the Middle
(c) Often Difference from Active Acute
(d) The Use of the Middle not Obligatory
(e) Either Transitive or Intransitive
(f) Direct Middle
(g) Causative or Permissive Middle
(h) Indirect Middle
(i) Reciprocal Middle
(j) Redundant Middle
(k) Dynamic (Deponent) Middle
(l) Middle Future, though Active Present
(m) The Middle Retreating in the N. T.
IV. The Passive Voice
(a) Origin of the Passive
(b) Significance of the Passive
(c) With Intransitive or Transitive Verbs
(d) The Passive Usually Intransitive
(e) Aorist Passive
(f) Future Passive

(g)
(h)

The Agent with the Passive Voice


Impersonal Construction
CHAPTER XVIII. Tense
I. Complexity of the Subject
1. The Difficulty of Comparing Greek Tenses with Germanic Tenses
2. Bad Influence of the Latin on Greek Grammarians
3. Absence of Hebrew Influence
4. Gradual Growth of the Greek Tenses
5. Aktionsart of the Verb-Stem
6. The Three Kinds of Action Expressed in Terms of Tense
7. Time Element in Tense
8. Faulty Nomenclature of the Tenses
9. The Analytic Tendency (Periphrasis)
10. The Effect of Prepositions on the Verb
11. Aktionsart with Each Tense
12. Interchange of Tenses
II. Punctiliar Action
1. The Aorist
(a) Aktionsart in the Aorist
() Constative Aorist
() Ingressive Aorist
() Effective Aorist
(b) Aorist Indicative
() The Narrative or Historical Tense
() The Gnomic Aorist
() Relation to the Imperfect
() Relation to the Past Perfect
() Relation to the Present
() Relation to Present Perfect
() Epistolary Aorist
() Relation to the Future
() Aorist in Wishes
() Variations in the Use of Tenses
() Translation of the Aorist into English
(c) The Aorist Subjunctive and Optative
() No Time Element in Subjunctive and Optative
() Frequency of Aorist Subjunctive
() Aktionsart
() Aorist Subjunctive in Prohibitions
() Aorist Subjunctive with
() Aorist Optative
(d) The Aorist Imperative
(e) The Aorist Infinitive
(f) The Aorist Participle
() Aktionsart
() and the Aorist Participle
() Antecedent Action
() But Simultaneous Action is Common also
() Subsequent Action not Expressed by the Aorist Participle
() Aorist Participle in Indirect Discourse (Complementary Participle)

2.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
3.
(a)
(b)
()
()
()
(c)
()
()
()
()
(d)
III.
1.
(a)
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
(b)
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
(c)
()
()
2.
3.
4.
5.
(a)
(b)

Punctiliar (Aoristic) Present


The Specific Present
The Gnomic Present
The Historical Present
The Futuristic Present
The Punctiliar (Aoristic) Future
Punctiliar or Durative
The Modal Aspect of the Future
Merely Futuristic
The Volitive Future
Deliberative Future
The Future in the Moods
The Indicative
The Subjunctive and Optative
The Infinitive
The Participle
The Periphrastic Substitutes for the Future
Durative (Linear) Action
Indicative
The Present ( ) for Present Time
The Descriptive Present
The Progressive Present
The Iterative or Customary Present
The Inchoative or Conative Present
The Historical Present
The Deliberative Present
The Periphrastic Present
Presents as Perfects
Perfects as Presents
Futuristic Presents
The Imperfect for Past Time
Doubtful Imperfects
The Descriptive Tense in Narrative
The Iterative (Customary) Imperfect
The Progressive Imperfect
The Inchoative or Conative Imperfect
The Negative Imperfect
The Potential Imperfect
In Indirect Discourse
The Periphrastic Imperfect
Past Perfects as Imperfects
The Future for Future Time
The Three Kinds of Action in the Future (futuristic, volitive, deliberative)
The Periphrastic Future
Subjunctive and Optative
Imperative
Infinitive
Participle
The Time of the Present Participle Relative
Futuristic

(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
IV.
1.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
2.
(a)
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
(b)
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
(c)
3.
4.
5.
(a)
(b)
()
()
6.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Descriptive
Conative
Antecedent Time
Indirect Discourse
With the Article
Past Action Still in Progress
Subsequent Action
No Durative Future Participles
Perfected State of the Action
The Idea of the Perfect
The Present Perfect
The Intensive Perfect
The Extensive Perfect
Idea of Time in the Tense
The Indicative
The Present Perfect
The Intensive Present Perfect
The Extensive Present Perfect=a completed state
The Present Perfect of Broken Continuity
The Dramatic Historical Present Perfect
The Gnomic Present Perfect
The Perfect in Indirect Discourse
Futuristic Present Perfect
The Aoristic Present Perfect
The Periphrastic Perfect
Present as Perfect
The Past Perfect
The Double Idea
A Luxury in Greek
The Intensive Past Perfect
The Extensive Past Perfect
The Past Perfect of Broken Continuity
Past Perfect in Conditional Sentences
The Periphrastic Past Perfect
Special Use of
The Future Perfect
The Subjunctive and Optative
The Imperative
The Infinitive
Indirect Discourse
Perfect Infinitive not in Indirect Discourse
Subject or Object Infinitive
With Prepositions
The Participle
The Meaning
The Time of the Tense
The Perfect Tense Occurs with Various Uses of the Participle
The Periphrastic Participle
CHAPTER XIX. Mode
Introductory

