Sunteți pe pagina 1din 864

April 2007

City Council Ordinance No. 3070

Prepared for:
City of Chula Vista
276 Fourth Avenue
Chula Vista, CA 91910

Prepared by:

Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Acknowledgements
City Council
Cheryl Cox, Mayor
Steve Castaneda, Councilmember
John McCann, Councilmember Chula Vista
Rudy Ramirez, Councilmember
Jerry R. Rindone, Councilmember

Planning Commission
Bryan Felber, Chair
Pamela Bensoussan
Joanne Clayton
Lisa Moctezuma
Michael Spethman
Bill Tripp
Scott Vinson

Urban Core Specific Plan Advisory Committee


Stephen C. Padilla, Former Mayor, Chair
Dr. Richard Freeman, Vice Chair
Nikki Clay
Diane Carpenter
Brett Davis
Sharon Floyd
Henri Harb
Tom Hom
Peter Mabrey
Greg Mattson
Gary Nordstrom
Manuel Oncina
Bill Ostrem
Debi Owen
Jerry Rindone, City Councilmember
Pedro Romero, Jr.
Dave Rowlands, Former City Manager
Colton Sudberry

Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


City Staff
The following is a list of the core staff team involved in the preparation of the
Specific Plan. It is acknowledged that many other staff members participated
in the planning process.

Ann Hix, Acting Community Development Director


Mary Ladiana, Planning Manager Chula Vista
Brian Sheehan, Senior Community Development Specialist
Ray Pe, Senior Community Development Specialist
Jim Sandoval, Planning Director
Jim Hare, Assistant Planning Director
Luis Hernandez, Deputy Planning Director
Ed Batchelder, Deputy Planning Director
Alex Al-Agha, City Engineer
Frank Rivera, Deputy City Engineer
Samir Nuhaily, Senior Civil Engineer
Jim Newton, Civil Engineer
Dave Kaplan, Transportation Engineer
Ann Moore, City Attorney
Joe Gamble, Landscape Planner
Ed Hall, Principal Recreation Manager

Prepared by:

Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Table of Contents

I. Executive Summary I-1


II. Introduction and Background II-1
A. What is a Specific Plan? II-1 Chula Vista
B. Consistency with the General Plan II-2
C. Plan Purpose and Intent II-4
D. Boundaries and Setting II-5
E. Relevant City Documents II-9
F. Community Outreach Process II-20

III. Vision III-1


A. Vision for the Urban Core III-1
B. Ten Key Principles III-4
C. Vision Areas III-5

IV. Existing Conditions IV-1


A. Introduction IV-1
B. Historic Resources IV-2
C. Land Use, General Plan, and Zoning IV-12
D. Circulation and Mobility IV-17
E. Economic Conditions IV-19

V. Mobility V-1
A. Introduction V-1
B. Pedestrian Facilities V-2
C. Bicycle Facilities V-5
D. Transit Routes V-9
E. Vehicle Traffic V-14
F. Parking V-46

VI. Land Use and Development Regulations VI-1


A. Administration VI-1
B. Land Use Matrix VI-4
C. Development Standards VI-10
D. Special Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts
and Transit Focus Areas VI-40
E. Special Provisions VI-42

Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


F. Urban Amenity Requirements and Incentives VI-48
G. Signs VI-52
H. Other Regulations VI-53
I. Development Exceptions VI-54

VII. Development Design Guidelines VII-1


Chula Vista
A. Introduction and Background VII-1
B. What is Urban Design? VII-4
C. How to Use the Design Guidelines VII-5
D. Village District VII-33
E. Urban Core District VII-79
F. Corridors District VII-107
G. Special Guidelines VII-139

VIII. Public Realm Design Guidelines VIII-1


A. Introduction VIII-1
B. Purpose VIII-2
C. Urban Design Treatment VIII-3
D. Village Theme VIII-5
E. Urban Core Theme VIII-12
F. Urban Amenities, The Unifying Elements VIII-27
G. Landscape Treatment VIII-30
H. Sidewalks and Pedestrian Improvements VIII-34
I. Lighting Concepts VIII-37
J. Street Furnishings VIII-39
K. Key Intersections VIII-43
L. Gateways and Wayfinding VIII-44
M. Public Art VIII-50
N. Parks, Plazas, Paseos, and Public Spaces VIII-52

IX. Infrastructure and Public Facilities IX-1


A. Introduction IX-1
B. Growth Forecasts IX-2
C. Water, Sewer, Drainage and Solid Waste IX-3
D. Law Enforcement, Fire Protection and Emergency Services IX-13
E. Schools IX-19
F. Parks and Recreation IX-23
G. Energy and Telecommunications IX-30

Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


X. Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program X-1
A. Introduction X-1
B. Regulatory Framework X-2
C. Visualization X-4
D. Long Term Implementation Process X-9
E. Description of Improvements X-11 Chula Vista
F. Mobility Improvements X-12
G. Urban Amenity Improvements X-17
H. Additional Community Improvements X-20
I. Key Short-Term Demonstration Projects X-22
J. Infrastructure Financing Mechanisms and Funding Sources X-24
K. Community Benefit Analysis X-28

XI. Plan Administration XI-1


A. Introduction XI-1
B. Specific Plan Adoption XI-2
C. Specific Plan Administration XI-3
D. Specific Plan Amendment XI-9
E. Five Year Review XI-12

Appendices (Bound under separate cover)


Appendix A. Glossary
Appendix B. Traffic Impact Analysis
Appendix C. Market Analysis
Appendix D. Public Facilities and Services Program

Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


I. Executive Summary

Chula Vista

Chapter I Executive Summary


Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
I. Executive Summary
The City of Chula Vista has grown substantially over the years through annexations
and development, and is the second largest city in San Diego County. Chula
Vista continues to play a significant role in the region’s growth and is emerging
as the hub of civic and cultural activity in South San Diego County. Chula Vista is
one of the most rapidly growing areas in the region with a projected population Chula Vista
of approximately 300,000 by 2030. While much of the City’s recent growth
has occurred in large master planned communities developing on vacant land
in the eastern portion of the City, demographic changes and other influences
are bringing about population growth and renewed interest and need for
revitalization and redevelopment in the older, developed western portion of the
City.

The recent update to the City of Chula Vista General Plan focused primarily
on revitalization and redevelopment within the older, developed area in the
western portion of the City. The Urban Core Specific Plan follows the direction
and vision provided in the City’s General Plan and establishes a more detailed
vision, guidelines, and regulations for future development and beautification
in the traditional downtown area. The Specific Plan area is generally located
east of I-5, west of Del Mar Avenue, north of L Street, and south of C Street.
While there are approximately 1,700 acres within the Specific Plan boundary,
it was determined that changes should be focused on areas more in need of
redevelopment. Therefore, the Specific Plan focuses on the redevelopment of
approximately 690 gross acres within the larger Specific Plan study area. The
Specific Plan creates a framework to attract investment and be a catalyst for
revitalization. The overall goal is to create pedestrian-friendly environments,
gathering places and public amenities through community development.

The Specific Plan considers marketplace realities to increase the economic viability
of the downtown and surrounding areas to meet City, business, and community
needs. The Specific Plan addresses land use mixes and distributions; zoning;
urban and sustainable design; vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian circulation;
parking; transit services and facilities; public improvements and infrastructure;
gateways and image; street furniture and pedestrian amenities; parks and
public spaces; implementation strategies and possible funding sources. The
Specific Plan is based upon the valuable comments and participation from
residents, business leaders, and other community stakeholders, as well as the
diligent and committed Urban Core Specific Plan Advisory Committee.

The intent of the Specific Plan is to facilitate and encourage development and
improvements that will help realize the community’s vision for the Urban Core
area. The community wants the Urban Core to be a desirable San Diego County

Chapter I Executive Summary I-1


destination for both visitors and residents alike, with an identity of its own. The
community wants a downtown that is vibrant, forward thinking but respectful of its
past, and alive with thriving businesses, attractive housing, and entertainment,
cultural and recreational activities. The plan envisions a broad mixture of uses
and business opportunities, as well as a wide range of residential housing types.
The Urban Core is envisioned to be the “heart” of the community, where people
gather to enjoy special events, farmers markets, street performances, and
outdoor dining. It is a downtown with a synergistic mix of land uses, attractive
streetscapes and sidewalks, full of people, all interconnected with a series of
plazas and pedestrian paseos. To this end, the Specific Plan includes a variety
of recommendations to help obtain this vision including:
• Mobility recommendations
• Land Use Development Standards
• Development Design Guidelines
• Public Realm Design Guidelines
• Plan Implementation Strategies and Community Benefits Program

Mobility
Specific Plan mobility recommendations provide a variety of approaches and
strategies to “get people from here to there.” Improvements for the main
thoroughfares and other streets within the Urban Core are identified in Chapter
V - Mobility and address pedestrian, bicycle, transit, automobile and parking
opportunities.

Traffic calming elements and pedestrian improvements are introduced to slow


traffic and create a more pedestrian-friendly environment, such as along Third
Avenue in the Village District. The suggested improvements include bulbouts
(sidewalk extensions), narrowed travel lanes, reducing the number of travel
widths in some areas, special paving at crosswalks and median refuge islands.
Paseos and pedestrian walkways are emphasized in the Specific Plan as well.
For bicycle transit, the Mobility chapter includes recommendation for new
and upgraded bikeway facilities throughout the area for both recreational and
commuting users.

Three transit focus areas within the Urban Core provide multi-modal opportunities
for both local and regional transit. The stations located at I-5/H Street and I-5/E
Street link to the San Diego Trolley’s Blue Line. As a feature of the Specific Plan,
a new shuttle loop system called the West Side Shuttle is proposed. The shuttle
route will serve both the Urban Core Specific Plan and Bayfront Master Plan
areas in western Chula Vista. This new service would complement existing and
planned future transit improvements.

I-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


A program of improvements to the roadway network is proposed, especially
reintroducing the street grid in areas where it has been interrupted over time.
The Mobility chapter also addresses off-street parking within the Urban Core
Districts and offers public parking strategies, including parking districts for
portions of Third Avenue and strategically located parking structures particularly
for the transit focus areas.
Chula Vista
Land Use Development Standards
Chapter VI – Land Use and Development Standards establishes three different
Specific Plan Districts: Village, Urban Core and Corridors, as well as twenty-six
subdistricts to allow for customized regulations and standards. The subdistrict
regulations shape the building form and intensity, allowable land uses, and
parking requirements. In summary, the land uses are customized to encourage
a mix of pedestrian-oriented uses integrated with higher density residential. The
development and parking standards have been relaxed to encourage investment
in the Urban Core, including locating buildings closer to the street with parking
behind or tucked under the building. The Specific Plan regulations stress
flexibility and provision of urban amenities such as streetscape improvements,
parks, plazas, transit, cultural arts and mixed use.

The tallest buildings are allowed in the transit focus areas located at I-5/H Street
and I-5/E Street where support by alternative modes of transportation is readily
available. Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts have been created for
subdistricts adjacent to R-1 and R-2 zoning areas to protect and buffer existing
residential neighborhoods and ensure compatible, stepped-back building
heights and setbacks. Special provisions address live/work units, mixed-uses
and parking structures. Zoning incentives are provided to entice developers to
provide urban amenities such as parks and plazas beyond required levels.

Development Design Guidelines


In Chapter VII – Development Design Guidelines, comprehensive design
guidelines are provided for development within the three Specific Plan Districts, as
well as special guidelines for hotels, mixed-use projects, multi-family residential
projects, and sustainability principles. The form-based guidelines supplement
Specific Plan development regulations and the City’s Zoning Ordinance to create
a more attractive, well-designed urban environment. The guidelines apply to
construction, conservation, adaptive reuse, and enhancement of buildings
and street scenes. Although no specific architectural style is prescribed, the
quality of design is guided by policies addressing site planning, building height/
form/mass, building materials/colors, storefront design, landscaping, lighting,
parking, circulation, signs and other development considerations. The goal of
the guidelines is to create a positive image for the Urban Core and frame the
streets and sidewalks with inviting buildings, entrances, awnings and outdoor
dining areas.

Chapter I Executive Summary I-3


Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII – Public Realm Design Guidelines focuses on ways to create more
attractive and pedestrian-friendly public environments and gathering places.
Street furniture, landscaping, sidewalks, crosswalks, lighting, paseos, public
art, parks and plaza concepts are defined. Two main themes emerge within the
Specific Plan: an art-deco inspired design theme is proposed along Third Avenue,
building upon the era when much of the development along the street occurred,
and a more contemporary theme is proposed for the remaining public realm
areas in the Urban Core, indicative of a forward-looking Chula Vista. Gateway
treatments are proposed at six locations to welcome people to the Urban Core
and to reinforce the identity of the Urban Core.

Plan Implementation Strategies and Community Benefits Program


One of the most important elements of the Specific Plan is identifying the
implementation programs that will result in the desired changes emphasized in
the Specific Plan. The sole purpose of the Specific Plan is to improve the quality
of life for Chula Vista in general, with a focus on the west side in particular.
Visual simulations of potential future conditions for four areas of the Specific
Plan are provided to help illustrate the possible positive changes and community
benefits envisioned.

The visions expressed in the Specific Plan include investments in streets, transit,
parks, plazas, cultural facilities, protection of historic resources, schools, and
improvements to City services such as utilities, police, fire, health and human
services. These investments will be supported by a partnership between the
City and the private sector as new development occurs. Chapter X – Plan
Implementation and Community Benefits Program contains realization strategies
and forms a critical link between the improvements the City desires and how
both the City and private investment will contribute to make the improvements
happen. Specific improvements are identified, and financial tools and strategies
are outlined.

I-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


II. Introduction and Background
A. What is a Specific Plan? II-1
B. Consistency with the General Plan II-2
C. Plan Purpose and Intent II-4
D. Boundaries and Setting II-5 Chula Vista
E. Relevant City Documents II-9
F. Community Outreach Process II-20

Chapter II Introduction
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
II. Introduction and Background
A. What is a Specific Plan?
The Urban Core Specific Plan (“Specific Plan”) is established pursuant to the
authority granted in the Chula Vista Municipal Code Section 19.07, Specific
Plans, and the California Government Code, Title 7, Division 1, Chapter 3, Article Chula Vista
8, Sections 65450 through 65457 and contains all the mandatory elements
identified in Government Code Section 65451.

Specific Plans must be consistent with the policies contained within the General
Plan and may be adopted by resolution or by ordinance. This differentiation
allows cities to choose whether their specific plans, or portions thereof, will
be policy driven (adopted by resolution), or regulatory (adopted by ordinance).
This Specific Plan is adopted by ordinance. All zoning related portions of
this Specific Plan (i.e. land use matrix, permitted uses and development
regulations) are prepared to serve as regulatory provisions and supersede
other regulations and ordinances of the City for the control of land use and
development within the Specific Plan subdistrict boundaries. Other portions,
such as the development design guidelines and public realm design guidelines
are provided as City policies aimed at providing direction for future planning and
public improvement efforts. Future development projects, subdivisions, public
improvement projects and other implementing programs should be consistent
with the adopted Specific Plan.

Chapter II Introduction II-1


B. Consistency with the General Plan
Over the last several years the City of Chula Vista has been in the process of
updating the City’s General Plan, which was last comprehensively updated in
1989. The main focus during the 1989 update was on the newly annexed and
developing eastern portions of the City. Although comprehensive, the recent
General Plan (2005) has instead been primarily focused on the currently
developed areas of the city, in particular the western portions of the City. As such,
the planning effort was confronted with balancing “how” the City should grow
over the next 25 years given the continued growth projections with “where” the
growth should occur, given the numerous established stable neighborhoods.
This challenge was seen as an opportunity to utilize the key principles found in
smart growth strategies relative to urban revitalization and apply them to areas
that have experienced recent decline or underutilization.

The General Plan is based on many of the common elements and concepts of
smart growth such as:
• Provide a mix of compatible land uses
• Take advantage of compact building design
• Create a range of housing opportunities and choices
• Create walkable neighborhoods
• Strengthen and direct development towards existing communities
• Provide a variety of transportation choices

In order to realize the vision for the urban core established by the updated
General Plan, it was recognized that existing zoning for the urban core needed
“re-tooling”. The 30+ year-old zoning regulations either precluded or created a
cumbersome entitlement process
Projected Buildout to achieve the variety of living,
Land Use Existing Net Increase Total
employment and service choices
Multi-Family
Residential
envisioned by the General Plan and
(dwelling units) 3,700 7,100 10,800 quite commonplace in the 21st
century. Therefore, the Specific
Commercial Retail Plan was prepared to provide a set
(square feet) 3,000,000 1,000,000 4,000,000 of contemporary implementing
tools to allow new development
Commercial Office
(square feet) 2,400,000 1,300,000 3,700,000
and redevelopment to occur over
Commercial - the next 20-25 years. To that end,
Visitor Serving the Specific Plan anticipates the
(square feet) 1,300,000 1,300,000 following projected buildout over
Projected buildout of the Specific Plan area
Fg. 2.1 the life of the plan consistent with
the General Plan. (Refer to Figure
2.1)

II-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Due to the length of time that buildout of the Specific Plan is expected to take
(i.e. 20+ years), as well as the nature of urban revitalization, the exact extent,
timing and sequencing of development is difficult to predict. However, the
Specific Plan is not a static document and as such will be revisited on an on-
going basis to evaluate progress towards buildout projections, priority ranking
of important public improvements and other issues that may arise. A series of
checks and balances will be part of that process and may include review under Chula Vista
the City’s Growth Management Ordinance, the biannual budgetary and Capital
Improvements Program (CIP) cycle, and five-year progress check of the Specific
Plan.

Chapter II Introduction II-3


C. Plan Purpose and Intent
First and foremost, the purpose of the Specific Plan is to revitalize and enhance
the economic, social, cultural, and recreational fabric of the City’s Urban Core.
An overall goal is to develop the Urban Core with a mix of retail, office, and
residential uses that are supported by a variety of options for moving from
one place to another, often referred to as “mobility”. The Specific Plan is a
tool to facilitate and prioritize community improvement projects, evaluate
development proposals and new land uses, and enhance existing uses. To do
this, the Specific Plan provides a structure to implement the Specific Plan vision
over time. Implementation measures include development standards, design
guidelines, land use regulations, and a series of specific actions that may be
undertaken by both the City and private sector to make progress toward the
Specific Plan goals. Existing City zoning is not adequate to realize the desired
vision for the Specific Plan area and must be updated and retooled. As the
existing zoning dates back to last century, revisions are necessary to modernize
and allow for the living and lifestyle choices appropriate for current needs.

The Specific Plan provides detailed development scenarios and regulations for
the Urban Core. It features focused design guidelines tailored to individual
neighborhoods.

The Specific Plan focuses on increasing the economic viability of the downtown
and surrounding areas in order to meet City, business, and community
needs. Many of the stable residential areas within the Specific Plan area will
be maintained with as few changes as possible, though all neighborhoods,
including those outside the Specific Plan boundaries, benefit from the
improved services and amenities (e.g. bikeways, parks, etc.) resulting from the
revitalization efforts.

The Specific Plan seeks to establish a direct connection between the City of
Chula Vista General Plan and revitalization and enhancement opportunities
within the Urban Core of the City. An overall goal is the orderly development of
Chula Vista’s Urban Core in a method consistent with the City’s General Plan
and, more specifically, with the vision as developed through the Specific Plan
public outreach process.

The intent is to produce a realistic, market-based action plan that will bring
about programs, policies, and partnerships that will facilitate a major increase
in the quality and quantity of retail and other commercial activity and provide
additional housing opportunities in the Urban Core. The future Urban Core
will contain a diversity of public, commercial, civic, financial, cultural, and
residential uses that will emphasize its role as the central focal point of the
City.

II-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


D. Boundaries and Setting
1. Background
The Specific Plan area represents the traditional downtown heart of the City. This
northwestern corner of the City was the nucleus of Colonel William Dickinson’s
town plan for Chula Vista from the late nineteenth century (see Figure 4.1 -
Chula Vista Plat Map). Originally a thriving agricultural community known for Chula Vista
lemon orchards, the City’s main economic focus shifted to industrial production
during the time of World War II, due to the opening of Rohr Aircraft Corporation,
a major manufacturing company supplying the US military forces. Due to the
proximity to the San Diego metropolitan area, the City of Chula Vista has since
acted as a commuting suburb of the larger city. Over the last 30 years, large
tracts of land have been annexed in the City’s eastern area and subsequently
developed as master planned communities. One major annexation was that
of the Montgomery community, a 3.5 square mile area considered the largest
annexation of an inhabited area in State history. Over the last century, especially
the latter decades, significant annexation, and subsequent population growth
led to a decentralization of the City center. The Specific Plan will revitalize
the fabric of the City’s Urban Core and reestablish the focus on the traditional
center of the community.

2. Regional Context
The City of Chula Vista
covers approximately 52
square miles of southern
San Diego County and is
the second largest city in
the County. The City is
bounded by the South San
Diego Bay on the west, the
Sweetwater River on the
north, mountains and the
Otay Lakes on the east,
and the Otay River to the
south. Please see Figures
2.2 - Regional Context
Map and 2.3 - City Context
Map.

In 2004, the City had an Regional context map (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Fg. 2.2
estimated population of
approximately 210,000.
Based on the General Plan Update population projections, the population in
Chula Vista will continue to rise, reaching approximately 300,000 by 2030.

Chapter II Introduction II-5


II-6
City Context Map (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Fg. 2.3

II-6
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Though for many years Chula Vista was largely a residential suburban
community, the City is evolving into a regional economic center. Located just
south of downtown San Diego and a few miles north of the United States-
Mexican border, the City is well-situated to take advantage of two very different
economic markets. Regional transportation routes, such as the I-5, I-805,
and SR-125 corridors as well as links to the San Diego Trolley system, are
contiguous to the Urban Core boundary and provide convenient connections Chula Vista
to the surrounding region. The traditional downtown area along Third Avenue,
as well as the Chula Vista Center and other retail facilities along H Street, have
been regional shopping attractions for decades. However, expansion of the
City to the east, as well as growth in other parts of the County, have led to a
decline in the Urban Core’s market share of consumers.

3. Specific Plan Boundary


The Specific Plan Study Area covers approximately 1,700 acres within the
northwestern portion of the City of Chula Vista. It is generally bordered by the
San Diego Freeway (I-5) to the west, C Street to the north, Del Mar Street to the
east, and L Street to the south. While there are 1,700 acres within the Specific
Plan Study Area, it was determined that changes should be focused on areas
more in need of redevelopment. Therefore, the Specific Plan focuses new
development zoning regulations and design guidelines for approximately 690
gross acres within the larger Specific Plan Study Area, denoted as the Specific
Plan Subdistricts Area. Existing zoning outside of the Specific Plan Subdistricts
Area is not modified by this Specific Plan and future development outside of
the Specific Plan Subdistricts Area will be processed under the existing zoning
ordinance. Its final form takes into consideration areas of unique urban
design challenges, areas of particular economic interest, and areas in need
of character retention or redefinition. (Refer to Figure 2.4 for a map of the
Specific Plan area.)

4. Setting
The Urban Core area is flanked by the proposed Bayfront project to the west and
the almost built-out territory east of the I-805. Residents from the east and west
will primarily access the Urban Core by car; however, alternative transportation
modes are encouraged. In addition, walking and bicycling between the Urban
Core and the proposed Bayfront will be feasible as the distance from 3rd Avenue
to Lagoon Drive is approximately two miles. E Street, F Street and H Street
provide linkages over the I-5 between the Urban Core and Bayfront.

The Specific Plan area is characterized by urbanized development on relatively


flat topography. The built environment largely consists of one- to three-story
buildings with a few exceptions. Streets are generally laid out in a traditional
grid pattern while some portions of the grid system have been substantially
interrupted over time. Freeway access is predominantly provided at E Street, H
Street and J Street.
Chapter II Introduction II-7
Urban Core Specific Plan Area
Fg. 2.4

II-8
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
E. Relevant City Documents
The following documents provided the basis for many of the goals, polices,
standards, guidelines and approaches developed for the Specific Plan. In
some cases the Specific Plan provides the implementing regulations or further
refinements to existing policies contained in these documents, and in other
cases the Specific Plan replaces the relevant documents. Future development
Chula Vista
proposals must be found consistent with the Specific Plan, therefore, where
inconsistencies arise in implementation documents, the provisions of the
Specific Plan will take precedence.

1. City of Chula Vista General Plan


The City’s General Plan is intended to guide the physical development of the
City over a 20-30 year time frame. It establishes a vision for the City’s future.
The plan provides guidelines for making decisions concerning development of
the City. Though largely focused on land use decisions, the plan addresses a
range of elements, such as housing, open space and conservation, and public
facilities and services that contribute to the City’s well-being.
State law requires that the General Plan cover the following areas: Land Use,
Circulation, Housing, Conservation, Open-Space, Noise, and Safety. In addition,
cities may choose to address subjects of particular interest to that jurisdiction;
Chula Vista’s plan includes elements on Public Facilities and Services, Growth
Management and Child Care.

The Specific Plan is consistent with and furthers the objectives of the City of
Chula Vista’s General Plan by providing detailed criteria for development of
specific sites and public streetscape improvements.

The update to the General Plan built upon the City’s 1989 General Plan and
provides a vision for the next 25 years of Chula Vista’s future. Goals, objectives,
and policies are presented that will guide the development of Chula Vista
through the year 2030. Reference to the General Plan throughout this Specific
Plan refers to the updated General Plan (2005) unless specifically referenced
to previous versions (e.g. 1989).

The General Plan (2005) includes a new Economic Development Element


and Environmental Element. It also features a combined Land Use and
Transportation element that reinforces the link between land use planning
and circulation throughout the City. An Implementation Chapter facilitates the
ease of using the Specific Plan and makes the Specific Plan more beneficial
for the citizens of Chula Vista. In the northwest area of the City, the General
Plan recommended land use changes to “Focus Areas” primarily consisting of
existing commercial corridors and residential areas close to transit facilities.

Chapter II Introduction II-9


The Specific Plan’s vision, goals, and implementation measures are based on
direction given in the City’s General Plan. There are many goals, objectives,
and policies within the General Plan that are relevant to this Specific Plan; the
most representative objectives have been selected and are listed below. These
objectives may apply to the entire City or only to the specific district noted in
the policy.

a. Vision and Themes


Each of the Vision and Themes established in the General Plan will be
implemented in the Urban Core and are reflected in the subsequent pages and
chapters of the UCSP. For example, General Plan Theme 4 - Improved Mobility
is addressed through UCSP Chapter V - Mobility and Chapter VIII - Public Realm
Design Guidelines. The following theme is of particular importance to the Urban
Core:

• Theme 8 - Shaping the Future Through the Present and Past: Chula Vista
values its unique heritage and sense of place and manages change in a
way that complements the important qualities and features that shape
its identity.
To this end, it is important to recognize the specific components of the UCSP
that implement this theme.

1. Regulate new development and other physical alterations to be


completed in a manner that respects the character, scale, and historical
value of the City:
Chapter IV - Existing Conditions
Chapter V - Mobility
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter IX - Infrastructure and Public Facilities
Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program
2. Harmonizing changes to blend in with and enhance the positive aspects
of what is already there, see:
Chapter IV - Existing Conditions
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines

II-10 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. Shaping established Chula Vista’s future through policies that focus on
preserving and enhancing stable residential neighborhoods, see:
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chula Vista
Chapter IX - Infrastructure and Public Facilities
Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program
4. Enhancing community image, see:
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
Chapter IX - Infrastructure and Public Facilities
Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community Benefits Program
5. Protecting cultural and historical resources, see:
Chapter IV - Existing Conditions
Chapter V - Mobility
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines
6. Implementing compatible land uses and edge transition, see:
Chapter VI - Land Use Development Regulations
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines

b. Land Use and Transportation Objectives


• Objective LUT-1: Provide a balance of residential and non-residential
development throughout the City that achieves a vibrant development
pattern, enhances the character of the City, and meets the present and
future needs of all residents and businesses.
• Objective LUT-2: Limit locations for the highest development
intensities and densities, and the tallest building forms, to key urban
activity centers that are well served by transit.

Chapter II Introduction II-11


• Objective LUT-3: Direct the urban design and form of new
development and redevelopment in a manner that blends with and
enhances Chula Vista’s character and qualities, both physical and
social.
• Objective LUT-4: Establish policies, standards, and procedures
to minimize blighting influences and maintain the integrity of stable
residential neighborhoods.
• Objective LUT-5: Designate opportunities for mixed use areas
with higher density housing that is near shopping, jobs, and transit in
appropriate locations throughout the City.
• Objective LUT-6: Ensure adjacent land uses are compatible with
one another.
• Objective LUT-7: Appropriate transitions should be provided
between land uses.
• Objective LUT-8: Strengthen and sustain Chula Vista’s image as a
unique place by maintaining, enhancing and creating physical features
that distinguish Chula Vista’s neighborhoods, communities, and public
spaces, and enhance its image as a pedestrian-oriented and livable
community.
• Objective LUT-9: Create enhanced gateway features for City entry
points and other important areas, such as special districts.
• Objective LUT-10: Create attractive street environments that
complement private and public properties, create attractive public
rights-of-way, and provide visual interest for residents and visitors.
• Objective LUT-11: Ensure that buildings and related site improvements
for public and private development are well designed and compatible
with surrounding properties and districts.
• Objective LUT-12: Protect Chula Vista’s important historic
resources.
• Objective LUT-15: Improve transportation connections within Chula
Vista and between eastern and western Chula Vista, particularly transit
connections between major activity centers.
• Objective LUT-16: Integrate land use and transportation planning
and related facilities.
• Objective LUT-17: Plan and coordinate development to be compatible
and supportive of planned transit.

II-12 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


• Objective LUT-18: Reduce traffic demand through Transportation
Demand Management (TDM) strategies, increased use of transit,
bicycles, walking, and other trip reduction measures.
• Objective LUT-20: Make transit-friendly roads a top consideration in
land use and development design.
• Objective LUT-21: Continue efforts to develop and maintain a safe Chula Vista
and efficient transportation system with adequate roadway capacity
to serve future residents, while preserving the unique character and
integrity of recognized communities within the City.
• Objective LUT-23: Promote the use of non-polluting and renewable
alternatives for mobility through a system of bicycle and pedestrian
paths and trails that are safe, attractive and convenient forms of
transportation.
• Objective LUT-26: Establish an Urban Core Improvements Program
for the Urban Core Subarea.
• Objective LUT-27: Establish a program for development to provide
public amenities and/or community services necessary to support
urban development and implement the following policies. (Refer to
General Plan for list of policies.)
• Objective LUT-28: Consider use of lot consolidation, where
appropriate, so that projects meeting the objectives of this General
Plan can be achieved, and a high level of community amenities can be
provided.
• Objective LUT-29: Allow for the clustering of residential development
to respond to site constraints, and improve amenities for project
residents.
• Objective LUT-30: Use parking management to better utilize parking
facilities and implement policies to reduce parking demand before
considering public expenditures for additional parking facilities.
• Objective LUT-31: Provide parking facilities that are appropriately
integrated with land uses; maximize efficiency; accommodate alternative
vehicles; and reduce parking impacts.
• Objective LUT-32: Evaluate the use and applicability of various
strategies to provide parking.
• Objective LUT-33: Ensure that parking facilities are appropriately
sited and well-designed in order to minimize adverse effects on the
pedestrian-oriented environment, and to enhance aesthetic qualities.

Chapter II Introduction II-13


The following objectives are provided in the General Plan for the Northwest
Area Plan, which includes the Specific Plan area and contains “area specific”
policies for the Urban Core.

• Objective LUT-46: Establish linkages between the Urban Core


Subarea and the Bayfront Planning Area for pedestrians, bicycles, and
transit.
• Objective LUT-47: Establish roadway classifications in the Urban
Core Subarea that respond to the special operating characteristics of
roadways within a more urbanized environment, accommodate slower
speeds in pedestrian-oriented areas, and facilitate multi-modal design
elements and amenities.
• Objective LUT-48: Increase mobility for residents and visitors in the
Urban Core Subarea.
• Objective LUT-49: Encourage redevelopment, infill, and new
development activities within the Urban Core Subarea that will provide
a balance of land uses, reinforce its identity as Chula Vista’s central
core, and complement land uses in other planning areas, including the
Bayfront and East Planning Areas.
• Objective LUT-50: Provide for the redevelopment and enhancement
of the Downtown Third Avenue District as a lively, higher density, mixed
use area, while preserving the important elements that contribute to the
charm and character of traditional Third Avenue.
• Objective LUT-51: Maintain Downtown Third Avenue as a focal point
for the City so that it continues to express the City’s history, provides
a venue for cultural vitality, and retains its role as a center for social,
political, and other civic functions.
• Objective LUT-52: Encourage redevelopment of the Chula Vista
Center, as well as properties north of H Street, with a mix of land uses
that will reinforce H Street as a future planned transit boulevard and
gateway corridor, and establish the area as a significant public gathering
space and vibrant mixed use area.
• Objective LUT-53: Encourage redevelopment to be mixed use along
the H Street Corridor, between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue, within
walking distance of a planned future transit station near Third Avenue
and H Street.
• Objective LUT-54: Encourage redevelopment activities within the
North Broadway Focus Area that will result in the establishment of a
pedestrian-oriented commercial corridor providing housing opportunities
and local-serving compatible commercial uses.

II-14 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


• Objective LUT-55: Encourage redevelopment of E Street between
Interstate 5 and Broadway with mixed use, especially near the E Street
Trolley Station, and an emphasis on visitor-serving uses, with some
offices and multi-family residential.
• Objective LUT-6: Encourage redevelopment of the area between
Interstate 5 and Broadway, bounded on the north by F Street and on the
south by G Street, with predominantly high density residential, supported Chula Vista
by mixed use along Broadway.
• Objective LUT-57: Encourage redevelopment of the area between
Interstate 5 and Broadway, between G Street and H Street, emphasizing
transit-oriented mixed use near the H Street Trolley Station and
reinforcing H Street as a major gateway and transit boulevard.
• Objective LUT-58: Encourage redevelopment of the area between
Interstate 5 and Broadway, between H Street and I Street, as a regional
shopping center or transit focus mixed use area that will complement
redevelopment of the existing Chula Vista Center, and reinforce H Street
as a major gateway and transit boulevard.
• Objective LUT-59: Encourage redevelopment activities within the Mid-
Broadway District that will establish a pedestrian oriented commercial
corridor providing housing opportunities and compatible neighborhood-
serving commercial uses.
• Objective LUT-60: Reinforce the existing land use pattern of
predominantly retail uses on the west side of Third Avenue, and office
uses on the east side of Third Avenue between J Street and L Street.
c. Public Facilities and Services Objectives
• Objective PFS-14: Provide parks and recreation facilities and
programs citywide that are well maintained, safe, accessible to all
residents and that offer opportunities for personal development, health
and fitness in addition to recreation.

The Specific Plan provides for more precise implementation of the General
Plan’s goals, objectives, and policies. The Specific Plan has been prepared to
reinforce all elements of the General Plan relative to the Urban Core.

2. Chula Vista General Plan Update Program Environmental


Impact Report (EIR)

The General Plan Update EIR provides an assessment of the existing conditions
within the City and the suitability of those conditions for meeting the goals for
the City’s future. The EIR evaluates potential impacts relating to the General

Chapter II Introduction II-15


Plan Update and presents feasible mitigation measures where significant
environmental impacts are identified. Environmental concerns identified
through the General Plan Update EIR were taken into consideration in the
development of the Specific Plan.

3. Chula Vista Municipal Code – Title 19 Zoning


The City of Chula Vista’s Municipal Code, Title 19 Zoning, sets standards and
regulations to protect and promote the public health, safety, welfare, and
quality of life within Chula Vista and to implement the goals set forth in the
General Plan. The Zoning Code provides site specific development and land
use regulations that govern the size, shape, and intensity of development in the
City and uses to which new development may be committed. The Zoning Code
divides the City into districts, each of which establishes a set of regulations
controlling such issues as the uses of land, uses and locations of structures,
height and bulk of and open spaces around structures, signs, and parking.
The traditional Euclidean zoning classifications found within the Specific Plan
districts include: Central Commercial (CC), Administrative and Professional
Office (CO), Commercial Thoroughfare (CT), Visitor Commercial (CV), Limited
Industrial (IL), Mobilehome Park (MHP), Public/Quasi-public (PQ), One- and Two-
Family Residence (R2), and Apartment Residence (R3). These classifications
commonly allow only a single land use type; mixed-use areas are implemented
through rezonings, conditional use permits, and General Plan changes. The
Specific Plan customizes the standards and regulations found in the City
Zoning Code in order to achieve the Urban Core vision. The Specific Plan sets
more detailed zoning standards and regulations for the sub-districts within the
Specific Plan and replaces the zoning regulations provided in 19.24 - 19.40 and
19.44. The provisions of the City Zoning Code apply to the properties within
the Specific Plan area; in such cases where the Specific Plan and Zoning Code
conflict, the Specific Plan regulations and development standards shall apply.
Where the Specific Plan is silent, provisions of the zoning code shall apply..

4. Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan


Adopted in 1976, the goal of the Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan is to
“revitalize the Town Centre area as the commercial-civic focus of the City. The
Town Centre I Redevelopment Plan is a Specific Plan that provides permitted
uses and controls and design guidelines for the project area. The Plan presents
12 objectives toward achieving this goal, including eliminating blighting
influences and incompatible land uses, restructuring City infrastructure, such
as the irregular block and lot subdivisions and poorly planned streets, attracting
new capital and businesses to the area, establishing design standards
and supporting “comprehensive beautification” of the area, incorporating
increased multi-family housing and transit opportunities in the area. A series
of redevelopment actions are proposed for Agency implementation, permitted

II-16 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


uses and controls are addressed, and methods for financing the project are
proposed. The Plan also gives attention to the potential impact the Plan will
have on existing neighborhoods in the area. The Town Centre I Land Use Policy
acts as a land use guide for establishing the traditional downtown of Chula
Vista into a focal business, commercial, and cultural area. The Town Centre I
Land Use Policy delineates permitted, special, and prohibited land uses for the
downtown district based on the objectives of the Town Centre I Redevelopment Chula Vista
Plan (discussed previously).

The Town Centre Design Manual was prepared nearly 30 years ago and
addresses the physical elements of the Town Centre area. The Design Manual
provides general urban design guidelines, standards, and specifications for
development within the project area. It covers such issues as siting, scale, and
density of buildings, landscaping, streetscape elements, and transportation. A
pedestrian orientation is a highlight of the Manual recommendations, including
pedestrian-oriented mixed-uses and the development of pedestrian linkages
between the various sub-sections of the Urban Core. Significant attention is also
given to the importance of landscaping through the area and the opportunities
for development of plazas and parks.

The Specific Plan more fully develops many of the ideas presented in the Town
Centre I Redevelopment Plan, Land Use Policy and Design Manual, and offers
an updated approach using contemporary regulations and design guidelines
for the successful revitalization of the downtown and surrounding areas.

5. Third Avenue District Market Opportunity Study and Recruitment


Strategy
This study was prepared in 2000 and provides a retail market analysis for
the Town Centre I Redevelopment Project Area. An analysis of the marketing
strengths and challenges of the area allows for development of a recruitment
strategy that assists property owners in improving their sites while attracting new
tenants to vacant commercial spaces. The document addresses the continued
economic decline of Third Avenue, despite dedicated Redevelopment Agency
efforts at revitalization. Identified opportunities include the potential to support
a “fine limited local commercial district,” establishing Third Avenue as a “unique
or niche” destination within the larger economic community, the creation of
a Third Avenue identity that sets it apart from other cities and districts, and
the potential to intensify development near transit nodes, areas of greater
pedestrian frequency, and civic uses. Major strategies include strengthening
existing locations, providing transit linkages, developing an improved sign
program and offering a variety of development incentives. These strategies are
further developed through the Specific Plan. Implementation of the Specific Plan
document will help Third Avenue overcome the existing economic challenges
and foster a successful revitalization program for the area.

Chapter II Introduction II-17


6. Broadway Revitalization Strategy

The focus area of this document is Broadway from H Street to L Street, with
particular attention to the H Street entryway into the City. The plan strives to
reverse deteriorating conditions along the auto-oriented strip and reform the area
into a commercially viable and visually pleasing environment. The document
outlines proposed broad economic, aesthetic, and circulation improvements
along Broadway. The Specific Plan will implement many of the changes and
improvements suggested in the Broadway Revitalization Strategy.

7. Bayfront Master Plan

The purpose of the Bayfront Master Plan is to create a world-class bayfront in


Chula Vista. Goals of the Bayfront Master Plan include creating one unified
Bayfront area from the three existing districts, finding a balance between being
sensitive to both environmental and community recreational needs, creating
an active boating waterfront in the deep water area, developing a sense of
place at the Bayfront, and extending the City to the Bayfront. The Specific Plan
strives especially toward the latter goal of connecting the City’s downtown to the
Bayfront. Design suggestions in the Specific Plan seek to restore and reinforce
connectivity between the Urban Core and the Bayfront.

8. MTBD/South Bay Transit First Study


The Transit First Study evaluates potential future transit options for the City. The
study identifies transit priority treatment options, alternate transit alignments,
and potential transit station locations and types, such as mixed flow transit
lanes, dedicated transit lanes, freeway HOV/transit lanes, guideways, queue
jumpers, and transit priority signals. Based on ridership potential and the
ability to best serve the established travel patterns of the region, alternative
transit routes were divided into Tier One and Tier Two options. The Specific
Plan supports increased public transit usage. Many of the recommendations
made in the Specific Plan will benefit from the implementation of successful
transit projects. Strategies from this report were considered in the Specific
Plan Transportation Impact Analysis and also provide support for the transit
intensive Urban Core.

