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THE

GERMAN NOVELISTS: TALES


SELECTED FROM

ANCIENT AND MODERN AUTHORS


IN

THAT LANGUAGE:

FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD DOWN TO THE CLOSE OE


THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.
TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINALS
:

WITH

CRITICAL

AND BIOGRAPHICAL

NOTICES.

BY THOMAS ROSCOE.
IN

FOUR VOLUMES.
VOL. IV.

LONDON
HENRY COLBURN, NEW BURLINGTON STREET.
1826.

LONDON:
l'SINTED BV
S.

A.ND K.

BENTLEY, DORSET STREET.

CONTENTS
OF

THE FOURTH VOLUME.

German Novels.
PAGE

Lewis Tieck.
Introductory Notice

3
7

Love Magic

some centuries ago


Part
I.

The Faithful Eckart and the Tannenhuser.


The Tannenhuser,
Part II
or

53

Lord

of

the

Fir

Woods.
81

Auburn Egbert

102

Laxgbeix.
Introductory Notice
^Marianne Richards, or Memoirs of an Actress

133

136

Seven 3Iarriages, and never a husband

216

The

Irreconcileable

Man

258
275

Albert Limbach, or a IMartyr to the Fair

An

Hour's Instruction in-Political Economy


Palfrey (a Tale of the Court)

315
331

The Lady's

Engel.
The
Anti-speculator
340"

Toby Witt

358

Lady Elizabeth HiU

368

GERMAN

NOVELS.

GERMAN

NOVELS.

LEWIS TIECK.
In common with so many of
his

learned but

eccentric contemporaries, Tieck put forth his earliest

literary

efforts

under a pseudonymous

title,

and appeared under the wing of Peter Lebrecht, and G. Frber.


are
in

Many

of his favourite productions

become already
scholars.

familiar to the English reader,

several able versions

from the pens of our best


least

German

Not the

excellent

and

amusing among these are

to be

met with

in a re-

cent English translation of his two Tales, entitled,


the " Pictures, and the Betrothing," presented to us by an
It

anonymous hand.
idle-

would be an

attempt on the part of the

present Editor, after the various beautiful versions,

and notices of Tieck's genius, which have appeared


in

some of our

periodical journals, to

presume to

enter at any length into this great writer's character

and productions.

At the same
B 2

time,

it

will

be ob-

GERMAN NOVELS.
embracing so great a va-

vious, that in a selection


riety of
fine

names and

materials, the Editor

must con
most

his attention to a few only of the

brief

and

characteristic

among
most

his fanciful effusions, in

affording specimens

suitable to the object

he

has in view

specimens of the traditionary and ro-

mantic character of the Germans.

Ludwig Tieck was born

at Berlin on the 3

st

of

May, 1773.
sophy

He was
One

raised to the chair of philo-

at the University,

and

chiefly resides at the


first

city of Dresden.
entitled,

of his

productions was

William Lowell, published at Berlin, 1795,


in

2 vols, a new edition

1814.

This was followed

by that of " Peter Lebrecht; or a History with no


Adventures," 2 vols. 1795-6. The next was " Ritter
Blaubart,

an

Old Woman's Story

;"

and of

still

more

familiar

sound came the " Booted

Tom

Cat,"

" Puss in Boots, a Child's Story, with Interludes, a Prologue, and an Epilogue
of a
;"

" Heart Effusions

Monk

devoted to Art."

" Popular Stories."

" Francis Sternbald's Travels, an old


tory," 2 vols. 1798.

German
his

His-

Tieck's powers, however, soon

freed

him from the danger of indulging


;

more

wild and eccentric qualities

he engaged

in several

works conjointly with A.


cellent version of

W.

Schlegel, gave an ex-

Don

Quixote, and wrote his well

known work,

entitled

" Phantasus,"

from which

the following specimens have been chiefly drawn.

In the year 1820, he edited the works of Kleist,

and pubhshed a collection of


besides editions of

his

own poems,

3 vols,

the old English and

German

dramatic writers.

Among

the specimens here offered,

it

may

be

proper to warn the English reader, unacquainted


with the wild and daring cast of this author's productions, that he

must not be too much

startled at

meeting with a few of those more supernatural exhibitions

which Tieck so much delights


terrific

in

conjuring

up, however startling and


sionally appear.

they

may

occa;

He

is

a true northern magician


his terrors
;

one who disguises nothing of

like

an

experienced master, he leaps at once into the magic


ring,

and casts

his spells

about him with

all

the

confidence and power so well calculated to impress

upon us that
chantments

sort of illusion

sought

for in the enall,

to

which he

aspires.

Most of

he

succeeds in embodying the traditionary phantoms


of the past.

Dim

forms, just disappearing in the


still

darkness of the middle ages, yet


distance
;

visible

in

the

and whose names have some of them

survived in the old herorc poems and ballads of the country.

To

this class will

which are

entitled,

be found to belong the two " The Faithful Eckart," and the

" Tannenhuser, or Dweller of the Firs."


former of these mention
is

Of

the

made

in

the Preface to

GERMAN NOVELS.
of

the Book of Heroes, an analysis and specimen

which appear
Antiquities,"*

in

the

" Illustrations

of

Northern

from the pen of the most distin;

guished writer of his age


cian of the North.

likewise

a great magi-

In his introduction to both these stories, Tieck


takes occasion to observe, that he
his idea of the

was indebted

for

Venus-berg to a tradition current


;

during the middle ages

but that in respect to the

poem

of the " Tannenhuser," as well as that of

the " Niebelungen," he was wholly unacquainted

with them at the period

when he composed

the

second portion of his " Faithful Eckart," and " The


Dweller of the Fir-woods."

He

adds, that frequent

mention of the former occurs

in the writings of old


all

Hans Sachs and


Venus-berg.

other poets, by

of

whom he

is

represented as keeping constant watch before the

Hence, too, he borrowed his ideas of


fictions.

some of the following ^jrose and poetic

work

of a(lmiraV)le learning, taste,

and execution,

produced by the conjoint labours of several very able antiquarians, but unfortunately presented to the world in some-

what too un wieldly and uninteresting a shape

Ed.

LOVE-MAGIC; SOME CENTURIES AGO.

Absorbed in

his

own thoughts, Emilius

sat lean-

ing his head upon the table, awaiting the arrival

of his friend Roderick.

His lamp began to burn

dim

it

was a cold

winter's evening,

and he wish-

ed his fellow-traveller would return, although, at

one time, he had as earnestly avoided his society.

The

truth was, he

had determined that evening


secret,

to

entrust

him with a

and

farther solicit his

advice in what

way

to act.

The

unsocial Emilius
difficulties,

found, or rather imagined so

many

so

many insurmountable
affairs

obstacles in the
life,

commonest

and occurrences of
in

that fortune seem-

ed to have thrown him a mere freakish

Roderick's

way out
the

of

ironical

humour

as

latter

afforded in every respect almost a ludicrous contrast to his poor friend.


flattery, influenced

Volatile, affable even


first

to

and determined by

impres-

sions,

Roderick undertook every thing, was every

one's adviser, thought nothing too difficult for him,

and was
to an

least of all to be deterred

from pursuing

his object.

Not
:

so in prosecuting his undertaking

end

he soon grew weary, and broke down

GERMAN NOVELS.
almost as suddenly as he had
career.
first

entered upon his

His
;

elasticity

and inspiration of ideas then


obstacle, instead of acting
to greater efforts,

forsook him

every

little

as a spur to incite

him

induced

him

to

relax

them, and to undervalue the task

which he had so warmly approved and commenced.

Thus

his plans lay all confused,


;

without a motive

and without conclusion


as they

abandoned as weakly
Hence,
too, not a

had been conceived.

day

passed without some difference of opinion arising

between the two friends, which often seemed to


threaten the continuance of their regard
;

yet this

apparent hostility was perhaps the real bond which

more intimately united them.


truly attached to each other
little
;

They were,
although both

in fact,
felt

no

satisfaction

in

the idea,

that they had the

best grounds in the world for complaining of each


other's

whims.

Emilius was a young


thusiastic,
irritable

man

of fortune, of an en-

and melancholy temperament.


his

He had
property
I

early
;

become master of
set out
latterly

own time and

had

on a tour to enlarge his


spent some months in a

views,

and had

celebrated city to enjoy the pleasures of the carnival


;

about which, however, he in truth cared very


Still

little.

he had to meet the very significant ex-

pectations of his relations,


ever
visited
;

whom

he had scarcely

but

who

calculated

upon splendid


TTF.CK.
9

proofs of his o^reat fortune, in his future style of


living.

Meanwhile, the
;

fickle

and busy Roderick


his

urged him forward

for

he had quarrelled with

guardians, and in order to rid himself altogether

of their tedious admonitions, he had eagerly em-

braced the opportunity of accompanying his new


friend

upon

his tour.

As they proceeded,
to the resolution

indeed, they had often


;

come
more

of separating
it

yet in every disto grow, the

pute, the

more serious
both
feel,
it

seemed

.sensibly did

when they came


was
for

to bid fare-

well,

how

impossible

them

to part.

They
Rode-

had barely alighted


rick protested

in

any new

city, before
all

he had already beheld


it

the most

remarkable objects

contained, and which were


;

forgotten before the next day

while Emilius de;

voted a

full

week

to the examination of libraries

suffered nothing curious to escape

him

leaving

Roderick, meanwhile,- to form a thousand acquaintances, visit a thousand


places,

and return with

some of
quiet

his

new

friends to invade his companion's

apartment.

Nay, he

would

not

scruple,

when the company he had brought grew


to leave Emilius with

tiresome,

them alone

and

set out in

quest of something fresh.

Often, of a truth, he

brought the reserved Emilius into the most cruel


dilemma, by passing extravagant encomiums upon
his

merits

and acquirements, before learned and

b5

10

GERMAN KOVELS.
men
dwelling upon
his familiarity
arts,

distinguished

with lano;uages, antiquities, and the


of which he was well qualified,
lectures
to

upon
to

all

he

said,

give

the most accomplished audience; yet

the volatile wretch

had never had even patience

enough
once

to listen to his friend,

when discoursing

on any one of these subjects.


betook
himself to
active

Whenever Emilius
employment, his

restless friend

was sure

to have

engaged himself to
sledge,

some
his

ball, or in

some excursion on the

when
in

couch was certain


;

for that night, at least, to

rem.ain unpressed

and Emilius, while travelling


liveliest,
left

the society of one of the

most
in

restless,

and
soli-

sympathizing of beings, was


tude.

complete

That day, however, Emilius looked

for his arrival

with confidence, as he had extorted the most

warm

and

Avilling

promise, that he would spend this very


in order to receive

evening with him,

an explana-

tion as to the cause of his

friend's evident anxiety

and low

spirits,

during some weeks past.

Emilius,
fol-

meanwhile, amused himself with penning the


lowing lines

upon a subject which

filled

all

his

thoughts

How

sweet and pure

life's

vernal gales,

^^Tien every bird that sings,

Pours strains
Till

all like

the nightingale's,

And

leaves

wood and valley rings, and flowers tremble like breathing

things.

11

How sweet in golden moon-lit hours, When evening airs first blow,
Through calm and fragrant Linden-bowers To feel them as we go

And

hear their music with the streamlet's flow;

Serenely shines the rosy light,

When

fay-rings deck the fields.


rose of night,

Love peeps from every

From every
Its

star that jnelds

lamp

to lovers,

and their raptures


far to

gilds.

Yet sweeter, purer,

me

The pale light of that lamp, Where in her chamber I may see
That
face

Of beauty on my

and form, whose stamp soul, nor time, nor seasons damp.

Behold her white hand through the gltam. Unloose her lovely zone.

And

let her auburn tresses stream In luscious freedom down,

And from
Hark

her fair lirows take her rosy crown.

'twas the music of her lute

Sweet notes might wake the dead

From every

string,

till

through

my mute
bled.

And
The

listening soul their

light of mirth

and joy,

magic sped with griefs that

Let

me

aj)proach

near and more near.


my

In conscious honour bold.

Nor more depart until she hear The tale I'd long have told.

And

learn that love

is all

hope

my world.

12

GERMAN NVKES.
Emilius rose impatiently.

