Sunteți pe pagina 1din 4

EPJ0040 Project Management in Construction – Logical Framework Exercise Spring 2009

Exercise 1 – Hospital Reconstruction Project Logical Framework

Objectives of this exercise:

• to stimulate thought about the relationships between project elements (goal,


purpose, outputs, activities, inputs, assumptions, indicators, etc.)
• to demonstrate the logical framework as a structured project initiation tool

Scenario development:

The hospital in Puthukkudiyiruppu village, in Wanni region, Northern Sri Lanka was
partially destroyed in fighting between the Sri Lankan army and LTTE rebels on Saturday
31 January 2009.

You are a project manager for an emergency relief agency. Your task is to prepare the
logical framework for a project to improve living conditions for villagers in
Puthukkudiyiruppu by reconstructing the hospital buildings. Reconstruction can begin as
soon as a ceasefire has been declared and you are advised that it is safe to proceed.

What you must do:

Complete the boxes in the logical framework template on page 4 in the sequence shown
in the lecture 1 handouts (Slide 12).

1. Left hand “Objectives” column


Start with the “Goal” which is:

“To improve living conditions for villagers in Puthukkudiyiruppu within 12 months of a


ceasefire”. (I have filled this in for you).

Next, decide what the purpose of the project is. (Hint: What do you expect your project to
achieve? Write something about “reconstruction” but make sure that your Purpose
statement is “SMART”).

Next, work out what precise Outputs your project must have in order to achieve your
Purpose. (Hint: Check that if you achieve Output 1 and Output 2 and so on, then you
will have achieved your Purpose).

Next, write down a list of the general (not detailed) activities which you would need to
undertake to achieve your Outputs.

2. Right hand “Important Assumptions” column

Now begin working up the right hand “Important Assumptions” column.

Emlyn Witt Page 1 of 4


EPJ0040 Project Management in Construction – Logical Framework Exercise Spring 2009

Start with the “Activity to Output” assumptions. If you do the activities, you will achieve
the Outputs only if certain conditions are met. What are these conditions? (For example,
if you have an activity which involves hiring local workers, then you might be assuming
that suitable workers are available locally and that they are willing to work for your
project).

Continue with the “Outputs to Purpose” assumptions and then the “Purpose to Goal”
assumptions.

3. Inner “Measurable Indicators” and “Means of Verification” columns

Measurable indicators are any evidence which can be easily seen to show that something
has been achieved. For example, “wage costs” would be an indicator that workers had
been hired.

Means of verification are often the source documents from which the indicators can be
found. If we keep using the example of “wage costs” above, then the project’s monthly
financial account would be a “means of verification”.

4. “Inputs” box

Finally, when you are satisfied with you project as described in your logical framework,
then you can consider what inputs it would need. These are just sums of money which
are estimated for each of the activities.

Remember:
• Use your imagination – if you need more information for your project, simply
make it up.

Emlyn Witt Page 2 of 4


EPJ0040 Project Management in Construction – Logical Framework Exercise Spring 2009

Logical Frameworks – Quick Reference

The Logical Framework approach was developed by the United States Agency for
International Development in the 1960s and is a widely used project management tool
within the international aid community. It can help designers of projects think
logically about:
• what the project is trying to achieve (the purpose),
• what things the project needs to do to bring that about (the outputs)
• what needs to be done to produce these outputs (the activities), and
• how the achievement of the purpose will feed into the wider strategies of the
funding organisation (the goal).

Objectives Measurable Means of Important


indicators verification assumptions

GOAL:
Wider problem the Quantitative ways of Cost-effective
project will help to measuring or methods and
resolve qualitative ways of sources to
judging timed quantify
achievement of goal or assess
indicators

PURPOSE: (Purpose to Goal)


The immediate Quantitative ways of Cost-effective External conditions
impact measuring or methods and necessary if achieved
on the project area or qualitative ways of sources to project purpose is to
target group i.e. the judging timed quantify contribute to reaching
change or benefit to achievement of or assess project goal
be achieved by the purpose indicators
project

OUTPUTS: (Outputs to purpose)


These are the Quantitative ways of Cost-effective Factors out of project
specifically measuring or methods and control which, if
deliverable qualitative ways of sources to present,
results expected from judging timed quantify could restrict progress
the project to attain production of outputs or assess from outputs to
the purpose indicators achieving project
purpose

ACTIVITIES: INPUTS: (Activity to output)


These are the tasks This is a summary of Factors out of project
to the project budget control which, if
be done to produce Financial out-turn present,
the outputs report as agreed in could restrict progress
grant agreement from activities to
achieving outputs

Emlyn Witt Page 3 of 4


EPJ0040 Project Management in Construction – Logical Framework Exercise Spring 2009

Blank Framework

Objectives Measurable Means of Important


indicators verification assumptions

GOAL:
To improve living
conditions for
villagers in
Puthukkudiyiruppu
within 12 months of
a ceasefire.
PURPOSE: (Purpose to Goal)

OUTPUTS: (Outputs to purpose)

ACTIVITIES: INPUTS: (Activity to output)

Emlyn Witt Page 4 of 4