9. Chula Vista Economic Development Strategy

The Economic Development Strategy was prepared in 2003 and serves as


a blueprint for development of fiscal sustainability for the community. The
Strategy has been updated and incorporated into the General Plan to serve as
a blueprint for development to ensure short and long-term fiscal sustainability.
The Strategy establishes 12 goals, supported by objectives and action items,

II-18 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


which will facilitate Chula Vista’s economic prosperity through the year 2020.
Goals that support increasing investment in western Chula Vista, providing the
necessary physical infrastructure to support economic prosperity, and becoming
the south county hub for leisure, recreational, shopping, and entertainment
activities are directly reflected in the Specific Plan.

10. Historic Preservation Strategic Plan Chula Vista


The Historic Preservation Strategic Plan resulted from an effort by the Ad
Hoc Historic Preservation Committee to evaluate the City’s current historic
preservation program and to make recommendations for the future of the City’s
historic resources. The Committee developed an action plan that could develop
Chula Vista’s Historic Preservation Program as a method for preserving the
important historic resources of the City. Recommendations include becoming
a Certified Local Government, establishing a predictable and consistent historic
review process, establishing an historic preservation review board, and providing
incentives for historic preservation. The Urban Core Strategic Plan encourages
preservation of historic resources within the Urban Core area.

Chapter II Introduction II-19


F. Community Outreach Process
An important component of the Specific Plan is the public participation process.
The community outreach effort was designed to involve the various citizens
and interest groups of Chula Vista in the Specific Plan process. Careful initial
steps were taken to involve the citizens of Chula Vista. The following is a brief
summary of the outreach efforts included in the public participation process
that helped to shape the Specific Plan.

1. Key Person Interviews


A series of interviews were conducted in March of 2004 with various individuals,
agencies, and organizations with strong interests in the Urban Core area. The
purpose of these meetings was to listen to the issues and observations from
key persons about the planning area. The interviews were quite informative for
laying a foundation of background information and identifying many issues as
well as visions for the Urban Core area.

Overall, most of the stakeholders voiced consistent feedback. Some of the


most frequent comments included the following:
• Third Avenue currently has the wrong tenant mix.
• Third Avenue should have more pedestrian-oriented uses and mixed-
use projects.
• Broadway is an “eyesore” and is in need of aesthetic improvements.
• H Street is the major thoroughfare in Chula Vista.
• Uses such as liquor stores, pawn shops, dentist labs, adult stores,
social service/employment agencies, and check cashing, etc. should be
prohibited from the Urban Core.
• Single-family neighborhoods should be protected.
• The key project in the City is the Gateway project.
• The predominant architectural style should be Historic Spanish
Mediterranean.
• Chula Vista should be connected to downtown San Diego via the trolley.
• A “small loop” trolley should circulate through Chula Vista and connect
to the San Diego Trolley system.
• Connections to the Bayfront are needed.

II-20 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Stakeholders also voiced the top things they would change about Chula Vista.
The most prominent ideas were:
• Increase the density and building height of the Urban Core.
• Add open space to the Urban Core.
• Create a different tenant mix on Third Avenue.
Chula Vista
• Make H Street more pedestrian-oriented through a variety of streetscape
improvements.

2. Advisory Committee Meetings


Beginning in August 2004, the Chula Vista Urban Core Advisory Committee
met monthly in sessions open to the public. The Advisory Committee meetings
allowed opportunities for the consultant team to present and refine ideas and
concepts with substantial input from Advisory Committee members as well as
the public at each stage of the planning process. The Advisory Committee
was composed of 18 members that were representative of many community
sectors, offering a broad variety of backgrounds and perspectives. The Advisory
Committee members were essential to keeping the project on track for the
benefit of the citizens of Chula Vista.

Topics discussed in the Advisory Committee meetings included:


• Issue Identification
• Key Person Interviews
• Photo Tour and Visual Preference
Survey
• Goals and Objectives for Vision Plan
Areas
• Draft Vision Plan Review and Exercise
• Presentation of Vision Plans, Vision
Statements, and Ten Key Principles
• Design Guidelines
• “At-A-Glance” Zoning Sheets and Land
Use Matrix
• Gateways and Streetscapes Concepts
• Urban Amenities and Incentives
Frequent updates on the traffic analyses and Advisory Committee meetings helped
Fg. 2.5
market conditions studies were also provided guide the Urban Core Specific Plan

by the consultant team.

Chapter II Introduction II-21


The Advisory Committee meetings provided substantial feedback for the
consultant team and were essential to the refining of the draft critical
components of the Specific Plan.

3. Advisory Committee Charrette


In August 2004, the City Council appointed
an 18-member Advisory Committee, chaired
by Mayor Padilla and composed of various
stakeholders, to help guide the Urban Core
planning effort. The first meeting of the
committee was a two-day visioning charrette,
held on August 12-13, 2004. After participating
in a bus tour of the Specific Plan area, an
introduction was provided to the Urban Core
visioning effort and an invitation was extended
to the community to urge citizens to participate
in the development of the Specific Plan.

Advisory Committee members and The workshop meeting continued with a


members of the public develop ideas
Fg. 2.6 presentation on the importance of the work
effort and its relationship to the General Plan
Update and the Bayfront Master Plan project. A description of the Specific Plan
effort and purpose was also provided. Following these presentations, a round-
table exercise solicited preliminary thoughts and issues for the Urban Core.

After a preliminary review of the Land Use Concepts, Urban Core Focus
Districts, Urban Design Themes, and Opportunities and Constraints of the site,
the Advisory Committee members were asked to identify potential “big ideas”
for the Urban Core.

The second day of the charrette kicked off with presentations from
subconsultants regarding marketing and economics research as well as traffic
and transportation research. A summary of the urban core market context
and the regional economy and an overview of
urban mobility concepts and transportation
opportunities, respectively, were provided.

The next portion of the meeting provided a


visual overview of each of the nine original
focus districts with a number of images ranging
in height and massing. The images shown also
An Advisory Committee Charrette was included a variety of streetscape scenarios.
held on August 12-13, 2004
Fg. 2.7

II-22 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Committee members then participated in a
Visual Preference Survey and were asked to
rank the images as appropriate, neutral, or
inappropriate.

Finally, both Advisory Committee members and


the public were invited to write issues, concerns, Chula Vista
and “big ideas” on six banners provided. Banner
headings included Circulation/Transit, Land
Use, Community Design, Parks & Services,
Implementation, and Other Key Issues.
Issues, concerns, and “big ideas” were
solicited at the Charrette
Fg. 2.8
4. First Community Workshop
The first community workshop was held on September 13, 2004 at the Chula
Vista Public Library (Civic Center Branch). Approximately 85 members of the
public attended. The meeting began with an introduction to the project and
process. A discussion on opportunities for public participation, anticipated
timelines, and related projects followed. The consultant team then presented
the basics of a Specific Plan, the boundaries of the study area, and a description
of the existing conditions for each of the nine Focus Area Districts.

A Visual Preference Survey was then conducted where members of the public
were to vote on various images with regard to building massing and scale.
Participants were able to rate images for each of the nine Focus Area Districts
as being appropriate, neutral, or inappropriate for that particular district.

In summary, participants consistently voted


pedestrian-oriented streetscapes with the
buildings located at the street edge as
their preference. Buildings with interesting
architectural details, such as well articulated
windows, entries, rooflines, and buildings
bases, were clearly preferred over large, box-
like structures. In most districts, a building
height of two to three stories seemed to be most
acceptable, with higher buildings preferred Participants voted on images in terms
Fg. 2.9
of appropriateness of massing and scale
near the freeway interchange districts.

Chapter II Introduction II-23


Public comments and questions were solicited. Comments received included:

• A Website is needed as well as access for non-Internet users, such as a


hotline.
• Focus on streetscape – shade trees.
• Consider free shuttle buses to connect to Bay area, 3rd Avenue,
Broadway.
• Encourage public art.
• Create unified features to connect
pedestrian paths.
• Consider allowing 2nd floor residences
over commercial uses.
• Use “walkable communities” principles.
About 85 people attended the First • Encourage adaptive reuse of existing
Community Workshop
Fg. 2.10
historic buildings.
• Decide what is desirable about Chula Vista and reinforce that
character.
The workshop was very informative in setting a clear direction for how the
community visualized the short and long-term future of Chula Vista’s Urban
Core. The feedback obtained helped the consultant team to further develop
vision and design plans and ultimately this Specific Plan.

5. High School Presentations

Visual Preference Surveys were conducted at two local high schools on


September 29, 2004. Sixty-four students at Castle Park high school and
53 students at Hilltop High School rated images for each of the nine Urban
Core Focus Area Districts as being appropriate, neutral, or inappropriate for
that particular district with regard to building
massing and scale.

The students were enthusiastic about being


involved in the planning process and having
a chance to have their opinions heard. Both
groups of students presented similar results.
The students’ preferences were comparable
to those of the community at large; though
Students at Hilltop High School
Fg. 2.11 the students often rated larger developments
participate in a Visual Preference Survey
as more appropriate than did members of the

II-24 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


community participating in other visual preference surveys. In general, the
students’ preferences showed a greater affinity for higher intensity development
and taller buildings as well as more contemporary architectural styles.

6. Planning Commission and City Council Workshop


The information and ideas generated from the initial committee meetings,
community workshops, and high school surveys were used to create a series Chula Vista
of “vision plans” for the Urban Core. The vision plans were intended to evoke
an image of what the Urban Core could look like over the next 20 to 25 years
and to set the frame work for the preparation of the Specific Plan. A workshop
was then held on November 17, 2004 for members of the Chula Vista Planning
Commission and City Council to review the draft Vision Plans and Ten Key
Principles.

After some discussion on the differences between vision plans, which are
representative of broad ideals, versus master plans, which are more literal
representations of changes to an area, the Planning Commission and City
Council were very supportive of the Vision Plans. Only minor revisions were
suggested, such as the relocation of certain parking areas and structures and
the addition of more commercial development along H Street.

7. Second Community Workshop


On December 1, 2004 citizens were invited to participate in a second community
workshop. Results were presented from four visual preference surveys,
conducted at an Advisory Committee meeting, the first community workshop,
and two presentations at local high schools. The draft Vision Plans were also
presented, including the 10 Key Principles for future Urban Core development.
Public comments and questions were solicited using an interactive round-table
discussion focused on the three key visioning areas.
In summary, participants were supportive
and enthusiastic of the concepts and visions
presented. Comments included concern over
visitor parking, affordability of housing, and
the need to develop the Broadway corridor as
a retail, hospitality, and housing district that
would serve the needs of existing Chula Vista
residents. Participants were encouraged by
the opportunity to provide feedback.

The Draft Vision Plans were presented at


the Second Community Workshop
Fg. 2.12

Chapter II Introduction II-25


8. Other Outreach Efforts
Frequently updated information was made available to the public on the
City’s website regarding the progress of the Specific Plan effort. The website
explained the Specific Plan project and process and kept citizens up to date
on the latest work projects. Information and exhibits presented at Advisory
Committee meetings were presented on the website and upcoming meeting
dates were posted. The website acted as a convenient source of information
for interested citizens.

9. Urban Core Newsletter

The City published an Urban Core Newsletter that informed residents of the
purpose and progress of the Specific Plan. The Newsletter provided a summary
of the initial planning effort culminating in the Vision Plans, which were
completed in December 2004. The newsletter allowed citizens of Chula Vista
to be more knowledgeable about
the Specific Plan effort and
afforded them an opportunity to
be more involved in the overall
Specific Plan process.

The City provided the Urban Core Specific Plan


Newsletter as an update for residents
Fg. 2.13

II-26 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


III. Vision
A. Vision for the Urban Core III-1
B. Ten Key Principles III-4
C. Vision Areas III-5
Chula Vista

Chapter III Vision


Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
III. Vision
A. Vision for the Urban Core
The Specific Plan provides framework for enhancement to the economic,
social, and community fabric of Chula Vista’s Urban Core. The Specific Plan will
produce an economically enhanced Urban Core that is once again a thriving Chula Vista
downtown and focus of the City. The vision for the Urban Core builds upon the
vision for the City in the General Plan. The area will exhibit revitalized core uses
linked by pedestrian and bicycle connections with easy access to goods and
services and exhibiting quality design. The vision for the Urban Core seeks to
make a great place to live, work, and play even better.

While much of the existing stable residential fabric of the Urban Core will be
preserved, an increase in living and lifestyle choices for existing and future
residents will be afforded. These residents will further add to local business
revenues and create a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly activity center throughout
the day. The Specific Plan provides framework for additional mobility options by
creating linkages between the Urban Core, the Bayfront, and east Chula Vista
and encouraging increased pedestrian, bicycle, and transit activity. Improved
services and amenities will make Chula Vista’s Urban Core an attractive and
focal hub of the City, as well as the South County region.

The Urban Core will be a successful environment for a variety of retail,


recreational, and residential opportunities
Fg. 3.1

Chapter III Vision III-1


The Urban Core Vision aims to create a uniquely identifiable Urban Core for
Chula Vista that is an economically vibrant, pedestrian-oriented, and multi-
purpose destination.

As part of the early foundational planning process, a vision for the urban core
was framed using the broad policies and objectives outlined in the General
Plan (2005).

Imagine a future for the Urban Core that is...

• A pedestrian-friendly City Center with an integrated mix of land uses


(retail, office, residential, entertainment and civic/cultural) woven
together by attractive and cohesive street improvements and buildings.
• The entertainment “hub” of the City with movie theaters, a playhouse,
restaurants with outdoor dining, adorned with broad sidewalks, plazas
and green parks that feature music and artistic performances.
• A place where new businesses are eager to locate and are attracted by
the improvements and the encouragement the City gives to investors,
downtown merchants, and property owners.
• A place for living as well as working. New “loft” style apartments that
will allow artisans and small businesses to get a start in the Village, while
new office spaces and residences for a diverse age group will flourish
above and behind ground floor shops.
• Supported by an expanded and improved public transit system, including
a new west side shuttle, with frequent and conveniently located stops
and including connections to the proposed transit centers, the Bayfront,
and the existing regional trolley system.
• Enriched with new cultural, recreational, and civic facilities to support
the mixed-use environment and reinforce the Urban Core as the “heart
of the City.”

• A harmonious blend of old and new, where new development takes its
design cues from the existing culture, character, and history of northwest
Chula Vista.

III-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Imagine a future for the Urban Core that embraces Chula Vista’s unique culture
and celebrates its rich heritage. The Urban Core of the future is the Urban
Core of the past, only better.

Chula Vista

The Urban Core should again be the heart of the City


Fg. 3.2

Chapter III Vision III-3


B. Ten Key Principles
Based on input from the community and Urban Core Specific Plan Advisory
Committee, ten key principles were established. The future development of
Chula Vista’s Urban Core shall be guided by the following overarching ideas and
goals that apply to all of the vision areas.

1. Develop a vibrant, distinct urban atmosphere with a day to evening


environment.
2. Build on and enhance Chula Vista’s cultural and historic traditions and
diversity.
3. Foster visible cultural and civic amenities, such as urban parks, outdoor
dining opportunities and civic promenades.
4. Establish a hierarchy of building forms with greatest densities at key
nodes.
5. Connect and integrate the Bayfront, East Chula Vista and individual
focus areas within the urban core.
6. Create lively and pedestrian-friendly environments through a
concentration of activities in a compact, mixed-use setting.
7. Transition new development to minimize impacts on existing residential
neighborhoods.
8. Provide creative parking strategies, including parking districts, structures
and reductions.
9. Define unique identities for focus areas through individualized
streetscape design and public spaces.
10. Restore the historic street grid in order to maximize transportation choices
and increase mobility and circulation opportunities for pedestrians,
transit and automobiles.

III-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


C. Vision Areas
As part of the visioning process, three distinct “vision areas” were identified.
The Vision areas were not intended to cover the entire Specific Plan Subdistricts
Area but rather capture the most significant areas that required further
planning guidance beyond that provided in the General Plan Update. The three
areas selected included the “Village”, consisting of downtown Third Avenue and
Chula Vista
the surrounding area, the “Grand Boulevard”, concentrating on the H Street
Corridor, and the “Promenade”, focusing on the rectangle between E Street
and H Street and I-5 and Broadway. Though the Urban Core area needs to be
unified and identifiable as the Urban Core of Chula Vista, the individual vision
areas each have distinguishing characteristics. Each vision area is described
below and a vision statement for that area is delineated.

Chapter III Vision III-5


1. The Village Vision Area
a. Description
The Village Vision Area is the heart of Chula Vista’s traditional downtown. This
area is generally bounded by Church Avenue and Fourth Avenue on the east
and west and by E Street and G Street on the north and south. Third Avenue
is the primary retail and office district and is anchored by transitional office
and residential uses. The Civic Center, including City Hall and associated
facilities, is located at Fourth Avenue and F Street and is in the process of being
upgraded pursuant to the Civic Center Master Plan. Friendship Park, Memorial
Park, and other potential park opportunities link the Village and provide quality
urban amenities to nearby residents. This area exhibits much of the traditional
community character and is home to many community facilities, such as the
Civic Center, the Central Library, Police Station, and Friendship Park.

b. Vision Statement
The Village will be a lively destination with a small town feel. Restaurants,
outdoor cafes, bookstores, art houses, theaters, and shops will flank the
expanded sidewalks and tree-lined streetscape. This entertainment and retail
destination serves all of Chula Vista by energizing the 3rd Avenue corridor and
vicinity. The district also celebrates cultural arts and civic functions linked by an
enhanced park system. In addition, the new residential housing opportunities
will allow the area to resurge and thrive.

III-6 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Third Avenue

Gateway Monument

Typical Paseo
The Village Visionary Sketches
Fg. 3.3

Chapter III Vision III-7


2. The Grand Boulevard Vision Area
a. Description

The Grand Boulevard Vision Area is the central axis of the Urban Core area.
This vision area consists of H Street and the adjacent area from Third Avenue
to Broadway. This area includes the Gateway office development, the South
County Regional Courthouse Complex, Scripps Hospital and associated medical
facilities, and the Chula Vista Center regional shopping mall, as well as a variety
of other office and commercial activities.

b. Vision Statement
The H Street corridor is the primary business, commercial and transit backbone
of the Urban Core. Buildings, plazas and parkways activate the street edge and
deliver a bustling pedestrian environment. The Grand Boulevard is the most
urban of the vision areas with medium rise buildings forming the backdrop to
the double rows of trees, extended sidewalks, frequent transit stops, newspaper
stands and kiosks. A unique streetscape character provides continuity among
diverse elements such as the regional mall, hospital, and office developments.

III-8 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

III-9

Plaza along H Street

Third Avenue and H Street

Row Housing adjacent to Retail Center


The Grand Boulevard Visionary Sketches
Fg. 3.4

Chapter III Vision III-9


3. The Promenade Vision Area
a. Description
The Promenade Vision Area acts as an attractive entryway to the City of Chula
Vista. Stretching parallel to the I-5 corridor and generally west of Broadway,
from E Street to H Street, the area is currently a mix of auto-oriented retail
commercial uses and low-rise multi-family housing and mobile home parks.
Redevelopment of the area will provide a mix of aesthetically pleasing visitor
serving and resident serving uses and create a desirable neighborhood
atmosphere.

b. Vision Statement
A dynamic mix of regional transit centers, visitor serving uses and a retail
complex surrounds an enhanced, medium-rise residential quarter. Circulation
is improved by re-establishing the traditional street grid. A tree-lined, extended
linear park offers both neighborhood and community serving amenities
supported by mid-block paseos. The park transitions from an active community
venue with a more formal landscape to recreational features such as tennis
and basketball courts to passive greens. Anchoring the park, the retail plaza
links the Bayfront to the regional mall. Ample public spaces provide for open
air markets, mercados, cultural festivals, art exhibits and other community
events.

III-10 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Plaza at
Promenade
Terminus

Park Atmosphere

Typical
Paseo
The Promenade Visionary Sketches
Fg. 3.5

Chapter III Vision III-11


III-12 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV. Existing Conditions
A. Introduction IV-1
B. Historic Resources IV-2
C. Land Use, General Plan, and Zoning IV-12
D. Circulation and Mobility IV-17 Chula Vista
E. Economic Conditions IV-19

Chapter IV Existing Conditions


Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
IV. Existing Conditions
A. Introduction
The purpose of this chapter is to describe the built environment within the
Specific Plan area. A brief historical overview of the Urban Core is provided as
well as significant historical structures and features in the area. The chapter Chula Vista
also details the existing conditions within the plan area in terms of land use
and zoning, circulation and mobility, and economic conditions.

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-1


B. Historic Resources
1. The Early Years Before Incorporation
The Otay Valley has been occupied by Native American cultures for more than
9,000 years. The early Native American inhabitants established settlements,
hunted game, and utilized the abundant resources along the river valley. The
first western settlers were Spanish missionaries sent by the King of Spain to
establish missions along the coast of California. In 1795, the area known today
as Chula Vista became part of a land grant from the King of Spain; the area was
known as Rancho del Rey or the King’s Ranch.

With Mexico’s independence from Spain in 1821, Rancho del Rey became part
of the new Mexican nation and was renamed Rancho de la Nacion, National
Ranch. In 1845, National Ranch was granted to John Forster, son-in-law of
the Mexican governor Pico. After
the Mexican-American War and
the subsequent admission of
California to the United States,
the US confirmed ownership and
operation of the ranch by John
Forster.

A change of ownership and


several significant transportation
improvements, such as the
addition of several major rail lines,
occurred throughout the mid and
late 1800’s. By 1890 a railroad
had been built from San Diego,
through Chula Vista, and ending in
San Ysidro. In the late 1800’s, San
Diego Land and Town Company
developed the 5,000-acre Chula
Vista tract, as a product of the
professional town planner, C.W.
Dickinson. Lots were originally
laid out in 5-acre parcels with 80-
foot wide streets. Many of the new
owners began citrus orchards on
their acreage, particularly lemon
orchards, leading to early Chula
Vista claims of the “Lemon Capital
1894 Plat Map of the Chula Vista area
Fg. 4.1 of the World.”

IV-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Lot purchasers were expected to build a modern house within six months; the
house was subject to architectural approval and had a required setback of 125
feet. Land sales in Chula Vista began in 1887 and proved to be very popular. Most
early houses were of a traditional Victorian style. Architecturally, Craftsman folk
cottages and bungalows followed the Victorian style and an eventual transition
was made to a more Mission Revival and Spanish Mediterranean architecture.
Lot sizes also decreased over the years, to an average one-acre and half-acre Chula Vista
lots, with continued generous setbacks.

Around this time, the intersection of Third Avenue and F Street was considered
to be the center of town. In 1907, the National City and Otay Railroad line
was converted to an electric streetcar line. The streetcar line ran north to
south along Third Avenue for several years and was eventually replaced by a
landscaped median.

2. The City of Chula Vista is Formed


In 1911, the City of
Chula Vista was officially
incorporated with a
population of 550. As
a top priority, in 1913
the City installed 26
streetlights and paved
several streets. Looking south on F Street east of Third Avenue in 1911.
The first church and school are to the right.
Fg. 4.2
Over the next quarter
century, the World Wars proved to have a significant impact on Chula Vista’s future.
The City’s economic system began to shift from agriculture to manufacturing
and Chula Vista
expanded significantly
during World War II due
to booming wartime
production in local
industries. The largest
of these companies
was the Rohr Aircraft
Corporation, a major
military supplier during
WWII that employed
9,000 at the height of
production. In addition,
the high concentration
Looking south at intersection of Third Avenue and F
of military bases in the Street in 1936
Fg. 4.3

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-3


area led to an increase in population as many
veterans decided to remain in the area after
the end of the war. These major changes
caused the population of Chula Vista to triple
in the time period from 1940 to 1950.

Major projects from the later twentieth century


included the 1962 development of the Chula
Vista Shopping Center on Broadway between H
Street and I Street and the 1972 construction
of the first high-rise building, the 16-story
Chula Vista Community Congregation Tower on
F Street. Throughout the century, the City of
Chula Vista experienced continued annexation
and expansion to the east, north, and south and
developed into one of the largest communities
in the San Diego region. However, in the midst
of the expanding community, the central core
experienced problems with the changing
economic situation and began to develop a
blighted atmosphere. In the 1970’s, several
The 16-story Chula Vista Community
Tower was the City’s first high-rise
Fg. 4.4 City redevelopment projects, made the first
steps toward revitalization of the declining
Urban Core.

All great cities evolve over time but only the best cities recognize, build on and
enhance their most valued traditions and resources. Beginning with the early
1900’s and the City’s incorporation, the City of Chula Vista progressed through
a series of “lifecycles”, each with it’s own unique contribution to the City’s
history. The community’s lifecycle during the early 1900’s revolved around its
agricultural heyday, the mid 1900’s are remembered as the “Rohr” ing 50’s and
the changes of the latter 1900’s focused on an expanding the City with annexing
new lands and rapidly developing to the east. The City is now approaching its
100th anniversary and, with the new visions established for the urban core, is
poised to write the next chapter in its history.

At the start of the current century, citizens of Chula Vista have high hopes for
the future of their City. With over 200,000 residents and over 50 square miles
of land, Chula Vista is now the second largest city in San Diego County. Citizens
are eager for the City to reflect and reestablish its prominence and aesthetic
quality, especially in the traditional Urban Core.

IV-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. Historic Sites in the Study Area
In 1985, the City of Chula Vista sponsored a local historic resources inventory.
The inventory was limited to the area bounded by Trousdale Drive to the north,
L Street to the south, Interstate 5 to the west, and Hilltop Drive on the east. As
a result, approximately 258 homes were included on the survey list with 42 of
the homes being included on the Chula Vista List of Historic Sites. There are
68 sites currently designated as historic by the City of Chula Vista. These 68 Chula Vista
structures have been determined by the City Council to meet the City’s historic
criteria.

Several City designated historic sites and structures are located within the
Specific Plan area and provide context and historical reference for the Specific
Plan’s architectural and cultural character. (See Figure 4.5 Historic Resources
Map.)

The Chula Vista Heritage Museum maintains information on the historical areas
and structures in Chula Vista and is an excellent source for further information
on historic properties. The Heritage Museum’s “Take a Walk of History, Tour
Historic Sites in Chula Vista” brochure provides detailed information on many
of these non-designated sites. The following describes the designated historic
sites and their features:

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-5


Historic Resources Map
Fg. 4.5

IV-6
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
a. 699 E Street – Former Site of Greg Rogers House
The Greg Rogers House, also known as
“Bay Breeze” was built in 1910 at 699
E Street. The home was constructed by
Greg Rogers, one of the founders of the
City of Chula Vista and also founded the
City’s first bank. The 5,700 square foot Chula Vista
Craftsman style house had multiple
bathrooms and several fireplaces. In
1985, the home was threatened with
demolition in its original location and
was moved from 699 E Street. The
home was eventually relocated to 616
Second Avenue. At this time, the site Sketch of Bay Breeze, the Greg
where the home once stood remains a Rogers House
Fg. 4.6
City designated historical site.
b. 666 Third Avenue – Our House/Orchard
House
“Our House”, a large home in the Queen
Anne style, once stood at 666 Third
Avenue; however, the structure was
destroyed by fire. At this time, the site
where the home once stood remains a
City designated historical site.

Photo of “Our House” before it was


destroyed by fire
Fg. 4.7

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-7


c. 276 F Street – First Congregational
Church
The First Congregational Church was the
first church opened in Chula Vista. The
original sanctuary for the church was
constructed in 1894 at 276 F Street.
Community members raised money to fund
the sanctuary construction and the Land
and Town Company donated the land. The
original structure was torn down in 1951
and a new sanctuary was constructed in its
place; the site of the former sanctuary is a
City designated historical site.
d. 301-305 Third Avenue – Melville Block
The Melville Block was constructed by
Original First Congregational Church Edward Melville, one of Chula Vista’s first
building constructed in 1911
Fg. 4.8
businessmen. The Melville Block consists
of a 1911 two-story building in the Eclectic
Commercial style architecture. The Chula
Vista State Bank originally occupied the
corner spaces, followed by the Chula Vista
Dry Goods Company. The first story of the
building has been significantly altered from
its original state and many of the original
ornamental features have been removed,
but overall the building retains its historical
value. The structure was recently noted in a
guide to San Diego Architecture published
New First Congregational Church by the American Institute of Architects.
building constructed in 1956
Fg. 4.9

301-305 Third Avenue is known as


the Melville Block
Fg. 4.10

IV-8 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


e. 374 Roosevelt Street – Mark Skinner
House
Constructed in 1924 by Mark Skinner,
a well-known local businessman, this
house is a unique variation on the
Bungalow style popular in the early part
of the twentieth century. The original Chula Vista
siding on the house has been replaced
but the original design theme remains. The Mark Skinner house at 374
Roosevelt Street
Fg. 4.11
f. 382/384 Del Mar Avenue – The First
Women’s Clubhouse
The Women’s Club was the first place in
the City of Chula Vista for women active
in civic affairs to meet and gather. The
Club was involved in many community
activities, including fund-raising for
various events. The Club first convened
at 382/384 Del Mar Avenue in the
early 1900’s and met at this site on Del
Mar Avenue for many years until the
Club eventually outgrew the site and
relocated to a larger space at 357 G The First Women’s Club in Chula
Fg. 4.12
Street. The building on Del Mar Avenue Vista met here on Del Mar Avenue

retains its historical significance as the


Women’s Club’s first meeting site.

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-9


4. Other Sites of Historic Interest
The following sections document or describe sites that fall within the Specific
Plan Subdistrict Area that are other sites of historical interest and sites that
were identified as part of the Cultural Resources Report for the Evaluation of
the Historical and Architectural Significance of 50 Properties within the Chula
Vista Urban Core.

In addition to the six designated historic sites, the Urban Core Specific Plan
Area includes other sites of historical interest. These sites include: The El
Primero Hotel, The Memorial Bowl (A Works Projects Administration project),
The Charles Smith Building, The People’s State Bank, Leader Department
Store, and Security Pacific Bank. These sites/structures, in addition to others,
all contribute to the historic fabric of the Specific Plan area. Important historical
sites such as these provide the context of the image, character, and history of
Chula Vista’s urban core that is to inspire and shape future development within
the Specific Plan area.

A photographic essay has been included in Chapter VII - Development Design


Guidelines to provide architects and designers with important visual cues
that can be drawn from existing development and incorporated into new
development. Used appropriately, new development can respond to Chula
Vista’s unique architectural heritage and promote the most positive aspects of
existing development.

5. Sites Evaluated for Potential Eligibility as Historic Architectural


Sites
In 2005, the City evaluated 50 properties within the Specific Plan Subdistrict
Area for historic evaluation and determination of eligibility for listing. This
evaluation is titled Cultural Resources Report for the Evaluation of the Historical
and Architectural Significance of 50 Properties within the Chula Vista Urban
Core.

This focused survey augments the 1985 inventory and is not intended to be
representative of a comprehensive survey of the Specific Plan Subdistrict Area.
The area around Third Avenue and F Street is considered to be the historic
core of the City and includes important elements of the early residential and
business activities of the City. Therefore this area within the Specific Plan Village
District was the focus area for historic evaluation.

The structures were selected based on the periods of significance and include
mostly structures within the Village District along Third Avenue, the City’s
traditional downtown, and adjacent side streets. The sites are also all located
within adopted redevelopment areas and thus have an increased potential to
redevelop over the short to mid term. Five sites were identified as potentially

IV-10 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


eligible. For a complete listing of properties inventoried, please see the Specific
Plan Program EIR NO. 06-01, Appendix B.

The potential for the existence of other significant historic properties within the
Specific Plan Subdistrict Area is possible given the number of older commercial
structures and homes throughout the Specific Plan Subdistrict Area. These
could be identified as part of a more comprehensive survey conducted in the Chula Vista
future.

In addition, the City is considering developing a Historic Preservation Ordinance


and establishing design standards and other relevant requirements for historic
properties. Currently, the City of Chula Vista historic preservation program is
limited to voluntary historic designation and voluntary participation in the Mills
Act. Under the Mills Act, a property owner enters into a contract that gives City
oversight on matters of rehabilitation and renovation of the site in exchange for
a reduction in property taxes. Conducting a current inventory and establishing
an historic designation process, and seeking Certified Local Government
designation are top historic preservation priorities for the City.

6. How Historic Information Will Be Used


The inventory of existing historical resources lends important reference for
new development in the Specific Plan area. While the plan does not require
strict application of traditional historic architectural styles, the historic
influences, nonetheless, should be honored and retained where possible.
Land use and development recommendations within the plan area will use and
refer to the 1985 Historic Resources inventory. In addition, the Urban Core
Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (EIR) provides an assessment of
limited additional properties within the Specific Plan area that may qualify as
historic and establishes mitigation measures to be considered in the event of
redevelopment. See EIR NO. 06-01 for specific sites. Other sites that may be
identified as part of other historic surveys should also be considered.

Consideration of important historical features is built into the planning process


and is an important facet of land use planning and urban design throughout
the plan area. The design guidelines encourage the use of building elements
and/or features typically found on historical structures. The development
standards emulate the form, massing, and relationship of building to sidewalk
of these historical structures.

The plan is subdivided into various planning districts, each with a special set of
planning and design directions. The degree to which historic structures influence
the design direction within these districts may vary; however, protection of
existing noteworthy structures and respect for the City’s heritage is a theme
that will guide new development.

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-11


C. Land Use, General Plan, and Zoning
1. General Plan
The General Plan (2005) divides land uses into six broad categories: Residential;
Commercial; Mixed Use; Industrial; Open Space, Parks, and Public/Quasi-
Public; and Special Plan Areas. Of these categories, the Specific Plan area
encompasses residential, commercial, mixed use, and open space, parks, and
public/quasi-public uses (see Figure 4.13). These designations are further
broken down into subcategories, based on density and intensity of the use. For
General Plan purposes, densities apply to residential uses and are measured in
terms of dwelling units per gross acre (du/ac). Intensity applies to commercial,
mixed use, and industrial uses and is measured by Floor Area Ratio (FAR). On
the whole, the General Plan provides for an increase in density and intensity
for most areas of the Specific Plan. As the population of the City continues
to expand, increasing the intensity of uses provides an opportunity for more
efficient use of land in the Urban Core and will create a more urban, rather than
suburban, context.

One of the most significant changes related to land use designations for the
General Plan is the addition of the new Mixed Use category. The combination
of commercial and residential activities is expected to provide many benefits,
including better utilization of scarce land resources and improved accessibility
to public amenities.

Each General Plan land use designation is related to specific zoning districts,
which are defined by the zoning ordinance. As an implementing action of
the General Plan (2005), several new zoning categories will be created to be
consistent with new General Plan standards. The Specific Plan will provide new
zoning regulations for sub-district areas within the Specific Plan area. (See
Chapter VI - Land Use and Development Standards and Figure 5.1 Specific Plan
Key Map.)

2. Zoning
The majority of the Specific Plan Subdistrict Area is currently designated for some
form of commercial uses, though the outer edges of the area permit broader
uses. Zoning districts within the Urban Core include: Central Business, Central
Commercial, Commercial Thoroughfare, Visitor Commercial, Administrative
and Professional Office, Limited Industrial, Public/Quasi-Public, One- and Two-
Family Residence, Apartment Residential, and Exclusive Mobilehome Park.
(See Figure 4.13 and 4.14.)

IV-12 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


The existing zoning ordinance includes modifying districts have been attached
to several of the zones within the Specific Plan area. These existing modifying
districts impose special regulations in addition to those otherwise applicable to
the zone. The modifying districts appearing within the Specific Plan area are:
Design Control and Precise Plan. Property within the Design Control modifying
district requires site plan and architectural approval of the City. The Precise
Plan modifying district allows for diversification in structures, land uses, density, Chula Vista
and landscaping. A precise plan for the area must gain City approval.

The traditional downtown along Third Avenue and the area of the H Street corridor
consist mainly of Central Business, Central Commercial, and Administrative
and Professional Office uses. These districts are primarily composed of
general retail sales and restaurant uses that serve the city as a whole and/
or the surrounding community, as well as medical, dental, executive, financial
and other offices. Residential mixed-use development may be permitted with
a conditional use permit. The center of the H Street corridor is marked by the
retail uses of the Chula Vista Mall as a regional shopping destination.

The Broadway corridor is almost exclusively a Commercial Thoroughfare zone.


The Commercial Thoroughfare zone allows the same types of retail sales as
the other districts but also permits car dealerships, hotel uses, and other
commercial recreational facilities. Less intensive multi-family residential, and
occasionally industrial, uses extend out from these three core areas to the
edges of the Specific Plan boundaries.

The Specific Plan subdistricts border established residential neighborhoods


where measures are warranted to minimize impacts from more intensive
commercial activities and development.

The majority of Public/Quasi-Public uses are concentrated in the traditional


downtown area of Chula Vista, between Third and Fourth Avenues and E and G
Streets. The Chula Vista Civic Center is comprised of a number of civic facilities,
including the police headquarters, the library’s main branch, administration
offices, City Council chambers, a public services building, and Fire Station
No. 1. The Civic Center is currently undergoing an extensive expansion to
accommodate the long term needs and growth of the City. In addition to civic
facilities, the Civic Center and downtown are surrounded by a series of parks and
community centers. These public spaces include Will T. Hyde/Friendship Park,
Memorial Park, Parkway Gymnasium and Pool, Norman Park and Community
Senior Center, and Eucalyptus Park.

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-13


Existing City of Chula Vista General Plan Land Use Map (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Fg. 4.13

IV-14
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Existing City of Chula Vista Zoning Map (Source: City of Chula Vista)
Fg. 4.14

IV-15
Chapter IV Existing Conditions
3. Land Use Opportunities and Constraints
A primary objective of the Specific Plan is to focus pedestrian-oriented retail
and entertainment uses in the downtown core and minimize the amount of
auto-oriented uses. The Specific Plan will also allow residential and office uses
to mix above retail shops, forming a traditional downtown environment where
living, working, shopping, and entertainment all coexist together.

The H Street corridor will have a continued focus on commercial uses,


though revitalization of the regional mall area into a more pedestrian-friendly
environment is a major goal.

The Broadway corridor will be reinforced as the main visitor-serving area of


Chula Vista and new development will support this focus. The corridor includes a
substantial number of culturally diverse restaurants, and with proper marketing,
this cluster could lend itself to the formation of a successful restaurant row.
Major transit centers are located in this area and will facilitate transportation
throughout the Urban Core. A redeveloped residential neighborhood, which
will provide expanded housing opportunities as well as a variety of recreational
opportunities, will augment the aesthetic quality of the Broadway district.

When working toward achieving the Specific Plan vision, several issues have the
potential to create challenges for the process. The Specific Plan subdistricts
area contain multiple parcels under many different ownerships. Residential
development within the Urban Core has occurred over an extended period
of time and there are varying ages of the existing housing stock. In terms
of commercial activity, there is a current lack of cohesiveness among the
commercial corridors within the area. The Urban Core would also benefit from
the addition of supporting neighborhood-serving commercial businesses.

The traditional street grid pattern offers a variety of connectivity and accessibility
opportunities; however, the traditional grid is interrupted in several places within
the Urban Core, limiting current connectivity options. In addition, the Urban
Core is currently very automobile-oriented and a lack of pedestrian, bicycle and
transit corridors exists. Implementing improvements to these areas will be a
focus of the Specific Plan.

IV-16 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


D. Circulation and Mobility
Circulation in the Urban Core is primarily provided through the traditional street
grid pattern. H Street, an east-west urban arterial, is the central connector for
the Urban Core, supporting important retail commercial activities for the region.
Broadway runs north-south and provides a more auto-oriented environment,
with a focus on visitor-serving commercial. In contrast, Third Avenue is the
Chula Vista
heart of the traditional downtown core of Chula Vista and offers a pedestrian-
friendly, intimate retail/office environment. Other significant roadways include
E Street and F Street. Appendix B provides a complete Traffic Impact Analysis
for the Specific Plan.

Though not within the Specific Plan area, Interstate 5 and the San Ysidro Blue
Line of the San Diego Trolley System form the western border of the Specific
Plan area, thus developing a major connection between the Urban Core and
the surrounding region and providing extended transportation opportunities.
The City is currently served by a variety of mass transit options, including rail,
trolley, and bus services.

In general, the street network within the Urban Core of Chula Vista is laid out in
a grid system. Roadways running east-west are usually “Streets” and roadways
flowing north-south are usually “Avenues”. However, over time, the traditional
street grid has been broken. Many roads have been interrupted, especially
in the extreme northwestern corner of the Specific Plan area, between the
I-5 Freeway and Broadway. The truncated streets create a connectivity
problem within neighborhoods. The Specific Plan endeavors to reintroduce
the traditional grid, thus diffusing traffic along multiple routes and providing a
variety of opportunities for reaching one’s destination.

Another challenge is to improve mobility by clarifying the system of street


hierarchy. Though some streets are more significant than others in terms of
community services provided, these streets are not differentiated from other
roadways in terms of width, number of lanes, or other recognizable features.
For example, as the address of a major regional retail center, H Street should
be more dominant than some of the surrounding streets that provide access to
other neighborhood servicing commercial uses and residences.

The General Plan and Specific Plan both focus on increasing the opportunities
for multiple travel modes in this area. The synchronicity of the transit systems
is also an important topic. Transit stops for different modes of transit should
be located close to one another to provide easy access to changes in mode of
travel. The scheduling of transit vehicles, both within a service and amongst
services, should be coordinated to allow easy transfers between transit routes
and different types of transit services. The Specific Plan addresses these issues
and suggests ways to calm the behavior of traffic within the Urban Core.