It

grew darker, and


as he longed to

Roderick did not appear

much

confide to him his secret, that of his attachment


to a fair

unknown, who resided At

directly opposite,

and who thus kept him night and day awake, and
at

home.

last

he heard footsteps on the

stairs,

his door

opened without any preliminary knock,

and two masks, of most revolting aspect, marched


boldly
in.

One
;

of these was a Turk, arrayed in


the other a Spaniard, in crimson

red and blue silk

with a mixed pale yellow, with fine waving feathers


in

his

hat.

Emilius
his

expressing

his

impatience

at this intrusion,

friend Roderick

unmasked,

displaying the same smiling countenance as usual,

and exclaiming, " Lord


rueful face
!

my

poor friend, what a

Is that

a face for the Carnival, think

you

have brought

my young
I

friend here to en-

tertain you.

There

is

a grand ball to-night in the


well

masquerade rooms, and as

know

that you

have taken an oath not to go, except you wear


mourning, which
is

your every-day habit


;

we

are

glad to find you ready dressed with us


:

so

you

will

go along

it is

getting rather late."


little irritated,

Emilius, not a

replied, " It

would
you
:"

seem that according

to your

habit, likewise, Sir,

have broken your engagement to

me

this

evening
I

then turning towards the stranger, he added, "

am
to

much concerned

that

it

will

not be in

my power

13

accompany you
in

and

my
to

friend has been too hasty


it is

engaging

for
I

me.

Indeed,

quite out of the

question, as

happen

have something of impor-

tance to communicate to him." The stranger, aware


of the meaning of
rick
this, instantly

withdrew

Rode-

resumed his mask, walked before the mirror, and said, " Is it not true ? one looks quite hideous.

Upon my honour
taste
;

it

is

a remarkable

proof of

ill

it is

a notable discovery of mine."


is

" There
all

no question of that

nothing new at
after the

in caricaturing yourself,
;

and running
but

most absurd amusements


possessed."

perhaps

you are

" This

is all

said

in

spite," returned Roderick,


;

" because you can't dance

because you consider


;

it

most d

nably grievous offence


It
is

and so nobody

must be merry.
"

truly pitiable to see a

man

turn himself into a bundle of conceited prejudices.''


It is certain,"
is
;

replied Emilius, in high dudgeon,

" there
to

occasion enough for them, in reference


I

you

yet

was simple enough


us,

to believe,

from

what passed between


given

that

you woidd have

me

the pleasure of your

company

for

one

short evening."

"True
" and
all

but

it is

the Carnival," returned the other,

my

acquaintance, with several ladies to

boot, are expecting to see

me

at the
it is

grand

ball.

Only consider,

my

good

fellow, that

sheer sick-

14

GERMAN NOVELS.

ness that gives you such an unreasonable aversion


to all kind of fun."

"

I will

not pretend to decide," retorted Emilius,


is

" which of us

sick

but thy irreclaimable

frivolity,

thy determination to ruin thyself, thy


of pleasure,

mad

pursuit

with the elevation of thy head, and

the emptiness of thy heart, are, doubtless, no good

symptoms
imitate
in

of a sound mind.

You would do
call
it,

well to
it

my

weakness, as you
;

if

such

be,
is

some things

and think with me, that there

nothing in the world so utterly intolerable as that

mad

riot
its

called a ball, with all the frightful noise

called
to the

music.

It

has been truly observed, that

dumb, happily exempt from the nuisance,


;

a ball appears a dance of bedlamites

but

am

of opinion that this frightful music itself


nal harping
petion

this eter-

upon a few notes

in quick, incessant re-

in certain miscalled
I

melodies, which really


all

set all one's thoughts,

into

commotion,

might add,

one's blood,

'

confusion thrice confounded,'


little

so as to require no
injury
;

time to recover from the

say that
;

all

this

must be downright
if

folly

and insanity
be tolerated,
be no music
;

insomuch
it

that,

dancing ought to

should be on conditions that there

but both are intolerable."

"
in

What

a paradoxical wretch !" cried the


;

Mask,

high good humour

" you have gone so far as to

accuse the most natural, innocent, and delightful

15

amusement
sanity."

in the world, of absurdity, folly,

and

in-

"

cannot account
'*

for it,"

continued his friend,

more

seriously,
feel

how

certain tones of music have


;

made me

unhappy from my childhood

even

often reduced

me

to the brink of despair.


if

To me

the world of sound appears as


lins, furies,

haunted with gob;

and

all

kind of

ill

spirits

which wave

their

wings over me, and mock and

mow

in

my

face."

"

Weak

nerves,

blue

devils all !" exclaimed his

friend, ''just like

your abhorrence of spiders, and


creepers."

other innocent

worms and
call

" Innocent do you

them," cried

his irritated

companion.
pose you.

"Yes; as long as they do not opTo me, who indulge a feeling of utter
all

repugnance at the sight of toads and spiders, and


that most detestable of

ugly nondescripts, a batt

to me,
strongly

say, they are like ferocious wild beasts


their

and you cannot deny but that


opposed
to

nature

is

ours.

Let

unbelievers

ex-

perience some of the phantoms of a sick man's

dream, or behold some of Dante's pictures of


ror,

ter-

and declare that (hey

are not horrible

" How, in fact, should we rightly appreciate the

forms of beauty

itself,

without detesting and won;

dering at the sight of these


stinctively as
it

so naturally

and

in-

were opposed to them ?"

16

GERMAN NOVELS.
"

Why

amaze us

?" inquired

Roderick, "

why

should the great world of water, for instance, present us with this
ideas have
terrific

character, to which your

become accustomed, why should not


and ridiculous view, so that the whole

such objects more likely appear under an odd, entertaining,

province

of
a

nature
well

should

bear

some

resem-

blance

lo

furnished

comic
farther

masquerade.
;

Your whims, however, run yet


you are inclined
ers
;

for just in

proportion as you would almost worship the rose,


to despise

and detest other flowlily

yet what has the fine yellow of


its

done, with
?

so

many

other
in

summer

sisters

Some

kind of colours,

the same way, displease you


;

some

scents,

and some sounds

yet

you make no
weakly

exertion

to rise superior to

to such

fancies,

giving

way

them
will

insomuch that

bundle of

such peculiarities

soon occupy the place which

your egotism should possess."


Emilius was highly incensed at this language,
but said not a word.

He had

already changed his

mind,
secret,

in

regard to entrusting Roderick

with

his

who, on his part, expressed no curiosity to

hear

it

a secret which

his

gloomy companion had


air.

alluded to with so very important an

He

sat

playing with his mask, in an arm-chair, in the most


careless attitude, until, as
if

suddenly recollecting

17

himself, he

jumped up, exclaiming " Oh,

Emilius,

be so good as to lend

me

your large mantle."

"

What
I

for,

Sir?" inquired the other,


in

"

hear music

the church there over the


I

way," replied Roderick, " and


slip

have already
;

let
I

the

opportunity several

evenings

to-night

am
and

well reminded,

and

can disguise this fancy

dress under your great


all
;

mantle,
it

mask and turban


I

then, as soon as

is

finished,

can go to

the ball."

The grumbling Emilius took the mantle from


his drawers, gave
it

to his friend in the act of going,

and

foi-ced

himself to a kind of ironical smile.


is

" There," said Roderick, "


tar for you,

my

Turkish scymi-

which

purchased yesterday, (covering


;

himself at the same time with his mantle)

"

it is

not good to carry so serious a weapon upon a fool's


errand,

not knowing to what purpose

it

may be
To-

misapplied, should a bit of a breeze, or any other

pleasant

adventure,

afford

an

opportunity.

morrow we
try to

two meet again, until

wheu

farewell,
for,

and

be content."

Neither waiting

nor re-

ceiving any answer, he ran

down

the steps.

Once more
his vexation

left

alone, Emilius sought to


his friend's

remove

by viewing

conduct only in a
the naked, ele-

ludicrous point of view.

He examined

gantly wrought dagger, and said, "

How

must that

18

GERMAN NOVELS.
piercing his enemy's
or ?"

man feel who is


sharp as this
object with
;

bosom with

steel

who,

still

more, wounds a beloved


it
;

it

He
;

then sheathed

softly raised

the sashes of his window, and gazed across the street.

But he saw no
house
:

light

all

was gloom

in the opposite

the lovely form which dwelt there, and was


to

accustomed, about this time,


her
little

be seen engaged in

household

affairs,
is

had some way disapthought Emi-

peared. " Perhaps she


lius,
little

at the ball !"

as

it

appeared adapted to her usual seSuddenly, however, there aplittle

cluded mode of

life.

peared a light, and the

attendant,

who

usually

appeared

along with

his

unknown

beauty,

ap-

proached the window sashes with a lamp, and drew

them up.

crevice,

however,

remained, which

admitted a view of part of the room from the spot

where Emilius stood, and where he was often

re-

joiced to stand until past midnight rooted to the

ground.

He watched

each motion of her hand,


if

every feature of his beloved, as

enchanted

and

could have stood gazing for hours, when he saw


her
sit

down, and begin to teach the

little

girl to

read, to scav, or to knit.


quiry, that the child

He had

learnt from in-

was a poor orphan, of

whom
in-

the lovely maiden had kindly taken charge,

tending to give her an education.


Emilius could not conjecture

The

friends

of

why he

inhabited this
;

narrow

street,

in

an inconvenient house

appeared

TIECK.

19

SO

little

in

any kind of society, and

in

what busiin

ness he was occupied.


solitude,

Yet he was unoccupied,


except
in

and happy

as far

as

he ac-

cused himself of an unsocial, shy disposition, for not


venturing upon a nearer intercourse with this beloved being, although she had frequently smiled

upon and greeted him when she became aware of


his notice.

He

little

dreamed

that,

on her part, she

was
she

as deeply

engaged with him.


her
felt

What
capable

wishes

cherished in
sacrifices

bosom,
herself

what

difficulties,

what
hopes

she

of

en-

countering, in order to insure the success of her

After pacing the


that

room

for

some

time, observing

the

light

along

with

the child

had disap-

peared, he suddenly resolved, in spite of his want

of inclination, to go to the ball, as


that his fair

it

struck
to

him
and
its

unknown might chance

have destyle,

viated, in this instance,

from her usual


little

was gone
vanities.

to enjoy a

of the world and

The

streets

were just lighted up;


his feet
;

the

snow crumbled under


past

the carriages rolled

him

and masks of the most opposite chaand jeered, and twitted him
as they

racter whistled

went by.

From many a house came


ear,

the detested

music bursting upon his


contrive
to

and yet he could not


path towards the
in every direc-

find

the

shortest

assembly rooms.

Crowds of persons

20

OERMAX XOVELS.
mad,

tion were rushine:, as if they were

to reach the
;

desired spot.

He approached
its

the ancient church

looked

wistfully at

old high towers, fro^vning

darkly through the dim midnight, and enjoved the dreary stillness and solitude of the deserted place. He took his station in the recess of
a large tower,

whose variety and grandeur of architecture he had


often admired, indulging his taste for ancient art, and the recollection of other times ; and here, for

some moments, he yielded hmiself up to the melancholy reflections which the scene inspired. Shortly, however, his attention was directed towards a strange figure, pacing to and fro in evident impatience and
arrival.

anxiety, as

if

expecting some one's

the light of a lamp, burning before a figure of the Virgin, he could distinguish the features ; and, in particular, the singular attire of this person. It was an old hag of the most re-

By

more remarkable, as she was seen in the act of stabbing at a scarlet


bodice, adorned with gold, in a wild manner, as if

volting appearance, and the

mad part. Her robe was of a dark hue, and the cap she had on her head, likewise sparkled with rich gems
and gold.

she were acting some

At

first

Emilius conjectured

it

to be

some

horrible kind of

mask
his

one of those which,


;

way

like himself, had missed but he was soon convinced by the clear
it

light,

that

was

really

an

old,

horrid, vellow

21

wrinkled

countenance,

and no burlesque.

Soon

there appeared two men, both wrapped

in mantles,

approaching the place cautiously and slowly; and


frequently looking round, to observe whether any

one was f'ollowirg them.

The

old

hag went

for-

ward

to

meet them.
;

" Have you lights," she inquired hastily


hoarse tone of voice.

in

" Here they are," replied one of the men.