A.
I.
1.
2.
(a)
(b)
3.
(a)
()
()
()
()
(b)
(c)
II.
1.
(a)
(b)
(c)
2.
3.
(a)
(b)
(c)
III.
1.
2.
3.
(a)
(b)
(c)
IV.
1.
2.
3.
4.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
5.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)

Independent or Paratactic Sentences


The Indicative Mode
Meaning of the Indicative Mode
Kinds of Sentences Using the Indicative
Either Declarative or Interrogative
Positive and Negative
Special Uses of the Indicative
Past Tenses
For Courtesy
Present Necessity, Obligation, Possibility, Propriety in Tenses of the Past
The Apodosis of Conditions of the Second Class
Impossible Wishes
The Present
The Future
The Subjunctive Mode
Relations to Other Modes
The Aorist Subjunctive and the Future Indicative
The Subjunctive and the Imperative
The Subjunctive and the Optative
Original Significance of the Subjunctive
Threefold Usage
Futuristic
Volitive
Deliberative
The Optative Mode
History of the Optative
Significance
The Three Uses
Futuristic or Potential
Volitive
Deliberative
The Imperative
Origin of the Imperative
Meaning of the Imperative
Disappearance of the Imperative Forms
Alternatives for the Imperative
The Future Indicative
The Subjunctive
The Optative
The Infinitive
The Participle
Uses of the Imperative
Command or Exhortation
Prohibiton
Entreaty
Permission
Concession or Condition
In Asyndeton
In Subordinate Clauses
The Tenses

(i) In Indirect Discourse


B. Dependent or Hypotactic Sentences
Introductory
(a) Use of Modes in Subordinate Sentences
(b) The Use of Conjunctions in Subordinate Clauses
(c) Logical Varieties of Subordinate Clauses
1. Relative Sentences
(a) Relative Sentences Originally Paratactic
(b) Most Subordinate Clauses Relative in Origin
(c) Relative Clauses Usually Adjectival
(d) Modes in Relative Sentences
(e) Definite and Indefinite Relative Sentences
(f) The Use of in Relative Clauses
(g) Special Uses of Relative Clauses
(h) Negatives in Relative Clauses
2. Causal Sentences
(a) Paratactic Causal Sentences
(b) With Subordinating Conjunctions
(c) Relative Clauses
(d) and the Infinitive
(e) The Participle
3. Comparative Clauses
(a) The Relative
(b) Relative with
(c) in a Comparative Sense
(d) and its Compounds
4. Local Clauses
5. Temporal Clauses
(a) Kin to Relative Clauses in Origin and Idiom
(b) Conjunctions Meaning When
(c) The Group Meaning Until (While)
(d) Some Nominal and Prepositional Phrases
(e) The Temporal Use of the Infinitive
(f) Temporal Use of the Participle
6. Final and Consecutive Clauses
(a) Kinship
(b) Origin in Parataxis
(c) Pure Final Clauses
()
()
()
() , ,
() Relative Clauses
() The Infinitive
() The Participle
(d) Sub-Final Clauses
()
()
() , ,
() The Relative Clause

()
()
(e)
()
()
()
()
()
()
7.
8.
(a)
(b)
()
()
()
()
(c)
()
()
()
()
()
9.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
()
()
()
()
(g)
()
()
()
(h)
()
()
()
(i)
(j)
10.

The Infinitive
* and
Consecutive Clauses

The Relative
The Infinitive
Wishes
Conditional Sentences
Two Types
Four Classes
Determined as Fulfilled
Determined as Unfulfilled
Undetermined, but with Prospect of Determination
Remote Prospect of Determination
Special Points
Mixed Conditions
Implied Conditions
Elliptical Conditions
Concessive Clauses
Other Particles with and
Indirect Discourse
Recitative in Oratio Recta
Change of Person in Indirect Discourse
Change of Tense in Indirect Discourse
Change of Mode in Indirect Discourse
The Limits of Indirect Discourse
Declarative Clauses
and the Indicative
The Infinitive
The Participle

Indirect Questions
Tense
Mode
Interrogative Pronouns and Conjunctions Used
Indirect Command
Deliberative Question
The Conjunctions and
The Infinitive
Mixture
The Subordinate Clause
Series of Subordinate Clauses
CHAPTER XX. Verbal Nouns
I. Kinship
II. The Infinitive
1. Origin
2. Development