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-17


Other key constraints to mobility within the Urban Core include an environment
that is generally unfriendly to pedestrians and cyclists, as well as the lack of
links from the Urban Core to other portions of the City, such as the Bayfront
area or east Chula Vista.

IV-18 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


E. Economic Conditions
The following is a summary of economic conditions that will influence the
type and quantity of new and redevelopment activity in the Specific Plan area.
Appendix C provides a complete Market Analysis for the Specific Plan.

1. Existing Conditions and Projected Trends Chula Vista


a. Regional
The City of Chula Vista is located in a strong and relatively stable regional
economic environment. The City’s location within South San Diego County,
between the two growing economic hubs of San Diego and Tijuana, is a prime
location for capitalizing on regional growth. Regional competition continues to
thrive in this market. The diverse regional economy is powered by manufacturing,
the military, tourism, business and technology services, and trade.

The defense portion of the City’s trade has declined in recent decades due
to successful efforts in international relations as well as national economic
trends. However, recent international events have led to somewhat of a
resurgence in this particular industry. Currently, in spite of its location, Chula
Vista is not very competitive in the regional tourism market and tourism is only
a minor player in the local economy. Bayfront development may provide a key
for regional attraction to Chula Vista. Despite the recent challenges to these
sectors, defense, tourism, and the City’s proximity to Mexico will continue to be
significant factors in the region’s economy.

Currently, there is a regional shortage of affordable market rate housing; as long


as San Diego County continues to rank as one of the highest priced housing
markets in the country, affordable housing will continue to be an issue for the
area.

b. Urban Core
Though the Urban Core exists in a relatively stable economic environment,
revitalization is essential to the long-term future of the area. Western Chula
Vista, which includes the Urban Core, is relatively built out compared to eastern
Chula Vista, presenting both opportunities and challenges for development.
Existing SANDAG forecasts predict that the Urban Core may see a declining
portion of sub-regional growth over the next 25 years. However, western Chula
Vista’s share of jobs will continue to remain strong relative to other portions
of the City. New competition may elicit a decline in the Urban Core’s market
share of regional sales, but as the market population grows, local sales are also
expected to expand.

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-19


In comparison to eastern Chula Vista, the Urban Core overall receives lower
rents but has higher land prices, which makes it difficult for new projects to
achieve financial feasibility. Rents in the Urban Core, for retail, residential, and
office uses, are lower than average, due mainly to the older building stock.
Of these, the retail and residential sectors appear to be faring best overall.
Rising prices and low vacancy rates are positive indicators for these sectors,
despite the low rental rates. Trends show that the Urban Core could absorb at
least 3,600 new housing units over the next 25 years while many opportunities
exist for the retail sector. The office sector is slightly worse off, with both low
occupancy rates and low rental rates. However, recent success in new office
development indicates that there is a potential latent demand for higher quality
office space in the Urban Core.

2. Economic Strategies
Opportunities for residential development appear to be a major basis for future
development in the Urban Core. The shortage of affordable housing stock
presents an immediate need and opportunity both within the Urban Core and
the region as a whole.

Retail development is also key to the revitalization of the Urban Core. The
traditional role of the Urban Core must adjust to growing competition from
surrounding areas, including eastern Chula Vista, downtown San Diego, and
border communities. The Urban Core should develop a strategy to recapture
sales lost to these surrounding locations.

A strategy with high potential for success is that of focusing on a niche market.
The Urban Core could greatly increase its retail trade by developing a unique
niche environment, focused on culture, music, and food, that would attract
its own visitors to the region. Tourism opportunities could increase from this
development and the City may expand its regional entertainment value from its
current state.

Another viable opportunity is that of leveraging the Mexican market. The Urban
Core has potential to increase the quantity of cross-border shoppers for a variety
of retail products, services, and entertainment needs.

IV-20 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. SWOT Analysis
Development prospects within the Urban Core have many competitive strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to capitalize upon or avoid
and prepare against. SWOT analysis is a tool used to identify each of these
potential market and economic issues early in the planning and development
process to help concentrate efforts and avoid diluted or scattered development.
Ultimately, the goal of any SWOT analysis is to focus efforts towards achieving Chula Vista
early success and generate the momentum necessary to achieve the long-
term vision. The following is an examination of the Urban Core’s market and
economic strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

a. Strengths
• Location between San Diego and Tijuana
• Strong and established retail market
• Proximity to the Bay
• Established employment, retail, and residential center with high
occupancy
• Public investment in infrastructure
• Quality entry-level and mid-market rate ownership housing
• Transit linkages
• Traditional downtown district
• Good regional access
b. Weaknesses
• Relatively lower incomes
• Practically nonexistent tourism industry
• Low hotel room costs and hotel occupancy rates
• Aging building stock
• Relatively lower rents
• Public facility deficiencies
• Relatively neutral regional market image
• Weak linkage with the Bayfront

Chapter IV Existing Conditions IV-21


c. Opportunities
• Affordable development relative to downtown San Diego
• Ability to capture a larger share of housing demand than SANDAG
forecasts
• An alternative urban lifestyle from downtown San Diego
• Coastal view development and links to the Bayfront
• Pedestrian and transit-oriented development
• Intercept Mexican market consumers
• Become South County’s office employment, retail, and entertainment
center
• Housing for many incomes, preferences, and cultures
d. Threats
• Competition from other mixed-use urban nodes in the region
• Competition from Bayfront development if not linked with core
• Competition from the Eastern Urban Center if not adequately
distinguished
• Cost and complexity of land assembly and infill development
• Infrastructure and public facility constraints
• Not overcoming “second tier” reputation in regional market
• Exposure to Mexican currency fluctuations

IV-22 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


V. Mobility
A. Introduction V-1
B. Pedestrian Facilities V-2
C. Bicycle Facilities V-5
D. Transit Routes V-9 Chula Vista
E. Vehicle Traffic V-14
F. Parking V-46

Chapter V Mobility 1
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V. Mobility
A. Introduction
This chapter of the Specific Plan discusses the roles of mobility to support the
vision and goals for the planning area. This chapter presents improvements for
the main thoroughfares of the Urban Core and other streets within the Specific Chula Vista
Plan area, including pedestrian, bicycle facilities, transit, vehicular and parking
opportunities.

The Specific Plan strives to create pedestrian-friendly destinations in the Urban


Core. The Mobility chapter is intended to foster a downtown environment that
is the heart of the City with active, engaged, human-oriented streetscapes and
where the car is not viewed as the only mode of travel for the people who live,
work, or shop here.

Although mobility in many forms is encouraged and needed throughout the


Urban Core, the hierarchy of emphasis is: pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and
finally, the automobile. However, the mode emphasis will vary from street to
street and neighborhood to neighborhood. For instance, H Street is the transit
and vehicle backbone for the Urban Core, yet still provides enhanced pedestrian
and bicycle amenities. For Third Avenue, the pedestrian takes precedence and
vehicle speeds are reduced. While different streets will have varying emphasis
on the type of travel modes utilized, it is a goal of the Specific Plan that non-
motorized trip making will be the fastest growing component of all types of trips
made, rather than trips by private vehicle.

Information contained in this chapter relies in large part on the traffic engineering
analyses conducted for the Urban Core by Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.,
and is also complemented by the policies contained in Chapter VIII - Public
Realm Design Guidelines. For the complete traffic analyses, see Appendix B
- Traffic Impact Analysis.

Chapter V Mobility V-1


B. Pedestrian Facilities
1. Introduction
Creating better pedestrian facilities and providing an expanded and enhanced
pedestrian environment is a primary objective of the Urban Core. In fact, almost
all of Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines is devoted to improving
the pedestrian environment. With the increased density, mix of uses, and
pedestrian improvements, walking will become a preferred way to move about
the Urban Core.

Widened sidewalks are proposed for all key streets including Third Avenue, E
Street, F Street, H Street and Broadway. In Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design
Guidelines, direction is provided for sidewalks, crosswalks, furnishings,
intersections, trees and other landscaping, lighting, plazas and paseos -- all in
support of improving the pedestrian experience and encouraging “feet on the
street.” In this chapter, focus is provided on traffic calming elements in support
of pedestrian circulation.

2. Traffic Calming Design Elements


The potential design elements described below aim to balance the needs to
effectively moderate vehicle speeds and improve the pedestrian environment
while conforming to acceptable engineering standards. These traffic calming
tools include adding median refuge islands, corner curb extensions or
“bulbouts,” accent paving at crosswalks, and speed tables, as well as narrowing
traffic lanes. Design elements should be considered at key intersections, such
as those described in Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines, Section
H. Sidewalk and Pedestrian Improvements. Specific locations for these
elements will be identified through a Streetscape Master Plan or other similar
improvement plans.

a. Refuge Islands
Medians can be used to create pedestrian “refuge islands” that reduce the
number of lanes a pedestrian must cross at one time. Refuge islands are
extensions of the median that create a protected
crosswalk in the middle of the street. Refuge
islands should be considered on streets where
medians are provided: Third Avenue, H Street,
F Street and Broadway.

Example of a refuge island


Fg. 5.1

V-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


b. Bulbouts
The use of curb extensions or “bulbouts’ is
also suggested at selected intersections in the
Urban Core including Third Avenue, F Street,
Broadway and Woodlawn. Bulbouts extend the
curbs to widen the sidewalk area at crosswalk
locations. This reduces the distance that Chula Vista
pedestrians must cross. Intersections that
include bulbouts shall be designed so that the
outer travel lanes have adequate clearance
for turning of larger vehicles such as trucks. Example of a bulbout Fg. 5.2
Drainage issues with bulbouts are also an
important consideration, particularly in Chula
Vista where much of the drainage is surface. So where gutter flow cannot be
accommodated around the perimeter of a bulbout, it may be necessary to
incorporate features such as removable grates to facilitate water flow. Fire lane
access also can be accommodated successfully with thoughtful design.

c. Street Trees
Street trees offer an aesthetic alternative to the wide-open speedway feeling
of a treeless arterial. Street trees planted at the sidewalk edge and in medians
have a traffic calming effect as they create a visually enclosed and perceptually
narrower street scene. Street trees are encouraged throughout the Specific
Plan area. Within Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines, conceptual
streetscape plans incorporating street trees are provided for Third Avenue, E
Street, F Street, H Street, and Broadway as well as other primary streets and
neighborhoods streets. Street tree species recommendations are provided as
well as complementary landscape palettes.

d. Accent Paving
Accent paving such as unit pavers or colored concrete can be used on crosswalks
to accentuate pedestrian crossings. The change in texture gives motorists a
visual and audible heightened awareness which in turn can slow traffic. Please
refer to Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines for additional information
on accent paving and pedestrian crossings.

e. Narrowed Travel Lanes


Narrowing travel lanes, such as those proposed for H Street and Broadway,
encourage slower vehicle speeds and reduce the pedestrian crossing distances.
Drivers have been found to travel more slowly on streets with narrower lane
widths. The effect is largely psychological. Narrower travel lanes and street
widths require more attention from drivers and are often used in downtown

Chapter V Mobility V-3


environments that experience a higher degree of potential conflicts, such as
pedestrians, frequent movements to and from side streets, and vehicles making
parking maneuvers.

Narrower lanes also have the benefit of reducing pedestrian crossing distances
(which is also a safety benefit) and freeing up space for other uses such as
parking, bike lanes, medians, and widened sidewalks. The street cross sections
provided in the following section of this chapter provide for the least wide travel
lanes while still meeting traffic engineering needs.

V-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


C. Bicycle Facilities
The bicycle is an important component to any mobility plan in Chula Vista,
and especially for the Urban Core. Bicycling offers enjoyment and quality of
life for residents of Chula Vista, and it also offers a valuable, cost-effective,
and environmentally sensitive form of transportation. The Circulation Element
of the General Plan and the Bikeway Master Plan have targeted corridors in
Chula Vista
areas of the City for improvement with regard to bicycle facilities. Presently
the General Plan does not contain plans to add bikeways routes or upgrade
classifications of existing bikeways in the Urban
Core. Despite higher volumes of traffic on many
of the Urban Core roadways, bicyclists will still
access downtown businesses and attractions
and, therefore, will need to be considered
in any planning efforts encompassing this
area. Therefore the Specific Plan provides
an opportunity to address deficiencies in
the bikeway network. Figure 5.4 presents a
graphic depiction of the Existing and Proposed Bikeway classifications Fg. 5.3
Bikeways.

Class III bikeways (signs, no paint in right-of-way) are presently provided on the
following roadways within the Urban Core:
• Fourth Avenue
• Fifth Avenue (except between H and I Streets)
• F Street
• J Street

As a project feature of the Specific Plan, Class I bike paths are proposed to be
added to F Street and H Street. Both F and H Streets are excellent candidates
for enhanced bicycle transit due to the available right-of-way and connectivity
with the Bayfront. Bike path and lanes (Class I or Class II facilities respectively)
are typically more attractive to families and casual cyclists. The proposed
improvements parallel E Street and G Street, and provide an improved
opportunity for east-west bicycle travel. F Street and H Street cross sections
and proposed improvements are described under the Future Conditions and
Street Improvement Opportunities section found in Section E. Vehicle Traffic.
Bicycle paths should also be evaluated for Davidson Street and G Street.

Chapter V Mobility V-5


Existing and Proposed Bikeways
Fg. 5.2

V-6
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Bicycle facilities improvements are proposed for the following roadway
segments:
• Third Avenue - Class III
• Fifth Avenue (between H Street and I Street) – Class I (Future
redevelopment of Chula Vista Center may allow the opportunity to
complete this link.)
Chula Vista
• Broadway (between C Street and L Street) – Class II
• E Street – Class III
• F Street (between 3rd Avenue and I-5) - Class I
• G Street – Class III
• H Street (between Third Avenue and I-5) – Class I
• I Street – Class III
• J Street – Class III
Bike lanes on arterials with raised medians and bikeways in low traffic volume
neighborhoods should also be pursued. Higher traffic volumes on most streets
dictate Class II facilities, although bike lanes are generally not compatible
with diagonal parking. Further, the street network within transit focus areas
should accommodate at least Class I bicycle facilities to accommodate bicycle
commuters accessing public transit at the stations located at H Street/I-5 and
E Street/I-5, as well as the potential Bus Rapid Transit station at Third Avenue/
H Street. Opportunities may also exist for the addition of Class III bike lanes on
other streets within the Urban Core, such as Woodlawn Avenue.

Off-street facilities for bicycles (bicycle parking) are also integral to cyclists
for accessibility. Convenient bicycle parking should be provided along Third
Avenue, Fourth Avenue, Broadway, F Street, H Street, and J Street, as well as at
transit focus areas such as Third Avenue/H Street, H Street/I-5 and E Street/I-
5. Convenient bicycle parking should also be provided in commercial parking
lots, including destinations such as malls, and in commercial areas, event
locations, transit stops, and parks. Bicycle racks should be placed along the
street where appropriate and provided in parking lots at 5% of the number
of vehicle stalls. Racks in off-street locations should be visible and well lit to
discourage theft or vandalism and be placed to be convenient to the cyclist.
Refer to Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines for guidance on bicycle
rack design.

Chapter V Mobility V-7


In addition, bike stations should be considered at the H Street trolley and E
Street trolley centers. Bike stations should be located close to connections to
different modes of transit, to allow bicycle riders to make a convenient switch
in transportation choices without limiting mobility. Bike stations offer a secure
parking area, changing rooms, restrooms and showering facilities for bicycle
riders. There may also be shops for bicycle rentals, repairs and accessories.

V-8 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


D. Transit Routes
Chula Vista is presently served by a variety of local and regional transit systems.
These networks are planned to grow over the next thirty years. Provision of
adequate transit service is a key component for creating the desirable pedestrian
and urban environment envisioned for the Specific Plan.
Chula Vista
1. Existing Conditions
The Urban Core is currently served by 11 Chula Vista (CVT) routes (Routes 701,
702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 708, 709, 711 and 712), two Metropolitan
Transit System (MTS) routes (Routes 929 and 932), and the San Diego Trolley’s
Blue Line. Several CVT transit routes circulate within the Urban Core and Bayfront
area; others serve the greater Chula Vista area and provide connections to
National City Transit and other transit providers. MTS route 929 runs along
Third and Fourth Avenues through the Urban Core; MTS transit route 932 runs
along Broadway.

The San Diego Trolley’s Blue Line provides service between Qualcomm Stadium
and San Ysidro/Tijuana and extends through the Urban Core parallel to and
on the east side of I-5, with stations at Bayfront/E Street and H Street. Service
is provided seven days a week with service starting at around 5:00 a.m. and
ending around 12:00 a.m. During the peak periods, service is provided with 7.5-
minute headways and additional service to America Plaza/Old Town is available.
Headways of 15 minutes are provided during off-peak periods. Existing transit
routes are illustrated in Figure 5.5.

2. Future Conditions
Building upon the existing transit network, a number of regional transit
improvements are envisioned that will serve the Urban Core area. Many of these
lines provide transit stations within the Specific Plan and are integrated with the
land use concepts and planning. Other routes are located with transit stations
nearby; these routes could serve the Urban Core area. Figure 5.6 depicts the
planned routes in the South Bay.

a. Route 510 (Existing Blue Line Trolley)


This route would have increased frequency of service. Light Rail Transit (LRT)
headways would be reduced from ten minutes to five minutes. In order to
achieve this level of transit service, it would be necessary to grade separate the
LRT tracks from key surface streets, such as E Street and H Street within the
project area.

Chapter V Mobility V-9


Chula Vista Urban Core
Existing Transit Routes (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.5
3-27 Figure 3-5
Existing Transit Routes

V-10
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Future Regional Transit Routes (Source: SANDAG)
Fg. 5.6

V-11
Chapter V Mobility
b. South Bay Transit First Project
This project would provide regional Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service between
Otay Ranch in eastern Chula Vista and downtown San Diego. As described in
the transit first report, the first phase of the project would follow I-805 and SR-
94, along with East Palomar Street. Phase 1 of the project could be completed
by Year 2010. The second phase of the project would extend the line to the Otay
Border crossing and serve businesses in Otay Mesa.

c. Route 540 (I-5 Express Service)


This route would provide regional Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service from San
Ysidro to downtown San Diego and Old Town. This route would use median
lanes in the I-5 Freeway and would have a transit stop at H Street (with elevators
to the H Street overcrossing at I-5). This route would have infrequent stations,
which would allow for shorter travel times, as compared to Route 510.

d. Route 627 (H Street BRT)


This route would provide a transit connection between the Specific Plan area
and Southwestern College and the Eastern Urban Center. This route will connect
the major activity centers in the redeveloping areas of western Chula Vista to
the rapidly growing areas of eastern Chula Vista.

e. Route 628 (Sorrento Valley to San Ysidro International Border)


This route would provide regional BRT service between the San Ysidro and
Sorrento Mesa along the I-805 corridor. This service would connect Chula
Vista to major employment centers in Kearny Mesa and Sorrento Mesa. Transit
stations for this route would be located on I-805 at H Street.

f. West Side Shuttle


This project is a concept proposed to serve both the Specific Plan and Bayfront
Master Plan areas in western Chula Vista. This service would complement existing
and planned future transit improvements. The shuttle would provide localized
service between various uses in western Chula Vista and provide connections
to the regional transit system. (See Figure 5.7 for proposed West Side Shuttle
Route.) The shuttle would provide regional connectivity with the existing E Street
and H Street trolley stations (Routes 510, 540, and 627) and with the future
station at Third Avenue. In addition, five other stations are planned to serve
destinations within the Specific Plan, along with three additional stations within
the Bayfront Master Plan. Formation of the West Side Shuttle is included as
an implementation action in Chapter X - Plan Implementation and Community
Benefits Program.

V-12 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

6-25

Note: Route may use E Street or F Street


West Side Shuttle Proposed Route (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.7

Chapter V Mobility V-13


E. Vehicle Traffic
1. Existing Conditions
The existing roadway network is based upon a traditional grid system. “Streets”
typically running east-west and “Avenues” typically running north-south.
Some areas of the grid system have been interrupted over time. Following
are descriptions of the main roadways within the Urban Core; City roadway
classifications are illustrated in Figure 5.8. Existing daily traffic volumes are
shown in Figure 5.9. Existing Average Daily Traffic Volumes. As a rule of thumb,
typical existing dimensions for four lane east-west streets in the Urban Core is
64 feet of curb-to-curb roadway width on 80 feet of right-of-way. Typical existing
dimensions for north-south avenues in the Urban Core is 80 feet of curb-to-curb
roadway width on 100 feet of right-of-way. The descriptions of the following
roadways are based on the new classifications as provided for in the General
Plan Update (2005).

a. Third Avenue
Third Avenue is a north-south roadway. Third Avenue is classified as a four-lane
commercial boulevard between C Street and E Street and between H Street and
L Street and a two or four-lane downtown promenade between E Street and H
Street. Third Avenue is two lanes between E Street and F Street, approximately
72 feet in width. Between F Street and Madrona Street, Third Avenue is a four-
lane roadway with a raised median, approximately 101 feet in width. Between
Madrona Street and G Street, Third Avenue is four lanes and approximately
72’ feet in width. Angled parking is provided in these first three sections. Third
Avenue is a four-lane roadway with a center two-way left-turn lane between G
Street and H Street; it is approximately 66 feet in width and parallel parking is
provided. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the street in all four sections.
The posted speed limit is 35 mph.

b. E Street
E Street is an east-west roadway. E Street is classified as a four-lane gateway
between I-5 and I-805, with the exception of the segment between Broadway
and First Avenue, which is classified as a four-lane arterial. E Street is four
lanes between Third Avenue and Broadway, approximately 62 feet in width.
Parallel parking is provided on both sides of the street in this section. E Street
to the west of Broadway has four lanes plus a two-way left turn lane and no on-
street parking; it is approximately 70 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided on
both sides of the roadway in both sections. The posted speed is 30 mph.

c. F Street
F Street is an east-west roadway. F Street is classified as a four-lane downtown
promenade between I-5 and Broadway and as a two-lane downtown promenade

V-14 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

City of Chula Vista Roadway Classifications (Source: City of Chula Vista)


Fg. 5.8

Chapter V Mobility V-15


Existing Average Daily Traffic Volumes (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.9

V-16 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


between Broadway and Third Avenue. F Street is four lanes between Third Avenue
and Fourth Avenue with a raised median in the center and is approximately 65
feet in width. The only on-street parking provided in this segment is limited
parallel parking on the north side of F Street between Third Avenue and Garret
Avenue. Between Fourth Avenue and Broadway, F Street is a two-lane roadway,
approximately 40 feet in width with parallel parking on both sides. F Street has
four lanes between Broadway and I-5 with parallel parking on both sides and Chula Vista
is approximately 66 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided on both sides of the
roadway in all three sections. The posted speed limit is 30 mph.

d. H Street
H Street is an east-west roadway with a center two-way left turn lane. H Street is
classified as a six-lane gateway street between I-5 and Broadway and between
Hilltop Drive and I-805 and as a four-lane urban arterial between Broadway and
Hilltop Drive; however, it should be noted that H Street is not built to its ultimate
classification and functions as a four-lane roadway between I-5 and Broadway.
Parking is provided on-street east of Third Avenue. H Street is approximately 70
feet in curb-to-curb width between Third Avenue and Broadway and 64 feet in
curb-to-curb width between Broadway and I-5. Sidewalks are provided on both
sides of the street. The posted speed limit is 35 mph.

e. Broadway
Broadway is a north-south roadway. Broadway is classified as a four-lane gateway
street between SR-54 and C Street and as a four-lane commercial boulevard
between C Street and L Street; parallel parking is provided on both sides of the
roadway in these sections. Broadway is approximately 68 feet in width between
E Street and F Street. Between F Street and H Street, there is a two-way left turn
lane and the roadway is approximately 82 feet in width. Sidewalks are provided
on both sides of the street. The posted speed limit is 35 mph.

f. Neighborhood Streets
Neighborhood streets are located throughout the Specific Plan study area,
mostly outside the focus areas and sub-districts. These streets predominantly
serve established single-family and some multi-family neighborhoods.
Neighborhood streets generally are two lanes in width with on-street parking
on both sides. Figure 5.35 shows Woodlawn Avenue at 36’ in width. Sidewalks
and curb improvements are typically provided. Street surface and landscaping
conditions vary from street to street.

g. Alleys
The alley system within the urban core allow for increased access for delivery
services, as well as for residential and commercial parking areas. In addition
to providing alternate access routes, the alleys also somewhat relieve traffic
volume along the major corridors.
Chapter V Mobility V-17
h. Roadway Segments
Currently all roadway segments within the Urban Core are performing at a Level
of Service (LOS) C or better, based on volume to capacity ratio.

i. Intersections
Intersections within the Specific Plan area presently operate at Level of Service
(LOS) D or better during both a.m. and p.m. peak periods, except for the following
intersections:
• I-5 Northbound Ramp at E Street (LOS F - PM Peak)
• Woodlawn Avenue at H Street (LOS F – PM Peak)
• Broadway at SR-54 Westbound Ramp (LOS F – AM Peak)*
• L Street at Bay Boulevard (LOS F – PM Peak)*
• Bay Boulevard at I-5 Southbound Ramp (LOS E – PM Peak)*

The above intersections marked with an asterisk (*) are outside of the Specific
Plan Study Area boundary but are presented as the functioning of these
intersections affects traffic movement within the urban core.

3. Future Conditions and Street Improvement Opportunities


Following General Plan guidance, the Urban Core will provide a mix of housing,
offices, retail, civic and hospitality uses to support a vibrant urban environment.
Growth factors determined through computer modeling were applied to existing
traffic volumes at intersections to determine projected conditions in twenty five
years (Year 2030). The average growth in the Urban Core area was estimated to
be 10 percent. (See Figure 5.10 Year 2030 Projected Roadway Volumes.)

In developing the street improvement opportunities, focus was given to providing


a street environment that not only moves vehicle traffic and transit but creates
a safer and more enjoyable environment for pedestrians and bicycles in the
Specific Plan area. As noted previously, each street is intended to serve a multi-
modal function, with different modes of travel emphasized to a greater or lesser
extent on each street. The following section describes the improvements along
the roadway segments in the Urban Core area, specifically focusing on roadway
operational characteristics. The Mobility chapter concentrates only on curb-to-
curb street improvements that facilitate traffic flow. Although some information
is provided regarding parkway treatment and size, this element is a focus of
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines. The following recommendations
are to be used in conjunction with the recommendations contained in Chapter
VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines. The improvements will be implemented
over the term of the Specific Plan and may occur as comprehensive street
improvements or may be improved in phases as part of the redevelopment
process.
V-18 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Chula Vista

Year 2030 Projected Roadway Volumes (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)


Fg. 5.10

Chapter V Mobility V-19




     
    
      
            
Third Avenue between E
Street and F Street 2 2 No Median No Median 100' 100' 72' 24'/72' * Y Y/N * N N
Third Avenue between F
Street and Madrona Street 4 4 Raised Median Raised Median 100' 100' 101' 101' Y Y/N * N N
Third Avenue between
Madrona Street and G
Street 4 4 No Median No Median 100' 100' 72' 72' Y Y/N * N N
F Street between Third Raised Median, Two-Way Left Turn
Avenue and Fourth Avenue Bike Routes (Class Lane/Raised Median,
4 2 III) Bike Paths (Class I) 80' 80' 65' 48' Y Y Y Y
F Street between Fourth Two-Way Left Turn
Avenue and I-5 No Median, Bike Lane, No Median,
2 2 Routes (Class III) Bike Paths (Class I) 80' 80' 40' 48' Y Y Y Y
H Street between Third Two-Way Left Turn Raised Median, Bike
Avenue and Broadway 4 4 Lane Paths (Class I) 80'-106' 102' 70' 70' N Y N Y
Broadway between C Street Raised Median, Bike
and F Street 4 4 No Raised Median Lanes (Class II) 100' 100' 68'/82' 82' Y Y N Y
Broadway between F Street Two-Way Left Turn Raised Median, Bike
and H Street 4 4 Lane Lanes (Class II) 100' 100' 82' 82' Y Y N Y
Woodlawn Avenue between
E Street and H Street 2 2 No Median Park Area 60' Varies 36' Varies Y Y N N

E Street between Woodlawn Two-Way Left Turn Two-Way Left Turn
Avenue and 300' east of I-5 Lane, Westbound Lane, Westbound
4 4 Right Turn Lane Right Turn Lane @ I-5 80' 76' 70' 76' N N N N
H Street between Broadway Two-Way Left Turn
and I-5 Two-Way Left Turn Lane/Raised Median,
4 6 Lane Bike Paths (Class I) 80' 118' 64' 86' N N N N
* The 24' cross section assumes no parking along Third Avenue and the 72' cross section assumes diagonal parking on both sides of Third Avenue.
Proposed Roadway Segment Changes
Fg. 5.11

V-20
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
Figure 5.11 summarizes the proposed changes to the existing roadway network.
The table shows existing versus proposed conditions for the number of total
travel lanes, turn lanes or raised medians, curb-to-curb width, parking and bike
lanes. It should be noted that roadway segments that do not have any changes
compared to existing conditions are omitted from the table.

In addition to improvements to existing street segments, reintroduction of the Chula Vista


traditional street grid is proposed. By adding street segments, additional routes
choices are provided to all modes of travel (pedestrian, bicycle, transit and
vehicles). These reintroduced connections are especially important within an
approximately one-mile radius of the transit focus areas (E Street/I-5, H Street/
I-5 and Third Avenue/H Street). New connections could include:
a. Davidson Street between Woodlawn Avenue and Broadway – This
roadway segment could also be considered for future bikeway
improvements and providing bikeway priority at intersections due to the
lower vehicle volumes and direct connection to the future transit focus
area at E Street/I-5.
b. Woodlawn Avenue between F Street and G Street
c. Jefferson Avenue between E Street and H Street – This segment
potentially could also be extended to F Street or H Street
d. Parkway between Broadway and Woodlawn Avenue extension
e. Oaklawn Avenue between Flower Street and G Street

The reintroduction of roadway segments is a long range vision that can only
be accomplished if and when development occurs. The above segments are
provided only as examples of where the street segments could be reintroduced.
The City would evaluate the merits of such connections and retain its full
discretion as to whether such actions are in the City’s best interest.

Chapter V Mobility V-21


a. Third Avenue
The cross section of Third Avenue varies greatly between E Street and G Street.
The roadway varies between 72 feet and 101 feet.

The roadway will be maintained in its current two and four lane configuration
between E Street and G Street. The remainder of Third Avenue to L Street will
stay in the current four-lane configuration. It is proposed to retain the existing
median.

Diagonal parking will be provided for most parts of Third Avenue. Figure 5.16
shows the cross section where angled parking is permitted. Due to relatively
high through traffic volumes, it is recommended that the roadway be of sufficient
width to allow vehicles to back out without blocking the through traffic lane. It
should be noted that the curb-to-curb dimension is not reduced where diagonal
parking is provided on the segment of Third Avenue between E Street and F
Street.

V-22 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

*Dimension varies
Existing Third Avenue between E Street and F Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.12

*Dimension varies
Existing Third Avenue between F Street and Madrona Street (Source: Kimley-
Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.13

Chapter V Mobility V-23


*Dimension varies
Existing Third Avenue between Madrona Street and G Street
Fg. 5.14

*Dimension varies
Existing Third Avenue between G Street and H Street
Fg. 5.15

V-24 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Not Approved
72’

Chula Vista

Proposed Third Avenue between E Street and G Street with diagonal parking
Fg. 5.16

Not Approved

24’

Proposed Third Avenue between E Street and G Street without diagonal parking
Fg. 5.17

Chapter V Mobility V-25


Not Approved

52’

Proposed Third Avenue at signalized intersections (Source: Kimley-Horn and


Associates)
Fg. 5.18

V-26 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


b. E Street
The existing roadway cross section on E Street is adequate to serve future
traffic needs except for the segment between I-5 and 300’ east I-5. To mitigate
the intersection impact at the I-5 northbound ramp with E Street, a westbound
right-turn lane is required. It is recommended that E Street be widened between
Woodlawn Avenue and I-5, which will add an additional six feet in the curb-to-
curb width. This segment will need an additional 22 feet of right-of-way. This Chula Vista
added width will allow for an extended right-turn lane on westbound E Street
onto the I-5 northbound on-ramp. This improvement will help to reduce the
queues in the westbound direction and will improve the operations at the I-5
northbound ramp at the Woodlawn Avenue intersection.

Chapter V Mobility V-27


*Dimension varies
Existing E Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
Fg. 5.19

*Dimension varies
Existing E Street between Broadway and Woodlawn Avenue (Source: Kimley-
Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.20

V-28 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

*Dimension varies
Existing E Street between Woodlawn Avenue and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.21

62’

Proposed E Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn


and Associates)
Fg. 5.22

Chapter V Mobility V-29


76’

Proposed E Street between I-5 and 300’ east of I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.23

V-30 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


c. F Street
As a project feature of the Specific Plan, Class I bike lanes will be added to
F Street between Third Avenue and I-5, as illustrated in Figure 5.27. The new
Class I bike paths will improve the connectivity of the Urban Core to the Bayfront.
Greater synergy between the two areas will be fostered through pedestrian and
bicyclist opportunities. Wide parkways, off-street bike lanes, and wide sidewalks
will provide an opportunity to stroll or bicycle through the Urban Core. A Class II Chula Vista
facility will exist on F Street where a Class I bike path cannot be accommodated
due to mature trees or new/existing medians.

For F Street, a 16-foot parkway is provided between Fourth Avenue and


Broadway and a 12-foot parkway is provided between Third Avenue and
Fourth Avenue. The exact location and configuration of bike path and parkway
amenities will be decided through a future Streetscape Master Plan or other
similar improvement plan. Existing trees from Third Avenue to Broadway are
proposed to be preserved and incorporated into the streetscape theme. It is
also recommended that the overhead utility line be placed underground as part
of this improvement project.

Chapter V Mobility V-31


* Parallel parking exists on north side of F Street between Garret Avenue and Third Avenue; Dimension varies
Existing F Street between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue (Source: Kimley-
Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.24

*Dimension varies
Existing F Street between Fourth Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
Fg. 5.25

V-32 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

*Dimension varies
Existing F Street between Broadway and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.26

48’

Class I Class I
Bike Bike
Path Path

* Raised median east of Broadway in some segments **Dimension varies


Proposed F Street between Fourth Avenue and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.27

Chapter V Mobility V-33


d. H Street
The segment of H Street from Third Avenue to Broadway will be widened by
eight feet. The new segment configuration will feature two travel lanes, a raised
center median, and a Class I bike path on both sides of the street. One side of
the street will also have parallel parking.

An additional 22 feet in the curb-to-curb width will be added to H Street between


Broadway and I-5 to include an additional travel lane in both directions.
This improvement is consistent with the ultimate classification of H Street
as defined in the General Plan (2005). The additional travel lane is needed
to accommodate buildout daily and peak-hour traffic on H Street and would
improve the operations along this segment.

Further, a Class I bike path is proposed to be added to H Street between Third


Avenue and I-5. H Street is intended as the “backbone” of the Urban Core, as
it connects the transit focus areas at H Street/Third Avenue and H Street/I-5
and facilitates local and regional transit routes (and Bus Rapid Transit in the
future). A sixteen-foot wide parkway is proposed in order to create a grand
boulevard feeling and promote pedestrian use. The exact location of bike path
and other amenities will be decided through a future Streetscape Master Plan
or other similar improvement plans.

V-34 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Existing H Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn


and Associates)
Fg. 5.28

* *

*Dimension varies
Existing H Street between Broadway and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.29

Chapter V Mobility V-35


70’

PARKWAY PARKWAY

* Raised median varies in width (from 4’-14’) and is not provided in all locations.
Proposed H Street between Third Avenue and Broadway (Source: Kimley-Horn
and Associates)
Fg. 5.30

86’

PARKWAY PARKWAY

Proposed H Street between Broadway and I-5 (Source: Kimley-Horn and


Associates)
Fg. 5.31

V-36 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


e. Broadway
Broadway will be improved by adding a 12-foot raised median as a project
feature. In addition, a Class II bikeway is proposed to be added along Broadway
between C Street and L Street. Broadway will be widened by 14 feet between E
Street and F Street to accommodate a final consistent configuration consisting
of the raised median, bike lanes in both directions, and narrower traffic lanes.
Between F Street and H Street, the roadway will not need to be widened and the Chula Vista
existing median will be converted to a raised median. Nine-foot wide sidewalks
will support pedestrian circulation. It is proposed to retain the existing palm
trees within parkway areas.

Chapter V Mobility V-37


*Dimension varies
Existing Broadway between E Street and F Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.32

*Dimension varies
Existing Broadway between F Street and H Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.33

V-38 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


82’

Chula Vista

*
*At intersections, parking is removed to allow for 14’ median
Proposed Broadway from C Street to L Street (Source: Kimley-Horn and
Associates)
Fg. 5.34

Chapter V Mobility V-39


f. Woodlawn Avenue Couplet
Woodlawn Avenue is not currently built as a continuous roadway between E
Street and H Street, but it is recommended that the street grid be recreated by
adding the currently missing segments. As redevelopment occurs, Woodlawn
Avenue will be extended and converted to a one-way couplet between south
of E Street and north of H Street. The creation of the one-way couplet could
include the addition of a neighborhood public park between two one-way streets.
The neighborhood park may include a variety of uses, such as playgrounds,
walkways and basketball courts. The couplet would likely be implemented over
time as property redevelops.

V-40 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

*Dimension varies
Existing segments of Woodlawn Avenue between E Street and H Street (Source:
Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.35

Chapter V Mobility V-41


XX’

** Park area dimension to be determined.

Proposed Woodlawn Avenue entire length (Source: Kimley-Horn and


Associates)
Fg. 5.36

V-42 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


g. Neighborhood Streets
Enhancement strategies for neighborhood streets focus on the public realm
rather than roadway width and lane configuration; therefore, these strategies are
described in Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines. Such improvements
will focus on beautification, landscaping, improving sidewalk and street
conditions, and pedestrian system improvements such as crosswalks where
warranted. New connections reintroducing the grid system are also possible Chula Vista
and should be encouraged as development occurs or planned as capital
improvements projects in the long-term.

h. Alleys
Alleys, to the extent feasible, will allow for short-term loading and unloading
and other delivery services. Alleys will also function as alternative access to
uses and parking areas.

i. Roadway Segment Levels of Service and Intersection Improvements


With the implementation of recommended improvements and reclassifications,
Urban Core roadways will perform at an acceptable level of service. Intersection
improvements have been identified at 20 intersections related to implementation
of the Specific Plan. (See Figures 5.37 and 5.38 Proposed Intersection
Improvements.) After implementation of recommended improvements, 17
of the intersections would be improved to acceptable levels of service. Three
intersections would be improved to operation at LOS E: H Street/Broadway,
Third Avenue/J Street, and Hilltop/H Street. Although mitigation options have
been explored, improvement to an acceptable LOS of D is not feasible due
to right-of-way and existing building constraints or impediments to pedestrian
circulation.

Chapter V Mobility V-43




 
Bay Boulevard/I-5 SB Ramp/E Street Add EBT, EBR, SBL, SBR, and NBR lanes*
I-5 NB Ramp/E Street Add WBR lane and Light Rail Transit grade separation*
Broadway/F Street Add EBR lane
I-5 SB Ramp/H Street Add SBL, EBT, and EBR lanes*
I-5 NB Ramp/H Street Add WBR, WBT, restripe south approach to accommodate
dual left turns and Light Rail Transit grade separation*
Woodlawn Avenue/H Street Change Woodlawn Avenue to a one-way couplet
Broadway/H Street Add EBT Queue Jumper Lane, WBT and WBR lanes
Fifth Avenue/H Street Change NB and SB approaches to protective plus permissive
phasing in traffic signal and add WBR lane
Fourth Avenue/H Street Add EBR and WBR lanes
Hilltop Drive/H Street No improvements recommended due to ROW constraints
Broadway/SR-54 WB Ramp Add WBR lane*
Fourth Avenue/SR-54 EB Ramp Add EBR lane*
Fourth Avenue/Brisbane Street Add SBR overlap phase
Third Avenue/J Street No improvements recommended due to ROW constraints
Second Avenue/D Street Convert to an all-way stop controlled intersection
J Street/I-5 NB Ramp Add EBL and WBR lanes*
L Street/Bay Boulevard Add SBL lane, signalize intersection, and add NBR overlap
phasing to traffic signal
Bay Boulevard/I-5 SB Ramp Signalize intersection*
Industrial Boulevard/I-5 NB Ramp Signalize intersection*
RT = Right turn lane NBT = Northbound through lane
EBL = Eastbound left turn lane NBR = Northbound right turn lane
EBT = Eastbound through lane SBL = Southbound left turn lane
EBR = Eastbound right turn lane SBT = Southbound through lane
WBT = Westbound through lane SBR = Southbound right turn lane
WBR = Westbound right turn lane *Coordination with Caltrans is required
Proposed Intersection Improvements (Source: Kimley-Horn and Associates)
Fg. 5.37

V-44 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


4. Conclusions
The Specific Plan emphasizes a multi-modal strategy and provides project
benefit features in addition to required mitigation measures. This approach
accommodates additional development intensity while providing sufficient
levels of service.

The comprehensive traffic impact analysis for the Specific Plan evaluated Chula Vista
a total of 64 intersections and 32 roadways. Under existing conditions, five
intersections operate at LOS E or worse during peak periods and all roadway
segments function at an acceptable LOS. With implementation of the Specific
Plan, proposed improvements and multi-modal strategies, future conditions
show three intersections operating at LOS E or worse.

Chapter V Mobility V-45


F. Parking
1. Existing Conditions
Parking within the Specific Plan area is primarily provided for individual land
uses on-site. For example, commercial and office uses along H Street and
Broadway meet their parking demand on-site, and existing residential uses
are required to provide on-site parking. In addition, many of the major and
neighborhood streets with the Urban Core have on street parking available to
the general public.