" You

know
well."

the price,

and manage the

affair right

right

The old creature then put money


their hands,

into

one of

which he seemed

to be counting

under

his mantle.

"

trust," she added, " that

you

will find

them

cast exactly after the


their

same

art

and pattern, so that

workmanship

will

not appear."

" Don't be anxious," said the other, as he departed quickly


;

leaving his companion,

young

man, with the strange-looking creature

alone.
it

He

took her hand,

saying,

"

Is

possible,

Alexia, that such forms and ceremonies, and such

strange old sayings and irivoctions, in which

had

never the smallest


free will,

belief,

can really control our


at their

and make us love and hate

com-

mand ?"

"So
" but

it

is,"

cried the old red-mantled wretch

all

things

must

conspire

together.

Not

GERMAN NOVELS.
merely those
in the
lights,
;

dipped

in

blood, and moulded

new moon
to

not these magic forms and inother potent charms are to be the initiated well under-

vocations.

Many

added
stand."

them, which

" Insomuch
the stranger.

am

then beholden to you," said


I
;

" To-morrow, after midnight,

shall

be at your service," replied the old


will

woman

" you

not have been the

first

who has found reason


To-day, as you

to repent of

my
am

acquaintance.

have heard,

occupied for another, upon whose


art
will
if in

whole mind
powerfully."

and senses our

work very
triumph, as

She

laughed out, as
;

she pronounced these last words

and she and her

companion

then separated in different directions.

Emilius shuddering stepped from his hiding-place,

and fixed
child.

his eyes

upon the image of the Virgin and

" Before thine eyes, most chaste and holy one,"

he involuntarily exclaimed,
broken
only to
off their

" have the

evil

ones

hateful
vile

dialogue;

yet separated

pursue their

and unlawful practices


Yet,

upon the reason and

free-will of the innocent.

as thou art yet seen,

most pure and lovely one,

embracing thy tender child, so doth the power of


invisible

love

protect

us

and

in

joy

as

in

sorrow,

our heart

turns

towards

that
is

source

of

mightier strength and charity, which

never

known

23

to desert

its

orphan children.

Clouds pass over

the spire of the tower, casting their shadows across


this

rude and massy

pile.

The

eternal stars cast


to regard us with

their soft

and quiet

rays,

and seem

a tender power." Emilius then turned from the nocturnal scene,

and began

to dwell

upon the beauty of


the

his beloved.
in

He mixed
streets
;

once

more with

crowds
the

the

gradually approaching nearer

bright

and splendid ball-rooms, whence he could already


catch the sounds of voices, rolling carriages
in
;

and,

certain pauses, the


itself.

loud pealing notes of the

music

In the rooms, too, he was soon lost in the waves


of a sea of beauty and fashion flowing to and fro

of dancers, masks, and mimes, elbowing him on


sides
;

all

while

kettle-drums

and trumpets

assailed
his

his ear,

insomuch that he hardly knew whether


life

waking

were not a dream.

He pushed
;

his

way,

however,

through rows of fashionables


fair
girl

bent on

catching the eye of his own

in every face
;

he saw, with her bright brown

tresses

and that

night he longed more -than usual to behold her.

He

secretly reproached her, at the

same time,

for

mingling in such a scene, and thus rendering him


guilty of the
self,

same

folly.

" No," said he to himcould

" no

heart that truly loved

open
in

its

feelings to such emotions as here triumph

the

24

QEllMAN NOVELS.

woes they create rank jealousy, and tears, and food for blood, mixed with the ranting mockery of wild music such as drums and trumpets, fit only
:

for

murderous scenes,
of the trees
;

afford.

Away!
fall

it

is

the

murmur

the bubbling

of waters
filling

the burst of involuntary joy and song,

the

happy bosom with nature's sweetest pleasures; this is the music for love. But this this, alas,' is more akin to the bold and raving
!

tumult,

the

shouts of madness and despair."

He found not
made
his

her

whom
still

he sought, and the idea of the beloved face


search
al-

being concealed under a mask,

more anxious and unprofitable.

He had

ready traversed the hall three several times; and reviewed all the unmasked ladies whom "he found seated-all in vain. Just then, the Spaniard came

up

to him,

and said

"

It

is

amusing enough,

in-

deed, to see you here after seeking your friend."

all.

You

are, perhaps,

No

Emilius had quite forgotten him

but re-

plied in an embarrassed tone, " In fact I am surprised not to find him; for his mask is easily re-

cognised."
in what the whimsical gentleengaged, Sir? He has neither danced nor remained long in the rooms, for he found here ray friend Anderson, just arrived from the

"

Do you know

man

is

country. Their conversation turning upon literature, and the

TIECK.

25

stranger being

unacquainted with the new poem


took

which

lately

appeared, Roderick

him

aside

into another room,

where they are shut up together


zest.
;

perusing

it

with great
all

" Not at

unlikely," said Emilius

" for he

follows nothing with so

much

pleasure as his

own
him

whims.

have tried every means, and even quar-

relled with

him more than once,


life
;

to dissuade

from
his

this

extempore mode of

from

devoting

whole existence to sudden impromptus and to


;

whims

but

fear they are so thoroughly engrafted


I

in his nature, that

verily believe

he would rather

part with the best friend he has than with them.

This identical work, which has so greatly taken his


fancy, and which he every where carries about him,

he began to read to
scarcely got into
its

me

the other day.

Yet he had

beauties and

awakened some

degree of interest, when, in spite of

my

intreaties

that he would forbear, he suddenly sprang up, and

tying on a cooking apron, he said he must instantly

go and superintend the broiling of a beef-steak,

in

which he

said he could instruct the first

cook

in

Europe, although, indeed, he more frequently spoiled


than broiled the beef-steak to
protested
steak."
1

my

liking

and

wanted

to

have the poem, and not the


" Has he never been in

The Spaniard laughed.


love then ?" he inquired.

VOL. IV.

26

GERMAN NOVELS.
" Yes
in

his

more

seriously,
it
;

own way," continued Emilius, " just as if he meant to make a


in little

farce of

while he declared he was on the brink

of despair, he

was a sound man again

more
and
he

than a week."

They were here separated by the throng


Emilius proceeded in search of his friend,

whom

heard loud in argument

so loud as easily to lead

him, from some distance, into the right chamber.

" Lord
as he

is

one to believe one's own eyes ?" he cried,


It is

saw Emilius approach. "

very lucky, as

have just got to the place where


were interrupted " At present
Emilius
for
; :

so you can

sit

I left off when we down and listen."

am

not in the humour," replied


is

" and

think this

no time nor place


" we ought

such kind of entertainment."

"

Why
;

not ?"

inquired

Roderick,

not always to listen to our humours, you know,

Emilius

and every time

is

good

to

employ our-

selves in so laudable a

manner.
;

But, perhaps, you

had rather dance, Emilius


of partners, and you

the ladies are in

want

may

easily, at the

expence of

a pair of weary heels, a few hours gentle curvetting,

become a favourite with them." " Adieu, at present, skitterwit," returned


friend,

his
for

with his hand on the door.

"

am

home."
*'

word with you yet," cried Roderick, as

his

27

friend

was going

"

am

off early in the morning,

with

my companion
I

here,
call

on a few days' tour


P. P. C. before

though
out.

promise you a
if

we

set

Only

you should happen to be asleep, do

not waken yourself merely to bid


in three

me good-bye
That
is

for

days

am

with you again.

one of

the most extraordinary fellows," he continued, as

Emilius
serious

left

the
fact,

room
I

" the most miserable, dull,


is

in

cannot conjecture what

the

matter with him.


thing

He

takes no pleasure in any


to have
in

his
feel

name ought
interested

been Kill-joy.

He

must
pathy

only

what he conceives

noble, grand,

magnanimous, with a dash of symcomedy.

and the lachrymose, which he more espe-

cially looks for in a

Were he
in

at a puppet-

show which did not chime


pretensions,
airs,
it

with his ridiculous

he would assume the most tragical


of the whole world, asserting that

and

fall foul

contained nothing but what was crude, rude, and

ridiculous.

Under the humourous masks of old


and

Pantaloon and Punchinello, he expects to find the

most preposterous

fine feelings

lofty impulses

and

will

have Harlequin to philosophise with him


all

upon the emptiness of


and he turns

things.

Then, on finding

himself disappointed, the tears start into his eyes,


his

back upon the motley good-hu-

moured personages with an expression of anger and


contempt."

28

GERMAN NOVELS.
"
Is

he melancholy, too

?"

inquired Roderick's

companion.
"

No! not

downri<j^ht

melancholy

by

his over-indulgent parents


is

only spoiled and then by himself.


feel

He
tide

accustomed

to think

and think, and

and

feel,
;

with the due return and precision of ebb and

and when such thought or emotion did not

return just as he expected, he shouted a miracle,

and offered a premium

for the physical inquiry

and
the

discovery of so strange a phenomenon.


best fellow under the sun
;

He
;

is

but

all

attempts to re-

move

his rooted perversity


to

go

for

nothing

and

if I

would not wish


of him,
I

be insulted for
it."

my

good opinion

must warrant

"

He

is,

perhaps, in want of a physician ?" said

the other.

" But

it is

one of his peculiarities," replied Ro-

derick, " to hold medicine in utter contempt.

He

opines that disease assumes an individual character


in

each respective subject, and

is

not to be treated

according to general symptoms or established theories.

He has more faith

in

sympathetic influences and

the cures of old

women. In the same way he despises in other respects every thing we call order, moderation and frugality. From childhood his favourite
chief aim to unite, as far
as possible, such ideal
all

idea has been that of some noble character, and his

excellence in himself with a lofty contempt of

TIFXK.

29

things , more particularly of money.

Thus,

in

order

to avoid the least suspicion of being economical,

he

purposely

dissipates

it

as fast as

he can

so as to

contrive, in spite of an

immense income,
all

to

remain

always poor

and

is

the ready tool of

those

who

choose to take advantage of


nimity to which he
is

this species of

magna-

become
blem of

his friend,
all

much attached. How to and how to serve him, is the proso


;

problems
little

for

you have only most of

to

cough
to pick

to eat with too

dignity, or,

all,

your teeth, "


"

in order to offend

him mortally."
replied

Was

he never

in

love?" inquired the stranger.


love ?"
all

Whom
to

should he
as

Roderick,

" despising

he does

the daughters of Eve.


fair

Were he

detect his
or
in

ideal

in

fashionsight

able dress,

the
;

act of dancing, the

would break
the
spot
if

his heart

perhaps he might die on

she

were so unlucky as to catch a

cold."

Meanwhile, Emilius had mixed

in

the crowd,

when he suddenly
so often surprised

felt

himself attacked by that

wild and strange feeling pf anxiety and alarm which

him amidst a vast human throng,

and seemed

to pursue
his

him

as he fled from the as-

sembly towards
serted
streets

own house.

He paced
to

the dehis

with an eager desire

reach

chamber, and throwing himself into a chair,


first

for the

time that evenmg

felt

some

relief.

His lamp

so

GERMAN NOVELS.
he bade his servant rein a

was already extinguished


tire to rest,

and seating himself

musing posture,

he began to ruminate upon the impressions made

upon him by the


seen and heard.

ball

upon
:

all

he had that night

Wearied

at length with

thought, he went and

looked out of his window


bright vision in the
ever.

and there he beheld the

chamber opposite

lovely

as

Her dark brown


neck, and

tresses streaming over her


in

white
folds.

playing

a thousand

wanton

She was
in

in

a loose undress, and appeared

engaged
A'ious

some

little

domestic arrangements pre-

to retiring to rest.
in

He

observed her place

two lighted tapers

two corners of the room


retire.

spread a white cloth over the table, and then

Emilius

now
;

yielded himself

up

to the

most

flatter-

ing dreams

the image of his beloved

still

stood

arrayed in

all

her charms before his fancy,

when,
The

to his utter dismay, he beheld the frightful old red-

hooded woman step quickly


bright gold shone quite

into the

room.

terrific

from her large hag-

gard face and bosom, and cast a red glow, glaring


still

redder with the light, upon the wall.


!

He
it

turn-

ed away his eyes


gone.
illusion

he

looked again, and she was


?