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
3.
4.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
5.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)
(l)
(m)
III.
1.
2.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
3.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
4.
(a)
(b)
()
()
(c)
(d)
(e)

The Prehistoric Period


The Earliest Historic Period
The Classic Period from Pindar on
The Period
The Later Period
Significance
Substantival Aspects of the Infinitive
Case (Subject or Object Infinitive)
The Articular Infinitive
Prepositions
The Infinitive with Substantives
The Infinitive with Adjectives
The Infinitive with Verbs
The Appositional Infinitive
Verbal Aspects of the Infinitive
Voice
Tense
Cases with the Infinitive
The Infinitive in Indirect Discourse
Personal Construction with the Infinitive
Epexegetical Infinitive
Purpose
Result
Cause
Time
The Absolute Infinitive
Negatives
with the Infinitive
The Participle
The Verbals in - and -
History of the Participle
The Sanskrit Participle
Homers Time
The Attic Period
The
Modern Greek
Significance of the Participle
Originally an Adjective
The Addition of the Verbal Functions
The Double Aspect of the Participle
Relation between Participle and Infinitive
Method of Treating the Participle
Adjectival Aspects of the Participle
Declension
Attributive Participle
Anarthrous
Articular
Predicate Participle
The Participle as a Substantive
The Participle as an Adverb

5. Verbal Aspects of the Participle


(a) Voice
(b) Tense
() Timelessness of the Participle
() The Aorist
() The Present
() The Perfect
() The Future
(c) Cases
(d) The Supplementary Participle
() The Periphrastic Construction
() A Diminution of the Complementary Participle
() Verbs of Emotion
() Indirect Discourse
(e) The Circumstantial Participle
() The General Theory
() Varieties of the Circumstantial Participle
() The Absolute Participle in Subordinate Clauses
(f) The Independent Participle in a Sentence
(g) Co-ordination between Participles
(h) and with the Participle
(i) Other Particles with the Participle
CHAPTER XXI. Particles
I. Scope
II. Intensive or Emphatic Particles
1. Limitations
2. The N. T. Illustrations
(a)
(b)
(c) , and
(d)
(e)
(f)
III. Negative Particles
1. The Objective and its Compounds
(a) Origin
(b) History
(c) Meaning
(d) Uses
(i) The Indicative
() Independent Sentences
() Subordinate Clauses
(ii) The Subjunctive
(iii) The Optative
(iv) The Imperative
(v) The Infinitive
(vi) The Participle
(vii) With Nouns
(e)
(f) Redundant or Pleonastic

(g) Repetition of
(h) The Intensifying Compound Negative
(i) The Disjunctive Negative
2. The Subjective Negative and Its Compounds
(a) The History of
(b) Significance of
(c) Uses of
(i) The Indicative
(ii) The Subjunctive
(iii) The Optative
(iv) The Imperative
(v) The Infinitive
(vi) The Participle
(vii) Nouns
(d) The Intensifying Compounds with
(e)
(f) Disjunctive Use of
3. Combination of the Two Negatives
(a)
(b)
IV. Interrogative Particles
1. Single Questions
(a) Direct Questions
(i) No Particle at All
(ii) The Use of Negative Particles
(iii) Other Particles
(iv) Interrogative Pronouns
(v) Interrogative Conjunctions
(b) Indirect Questions
(i) Pronouns
(ii) Conjunctions
2. Double Questions
(i) Direct
(ii) Indirect
V. Conjunctions
1. Paratactic Conjunctions
(a) Copulative
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(b) Adversative
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)
(c) Disjunctives

(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(d)
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
2.
VI.

()
()
Inferential Conjunctions

Hypotactic Conjunctions
Interjections
CHAPTER XXII. Figures of Speech
I. Rhetorical, not Grammatical
II. Style in the N. T.
III. Figures of Idea or Thought
IV. Figures of Expression
(a) Parallels and Contrasts
(b) Contrasts in Words
(c) Contraction and Expansion
(d) Metaphors and Similar Tropes
ADDITIONAL NOTES
1. or
2. Prothetic Vowels in the N. T.
3. Elision
4.
5. Assimilation of
6. Rules for Assimilation of Consonants
7. Metathesis
8. Enclitics and Proclitics
9.
10. Perfect of
11. Augment in the Past Perfect
12. List of Important Verbs
13. Ablaut
INDEX OF SUBJECTS
INDEX OF GREEK WORDS
INDEX OF QUOTATIONS
(a) New Testament
(b) Old Testament
(c) Inscriptions
(d) Papyri and Ostraca
(e) Greek Literature
(i) Classical
(ii)
(f) Latin
ADDENDA TO THE SECOND EDITION
ADDENDA TO THE THIRD EDITION
INDEX TO ADDENDA TO SECOND AND THIRD EDITIONS