In addition to on-site parking, a parking district has been established along


Third Avenue and abutting streets within the Village District. The parking district
through a metered system includes public parking both on Third Avenue, and
a series of small to large public parking lots. Within the Village parking district
approximately 509 metered spaces are on street and 1,205 spaces are provided
in 11 different public parking lot locations. The parking district establishes
parking supply for existing and new (permitted) commercial uses in the Village
commercial corridor and provides a mechanism for new conditionally permitted
commercial uses to pay an in-lieu fee instead of providing new on-site parking
spaces, which is often infeasible given the
developed condition of the commercial corridor.
The district also provides a comprehensive
maintenance program of existing parking lots.

2. Parking New Uses

Successful implementation of the Specific


Plan, which promotes pedestrian-friendly and
transit-friendly streetscapes and development,
will cause a gradual transition to a “park-once/
Fg. 5.38 walk-many” environment. This would be in stark
On-street parking is provided in some
areas
contrast to the current pattern, where many
customers park at one business then take a
short car trip to the next business. Proper design and promotion of local transit
and the proposed West Side Shuttle could promote the arrival of customers
by bus and bicycle/pedestrian travel to each business. Although alternative
modes of transportation (walking, bicycling and transit) are foundational to the
Specific Plan, vehicle use may remain one of the primary means of access
throughout the Urban Core. Therefore, in concert with the pedestrian, bicycle
and transit centered improvements recommended in the Specific Plan, the
provision of an adequate parking supply is necessary in order to provide for all
modal types of trips.

V-46 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Parking supply will need to be balanced and
should not overshadow the primary goal
of creating a vibrant pedestrian friendly
urban core. It is also recognized that one of
the greatest challenges to revitalization of
properties within the Specific Plan area may be
the ability to provide adequate on-site parking Chula Vista
for new commercial uses. With limited land
resources and the additional costs typically
associated with infill development, provision of Diagonal parking such as that above
on-site parking is often financially challenging, is provided on portions of Third Avenue
Fg. 5.39
and can make or break the success of a
commercial project.

The Specific Plan allows an intensification of development in the Urban Core


which will create an increased demand for off-street parking. Chapter VI - Land
Use and Development Regulations identify parking requirements such as the
minimum number of parking spaces required per use and parking locations.
Parking standards are identified for residential, guest, and non-residential
uses; parking locations are for the most required on-site parking. In addition,
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines provides guidance on the design
of parking lots and facilities, with an emphasis on accessibility and safety. As
new development occurs compliance with the development regulations and
design guidelines will be required.

While the majority of new uses will provide parking on-site, there are specific
locations such as within the Village district and transit focus areas that allow
some of the parking needs to be met off-site and/or through alternative
means such as in lieu fees and shared parking arrangements. This approach
is appropriate given the planned land uses for these subdistricts which are
primarily mixed use and typically have opposing peak parking demands. As
part of the approval process, projects will need to demonstrate that sufficient
parking will be made available with their development. The following section
further describes potential parking improvement strategies within the Urban
Core.

3. Parking Improvement Strategies

a. Parking Circulation
Parking should always be designed with accessibility and safety in mind. In
areas where pedestrian streetscapes and site design will be promoted, it is
desirable to provide buffers between pedestrians and traffic as much as
possible. Buffers can include low-profile elements such as bollards near the

Chapter V Mobility V-47


curb or additional parkway/tree well landscaping. A consistent layout of on-
street parking also helps to create visual separation between roadway traffic
and sidewalk areas. Properly designed buffers induce a feeling of safety by
pedestrians and help define crosswalk and outside seating areas. These design
principles are described in further detail in Chapter VII - Development Design
Guidelines and Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.

Access to new parking areas should be designed carefully so that incoming traffic
to centralized parking lots does not conflict with pedestrian circulation either
on major streets such as Third Avenue, H Street and Broadway, or internally
through parking lots and garages. Traffic should be routed onto major streets
by a directional sign program, so that undue incursions into nearby residential
neighborhoods do not occur. Alleys, although not currently a predominant
feature within the Urban Core, should be dedicated and extended with proper
site planning for new development. Alleys can provide additional access routes
to both on-site and centralized parking lots.

b. Parking Reductions
One method to create incentives for
redevelopment and restructuring of the urban
form is to minimize the number of required
parking spaces at identified transit nodes
and mixed-use areas. As set forth in Chapter
VI - Land Use and Development Regulations,
parking requirements have been reduced to
Example of parking structure be more consistent with urban standards and
wrapped with retail uses
Fg. 5.40
reflective of the multi-modal design principles
embraced by the Specific Plan.

c. Parking Districts
Parking Districts can be very effective tools to help create more parking, to
promote efficient use of existing parking spaces, and to provide a means for
allowing shared parking and off-site, remote parking for a development site. A
parking district was established several years ago in the Village District. Figure
5.42. Parking Strategy Map indicates areas within the Urban Core where
additional parking districts and transit focus area parking may be studied and
located. Future parking districts should be developed in cooperation with area
property owners and business owners.

Consideration should be given to expanding the Village parking district to


better align the boundaries with the Village subdistricts. On-site parking for
new commercial uses should not impede the intended pedestrian character
of the area, and may be better suited in centralized easy to reach locations. In

V-48 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Parking Strategy Map
Fg. 5.41

V-49
Chapter V Mobility
addition, some diagonal parking may be phased
out along Third Avenue as pedestrian and
landscaping improvements are implemented.
Replacement parking should be provided if
determined to be necessary in the short term.

An expanded in-lieu parking fee program


may be another means to providing efficient
parking supply within the parking districts.
The in-lieu fee program could assist some new
The pedestrian area is separated businesses in locating within the Urban Core,
from parking areas
Fg. 5.42 as the expense of providing on-site parking
would be offset. The assessment could also
assist the City by providing reimbursement for property acquisition, capital
funding, and operating funds for new parking lots or structures. The existing
in lieu fee program within the Village District should be reevaluated to ensure
adequate funding or reimbursement for new publicly owned parking lots is
being assessed. Parking developed under an in- lieu program would need to
be strategically timed in order to ensure a proper balance between parking
demand and supply.

Unlike a parking assessment district, the in-lieu fee program would not be a local
tax that would be levied upon all business owners in a designated area. The in-
lieu fee would be optional and only assessed on new commercial developments
within a specified area if on-site parking is not provided. The in-lieu fee would
be based on the number of required parking spaces that could not be provided
on-site by the development. A radius from a particular development could be
utilized, between one-quarter mile and one-
eighth mile walking distance, to determine
the location of the nearest off-street parking
lots that could feasibly serve that particular
business. This assessment would need to
evaluate the availability of parking in the
identified lots, including both the existing
demand and parking supply commitments
made to other nearby developments.

d. Parking Structures
The use of structured parking can be particularly
effective in allowing increased densities. The
Specific Plan recommends parking structures
where feasible, and in particular within the
Multi-level parking facility with retail
Fg. 5.43 transit focus areas (such as UC-2, UC-12 and
on ground floor

V-50 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-15), to encourage the intensification of mixed-use, commercial, office and
residential projects where parking can be provided on-site in a structured
format. Land values and the proximity to transit in these areas tend to support
the higher economic investment necessary to construct parking structures.
These parking structures could serve individual development sites, provide
shared facilities and/or serve as additional public parking facilities.
Chula Vista
Over the mid to long-term, parking structures
may also be warranted in the area around
Third Avenue, since existing surface parking
lots may only be sustainable in the near term.
As existing public surface lots redevelop, new
development should be required to replace
public parking either on or off site. In addition,
where appropriate and feasible, the use of
the incentives program should be encouraged
to enhance public parking opportunities
(See Chapter VI - Land Use and Development
New surface parking lots should be
Regulations.) well landscaped
Fg. 5.44

Chapter V Mobility V-51


V-52 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI. Land Use and Development Regulations
A. Administration VI-1
B. Land Use Matrix VI-4
C. Development Standards VI-10
D. Special Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts Chula Vista
and Transit Focus Areas VI-40
E. Special Provisions VI-42
F. Urban Amenity Requirements and Incentives VI-48
G. Signs VI-52
H. Other Regulations VI-53
I. Development Exceptions VI-54

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations 1


Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VI. Land Use and Development Regulations
A. Administration
1. Purpose
The purpose of this chapter is to establish the appropriate distribution, mix,
Chula Vista
intensity, physical form, and functional relationships of land uses within the
Urban Core. These regulations are intended to encourage and facilitate infill
development, mixed uses, pedestrian scale, urban amenities, transit use,
creative design, and the general revitalization of the Urban Core.

In contrast to the City’s existing Zoning Code, the Specific Plan’s Land Use and
Development Regulations and associated design guidelines utilize a “form-
based” approach. This approach places primary emphasis on the physical
form of the built environment and focuses on where and how the buildings are
placed rather than the use occupying the building. This is especially important
given the extent of mixed use development envisioned in Specific Plan which
requires flexibility in uses in order to be responsive to market demands while
still ensuring a clear vision of what the built environment should look like.

To that end the Specific Plan proposes a multi-dimensional approach to


creating the building form through the use of floor area ratio, lot coverage and/
or street wall frontage, and height regulations. In addition, the Specific Plan
provides graphic depictions of building placement relative to the street and
public spaces, and extensive design guidance for building and site planning is
contained in Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines.

2. Applicability
Proposed land uses and development regulations within the Urban Core shall
comply with the applicable provisions of this chapter. This chapter replaces
provisions of the Chula Vista Municipal Code Sections 19.24 through 19.40
and 19.44. Where in conflict with other sections of the Municipal Code, this
chapter shall apply, and where this chapter is silent, the Municipal Code shall
apply. The definitions found in the Chula Vista Municipal Code, section 19.04
apply to the Specific Plan, except where specific definitions are provided within
the Specific Plan (Section C of this chapter and Appendix A - Glossary).

3. Administration
The administration of this chapter shall be in accordance with Chapter XI - Plan
Administration.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-1


4. Subdistricts
The Specific Plan area has been grouped into the following three districts based
on similar building and use types: the Village, the Urban Core, and the Corridors.
These three districts have been further subdivided into 25 subdistricts, each
with its own character for buildings and public spaces and specified uses.
Zoning regulations for each subdistrict are presented on individual zoning
sheets specific to that subdistrict. The Urban Core Specific Plan Subdistricts
Key Map, shown in Figure 6.1, identifies the subdistrict boundaries. Please
note that in the event that a project encompasses more than one subdistrict,
a determination of the primary subdistrict may be necessary at the time of
individual project submittal.

VI-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Specific Plan Subdistricts Key Map
Fg. 6.1

VI-3
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations
B. Land Use Matrix
The following Land Use Matrix specifies permitted uses, conditionally permitted
uses, and prohibited uses for each of the Specific Plan subdistricts. Permitted
land uses of the existing underlying zone shall continue to apply to areas outside
of the Specific Plan subdistricts.

Permitted uses indicate that the use is allowed in the specified zone. Conditionally
permitted uses require the granting of a Conditional Use Permit as provided in
Municipal Code Section 2.55, 19.14, and/or 19.58. Uses marked as prohibited
uses are not permitted in the specified subdistrict. Accessory uses means a
use or structure subordinate to the principal use of a building on the same
lot, and serving a purpose customarily incidental to the use of the principal
building. Uses not specifically listed in the Land Use Matrix may be considered
by the Chula Vista Redevelopment Corporation (CVRC) or Planning Commission
if determined to be of the same general character of those uses listed in the
matrix for the Specific Subdistrict to those uses listed in the matrix.

VI-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan





 


 
  
  
  
  
 

Chula Vista
(a)
Apartments, efficiency P P(a) P P -- P(a)
Boardinghouses or lodginghouses P P(a) P P -- P(a)
Dwellings, single-family -- -- -- -- -- --
Dwelling groups (2 or more homes on same lot) -- -- P P -- --
Dwellings, two-family or duplex -- -- -- -- -- --
Dwellings, townhouse P P(a) P P -- P(a)
Dwellings, multiple P P(a) P P -- P(a)
Dwellings, temporary -- -- -- -- -- --
Family day care homes, large (9 to 14 children) CUP CUP(b) -- -- -- CUP(b)
Family day care homes, small (8 or fewer CUP CUP(b) -- -- -- CUP(b)
children)
Full-time foster homes P P(a) -- -- -- P(a)
Live/Work P(c) P(c) P(c) CUP -- P(c)
Mixed commercial/residential projects -- P(a) P -- -- P(a)
Mobilehomes -- -- -- -- -- --
Mobilehome parks -- -- -- -- -- --
Nursing homes CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Residential care facilities CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Senior housing developments CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Shopkeeper unit P(c) P(c) P(c) CUP -- P(c)
Tract offices, temporary -- -- -- -- -- --


Ambulance services CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Animal shelters -- -- -- -- -- --
Cemeteries CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Civic facilities P P P P P P
Community service facilities -- P(d) P -- P P
Court facilities -- -- P -- -- --
Court-supported facilities -- P(a) -- -- P P
Fire stations -- P P -- P P
Health care facility (including 24 hour facilities) CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Libraries -- P P -- P P
Museums CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Non-commercial recreation centers (indoor) -- P P -- P P
Non-commercial recreation centers (outdoor) CUP CUP P CUP P P
Parks (public and private) P P P P P P
Police stations -- P P -- P P
Post office -- P P -- P P
Public utility uses and structures CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Religious facilities CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Schools, professional, business and technical -- P(b) P -- P P
(not requiring outdoor facilities)
Schools, public CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Social and fraternal organization facilities CUP CUP(d) P CUP P P
Telecommunications facilities CUP CUP(d) CUP CUP CUP CUP
Radio and television broadcasting CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP CUP
Youth center CUP CUP(d) P -- P P
Land Use Matrix (Page 1 of 5)
Fg. 6.2

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-5





 


 
  
  
  
  
 


Administrative and executive offices -- P P -- P P
Financial offices -- P P -- P P
Medical and dental offices/clinic -- P P -- P P
Medical, optical, and dental laboratory -- CUP(b) CUP -- CUP P
Professional offices (architectural, engineering, -- P P -- P P
law)
Real estate offices -- P P -- P P
Research and development -- P P -- P P
Veterinary clinics/animal hospitals -- CUP(b) P -- P P

Automatic teller machines -- P P -- P P
Bail bond facilities -- -- -- -- -- P
Barbershop and beauty shop -- P(e) P -- P P
Bicycle repair -- P P -- P P
Body art/tattoo/piercing salon -- -- CUP(f) -- CUP(f) P(f)
Carpentry shops -- -- -- -- -- P
Catering halls (with full-time, full-service -- CUP(b) -- -- -- P
restaurants, operating after hours)
Check cashing establishments -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Cobbler -- P(e) P -- P P
Coin-operated laundry -- P(d) P -- P P
Day nursery -- CUP(b) P -- P P
Day spa -- P P -- P P
Drycleaners -- CUP(b) P -- P P
Electrician services -- CUP(b) -- -- -- P
Electronics repair -- CUP(b) -- -- -- P
Exterminating services -- -- -- -- -- P
Financial services (without drive-through access -- P(e) P -- P P
onto Third Avenue)
Fortune-telling -- P P -- P P
Funeral parlors and mortuaries -- -- P -- P P
General contracting services -- P(b) CUP -- CUP P
Heating and cooling services -- CUP(b) -- -- -- P
Home appliance repair -- CUP(b) -- -- -- P
Home furnishing repair (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) -- P(e) -- -- -- P
Jewelry and watch repair -- P P -- P P
Locksmiths -- P(d) P -- P P
Manicure and pedicure shops -- P(e) P -- P P
Massage parlor -- -- -- -- -- P(h)
Pedi-cabs -- P P -- P P
Pet grooming -- P(e) P -- P P
Photocopying and blueprinting services (over -- CUP P -- P P
2500 sq. ft.)
Photocopying and blueprinting services (up to -- P(e) P -- P P
2500 sq. ft.)
Photography studios -- P P -- P P
Plumbing services -- CUP(b) P -- P P
Postal stores (over 2500 sq. ft.) -- CUP P -- P P
Postal stores (up to 2500 sq. ft.) -- P(e) P -- P P
Printing and publishing services -- P(b) P -- P P
Tailor shops -- P(e) P -- P P
Ticket agencies -- P P -- P P
Travel agencies -- P(e) P -- P P
Video/DVD rentals/sales (no adult rentals/sales) -- P(b) P -- P P

Land Use Matrix (Page 2 of 5)


Fg. 6.3

VI-6 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan





 


 
  
  
  
  
 

Chula Vista

Adult book/video sales -- -- -- -- -- CUP(h)
Antique shops (not including secondhand stores) -- P P -- P P
Bait and tackle shops -- P P -- P P
Bookstore -- P P -- P P
Building material sales (indoor; up to 5,000 sqft) -- P P -- P P
Building material sales (indoor; over 5,000 sqft) -- -- -- -- -- P
Convenience stores -- -- P -- P P
Department stores -- CUP P -- P P
Drive-through retail sales -- -- -- -- -- P
Florist -- P P -- P P
Galleries (photography, art) -- P P -- P P
Hardware stores (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) -- P P -- P P
Hardware stores (over 5,000 sq. ft.) -- -- P -- P P
Home furnishing stores (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) -- P(e) P -- P P
Handicraft shops (up to 5,000 sq. ft) -- P P -- P P
Lumberyards -- -- CUP -- CUP CUP
Marine sales, supplies, and rentals -- -- CUP -- CUP P
Newstands -- P P -- P P
Pawn shops -- -- -- -- -- P
Pet shops -- CUP P -- P P
Pool and spa supplies -- CUP(b) -- -- -- P
Prescription pharmacy -- P P -- P P
Product wholesaling (50% of area must be -- CUP P -- P P
devoted to retail)
Retail sales (over 5,000 sq. ft.) -- CUP P -- P P
Retail sales (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) -- P P -- P P
Secondhand stores -- P(g) -- -- -- P

Automobile and recreational vehicle storage -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Automobile sales/leasing, new -- -- P -- P CUP
Automobile sales/leasing, new (indoor; under -- CUP P -- P P
5,000 sqft)
Automobile sales/leasing, used -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Automobile dismantling -- -- -- -- -- --
Automobile maintenance and repair, minor -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Automobile parts and accessories sales -- -- P -- P P
Automobile rental agencies -- -- P -- P CUP
Automobile salvage -- -- -- -- -- --
Automobile service stations (with or without -- -- -- -- -- CUP
convenience store)
Automobile towing services -- -- -- -- -- --
Automobile paint and body shops -- -- -- -- -- --
Boat and equipment sales and rentals -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Car washes, automated, drive-through -- -- CUP -- CUP CUP
Car washes, hand -- -- CUP -- CUP P
Parking structures and lots, commercial -- P(b) P -- P CUP
Parking structures and lots, public -- P(b) P -- P CUP
Motorcycle sales/leasing -- -- P -- P CUP
Specialty repair shops -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Taxi-cab services -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Truck and trailer sales and rentals -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Trucking yards, teminals, and distribution -- -- -- -- -- --
operations

Land Use Matrix (Page 3 of 5)


Fg. 6.4

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-7





 


 
  
  
  
  
 


Adult-oriented entertainment -- -- -- -- -- --
Amusement facilities -- CUP CUP -- CUP CUP
Athletic/health clubs -- P P -- P P
Bakery (less than 5,000 sq. ft.) -- P P -- P P
Bed and breakfast -- P P -- P P
Billiard and pool parlors -- CUP(b) CUP -- CUP P
Bowling alleys -- CUP P -- P P
Cardroom -- -- -- -- -- --
Carnivals (temporary) -- CUP CUP -- CUP CUP
Catering services -- CUP CUP -- CUP P
Cocktail lounge -- CUP P -- P P
Coffeehouse/café -- P P -- P P
Commercial recreation facilities (indoor) -- CUP CUP -- CUP CUP
Commercial recreation facilities (outdoor) -- CUP CUP -- CUP CUP
Dairy sales -- P P -- P P
Dancehall -- P(h) P(h) -- P(h) P(h)
Delicatessen/sandwich shop -- P P -- P P
Drive-in theaters -- -- -- -- -- --
Farmer's market CUP CUP CUP -- CUP CUP
Golf driving ranges (with or without lighting) -- -- -- -- -- --
Grocery, fruit, or vegetable sales -- P P -- P P
Hotels/timeshares -- CUP P -- P P
Ice cream/yogurt shop -- P P -- P P
Ice skating rinks (indoor) -- -- CUP -- CUP P
Liquor stores (excluding specialty wine retail) -- -- CUP -- CUP CUP
Live entertainment (excluding adult-oriented -- P P -- P P
entertainment)
Meat sales -- P P -- P P
Miniature golf course -- -- P -- P P
Motel -- -- -- -- -- --
Produce stands (temporary) -- CUP P -- P P
Restaurants (with sale of alcoholic beverages) -- P P -- P P
Restaurants, drive-through -- -- P -- P P
Restaurants, fast food (non-formula franchise -- P P -- P P
without drive-through)
Restaurants, full-service (outdoor dining on public -- P P -- P P
or private property)
Roller and ice skating rinks (indoor) -- -- CUP -- CUP P
Shooting clubs (indoor) -- CUP CUP -- CUP CUP
Smokeshop -- P P -- P P
Snack bar -- P P -- P P
Specialty wine retail -- P P -- P P
Swimming pools -- CUP(d) P -- P P
Taverns -- CUP P -- P P
Tennis courts P P(d) P P P P
Theaters, live or movie (no adult theaters) -- P P -- P P

Land Use Matrix (Page 4 of 5)


Fg. 6.5

VI-8 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan





 


 
  
  
  
  
 

Chula Vista

Animal grazing, breeding, boarding, and training -- -- -- -- -- --
(including cattle, sheep, goats)
Apiaries -- -- -- -- -- --
Crop and tree farming -- -- -- -- -- --
Equestrian facilities -- -- -- -- -- --
Horse stables (commercial) -- -- -- -- -- --
Horse stables (non-commercial) -- -- -- -- -- --
Kennels (commercial) -- -- -- -- -- P
Kennels (non-commercial) -- -- -- -- -- P
Plant nurseries (up to 5,000 sq. ft.) -- -- -- -- -- P
Poultry farms -- -- -- -- -- --

Caretaker units -- -- -- -- -- P
Employee units (detached) -- -- -- -- -- CUP
Home occupations P P P -- P P
Roof-mounted satellite dishes -- CUP CUP -- CUP P
Water reservoir -- -- -- -- -- --
*The Urban Core is a combination of the Boulevard and Promenade Visioning Areas.
(a) Prohibited on groundfloor fronting Third Avenue
(b) Prohibited on groundfloor V-2 District
(c) Work-related component may include uses allowed in professional office, commercial-service, or commercial-retail and may require CUP
(d) Prohibited in V-2 district
(e) Limited to 15% of business mix of groundfloor shopfronts in V-2 District
(f) Prohibited on groundfloor
(g) Maximum of 5,000 sq.ft.
(h) Use subject to CVMC 19.58.024 provisions

Land Use Matrix (Page 5 of 5)


Fg. 6.6

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-9


C. Development Standards
1. Sub-district Zoning Sheets
The purpose of the subdistrict zoning sheets is to provide quick reference land
use and development requirements for each subdistrict. Proposed development
in the Specific Plan area shall comply with the development standards of the
applicable zoning sheets. Subdistricts labeled as “Neighborhood Transition
Combining Districts” or “Transit Focus Areas” should refer to Section D. Special
Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts and Transit Focus
Areas for further requirements.

2. Floor Area Ratio


Floor Area Ratio (FAR) is a measure of the bulk of buildings on a lot or site.
FAR is calculated by dividing the gross floor area of all buildings on a lot or site
by the lot or site area. Gross floor area includes the total enclosed area of all
floors of a building measured from the exterior walls including halls, stairways,
elevator shafts at each floor level, service and mechanical equipment rooms,
balconies, recreation rooms, and attics having a height of more than seven feet
but excluding area used exclusively for vehicle parking or loading. For example,
a two-story building occupying one-half of a site has an FAR of 1.0. Any floor
area below finish grade does not count towards FAR. If floors are partially
above and partially below grade, then only the proportion of the floor above
grade is counted towards FAR. For example, if 5 feet of a 10-foot high floor
is below grade, then only 50% of the floor area will count towards FAR. (See
Figure 6.7 for example FAR diagrams.)

3. Lot Coverage
Lot coverage is the percentage of a lot or site covered by buildings. (See Figure
6.7 for example lot coverage diagrams.)

4. Building Height

Building heights are measured from finish grade to top of roof, not including
parapets or other architectural features. Minimum building heights in some
subdistricts ensure that the desired building heights are achieved.

VI-10 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


2.0 FAR
1.0 FAR 2.0 FAR
70% Lot Coverage
Chula Vista
70% Lot Coverage 90% Lot Coverage

3.0 FAR 3.0 FAR


3.0 FAR 3.5 FAR
90% Lot Coverage 90% Lot Coverage
70% Lot Coverage 90% Lot Coverage

5.0 FAR
4.0 FAR 5.0 FAR
50% Lot Coverage
70% Lot Coverage 70% Lot Coverage

6.0 FAR 6.0 FAR 6.0 FAR


50% Lot Coverage 70% Lot Coverage 90% Lot Coverage
Example FAR and lot coverage diagrams (These diagrams are provided for
illustrative purposes only and are not the only options for building form.)
Fg. 6.7

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-11


5. Building Stepback
In some districts, the upper portion of a building must step back from the
lower portion of the building when located adjacent to major streets. The
stepback is a minimum horizontal distance, as measured from the street
property line, and must occur at or below the noted building height. At primary
gateways, as identified in this Specific Plan, stepback requirements may be
modified to allow significant architecture or design statements at these corner
locations. Subdistricts labeled as Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts
have additional stepbacks addressed in Section D. Neighborhood Transition
Combining Districts.

6. Street Wall Frontage


Street wall frontage is the percentage of street front that must be built to, with
the ground floor building façade at the minimum setback.

7. Setback
Setback is the distance between the property line and the building. Setback
is measured horizontally and perpendicular to the property line. Minimum
setbacks in some subdistricts ensure appropriate distances between land uses.
Maximum setbacks in some subdistricts ensure that the desired building line
is maintained, e.g. along certain streets. Subdistricts labeled as Neighborhood
Transition Combining Districts have additional rear and side yard setbacks which
are addressed in Section D. Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts.

8. Open Space Requirement

For the purposes of the open space requirement, the term “open space” refers
to any areas with minimum dimensions of 60 square feet (6’x10’) and devoted
to the following common, private, or public uses: patio, porch, balcony, deck,
garden, playground, plaza, swimming pool, sports court/field, recreation room,
gym, spa, community room, cultural arts, lawn/turf, pond, fountain, atrium,
sunroom, theater, amphitheater, band shell, gazebo, picnic area, shelter, roof,
or similar passive or active recreational/leisure use or facility that is not used
for enclosed dwelling unit floor area or commercial use space.

9. Primary Land Uses

Primary land uses define the character and function of each subdistrict but are
not intended to be the only uses that may be permitted. The primary land uses
designate the maximum percentages of floor area devoted to each use; there
are limited instances where a minimum percentage requirement applies. There

VI-12 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


are use requirements in certain districts at ground floor locations, such as for
ground floor retail uses in the V-2 subdistrict. General categories are noted
on each zoning sheet while specific uses, including permitted and conditional
uses, are listed in the Land Use Matrix.

Maximum percentage of land uses are intended to generally achieve on a


parcel basis the overall intent of land use mix that was envisioned on a district- Chula Vista
wide basis by the General Plan. For subdistricts with more than one primary
land use, the maximum FAR for each land use is calculated by multiplying the
primary land use percentage by the maximum FAR. For example:

V-2 Subdistrict

Example Lot Size: 10,000 sq.ft.

Max. FAR: 2.0 = 20,000 sq.ft. buildable area

Primary Land Use: Residential 40% Max. or 8,000 sq.ft. residential


Retail 40% Max or 8,000 sq.ft. retail
Office 20% Max or 4,000 sq.ft office
Total 20,000 sq.ft.

10. Parking Regulations


Development proposals within the Specific Plan area shall comply with the
type, location, and number of parking spaces established for residential and
non-residential land uses as specified herein. For residential uses, a minimum
amount of parking has been designated for use by the residents of the project.
In addition, an amount of guest parking has been planned. Guest parking is
arrived at by multiplying the cumulative total number of project dwelling units
by the guest parking ratio. A percentage of the required parking must be
provided onsite as indicated on the zoning sheets for each subdistrict. Parking
is onsite if it is within the project, provided on an adjacent site, and/or within
a comprehensive development/center. Parking is allowed offsite if it is within
500-feet of the project and/or provided as an alternative in lieu (e.g. transit,
ride-share, flex, etc.). Offsite parking must be accessible from publicly available
pedestrian access and assured in terms of reservation in perpetuity, for the use
it serves or an alternative replacement plan will be required.

11. Pedestrian Connections and Walkways


Additional side setbacks may be required for pedestrian connections such as
mid-block paseos.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-13


V-1 East Village

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 90%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
45’ Max Height

9. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 100% Max
18’ Min Height

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Behind /Subterranean/Tuck Under
2. Residential Parking:
Section View Fg. 6.8
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
Mid Block
Street Paseo
Sidewalk

Plaza
0’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.9 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-14 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


V-2 Village

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 0.75 Max: 2.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 75% Max: 90%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory

5. Street Wall Frontage: 80% Min


6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
45’ Max Height
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 40% Max (Not allowed on
18’ Min Height

Third Avenue on ground floor, except for


access)
Retail: 40% Max
Office: 20% Max

Parking Regulations
Section View Fg. 6.10
1. Parking Locations:
Behind/Subterranean/Tuck Under
2. Residential Parking:
Mid Block
Min: 1.5 space/du Street Paseo

Guest: 1 space/10 du Sidewalk

Onsite Min: None Plaza


0’ Min Setback

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.11

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-15


V-3 West Village
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 2.0 Max: 4.5
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 70% Max: 90%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 84’*
*Buidlings fronting Third Avenue between F
Street and Park Way are limited to 45’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
15’ Min Stepback
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
84’ Max Height

Neighborhood Transition: See Section D. for


additional setbacks for parcels adjacent
to R-1 and R-2 districts
18’ Min Height

7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du


35’

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 100% Max (Not allowed on
ground floor of Third Avenue or E Street,
except for access)
Section View Fg.
Fg.6.12
1.2
Retail: 10% Max (North of E Street and west
of Landis Avenue - retail only)
Office: 10% Max
Mid Block
Street Paseo Parking Regulations
Sidewalk
1. Parking Locations:
Plaza
Behind/Subterranean/Tuck Under
0’ Min Setback

2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Plan View Fg. 6.13 Onsite Min: None
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
VI-16 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
V-4 Civic Center
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du

60’ Max Height


8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 100% Max

18’ Min Height


Office: 100% Max
Public/Quasi-Public: 100% Max

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations: 15’ Min Setback

Behind/Subterranean/Tuck Under Section View Fg. 6.14


2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du Street
Onsite Min: 50% Sidewalk

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Plaza
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
15’ Min Setback

Onsite Min: None

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg.
Fg.1.3
6.15

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-17


UC-1 St. Rose
(Transit Focus Area)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 2.0 Max: 4.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: 80% Min
6. Setbacks:
15’ Min Stepback Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
84’ Max Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 70% Max (Not allowed on Third
30’ Min Height

Avenue or H Street frontage on ground


floor, except for access)
35’

Retail: 10% Max


Office: 20% Max

Parking Regulations
Section View Fg. 6.16
1. Parking Locations:
Structure/Subterranean/Behind/Tuck
Under
Mid Block
Street Paseo 2. Residential Parking:
Sidewalk Min: 1 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Plaza
0’ Min Setback

Onsite Min: 50%


3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.17 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-18 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-2 Gateway
(Transit Focus Area)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 2.5 Max: 5.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: 80% Min
15’ Min Stepback
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’* Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk) 15’ Min Stepback

7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du


84’ Max Height
45’ Min Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 70% Max (Not allowed on
Third Avenue or H Street frontage on 35’
35’

ground floor, except for access)


Retail: 10% Max
8’ Min Setback
Office: 20% Max
Section View Fg. 6.18
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
8’ Min ROW

Any location except in front of building


2. Residential Parking: Street

Min: 1 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du Sidewalk

Onsite Min: 50%


Plaza
8’ Min Setback

16’ Total Sidewalk

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.19

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-19


UC-3 Roosevelt

Urban Regulations

Rezone of this subdistrict 1. Floor Area Ratio:


Min: 1.0 Max: 3.0
not adopted.
2. Lot Coverage:
See CVMC 19.28 (R-3 zone) Min: N/A Max: 70%
and City Design Manual for 3. Building Height:
development regulations and Min: 18’ Max: 60’
design guidelines. 4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
60’ Max Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 100% Max
30’ Min Height

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site, except in front of building
15’ Min Setback
2. Residential Parking:
Section View Fg. 6.20 Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
Street

Sidewalk

Plaza
15’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.21 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-20 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-4 Hospital

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’ Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk)
84’ Max Height
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
30’ Min Height

Office: 100% Max


Retail: 20% Max

Parking Regulations
8’ Min Setback
1. Parking Locations:
Any Section View Fg. 6.22

2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
8’ Min ROW

Onsite Min: 100%


Street

Sidewalk
16’ Total Sidewalk

Plaza
8’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.23

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-21


UC-5 Soho
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: N/A
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’ Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
60’ Max Height

sidewalk)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
30’ Min Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Retail: 50% Max
Office: 100% Max

Parking Regulations
8’ Min Setback

Section View Fg. 6.24 1. Parking Locations:


Any location except in front of building
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
8’ Min ROW

Onsite Min: 50%


Street

Sidewalk
8’ Min Setback

Plaza
16’ Total Sidewalk

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.25 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-22 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-6 Chula Vista Center Residential
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 30’
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks: 15’ Min Stepback

Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A

60’ Max Height


Neighborhood Transition: See Section
D. for additional setbacks for parcels
adjacent to R-1 and R-2 districts
18’ Min Height
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
30’

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 100% Max

15’ Min Setback


Parking Regulations
Section View Fg. 6.26
1. Parking Locations:
Structured
2. Residential Parking: Street
Min: 1.5 space/du Sidewalk
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
15’ Min Setback

Plaza

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.27

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-23


UC-7 Chula Vista Center

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0

2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 25% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 8’* Street Max: N/A
(*Along H Street only to provide total of 16’
sidewalk)
60’ Max Height

7. Open Space Requirement: N/A


8. Primary Land Uses:
18’ Min Height

Retail: 100% Max


Office: 25% Max (Not allowed on ground
floor facade, except for access)

8’ Min Setback Parking Regulations


Section View Fg. 6.28 1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Non-Residential Parking:
8’ Min ROW

Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Street Onsite Min: 100%

Sidewalk
8’ Min Setback

16’ Total Sidewalk

Plaza

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.29 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-24 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-8 Otis
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio: Rezone of this subdistrict
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
not adopted. Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70% See CVMC 19.26 (R-2 zone)
3. Building Height: and City Design Manual for
Min: 18’ Max: 45’ development regulations and
design guidelines.
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses: 45’ Max Height
Residential: 100% Max 18’ Min Height

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site except in front of building
15’ Min Setback
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du Section View Fg. 6.30
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%

Street
Sidewalk
15’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.31

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-25


UC-9 Mid H Street
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
72’ Max Height

2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: N/A
18’ Min Height

3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 72’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 70% Min
8’-16’ Min Setback
6. Setbacks:
Section View Fg. 6.32
H Street East of Broadway
Street Min: 8’ Street Max: N/A
H Street West of Broadway
3’ Min

Street Min: 16’ Street Max: N/A


ROW

Street Broadway
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A
Sidewalk
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
Plaza
16’ Min Setback
and Total Sidewalk

8. Primary Land Uses:


Retail: 100% Max
Office: 25% Max

Parking Regulations
West of Broadway
1. Parking Locations:
8’ Min ROW

Any, except in front of building


Street
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Sidewalk

Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%
Plaza
16’ Total Sidewalk
8’ Min Setback

East of Broadway

Plan View Fg. 6.33


Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
VI-26 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
UC-10 Chula Vista Center West
(Transit Focus Area and
Neighborhood Transition Combining District)
Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Rezone of portions of this
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
subdistrict not adopted. Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80% See CVMC 19.24 (R-1 zone);
3. Building Height: 19.26 (R-2 zone); and 19.28
Min: 18’ Max: 72’ (R-3 zone) and City Design Manual
for development regulations and
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
design guidelines.
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
H Street
Street Min: 16’ Street Max: N/A
Broadway 72’ Max Height

Street Min: 0’ Street Max: N/A


7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
18’ Min Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 40% Max (Not allowed
within 500’ of the southwest corner of
Broadway and H Street intersection,
on any floor; Not allowed on Broadway
or H Street frontage on ground floor, 16’ Min Setback
except for access)
Section View Fg. 6.34
Retail: 50% Max
Office: 30% Max (Not allowed on ground
floor facade, except for access)
3’ Min
ROW

Parking Regulations
Street
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
Sidewalk
2. Residential Parking:
Plaza
16’ Min Setback
and Total Sidewalk

Min: 1.5 space/du


Guest: 0 spaces
Onsite Min: 100%
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100% Plan View Fg. 6.35
Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations
that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.
Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-27
UC-11 Chula Vista Center West Residential
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
Rezone of this subdistrict 1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
not adopted.
2. Lot Coverage:
See CVMC 19.24 (R-1 zone); Min: N/A Max: 70%
19.26 (R-2 zone); and 19.28
3. Building Height:
(R-3 zone) and City Design Manual Min: 18’ Max: 45’
for development regulations and
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
design guidelines.
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
Neighborhood Transition: See Section D. for
additional setbacks for parcels adjacent
to R-1 and R-2 districts
45’ Max Height

7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du


18’ Min Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 100% Max

Parking Regulations
15’ Min Setback 1. Parking Locations:
Section View Fg. 6.36 Any, except in front of building
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Street Guest: 1 space/10 du
Sidewalk Onsite Min: 100%
15’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.37 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-28 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-12 H Street Trolley
(Transit Focus Area)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 4.0 Max: 6.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 45% Max: 60%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 210’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
H Street

210’ Max Height


Street Min: 16’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses:
Residential: 90% Max 45’ Min Height
Retail: 1% Min 10% Max
Office: 10% Max
Hospitality: 1% Min 10% Max
16’ Min Setback
Parking Regulations Section View Fg. 6.38
1. Parking Locations:
Any
2. Residential Parking:
3’ Min
ROW

Min: 1 space/du Street


Guest: 0 spaces
Onsite Min: 100% Sidewalk
Plaza

3. Non-Residential Parking:
16’ Min Setback
and Total Sidewalk

Min: 1 space/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult Plan View Fg. 6.39
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-29


UC-13 Mid Broadway
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 0’ Street Max: 20’
Neighborhood Transition: See Section D. for
additional setbacks for parcels adjacent
to R-1 and R-2 districts
60’ Max Height

7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du


18’ Min Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 70% Max (Not allowed on
Broadway or H Street frontage on
ground floor, except for access)
Office: 50% Max
0’ - 20’ Setback Retail/Hospitality: 50% Max
Section View Fg. 6.40
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere except in front of building
Street
Sidewalk 2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 50%
0’ Min Setback

20’ Max Setback

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.41 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-30 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-14 Harborview

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.5 Max: 3.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 30’ Max: 84’
4. Building Stepback:
Min: 15’ At Building Height: 35’
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks: 15’ Min Stepback
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A

84’ Max Height


7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
8. Primary Land Uses: 30’ Min Height

Residential 100% Max

35’
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building 15’ Min Setback

2. Residential Parking: Section View Fg. 6.42


Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100% Street
Sidewalk

Plaza
15’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.43

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-31


UC-15 E Street Trolley
(Transit Focus Area)

Urban Regulations

Rezone of portions of this 1. Floor Area Ratio:


subdistrict not adopted. Min: 4.0 Max: 6.0
2. Lot Coverage:
See CVMC 19.28 (R-3 zone)
Min: 45% Max: 60%
and City Design Manual for
3. Building Height:
development regulations and
Min: 45’ Max: 210’
design guidelines.
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 11’* Street Max: N/A
(*Applies only along E Street between I-5
and 300’ east of I-5)
210’ Max Height

7. Open Space Requirement: 100 sf/du


45’ Min Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 90% Max
Retail: 1% Min 10% Max
Office: 10% Max (Not allowed on ground
floor facade, except for access)
11’ Min Setback Hospitality: 1% Min 10% Max
Section View Fg. 6.44
Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any, except in front of building
2’ Min ROW

Street
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1 space/du
Sidewalk/ Guest: 0 spaces
Parkway
Onsite Min: 100%
Plaza
11’ Min Setback

13 ’ Total
Sidewalk/ Parkway

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Plaza Min: 1 space/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: None

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.45 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-32 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-16 Broadway Hospitality

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 11’* Street Max: 20’
(*Along E Street between I-5 and 300’ east
of I-5)

60’ Max Height


7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses:
Retail: 50% Max 18’ Min Height

Hospitality: 100% Max

Parking Regulations
11’ - 20’ Setback
1. Parking Locations:
Section View Fg. 6.46
Any, except in front of building
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Street
Onsite Min: 50%
Sidewalk
11’ Min Setback
20’ Max Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.47

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-33


UC-17 Harborview North

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.0 Max: 2.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 80%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: N/A
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
7. Open Space Requirement: 200 sf/du
45’ Max Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Residential: 100% Max
18’ Min Height

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Any
10’ - 20’ Setback
2. Residential Parking:
Section View Fg.
Fg.6.48
6.2 Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%

Street
Sidewalk
20’ Max Setback

10’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg.
Fg.6.49
6.3 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-34 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


UC-18 E Street Gateway

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: 1.5 Max: 3.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 50% Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 45’ Max: 120’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 11’* Street Max: N/A
(*Applies only along E Street between I-5
and 300’ east of I-5)
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A 120’ Max Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


45’ Min Height

Retail: 20% Max


Hospitality: 100% Max

Parking Regulations
11’ Min Setback
1. Parking Locations:
Section View Fg. 6.50
Any
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
2’ Min ROW

Onsite Min: 100%


Street

Sidewalk/
Parkway
13 ’ Total
Sidewalk/ Parkway
11’ Min Setback

Plaza

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.51

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-35


UC-19 Feaster School

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 15’ Street Max: N/A
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
45’ Max Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Public/Quasi-Public: 100% Max
18’ Min Height

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
15’ Min Setback
2. Non-Residential Parking:
Section View Fg. 6.52 Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 100%

Street
Sidewalk
15’ Min Setback

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.53 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-36 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


C-1 Third Avenue South
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: N/A Max: 70%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 60’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
Neighborhood Transition: See Section
D. for additional setbacks for parcels
adjacent to R-1 and R-2 districts

60’ Max Height


7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses: 18’ Min Height
Retail: 100% Max (West of Third Avenue)
Office: 100% Max (East of Third Avenue)
Residential: 40% Max
10’ - 20’ Setback
Parking Regulations
Section View Fg. 6.54
1. Parking Locations:
Anywhere on-site
2. Residential Parking: Street
Min: 1.5 space/du Sidewalk
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Onsite Min: 100%
10’ Min Setback
20’ Max Setback

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
Onsite Min: 50%

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.55

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-37


C-2 Broadway South
(Neighborhood Transition Combining District)

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 35% Max: 75%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
45’ Max Height

8. Primary Land Uses:


Retail: 50% Max
18’ Min Height

Office: 50% Max


Residential: 70% Max

Parking Regulations
10’ - 20’ Setback 1. Parking Locations:
Section View Fg. 6.56 Anywhere on-site
2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du
Street
Onsite Min: 100%
Sidewalk
3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
10’ Min Setback
20’ Max Setback

Onsite Min: 50%

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
Plan View Fg. 6.57 the remainder of the chapter for all criteria.