Was

he to believe his senses

Was
?

some

of the night, which his

own heated and

alarmed imagination had conjured up


"

Oh

no," he cried, " she

is

coming back more

31

horrible
grizly,

than before
greyish-black

1"

for hair,

she had unlocked her

which hung
;

in

disor-

der over her back and breast


girl followed, pale

while

the lovely

and

disfigured, her beauteous bo-

som bare

her whole form most resembling a mar-

ble statue.
child,

Between them stood the pretty


to the

little

which crept weeping close

young wo-

man, whose eyes were turned another way.


the timid creature stretched forth
its

But

hands, and

caressed the lovely maiden's neck and cheeks, as


if

exhorting her protection against that fearful old

woman.
in its hair

But
;

in vain

her bony hand was already

in

her other, she held a silver basin

and then murmuring some horrid words, she plunged


a knife into
its

throat.

Next there appeared


;

to rise

something out of the place behind them


however, appeared to notice then
as
it
;

neither,

for

both seemed
himself.
It

much
up

terrified

as

Emilius

wound

itself

in

a spiral form, higher and higher,


light,

amid the gloomy

and now appeared

like

huge dragon, which crawled towards the dead body


lying,
still

throbbing,

in-

the old woman's arms


;

it

sucked the red-flowing blood from the wound


then fixed
its

and

dark-green sparkling eye upon that of

Emilius, through the open crevice which betrayed


this terrific scene.

That look suddenly shot through


;

the frame, the brain and heart of Emilius


fell

and he

senseless

upon the ground.

32

C.

ERMAN

.VOVELS.

In this state he was found by Roderick several

hours afterwards, on his return.

Time
and
in

flew.

It

was a beautiful summer morning


looking and chat-

the umbrageous shade of a pleasant garden,


gay, bridal party,

sat a bright,

tering pleasantly.

Abundance of healths were drunk


handsome young couple,

to the happiness of the

though neither were yet present.


still

The
toilet,

bride

was

busied with her maids at the

while her

lover

was taking a upon

delightful

walk,

meditating,

doubtless,

his exceeding

good fortune, now

drawing rapidly nigh.

"

'Tis really a pity," cried


:

Anderson, " that we

have no music

the

ladies are sadly out of tune,

for they never felt so irresistibly


in all their lives,

inclined to dance
not,

because they must

as this

very day. But, you know, music would be the death

of him."

cer,

" Yet I can inform you." returned a young offi" that we shall, nevertheless, have a ball a right
;

mad and
ness
;

riotous one too.

Every thing

is

in readi-

the musicians have secretly arrived, and taken


safe

up a

and

invisible position.
;

Roderick has con-

ducted the whole proceedings

though he says we
with,

must none of us
to pass

offer to interfere

much

less

any remarks upon


his
I

his friend to-day,

what-

ever

may be

odd humour.

He

is

more kind and

reasonable,

think, than he was," said the officer.

38

" and on
marriage

that account,

think too, the chang;e of

places will not prove disagreeable.


is

Yet

this

sudden

somewhat against
is

one's expectations."

"There

only one opinion upon that.


life,"

The
is

tenor of his whole

continued Anderson, "


I

as

singular as his character.

believe

you are

all

ac-

quainted with his journey, last autumn, to


city.

visit

our

He
no

spent the winter here, like an anchorite,


;

secluded in his chamber the whole time


into
sort of

entering
as going

amusements, not so

much

to the theatre.
friend

He

very nearly quarrelled with his

Roderick, for trying to amuse him, and not

being as miserable as himself.

His

irritability

and

eccentricity was, doubtless, for the

most

part, dis-

ease

for, if

you

will recollect,

he was seized with

a horrid nervous

fever,

which had nearly carried


at least four
itself to

him

off,

and hung upon him

months.
rest,

When

his imagination had raged

he

came to himself, but could recal nothing but his


earlier years of

childhood

his

memory,

as to

what
his

had happened during


illness,

his journey,

and during

having totally failed him.


;

He

did not even

know
until,

his former friends

and

it

was long before


;

Roderick himself could revive their acquaintance

by degrees, traces of past occurrences began

to cast

some dim glimmerings over

his

mind.

His
in

uncle had kindly taken him under his

own

roof,

order to attend personally to his wants, and treated

c 5

M
him every way
went

GTRMAX
like his

xovr.i.s.

own
air,

child.

When

he

first

to breathe the

open

on a mild spring day,


little dis-

in the

park, he saw a

young lady seated a

tance from him, apparently absorbed in thought.

She looked up, and her eyes met

his

at the

same

moment,
stopped.

as if seized

by an

irresistible

impulse, he

He approached

her,

and taking both her


tears.
;

hands
friends

in his,

he burst into a flood of

His
but

became again anxious

for his reason

henceforth, he grew calmer, more cheerful and


sociable.

more

He

soon announced himself to the parents


in

of the lady, a request

and requested her hand

marriage
felt

which was complied with.


to enjoy

He now

happy

seemed

new

life,

and daily became

stronger and

more

cheerful.

About a week ago he

arrived here, on a visit to

me
;

the country round

appeared
give
I

much

to his taste
I

and, in fact, he would


sell

me

no rest until
easily

agreed to

him the

estate.
it

might

have turned his predilection


;

for

to

good account

for

whatever he sets his heart upon,


all risks.

he will purchase at

So we agreed, and he up
his

instantly determined
for the

upon

taking*

abode here

summer

and here we are

all

assembled at

my

old residence, to celebrate our friend's nuptials."

This

country seat was

on a large
one side
;

scale,

and

very pleasantly situated.

On

it

overlooked

a river, with hills in the distance

it

was surround-

ed with fine plantations, and a garden, well stocked

TIF.CK.

35

with the sweetest plants and flowers, in the centre.

The orange and

the citron shed their rich odours in

the spacious hall.

The range of rooms was noble

and elegant, with only small side-doors, which led


to the

household establishment, well supplied with

eating-rooms, cellars, &c.

On

the other side opened

a rich prospect of lawns and meadows, extending


into a large park
;

while to each long and stately

wing of the

edifice,

was attached a large open court,


pillars, rose

whence, from three rows of marble

num-

bers of broad, lofty steps, leading into the respective


halls

and chambers

which gave a very imposing,


air to

as well as novel
fice
:

and pleasing

the whole edifigures,

for

on

this side

were seen a number of

as

you entered the porches, engaged

in a variety

of

occupations, extending

through the lofty I'ooms

while between the halls and the

way

to the respective

chambers, you met with others of every description,


proceeding to and fro along the passages and noble
corridors at pleasure.

Of

these,
;

some

parties

were

engaged at

tea, others

at play

while beyond the

whole of these spacious apartments, rose the aspect


of a theatre, round which numbers of guests were
lingering, in anticipation of the novel

and charming

entertainments in store for them.

The whole party of young people


proached them along the garden.

rose with an air

of respect, as the lovely bride, richly adorned, ap-

She was dressed

36

GERMAN NOVELS.
sparkling ornaments
still

in violet-coloured velvet, with

round her snow-white neck

while

more costly
full,

gold was thrown into stronger relief by her

white, heaving bosom. Her dark auburn tresses were

bound with a myrtle crown, mixed with other flowers,


which seemed
to gather fresh beauty
air

from her looks.


all

With a charming
the young

she greeted
in

her guests

men

standing

astonishment at her
flowin

surpassing loveliness.
ers in the garden, with

She had been gathering

which she was returning,

order to inspect the progress of the approaching

entertainments.
galleries
;

The

tables were spread in the long

their rich

covers of a dazzling white


crystals,

their bright silver


filled
lull

and glowing

and

vessels

with

all

kinds of odoriferous flowers, seemed to

the senses in a dream of delight.

The

ceilings

were overhung with garlands of the choicest greens

and

flowers, resembling

one grand bower, the charm

of which was not to be described, as the blooming


bride entered the gallery, winding her
a Paradise of love

way through

and

flowers.

She was seen to


and then

proceed through the opposite doors, visiting the

whole arrangements

in the

adjacent halls

mounting into the


steps into her

corridor, she

went up the marble

own chamber.
!"

" By Heavens

cried Anderson, " there goes the


I

most charming and exquisite creature,


have ever seen.
indeed."

think,

Our

friend

is

a very happy fellow,

37

" Yes, and

think," said the officer, " that her


all

paleness heightens

her charms.

How

her dark

hazel eyes lighten over her cheeks, and fronn under

her dark tresses, giving her face so fine a relief

and then that moist warm redness of her


is

ripe lips

surely something

more than mortal

she has

quite an irresistible, almost a magic air about her

something enchanting one cannot describe." "


It
is

that look of calm tender melancholy,"

replied Anderson, "

which seems

to invest her with

more dignity."

The bridegroom now approached, and


ed for his friend Roderick,

inquir-

who had been missing


him.
"

some time, and no one coidd conjecture where he


was.

They

all

went

in search of

He

is

in

the hall below," said

young man whom they

met, " busily engaged with some of the domestics,

showing them some new


proceeded to the
domestic oracle,
magical
spot,

tricks

at

cards.

They

and surprized the great


with his
of

who proceeded, however,


to

evolutions,

the

astonishment

the

whole admiring household. "

When

he at length con-

cluded, he agreed to go with his friends into the

garden, observing,
the rascal's faith
;

only do this to strengthen


I

for the art

have displayed

will

make some
jockies,

impression

upon these free-thinking

and tend
I

to their conversion."

" So

find," said the bridegroom, " that in ad-

38

GERMAN NOVELS.
to

dition

his

other

talents,

my

friend

does not
it

despise the fame of a charlatan,

odd as

may

appear."

" Yes, we live in wonderful times," rejoined the other; " one ought, in fact, to despise nothing now,
for

we

never

know how soon

it

may

prove useful

to us."

When

Roderick and his friend were at

last left

to themselves, the latter turned

mto a shady walk,


I
!

observing, "

How

strange that
this

should

feel so

low

and odd on such a day as

Yet

assure you,

Roderick, of a truth, whatever you


that
vast
it is

may

think,

quite too

much

for

me

to mingle in this

throngto
to

notice each and all of

my

guests
rela-

to omit not a single


tives
;

one of

my

old and

new

pay respect to the old people, compliment

to the ladies,

welcome the coming, speed the going,


for

and despatch messengers


directions."

every thing

in

all

"
itself;

Oh

!"

replied Roderick, " all this


is

is

done of

your household
;

right well stocked


all

and

well ordered

your house-steward keeps

hands

and
in

all

legs in exercise,
to reach

and every thing proceeds


all

way

the consummation of

good
:

cheer, without confusion of dishes or of guests

the whole hostship will go off with an air and a

grace

depend upon your old steward and your


for that."

young bride

TIECK.

39

"

was walking

this

morning," said Emilius,


I

" before sun-rise in the woods;


deeply

felt

keenly and

how decided a
I

step

had taken

how
in

this

new connexion had given me a vocation and a


home.
I

at last

approached near yonder bower


it

heard voices

was

my

beloved
'

girl's

confi-

dential dialogue with

some one.
'

Has
I

it

not hapit

pened,'

said

the

stranger,

just as

foretold

would

You have your


I I

wish,

and therefore
to

rest

content.'

did

not

venture

disturb

them,
next

though

approached nearer to
gone.

listen
I

the
!"

moment they were both


Roderick
loved
said,

Yet

keep thinking

what could be the meaning of those words


" Perhaps she

may have

long
so

you

without your knowledge

you

are

much the happier." One of the latest


song,
as
if

nightingales here began

its

inviting

the

young

bridegroom to

thoughts of rapture and approaching night.


lius

Emi-

grew more

serious.

"

Come

with me," cried


I

his friend, " into the


will

neighbouring village, and


up.

soon

make you cheer


;

There you shall see

a bridal pair

for

you must not imagine you are

the only happy fellow on earth this blessed day.

A young
and
is

page has

fallen into the snares of

an ugly

elderly sort of soi-disante maid,

who

first

seduced

now going

to

marry the young simpleton.

Both by

this time are

decked out

for sacrifice

we

40

GERMAX NOVELS.
must have a peep
at

really

them

it

will

be truly

an edifying sight."

The
his

serious bridegroom
friend,

was prevailed upon by


to the little

amusing

and they hastened

cottage.

The

rural procession

was just then prefool

paring to go to church.

The young

was dressed
pair of
for

in his ordinary day's frock

only sporting a

leather gaiters

which he had newly brushed

the occasion.

