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Close Reading Text Analysis Chart

Use the chart below to track your analysis of the text at each of the four levels.

 

Linguistic

 

Semantic

Structural

Cultural

you’ve observed when reading

at this levelcited in MLA format.

(You may use numbers or bullets here to take notes)

“Not so faintly now as they come near the bridge;” (Joyce 4-5)

“They are heard now far away, hoofs that shine/ amid the heavy night as gems, hurrying beyond the sleeping/ fields to what journey’s end”

which has turned from dreams to/ dreamless sleep” (2-3)

dreams to dreamless sleep as a weary lover whom no caresses move,” (2-3)

(8-10)

Faintly, under the heavy night… Not so faintly now as/ they come near the bridge;” (1, 4-5)

They are heard now far away, hoofs that shine/ amid the heavy night as gems, hurrying beyond the sleeping/ fields to what journey's end--what heart? /

examples of whattextual

Specific

“the silence is cloven by alarm as by/ an arrow.”

“through the/ silence of the city which has turned from dreams

to/ dreamless sleep as

(6-7)

“what heart? /bearing what tidings?” (9-10)

“what heart? bearing

a

weary lover whom

what tidings?” (9-10)

bearing what tidings?” (7-10_

   

no caresses move/ the sounds of hoofs upon the road.” (1-4)

Demonstrate the development of complexity of thought at each level by writing a descriptive response to what you’ve written in

your thought patterns when observing(Analyze listed above —these may also be in note -you’ve taking form)

This freeform poem, although terse, contains a few similes and rhetorical questions. These help emphasize the most important lines of the poem and what it stands for. The similes refer to objects that would’ve have been very predated, even in Stephen’s time, such as “arrows” and “gems” a term that would’ve probably been considered archaic at that time. The rhetorical questions help provide a frame of mind for the poem’s ending.

 

The structure of the poem

Stephen, the next day, describes the poem as “vague words for a vague emotion”, but wonders if “she” would like it, and determines that she would. As Stephen never provides closure as to what this poem is about, it could be speculated to be about Emma – the “she” – as she was the one who got him to start writing in the first place. The “weary lover” could represent a lonely Stephen who is alone and the hoofs heard could be Emma moving far away, or vice versa, as Stephen ends up leaving Dublin for Trieste.

It

clearly can be seen

already informs the audience of one think. It is freeform, and where the stanzas end and begin depends on which version of A Portrait one owns. Anyway, this structure helps show that the choice of individual words and rhetorical strategies used

that the poem takes place very late at night (Note: It seems all the important thinking is done way late into the night in Joyce’s works), almost in a dreamlike state, where reality is

a

bit hazy. Did a group

is more important than how the words act together independent of a

of people just pass by on a journey, or is just

a

figment of

strategy. There are questions posed by the protagonist of the poem, left to the audience to interpret the answer to.

the row above. the examples

imagination on the end of the sleepless, “weary lover”?

Poem #2 and Author

Analysis of Close Reading

Faintly, under the heavy night, through the

 

silence of the city which has turned from dreams to

dreamless sleep as a weary lover whom no caresses move,

the sound of hoofs upon the road. Not so faintly now as

they come near the bridge; and in a moment, as they pass

the darkened windows, the silence is cloven by alarm as by

an arrow. They are heard now far away, hoofs that shine

amid the heavy night as gems, hurrying beyond the sleeping

fields to what journey's end--what heart?

bearing what tidings?