VI-38 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


C-3 Broadway North

Urban Regulations
1. Floor Area Ratio:
Min: N/A Max: 1.0
Chula Vista
2. Lot Coverage:
Min: 35% Max: 75%
3. Building Height:
Min: 18’ Max: 45’
4. Building Stepback: Not mandatory
5. Street Wall Frontage: 50% Min
6. Setbacks:
Street Min: 10’ Street Max: 20’
7. Open Space Requirement: N/A
8. Primary Land Uses: 45’ Max Height
Retail: 50% Max 18’ Min Height

Office: 50% Max


Residential: 70% Max

Parking Regulations
1. Parking Locations: 10’ - 20’ Setback

Anywhere on-site Section View Fg. 6.58


2. Residential Parking:
Min: 1.5 space/du
Guest: 1 space/10 du Street
Onsite Min: 100% Sidewalk

3. Non-Residential Parking:
Min: 2 spaces/1,000 sf
10’ Min Setback
20’ Max Setback

Onsite Min: 50%

Summary sheet does not reflect all regulations


that may apply to each property. Please consult
the remainder of the chapter for all criteria. Plan View Fg. 6.59

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-39


D. Special Provisions for Neighborhood Transition Combining
Districts and Transit Focus Areas
1. Purpose
The purpose of the Neighborhood Transition Combining District (NTCD) is to
permit special regulation to insure that the character of zones within the Specific
Plan area will be compatible with and will complement surrounding residential
areas. Neighborhood Transition Combining Districts apply to the subdistricts
adjacent to R-1 and R-2 zones: V-3, V-4, UC-5, UC-6, UC-8, UC-11, UC-13, C-
1, and C-2. Transit Focus Areas provide special regulations to encourage the
development and use of public transportation: UC-1, UC-2, UC-10, UC-12, and
UC-15.

2. Requirements
a. Figure 6.60 details required side and rear setbacks from the property
line that abuts an R-1 or R-2 zone. Where such yard is contiguous and
parallel with an alley, one-half the width of such alley shall be assumed
to be a portion of such yard. Within transit focus areas, provide a
minimum 15 feet of rear yard setback for structures up to and over 84
feet in height.
 b. For every 35 feet in height, the
  structure shall step back at least
0<45 10 15 feet on the side(s) of the
46<55 15
56<65 20
structure that abut an R-1 or R-2
66<75 25 district. Within Transit Focus Areas,
76<85 30 provide a building stepback of at
86<95 35
least 15 feet for every 35 feet in
96<105 40
Rear/side yard setback requirements for
height abutting residential uses. In
Neighborhood Transition Combining District
Fg. 6.60 addition to meeting the stepback
requirements, no part of the building
shall be closer to the property line
than a 60-degree plane extending
from each stepback line.
Property Line

15’
60
Stepback c. A landscaping plan should include one
to three small shade tree(s) for every
3,000 square feet within the rear/side
60 60 yard and should be located on the site
to provide shade/heat gain reduction
35’

effect (i.e. trees not to be planted on the


R-1 or R-2
north facing facade of the building).
15’ Min Setback
Additional building stepbacks may be
required in NTCDs
Fg. 6.61

VI-40 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


d. All exterior lighting shall focus internally within the property to decrease
the light pollution onto the neighboring properties.
e. Screening and/or buffers shall be required to obscure features such
as dumpsters, rear entrances, utility and maintenance structures and
loading facilities.
f. A six-foot solid or decorative metal fence shall be placed on the property Chula Vista
line. If the fence is solid, it shall have
North
design treatment and be articulated
every six to eight feet to avoid
presenting a blank wall to the street
or adjacent property.
g. Building design shall be cognizant of
adjacent low density uses (i.e. avoid
balconies overlooking rear yards).
h. As part of the project design and
submittal, developments within Transit
Focus Areas shall conduct studies to
assess the effects of light and solar Trees should not be planted on the
Fg. 6.62
north facing building facade
access, shadowing, and wind patterns
on adjacent buildings and areas.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-41


E. Special Provisions
1. Applicability
There are certain uses that, due to the nature of the use, deserve special
consideration and the application of limitations, design standards, and
operating requirements.

2. Live/Work Units
a. Purpose
Live/work units are occupied by business operators who live in the same
structure that contains the commercial activity. A live/work unit functions
primarily as a workspace with incidental residential accommodations that meet
basic habitability requirements.

b. Limitations on Use
The non-residential component of the live/work unit shall be a use allowed in
the applicable subdistrict. A live/work unit shall not be established or used in
conjunction with any of the following activities.
• Adult businesses
• Vehicle maintenance or repair
• Any H occupancy as classified by the California Building Standards
Code.
• Welding, machinery, or any open flame work; and
• Any other activity determined by the Community Development Director
to not be compatible with the residential activities and/or to have the
possibility of affecting the health or safety of residents, because of the
potential for the use to create dust, glare, heat, noise, noxious gasses,
odor, smoke, traffic, vibration, or other impacts, or would be hazardous
because of materials, processes, products, or wastes.

c. Density
One live/work unit shall be allowed for each 1,000 square feet of lot area.

d. Design Standards
1) Floor area requirements. The net total floor area of a live/work unit shall
be 1,000 square feet minimum and 3,000 square feet maximum. No
more than 60% shall be reserved for living space.

VI-42 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


2) Separation and access. Each live/work unit shall be separated from
other live/work units or other uses in the structure. Access to each live/
work unit shall be provided from shop fronts, directly from the street,
common access areas, corridors, or halls; and the access to each unit
shall be clearly separate from other live/work units or other uses within
the structure.
3) Facilities to accommodate “work” activities. A live/work unit shall Chula Vista
be designed to accommodate commercial uses as evidenced by the
provision of ventilation, interior storage, flooring, and other physical
improvements necessary for the commercial component of the live/
work units.
4) Building and fire code compliance. Any building, which contains a live/
work unit, shall comply with the latest edition of the California Building
Code (CBC) as adopted by the City of Chula Vista, and applicable building
and life safety policies for such units.

e. Operating Requirements
1) Notice to occupants. The owner or developer of any building containing
live/work units shall provide written notice to all live/work residents and
users that the surrounding area may be subject to levels of noise, dust,
fumes and other effects associated with commercial uses at higher
than would be expected in residential areas. State and Federal health
regulations notwithstanding, uses shall be subject to the performance
standards as provided in CVMC Section 19.66.
2) Non-resident employees. Up to two persons who do not reside in the
live/work unit may work in the unit unless this employment is prohibited
or limited by the subdistrict. The employment of three or more persons
who do not reside in the live/work unit may be permitted subject to
Conditional Use Permit approval based on the additional findings that
the employment would not adversely affect traffic and parking conditions
in the vicinity.
3) Client and customer visits. Client and customer visits to live/work units
are permitted subject to any applicable conditions placed upon them by
the City.

f. Required Findings
See CVMC Section 19.14.080.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-43


3. Mixed-Use Projects
A mixed-use project shall comply with the following design objectives:

a. Storefronts along street frontages must maintain a pedestrian orientation


at the street level.
b. Provide for internal compatibility between the different uses within the
project.
c. Minimize the effects of any exterior noise, odors, glare, vehicular and
pedestrian traffic, and other potentially significant impacts.

4. Parking Structures
a. Parking Structure Design
The following parking structure design standards shall apply to all parking
structures located in the Specific Plan area.
1) Parking decks should be flat where feasible. At a minimum, a majority
of both the ground floor and top parking decks should be required to be
flat, as opposed to continuously ramping.
2) External elevator towers and stair wells shall be open to public view, or
enclosed with transparent glazing.
3) Lighting shall meet the requirements of The Chula Vista Municipal
Code.
4) Parking structure top floor wall designs must conform to one or more of
the following options:
a) Top Floor Wall with Architectural Focal Point. A top floor wall focal point
refers to a prominent wall edge feature such as a glazed elevator
and/or stair tower, or top floor line trellis structure.
b) Top Floor Wall Line Variation.
i. Projecting Cornice. Top floor wall line
articulated through a variation or step
in cornice height or detail. Cornices
must be located at or near the top of
the wall or parapet.
ii. Articulated Parapet. Top floor wall line
parapets shall incorporate angled,
curved or stepped detail elements.

Parking decks should be flat where


feasible
Fg. 6.63

VI-44 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5) Parking structures with building facades facing or visible from the public
right-of-way (ROW) shall use one or a combination of the following design
features:
a) The facade shall have the appearance of an office building or hotel
use.
b) Design features that would mask the building as a parking Chula Vista
structure.
Proposed design features shall be approved by the designated design review
authority.

b. Parking Structure Character and Massing


Parking structure facades over 150 feet in length shall incorporate vertical
and/or horizontal variations in setback, material or fenestration design along
the length of the applicable facade, in at least one or more of the following
ways:
1) Vertical Facade Changes. Incorporation of intervals of architectural
variation at least every 80 feet over the length of the applicable facade,
such as:
a) Varying the arrangement, proportioning and/or design of garage
floor openings,
b) Incorporating changes in architectural materials, and/or
c) Projecting forward or recessing back portions or elements of the
parking structure facade.
2) Horizontal Facade Changes. Designed differentiation of the ground floor
from upper floors, such as:
a) Stepping back the upper floors from
the ground floor parking structure
façade,
b) Changing materials between the
parking structure base and upper
floors, and/or
c) Including a continuous cornice line
or pedestrian weather protection
element between the ground floor
and upper floors.
Incorporate intervals of architectural
variation in parking structures
Fg. 6.64

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-45


c. Minimizing Views Into the Parking Structure Interior
Façades of parking structures shall be designed without continuous horizontal
parking floor openings.
1) For portions of parking structures without a pedestrian level retail/
commercial use, the following building facade landscaping is required:
a) Five-foot wide façade landscape strip consisting of:
i. a mix of evergreen shrub groupings spaced no more than four
feet apart that do not exceed a height of six feet at maturity,
ii. groundcover, and
iii. seasonal displays of flowering annual bedding plants.
2) Any portion of a parking structure ground floor with exposed parking
areas adjacent to a public street shall minimize views into the parking
structure interior through one or more of the following methods which
are in addition to the above facade landscaping strip:
a) Decorative trellis work and/or screening as architectural elements
on the parking structure facade, without compromising the open
parking structure requirements of the Uniform Building Code.
b) Glass window display cases incorporated into pedestrian walls built
between two structural pillars. Glass window display cases shall be
at least 2 feet deep, begin 12 to 30 inches above the finished grade
of the sidewalk, and cover at least 60% of the area between two
pillars. The trellis work or window display cases may be waived if the
proponent can actually provide first floor retail or commercial uses
on the bottom floor adjacent to the sidewalk.
3) Upon conversion of portions of a
parking structure to a pedestrian retail/
commercial use, the Director of Planning
and Building or Community Development
may approve the removal of initially
installed pedestrian screening material
in order to allow maximum visibility and
access to the converted portions of the
parking structure.

Views into the upper floors of parking


structures should be screened
Fg. 6.65

VI-46 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


4) In addition to the above, views into the upper floors of parking structures
shall be minimized through one or more of the following methods:
a) the use of planters integrated into the upper floors of parking
structure facade design,
b) decorative trellis work and/or screening as architectural elements
on the parking structure upper floor facades, and/or Chula Vista
c) upper parking floors designed as a pattern of window-like openings
on the parking structure facade.

d. Parking Floors Located Under or Within Buildings


1) Parking located under or within buildings shall subordinate the garage
entrance to the pedestrian entrance in terms of prominence on the
street, location and design emphasis. No Parking Structure entry shall
be allowed on Third Avenue.
2) Parking at grade under a building shall be completely or wholly screened
through any combination of walls, decorative grilles, or trellis work with
landscaping.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-47


F. Urban Amenity Requirements and Incentives
1. Introduction
This section outlines requirements and incentives for urban amenities that will
enhance the quality of life within the Urban Core by encouraging pedestrian-
friendly design, amenities, beautification, sufficient parking, mixed-use districts,
preferred site location, affordable housing, and access to public transit, parks,
community facilities, and social services.

2. Incentive Zoning
The Urban Core Specific Plan regulates the development of property through
use and bulk restrictions. The tool selected for regulating density and intensity
in the Urban Core is a limitation on the allowable Floor Area Ratio. FAR is the
ratio between the size of the lot and the maximum amount of floor space that
a building constructed on that lot may contain.

Through incentive zoning, Chula Vista seeks to realize certain amenities or


design provisions related to a particular development project in exchange for
granting an increase in the FAR or FAR waiver for the property being developed.
Locations where the City may grant such incentives are clearly identified in this
chapter.

Bonus awards may be as “of right” or discretionary. Discretionary authority


to grant all FAR bonuses or fee waivers is delegated to the CVRC or Planning
Commission or City Council as necessary.

The amount of bonus awards Chula Vista will make available should take into
account the projected build-out that would occur if all of the bonus provisions
allowable under the program were actually awarded. This total should not exceed
the capacity of the land or the capacity of the City to provide infrastructure and
services to support the build-out.

To determine just how much additional FAR or FAR waiver should be granted,
the CVRC or Planning Commission should take into account the value added
to the property by the amenity or design, and a reasonable share of additional
FAR or FAR waiver that will proportionally compensate the developer for the
additional amenities or design provisions.

VI-48 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. Urban Amenities Table
The Urban Amenities Table presents a wide variety of urban amenities either
required or desired in the Urban Core. The table describes whether these
amenities are required through the Specific Plan (or other regulations) or
whether provision of these elements will be encouraged through incentives.
When an urban amenity is required, the specific responsibilities of the property
owner are identified in the Requirements column. In some cases, the applicant Chula Vista
should refer to other sections contained within the Specific Plan for particular
guidelines or regulations. When provision of an urban amenity results in
additional benefits to the property owner, the incentive for providing the amenity
is listed in the Incentives column. Incentives requests will be evaluated case-by-
case based on the degree of public benefit provided by the proposed project.

Several of the urban amenities may be both a requirement and an incentive;


in these cases, a certain portion of the amenity is required to be provided
and the property owner may also recognize additional benefits by providing
an additional portion of the amenity. The Urban Amenities Table also details
the subdistricts within the Specific Plan area in which provision of a particular
element is required or eligible for incentives. If no subdistricts are specified,
the amenity is applicable to all subdistricts.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-49




  
Streetscape Improvements Development impact fee and/or
development requirements (Contained None
in Chapter VI)
Paseos Public right of way, development
requirements (Contained in Chapter None
VI), and/or development impact fee
Pedestrian Circulation (Onsite Design guidelines (Contained in
and Offsite) Chapter VII) and development
None
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)

Streetfront Facades/Street Design guidelines (Contained in


Wall Chapters VI & VII) and development
None
regulations (Contained in Chapters VI &
VII)
Upper Level Setbacks Design guidelines (Contained in
None
Chapters VI & VII)
Landscaping Design guidelines (Contained in
None
Chapter VII)
Transit Station Improvements Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and/or development
impact fee
Applicability: V-1, V-2, V-4, V-5, UC-1,
None
UC-2, UC-4, UC-5, UC-7, UC-9, UC-10,
UC-12, UC-13, UC-14, UC-15, UC-16,
UC-18, UC-19, C-1, C-2, and C-3

Cultural Arts (Public) Development impact fee Applicability:


V-1, V-2, V-3, V-4, UC-1, UC-2, UC-4,
UC-5, UC-7, UC-9, UC-10, UC-12, UC- None
13, UC-15, UC-16, UC-18, UC-19, C-1,
C-2, and C-3
Site Access Design guidelines (Contained in
Chapter VII) and development
None
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)

Vertical Mixed-Use Design guidelines (Contained in


(Residential over Commercial Chapter VII) and development
Projects) requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
Applicability: V-1, V-2, V-3, V-4, U-C1, None
U-C2, UC-5, UC-10, UC-12, UC-13, UC-
14, UC-15, C-1, C-2, and C-3

Vertical Mixed-Use Design guidelines (Contained in


(Residential over Commercial Chapter VII) and development
None
Projects) within 500 feet of a requirements (Contained in Chapter VI)
Transit Station
Urban Amenities Table (Page 1 of 2)
Fg. 6.66

VI-50 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan




  
Parking Design guidelines (Contained in 10% increase in the allowable
Chapter VII) and development FAR and the allowable number of
requirements (Contained in Chapter VI) residential units when all parking
and/or development impact fee for is provided within the building, Chula Vista
parking district, including structured and entirely below grade, or in a
underground facilities Applicability: V-1, parking garage of at least two
V-2, V-3, V-4, UC-1, U-C2, UC-4, UC-5, levels and wrapped with uses or
UC-7, UC-9, UC-10, UC-12, UC-13, UC- architecturally concealed
15, UC-16, UC-18, C-1, C-2, and C-3 Applicability: All subdistricts
Public Parks and Plazas, Development impact fee and parkland 10% increase in the allowable
including Sports/Recreation dedication FAR when additional public
Facilities, Play Lots, Water outdoor space is provided above
Features, Trails, Par Courses, and beyond PAD requirements
Equipment, Gardens, Art and other than those identified in
Works Figure 8.64 is provided. The
public outdoor open space shall
have the following
characteristics: has an area
greater than 500 square feet with
a minimum depth of 30 feet;
provides tables and chairs;
provides pedestrian-scaled
lighting of at least 2 footcandles;
and has outdoor public art and
other desired amenities, such as
fountains.
Applicability: All subdistricts
Affordable Housing City inclusionary housing requirement
As allowed by State Density
when applicable Bonus Law (Government Code
Section 65915)
Applicability: All subdistricts that
allow residential
Green Building LEED Scorecard submitted with Urban FAR increase (20% for LEED
Core Development Permit application Certification, 25% for LEED
Silver up to 35% for LEED
Platinum), also priority permit
review with LEED certification.
Applicability: All subdistricts
Historic or Architectural FAR waiver: FAR for elements
Acquistion and Maintenance not included in overall project
None
FAR
Applicability: All subdistricts
Community Services/Human FAR waiver: FAR for elements
Services not included in overall project
None
FAR
Applicability: All subdistricts
Urban Amenities Table (Page 2 of 2)
Fg. 6.67

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-51


G. Signs
1. Applicability
For all signs within the Specific Plan Area, the Zoning Code shall apply with
respect to the size, type, location and illumination in the following manner.
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines provides additional design
requirements for signs within the Village, Urban Core, and Corridors Districts.

2. Village District
The provisions of Chapter 19.60 of the Chula Vista Municipal Code shall apply
to all signs in the Village Area of the Specific Plan. In particular, the provisions
of Section 19.60.520 (C-B zone provisions) shall apply to all commercial signs
in the area, subject to the following exceptions:
a. Illumination: No internally illuminated “can” signs or individually cut,
internally illuminated plastic letters shall be permitted in the Village
District.
b. No pole or ground signs shall be allowed in the Village District.
c. Awning signs shall be restricted to the awning valence (flap) only.
d. All window signs above the ground floor shall be prohibited.
e. No wall sign shall exceed one square foot per linear foot of building
frontage.

3. Urban Core District and Corridors District


The provisions of Chapter 19.60 of the Chula Vista Municipal Code shall apply
to all signs in the Urban Core and Corridors districts of the Specific Plan. In
particular, the provisions of Section 19.60.540 (C-C zone provisions) shall apply
to all commercial signs in the area, subject to the following exceptions:
a. Illumination: No internally illuminated “can” signs shall be permitted in
the Urban Core or Corridor Districts.
b. No pole signs shall be permitted shall be allowed in the Urban Core or
Corridor Districts.
c. All window signs above the ground floor shall be prohibited.

VI-52 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


H. Other Regulations
1. Outdoor Storage
All uses shall be conducted wholly within a completely enclosed building, except
for outdoor restaurants, off-street parking and loading facilities, and other
open uses specified under conditional use permits as determined by the CVRC
or Planning Commission. Permanent and temporary outside sales and display Chula Vista
shall be subject to the provisions of Chula Vista Municipal Code 19.58.370.

2. Trash
Trash storage areas shall be provided in accordance with Chula Vista Municipal
Code 19.58.340.

3. Performance Standards
All uses developed pursuant to the Specific Plan shall be subject to initial and
continued compliance with the performance standards in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code 19.66.

4. Design Control
The exterior design and arrangement of all residential, commercial, and office
uses and mixed-uses and structures proposed for establishment, location,
expansion or alteration in the Specific Plan subdistricts shall be governed by the
goals, general objectives, statements of policy and principles, and standards of
Chapter VII - Development Design Guidelines.

Chapter VI Land Use & Development Regulations VI-53


I. Development Exceptions
The land use and development regulations encourage the siting of a variety of
land uses in an urban environment that is both pedestrian and environmentally
sensitive. Where used in combination with the Urban Amenities Incentives, as
provided for in this chapter, the development regulations and urban amenities
incentives will encourage innovative design. To further achieve this goal, it may
be necessary to be flexible in the application of certain development standards.
As such, the Chula Vista Redevelopment Corporation or Planning Commission
may authorize exceptions to the land use and development regulations included
within this chapter through the issuance of an Urban Core Development Permit,
if all of the following findings are made:

1. The proposed development will not adversely affect the goals and
objectives of the Specific Plan and General Plan.
2. The proposed development will comply with all other regulations of the
Specific Plan.
3. The proposed development will incorporate one or more of the Urban
Amenities Incentives in section F - Urban Amenities Requirements and
Incentives, of this chapter.
4. The exception or exceptions are appropriate for this location and will
result in a better design or greater public benefit than could be achieved
through strict conformance with the Specific Plan development
regulations.
Consideration of a development standard exception shall be concurrent with
the review of the Urban Core Development Permit, as outlined in Chapter XI
- Plan Administration, Section C.1. Urban Core Development Permit and Design
Review Requirements, of this Specific Plan.

VI-54 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


VII. Development Design Guidelines
A. Introduction and Background VII-1
B. What is Urban Design? VII-4
C. How to Use the Design Guidelines VII-5
D. Village District VII-33 Chula Vista
E. Urban Core District VII-79
F. Corridors District VII-107
G. Special Guidelines VII-139

Chapter VII Design Guidelines 1


Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
VII. Development Design Guidelines
A. Introduction and Background
Over the last few decades, Chula Vista has dramatically emerged as an
economic and population center for the San Diego region. Increasingly, the
City and the public have recognized the importance of fostering a strong Urban Chula Vista
Core that can accommodate further commercial and residential growth and
serve as the retail, office, and entertainment center of the community. The City
has established these design guidelines, which supplement the Specific Plan
and Zoning Ordinance, to provide Chula Vista with recommendations for the
preservation and aesthetic improvement of the Urban Core, which will, in turn,
enhance the overall vitality and economic stability of the broader community.

1. Purpose
The purpose of the design manual is to provide guidance for the construction,
conservation, adaptive use, and enhancement of buildings and street scenes
contained within Chula Vista’s Urban Core. The manual is intended to assist
many users (property owners, merchants, real estate interests, architects,
designers and building contractors, vendors and craftsmen, the City of Chula
Vista, and other interested persons and organizations) in being responsive to
City objectives. Each of these interests has
a vital and often related role to play in the
continued revitalization of the Urban Core.

The design standards in this manual are, by


specific intent, prescriptive. They describe
appropriate kinds of changes and improvements
that can be made to existing structures, as well
as recommend the incorporation of particular
design elements in new construction.
These guidelines, while attempting to be
comprehensive in scope, certainly are not
exhaustive in detail. The overall aim is to This photo received favorable ratings Fg. 7.1
in the Visual Preference Survey
encourage creative approaches and solutions
within a workable framework. The focus of the “form-based” design guidelines
is the relationship of development to the street, not a mandatory preference of
one architectural style over another architectural style.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-1


2. Applicability
This manual is to be used as a guide for new construction and for the renovation
of existing structures within the Urban Core and does not apply to existing
structures not undergoing any anticipated improvements. Any new residences,
buildings, additions, exterior alterations, or landscaping, and any modification
to an approved landscaping plan or parking lot design will adhere to these
Design Guidelines as applicable. The design guidelines are to be applied within
the confines of private property, with the exception of public parks, plazas, etc.,
that may be developed as part of individual projects. Refer to Chapter VIII -
Public Realm Design Guidelines for more information on the design of public
parks, plazas, etc. The guidelines are form based and should be applied to
projects regardless of the type of land use.

3. Goals
The following goals provide explanation of the design philosophy expressed
throughout subsequent sections of the Design Guidelines. This manual intends
to promote a desired level of future development quality in the Urban Core that
will:
• contribute to implementing the goals, objectives, and policies provided in
the General Plan and Urban Core Specific Plan;
• stimulate investment in and strengthen the economic vitality of the Urban
Core;
• contribute to a positive physical image and identity of the City;
• promote a visually attractive, safe and well-planned community through the
incorporation of sound design principles;
• create unique identities for each district;
• protect Urban Core residents from unsafe or unsightly conditions;
• minimize negative impacts of new development and redevelopment; and
• preserve and maximize the image, character, and history of Chula Vista’s
Urban Core.

4. Organization
The first three of the following four sections focus on three distinct districts or
development types within the urban core: the Village District, the Urban Core
District, and the Corridors District. All sections include guidelines with regard
to architecture, site planning, storefront design, landscape design, lighting,
parking and circulation, and signs. The fourth section focuses on guidelines for
special types of projects and special project features, including guidelines for
hotels and motels, mixed-use projects, and stand alone multi-familly residential
projects.

VII-2 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


a. Village District
The guidelines contained in this section aim to retain and enhance the small-
town, mixed-use ambience of the traditional Village through rehabilitation of
older structures and well-designed new development. Like those for the Urban
Core, the guidelines for the Village stress pedestrian-oriented site planning and
building design, including requiring upper floors to step back to allow sunlight
to reach the streets below. The section also concentrates on preserving the Chula Vista
historic fabric of the area, including providing guidance for those who wish to
renovate or add on to existing buildings and promoting design compatibility
between infill structures and surrounding buildings.

b. Urban Core District


The Urban Core District will serve as the primary business, commercial, and
regional center of Chula Vista. This section focuses on accommodating mid- to
high-rise development while encouraging an active street life. Specifically, the
design guidelines support the development of primarily ground floor retail uses
along Broadway and H Street. Such guidelines help ensure that the Urban Core
contains a comfortable environment for pedestrians to shop, dine, and recreate.
In light of the intensity of land uses and need for parking in the area, this section
contains a special section devoted to the design of parking structures.

c. Corridors District
In contrast with the Urban Core and the Village Districts, the Corridors District
is oriented towards the automobile rather than pedestrian traffic. Sections of
Broadway and Third Avenue are characterized by minimum ten-foot setbacks,
one or two-story structures, and a high percentage of retail, service, and office
development. The guidelines in this section focus on promoting quality and
diversity in new commercial and residential development and safe and efficient
parking and circulation.

d. Special Guidelines
This section provides supplemental guidelines for hotels and motels, mixed-
use projects, and multi-family residential projects to provide further site
design considerations based on their individual uses. Sustainable design
recommendations for all project types are also discussed.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-3


B. What is Urban Design?
In part, urban design is the “art” of enhancing the vitality, meaning, and form
of communities by ensuring quality, sensible design and development. Urban
design is but one of several factors that must
be considered in community design and
development. The others include economic
conditions, promotion, and marketing of
businesses, management, and maintenance.
For purposes of this manual, design guidelines
are presented that aim to foster an image
and character desired by the community and
Good urban design enhances the supportive of the other factors pertaining to
Fg. 7.2
vitality and character of a community different types of development.

VII-4 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


C. How to Use the Design Guidelines
People judge a place by the quality of the physical spaces they see around them
– in terms of function and attractiveness. The areas within the Urban Core are
not only places for residential, commercial, governmental, and employment
activities but also statements about the community. Many areas within the
Urban Core have either been neglected, poorly designed, or are outdated. The
Chula Vista
role of the design guidelines is to help new and old development become points
of pride for Chula Vista residents.

These guidelines should be used to influence the design of development/


redevelopment of residential and non-residential land uses in the Specific Plan
area and apply primarily to on-site private development areas. The guidelines
are organized and written to help achieve an envisioned design quality through
Chula Vista’s Urban Core.

These guidelines should be used as a starting point for the creative design
process and should not be looked upon as the only solution for design. Owners
of properties should strive to be creative and innovative, and should be
encouraged to look beyond franchise or boilerplate architectural and landscape
architectural design treatments. It is encouraged that property owners involve
City staff, community groups, and affected merchants and business owners in
the design process prior to making a significant investment in design.

a. Harmonizing Change
Architects and designers should consider the importance of General Plan
Theme 8 - “Shaping the Future Through the Present and Past” when developing
any new or redevelopment project in the Urban Core. The following photo essay
provides a brief summary of the important design themes that have helped
shape the unique architectural character of the City. Important design cues
can be found in these examples and should be referenced in new development
in a way that reflects Chula Vista’s heritage and sense of place. The following
photo essay was compiled by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-5


El Primero Hotel, 1930,
Designed by H.W. Whitsitt
416 Third Ave

Congregational Church, 1951


Historical Site #5 at 276 “F” Street

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.3
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 2 of 27

VII-6 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Charles Smith Building, 1930


Zig Zag Moderne style
289 Third Avenue

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.4
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 3 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-7


Relating architectural elements from El Primero Hotel,
Charles Smith Building and Congregational Church

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.5
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 4 of 27

VII-8 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Vogue Theater (views circa 1945 and 2005)


Art Deco Moderne
226 Third Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.6
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 5 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-9


Bank of America Building, 1949
Mid-Century Moderne
253-257Third Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.7
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 6 of 27

VII-10 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Dyson Court Apartments


Streamline Moderne, circa 1928
516-518 Flower

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.8
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 7 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-11


Burnett’s Furniture Store
Mid-Century Moderne 1952
345 “E” Street

Garden Farms Market


“E” Street Circa 1940s
Art Deco Commercial

Streamline Moderne Commercial Building


Circa 1930
45 Broadway

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.9
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 8 of 27

VII-12 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

“Highway 101” Vintage Neon


Broadway
Third Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.10
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 9 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-13


Logan’s Paint & Linoleum
Commercial Brick Building, 1926
277-279 Third Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.11

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 10 of 27

VII-14 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Flower Street Apartments, circa 1928


Tudor inspired with clinker bricks
500 Flower St

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.12

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 11 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-15


Horace Nelson House, Historic Site #
Tudor Revival brick house, 1933
470 “E” St

Hadley Johnson House, circa 1950


Historic Site #58
7 Cresta Way
Community Character Photo Essay
Fg. 7.13
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 12 of 27

VII-16 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Bay View Hospital


Tudor Revival, Third Ave at “L”
(half-timbers were stuccoed over)

“Zontek’s Café” 1953


Tudor Revival
230 Third Ave

Mae Edgecomb House


Tudor Revival, ca 1924
834 First Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.14

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 13 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-17


George Sample House, Historic Site #
French Normandy Style, circa 1929
466 “E” Street

French Colonial Atherton House


Historic Site #59, 1950
415 Hilltop Dr.

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.15

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 14 of 27

VII-18 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

First Baptist Church of Chula Vista, 1929


Spanish Colonial Style
“E” St & Fifth Ave

Woman’s Club Historic Site #12


Designed by Edgar Ullrich
357 “G” Street

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.16

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 15 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-19


Sallmon House, 1916, Pueblo Revival Style
Designed by William Templeton Johnson in 1916
Historic Site #28
435 First Avenue

San Diego Country Club, 1984


Pueblo Revival Style
“L” Street Chula Vista

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.17
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 16 of 27

VII-20 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Spanish Eclectic
Hacienda style Homes
Chula Vista

447 “I” Street, ca 1930

Palomar Dr West, ca 1929

629 Del Mar Ave, ca 1932

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.18
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 17 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-21


Spanish Eclectic Hacienda style, circa 1928
Hilltop and “F” Street

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.19

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 18 of 27

VII-22 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Harry McCrea House


Spanish Eclectic, circa 1924
225 Garrett Ave

Spanish Eclectic, circa 1920s


Flower St at Fifth Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.20

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 19 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-23


Mission Revival Style
Circa 1920s
244 Elder St.

Edmond Russ House, 1929


Mission Revival, Historic Site #47
200 “K” St.

Elmer Kinmore House, 1926, Spanish Eclectic


230 Fifth Ave
Community Character Photo Essay
Fg. 7.21

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 20 of 27

VII-24 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Chula Vista Library Civic Center


Designed by Tom Williamson
of Richard George Wheeler & Associates, 1976
365 “F” Street

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.22

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 21 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-25


Garrettson-Frank House
Victorian ca 1889
Historic Site #43
642 Second Ave

James Johnson House


Victorian, ca 1891
Historic Site #6
525 “F” St

Jennie MacDonald House


Victorian, ca 1888
Historic Site #44
644 Second Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.23

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 22 of 27

VII-26 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Edward Gillette House
Victorian, ca 1894
Historic Site #30
44 North Second Ave Chula Vista

Cordrey House
Victorian, ca 1889
Historic Site #3
210 Davidson St

Mary Francisco House


Victorian, ca 1888
681 Del Mar Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.24

Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 23 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-27


William Drew House
Craftsman, ca 1913
Historic Site #54
475 “E” Street

Dupree-Gould House
Craftsman, ca 1921
Historic Site #22
344 Hilltop Drive

Greg Rogers House


Craftsman, ca 1910
Historic Site #1 and 42
616 Second Ave

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.25
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 24 of 27

VII-28 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Reginald Walters House, 1908


Folk Pyramidal
219 “F” Street

Nadine Davies House, 1911


Craftsman Bungalow
Historic Site #41
614 Second Ave

Edwin Smith Sr House, 1912


Craftsman (modified)
Historic Site #
616 Del Mar

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.26
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 25 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-29


Memorial Bowl
Amphitheatre & Park
1939 W.P.A.
Parkway between Third & Fourth

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.27
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 26 of 27

VII-30 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Norman Park Center


Designed by Visions Studio 1992
270 “F” St

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.28
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 27 of 27

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-31


South Chula Vista Library
Designed by Ricardo Legorreta 1992
389 Orange Ave

MAAC Community Charter School


Contemporary
Third Ave & Palomar

Community Character Photo Essay


Fg. 7.29
Submitted by Pamela Bensoussan, ASA July 24, 2006 page 28 of 27

VII-32 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


D. Village District
1. Introduction
The purpose of this section is to present design guidelines for new private
development and rehabilitation of older commercial structures in the Village
district. The guidelines seek to promote a blend
of high quality residential and commercial uses Chula Vista
within a small-town atmosphere. Guidelines
include groundfloor commercial with office and
residential above or single use structures where
the design focus is on entryways, access, and
pedestrian orientation. General architectural
guidelines should be followed regardless of the
internal use.

Third Avenue is the heart of Chula


Vista
Fg. 7.30

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-33


2. Design Principles

a. Promote Sound Architectural Practices


New infill development and renovation to existing
structures must respect sound architectural
design practices in order to create a positive
ambiance within the Village. The standards
contained in this section do not dictate the use
of any specific architectural style. Architectural
standards should guide the designer in massing,
proportion, scale, texture, pattern and line. New
creative interpretations of traditional design
variables are particularly encouraged.

b. Retain or Repeat Traditional Facade


Components
Changes to structures will, and need to,
occur over time. The concern is that these
changes do not damage the existing traditional
building fabric and that the results of building
renovation enhance the overall design integrity
of the building. New infill structures should
use traditional facade components, such as
bulkheads, arches, plazas, and balconies, to
create patterns and alignments that visually
link buildings within a block, while allowing
individual identity of each building. These
Infill should reflect the established
rhythm and scale of adjacent buildings
Fg. 7.31 elements are familiar to the pedestrian and
help establish a sense of scale.

c. Develop a Steady Rhythm of Facade


Widths
The traditional commercial/mercantile lot
width in the Village area has given rise to
buildings of relatively uniform width that create
a familiar rhythm. This is particularly visible
on Third Avenue. This pattern helps to tie
the street together visually and provides the
pedestrian with a standard measurement of his
progress. Reinforcement of this facade rhythm
is encouraged, in all new buildings, even if a
singular structure.

VII-34 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


d. Create a Comfortable Scale of Structures
All buildings must convey a scale appropriate for
pedestrian activity. Human-scaled buildings are
comfortable and create a friendly atmosphere
that respects the traditional scale of the Village
while also enhancing its marketability as a retail
and office area. For the most part, this means Chula Vista
two- to three-story development at the back of
the sidewalk, particularly along Third Avenue.

e. Support Pedestrian-Oriented Activity at


the Sidewalk and Amenity Areas
The activities that occur immediately inside
the storefront and along the building frontage,
particularly along Third Avenue, are an
important design consideration. Structures
can provide visual interest to pedestrians
Ground floor sidewalk activity adds
through goods and outdoor activities. Therefore, human scale to the two-story building
Fg. 7.32
building design elements should be located
in a way that enhances pedestrian visibility of
goods and activities, and they should be kept
free of advertising and non-product related
clutter (e.g. backs of display cases, etc.), to
the greatest extent possible. Storefronts with
clear, transparent glass also instill a sense of
safety for pedestrians since they sense that
employees and patrons are monitoring the
sidewalk. In contrast, storefronts with blank or
solid opaque walls degrade the quality of the
pedestrian experience and are not permitted.

Storefronts with abundant glass


encourage pedestrian activity
Fg. 7.33

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-35


3. Site Planning
Al
le
y a. Introduction
New infill buildings should reinforce the
pedestrian-orientation of the Village by providing
Access storefronts next to the sidewalk and locating
parking areas away from the street.

b. Building Siting
en rian
try
st
de
Pe

1) The first floor of any new building should be


Buildings should be sited next to the
street
Fg. 7.34 built at (or very close to) the front property
line, particularly on Third Avenue. The front
building facade should be oriented parallel
to the street. Buildings should also be
placed on the setback line along alleys.

2) Building indentations that create small


pedestrian plazas along the streetwall,
particularly along Third Avenue, are
encouraged.

3) Front setbacks should accommodate active


public uses such as outdoor dining and
therefore should use hardscape and limited
Corner buildings should continue
storefronts on side streets
Fg. 7.35 landscaping, such as potted plants and
flower beds. Provide additional setbacks at
public plaza areas.

4) Buildings on corners should include


storefront design features on at least 50%
of the side street elevation wall.

5) Entries that face onto an outdoor dining


opportunity are encouraged.

6) Retain existing paseos when possible. Create


additional pedestrian paseos and linkages
to parking lots, activity areas, or alleys
within the middle one-third of a block. In no
case should historic structures be modified
to achieve this particular guideline.

Paseos should be placed in the


Fg. 7.36 7) Buildings situated facing a plaza, paseo, or
middle one-third of a block other public space are encouraged.

VII-36 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


8) Loading and storage facilities should be
located at the rear or side of buildings and
screened from public view.

c. Street Orientation
1) Storefronts and major building entries
should orient to Third Avenue, F Street, Chula Vista
courtyards, or plazas, although minor side
or rear entries may be desirable.

2) Provide corner “cut-offs” for buildings on


prominent intersections. Storefronts and building entries
should face the street
Fg. 7.37

3) Create continuous pedestrian activity


along public sidewalks in an uninterrupted
sequence by minimizing gaps between
buildings.