His features were of the simple cast,

and he looked rather out of place. had a


fine

The

bride

sun-burnt skin

she bore few traces of

her younger days, looked coarse and poor, though


withal neatly
ribbands,
mill
built
sails

arrayed.

She wore red and blue


for wear,
;

somewhat worse

which flew which


fat

like

round her head dress

last

was

up

stiff

and high, by means of

and flower

and kitchen skewers, which rose

like threatening

horns for her unlucky help-mate out of her fore-

head

while a grand garland crowned the tower of

paste upon her head.

She laughed and looked very


;

frolicsome, as those do that win

yet withal was


relatives fol-

little
:

pale and abashed.


his father,
still

The

old

lowed

court page, whose hat

and coat bore

sufficient witness to his poverty.

miserably attired musician brought up the wake of


this miserable
fiddle,

show, scraping upon his wretched


he added, gratis, as wretched a

to

which

voice.

His instrument was half parchment, half

41

wood

and, instead of strings, enforced the harmony

derived from three pieces of packthread.

The

pro-

cession halted, at the sight of the gracious gentle-

man's approach.
rustics,

There was a party of bold young


satirical

amusing themselves with

touches
;

and
in

rural jokes at the

expense of the wedded pair


in particular, as

which the young pages,

more
he

ingenious and accomplished, bore a shining part.

Emilius almost shuddered

and turned away

looked at Roderick,
escape.

who was
varlet,

already making his

An impudent

bent upon displaying

his wit, call out to Emilius,

" Well, good gentleman, and what say you to


this

flaming

bridal

pair

The poor rogues


Sir,

are

somewhat dashed
to-morrow
;

at the idea of

wanting a dinner

but they have mettle.

and they are

going to give us a grand ball to-night


first
'^

all in

the

style."

No'bread?" cried Emilius; "

is it

so indeed?"

" Oh," said another, " every body knows their


poverty
thing,
is all
;

but the rogue says, that

life

is

a good

though he got nothing.


in
;

Oh,

yes, truly, love

all.

The ragamuffin has no bed


is

to lie

upon

but what of that? there


pair have

straw

and the
to

happy

begged enough of strong liquor

drown

their cares."

The whole

rustic

audience laughed
it

aloud at
cast

this sally, while the unlucky objects of

down

their eyes, evidently

much

hurt and abashed.

42

GERMAN NOVELS.
Emilius
thrust
it,"

the
cried,

unfeeling

jester

aside

" Here, take

he

and gave the bridegroom


into his

some hundred ducats, which he had put


pocket that morning.
people at sight of

The

bridal pair

and the old But

this, cried

out and wept aloud,


feet.

throwing themselves at their benefactor's


Emilius wished to get away.

" There," he cried, " keep want at a distance as


long as you can."

"
Sir,"

Oh

for ever, for ever,


all

my

good, most gracious

echoed

the relations at a time.

Emilius hardly knew

how he had

escaped,

but he was once more alone, and bent his steps to-

wards the wood.

He

sought out one of his most

secluded spots, and threw himself upon a green


hillock, while

he there gave
life,"

free course to his tears,


in painful will

" Yes
I

abhor

he cried

emotion.
try
!

cannot be happy and content


!

no longer

Receive me,
soft

that

Oh my mother earth, receive me in thy cool arms protect me from the wild beasts dog my footsteps protect me from mankind.
;

God

in

Heaven," he exclaimed, " how have


lie

de-

served to array myself in silk, and

upon down

that the grape should pour


all

its

richest juice

that
is

around should
to

vie, as it

were, in offering

homage
his

and respect

me

Why,
I,

that poor wretch

nobler and better than


nurse, and scorn

though misery be

and

bitter

mockery

his only por-

4S

tion,

feel

each precious morsel, and each lus-

cious glass at table, like the commission of


sin
;

some
soft

reposing on a

downy couch, and wearing

apparel and ornaments of

fine gold, while thou-

sands and millions of naked, hungry, and thirsting

wretches are

driven

at

the

world's frown

poor

outcasts from house to house.

Oh

yet,

promise

you, ye long tried, long suffering, insulted brother-

hood of misfortune

stretched
my
full

upon your couch of

straw, with a sack round your loins for raiment


I

would rather encounter your privations and your


to

wanderings,
feast at

expiate

indulging
rich,

sins,

than

the tables of the

whose profusion
joy

might
peace."

afford

you

all

competence,

and

The poor enthusiast saw every thing


him, as
in

float before

a dream

he resolved the

to unite his fate

with the unfortunate, and abandon his more happy

companions

for ever.

The party had been long


bride

expecting him in the hall


anxious

was become
At length,

and

her relations were in search of him

throughout the gardens and the park.


however, the mourner returned,
for the

more composed

very tears he had shed, and the splendid

entertainments were begun.

The party proceeded


the
table
galleries,

from the
to take

halls

below into

their places for the feast.

The

bride and

bridegroom led the way, at the head of a grand

44

GERMAN NOVELS.
among whom Roderick had
given his
lady.

procession

arm

to a very lively

and conversable young

"

What

can be the reason," she inquired, " of


?

the bride's sad looks

the tears started into her

eyes as she

came

into the gallery with Emilius."


is

" Because," replied Roderick, " she

at this

moment about
during
life."
all

to enter

upon the most important

and mysterious change, perhaps, that can occur " Yet of


fair

brides

ever saw," continued his

companion, " she surpasses them in solemnity


looks particularly
will observe,

she

pale

and melancholy

if

you

she never really laughs, nor even

smiles."

" This confers so much the more honour upon


her heart and feelings, as
it is

opposed

to her usual

custom.

You

are not acquainted, perhaps,

lady,

with her previous conduct.

Some

years since, she


in

took

charge of a

little

orphan

girl,

order to
to this

educate her.

She devoted her whole time


in

tender task, finding her sole reward


charge's improvement

her young
to

and

attachment

her.

When

about seven years of age, she had the mis-

fortune to lose this adopted child as she was one

day walking through the


all

city

and notwithstanding
her

her exertions to recover

all

the rewards

held out, she was no more heard

of.

This accident

preyed so

much upon

the lovely creature's mind.

TIECK.

45

that

she

has
;

never

since

recovered

her

usual
of

cheerfuhiess

and even yet sighs for the loss


playfellow."

her pretty

little

"

It

is
;

truly very interesting," said

Roderick's

companion
romantic;

"

it

may

give rise to something very


either
for

an

excellent foundation,

poem or a romance." The company now arranged


the
bride
places,

itself at

the tables

and bridegroom occupying the middle


lovely prospect
in

commanding a view of the


Mirth
toasts were drunk,

without.

and good cheer went hand

hand

and

all

were soon

in

high

good humour

more

especially the relations of the


still

young

bride.

The bridegroom alone appeared


and partaking of
little
;

reserved, saying

and even

starting as he heard the voice of music burst


his ear.

upon

Yet he soon recovered his presence of


softer notes of a distant

mind with the


and the

horn from

beyond the gardens, which resounded among the


trees,

far off

mountains beyond the park.

Roderick had himself stationed the musicians in


the rooms over their head, and his friend expressed

himself satisfied

with

the arrangement.

Towards
his

the close of the banquet, Emilius

summoned

house-steward, and turning to his bride, said, " Suppose,

my

beloved,

we

share

some portion of our

superfluity

with

the

hungry and the destitute."

He

then gave orders for a quantity of provisions.

46

GERMAN NOVELS.
fruit,

wine and

to

be sent to the unlucky pair he


seen, in order that they

had that morning


celebrate
their

might

intended feast, and have occasion

to hail the return of their marriage-day with a feel-

ing of pleasure.

"

Now

see,

my

friend," cried Roderick, "

how
That

happily things are connected in this world.

very frivolity and folly which you so often charge

me

with, has given rise to this

same charitable

embassy."

Many
host's

present were desirous of criticising their


this

prudence and misplaced confidence on

occasion, while the bride

was about

to say

some-

thing noble and sentimental in his favour.

" For Heaven's sake, be quiet," cried Emilius, in


a scornful tone
it is
:

"

it is

nothing worth mentioning


;

nothing good, nothing bad


If the birds

nothing

in

the

whole proceeding.

around us are per-

mitted to pick up the crumbs thrown from the win-

dows, and carry them to their young, surely there

can be no harm
creature to glean
fluity.

in

allowing

a wretched

fellow-

some portion of the same superridicule

Were

to venture to follow the dictates of

my own

heart,

you would

all

me, as you

would any other people, who were


selves in a desert, in order to

to seclude

them-

experience nothing

more of the world and


All were silent,

its

generosity."

and

in the

sparkling eye of his

TIKCK.

47

friend,

Roderick detected the utmost displeasure

and disdain.
feelings

He

sought,

therefore, to
;

calm

his

by turning
in

to other topics

though without

succeeding
ness

withdrawing Emilius from his uneasiHis looks were often di-

and abstraction.

rected towards the gallery above, where some of the

domestics

who occupied

the highest floors were en-

gaged
ved,

in various occupations.

At length he obser"

after a

long pause, to his bride,

Who

can

that peevish old

woman

be,

making
I

herself so very
in the

busy coming and going


cloak ?"

her

mean

grey

"

Oh

!"

replied the bride,


is

" she belongs to

my
in

household, and
the younger
different

doubtless keeping an eye upon

domestics and

maidens engaged

employments."

" But how can you bear such a disagreeable


looking old creature in your service so near your

person ?" replied Emilius.

"

Oh

let

her wear her ugly looks as long as she

lives," replied the

young

bride, " provided she


is

can

be useful to us

for she

so active

and honest."

The guests now


happiness.

rose from

table

surrounding
much
:

the lovely pair, and offering up fresh wishes for


their

They then

pressed, with

ardour, to be permitted to hold the ball

the bride

even threw her


ing said,

fair

arms around him, and beseechbeloved will not refuse

" Surely my

me

48

GERMAN NOVELS.
which we have
I

this simple boon,

all

along anticiI

pated

it

is

so long since
:

danced

and

think

you never saw me dance


see

have you no

curiosity to

how
"
I

can acquit myself ?"


I

think

never saw you so merry, lady


I

and

Heaven

forbid that

should mar your enjoyment.

No

do as you please
to

and

permit me.

have

no desire

render myself voluntarily ridiculous


feet

by bounding and curvetting and linking


hands."
"

and

Why

if

you are a bad dancer," she


it,

replied,

laughing, " depend upon


troubling you."

nobody
this,

will

think of

Having

said

the bride left

him

to attend to her toilet

and make preparations


retired, as well as

for the ball.

When

Emilius, too,

had

many

of the ladies, to attend to their ball dresses, and

summon their maids, Roderick invited the young men to accompany him to his apartment. " It will
soon be evening," he said
twilight
;

" certes,

it

is

already
let

and we are none of us dressed. Quick,


!

us despatch

for to-night

we

will,

once

in

our

lives,
list.

be as smart, as jovial, and

as

mad

as

we

Whatever takes you


lows,

into the head,


restraint

my

pretty fel-

that
I.

do

without

the

worse

the

better, say

The more extravagant your whims,


I

the more will

commend you
so ugly

for

your

folly.

There

be

no hunch-backs

no

goblin,

and no

49

lask, with no disguises

and conceits so villanous


so wonderful an

that shall not be practised and paraded this blessed


night.

marriage, gentlemen,

is

occurrence

the

parties find themselves so suddenly

metamorphosed, when the yoke with Cupid's speed


is

suddenly thrown

round

their

necks

that
affairs
;

we

cannot render such a


strange, in order

festival as this too

absurd and
the sudden
so
lull

somewhat

to excuse
pair's

revolution in the
that,

young wedded

being
in

still

madder than they, we may

them

a soft elysian dream, and withdraw their


their
all

minds from the consequences of


showing ourselves at open war with

folly,

by

moderation

and common
work
you

sense."

" Be at peace," cried Anderson,


;

"

let

us to

shall find

no reason to complain.