4) Any building with more than 75 feet of street


frontage should have at least one primary
building entry.

d. Parking Orientation
1) Locating parking lots between the front
property line and the building storefront is
prohibited. Instead, parking lots should be
located to the rear of buildings, subterranean,
or in parking structures.
Rear parking lots should be
contiguous
Fg. 7.38
2) Rear parking lots should be designed and
located contiguously so vehicles can travel
from one private parking lot to the other
without having to enter the street. This
may be achieved with reciprocal access
agreements.
Building
entrance
3) Locate rear parking lot and structure entries
on side streets or alleys in order to minimize
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts along Third
Avenue and F Street.

4) Create wide, well-lit pedestrian walkways


Link parking areas to major building
from parking lots to building entries that rear entrances using textured paving
Fg. 7.39
utilize directional signs.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-37


e. Refuse, Storage, and Equipment Areas
1) Trash storage must be fully enclosed and
incorporated within the main structures or
separate freestanding enclosures (CVMC
19.58.340). Where practical, storage
at each unit is preferred over common
enclosures. Trash storage cannot be placed
under stairways.

2) All trash and garbage bins should be stored


in an approved enclosure.

3) Trash enclosures should allow convenient


access for commercial tenants. Siting
service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.

4) Trash enclosures should be located away


from residential uses to minimize nuisance
for the adjacent property owners. The
enclosure doors should not interfere with
landscaping, pedestrian, or vehicle path of
travel.

5) Trash enclosures should be architecturally


compatible with the project. Landscaping
should be incorporated into the design to
screen the enclosure from public view and
deter graffiti.

6) Refuse storage areas that are visible from


an upper story of adjacent structures
should provide an opaque or semi-opaque
horizontal cover/screen to reduce unsightly
views. The screening should be compatible
with the design of adjacent development.

7) Refuse containers and service facilities


should be screened from view by solid
masonry walls with wood or metal doors.
Use landscaping (shrubs and vines) to
screen walls and help deter graffiti.

VII-38 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


8) All mechanical equipment, whether mounted
on the roof, side of a structure, or on the
ground shall be screened from view (CVMC
15.16.030). Utility meters and equipment
should be placed in locations which are not
exposed to view from the street or should
be suitably screened. All screening devices Chula Vista
are to be compatible with the architecture,
material and color of adjacent structures.

f. Site Amenities
Site amenities help establish the identity of
a commercial area and provide comfort and
interest to its users. Individual site amenities
within a commercial setting should have
common features, such as color, material, and
design to provide a cohesive environment and a
more identifiable character.

1) Plazas and Courtyards


a) Plazas and courtyards are strongly
encouraged within commercial
developments over one acre .

b) Physical access should be provided from


shops, restaurants, offices and other
pedestrian uses to plazas.

c) A majority of the gross area of the plaza


should have access to sunlight for the
duration of daylight hours.

d) Shade trees or other elements providing


relief from the sun should be incorporated
within plazas.

e) Entries to the plaza and storefront entries


within the plaza should be well lighted.

f) Architecture, landscaping elements, and


public art should be incorporated into the
plaza design.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-39


g) Plazas and courtyards should include a focal
element of sculpture and/or water feature,
simple plants and simple sitting niches.

h) Seating should be provided in plazas. Where


applicable, plaza users should be provided
with a choice between active and passive
seating.

i) Courtyards should be designed to provide


both visibility and separation from the street,
parking areas, or drive aisles.

2) Site Furniture
a) Paving and furniture should complement
public streetscape elements when
appropriate.

b) Site furnishings should not create


pedestrian/vehicular conflicts.

c) Bicycle racks should be selected that


are durable and consistent with other
streetscape furnishings.

d) Based on their performance, “loop


rack” and “ribbon bar” bicycle racks are
recommended.

e) The design of newspaper boxes should be


consolidated into one rack. Racks should be
attractive on all sides.

VII-40 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


4. Architectural Guidelines
a. Introduction
The design of an infill building in the Village,
particularly its front facade, should be
influenced by historically significant facades on
the street but should not attempt to copy them. Chula Vista
The contemporary infill structure should be
compatible with specific plan zoning regulations
in terms of height, facade rhythm, placement of
doors and windows, color and use of materials Structures that integrate a mix of
Fg. 7.40
uses and vary heights are encouraged
without necessarily duplicating a “dated”
architectural style from the past.

b. Building Height, Form, and Mass


1) Multiple-use structures, with retail on
lower floors and residential or non-retail
commercial on upper floors, are required
along Third Avenue and encouraged
elsewhere within the Village District.

2) Horizontal building stepbacks are


encouraged to provide building articulation
, terrace space and other elements to soften
building facades. If a mid-rise building is
located on a corner site, increased stepbacks
from the street wall are encouraged along
both streets. Please also refer to Chapter VI
– Land Use and Development Regulations
for regulations regarding required minimum
building stepbacks for specific subdistricts
within the Specific Plan.
Stepback

3) Building heights should vary and enhance


public views, and provide adjacent sites Balconies
with maximum sun and ventilation and
protection from prevailing winds.

4) Exceptions to building height may be


provided pursuant to 19.16.040.

5) Whenever a proposed infill building is


adjacent to a designated historic structure, Building stepbacks are encouraged
Fg. 7.41

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-41


consideration should be given to proposed
building height, mass and form to minimize
effects on the historic structure.

c. Facades and Rhythm


Proportion of opening sizes New structures should reflect the established
to building mass is too small
scale and rhythm suggested by the regulations
contained herein and the traditional lot
pattern.

1) The characteristic proportion (relationship


of height to width) of existing facades should
Increase opening sizes be reflected in new infill development.

2) Building facades should be detailed in such


a way as to make them appear smaller in
scale. The smaller scale can be achieved
through vertical and horizontal articulation
such as:
Articulate openings • breaks (reveals, recesses) in the surface
of the wall itself;
• placement of window and door openings;
or
• the placement of bay windows, balconies,
awnings, and canopies.

3) Bay windows and balconies that provide


Break up building mass
usable and accessible outdoor space for
Vertical and horizontal articulation
Fg. 7.42 residential uses are strongly encouraged
make buildings appear smaller in scale
and may encroach on the public right-of-
way, consistent with City policy.

4) Whenever a proposed infill building is wider


than the existing facades on the street,
the infill facade should be broken down
into a series of appropriately proportioned
“structural bays” or components such as a
series of columns or masonry piers to frame
window, door and bulkhead components.

5) The predominant difference between upper


story openings and street level storefront
Upper stories should have smaller
Fg. 7.43 openings (windows and doors) should
window openings than the street level

VII-42 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


be maintained. Typically, there is a much
greater window area (70%) at the storefront
level for pedestrians to have a better view
of the merchandise displayed. In contrast,
upper stories have smaller window openings
(approximately 40%).
Chula Vista
6) Whenever an infill building is proposed that
has two adjacent commercial structures,
Architectural details help maintain
every attempt should be made to maintain horizontal rhythm along the street
Fg. 7.44
the characteristic rhythm, proportion,
and spacing of existing door and window
openings.

7) Whenever an infill building is proposed,


identify the common horizontal elements
(e.g. cornice line, window height/width
and spacing) found among neighboring
structures and develop the infill design
utilizing a similar rhythm or alignment.

8) Cornice lines of new buildings (a horizontal


rhythm element) should transition with
buildings on adjacent properties to avoid
clashes in building height.

9) If maintaining a horizontal rhythm or


alignment as a result of infill construction is
not feasible, the use of canopies, awnings, or
other horizontal devices should be included
to maintain a (shared) horizontal storefront
rhythm.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-43


d. Architectural Photographic Essay
The following pages provide photos illustrating
appropriate architectural bulk and massing
within the Village. These photos show buildings
with lower floors that are located at the front
setback line and upper floors that step back
from the street.

Upper floors step back from the street


Fg. 7.45

VII-44 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Buildings have lower floors that are located at the front setback line
Fg. 7.46

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-45


e. Building Materials and Colors
Building Materials
The complexity of building materials should be
based on the complexity of the building design.
More complex materials should be used on
simpler building designs and vice versa. In all
cases, storefront materials should be consistent
with the materials used on the applicable
building and adjacent buildings. The number of
different wall materials used on any one building
Materials such as wood provide should be kept to a minimum, ideally two. The
visual appeal
Fg. 7.47 following materials, including but not limited to,
are considered appropriate for buildings within
the Village:

1) Approved Exterior Materials

Walls
• Stucco (smooth or textured)
• Smooth block
• Granite
• Marble
• New or used face-brick
• Terra Cotta
Accent Materials
Accent materials should be used to highlight
building features and provide visual interest.
Accent materials may include one of the
following:
• Wood
• Glass
• Glass block (storefront only)
• Tile (bulkhead)
• New or used face-brick
• Concrete
• Stone
• Copper
• Cloth Awnings
• Plaster (smooth or textured)
• Metal
• Wrought Iron
• Cut stone, rusticated block (cast stone)
• Terra cotta

VII-46 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Rooftops
• Standing seam metal roofs
• Class “A” composition roof shingles
(residential application only)
• Crushed stone
• Built up roof system
• Tile Chula Vista
• Green roofs

2) Prohibited Exterior Materials

Walls and Accent Materials


• Reflective or opaque glass at ground floor
• Imitation stone (fiberglass or plastic)
• “Lumpy” stucco
• Pecky cedar
• Used brick with no fired face (salvaged from
interior walls)
• Imitation wood siding
• Plastic panels
• Heavily tinted glass
• Vinyl siding

3) Exterior Color

a) It is not the intent of these guidelines to


control color, however several general
guidelines should be applied:
• use subtle/muted colors on larger and
plainer buildings;
• use added colors and more intense
colors on small buildings or those with
elaborate detailing;
• encourage contrasting colors that accent
architectural details;
• encourage colors that accent
entrances;
• in general, no more than three colors
should be used on any given facade,
including “natural” colors such as
unpainted brick or stone, except for
Victorian and Craftsman era buildings. Contrasting colors should accent
entrances and architectural details
Fg. 7.48

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-47


• caution should be exercised when using
more than one vivid color per building;
and
• avoid using colors that are not harmonious
with colors found on adjacent buildings.

b) Light colored base walls of buildings and


other large expanses are encouraged. Soft
tones ranging from white to very light pastels
are encouraged. Neutrals such as off-white,
beige and sand are also acceptable colors.
However, dark colors can be appropriate for
“Natural” materials such as brick are
encouraged
Fg. 7.49 storefronts.

c) Finish material with “natural” colors such


as brick, stone, copper, etc., should be used
where practicable.

d) Exposure to the amount of sunlight can


change the appearance of a paint color;
therefore, paint chips should be checked on
both sunny and cloudy or foggy days.

e) The orientation of a building (north, east,


south, west) affects the appearance of
colors. Colors on south and west facades
appear warmer than if placed on north or
east sides.

f. Arcades and Columns


1) Arcades provide a dramatic architectural
element on many buildings in the Village,
particularly in the Civic Center area. Arches
should be semi-circular or slightly flat.
Parabolic arches are discouraged.

2) Care must be taken that arcades appear


authentic. The integrity of an arch is lost
when its mass is not proportional to its size.
Columns must relate in scale to that portion
of the building that they visually support.

Arches should be semi-circular and


Fg. 7.50 3) Columns should be square, rectangular or
relate to the scale of the building
round, and appear massive in thickness.
The use of capitals and column bands are

VII-48 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


strongly encouraged. Faux columns should
be avoided.

4) A base should be incorporated at the bottom


of the column. The column height should be
four to five times the width of the column.
Chula Vista
5) To enhance the pedestrian realm, arcades,
arches, and canopies are encouraged along
west and south facing facades.

g. Roofs and Upper-Story Details


1) No roofline ridge or parapet should run
unbroken for more than 75 feet. Vertical or
horizontal articulation is required.

2) The visible portion of sloped roofs should


be sheathed with a roofing material
complementary to the architectural style Not acceptable
of the building and other surrounding
buildings.

3) Radical roof pitches that create overly


prominent or out-of-character buildings
such as A-frames, geodesic domes, or
chalet-style buildings are discouraged. Acceptable

Roofs on infill buildings should


4) Access to roofs should be restricted to complement existing structures
Fg. 7.51
interior access only.

5) Rooftops can provide usable outdoor Parapet wall


space in both residential and commercial
developments.
Cornice
Flat roof
6) Roof-mounted mechanical equipment
should be screened by a parapet wall or Equipment

similar structural feature that is an integral


part of the building’s architectural design.

7) Building vertical focal elements are


encouraged, especially at key intersections
such as Third Avenue and E Street, which
Rooftop screening
are primary entrances to the Village District. Fg. 7.52
Towers, spires, or domes become landmarks

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-49


and serve as focal/orientation points for the
community.

h. Plazas and Paseos


Plazas and paseos are a vital component of the
Village district and pedestrian activity is critical to
the success of both areas. The broad sidewalks
along Third Avenue provide the primary plaza
and pedestrian zone within infill development
off of Third Avenue.

Features such as fountains attract


Fg. 7.53 1) Plazas and paseos should contain a visual
pedestrians
and somewhat audible feature such as
a sculpture, fountain, or a display pond
that attracts pedestrians and serves as a
landmark.

2) Any decorative paving used in plaza and


paseo areas should complement the paving
pattern and color of the pavers used in the
public right-of-way.

3) Furniture and fixtures used in the plaza and


paseo areas should complement those in
the public right-of-way. Furniture and fixtures
should be selected with maintenance
consideration in mind.
Paseos encourage pedestrian activity
throughout the Village
Fg. 7.54
4) Ample seating in both shaded and sunny
locations should be provided in plaza and
paseo areas.

5) Link plazas and paseos to green spaces


such as Memorial Park where feasible

i. Franchise/Corporate Business
1) Architecture
a) The scale, design character, and materials of
franchise/corporate architecture should be
consistent with adjacent buildings. Natural
materials, such as brick, stone, or copper,
Franchise/corporate buildings should
Fg. 7.55 should be used where applicable.
complement surrounding buildings

VII-50 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


2) Color and Lighting
The color(s) used by franchise/corporate
buildings should be considered carefully since
they may be inappropriate within the Village.
Below are standards that should be considered
when addressing appropriate color(s) and
lighting: Chula Vista

a) Use colors that complement colors found


on adjacent buildings or in the Village area.

b) Franchise/corporate colors should be


consistent with the architectural style or
period of the building.

c) Bright or intense colors are strongly


discouraged, unless used on appropriate
architectural styles and reserved for more
refined detailing and transient features.

d) The use of symbols and logos can be utilized


in place of bright or intense corporate
colors.

e) Lighting of logos should be compatible with


the primary building and respect adjacent
buildings. Bright and intense lighting is
strongly discouraged.

f) Neon outlining should be consistent with the


architectural style or period of the building Neon should be used sparingly and be
and should be reserved for detailing and reserved for detailing
Fg. 7.56
transient features. The use of bright and
intense neon outlining of windows is strongly
discouraged.

g) Vintage neon incorporated in signage on


both Third Avenue and Broadway should be
preserved.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-51


5. Storefront Design Guidelines
a. Introduction
The storefront is only one of the architectural
components of the commercial facade, but it is
the most important visual element for a building
in the Village. It traditionally experiences the
greatest degree of change during a building’s
lifetime and further holds the greatest potential
for creative or poor alterations affecting both the
character of the building and the streetscape.
Traditional storefronts are comprised of a few
decorative elements other than simple details
that repeat across the face of the building (e.g.,
structural bays containing window and door
openings, continuous cornice line, transoms,
bulkheads) and integrate the storefront into
the entire building facade. Windows and
Cornice facades that are open to the public realm are
also encouraged to take advantage of the nice
climate.
Transom window

Display window
b. Storefront Composition

Bulkhead
1) Entries and Doorways
Pier a) The main entry to buildings in the Village
Recessed entry door
should be emphasized by utilizing one or
Storefront components more of the following design elements or
Fg. 7.57
concepts:
• Flanked columns, decorative fixtures
or other details, including a recessed
entryway within a larger arched or cased
decorative opening. The recessed
entryway should be continuously and
thoroughly illuminated.
• Entryways should be covered by a portico
(formal porch) projecting from or set into
the building face, and distinguished by a
change in roofline, a tower, or a break in
the surface of the subject wall.

b) Height exceptions may be allowed consistent


with CVMC 19.16.040.

c) All entryways should be equipped with


a lighting device providing a minimum
VII-52 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
maintained one foot-candle of light at
ground level during hours of darkness.
Vandal resistant covers should protect
lighting devices.

2) Awnings and Canopies


Awnings, canopies, and other accessory shade Chula Vista
structures that are relatively open and do not
restrict pedestrian or vehicular movement
may encroach over the right-of-way. Awnings
provide excellent opportunities for color and
visual relief as well as protection for buildings
and pedestrians from the sun and rain. They
add pedestrian scale and visual interest to the
storefront design. The following criteria should
be considered when using awnings:

a) The most purposeful awnings are


retractable.

b) Awning shape should relate to the window


or door opening. Barrel-shaped awnings
are only to be used to complement arched Awnings add pedestrian scale and
windows, while square awnings should be comfort
Fg. 7.58
used on rectangular windows.

c) Awnings should consist of a durable,


commercial grade fabric, canvas or similar
material.

d) Frames and supports should be painted or


coated to prevent corroding.

e) Awnings should have a single color or two-


color stripes. Lettering and trim utilizing
more colors is permitted, but will be
considered as a sign area.

f) Where the facade is divided into distinct


structural bays, awnings should be placed
between the vertical elements rather than
overlapping them. The awning design should
respond to the scale, proportion and rhythm Shed awnings are consistent with
Fg. 7.59
created by these structural bay elements rectilinear building forms
and “nestle” into the space created by the
structural bay.
Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-53
g) Glossy, shiny plastic, or similar awning
materials are not permitted.

h) Aluminum awnings or canopies do not fit


the atmosphere of the Village and are not
permitted.

3) Storefront Accessories and Other Details


There are a number of design elements that
may be incorporated into the building design,
especially at street level, in order to add to the
experience of the pedestrian while meeting
important functional needs as well. The
following storefront accessories and details are
recommended:

a) Grillework/Metalwork and Other Details

There are a number of details, often


considered mundane, that may be
incorporated into the design to add
visual richness and interest while serving
functional needs. Such details include the
following items:
• light fixtures, wall mounted or hung with
decorative metal brackets;
• metal grille work, at vent openings or
as decorative features at windows,
doorways, or gates;
• decorative scuppers, catches, and down-
spouts;
• balconies, rails, finials, corbels, and
plaques;
• flag or banner pole brackets;
• fire sprinkler stand pipe enclosures and
hose bib covers, preferably of brass;
and
• permanent, fixed security grates or
grilles in front of windows are strongly
discouraged. If security grilles are
necessary, they should be placed inside
the building, behind the window display
Light fixtures can enhance a area.
storefront
Fg. 7.60

VII-54 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


b) Door and Window Design

• Doors can be accentuated with simple


details such as a handsome brass door
pull, brass kickplate, or an attractive
painted sign on glass (limited to 15% of
door glass area). Chula Vista
• Doors to retail shops should contain a
high percentage of glass in order to view
Roll-up
the retail contents. A minimum of a 50% security Storefront
glass area is required. screen window
display area
• Use of clear glass (at least 88% light
transmission) on the first floor is
required.
• Traditional storefront windows should
be no closer than 18 inches from the
ground (bulkhead height). By limiting
the bulkhead height, the visibility to the
storefront displays and retail interior is Security features should be placed
Fg. 7.61
maximized. Maximum bulkhead heights behind the window display area
for new construction should be 36
inches.

c) Side and Rear Entrances

• Signs should be modestly scaled to fit


the casual visual character of the plaza,
paseo, alley, or rear parking area.
• An awning can soften rear and side
facades and provide a pleasant protected
space.
• The rear and side entry door design
should be compatible with the front
door. Special security glass (i.e. wire
imbedded) is allowed.
• Security lighting should be modest and
should focus on the side or rear entry
door.
• Selective use of tree planting, potted
plants, and other landscaping
complementary to the overall design
theme should be used to improve a side
and rear facade.
Side and rear entry treatments should
reflect the front facade treatment
Fg. 7.62

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-55


c. Storefront Photographic Essay
The following photographic essay includes
photos of storefronts that would be appropriate
for the Village. While these photos provide a
variety of storefront styles, this essay is not
intended to be exhaustive. Creative use of
storefront components is encouraged.

Appropriate storefront examples


Fg. 7.63

VII-56 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


Chula Vista

Appropriate storefront examples


Fg. 7.64

Section View Fg. 1.2

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-57


6. Building Additions and Renovation
Guidelines
a. Introduction
The renovation/restoration of older commercial
structures provides an excellent means of
maintaining and reinforcing the traditional
character of the Village. Renovation and
expansion not only increases property values
in the area but also serves as an inspiration to
other property owners and designers to make
similar efforts.

When an applicant proposes a renovation of


or addition to an existing structure, the work
should respect the original design character of
the structure. The appropriate design guidelines
in this section are to be implemented whenever
a structure is to be renovated or expanded. In
addition, renovation of all structures of historic
significance should follow The Secretary of
the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and
Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings,
published by the U.S. Department of the
Interior, National Park Service (available on the
web at: http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/tps/tax/
rhb). When the City becomes a Certified Local
Building renovation and restoration
Fg. 7.65 Government, the implementation procedures
can enhance the Village’s character
should be applied as appropriate to new infill
development in the Village.

b. Preserve Traditional Features and


Decoration
Original materials, details, proportions, as well
as patterns of materials and openings should
be considered when any additions or building
renovations would affect the appearance of an
existing building’s exterior.

Many times during the remodeling of storefronts,


original decorative details are intact as visual
“leftovers” or simply covered up with previous
Every effort should be made to
preserve traditional storefront details
Fg. 7.66 construction. If the building is to be refurbished,
these forgotten details should not be wasted. If
enough of them remain, they can be restored as
VII-58 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
part of the original design. If only a few remain,
they can be incorporated as design features
in a new storefront. In either case, the design
of any improvements should evolve through
the remaining traditional details and create a
harmonious background that emphasizes the
improvements. Chula Vista

All existing historic decorations should be


preserved since they reinforce the Village’s Existing original facade
traditional character and adds a richness of
detail that is often irreplaceable at today’s
costs.

c. Removal of Elements Inconsistent with


Original Facade
Owners or shopkeepers alter buildings over time
in an effort to “keep up with changing times”
or to “update a tired image.” Unfortunately,
such changes often result in gradual but severe
erosion of the original character and cohesion
of the core area. Restoration of buildings that
have been substantially or carelessly altered is
strongly encouraged.
Existing “modernized” facade

Existing building elements that are incompatible


with the original facade design of the building
Key Plan
should be removed. These include excessive use Fg. 1.1
of exterior embellishments and “modernized”
elements such as metal grilles or rusticated
materials.

d. Storefront Renovation
1) An original storefront with little or no
remodeling should be preserved and
repaired with as little alteration as possible.

2) Where only part of the original storefront


remains (limited remodeling has occurred), Restoration of original storefronts is
strongly encouraged
Fg. 7.67
the storefront should be repaired, maintaining
historic materials where possible, including
the replacement of extensively deteriorated
or missing parts with new parts based upon

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-59


surviving examples of transoms, bulkheads,
pilasters, signs, etc.

3) Where the original storefront is completely


missing (extensive remodeling has
occurred), the first priority is to reconstruct
the storefront based upon historical, pictorial
and physical documentation. If that is not
practical, the design of the new storefront
should be compatible with the size, scale,
proportion, material and color of the existing
structure.

e. Window Replacement
The impact of windows on the facade is
determined by the size, shape, pattern of
openings, spacing, and placement within
the facade. To retain the structure’s original
architectural balance and integrity, it is crucial
to consider these elements when altering or
reconstructing windows.

1) Wherever possible, the original window


openings should be retained. If the existing
ceiling has been lowered, the dropped
ceiling should be pulled back from the
original window.
Windows are critical to establishing
the pattern of a traditional storefront
Fg. 7.68
2) If possible, the original windows and frames
should be saved and restored. Missing,
rotting or broken sash, frames, mullions
and muntins with similar material should be
replaced.

3) Where transom windows exist, every effort


should be made to retain this traditional
storefront feature. If the ceiling inside the
structure has been lowered, the ceiling
should be sloped up to meet the transom
so that light will penetrate the interior of the
building.

Transom windows increase the


amount of natural light inside
Fg. 7.69

VII-60 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


4) If the original window openings have been
altered, the openings to their original
configuration and detail should be restored.
Blocking or filling window openings that
contribute to the overall facade design
should be avoided. Original Not acceptable - Not acceptable -
aluminum casement blocked-up
Chula Vista
5) When replacing windows, consideration
should be given to the original size and
shape detailing and framing materials.
Replacement windows should be the same
operating type and materials as the original
window.
Original Not acceptable - Not acceptable -
f. Door Replacement aluminum frame blocked-up with
with framed bulkhead stone veneer
1) Original doors and door hardware should be Window openings should be restored
Fg. 7.70
retained, repaired and refinished provided to the original configuration and detail

they can comply with ADA requirements or


conform to the Historical Building Code.

2) If new replacement doors are necessary, they


should be compatible with the traditional
character and design of the structure.

g. Awnings
1) Original awning hardware should be used if
it is in working order or is repairable. Key Plan
Fg. 1.1
2) The traditional canvas, slanted awning is
most appropriate for older storefronts and
is encouraged over contemporary hooped
or box styles.

h. Painting
Painting can be one of the simplest and most
dramatic improvements that can be made to a
facade. It gives the facade a well-maintained
appearance and is essential to the long life of
many traditional materials.

1) All the facade materials to be painted


should be catalogued. Materials of different Traditional storefronts typically
Fg. 7.71
properties may require different paints employ slanted awnings

or procedures. Consult a local expert for


advice.
Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-61
2) Any necessary repairs should be made
to surfaces before painting (e.g., replace
rotten wood, repoint masonry mortar joints,
remove rust from metal).

3) Each surface should be carefully prepared


according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
This will include scraping, sanding, and
thorough cleaning. This surface preparation
is an extremely important step toward a
good finish job.

4) Paint should be applied per the


manufacturer’s instructions. Paint only in
satisfactory weather and use a primer as a
first coat for better surface adhesion. Follow
with two coats of the final color.

i. Repair and Cleaning


1) Surface cleaning should be undertaken with
the gentlest means possible. Sandblasting
and other harsh cleaning methods that may
damage historic building materials is not
permitted.

2) Waterproofing and graffiti proofing sealers


should be used after cleaning and repair.

VII-62 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


j. Seismic Retrofitting
Where structural improvements for seismic
retrofitting affect the building exterior, such
improvements should be done with care and
consideration for the impact on appearance of
the building. Where possible, such work should
be concealed. Where this is not possible, the Chula Vista
improvements should be planned to carefully
integrate into the existing building design.

Seismic improvements should receive the same


care and forethought as any other building
modification. An exterior building elevation may
be required with seismic retrofit submittals,
showing the location and appearance of all
such improvements. When retrofitting historic
buildings, refer to the Secretary of Interior
Standards.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-63


7. Landscape Guidelines
a. Landscape plans should consider the scale
and mass of a building and its relationship
to the scale of the street and neighboring
properties.

b. Emphasis should be placed on California and


Mediterranean landscaping. Indigenous,
ornamental planting, vines, flowering plants,
arbors, trellises and container planting are
encouraged.

c. Expansive horizontal or vertical surfaces


comprised of a single material can be
segmented or interrupted with vines or
foliage. Vines can be used to dramatize
a building’s architecture or soften hard
materials. Vines can also be used to enhance
or screen fences and trash enclosures.

d. Courtyards, gardens, and fountains are


very desirable in the Village. Landscaping
within courtyards should include a balance
of hardscape and softscape materials and
provide shaded seating areas.

e. Boxed and container plants in decorative


Courtyards should include both
hardscape and softscape materials
Fg. 7.72 planters of ceramic, terra cotta, wood, or
stucco should be used to enhance public
areas in the Village.

f. Large planters may also be incorporated


into seating areas. Such planters should be
open to the earth below and be provided
with a permanent irrigation system.

g. All trees in paved areas should be provided


with “Deep Root” barriers automatic
irrigation and metal grates.

h. Freestanding planters may also be


incorporated into public spaces. Size, shape,
Landscaping is critical to creating a
Fg. 7.73 color, and texture should complement the
pedestrian-friendly atmosphere
overall design theme. Such planters should
be provided with a permanent irrigation
system.
VII-64 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
8. Lighting
a. Specialty lighting in trees near or within
outdoor patios and restaurants helps create
a festive atmosphere and encourages
nighttime use by pedestrians.

b. All exterior doors, aisles, passageways and Chula Vista


recesses should be equipped with a lighting
device providing a minimum maintained one
foot-candle of light at ground level during
hours of darkness. Vandal resistant covers
should protect lighting devices. Outdoor lighting can highlight
significant features
Fg. 7.74

c. Decorative accent lighting and fixtures above


the minimum one foot-candle illumination
levels of surrounding parking lots should be
provided at vehicle driveways, entry throats,
pedestrian paths, plaza areas, and other
activity areas.

d. Lighting fixtures should be attractively


designed to complement the architecture of
the project.

e. Lighting should improve visual identification


of residences and businesses and create an
inviting atmosphere for passersby.
Light fixtures should be located in
plazas and other activity areas
Fg. 7.75
f. Lighting sources should be shielded, diffused
or indirect to avoid glare for pedestrians and
motorists.

g. Wall mounted lights should be used to the


greatest extent possible to minimize the total
number of freestanding light standards.

h. Lighting should encourage the use of open


spaces and plazas.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-65


9. Parking and Circulation
a. Introduction
The following factors should be considered
in the design and development of off-street
parking in pedestrian-oriented areas:
• ingress and egress with consideration
to possible conflicts with vehicular and
pedestrian traffic;
• pedestrian and vehicular conflicts within
parking lots and structures;
• reinforcing the street edge and a pedestrian
environment;
• on-site circulation and service vehicle
zones;
• overall configuration and appearance of the
parking area;
• minimizing opportunities for crime and
undesirable activities through natural
surveillance, access control and activity
support;
• shading parking lots by means of canopy
trees and other landscaping; and
• creating a sense of spatial organization and
experiential meaning through the layout of
the design of parking lots and structures.
Parking lot design should address
possible vehicle-pedestrian conflicts
Fg. 7.76
b. General Considerations
1) Shared parking is strongly encouraged
whenever practical.

2) Parking areas should be separated from


buildings by a landscaped strip. Conditions
where parking stalls directly abut buildings
should be avoided.

3) Lighting, landscaping, hardscape, fencing,


parking layout and pedestrian paths
should all assist drivers and pedestrians
in navigating through parking lots and
structures.

Shade is an important feature of


Fg. 7.77 4) Bicycle parking should be provided at each
parking areas
development and should be easily accessible
and integrated into the overall site design.

VII-66 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5) Parking structures below or above ground
level retail or commercial uses are
encouraged since they allow for pedestrian
activity along the street while providing
parking convenient to destinations within
the Village.
Chula Vista
c. Access and Entries
1) Locate parking area entries on side streets
or alleys to minimize pedestrian/vehicular
conflicts along Third Avenue and F Street.
Parking structures should be
integrated with commercial uses
Fg. 7.78
2) Parking lots and structures adjacent to a
public street should provide pedestrians
with a point of entry and clear and safe
access from the sidewalk to the entrance of
the building(s).

3) Pedestrian and vehicular entrances must


be clearly identified and easily accessible
to create a sense of arrival. The use
of enhanced paving, landscaping, and
special architectural features and details is
required.

4) Where possible, use alleys or side streets


for access to parking areas. The use of
alleys for parking access must be balanced Features such as a trellis can accent
a pedestrian entrance
Fg. 7.79
with other common uses of alleys, including
service, utilities, and loading and unloading
areas.

d. Parking Lot Lighting


Lighting for a parking lot or structures should
be evenly distributed and provide pedestrians
and drivers with adequate visibility at night.

e. Circulation
1) The layout of parking areas should be
designed so that pedestrians walk parallel
to moving cars.

2) Access by disabled persons should be


incorporated into the overall pedestrian
circulation system.
Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-67
f. Landscaping
Landscape planter is bounded on three
sides by parking space or parking aisle 1) Surface parking facilities should be
landscaped with the following objectives:
• maximize distribution of landscaping;
• promote compatibility and function as a
“good neighbor;” and,
• strive to achieve shade over 50 percent
Preferred parking area landscaping of the asphalt area within five years from
Fg. 7.80 time of installation.

2) Parking lots adjacent to a public side street


should be landscaped to soften the visual
impact of parked vehicles from the public
right-of-way. Screening should consist of
a combination of low walls (a maximum of
three feet high) and landscape materials at
the setback line.
Elevation of staggered wall
3) A well thought-out selection and composition
of hardscape materials can help order space
and reinforce the relationship of the parking
Elevation of planters/wall
lot to its surroundings and to the buildings
it serves. Entrance and exit areas, areas
that are the central focus of the parking lot
design, major axis and areas that act as
Elevation of wall with breaks forecourts for entrances may be suitable
locations for special paving materials such
Types of screening for parking areas
Fg. 7.81 as brick or stamped concrete.

g. Structured Parking
1) Due to the more intense nature of
development in the Village, structured
parking which promotes compatibility, safety
and pedestrian activity is anticipated and
encouraged.

2) Where structured parking is provided, the


following design and operational features
should be considered to optimize public
safety:
• the design of parking structures should
permit maximum opportunities for
Parking structures should
complement surrounding structures
Fg. 7.82 natural surveillance into the structure;
• the public realm begins where the stairs
end in a structural parking and should
VII-68 be treated accordingly;
Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
• where possible, elevators and stairs
should be located on the perimeter

Property line
of parking structures with natural
surveillance from exterior public areas
via glass-back elevators and glass at
stairs and elevator lobbies;
• elevator lobbies and stairs in open Chula Vista
parking garages should be open to the
parking areas, except at roof levels
Retail
where glass or other visually penetrable
enclosures may be provided.
• elevator cabs should be provided with
glass-back cabs where those elements
are above grade;
• all parking structures should have lighting
Incorporate retail uses on the ground
in conformance with IESNA (Illuminating floor of parking structures
Fg. 7.83
Engineering Society of North America)
standards;
• interior walls of parking structures should
be painted a light color (e.g., white or
light blue) to improve illumination;
• if applicable, the parking structure should
be designed to integrate into existing or
proposed developments to allow direct
access from different levels;
• coordinated signs, color, or features
between developments should be used
for wayfinding purposes;
• signs should be posted to inform users
whether security escort service is
available;
• emergency buzzers and telephones
should be installed in easily accessible
places on each level, in elevators and in
stairwells; and
• directional arrows and signs indicating
exits, elevators, and emergency buzzers/
telephones should be visibly displayed
on walls.

3) Activities such as shops, offices or other


commercial space should be incorporated
along the ground level of structured parking
street frontage. In addition, parking
structures should provide landscaping
along blank walls on side streets and upper
levels. VII-69
Chapter VII Design Guidelines
10. Signs
a. Introduction
In contrast to highway commercial areas,
pedestrian oriented commercial areas such
as the Village were designed to accommodate
shoppers and residents strolling along
sidewalks, and motorists driving at slower
speeds. Considerations such as size, utility,
location, lettering style, color and illumination
are very important in designing an attractive,
functional sign.

The guidelines that follow address these issues


and others, and are intended to help business
owners provide quality signs that add to and
support the character of the Village District.
They are not intended to supersede any existing
City sign ordinances. All signs must comply with
the regulations contained in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code unless as indicated within the
specific plan, in which case the specific plan will
take precedence.
Signs should accommodate
pedestrians
Fg. 7.84
b. General Guidelines
1) Color and Contrast
Color and contrast are the most important
aspects of visual communication and can be
used to catch the eye or to communicate ideas
or feelings. The following general guidelines
should be considered prior to developing signs
for any project.

a) Contrast is an important influence on


the legibility of signs. Light letters on a
dark background or dark letters on a light
background are most legible.

b) Limit the total number of colors used in any


one sign. Small accents of several colors may
make a sign unique and attractive, but the
competition between large areas of many
Simple color schemes enhance a
sign’s readability
Fg. 7.85 different colors decreases readability.

VII-70 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


c) Bright day-glo (fluorescent) colors are
strongly discouraged. They are distracting
and do not blend well with other background
colors.

d) Sign colors should complement the colors


used on the structures and the project as a Chula Vista
whole.

2) Materials
a) The following materials are suitable for signs
in the Village:
• wood (carved, sandblasted, etched, and
properly sealed, primed and painted, or
stained);
• metal (formed, etched, cast, engraved,
and properly primed and painted
or factory coated to protect against
corrosion);
• high-density pre-formed foam or similar Colors on buildings and signs should
Fg. 7.86
material (New materials may be very be complementary

appropriate if properly designed in a


manner consistent with these standards
and painted or otherwise finished to
complement the architecture.); and
• custom neon tubing in the form of
graphics or lettering (may be incorporated
into several of the above permitted sign
types).

b) Sign materials should be compatible with


the design of the facade.

c) The selected materials need to contribute to


the legibility of the sign. For example, glossy
finishes are often difficult to read because
of glare and reflections.

d) Paper and cloth signs are appropriate for


interior temporary use only.

High-density pre-formed foam material


can complement surrounding buildings
Fg. 7.87

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-71


3) Sign Illumination
Illumination of a sign should be considered
carefully. Like color, illumination has
considerable value for visual communication.

a) First, consider if the sign needs to be


lighted at all. Lights in the window display
may be sufficient to identify the business.
Often, nearby streetlights provide ample
illumination of a sign after dark.

b) If the sign can be illuminated by an indirect


source of light, this is usually the best
arrangement because the sign will appear
to be better integrated with the building’s
architecture. Light fixtures attached to the
front of the structure cast light on the sign
and the face of the structure as well.

c) Individually illuminated letters should be


backlit. Signs comprised of individual letters
mounted directly on a structure can often
use a distinctive element of the structure’s
facade as a backdrop, thereby providing
a better integration of the sign with the
structure.

Backlit letter signs are encouraged


Fg. 7.88 d) Whenever indirect lighting fixtures are used
(fluorescent or incandescent), care should
be taken to properly shield the light source
to prevent glare from spilling over into
residential areas and any public right-of-
way.

e) Backlit plastic box signs are prohibited.

c. Private Wayfinding
Good sign design can be critical to helping people
move easily through an unfamiliar environment.
Private signs throughout the Village should be
conspicuous, easy to read, and convey clear
messages. As a result, visitors will enjoy their
time in the Village and want to return.

VII-72 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


1) Sign Visibility
Signs should be free of any obstruction, such
as landscaping, when viewed from different
angles.

2) Sign Legibility
Chula Vista
An effective sign should do more than attract
attention; it should communicate its message.
Usually, this is a question of the readability
of words and phrases. The most significant
influence on legibility is lettering. Make certain that signs are visible
from different angles
Fg. 7.89
a) Use a brief message whenever possible.
Fewer words help produce a more effective
sign. A sign with a brief, succinct message
is easier to read and looks more attractive.
Evaluate each word.

b) Avoid spacing letters and words too close


together. Crowding of letters, words or lines
will make any sign more difficult to read.
Conversely, over-spacing these elements
causes the viewer to read each item
individually, again obscuring the message.
As a general rule, letters should not occupy
more than 75% of the sign panel area.

c) Limit the number of lettering styles in order


to increase legibility. A general rule to follow
is to limit the number of different letter
types to no more than two for small signs
and three for large signs.

d) Use symbols and logos in the place of words


whenever appropriate. Pictographic images
will usually register more quickly in the
viewer’s mind than a written message.

e) Avoid hard-to-read, overly intricate typefaces


and symbols. Typefaces and symbols that
are hard to read reduce the sign’s ability to
communicate.
A sign’s message should be brief
Fg. 7.90

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-73


f) Avoid faddish or bizarre typefaces if they
are difficult to read. These typefaces may
be in vogue and look good today, but soon
may go out of style. The image conveyed by
the sign may quickly become that of a dated
and unfashionable business.

3) Business Directional Signs


a) Business directional signs should be provided
near vehicle and pedestrian entrances.
They should not obstruct pedestrian flow or
negatively impact sight lines at entrances.

b) Use consistent names for all buildings,


Intricate typefaces can cause services and destinations.
confusion and misunderstanding
Fg. 7.91
c) Maps should correspond to the building
layout so, for example, up on the map is
straight ahead for the viewer. Provide
markers to indicate where the person is
currently located and identify areas by using
color and memorable graphics.

d) Number floors in relation to the building’s


main entry so that directories will clearly
designate which floors are above or below
grade.

e) Location of directional signs should not


encroach on the public right-of-way.

f) Business directional signs should be easily


read during the day and evening. Illumination
of some type may be necessary at night.

g) Contrast is important for effectiveness of


directional signs. A substantial contrast
should be provided between the color and
material of the background and the letters
or symbols to make it easier to read.

d. Wall Signs
Directional signs should contrast
background and foreground colors
Fg. 7.92 1) Definition: A wall sign is any sign that is
attached or erected on the exterior wall of

VII-74 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


a building including the parapet, with the
Permitted wall sign location
display surface of the sign parallel to the
building wall, and which does not project
more than 12 inches from the building
or project above the height of the wall or
parapet.
Chula Vista
2) Signs should be placed consistent with the
proportion and scale of the elements within
the structure’s facade. A particular sign
may fit well on a plain wall area, but might
overpower the finer scale and proportion of
Wall sign location
a lower storefront. A sign that is appropriate Fg. 7.93
near an entry may look tiny and out of place
above the ground level.

3) Look at the facade of the structure. Are


there any architectural features or details
that suggest a location, size, or shape for
the sign? These elements could be bands or
frames of brickwork or stone, indentations
in the face material, gaps between columns,
or other permanent features. If these details
exist, use them to locate the sign.

4) Look at the facade of the structure in


relation to where adjacent businesses have
placed their signs. There may already be an
established pattern of sign locations. This
can establish visual continuity among the
storefronts, and at the same time provide
uniform sight lines for viewers. Alignment
makes all signs more readable at a glance
and is encouraged.

5) If aligning signs is not possible, look for


other features to determine placement of
the sign. Each sign may relate directly to
the store entrance in a similar fashion, or all
signs may be displayed within the windows.
Since the Village is a pedestrian-oriented
area, signs should relate to the sidewalk
instead of motorists. In this case, small Wall signs of consistent size and
projecting signs or signs under awnings are placement establish facade rhythm
Fg. 7.94
most appropriate.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-75


e. Awning Signs
1) Definition: An awning sign is a sign on or
attached to a temporary retractable shelter
that is supported from the exterior wall of a
building.

2) Sign copy should be centered on the awning


to achieve symmetry.

3) Message should be limited to the business


name and logo, sized to be proportional with
the awning, and located only on the fabric
valance flap of the awning.

4) When initially installed, awnings should be


provided with removable valances and end
panels to accommodate future changes in
sign copy. Painting cloth awnings in order to
change sign copy is prohibited.

5) Back-lit internally illuminated awnings are


strongly discouraged.

6) The shape, design, and color of fabric


Messages should be proportional and
located only on the valence flap
Fg. 7.95 awnings should be carefully designed to
coordinate with, and not dominate, the
architectural style of the building.

7) Where other fabric awnings are used on the


building, the design and color of the sign
awnings and all other awnings should be
coordinated.

f. Canopy Signs
1) Definition: A canopy sign is any sign attached
to the underside of a projecting canopy or
protruding over a sidewalk or right-of-way

2) Canopy signs provide pedestrian scale and


can enhance building fronts.

3) The bottom of the sign should maintain at


least eight feet pedestrian clearance from
the sidewalk level.

VII-76 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


g. Projecting Signs
1) The distance between projecting signs
should be at least 25 feet for maximum
visibility.

2) On a multi-storied building, the sign should


be suspended between the bottom of the Chula Vista
second story windowsills and the top of the
doors or windows of the first story. On a one-
story building, the top of the sign should be
in line with the lowest point of the roof. Canopy signs are often used for
pedestrian-oriented uses
Fg. 7.96

3) The bottom of the sign should maintain at


least eight feet pedestrian clearance from
the sidewalk level.

4) The sign should be hung at a 90-degree


angle from the face of the building. It should
be pinned at least 6 inches away from the
wall for best visibility but should not project
beyond a vertical plane set 3 feet from the
facade.
Small projecting signs reinforce a
5) Decorative iron and wood brackets that pedestrian-scale
Fg. 7.97
support projecting signs are strongly
3’ Max.
encouraged. The lines of the brackets should
harmonize with the shape of the sign. 6” Min.

6) To avoid damaging brick and stucco work,


brackets should be designed so that they
can be bolted into masonry joints whenever
possible.

h. Window Signs
1) Definition: A window sign is any sign in which
8’ Min.

the name, logo, address, phone number, or


hours of operation are applied directly to
the window of a business or placed on a
sign hung inside the window.

2) Interior signs should be within 36 inches of


the window so as to be readable from the
Guidelines for projecting signs
exterior. Fg. 7.98

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-77


3) Sign area should be less than 15% of the
total window area.

4) Window signs should be geared to the


pedestrian and be at eye level.

5) Window signs should be designed to be


pleasing and to aesthetically enhance
storefronts.

6) Letters applied to the glass may be vinyl or


painted. Glass-mounted graphic logos may
Gold leaf paint is recommended for
window signs
Fg. 7.99 also be applied as long as they comply with
the 15% area limitation. White and gold leaf
paint is recommended.

i. Figurative Signs
Signs that advertise the occupant business
through the use of graphic or crafted symbols,
such as shoes, keys, glasses, books, etc.
are encouraged. Figurative signs may be
incorporated into any of the allowable sign types
identified previously.

j. Temporary Signs
Posting of handmade window signs is not
Example of a figurative sign permitted. Refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
Fg. 7.100
19.60 for further regulations on temporary
signs.

VII-78 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


E. Urban Core District
1. Introduction
This section presents design guidelines for private sector projects in the Urban
Core district, which will serve as the primary business, commercial, and regional
center of Chula Vista. These guidelines focus specifically on accommodating mid-
and high-rise commercial and residential development while also developing Chula Vista
an active street life. Design guidelines for public areas will be considered in
Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-79


2. Design Objectives
a. Create a Comfortable Scale of Structures
A critical step in ensuring pedestrian scale in the
Urban Core district is by encouraging uniform
front façade heights that form a continuous
streetwall. Upper floors should step back from
the streetwall so that pedestrians feel enclosed
by the surrounding buildings but not confined.

b. Maintain Sunlight Exposure and Minimize


Wind on the Street Level
Buildings should form a continuous
Fg. 7.101
streetwall while upper floors step back Building stepbacks allow sunlight to reach the
ground and prevent the building from deflecting
wind towards the street as well as helping
to create a pedestrian-scaled environment.
Such measures will allow pedestrians to feel
comfortable and therefore permit them to
spend more time on the street.

c. Distinguish Between Upper and Lower


Floors
Through use and design, the ground floor should
welcome the public. Retail, dining, or active
residential uses can help create a vibrant street
life while greater use of transparent materials
Key Plan (windows) rather than solid materials (wall)
Fg. 1.1
encourage pedestrians to glance at storefronts
and linger on the street. Upper floors are
more likely to contain residential or non-retail
commercial uses and contain less window
space.

Retail uses can promote a vibrant


street life
Fg. 7.102

VII-80 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. Site Planning
a. Introduction
Siting involves a project’s relationship to the
property, the street, and adjacent buildings. In
the Urban Core, buildings should be sited in ways
that provide a comfortable and safe environment Chula Vista
for pedestrians while accommodating vehicles.

b. Building Siting
1) Most of the building “streetwall” should meet
the front setback lines, except for special
entry features, architectural articulation,
and plaza areas or other public spaces.

2) Setbacks should be dedicated to plazas that Plaza area created in


the building’s setback
focus on hardscape rather than landscaping area
and should be of sufficient size to increase
function and accessibility.

3) Locate loading and storage facilities away


from the street and screen from public
view.
Majority of building wall
4) Walls and fences should be integrated with located on front property line
the overall building design.
Preferred building siting in the Urban
c. Street Orientation Core
Fg. 7.103

1) Storefronts and major building entries should


orient to Broadway, H Street, courtyards, or
plazas, although minor side or rear entries
may be desirable.

2) Any building with more than 125 feet of


street frontage should have at least one
primary building entry.

3) All uses with street level, exterior exposure


should provide at least one direct pedestrian
entry from the street.

4) Any drop-off areas along Broadway, E Street


and H Street should be limited.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-81


d. Parking Orientation
1) Parking lots should not be located along
the frontage of primary streets such as
Broadway and H Street.

2) When off-street parking in the rear is not


possible, parking should be screened from
view by landscaped berms and/or low
walls.

3) Locate rear parking lot and structure entries


on side streets or alleys in order to minimize
pedestrian/vehicular conflicts along
Broadway or H Street. Driveways should
be kept to the minimum number and width
required for the project.

4) Create wide, well-lit pedestrian walkways


from parking lots and structures to building
entries that utilize directional signs.
Plaza
5) Access from side streets and alleys should
Street

minimize impacts on surrounding residential


Street

neighborhoods.

e. Refuse, Storage, and Equipment Areas


Street
Parking lot entries should be located 1) Trash storage must be fully enclosed and
Fg. 7.104
along side streets or alleys incorporated within the main structures or
separate freestanding enclosures (CVMC
19.58.340). Where practical, storage
at each unit is preferred over common
enclosures. Trash storage cannot be placed
under stairways.

2) All trash and garbage bins should be


stored in an approved enclosure. Refuse
containers and service facilities should be
screened from view by solid masonry walls
with wood or metal doors. Use landscaping
(shrubs and vines) to screen walls and help
deter graffiti.

VII-82 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3) Trash enclosures should allow convenient
access for commercial tenants. Siting
service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.

4) Trash enclosures should be located away


from residential uses to minimize nuisance Chula Vista
for the adjacent property owners. The
enclosure doors should not interfere with
landscaping, pedestrian, or vehicle path of
travel.

5) Trash enclosures should be architecturally


compatible with the project. Landscaping
should be incorporated into the design to
screen the enclosure from public view and
deter graffiti.

6) Refuse storage areas that are visible from


an upper story of adjacent structures
should provide an opaque or semi-opaque
horizontal cover/screen to reduce unsightly
views. The screening should be compatible
with the design of adjacent development.

7) All mechanical equipment, whether mounted


on the roof, side of a structure, or on the
ground, shall be screened from view (CVMC
15.16.030). Utility meters and equipment
should be placed in locations that are not
exposed to view from the street or be suitably
screened. All screening devices are to be
compatible with the architecture, material,
and color of adjacent structures.

f. Site Amenities
Site amenities help establish the identity of
a commercial area and provide comfort and
interest to its users. Individual site amenities
within a commercial setting should have
common features, such as color, material, and
design to provide a cohesive environment and a
more identifiable character.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-83


1) Plazas and Courtyards
a) Plazas and courtyards within commercial
developments over one acre are strongly
encouraged.

b) Physical access should be provided from


retail shops, restaurants, offices and other
pedestrian activity generating uses to
plazas.

c) A majority of the gross area of the plaza


should have access to sunlight for the
duration of daylight hours.

d) Shade trees or other elements providing


relief from the sun should be incorporated
within plazas.

e) Entries to the plaza and storefront entries


within the plaza should be well lighted.

f) Architecture, landscaping elements, and


public art should be incorporated into the
plaza design.

g) Plazas and courtyards should include a focal


element of sculpture and/or water feature,
simple plants and simple sitting niches.

h) Seating should be provided in plazas. Where


applicable, plaza users should be provided
with a choice between active and passive
seating.

i) Courtyards should be designed to provide


both visibility and separation from the street,
parking areas, or drive aisles.

j) Common open space should be provided


in large, meaningful areas and should not
be fragmented or consist of “left over” land.
Large areas can be imaginatively developed
and economically maintained.

VII-84 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


2) Site Furniture

a) Paving and furniture should complement


public streetscape elements when
appropriate.

b) Site furnishings should not create


pedestrian/vehicular conflicts. Chula Vista

c) Bicycle racks should be selected that


are durable and consistent with other
streetscape furnishings.

d) Based on their performance, “loop


rack” and “ribbon bar” bicycle racks are
recommended.

e) The design of newspaper boxes should be


consolidated into one rack. Racks should be
attractive on all sides.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-85


4. Architectural Guidelines
a. Introduction
New development in the Urban Core district should
carefully blend two different yet compatible
qualities: high allowable building heights and a
bustling pedestrian street life. These elements
can be combined by encouraging a continuous
street wall with ground floor retail and other
active uses while upper floors of mid- and high-
rise buildings step back to allow sunlight to
reach the street below.

b. Building Height, Form, and Mass


1) Multiple-use structures, with retail on
lower floors and residential or non-retail
commercial on upper floors, are encouraged,
particularly along Broadway and H Street.

2) Where buildings with towers have frontages


on multiple streets, the towers are
encouraged to orient towards the primary
Retail on lower floors and residences/ street such as Broadway and H Street.
offices above is encouraged
Fg. 7.105

3) Horizontal building stepbacks are


encouraged to provide building articulation,
terrace space and other elements to soften
building facades. If a mid-rise or high-
Stepback rise building is located on a corner site,
increased stepbacks from the street wall
are encouraged along both streets. Please
Balconies also refer to Chapter VI – Land Use and
Development Regulations for regulations
regarding required minimum building
stepbacks for specific subdistricts within the
Specific Plan.

4) Building heights should enhance public


views, and provide adjacent sites with
maximum sun and ventilation and protection
from prevailing winds.

Required stepbacks in the Urban


Core
Fg. 7.106

VII-86 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


c. Facades
1) The physical design of buildings facades
should vary at least every 200 linear feet
(half block). This can be achieved through
such techniques as:
• division into multiple buildings,
• break or articulation of the façade, Chula Vista
• significant change in facade design,
• placement of window and door openings,
or Desirable building massing has both
horizontal and vertical articulation
Fg. 7.107
• position of awnings and canopies.

2) Bay windows and balconies that provide


usable and accessible outdoor space for
residential uses are strongly encouraged
and may project beyond building setback
lines.

3) Awnings and overhangs should be used


in conjunction with street trees to provide
shade for pedestrians.

4) The predominant difference between upper


story openings and street level storefront
openings (windows and doors) should
be maintained. Typically, there is a much
greater window area at the storefront level
while upper stories have smaller window
openings.
Smaller architectural elements on
Fg. 7.108
5) Residential buildings should have entrances large buildings add pedestrian scale
from the street to facilitate pedestrian
activity and increase security through more
“eyes on the street.”

d. Building Materials and Colors


1) Building Materials
Building materials will incorporate two aspects:
color and texture. If the building’s exterior
design is complicated with many “ins and outs”
(extensions of wall façade, etc.), columns, and
design features, the wall texture should be Design projects to facilitate social
support and effective surveillance
Fg. 7.109

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-87


simple and subdued. However, if the building
design is simple, a finely textured material, such
as patterned masonry, should be used to enrich
the building’s overall character.

The following lists suggest those materials that


are “encouraged” and “discouraged” for use in
the Urban Core:

a) Approved Exterior Materials


• Masonry, including granite, marble,
brick, terra cotta, and cast stone
• Glass, which must be transparent on
ground floors
• Architectural metals, including metal
panel systems, metal sheets with
expressed seams, and cut, stamped or
cast, ornamental metal panels.
• New or used face-brick
• Copper
• Painted Metal
• Wrought Iron

b) Discouraged Exterior Materials


• Imitation stone (fiberglass or plastic)
• Textured, treated, decorative concrete
• “Lumpy” stucco
Masonry is appropriate for buildings
in the Urban Core
Fg. 7.110 • Rough sawn or "natural" (unfinished)
wood
• Used brick with no fired face (salvaged
from interior walls)
• Imitation wood siding
• Plastic panels

2) Exterior Color
a) The type of color depends on the size of
the building and level of detail. Larger and
plainer buildings should have subtle/muted
colors while smaller buildings or those
with elaborate detailing should have more
intense colors.
Subtle/muted colors complement
larger and plainer buildings
Fg. 7.111 b) Stronger colors should emphasize
architectural details and entrances.

VII-88 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


e. Roofs and Upper-Story Details
1) Additional sunlight should be brought into
large developments through the use of
atriums and skylights.

2) Any office and residential tower over


seven stories should have articulated and Chula Vista
varied roof shapes to add interest to the
architecture of the Urban Core and serve as
a landmark.

3) Slope roof shapes on one-story commercial Visible utility and communication


Fg. 7.112
buildings, gable-end roofs, single pitch (shed) devices are discouraged
roofs, false mansard roofs and curving roofs
are inconsistent with the character of the
Urban Core.

4) Access to roofs should be restricted to


interior access only.

5) Roof-mounted utility and communication


devices equipment should be screened by
structural features that are an integral part
of the building’s architectural design.

f. Plazas
Plazas allow additional sunlight to be brought
into large developments. Plazas should be
located at transit focus areas and other
areas where large assemblages of people are
expected, such as the Chula Vista Center.

1) Plazas should contain a visual and audible


feature such as a sculpture, fountain, or a
display pond that attracts pedestrians and
serves as a landmark.

2) Furniture and fixtures should be selected


with maintenance consideration in mind.
Ample seating in both shaded and sunny
locations should be provided in the plaza
areas.
Plazas should provide ample seating in
shade and sun and landmark features
Fg. 7.113

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-89


g. Site Furniture
1) Site furniture, including benches, bollards,
trash receptacles, bicycle racks, newspaper
racks, and kiosks should complement
existing development.

2) Site furniture should maintain a clear


passage for pedestrians and avoid
obstructing walkways and sidewalks.

3) Furnishings should be placed to eliminate


clutter and any potential pedestrian/
vehicular conflict.

4) Kiosks/directories should be provided


adjacent to vehicular and pedestrian
entrances and pedestrian nodes. Kiosk
siting should maximize visibility and minimize
traffic hazards or obstructing views.

5) Tree grates should be utilized at passages


to provide a continuous walking surface.
Tree grates should be a minimum of 4 feet
Tree grates are important in high- in width and a minimum of 36 square feet
Fg. 7.114
traffic areas for private areas and a minimum of 6 feet in
width for public areas.

6) Tree guards should be provided to protect


trees in high activity areas. Tree guard design
should be consistent with the adjacent
development and should coordinate with
street furnishings located either onsite or
within the public right-of-way.

VII-90 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5. Storefront Design
a. Introduction
Ground floors have typically been designed to
be what is now referred to as a “traditional”
storefront and sales floor. Upper floors commonly
were used for office space, residential units, Chula Vista
or storage. If retail uses are not appropriate
for a particular building, ground floors should
contain other active uses such as a health club,
community center, or residential common areas.
The ground floor should have transparent and
open facades and avoid blank walls wherever
possible.

b. Storefront Composition
1) Entries and Doorways
a) The main entry to buildings should be
emphasized through flanked columns,
decorative fixtures, a recessed entryway
within a larger arched or cased decorative
opening, or a portico (formal porch).

b) Buildings situated at a corner along


Broadway and H Street should provide a
prominent corner entrance to street level
Buildings at prominent corners
shops or lobby space. Fg. 7.115
should have prominent entrances

2) Awnings and Canopies


a) Awnings or arcades should be provided
along south and west facing buildings to
enhance the pedestrian experience.

b) Where the facade is divided into distinct


structural bays, awnings should be placed
between the vertical elements rather than
overlapping them. The awning design
should respond to the scale, proportion,
and rhythm created by the structural bay
elements and should “nestle” into the space
created by the structural bay.
Awnings should nestle into the space
created by a structural bay
Fg. 7.116

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-91


c) Awnings should have a single color or two-
color stripes. Lettering and trim utilizing
other colors is permitted, but will be
considered as a sign area.

d) Frames and supports should be painted or


coated to prevent corroding.

3) Storefront Accessories and Other Details


a) Recommended storefront details include
the following items:
• light fixtures, wall mounted or hung with
decorative metal brackets;
• decorative scuppers, catches and
downspouts;
• balconies, bay windows, rails, finials,
corbels, plaques, etc.;
• flag or banner pole brackets;
• fire sprinkler standpipe enclosures and
hose bib covers, preferably of brass;
and
• permanent, fixed security grates or
grilles in front of windows are strongly
discouraged. If security grilles are
necessary, they should be placed inside
the building, behind the window display
Balconies and planters embellish a
area.
storefront
Fg. 7.117
b) Door and Window Design

• Doors to retail shops should contain a


high percentage of glass in order to view
the retail contents. A minimum of a 50%
glass area is required.

• Use of clear glass (at least 88% light


transmission) on the first floor is
required.

A storefront should contain a high


percentage of clear glass
Fg. 7.118

VII-92 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


6. Landscape Guidelines
Landscaping within the Urban Core should be
different than typical suburban commercial
and residential settings. These guidelines
emphasize the use of potted plants, trees, and
landscaping within the structure.
Chula Vista
a. Landscape plans should consider the scale
and mass of a building and its relationship
to the scale of the street and neighboring Potted plants can enhance a
Fg. 7.119
properties. streetscape

b. Emphasis should be placed on California and


Mediterranean landscaping. Indigenous,
ornamental planting, vines, flowering plants,
arbors, trellises, and container planting is
encouraged.

c. Large planters may also be incorporated


into seating areas. Such planters should be
open to the earth below and be provided
with a permanent irrigation system.

d. All trees in paved areas should be provided


with “Deep Root” barriers, automatic
irrigation, and metal grates and have
adequate size, soil mix, and soil ventilation.
Trees can provide needed shade for
outdoor seating areas
Fg. 7.120
e. Freestanding planters may also be
incorporated into public spaces. Size, shape,
color, and texture should complement the
overall design theme. Such planters should
be provided with a permanent irrigation
system.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-93


7. Onsite Lighting
a. Lighting fixtures within developments
should be attractively designed to
complement the architecture of the project
and surrounding development and improve
visual identification of residences and
businesses.

b. All exterior doors, aisles, passageways and


recesses should be equipped with a lighting
device providing a minimum maintained one
foot-candle of light at ground level during
hours of darkness. Vandal resistant covers
should protect lighting devices.

c. Decorative accent lighting and fixtures above


the minimum one foot-candle illumination
levels of surrounding parking lots should be
provided at vehicle driveways, entry throats,
pedestrian paths, plaza areas, and other
activity areas.

d. Lighting sources should be shielded, diffused


or indirect to avoid glare for pedestrians and
motorists.

e. On each project site, all lighting fixtures


should be from the same family of fixtures
with respect to design, materials, color,
fixture, and color of light.

f. When placing lighting fixtures and luminaries,


consideration should be given to the extent
of landscape growth affects the function of
lighting. Landscaping such as trees and
shrubs should be placed and maintained so
that it does not obscure or deteriorate on-
site illumination.

g. Neon and other specialized lighting


effects that enhance the attractiveness
of commercial streets, restaurants, and
entertainment venues for pedestrian traffic
is encouraged within the Urban Core.

VII-94 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


h. Decorative up lighting that enhances
landscape features and building architecture
is encouraged as long as it does not compete
with street lighting and signs.

Chula Vista

Lighting effects can make a


commercial area pedestrian-friendly
Fg. 7.121

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-95


8. Parking and Circulation
a. Introduction
The following factors should be considered
in the design and development of off-street
parking in pedestrian-oriented areas:
• ingress and egress with consideration
to possible conflicts with vehicular and
pedestrian traffic;
• pedestrian and vehicular conflicts within a
parking lot or structure;
• reinforcing the street edge and a pedestrian
environment;
• on-site circulation and service vehicle
zones;
Parking facility design should • overall configuration and appearance of the
Fg. 7.122
strengthen the street edge parking area
• minimizing opportunities for crime and
undesirable activities through natural
surveillance, access control, and activities;
• shading parking lots by means of canopy
trees and other landscaping; and
• creating a sense of spatial organization and
experiential meaning through the layout of
the parking facility.

b. General Considerations
1) Shared parking between adjacent
businesses and/or developments is strongly
encouraged whenever practical.

2) Parking areas should be separated from


buildings by a landscaped strip. Conditions
where parking stalls directly abut buildings
should be avoided.

3) Lighting, landscaping, hardscape, fencing,


parking layout and pedestrian paths
should all assist drivers and pedestrians in
navigating through parking areas.

4) Bicycle parking should be provided at each


development and should be easily accessible
and integrated into the overall site design.

VII-96 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5) Parking structures below or above ground
level retail or commercial uses are
encouraged since they allow for pedestrian
activity along the street while providing
parking convenient to destinations within
the Urban Core.
Chula Vista
c. Access and Entries
1) Locate parking lot and structure entries on
side streets or alleys to minimize pedestrian/
vehicular conflicts along Broadway and H
Street. If this is not possible, use patterned
concrete or pavers to differentiate the
primary site entry from the sidewalk. Effects
on adjacent residential neighborhoods also
need to be considered in site access and
entries.

2) Parking lots and structures adjacent to a


public street should provide pedestrians
with a point of entry and clear and safe
access from the sidewalk to the entrance of
the building(s).

3) Pedestrian and vehicular entrances must


be clearly identified and easily accessible
to create a sense of arrival. The use
of enhanced paving, landscaping, and
special architectural features and details is Special architectural features should
required. help identify vehicular entrances
Fg. 7.123

4) Where possible, use alleys or side streets for


access to parking areas. However, effects
on adjacent residential neighborhoods
must be considered. The use of alleys for
parking access must be balanced with other
common uses of alleys, including service,
utilities, and loading and unloading areas.

d. Lighting
Lighting for parking lots and structures should
be evenly distributed and should provide
pedestrians and drivers with adequate visibility
at night.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-97


e. Circulation
1) Separate vehicular and pedestrian
circulation systems should be provided
whenever feasible. The layout of parking
areas should be designed so that pedestrians
walk parallel to moving cars.

2) Pedestrian linkages between adjoining


compatible uses should be emphasized.
Parking lot and structure designs should
include walkways and planting that help
direct pedestrians comfortably and safely to
their destinations.

3) Access by disabled persons should be


incorporated into the overall pedestrian
circulation system.

f. Landscaping
1) Parking facilities should be landscaped with
the following objectives in mind:
• visually break up large paved areas with
landscaping;
• maximize distribution of landscaping;
• promote compatibility and function as a
“good neighbor;”
Landscaping provides visual relief • consider the use of trees planted at
Fg. 7.124
within parking facilities regular distances as a grove; and,
• strive to achieve 50% shade of the
asphalt area within five years from time
Accent trees Canopy shade trees of installation.
delineate aisles located throughout
Low hedge or parking lot
screen wall
2) Parking lots adjacent to a public street
Landscape
should be landscaped to soften the visual
buffer impact of parked vehicles from the public
right-of-way. Screening should consist of
a combination of low walls (a maximum of
Accent
trees and three feet high) and landscape materials at
enhanced the setback line.
paving
define
entry 3) Use of a trellis situated above a wall or fence
Property line/
wall with vines
can visually maintain the street wall and
Preferred landscaping within a
parking lot
Fg. 7.125 improve the pedestrian environment along
the street.

VII-98 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


4) A well thought-out selection and composition
of hardscape materials can help order space
and reinforce the relationship of the parking
lot to its surroundings and to the buildings it
serves. Entrances, exits, and areas that act
as forecourts for entrances may be suitable
locations for special paving materials such Chula Vista
as brick or stamped concrete.

g. Structured Parking
1) Due to the more intense nature of
development in the Urban Core, structured
parking which promotes compatibility, safety
and pedestrian activity is encouraged.

2) Where structured parking is provided, the


following design and operational features
should be considered to optimize public
safety:
• The design of parking structures should
permit maximum opportunities for
natural surveillance into the structure;
• Where possible, elevators and stairs
should be located on the perimeter
of parking structures with natural
surveillance from exterior public areas
Open lobbies and stairs promote
via glass-back elevators and glass at safety in parking structures
Fg. 7.126
stairs and elevator lobbies;
• Elevator lobbies and stairs in open
parking garages should be open to the
parking areas, except at roof levels
where glass or other visually penetrable
enclosures may be provided.
• Elevator cabs should be provided with
glass-back cabs where those elements
are above grade;
• All parking structures should have lighting
in conformance with IESNA (Illuminating
Engineering Society of North America)
standards;
• Interior walls of parking structures should
be painted a light color (e.g., white or
light blue) to improve illumination;

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-99


• The parking structure should be
designed to integrate into existing or
proposed developments to allow direct
access from different levels;
• Coordinated signs, color, or features
between developments should be used
for wayfinding purposes.
Parking Structure • Signs should be posted to inform users
whether security escort service is
available;
• Emergency buzzers and telephones
should be installed in easily accessible
places on each level, in elevators and in
stairwells; and
• Directional arrows and signs indicating
Development should wrap the garage
to maintain positive street frontage
Fg. 7.127 exits, elevators, and emergency buzzers/
telephones should be visibly displayed
(painted) on walls.

3) Activities such as shops, offices or other


commercial space should be incorporated
along the ground level of structured parking
street frontage. In addition, parking
structures should provide landscaping
along blank walls on side streets and upper
levels.

VII-100 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


9. Signs
a. Introduction
Design, color, materials, and placement
are all important in creating signs that are
architecturally attractive and integrated into the
overall site design. Signs that are compatible Chula Vista
with the surroundings and which effectively
communicate a message promote a quality
visual environment.

The guidelines that follow address these issues


and others, and are intended to help business
owners provide quality signs that add to and
support the character of the Urban Core District.
They are not intended to supersede any existing
City sign ordinances. All signs must comply with
the regulations contained in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code unless as indicated within the
specific plan, in which case the specific plan will
take precedence.

b. General Design Guidelines


Good signs communicate their message well, are
easily seen by people, and relate harmoniously
to the building they are placed on or near. The
following guidelines give criteria for creating This highly effective sign uses a light
Fg. 7.128
well-designed signs. background with dark lettering

1) Sign color should be compatible with building


colors. A light background matching the
building with dark lettering is best visually.
While no more than two primary colors
should be used on a sign, a third color can
be used for accent or shadow detail.

2) Signs should be consistent with the


proportion and scale of building elements
within the façade. The placement of signs
provides visual clues to business location
and affects the design integrity of the entire
building.
External fixtures are an effective
method for illuminating signs
Fg. 7.129

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-101


3) Ground level signs should be smaller than
those on higher levels. Pedestrian-oriented
signs should be smaller than automobile
oriented signs.

4) There are two methods of illuminating signs:


internal with the light source inside the sign
and external with an outside light directed at
the sign. Internal illumination is permitted
on channel letters only.

5) Signs must be lighted with continuous light


sources.

6) Whenever indirect lighting fixtures are used


(fluorescent or incandescent), care should
be taken to properly shield the light source
to prevent glare from spilling over into
residential areas and any public right-of-
way.

7) Paper and cloth signs are appropriate for


interior temporary use only.

8) Backlit plastic box signs are prohibited.

c. Onsite Wayfinding
Good sign design can be critical to helping people
Private signs should guide people
through an unfamiliar environment
Fg. 7.130 move easily through an unfamiliar environment.
Private signs throughout the Urban Core should
be conspicuous, easy to read, and convey clear
messages. Signs should be located so as not to
block the pedestrian realm.

1) Sign Visibility
Signs should be free of any obstruction, such
as landscaping, when viewed from different
angles.

2) Sign Legibility
An effective sign should do more than attract
attention; it should communicate its message.
Usually, this is a question of the readability
of words and phrases. The most significant
influence on legibility is lettering.
VII-102 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
a) Use a brief message whenever possible.
Fewer words help produce a more effective
sign. A sign with a brief, succinct message
is easier to read and looks more attractive.
Evaluate each word.

b) Avoid spacing letters and words too close Chula Vista


together. Crowding of letters, words or lines
will make any sign more difficult to read.
Conversely, over-spacing these elements
causes the viewer to read each item
individually, again obscuring the message.
As a general rule, letters should not occupy
more than 75% of the sign panel area. Limiting the number of lettering
styles increases legibility
Fg. 7.131
c) Limit the number of lettering styles in order
to increase legibility. A general rule to follow
is to limit the number of different letter
types to no more than two for small signs
and three for large signs.

d) Use symbols and logos in the place of words


whenever appropriate. Pictographic images
will usually register more quickly in the
viewer’s mind than a written message.

e) Avoid hard-to-read, overly intricate typefaces


and symbols. Typefaces and symbols that
are hard to read reduce the sign’s ability to
communicate.

f) Avoid faddish or bizarre typefaces if they


are difficult to read. These typefaces may
be in vogue and look good today, but soon
may go out of style. The image conveyed by
the sign may quickly become that of a dated
and unfashionable business.

3) Business Directional Signs


a) Business directional signs should be provided
near vehicle and pedestrian entrances.
They should not obstruct pedestrian flow or
negatively impact sight lines at entrances.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-103


b) Use consistent names for all buildings,
services and destinations.

c) Maps should correspond to the building


layout so, for example, up on the map is
straight ahead for the viewer. Provide
markers to indicate where the person is
currently located and identify areas by using
color and memorable graphics.

d) Number floors in relation to the building’s


main entry so that directories clearly
designate which floors are above or below
grade.

e) Location of directional signs should not


encroach on the public right-of-way.

f) Business directional signs should be easily


read during the day and evening. Illumination
of some type may be necessary at night.

g) Contrast is important for effectiveness of


directional signs. A substantial contrast
should be provided between the color and
material of the background and the letters
or symbols to make it easier to read.
Directional signs should be easy to
locate
Fg. 7.132 d. Wall Signs

1) Definition: A wall sign is any sign that is


attached or erected on the exterior wall of
a building including the parapet, with the
display surface of the sign parallel to the
building wall, and which does not project
more than 12 inches from the building
or project above the height of the wall or
parapet.

2) Signs should be placed consistent with the


proportion and scale of the elements within
the structure’s facade.

Wall signs should be located on


prominent architectural features
Fg. 7.133

VII-104 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3) Bands or frames of brickwork or stone,
indentations in the face material, gaps
between columns, or other permanent
features should be used to locate the sign.

4) If applicable, follow an already established


pattern of sign locations. Chula Vista

5) If aligning signs is not possible, look for


other features to determine placement of
the sign. Each sign may relate directly to Attached light fixtures are preferred
the store entrance in a similar fashion, or all for illuminating awnings
Fg. 7.134
signs may be displayed within the windows.

e. Awning Signs
1) Definition: An awning sign is a sign on or
attached to a temporary retractable shelter
that is supported from the exterior wall of
a building. Marquee signs are affixed to a
permanent projection extending from the
building or beyond the wall of a building. Example of a marquee sign
Fg. 7.135
2) Sign copy should be centered on the awning
to achieve symmetry.

3) Painting cloth awnings in order to change


sign copy is strongly discouraged.

4) Back-lit internally illuminated awnings are


strongly discouraged.

5) The shape, design, and color of fabric


awnings should be carefully designed to
coordinate with, and not dominate, the
architectural style of the building.

6) Where other fabric awnings are used on the


building, the design and color of the sign
awnings and all other awnings should be
coordinated.

An example of a projecting sign


Fg. 7.136

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-105


f. Projecting Signs
1) The distance between projecting signs
should be at least 25 feet for maximum
visibility.

2) The bottom of the sign should maintain at


least 15 feet pedestrian clearance from the
sidewalk level.

3) The sign should be hung at a 90 degree


angle from the face of the building. It should
Figurative signs promote a festive
atmosphere
Fg. 7.137 be pinned at least 1 foot away from the wall
for best visibility but should not project
beyond a vertical plane set 6 feet from the
facade.

4) To avoid damaging masonry, brackets should


be designed so that they can be bolted into
joints whenever possible.

g. Figurative Signs
Signs that advertise the occupant business
through the use of graphic or crafted symbols,
such as shoes, keys, glasses, books, etc.
are encouraged. Figurative signs may be
incorporated into any of the allowable sign types
identified previously.

h. Temporary Signs
Posting of handmade window signs is not
permitted. Refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
19.60 for further regulations on temporary
signs.

VII-106 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


F. Corridors District
1. Introduction
In contrast with the Urban Core District and the Village District, the Corridors
District contains four separate and distinct areas along Broadway and Third
Avenue that are more oriented towards automobile than pedestrian traffic. The
district is characterized by low-rise structures with retail, service, office, and Chula Vista
residential uses lining the peripheral ends of Broadway and Third Avenue. The
guidelines in this chapter focus on developing a cohesive blend of high quality
new commercial and residential development. Design guidelines for the public
realm are contained in Chapter VIII - Public Realm Design Guidelines.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-107


2. Design Principles
a. Promote Sound Architectural Practices
Commercial and residential development
along major streets often includes repetitive
architecture and favors automobiles over
pedestrian and bicycle traffic. These standards
encourage architectural quality, variety in
building form, facades, and features, and
development that accommodates different
forms of transportation.
Development in the Corridors District
should provide variety in architecture
Fg. 7.138 b. Ensure Compatibility Between Different
Uses
New development in the Corridors District
should consider the area’s scale and character
and demonstrate sensitivity to surrounding
uses. Such efforts should include limiting
building massing, providing project amenities
such as landscaping, seating, and plazas, and
screening parking and equipment areas.

c. Encourage Safe and Logical Parking and


Circulation
The north and south segments of Broadway
and southern end of Third Avenue serve as
critical transportation corridors for automobiles,
public transit, bicycles, and pedestrians. Site
access, parking, and circulation within private
developments should be logically organized
Different forms of transportation and ensure that all forms of transportation are
should be able to function together
Fg. 7.139
able to coexist safely.

VII-108 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. Site Planning
a. Introduction
Site planning is an important facet of the
look and feel of the Corridors District. The
guidelines encourage new development that
maintains a healthy interaction with the major Chula Vista
street, whether Broadway or Third Avenue,
and surrounding uses by minimizing harmful
external effects and providing strong transit,
automobile, and pedestrian connections.

b. Site Character
1) Natural amenities unique to the site such
as mature trees should be preserved and
incorporated into development proposals.

2) Structures that are distinctive because of


their age, cultural significance, or unique
architectural style should be preserved and
incorporated into development proposals.

3) Design public and private outdoor spaces to


provide sunny and shaded areas.

c. Compatibility with Adjacent Uses


1) Link compatible residential and non- Discouraged layout- development
lacks connections to adjacent areas
Fg. 7.140
residential uses by utilizing access roads,
walkways, common landscape areas,
building orientation, and unfenced property
lines.

2) Additional setback areas and upper floor


setbacks are encouraged when commercial
and residential areas are adjacent to each
other.

3) When commercial buildings back up to


common open spaces or residential projects,
the rear setback area should be landscaped
and should appear to be functionally and/or
visually shared open space. Encouraged layout - development
connects to adjacent uses
Fg. 7.141

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-109


4) Avoid public access to the rear of commercial
structures when adjacent to potentially
incompatible uses.

5) Building orientation and landscaping


commercial buildings should minimize a
direct line of sight into adjacent residential
private open space.

6) Loading areas, access and circulation


driveways, trash and storage areas, and
rooftop equipment should be located at the
Key Plan rear or side of buildings and screened from
Fg. 1.1
public view.

7) Employ landscaping to screen parking lots


from adjacent residential uses and streets.

d. Building Siting
1) Any building with more than 125 feet of
street frontage should have at least one
primary building entry.

2) Use paving materials that differentiate the


setback area from the sidewalk.

3) Corner buildings should have a strong tie


Loading, trash, and storage areas
Fg. 7.142 to the front setback lines of each street.
should be located at the rear or side
Angled building corners or open plazas are
encouraged at corner locations.

4) When designing large commercial centers,


create inward-focused arrangement of
buildings to create a “village” feeling and
encourage multiple shopping stops. Plazas
and pedestrian areas are encouraged within
shopping centers.

5) Provide a “Main Street” for larger centers


with pedestrian connections to the major
street and parallel parking that promotes
pedestrian activity.
Corner buildings should feature
angled entrances and plazas
Fg. 7.143

VII-110 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


6) Anchor stores should be sited in the middle
Residential Residential
of the shopping center to increase visibility
for other stores.

7) When possible, freestanding buildings


should be sited along street frontages to
help screen parking areas. Chula Vista

8) Recognize the importance of spaces


between buildings as “outdoor rooms” on
the site. These spaces should be utilized as
open space.

9) Small open space areas should be grouped Cluster buildings to develop a


“village” atmosphere
Fg. 7.144
into larger, prominent public spaces.
Hardscape and vegetation should be
combined to create plazas that people can
use for rest, congregating, recreation, and
dining.

11) On sites with multiple structures, buildings


should be linked visually and physically.
These links can be accomplished through
architecture and site planning, such
as trellises, colonnades or other open
structures combined with landscape and
walkway systems).
Plazas can be used for casual seating
Fg. 7.145
12) Decorative walls and/or enhanced and outdoor dining
landscaping should be used at main
entrances. Special paving, raised medians
and gateway structures should also be
considered.

13) Developments should provide safe


pedestrian passage between building
entrances and bus stops.

14) Siting service areas in a consolidated and


controlled environment is encouraged.
Avoid service areas that are too expansive,
underutilized, and require heavy landscape
screening.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-111


e. Refuse, Storage, and Equipment Areas
1) All trash and garbage bins should be stored
in an approved enclosure.

2) Trash storage must be fully enclosed and


incorporated within the main structures or
separate freestanding enclosures (CVMC
19.58.340). Where practical, storage
at each unit is preferred over common
enclosures. Trash storage cannot be placed
under stairways.
Service areas should be compact and
organized
Fg. 7.146
3) Trash enclosures should allow convenient
access for commercial tenants. Siting
service areas in a consolidated and
controlled environment is encouraged.

4) Trash enclosures should be located away


from residential uses to minimize nuisance
for the adjacent property owners. The
enclosure doors should not interfere with
landscaping, pedestrian, or vehicle path of
travel.

5) Trash enclosures should be architecturally


compatible with the project. Landscaping
should be incorporated into the design to
screen the enclosure from public view and
deter graffiti.

6) Refuse storage areas that are visible from


an upper story of adjacent structures
should provide an opaque or semi-opaque
horizontal cover/screen to reduce unsightly
views. The screening should be compatible
with the design of adjacent development.

7) Refuse containers and service facilities


should be screened from view by solid
masonry walls with wood or metal doors.
Use landscaping (shrubs and vines) to
screen walls and help deter graffiti.
Landscaping and a trellis feature can
create an attractive trash enclosure
Fg. 7.147

VII-112 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


8) All mechanical equipment, whether mounted
on the roof, side of a structure, or on the
ground, shall be screened from view (CVMC
15.16.030). Utility meters and equipment
should be placed in locations that are not
exposed to view from the street or be suitably
screened. All screening devices are to be Chula Vista
compatible with the architecture, material,
and color of adjacent structures.

f. Site Amenities Plazas should include a focal element


such as a fountain or sculpture
Fg. 7.148
Site amenities help establish the identity of
a commercial area and provide comfort and
interest to its users. Individual site amenities
within a commercial setting should have
common features, such as color, material, and
design to provide a cohesive environment and a
more identifiable character.