We

have brought with us a huge parcel of masks, and


all

kind of mad, motley dresses, such as will excite


I

your admiration,

think."
I

" But

first

behold," cried Roderick, " what

have purchased from


point of cutting
it

my

tailor,

who was just on


Yes,
I

the
in

up

into lappets.

was

time to redeem this dress, which he received from


the hands of an old god-mother, who, doubtless,

had

it

from the shop of Lucifer, fashioned some-

where on the Blocksberg by Galla.


all

Survey with

your eyes, this scarlet red apron, fringed with

golden lace,

and

this

gold-studded cap

which

VOL. IV.

50

GERMAN NOVELS.
Add
which
to
to

shall ever continue to revere.

which

this

green

silk

gown,

Avith saffron

embroidery, and this


I

terrific

mask

arrayed

in

all

propose, in

the shape of an old

woman,

guide the whole

troop of caricatures into the bridal chamber.


all

Make
due

despatch you can, and we will then proceed to

escort the

young bride

to the ball-room, with all

pomp and circumstance

of fun."
;

The musical horns were yet playing


v/ere

part of the part

company wandered about the gardens, and


seated in the house.

The sun had

just set

behind a mass

of dark clouds, the prospect lay

half visible in the grey twilight;

when suddenly,
around, but
its

from out the gathered clouds, there shot a bright

beam, which

streaked

the

prospect
edifice,

more especially the whole

with

walks,

and marble

pillars,

and flowery ornaments, as with

sti'eaks of red blood.

The

relations of the bride,

and the

rest

of the

spectators on the spot, witnessed this very singular

sight as

it

hovered over the corridor above.


his procession of

Then
gobwith

came Roderick, heading


mittles,

masks and
fierce

huge monsters of wig and gown,


female

lins,

Punchinellos, and wild

figures,

long tresses and sweeping garments, along with the

most
as old

terrific

figures,

that

of

Roderick himself,

red riding-hood, a frightful old

woman

be-

ing

none of

the

least

and

almost

resembling

TIECK.

51

some pliantasma,
spread

or

hideous hooting

dream.

Soon they
about,

themselves,

and
in

leaping

starting from doors


faces,

and passages

the domestics'

and again vanishing from

sight.

few of
their
;

the spectators

had just

sufficiently recovered

surprize to enter into the joke, and laughed aloud

when suddenly
in

there burst a real fearful cry from

the inmost chambers

and there
;

rushed forth, seen

the red glaring light of dying evening, the pale

distracted bride in short white garments, all

em-

broidered with flowers

her beautiful bosom bare,


in
air.

and her

tresses

sweeping loose

Next, like

one in raging passion, with rolling eyes, and his


features
sternly
fixed,

came
in

Emilius,

with

the

naked Turkish dagger

his

hand, pursuing her

across the gallery, where, in her terror


sion she found
side.

and confu-

no

outlet,

and flew to the opposite


it,

Just as she reached


;

and could go no

far-

ther he overtook her

before the grey old


spot.

woman
Avhite

and the masks could reach the


by the
hair,

Seizing her

he pierced her bosom and her

neck, through and through, and her blood flowed


rapidly,

seen

in

that

same red

light of evening

that shone so portentous just before.

had by

this time
;

The old hag wound her arms round him, to tear


her
fiercely,

him back

struggling with

he came

nigher and nigher, and suddenly slipt over the lofty


banisters several stories high,

and both

fell

together

52

GERMAN NOVELS.
down
at the very feet of the rela-

with horrid crash,

tions of the bride,

who had

witnessed the bloody


to

spectacle.

They were nearly dashed


Above and below, through
the

atoms in

the

fall.

hall

and court

and

corridor, were seen the horrid features of ghosts


in

and goblins,

shape of

masks

who

ran

howling and weeping over the


like

terrific

catastrophe,

deemons just loosened from

their

dark abode.

Roderick took his dying friend in his arms.

He had
sight of

found him

in

his bride's

chamber playing
;

with the dagger.

She was nearly dressed

but the

the hateful red cloak

had kindled the


the recollection
Instant he

bridegroom's

fancy afresh

and

of that fatal night again occvirred.

threw himself upon the trembling bride, who esca-

ped from

his grasp, in order to

avenge the murder


for her hateful

he had seen, and punish her


diabolical arts.

and

The

old

hag likewise confessed the


;

murder before she expired

and a whole house of


of mourning, tears,

joy was turned into a scene

and

terror.

TIECK.

53

THE FAITHFUL ECKART


AND THE

TANNENHUSER.

PART L
That
Felt

noble Duke the great Of Burgundy's proud land,


all

his foemen's hate,


bit

And, vanquish'd,

the sand.

He

spoke

"

'm struck
valour
at

I bleed

Where
Friends

is

my
me

fled ?

fail

my

need.

My knights
*'

are flown or dead:

I I

cannot hold the


faint
!

field,

31 y strength,

my

pride,

Has left me here to yield True Eckart 's from my

side.

"'It

was not thus of old. war raged fierce and strong The last to have it told.

When
He

loved his

home

too long.

*'

Now,
's

see they trooping

Not long
Flight
I
'11

my

sword
for

made

come mine the base groom


is
:

die as died

my

line.


;;

54

GERMAN NOVELS.
With
that he raised his sword.

And would
When,

have smote his breast

truer than his word,

(rood Eckart fom'ard prest

Back spurn'd the vaunting

foe.

And
To

dash'd into the throng


his bold son slow,

Nor was

bring his knights along.

The bold Duke saw the sign. And cried, " Now God be praised

Now

tremble foemen mine,


raised !"

My drooping hopes be

Again he charged and cheer'd, True Eckart wins the fight " But where 's his boy ?" he heard No more he sees the light."
*'

;-

When now

the foe was fled. Out spoke the Duke aloud " Well hath it with me sped.

Yet Eckart's head

is

bow'd.

" Though many thou hast For country and for life

slain,
;

Thy son lies on the plain. No more to join the strife."


Then
Eckart's tears flow'd
stoop'd the warrior
fast,

Low

down

Embraced and kiss'd his last, And sadly made his moan.

TIECK.

" Sweet Heins, how died'st so young Ere yet thou wert a man What boots it that I 'm strong,

And

thou so

still

and wan

" Yet thou hast saved thy prince,

From his dread foeman's scorn Thou art his accept him, since

He

never will return !"

Bold Burgundy then mourn 'd

To

see a father's grief

His heart within him burn'd,

But could not bring

relief.

He

mingles tears with tears


clasps

He

him

to his breast

The hero he

reveres,
:

And
" Most

speaks his deep distress

faithful hast
fail'd

thou been.
all

When

me

beside

Henceforth we

will

be seen,

Like brothers,

side

by

side.

" Throughout

all

Burgundy,
;

Be

lord of

me and mine
make
it

And

could more honour be,


thine."

I 'd freely

He

journey'd through the land,

Each liege-man hail'd him home To each he gave command, True Eckart to welcome.

56

GERMAN NOVELS.
Years elapsed

It

was the voice of


resound-

an old mountaineer that sung


ing far

this song,

among

the rocks, where the faithful Eckart


declivity,

was

sitting

upon a

weeping aloud.
said,
?
*'

His

youngest boy stood near his father, and

do you cry so

bitterly,

my

dear father

Why Why are


if ?"

you so much better and stronger than other men, you are
afraid

can you be afraid of them

Meanwhile the Duke, at the head of a huntingparty,

was

leisurely proceeding

homewards
and
;

Bur-

gundy himself was mounted upon a


caparisoned steed.

stately, richly
silver

His princely gold

trappings sparkled in the evening sun


that the

insomuch
admire

young Conrad could not


it

sufficiently

the fine procession as


raised his eyes,

passed.

Faithful Eckart

and looked darkly and sorrowfully


;

towards the place

while his tender Conrad again


lost
:

began to

sing, as he

sight of the

princely

cavalcade in the distance


"

If you 'd wield Sword and shield,

And And

have good steed


spear at need
;

With

harquebuss

what must yoa do


like steel.
spirit;

You must

feel

Your nerves

Strong in heart and

IManhood good
In your blood

To

bear vou stoutlv throne:h with merit."

57

The

old warrior pressed his son to his heart

and

looked earnestly at his large clear blue eyes.

He

then said, " Did you hear the song of the good
mountaineer,
" Did
I

my

boy

?"

?" repeated

the boy

*'
:

surely

he sang
?"

loud enough.

And
I

are you, then,

still

that faithful

Eckart
''

whom

was glad to hear so praised


is

That same Duke

now my enemy
:

he has
my
se-

forgotten the battle in the song

he holds

cond son
low,
if I

in

durance,

yea, hath already laid

him

must believe

all

that the people

of the

country say."
" Then take your great sword, father, and bear
it

no longer," exclaimed

his brave

boy

" they

will

tremble

when they

see

you

the good people will


for they say

uphold you the country round,


their greatest hero."

you are

" No,

must not do

that,

my

boy, for then


I

should prove

my

enemies' worst words true.

must
not
to

not be unfaithful to

my

native Prince.

I will

break

my

fealty
I

and the peace of the country,

keep which

have sworn."
in-

" But what does he want to do with us ?"


quired Conrad impatiently.

Eckart had

risen,

but he again seated himself,

and

said,

" Dear boy, the whole of that history


in

would sound too harsh and strange


ears.

thy young

Enough

to

know

that great people always

D 5

58

OKRMAV XOVELS.
own
heart,

bear their worst enemy in their


live in fear

and

night and day.

The Duke now thinks


;

he has trusted

me
me

too

much

and been

all

along
in

only cherishing a viper in his bosom.

Yet

the

country they call

the Prince's sword


life

sword that restored him


people call

and

the strong land the


;

all

me

Faithful Eckart, and the wretched


for help in the

and oppressed cry imto me


the Court.

hearing of

This the

hath turned to
set

Duke cannot bear. His envy rage, and thev who might help,
and have turned
his

him against me,

heart

from love to hatred."

The aged hero then


spoken
evil

related

how

the

Duke had

words, and banished him from before


;

his face for ever

and how they now became quite

strange, like enemies, because envious

that he was going to deprive the

men had said Duke of his doto


tell,

minions.

More sadly did he proceed

as he

passed his hand across his eyes,


seized

how
life.

the

Duke had

upon himself and

his son,

of wanting to take his land and

and accused them " Yea, 'tis said

he hath even doomed

my
he

son to die."
to his father, seeing

Young Conrad spoke not


he wept
to the
:

at length
;

said,

" Father,

let

me

go

Court

and
to

will talk to the

Duke, that he

may be brought
better.

understand you, and treat you

Should he have hurt d hair of


is

my

brother's

head, he

so

bad a man that you

shall

punish

TIECK.

59

mm,

yet
all

it

can scarce be that he hath so soon

for-

gotten

your services."
!

" Alas poor boy


?

don't you

remember the old proverb,

'

M^hen the mighty want your hand.

They

'11

promise you both

gifts

and land

When

the evil day hath pass'd.


flieth, too, as fast.'

Their friendship

" Yes, and


gone
above

all

my

long and painful


raise

life

has

for nothing.

Wherefore did he

me

high

my

peers only to plunge


?

me

into the lowest


is

ignominy

The

love

of princes

like

a fatal

poison, which they ought to reserve only for their

enemies, and which finally often proves the ruin of


its

heedless possessor

so

it

hath ever been."


;

"

will

hasten to him," said Conrad

"

will

plainly remind

him of

all

you have done and


will treat

suf-

fered for

him

and then he

you as well

as he did before."

"

You

forget," replied Eckart, " that they have


traitors
:

pronounced us

we had

better seek refuge


;

together quickly in some foreign land


shall,

where we

perhaps, be more fortunate than here."

"

What,

father, in your old age

and
?

will

you

turn your back


try

upon our sweet home


this," said
;

Let us rather
"
I

any way but

Conrad.
will

will see

the

Duke

of

Burgundy

appease and make

60

GERMA.K NOVELS.

him

friendly to us

for

what harm can he do me^

though he does hate and fear you ?" " I do not like to let you go," replied Eckart;
for

my mind
;

misgives

me

sadly

yet I should like

to

be reconciled to him, for he was once

my

kind

friend
is

and

for the sake of

your poor brother,

who

lingering in prison, or perhaps dead."

The sun was now


upon the green earth
;

casting

its last

wild

beams

and Eckart sat down, ab-

sorbed in deep thought, leaning against the root of


a tree.

He

and at length

looked at Conrad earnestly a long while, said, " If you will go, my son, then
in
:

go now, before the night gathers

the lights are

already up, you see, in the windows of the Duke's


castle
;

can hear the trumpets sounding at a

disis

tance for the festival


arrived,

;^perhaps
feel

his son's bride

and he may

more friendly disposed


yet he parted

towards us."

His son was instantly on his way

with him unwillingly, for he no longer put any faith


in his own good fortune, or the Duke's gratitude. Young Conrad was bold and hopeful; doubting

nothing but that he should touch the Duke's heart,

who had

heretofore caressed

him on

his knees.

" Art thou sure thou wilt come back to me, my " for were I to sweetest child ?" cried the old man
;

lose thee
last of

have seen thee for the

last time

the

thy race."

His young son then kissed and

TIECK.

61

comforted him

promising that he would be with

him very soon

and they separated.


at the castle-gate,

Conrad knocked
mitted.

and was ad-

The aged Eckart remained seated where

he was, exposed to the night winds, all alone. " And 1 have lost him too ; I am sure I have lost
him."
eyes

He
will

cried bitterly

in

his solitude. his

" These

never rest upon

dear

face
old

again."

While thus lamenting, he saw an

wayfaring

man

leaning upon his crutch, and trying, at great

hazard, to
cipice

make

his

way down the mountain.

A prehis

yawned beneath him, and Eckart, aware of


"

danger, went and took him by the hand.


ther are you going ?" he inquired,

Whi-

as he assisted
sat.

him down
ran

to the place where he


sat

had himself
till

The old man

down, and wept

the tears

down

his furrowed cheeks.

Eckart sought to
but
the

comfort

him with gentle

advice,

other

semed too much


"

afflicted to

pay attention to him.


it

What

terrible

calamity can

overpowers you ?" inquired Eckart.


speak."

be that thus " Ohly try to

" Alas

my

children

!'-'

exclaimed the aged man.

Then
solable.

Eckart

again

thought

of

Conrad, of

Heins, and

Dietrich,

and became himself incon-

"
are

say nothing," he added, "

if

your children

all

dead

for

then your grief

is,

indeed, great."


GERMAN NOVELS.

62

" Oh worse than dead," exclaimed the other. " No, they are not dead," he repeated in a still
!

more
ever
!

bitter voice,

" but they are lost to

me

for

Yea, would to Heaven that they were only


!"

dead

The good old hero almost shrieked at hearing these words, and beseeched the unhappy father to
explain so horrible a mystery
replied, "
;

to

which the

latter

We
far

live in a wonderful world, and these

are

strange times.

Surely the last dreaded day


for

cannot be

from hand,

alarming signs and

omens

are daily abroad, threatening the world


All evil things
their ancient

more

and more.
loose,

seem to have broken


boundaries, and rage

beyond

and destroy
restrains

on every

side.
is

The
in the

fear

of
for

God
any

us not
;

there

no foundation

thing good

evil spirits

walk

broad day, and


or celebrate

boldly scare the good

away from

us,

their nightly orgies in their

unholy

retreats.

Oh

my

dear Sir,

we

are

grown grey

in the world,

but

not half old enough to have heard such histories as

we have
see.

heard, to have witnessed the sights

we

Doubtless you have seen the great comet

Heaven's portentous lightnings through the skies,

which glare so prophetically down upon


one forebodes
disasters,

us.

Every

but none think of reforming


escape the threatened
evil.

their lives in order to

As

if this,

too,

were not enough, the ancient earth

63

discovers her trouble, and casts up her mysterious


secrets

from the deep, while that portentous light

serves to reveal

them from above.

And hark

have

you never heard of the strange mountain, which the


people round call Venus-berg ?"

" No, never," said Eckart, " though


velled far

have

tra-

and wide here around the


I

hills."

" At that

wonder much,"
is

replied the old

man,

" for the dreadful thing

tiow

become
Sir, is

as well

known

as

it

is

true

for that,
evil

good

the very

mountain whither the


centre of the earth,

one

fled for refuge in the

when the holy

Christian faith

began
then

to

wax

strong, and pressed hard

upon the hea-

idols.

There, they

now

say, that fatal goddess

Venus holds her unblest

orgies, whither the infernal


all

powers of worldly lust and ambition, and


bidden wishes, come trooping
in

for-

myriads

for their
for-

prey, so that the whole mountain hath

become

saken and accursed from time immemorial."

"

On what
is

side

lies

the mountain ?" inquired

Eckart.

" There

the mystery

it

is

a secret," whis-

pered the old man, " which those

who know dare


power of

not

tell,

though

it

is

known

to be in the

our great adversary, and that no innocent person


will ever

venture the discovery.

Once only a wanto

dering musician by miracle appeared again, but he

came commissioned by the powers of darkness

C4

GERMAN NOVELS.
upon
the

traverse the world, and he plays strange notes

a pipe

sounds which are heard to echo

first in

distance, then

more loud and sweet.

Those who

approach too close within


a

his sphere are seized with

strange unaccountable delirium, and away they

run in search of the mountain, heedless of every


obstacle,

and never weary

never

satisfied

until

they gain the fatal summit, which opens for them,

and whence there

is

no return.

Their supernatural

strength forsakes them only in the infernal abode,

when they
round
its

turn

in

another direction,

wandering

unhallowed precincts

like unblest pilgrims,


I

without the least hope of salvation.


of comfort in

lost all

hope

my
;

sons long ago

they grew wilful

and abandoned

they despised their parents and


itself.

our holy religion

Then they began

to hear
far into

the strange music, and they are the


hills

now
is

fled

the

inhabited world
will

too

narrow

for

them, and they

never stop until they reach the


;"

boundless regions below


his hands.

and the old man wrung

"

And what

is

it

you think of doing

in

this

affair ?"

"

What
I

should

do

with this crutch,

my

only

support,

have

set out in pursuit of


to find

them, being

determined either

them

or to die."
resolute effort,

At these words he rose with a

and

hastened forward as fast as his feeble steps could

65

bear him, as

if

fearful of losing a

moment
pity,

while

Eckart gazed after him with a look of

lament-

ing his useless anxiety and sorrows yet to come.

" To

all his

other evils," cried Eckart, " even

madness
relief."

itself

does not seem to have brought any

Night came and passed away


broke, yei no signs of
warrior wandered

the

morping

young Conrad.
the
hills,

The

old
his

among

and cast

eyes wistfully towards the, castle;


peared.

still

no one approceeding

Then he heard a tumult,


;

as

if

from the place


anxiety,
near,

and, no longer able to restrain his

he mounted his steed that was grazing


hastily towards the castle.

and rode

He no
among

longer disguised himself, but spurred boldly

the troops and pages surrounding the castle-gates,

not one of

whom
is

ventured to stop or lay a hand

upon him.
"

All opened to

him

a path.

Where

my

son Conrad ?" inquired the old

hero, as he advanced.

" Inquire nothing," said one of the pages, casting

down
"
is

his eyes

"

it

would only grieve you

better

turn back."

And

Dietrich," added the old

man

" where

he?" " Mention


" the

his

name no more,"

said an aged

knight;

Duke's rage was kindled, and he

thought to pimish you through him."

66

GERMAN NOVELS.
Hot scorn
flushed the face of the old hero,
;

when

he heard these words


sion of him,
at speed.

grief

and rage took posses-

and he rode through the castle-gates

All opened a

way

for

him with

fear

and
his

reverence,

and he soon threw himself from

horse at the palace doors.

With trembling

step he

mounted
"

into the marble halls.


I

Am

here," he cried, " in the dwelling of


friend ?"

the

man who was once my


;

He

tried

to

collect his thoughts


rise

but dreadful visions seemed to

before him, and he staggered wildly into the

Duke's presence.

Not aware of
old man.

his arrival,

Burgundy uttered a

cry

of alarm, as he found himself confronted Avith the

" Art thou

the

Duke

of

Burgundy

?"

asked the old hero.

The Duke
"

replied, " that I am !" And hast thou caused my son Dietrich to die ?" The Duke said he had. " And my youngest boy my Conrad was not
!

he

too good

and beautiful
too ?"

for

thy sword

hast
" Oh,

thou killed him


''

That

have," said the


replied,

Duke

again.
tears,
!

And Eckart
say not that
!

as

he shed

say not that. Burgundy

for

cannot

bear those words


it

recal them.

Say, at least, that


I

repents you of
to

all

you have done, and

will

yet

try

take comfort, though you have now done


to break niv heart."

your worst

67

The Duke answered


traitor
!

"
!

Away

thou faithless

hence from
I

my

sight

thou art the bitterest

enemy

have on the face of the earth."


:

Eckart stood firm, and said


didst call
are

" Heretofore thou


but good thoughts

me

thy best friend


strange
:

now become
thee as

to

thee.
I

Never did

aught against thy honour


loved
or

nay,

have revered and

my

true

Prince, so help

me God
all

here with this hand upon

my

good sword,

could take speedy and bitter vengeance for

my

wrongs.

But no,

will for ever

banish myself from


evil

your presence, and end


solitude

my

few and

days in

and woe."

Having uttered these sad words, Eckart turned


away, while Burgundy, agitated with hateful passions, called

aloud for his pages and his lancers,


the
old hero,

who surrounded
palace

and followed him

with the points of their spears out of the Duke's


;

none venturing, though at


to put

their

lord's

command,

him

to death.

Away

he spurred at speed,

Eckart that uoblest- Knight

And spoke " no more I heed The world, nor v.-rongnor rig-lit,
" jMv sons
are gone,

and

I
;

Am left to mourn alone


My Prince
And

would have me

die,

friends I have not one."

<iS

GERMAN NOVELS.
Then made he
to the woods,

And

with

full

heart did strive,

To bear his dismal moods To bear his woes and live.

"

I fly

man's hated face

Ye

mountains, lakes, and

trees,

Be now

my

resting place.

And join
" No

your tears to these.

child beguiles

my

grief.
:

Their lives were sworn away Their days were all too brief,

My last

one they did slay !"

Thus wild did Eckart weep Till mind and sense were gone Then madly down the steep

He He

spurr'd his true steed on.

bounded, leaped, and fell Vet Eckart took no heed ; But said it was right well.

Though

sadly he did bleed.

He next ungirt his horse And lay down on the ground And wish'd it had happ'd worse.
That he
his grave

had found.

None

of the Duke's peasantry could say whi-

ther the faithful Eckart


to the wild

had

fled, for

he had taken

mountain-woods, and been seen by no

69

human

being.

The Duke dreaded

his great cou-

rage and prudence, and he repented that he had

not secured him


suffered

blaming his pages that they had


escape.

him

to

Yet,

to

make

his

mind

more easy, he proceeded, at the head of a large


train, as if

going to the chace, being determined to


all

ride
until

through

the surrounding hills and woods

he should find the spot where Eckart had

concealed himself, and there put him to death.

His followers spread themselves abroad on


sides,

all

and vied with each other

in the

hope of pleas-

ing the prince, and reaping the reward of their evil

deed

but the day passed, and the sun went down,

without their discovering any traces of him they


sought.

A
the

storm

was

now

gathering,

and the great


hills
;

clouds came darkling over the woods and

thunder began to peal along the sky


flashed
;

the
upon

lightning

athwart

the

heavens,

smiting

the largest oaks


their heads.

while torrents of rain

fell

The Duke and

his followers ran for


;

shelter

among

the rocks and caves

but the Duke's

steed burst his reins, and ran headlong


heights, while his master's voice

down
in

the the

was

lost
all

uproar of the storm.


lowers,

Separated from

his fol-

he called out

in vain for assistance.

Wild

as the animals of the forest, poor Eckart


his sorrows, or

had wandered, unconscious now of

70

GERMAN NOVELS.
Roots and
berries,

whither he went.
ter of the

with the wa-

mountain-spring, formed his sole refresh-

ment

he would no longer have known any of his


;

former acquaintance
at length to

the day of his despair seemed

have gone by.