1) Plazas and Courtyards


a) Plazas and courtyards within commercial
developments over two acres are strongly
encouraged.

b) Physical access should be provided from


retail shops, restaurants, offices and other
pedestrian activity generating uses to
plazas.

c) A majority of the gross area of the plaza


should have access to sunlight for the
duration of daylight hours.

d) Shade trees or other elements providing


relief from the sun should be incorporated
within plazas.

e) Entries to the plaza and storefront entries


within the plaza should be well lighted.

f) Architecture, landscaping elements, and


public art should be incorporated into the
plaza design.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-113


g) Plazas and courtyards should include a focal
element of sculpture and/or water feature,
simple plants and simple sitting niches.

h) Seating should be provided in plazas. Where


applicable, plaza users should be provided
with a choice between active and passive
seating.

i) Courtyards should be designed to provide


both visibility and separation from the street,
parking areas, or drive aisles.
“Ribbon bar” is one of the
recommended types of bicycle racks
Fg. 7.149
2) Site Furniture
a) Paving and furniture should complement
public streetscape elements when
appropriate.

b) Site furnishings should not create


pedestrian/vehicular conflicts.

c) Bicycle racks should be selected that


are durable and consistent with other
streetscape furnishings.

d) Based on their performance, “loop


rack” and “ribbon bar” bicycle racks are
recommended.

e) The design of newspaper boxes should be


consolidated into one rack. Racks should be
attractive on all sides.

VII-114 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


4. Architectural Guidelines
a. Introduction
There are no specific architectural styles
required for commercial buildings. However,
innovative and imaginative architecture is
encouraged. The guidelines seek quality and Chula Vista
complete design that will contribute to the
overall quality of built environment.

b. Building Height, Form and Mass


1) Building heights and setbacks should vary Varying building heights and
setbacks create visual interest
Fg. 7.150
from adjacent or adjoining buildings to
ensure diversity in building type.

2) One-story buildings along Broadway and


Third Avenue should be placed close to the
sidewalk to reinforce a pedestrian scale.
Two-story buildings should be located
farther away from the sidewalk and use a
plaza as a transition from the right of way to
the building.

3) Building heights should enhance public


views and provide adjacent sites with
maximum sun and ventilation and protection
from prevailing winds.
Plazas serve as an effective
transition from the public right-of-way
Fg. 7.151
c. Facades

1) The physical design of facades should utilize


such techniques as:
• Break or articulation of the façade;
• Vertical and horizontal offsets to
minimize large blank walls and reduce
building bulk;
• Significant change in facade design;
• Placement of window and door openings;
and
• Position of awnings and canopies.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-115


2) Design features must be consistent on all
elevations of a structure. Side and rear
elevations should not be minimized because
they are oriented away from public view.

3) Primary building entries should be easily


identified and provide a prominent sense
of entry. The use of projections, columns,
towers, change in roofline, entry lobbies,
or other design elements are strongly
encouraged.
Building entries should be easily
identified
Fg. 7.152 4) The size and location of doors and windows
should relate to the scale and proportions of
the overall structure.

5) Clear windows should be provided at


storefront locations.

d. Roofs and Upper Story Details


1) Roofs should be given design considerations
and treatment equal to that of the rest of
the building exteriors.

2) Roofs and rooflines should be continuous


in design throughout a commercial
development. Full roofs are strongly
encouraged due to proximity to residential
areas.

3) Roofline elements should be developed


along all elevations.

4) No roofline ridge should run unbroken for


more than 75 feet. Vertical or horizontal
articulation is required.

5) Slopes of roofs should range between 4:12


and 6:12. Slopes greater than 6:12 are
discouraged, except on certain architectural
elements and towers.

6) Radical roof pitches that create overly


prominent or out-of-character buildings

VII-116 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


such as A-frames, geodesic domes, or
chalet-style buildings are not permitted.
Sloping wood trellis

7) Roofs with large overhangs featuring open


Vented
rafters/tails are encouraged. screen wall
Tile roof
Equip.
8) The visible portion of sloped roofs should Chula Vista
be sheathed with a roofing material
complementary to the architectural style
of the building and other surrounding
buildings.
An appealing roof design should be
9) Access to roofs should be restricted to used to screen mechanical equipment
Fg. 7.153
interior access only.

10) Screening for roof-mounted mechanical


equipment should be an integral part of the
building’s architectural design.

11) Building vertical focal elements are


encouraged. Towers, spires, or domes
become landmarks and serve as focal/
orientation points for the community.

e. Walls and Fences


1) Walls and fences should be kept as low as
possible while performing their functional
Vertical elements such as a tower are
purpose to avoid the appearance of being a encouraged
Fg. 7.154
“fortress”.

2) Colors, materials and appearance of


walls and fences should be compatible
with surrounding development. Opaque
materials, such as plywood boards, and
sheet metal, are not permitted. Also, chain
link fences are not permitted.

3) Perimeter walls should be constructed


of decorative masonry block or similar
material. The use of chain link fencing is not
permitted.

4) Landscaping, particularly vines, should be


used to soften otherwise blank wall surfaces
and to help reduce graffiti.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-117


5) Walls should be offset every 50 feet and
architecturally designed to reduce monotony.
Landscape pockets along the wall should be
provided at regular intervals.

f. Building Materials and Colors


1) Exterior materials, textures and colors
should compliment the architectural style
or theme of a building.

2) Colors and materials should be durable and


Key Plan weather resistant.
Fg. 1.1
3) The use of natural stone is encouraged.
High quality man-made material may be
permitted.

4) Buildings with strong facade articulation


should contain wall texture that is simple
and subdued. If the building design is
Vines enhance otherwise blank walls simple, a finely textured material, such as
Fg. 7.155
patterned masonry, should be used to enrich
the building’s overall character.

5) Building colors should be predominately


neutral colors, off-white, cream, or light
pastels.

6) Accent colors may be used to impart a


festive quality to the buildings, especially in
commercial areas.

g. Franchise/Corporate
The scale, design character, and materials of
franchise/corporate architecture should be
consistent with adjacent buildings. Natural
materials, such as brick, stone, and copper,
should be used where applicable

1) Color and Lighting


Choice of color(s) for a franchise/corporate
Fg. 7.156 building is critical since they may be
Natural materials such as brick add to
the quality of franchise buildings inappropriate in certain environments. The

VII-118 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


standards below should be considered when
addressing appropriate color(s) and lighting:

a) Use colors that complement colors found


on adjacent buildings.

b) Franchise/corporate colors should be Chula Vista


consistent with the architectural style or
period of the building.

c) Bright or intense colors are prohibited, unless


used on appropriate architectural styles
and reserved for more refined detailing and
transient features.

d) The use of symbols and logos can be utilized


in place of bright or intense corporate
colors.

e) Finish materials with natural colors, such


as brick, stone, and copper, should be used
where applicable.

f) Lighting of logos should be compatible with


the primary building and respect adjacent
buildings. Bright and intense lighting is
prohibited.
Use of corporate logos, instead of
Fg. 7.157
g) Neon outlining should be consistent with the bright or intense colors, is encouraged
architectural style or period of the building
and should be reserved for detailing and
transient features. The use of bright and
intense neon outlining of windows is strongly
discouraged.

h. Security
1) If security grilles are necessary, they should
be placed inside the building behind the
window display area.

2) Electronic surveillance equipment or


alarm hardware should be as invisible and
unobtrusive as possible.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-119


3) The use of scissor grilles is strongly
discouraged since they communicate a
message of high crime and cannot be
integrated visually into the overall design of
a building or storefront.

4) Lighting should be designed to satisfy both


functional and decorative needs. All security
lighting should be designed as part of an
overall lighting plan rather than as single
stand-alone elements.

5) Safety behind buildings should be ensured


through use of:
• Adequate security lighting for parking
areas and pedestrian ways;
• Limited access (walls, fences, gates,
shrubs);
• Signs;
• Introduction of activities (e.g., rear
entrances for commercial activities) that
increase surveillance;
• Surveillance through windows or with
cameras;
• Ongoing maintenance of storage areas
and alleys.

Key Plan 6) Lighting, particularly at all building


Fg. 1.1
entrances, should be adequate but not
exceedingly bright. Light fixtures should
serve as an attractive element in isolation.

7) Storefront lighting should complement the


architectural style of the building while
providing illumination of building facades
Lighting should satisfy functional and
and entrances.
decorative needs
Fg. 7.158
8) Any window signs should be so placed as
to provide a clear and unobstructed view of
the store interior from the sidewalk.

VII-120 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5. Landscape Guidelines
a. Standard Design Concepts
Landscape areas are used to frame and
soften structures, to define site functions, to
enhance the quality of the environment, and to
screen undesirable views. Landscaping should Chula Vista
express the three dimensions of the project and
should continue patterns of landscaping in the
surrounding area.
Landscaping can soften and frame
1) Emphasis should be placed on California structures
Fg. 7.159
and Mediterranean landscapes and
gardens. Indigenous, ornamental planting,
vines, flowering plants, arbors, trellises and
container planting is encouraged.

2) Existing mature trees should be preserved


and incorporated into landscape plans.

3) Landscaped areas should generally


incorporate planting utilizing a three tiered
system: (1) grasses and ground covers, (2)
shrubs and vines, and (3) trees. All areas
not covered by structures, service yards,
walkways, driveways, and parking spaces
should be landscaped, consistent with the
following guidelines: Existing mature trees should be
integrated into new development
Fg. 7.160
Trees
• 20% 36-inch box
• 30% 24-inch box
• 50% 15-gallon

Groundcover
• 100% coverage within 1 year

Shrubs and Vines


• 100% 5 & 15 gallon

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-121


4) The following design concepts should be
utilized in all project design:
• Specimen trees (36-inch box or larger)
used in groupings and rows at major
focal points, such as project entries and
pedestrian gathering areas;
• Use of flowering vines on walls and
arbors where appropriate;
• Use of planting to create shadow and
patterns against walls.

Specimen trees should be used at


5) New development should look established
major focal points
Fg. 7.161 as quickly as possible. Planting new trees
that are older, better developed, and
properly grown is preferred to planting small,
underdeveloped, and juvenile planting
stock.

6) Trees should be placed as follows:


• A minimum of 8 feet between the center
of trees and the edge of the driveway,
6 feet from water meter, gas meter, and
sewer laterals.
• A minimum of 25 feet between the center
of trees and the point of intersection of
driveways and streets or walkways.
• A minimum of 15 feet between the
center of the trees or large shrubs to
utility poles/street lights.
• A minimum of 8 feet between the center
of trees or large shrubs and fire hydrants,
fire department sprinkler, and standpipe
connections.
• No species of tree or large shrub should
be planted under overhead lines or over
underground utilities if plant growth
will interfere with the installation or
maintenance of these utilities.
• In addition to trees, other plant
materials should be spaced so that they
do not interfere with the lighting of the
premises or restrict access to emergency
apparatus such as fire hydrants or fire
alarms boxes.

VII-122 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


• Plant spacing should also ensure
unobstructed access for vehicular and
pedestrians in addition to providing
appropriate lines of site at any
intersection.

7) All new trees should be double staked and Chula Vista


secured with a rubber or plastic strip, or
other approved commercial tie material.
Wire ties should not be used.

8) Use of vines and climbing plants on buildings,


trellises, and privately owned perimeter
walls is encouraged.

9) Landscaping should be in scale with


adjacent buildings and be of appropriate Climbing vines on structures are
size at maturity to accomplish its intended encouraged
Fg.7.162
goals.

10) Landscaping should work with the buildings


and surroundings to make a positive
contribution to the aesthetics and function
of both the specific site and the area.

11) Landscaping should be protected from


vehicular and pedestrian encroachment by
raised planting surfaces. Concrete mow
strips separating turf and shrub areas
should be provided.

12) Landscaping around the entire base of


buildings is encouraged to soften the edge Landscaping can contribute to the
Fg. 7.163
between parking lot and the structure. This overall appearance of a building
should be accented at entrances to provide
focus.

13) One tree should be planted for every six


parking spaces.

b. Irrigation
1) Permanent and automatic landscape
irrigation systems should be provided for all
landscape material.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-123


2) The landscape irrigation system should be
designed to prevent run-off and overspray.

3) All irrigation systems should be designed to


minimize vandalism.

4) Deep root irrigation is required for all trees


whose top of root crown is higher than any
adjacent paved areas. A separate bubbler
head to each tree is recommended.

5) Reclaimed water irrigation systems should


be clearly identified and separated from
potable water irrigation systems.

c. Tree Grates/Guards
1) Tree grates should occur along the edges
of internal streets and in plazas where a
continuous walking surface is needed.

2) Narrow openings should radiate from the


Groundcover and trees prevent
Fg. 7.164
center. Grates sizes should be a minimum
extensive erosion on steep slopes of 4 feet in width and a minimum of 36 feet
for private areas and a minimum of 6 feet
in width for public areas. Knockouts must
be provided to enlarge inside diameter for
supporting a larger tree trunk as the tree
grows.

3) Tree guards should extend vertically from


tree grates, and serve to protect trees in
highly active areas. Tree guards should be
narrow, painted in a similar color, and relate
to other site furnishings. Tree guards should
be attached to the tree grate and welds
should not be visible.

d. Pots and Planters


1) Planters and pots should be located where
pedestrian flow will not be obstructed.
Consider placing pots in locations where
deep building recesses exist, where access
Trees protect pedestrian and
landscaping
Fg. 7.165 is discouraged, to provide definition to
spaces, and adjacent to blank walls.

VII-124 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


2) Group similar sized planters in clusters to
enrich streetscapes and plazas.

3) Planter materials should be durable and


have natural earth tones that compliment
site architecture. Materials should consist
of cast stone, masonry, or stucco materials. Chula Vista

4) Planters should be at least three feet in


diameter.

5) Planters should be simple in form; round


and square types are recommended.

6) Large planters may also be incorporated


into seating areas. Such planters should be
open to the earth below and be provided
with a permanent irrigation system.

Planters should complement the


overall site architecture
Fg. 7.166

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-125


6. Lighting
a. The type and location of lighting should
minimize direct glare onto adjoining
properties. Lighting should be shielded to
confine all direct rays within the property.

b. Site lighting should not exceed more than 5


foot-candles of illumination with 50 feet of a
property used as or zoned residential.

c. Lighting should be designed to satisfy


Minimize light glare onto an adjoining function as well as contribute to overall
property with fixture type and location
Fg. 7.167 design quality.

d. Light fixtures and structural supports should


be architecturally compatible with the theme
of the development.

e. Wall mounted lights should be utilized to the


greatest extent possible to minimize the total
number of freestanding light standards.

f. Wall mounted lighting should not extend


above the height of the wall or parapet to
which they are mounted.

g. Lighting should be used to accent on-site


public art, specimen trees, and architectural
features.

h. Accent lighting, when provided, should


compliment exterior color and materials.

i. Lighting should be provided in a relatively


even pattern with ground level foot-candle
illumination levels not varying by more than
four to eight footcandles.

j. Security lighting should be designed as part


of a comprehensive lighting plan.

k. Vehicle entrances, driveways, parking


Lighting can highlight amenities such
Fg. 7.168 and service areas, pedestrian entrances,
as large trees

VII-126 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


walkways, and activity areas should have a
sufficient level of lighting to provide security
and safety. A minimum of 1 foot-candle
should be provided.

l. Lighting should improve visual identification


of residences and businesses. Chula Vista

m. Parking lot lighting fixtures should not


exceed 35 feet in height. When within
50 feet of residentially zoned properties,
fixtures should not exceed 20 feet.

n. Light standards within parking lots should


be designed with raised bases to protect
them from damage by vehicles.

o. Pedestrian-scaled lighting for sidewalk and


street illumination is encouraged.

p. Lighting should not be animated. Light fixtures should have pedestrian


scale
Fg. 7.169
q. Overhead service wires or exposed conduit
should be avoided.

r. Lighting fixtures with exposed bulbs are


prohibited.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-127


7. Parking and Circulation Guidelines
a. Introduction
Properly functioning parking areas are beneficial
to property owners, tenants, and customers
and they contribute to the design success of
a facility. Parking lots need to allow customers
and deliveries to reach the site, circulate
through the parking lot, and exit the site easily.
The following guidelines should be incorporated
into the design of commercial projects in the
Corridors District.

b. General Considerations
1) Commercial development should incorporate
internal parking to minimize the negative
impact on the street.

2) Avoid placing parking lots along Broadway


and Third Avenue so that the development
maintains a defined street edge.

3) Parking areas that accommodate a


significant number of vehicles should be
divided into a series of connected smaller
lots. Landscaping and offsetting portions of
the lot are effective in reducing the visual
impact of larger parking areas.

4) Shared parking between adjacent


businesses and/or developments is strongly
encouraged.

5) When possible, non-residential parking lots


should be designed and located contiguous
to each other so that vehicles can travel
from one private parking lot to the other
(reciprocal access) without having to enter
major streets.

6) Parking lots should be designed with a clear


hierarchy of circulation: major access drives
Shared parking and access with no parking; major circulation drives
agreements are encouraged
Fg. 7.170

VII-128 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


with little or no parking; and then parking
aisles for direct access to parking spaces.

7) Parking areas should be separated from


buildings by a landscaped strip. Conditions
where parking stalls directly abut buildings
should never be permitted. Chula Vista

8) Lighting, landscaping, hardscape, fencing,


parking layout and pedestrian paths should
all contribute to the strength and clarity of
the parking lot.

9) Bicycle parking should be provided at each


development and should be easily accessible
and integrated into the overall site design.

c. Access and Entries


1) Locate parking lot entries on side streets
to minimize pedestrian/vehicular conflicts
along Broadway and Third Avenue.
However, effects on adjacent residential
neighborhoods must be considered.

2) Parking lots adjacent to a public street


should provide pedestrians with a point of
entry and clear and safe access from the
sidewalk on Broadway, Third Avenue, or side
street to the entrance of the building(s).

3) Pedestrian and vehicular entrances must


be clearly identified and easily accessible
to create a sense of arrival. The use
Enhanced paving provides a sense of
of enhanced paving, landscaping, and arrival into a parking area
Fg. 7.171
special architectural features and details is
encouraged.

4) Developments should have shared entries


when the lot is less than 75 feet wide.

5) Where possible, use alleys or side streets


for access to parking areas. The use of
alleys for parking access must be balanced
with other common uses of alleys, including
service, utilities, and loading and unloading
areas.
Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-129
d. Lighting
1) Parking lots should utilize pedestrian-scaled
rather than high mast light fixtures.

2) Lighting systems should be designed for two


levels, one during normal operations hours
and another reduced intensity level during
late non-operational hours (for security
purposes).

3) Lighting for a parking lot should be evenly


distributed and provide pedestrians and
drivers with adequate visibility.

e. Circulation
1) Separate vehicular and pedestrian
circulation systems should be provided
whenever feasible. Design parking areas
so that pedestrians walk parallel to moving
cars in parking aisles to minimize the need
for the pedestrian to cross parking aisles
Pedestrian access to building
Fg. 7.172 and landscape islands to reach building
entrances should be clearly defined entries.

2) Clearly defined pedestrian access should


be provided from parking areas to primary
building entrances.

3) All commercial projects should connect


onsite pedestrian circulation system to
offsite public sidewalks.

4) Access by disabled persons should be


incorporated into the overall pedestrian
circulation system.

5) Decorative paving treatments should be


incorporated into parking lot design, driveway
entries, and pedestrian crosswalks.

6) Screen walls or landscaping should not


be located where they block the sight
lines of drivers entering, leaving or driving
throughout the site.

VII-130 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


f. Landscaping
1) Parking lots adjacent to Broadway, Third
Avenue, or a major side street should be
landscaped to soften the visual impact of
parked vehicles from the public right-of-way.
Screening could consist of a combination of
low walls (a maximum of three feet high) and Chula Vista
landscape materials at the setback line.

2) Parking lots should include landscaping


that accents the importance of driveways
from the street, frames the major circulation Landscaping provides needed shade
Fg. 7.173
in parking areas
aisles, and highlights pedestrian pathways.

3) Provide one regularly spaced tree for every


six parking spaces to provide shade and
avoid long rows of parked cars.

4) Provide continuous landscape planting


strips or triangles between every row of
parking and large planting islands at the
ends of a row.

5) The use of stamped concrete, stone, brick


or granite pavers, exposed aggregate,
or colored concrete should also be used
to minimize the negative impact of large Decorative pavers improve the
Fg. 7.174
expanses of black asphalt pavement. appearance of parking areas

g. Loading and Delivery


1) Loading and unloading zones should be
located to minimize interference with traffic
flow.

2) Loading and unloading zones should


provide adequate space for maneuvering
into and out of a loading position. These
areas should be designed to integrate with
the entire development.

Loading zones should integrate into


surrounding development
Fg. 7.175

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-131


8. Signs
a. Introduction
These design guidelines are intended to ensure
that the Corridors District contains quality signs
that communicate their message in a clear
fashion and integrate into the surrounding area.
Unlike the Village District, signs along Broadway
should be directed towards vehicles rather than
pedestrians.

The guidelines that follow address these issues


and others, and are intended to help business
owners provide quality signs that add to and
support the character of the Corridors District.
They are not intended to supersede any existing
City sign ordinances. All signs must comply with
the regulations contained in the Chula Vista
Municipal Code unless as indicated within the
specific plan, in which case the specific plan will
take precedence.

Oversized signs that project over the


roof area are not allowed
Fg. 7.176 b. General Design Guidelines
1) Consider the need for signs and their
appropriate locations early in the design
process; and

2) The location and size of signs on any building


should be proportioned to the scale and
relate to the architecture of that particular
structure.

3) Oversized and out-of-scale signs are not


permitted.

4) Sign colors and materials should be selected


to contribute to the sign’s legibility.

5) Excessive use of colors is discouraged.

6) Placement
a) Signs should not project above the edge of
the rooflines.

VII-132 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


b) Signs used for business identification on
the primary business frontage should be
placed near the main business entrance
in a location that does not cover doors,
windows, or architectural details.

7) Materials Chula Vista


a) Routing, carving or sandblasting the surface
of wooden signs can obtain the effect of
raised letters.

b) Different applications of metal on signs


include: applying raised letters, on a metal
band, or applying paint and lettering.
Galvanized or baked enamel finish should
be used to avoid rusting.

c) Sign materials should be compatible with


the building facade upon which they are
placed.

d) Painted signs are encouraged, but should


not be painted over existing architectural Painted signs should not cover
Fg. 7.177
elements existing architectural elements

e) The selected materials should contribute to


the legibility of the sign. For example, glossy
finishes are often difficult to read because
of glare and reflections.

f) Precast letters (e.g. molded plastic or brass)


applied to a building surface can be an
effective signing alternative.

8) Color
a) Colors should relate to and complement the
materials or paint scheme of the buildings,
including accenting highlights and trim
colors. The number of colors on any sign
should be limited to three. This heightens
readability (visibility), especially when one
color is a dark hue, the second a medium
hue, and the third a light accent color.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-133


b) Contrast is an important influence on
the legibility of signs. Light letters on a
dark background or dark letters on a light
background are most legible.

c) Fluorescent colors should not be used.

9) Sign Legibility
a) An effective sign should be legible. The most
significant influence on legibility is lettering
Easy to read, simple typefaces and
symbols are encouraged
Fg. 7.178 style.

b) Lettering styles used on signs should be


highly legible. It is in the best interest of the
business establishment to have signs read
clearly and attractively to the passer-by.

c) Limit the number of lettering styles in order


to increase legibility. A general rule to follow
is to limit the number of different letter
styles to no more than two for small signs
and three for larger signs.

d) Avoid spacing letters and words too close


together. Crowding of letters, words or lines
will make any sign more difficult to read.
Conversely, overspacing these elements
Lettering on signs should be kept
simple to increase legibility
Fg. 7.179 causes the viewer to read each item
individually, again obscuring the message.

e) Use symbols and logos in the place of words


whenever appropriate. These images will
usually register more quickly in the viewer’s
mind than a written message.

10) Sign Illumination


a) Signs should have the capacity of being lit
externally for evening visibility.

b) Individually illuminated letters, either


internally illuminated or back lighted solid
Backlighting of signs is preferred
letters (reverse channel), are a preferred
Fg. 7.180

VII-134 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


alternative to internally illuminated signs.
Avoid illuminating an entire sign.

c) Indirect external illumination fixtures should


complement the surface of the sign.

d) Whenever external lighting fixtures are used, Chula Vista


care should be taken to properly shield the
light source to prevent glare from spilling
over into residential areas and any public
right-of-way.
Choose light fixtures that are
compatible with the building facade
Fg. 7.181
e) Backlit plastic box signs are prohibited.

c. Wayfinding
1) Placement of on-site kiosks and electronic
bulletin boards should be obvious. Directories
should be provided near the vehicular and
pedestrian entrances of commercial centers
to assist visitors in orienting themselves.

2) Information contained on the signs should


be legible. Directories should be easily
readable during day and night.

3) Contrast is important for the effectiveness of


on-site directional and informational signs.
Light letters on a dark background are most
legible.

4) Electronic bulletin boards are not


permitted.

5) Kiosks may serve as information booths and/


or shelter for small vendors. Kiosks should
be consistent with surrounding buildings
and other streetscape furnishings.

d. Wall Signs
Wall signs are attached parallel to or painted on
a wall surface. The following guidelines apply to
wall signs: Wall signs in a shopping center should
be located in a consistent place
Fg. 7.182

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-135


1) Wall signs should not project from the
attached surface more than required for
construction purposes and, in no case, more
than 6 inches.

2) Wall signs should be applied horizontally


directly above the storefront.

3) When a building contains two or more


businesses, wall signs should complement
Freestanding/monument signs
Fg. 7.183 one another in color and shape and be
should be surrounded by landscaping
located in the same position over the
storefronts.

4) Wall signs should be centered above


the store or building entrance within an
architecturally established area or unbroken
area of the building facade.

5) A wall sign should be located where


architectural features or details suggest
a location, size or shape for the sign. The
best location for a wall sign is generally a
band or blank area above the first floor of a
building.

e. Freestanding and Monument Signs


A freestanding sign is any sign permanently
attached to the ground and which does not have
a building as the primary structural support.
Monument signs are freestanding low-profile
signs where the sign width is greater than the
sign height..

1) Freestanding and monument signs should


be located away from the public right-
of-way where they are not obstructed by
landscaping and can be easily viewed by
pedestrians and motorists.

2) Freestanding and monument signs are


required to be located in a landscaped
Pole or pylon signs, such as the one
Fg. 7.184 planter away from a driveway or other vehicle
above, are not permitted access point.

VII-136 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3) Freestanding and monument signs should
be placed perpendicular to the street.

4) Freestanding and monument signs should


be on ground. Pole or pylon signs are not
permitted.
Chula Vista
5) Signs should provide solid architectural
bases and should complement the
architectural elements of the development
it serves.

6) Avoid placing more than 8 items of text or


graphics on a single sign.

f. Window Signs
Window signs are located within a window area
of a business. Window signs may be consist
of permanent materials affixed to a window,
or text and graphics painted directly onto the
window surface. The following guidelines apply
to window signs:
Window signs should be limited to the
1) Window signs should not exceed 20 percent business name and brief messages
Fg. 7.185
of the window area, and only one window
sign per frontage is allowed.

2) Lighted signs, flashing signs or any other


sign not applied directly to a windowpane
are not permitted.

3) The text or sign copy of a window sign should


be limited to the business name and brief
messages.

g. Temporary Signs
Posting of handmade window signs is not
permitted. Refer to Chula Vista Municipal Code
19.60 for further regulations on temporary
signs.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-137


h. Figurative Signs
Signs that advertise the occupant business
through the use of graphic or crafted symbols,
such as shoes, keys, glasses, books, etc.
are encouraged. Figurative signs may be
incorporated into any of the previously identified
allowable sign types.

VII-138 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


G. Special Guidelines
1. Introduction
From a design perspective, hotels and motels and mixed-use projects are two of
the more challenging commercial development types in the Chula Vista Urban
Core. Sections on these two specialized project types focus on site organization
and building design. In addition, multi-family residential design guidelines for Chula Vista
stand alone residential projects are provided to supplement the Village District
and Urban Core District design guidelines.

Basic design principles and tools for designing and building sustainably in a
mixed-use development market are also presented and are strongly encouraged
for all project types. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) Rating System is the “green” standard for buildings in the United States.
Consult a LEED Accredited Professional for design assistance.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-139


2. Hotels and Motels
a. Description
Due to their location near Interstate 5, hotels
and motels provide visitors with a strong first
impression of Chula Vista and therefore deserve
special attention. They are also quasi-residential
uses and should be designed and sited to
minimize the effect of noise from Interstate 5
and major roads. The scale of and activities
associated with hotels and motels often make
them problematic neighbors for adjacent
residential properties. In addition, hotel and
motel architecture is often thematic, which
presents a strong temptation to exaggerate
the design of the building front and to neglect
side and rear facades. However, all sides of a
building should be stylistically consistent.

b. Site Organization
1) The primary presence along the major
street frontage should be the building and
driveway approach, not the parking lot.

2) Some short-term parking spaces should be


provided near the office for check-ins.
Hotel and motel facades should be
located along the primary street
Fg. 7.186 3) Delivery and loading areas should be
screened to minimize impact on sensitive
uses. Loading and unloading areas should
be located in the rear.

4) Recreational facilities such as swimming


pools should be designed to offer privacy to
facility users. They should not be exposed
to public streets to function as advertising.

5) Avoid locating driveway, garage ramps,


or loading and service areas where they
interfere with the flow of pedestrian
movement or impact the privacy of guest
rooms.

6) Utilize parking lots and open spaces on the


site to help buffer the hotel or motel from
any adjacent incompatible/sensitive uses.
VII-140 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan
c. Building Design
1) All sides of a building should be architecturally
consistent.

2) At least 25% of the total exterior surface


area of the hotel or motel building should
be surfaced in masonry or natural stone. Chula Vista

3) Masonry or stone should be applied to


logical places on each of the building’s
facades, and should begin and end at
logical breaks related to the structure of the
building. A single, one-story high, horizontal
“banding” of masonry or stone is strongly
discouraged.

4) The remainder of the exterior may be


surfaced in stucco, water-managed Exterior
Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS), or
integrally-dyed decorative concrete or
ceramic masonry units. Metal or vinyl siding
is prohibited.

5) Significant departures from standardized


architectural “themes” intended to market
or brand a hotel or motel building, such as
Swiss chalets or castles, is prohibited.
Masonry or natural stone are the
preferred building materials
Fg. 7.187
6) Public or semi-public spaces (lobbies,
restaurants, meeting rooms, and banquet-
facilities) sited at ground level adjacent
to a pedestrian walkway or a major street
should use glass and transparent materials
between the height of three feet (3’) and
eight feet (8’) above the walkway or street
grade.

7) Noise attenuation techniques should be


included in the design of buildings near
major noise generators (e.g., major streets
and I-5 freeway). Techniques may include:
double pane glass, berms or lowering the
grade of the subject building below the
roadway elevation.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-141


8) The scale of buildings should transition
to adjacent existing developments not
anticipated to redevelop pursuant to the
Specific Plan.

9) Walkway, stairway and balcony railings


and other similar details should be visually
substantial and stylistically consistent with
the basic building design.

10) Mechanical equipment of all types, including


swimming pool equipment, should be
located to minimize impacts on adjacent
uses. Air conditioning units should not be
visible from public streets.

11) Exterior corridors and stairwells on multi-


level buildings are strongly discouraged and
should not be located adjacent to residential
uses.

12) Guest rooms should be accessible from


hallways within hotels over two stories.
Avoid room entrances directly adjacent to
parking lots or exterior walkways.

13) Roof terraces and gardens augment open


space. Their design and location should
encourage human occupation and use.
Designs for open space should
encourage activity
Fg. 7.188

VII-142 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3. Mixed Use Projects
a. Description
For the purpose of these guidelines, mixed-
use projects are defined as developments
that combine both commercial/office and
residential uses or structures on a single lot or Chula Vista
as components of a single development. The
uses may be combined either vertically within
the same structure or spread horizontally on
the site in different areas and structures.

The primary design issue related to mixed use


projects is the need to successfully balance
the requirements of residential uses, such
as the need for privacy and security, with the
needs of commercial uses for access, visibility,
parking, loading, and possibly extended hours
of operation. There are two basic types of
mixed-use projects. The first type is vertical
mixed use, which is typified by residential use
over commercial uses in the same building. The
second, called horizontal mixed use, combines
residential and commercial uses on the same
site but in separate buildings.

b. Site Organization
Example of a vertical mixed-use
1) Primary business and residential entrances project
Fg. 7.189
should be oriented to the commercial street,
though each use should have a separate
entrance. Residential Common Residential
structure open space structure

2) Separate site access drive and parking Residential


parking and
facilities should be provided for residential circulation
uses and commercial uses.
Gate
Commercial
3) Projects should provide for connections with structure
existing and future streets. Commercial
parking

4) Principal access roads into new mixed-use


development areas should be of similar Residential Parking Parking and
access access service access
scale as streets in adjacent residential
neighborhoods. Conceptual layout for a small
horizontal mixed-use project
Fg. 7.190

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-143


5) Site access drives should incorporate
distinctive architectural elements and
landscape features that help to differentiate
access to commercial parking areas from
residential areas. Security gates should
be considered for access to residential
uses and residential parking areas, as well
as to securing commercial parking areas
when businesses are closed, except when a
shared parking arrangement is in effect.

6) Private drives should be designed as


pedestrian-friendly streets that are a
natural extension of the surrounding
neighborhood.

7) Minimize driveway width and pedestrian


crossing distance at sidewalks.

8) If enclosed parking is provided for the entire


complex, separate levels should be provided
for residential and commercial uses with
separate building entrances.

9) Outdoor dining, kiosks, benches, and other


street furniture are encouraged to enhance
street activity and interest.

10) Bike facilities should be designed into the


development.

c. Building Design
1) The architectural style and use of materials
should be consistent throughout the entire
project. Differences in materials and/or
architectural details should only occur
where the intent is to differentiate between
scale and character of commercial and
residential areas.

2) Residential units should also be shielded


from illuminated commercial signs.
A variety of architectural details
provide interest on the second level
Fg. 7.191

VII-144 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3) Pedestrian connections between commercial
and residential developments should be
active and friendly.

4) Large blank walls should not be allowed.

d. Special Requirements Chula Vista


1) Neighborhood-serving uses (such as
full-service grocery, drug, and hardware
stores) are encouraged in mixed-use
Outdoor dining provides activity for
developments. pedestrian connections
Fg. 7.192

2) Loading areas and refuse storage facilities


should be located as far as possible from
residential units and should be completely
screened from view from adjacent residential
portions of the project. The location and
design of trash enclosures should account
for potential nuisances from odors.

3) All roof-mounted equipment should be


screened. Special consideration should be
given to the location and screening of noise
generating equipment such as refrigeration
units, air conditioning, and exhaust fans.
Noise reducing screens and insulation may
be required where such equipment has the
potential to impact residential uses.

4) Open space intended for use by “residents


only” may not be accessible from commercial
areas. Open space and courtyards in
commercial areas may be accessible to
residential occupants and visitors.

5) Parking lot lighting and security lighting for


the commercial uses should be appropriately
shielded so as not to spill over into the
residential area.

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-145


4. Multi-Family Residential Projects
a. Description
Multi-family developments are higher density
residential buildings, such as apartments,
condominiums or townhomes. These types
of developments are typically comprised of
attached units with common facilities such as
Residential buildings should create a
parking, open space, and recreation areas.
consistent urban street wall
Fg. 7.193 This section provides general guidelines for
the design of multi-family developments. The
following guidelines supplement the design
guidelines for the Village District and Urban
Core District for instances where stand alone
residential projects, as opposed to mixed-use
projects, are allowed.

b. Site Planning and Design


1) Internally focused residential developments
are discouraged. Residential buildings
should create a consistent urban street wall
that defines the street edge, including street
elevations that are especially visible and
attractive.

2) Upper floor balconies, bays, and windows


should be provided that overlook the
Upper floor balconies and windows
overlooking the street are provided
Fg. 7.194 street, enliven the street elevation, and
communicate the residential function of the
building.

3) Three dimensional design features, such as


balconies and bays should be incorporated
into the building design. Windows other
than bays should be recessed behind the
plane of the building to create shadow lines.
Balconies should also be recessed and
should have a minimum depth of six feet.

4) Roof form and height should complement


a residential building’s mass and
articulation.
Roof form should complement building
mass and articulation
Fg. 7.195

VII-146 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5) Where residential uses occupy the first
floor, a shallow setback and minor grade
separation between the first floor and
sidewalk should be provided to promote
privacy and to accommodate entry porches
and stoops.
Chula Vista
6) Consideration should be given for privacy
relative to adjoining properties. Orient
A shallow setback and minor grade
buildings and decks to maximize views while separation may be appropriate
Fg. 7.196
preserving the privacy of the surrounding
neighbors.

7) Intensified landscaping, increased setbacks


adjacent to other uses, and appropriate
building orientation should be used to
buffer or transition residential uses from
incompatible adjacent uses.

8) Unless impractical due to physical


constraints, alleys should be used for access
to garages, parking spaces, and for other
functions such as garbage pick-up.

9) The preferred location of parking is at the


rear of lots, accessible from alleys or single- The preferred location for parking is
Fg. 7.197
width driveways extending along the side of at the rear of lots
the lots.

10) Parking areas should be screened from


public street views and surrounding
residential areas.

11) Alternatives to solid paved driveways, such


as brick, cobblestone, or interlocking pavers,
should be encouraged.

12) Easily identifiable pedestrian connections


should be provided from the street/sidewalk
to key areas within or adjacent to the site. Pedestrian connections should be
Fg. 7.198
easily identifiable from the street

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-147


c. Entries and Facades
1) Multiple residential building entrances
oriented toward the street should be provided
in order to activate the streetscape. Main
building entrances should be bold and easy
to see and should provide transition from
the public to private realm.

Entry porches and stoops should be 2) Entry porches and stoops should be
provided
Fg. 7.199 provided as transitional spaces between the
public sidewalk and the residential building
and/or dwelling entrances; porches or
stoops should not encroach upon a public
sidewalk.

3) A combination of ornamental landscaping,


water features, architectural elements,
decorative walls, signs and/or enhanced
paving should be incorporated into the
project entry as accent features.

4) Exterior stairways should be architecturally


integrated into the design of the building.
Exterior stairways should be Prefabricated stairs or railings are
integrated into the building design
Fg. 7.200
discouraged.

5) Contrasting colors may be used to accentuate


building entry features and architectural
details.

d. Landscaping
1) Landscaping should be used to:
• Define areas such as building entrances,
key activity hubs, focal points, and the
street edge;
• Provide screening for unattractive/
unsightly service areas; and
• Serve as buffers between neighboring
uses.

2) Front and side yard landscaping is highly


desirable; additional paving in the front and
Front and side yard landscaping is
highly desirable
Fg. 7.201 side yard areas should be avoided whenever
possible.

VII-148 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


3) Specimen (36-inch box or larger) trees
should be planted to assist new development
in looking “established” as quickly as
possible.

4) Flowering trees should be used to provide


color and accentuate entryways. Chula Vista

e. Utilitarian Areas
1) Transformers should be placed underground
to maximize safety and minimize visual
impacts. When this location cannot be
achieved, the transformers should be well
screened and placed in the rear or side yard Flowering trees can provide color and
Fg. 7.202
area, minimizing visibility from the public accentuate entrances
right-of-way.

2) Mechanical equipment, including gas and


electrical meters, cable boxes, junction
boxes and irrigation controllers, should be
located within a utility room, along with the
fire riser and roof access ladder. When this
location cannot be achieved, these features
should be designed as an integral part of
the building on a rear or side elevation and
screened from public view.

3) Common mailbox enclosures should be


designed to be similar or complementary in
form, material, and color to the surrounding
residential buildings.
Common mailboxes should
Fg. 7.203
4) Enclosures should be unobtrusive and complement the residential buildings
conveniently located for trash disposal
by tenants and for collection by service
vehicles. Enclosures should not be visible
from primary entry drives.

5) Where feasible, a pedestrian entrance to


the trash enclosure should be provided so
that large access doors do not have to be
opened.
Trash enclosures should be
decoratively screened from view
Fg. 7.204

Chapter VII Design Guidelines VII-149


f. Walls and Fences
1) A combination of elements, including
decorative masonry walls, berms, and
landscaping, should be used to screen
objects at the ground plane.

2) Walls and fences should be designed with


materials and finishes that complement
project architecture, should be architecturally
treated on both sides, and should be planted
Wall with columns and cap detailing
is encouraged
Fg. 7.205 with vines, shrubs and trees.

3) Fences and walls should be constructed


as low as possible while still performing
screening, noise attenuation, and security
functions.

4) Similar elements, such as columns, materials,


and cap details, should be incorporated on
perimeter walls that transition from one
development to another.

5) All fences and walls required for screening


purposes should be of solid material.
Chain link fencing with inserts is strongly
discouraged and should not be used.

VII-150 Chula Vista Urban Core Specific Plan


5. Environmental Sustainability Goals
a. Purpose
The City of Chula Vista prides itself on taking
steps toward environmental stewardship. The
Specific Plan sets forth goals for preserving and
improving the natural and built environment, Chula Vista
protecting the health of residents and visitors,
and simultaneously fostering vibrant economic
centers in the City. The purpose of this section
is to enhance the public welfare and assure
that further commercial and civic development
meets the city’s sustainability goals by
incorporating green building measures into
the design, construction, and maintenance
of buildings. These green building practices
should be used to help guide the transformation
of aging and blighted areas and infrastructure
into sustainable neighborhoods and villages.
These transformed sustainable neighborhoods
and villages should build on and compliment
the positive components of each area’s existing
character and integrate these features into an
environmentally and economically sustainable
Chula Vista community.

b. What is Green Building?


“Green Building” means a whole systems
approach to the design, construction, and
operation of buildings that encompasses
the environmental, economic, and social
impacts of buildings. Green building practices Image provided by KEMA

recognize the relationship between natural and Green building - many windows
Fg. 7.206