Yet no

as the storm

increased, he suddenly
tion of his intellect,

seemed
to

to recover

some por-

and

become aware of objects


aged breast, as he
" Dear as the

around him.
ror,

Then he

uttered a loud cry of horhis

tore his hair,

and beat

bethought himself of his children.


life-blood

of

my

heart," he
all

cried, " whither,


!

sweet boys, are ye

gone

Oh,

foul befall
!

my my

coward
smote

spirit that
I

hath not yet avenged ye


fell

Why
pierced

not your

destroyer,

who hath
I

my

heart through and through, worse than with a

thousand daggers.
serve
it all
;

Mad
I

wretch that

am

de-


all

for well

may your

tyrant mur-

derer despise me,

when

oppose not the assassin of

my own

children.

Ah, would that he might once


;

come within the reach of my arm for now I long, when it is all too late, to taste the sweetness of
revenge,"

Thus he spent the


ing as he went.
distant voice of

night, wandering,
last

and weep-

At

he thought he heard a
for

some one crying

help.

He
it

turned his steps towards the direction in which

came

and

finally

he approached a man,

whom

the

darkness hid from his sight, though he heard his

71

voice

close

to

him.

This

voice

beseeched

him

piteously, to guide a stranger into the right path.

Eckart shrieked as

it

again

fell

upon

his ear

he
felt

knew

it

and he seized

his sword.

He

prepared

to cut

down

the assassin of his children

he

new
all

strength

and

drew nigh

in the

hope of

full

vengeance, when suddenly his oath of fealty, and


his former promises,

when he was the Duke's


Instead of piercing

friend,

came

across his mind.

him

to the heart,

he took the Duke's hand, and

promised to lead him into the right path.


passed

They
the

along conversing together,


with fear and cold.

although

Duke trembled
some one,
it

Soon they met


was

,was

Wolfram, the Duke's page, who


It
still

had been long


dark night

in search of his master.

not a
to

star cast its feeble rays

through

the thick black clouds.

The Duke

felt

very weak,
to refresh

and sighed

reach

some habitation,
in

himself and repose,

besides he was
He

dread of en-

countering the enraged Eckart, whose strange, feign-

ed voice he did not yet know.


hardly survive
fresh blast of
till

feared he should

morning, and trembled at every


trees
;

wind that shook the

or

the

thunder as
"

it

rolled

more awfully above

their heads.

My

good Wolfram," cried the Duke, " mount


fir,

this lofty

and cast a keen glance around thee


light

to discover
it

some

whether from house


live to

or hut
it."

boots not, so that

we can but

reach

72

GERMAN NOVELS.
The page obeyed
at his life's risk, as the storm
if

bent the strongest branches of the huge tree as


it

had been a tender

reed.

Its

topmost boughs

sometimes nearly touched the ground, while the

boy appeared

little

more than an acorn growing

to

a branch of the

tree.

At length he
I

cried out, " In

the plain below us there,


I

perceive a glimmering

can see the way we ought to go."

At the same
;

time he carefully descended, and took the lead


in

a short while, the friendly light greeted the eyes


all three,

of

the very sight of which greatly restored

the fallen spirits of the Duke.

Absorbed within himself, Eckart uttered not a


word.

He walked

along, striving with the bitter


;

feelings that rose in his breast

leading the

Duke

by the hand.

At length the page knocked

at the cottage door,

and an infirm old woman appeared.


he had led along

had entered, Eckart loosed the Duke's hand,

When they whom


trembling

and

the

latter

fell

upon

his knees,

to

return heaven

tlianks for his

deliverance from the perils of that

terrific night.
;

Eckart retired into a dark corner


found, stretched in sleep, the
shortly before

where he

same old man, who


his

had been bewailing

unhappy
in

fate

in regard to his sons,


of.

whom

he was then

search

The Duke having

finished

his

prayers,

thus

73

spoke.

This has, indeed, appeared a miraculous


I

night to me.

feel

the goodness and


I

almighty

power of the Lord, more than ever


reason to do.

had before

Yet

my

heart hath failed within me,


die
;

and

feel that I

must shortly

only wishing

for time, before I depart, to entreat forgiveness for

my
my
I

manifold sins and offences against the Most


:

High

out

will

take care to
I

reward you both,

faithful

companions, before
as
I

go

and that as
trusty page,
close to the
in

handsomely

can.

To

thee,

my
lie

bequeath the two castles, which

next mountain here,

on condition that,
night,

rein

membrance

of

this

terrific

thou

dost

future take the

name

of the Dweller of the Firs.


laid thy
I

And who

art thou,

good man, that hast


?

v/eary limbs in the corner

Come

forth, that

may

reward thee quickly, according to thy great services

and many kind


!"

offices

shown me during

this terrific

nisrht

Then up
That

rose Eckart, like a thing

starts

from out the dim moonlight

His furrowed cheek betrays the sting

Of many

a woftil day and night.

The soul of Burgundy sighed sore To witness thus that aged face ; The blood forsook his veins ^lie tore

His hair, and swooned for dire disgrace.

VOL. IV.


;
:

74

GEUMAN NOVELS.
They
raise him from the low cold ground. His limbs and temples warmly chafe

" Then, 3Iighty Lord, at last he 's found" He cried " True Eckart 's here he '^ safe.

" Oh whither shall I fly thy look ? Was't thou didst bring me from the wood And was it I thy dear babes struck

Thou

that to

me

hast been so good ?"

And Burgundy, as thus he said, He felt his heart was breaking fast On Eckart's breast he laid his head, And thought he there would breathe his
His senses
fled
!

last.

Then Eckart spoke


;

"

I reck not, master, of their fate

That so the world may see, though broke. True Eckart's heart's yet true and great."

Thus passed the


followers of the
sick.

night.
arrived,

In

the

morning the
mules, and

Duke
to

and found him very


their

They placed him upon


him back
his

carried

castle.

Eckart stirred

not from his side, and often the

Duke took

his

hand, and, pressing

it

to his

bosom, looked up at

him imploringly
and speak
still.

when Eckart would embrace him,


till

soft

words of comfort

he was again

The Duke next

called together his council,


his confidence in his
all his

and declared, that such was


faithful

Eckart, the bravest and noblest of

75

l-and,

that

he would

leave

hiiii

governor of his

sons.

Having

said which, he groaned

and died.

Eckart then took the reins of government into


his
in

own hands,

fulfilling

the trust reposed in

him

such a humane and prudent way, as to excite


all

the admiration of

the country.

Shortly afterall

wards, the report spread more


sides, of the

and more on

arrival of the strange

musician, from
with
the

Venus-berg,

who seduced
leaving

his
;

victims

strange sweetness of his

tones

and they disapbehind.

peared without

a trace
;

Many

gave credit to

the

report

others

not

while

Eckart again bethought him of the unhappy old

man,
"

whom
I

he had seen so forlorn and crazed upon

the mountain.

have now adopted you as

my

children," he

said to the

young Princes,
hill

as he one

day

sat with

them on the
piness
is

before the castle.

" Your hapI

now become my
to

inheritance;

shall

continue

survive

after

my

departure

in

your

welfare and your good conduct."

They

all

stretched themselves on the hill side,


far into the distant

whence they could look


lovely prospect
strive

and

beyond

and Eckart would then


felt

to

subdue the regrets he

for his
if

own

children, though they

would appear as
him,

passing

over the mountain before

while in the dis-

76

GERMAN NOVELS.

tance he thought he heard the faint echo of delicious

music gradually growing louder.


Hark
comes
it

not like dreams


?

Before the morning beams

From some
Such

far

green-wood bowers,
dj-ing fall

as the night-bird pours,


its
!

So sweet, and such

Those tones the magic song

recall,

And

Eckart sees each princely cheek


its

Flushed with the joys

victims seek,

Wild wishes
For some
far

seized each youthful breast,

unknown bourne
cried,

of rest.

"Away

to the

mountains !" they

" the deep woods

\\'Tiere the trees,

winds and waters make music for gods

Sweet, strange, secret voices are singing there now,

And

invite us to seek their blest

Eden below."

In strange attire then came in view Theunldest Sorcerer, and anew


Inspired the maddening youths,
till

bright

And

brighter shone the sunny light.

Trees, streams, and flowers danced in the rays

Tlirough earth,

air,

heavens were heard the lays


blind.

The

grass, fields, forests, trembling join'd

That magic tumult wild and


Swift as a shadow fade the

ties

That bind the

soul to earth,

and

rise
;

Soft longings for unearthly scenes

And

strange confusion intervenes

Between the seen and unseen world.


Till reas(Mi

from her seat

is

hurl'd,

And madly
To mingle

bursts the soul

away

in the iufernal fray.


;
:

77

And Eckart felt the glow, He saw the magic show

Seemed young once more nor knew Twas the same world where first he drew The vilest air. " Those notes revive

Long

faded joys
;

my children live,"
form
is

He

cried

"

their mother's

there,

All that was mine,

before despair,"

Yet secret horror

thrills

The aged

hero's breast

He dares whate'er he wills He stands to manhood's


To
faith

test.

and honour

true.

He
The

struggles with the

charm

flattering forms

subdue

No more

his stedfast

arm

His children fade in

air

Mocks of infernal might His young friends vanished were

He

could not check their

flight.

Yes, these, his princely trust,

Late jaelded

to his

power,

He now
Or

desert

them must.

share their evil hour.

Faith, duty to his Prince,


Is still his

watch-word here

He

still

thinks of

him

since
tear.

His

last sad look

and

78

GERMAN NOVELS,
So boldly doth he now Advance his foot and stand. Arm'd proof to overthrow
Tlie evil powers at hand.

The

wild musician comes

Eckart his sword has ta'en

But ah

those magic tunes.


:

His mortal strength enchain

From out the mountain's

side

Come thousand

dwarfish shapes.

That threaten and deride, And leap and grin like apes.

The

Princes fair are gone

And

mingled with the swarm


is

True Eckart

alone.

And
I'lie

faint his valiant

arm.

rout of revellers grows,

Gathering from east to west,

And

gives

him no

repose

Around

before abreast.

True Eckart's 'mid the din. His might is lost and gone ; The hellish powers must win

He of their slaves be

one.

For now they reach the hiU,

Whence those wild notes are heard The dwarfish fiends stand still. The hills their sides uj)rear'd.

79

And made a mighty


*'

void,

Whence fiercer sprites glower'd grim What now will us betide ?" He cried none answered him.
:

Again he grasped his sword. He said he must prove true


Eckart has spoke the word,

And
He

rushed amid the crew.

saved the Princes dear

They fled and reach'd the But see, the fiend is near,
His imps their malice

plain

strain.

Though Eckart's strength is He sees the children safe

gone.

And

cried

"

I fight

alone

Now
He

let their

malice chafe."

fought

he

fell

he died
;

Upon

that well-fought field

His old heroic pride

Both scorn'd

to fly or yield.

'

True

to the sire

and son,
of their throne
;

The bulwark
Proud
There
's

feats hath

Eckart done

not a Knight, not one

" Of all my court and land" Cried the young Duke full *' Would make so bold a stand,

loud.

Our honour

to uphold.

80

GERMAN NOVELS.
and land and

For

life

all,
;

To Eckart true we owe He snatch'd our souls from


For
all it

thrall.

work'd liim woe."

And

soon the story ran


land.

Through Burgundy's broad That who so venture can

To
Upon

take his dangerous stand

that mountain side,


in that contest hard
died.

Where

True Eckart fought and

Shall see his shade keep guard.

To warn

the wanderers back.


pit,

Who
And
That

seek th' infernal

spurn them from the track


leads

them down

to

it.

TIECK,

SI

TIECK.
rUP.

OR, LORD OF TUE TANNENIIAI'SEH FIR-WOODS.


;

PART
About
certain

II.

four

centuries

had

elapsed since the

death of the Faithful Eckart, when there lived a


lord,

who

stood in high reputation as a

counsellor at the imperial court.

The same
all

lord

had a son, one of the handsomest knights in


land, highly esteemed and beloved

the

by

his friends

and countrymen.
peared

Suddenly,

however, he disap-

under very peculiar circumstances, which


;

occurred previous to his departure

and no one

could gather any tidings of him whatsoever.

But

from the time of the Faithful Eckart, a tradition


respecting the Venus-berg had
valent

become very prewas asserted by


thither,

among

the people, and

it

many, that he must have wandered

and

there been devoted to eternal destruction.

Among
much

the whole of his friends and relatives


loss,

who

lamented the young Knight's

none grieved so

as Frederick of Wolfsburg.

They had been

E 5

GERMAN NOVELS,
early companions,

and

their

attachment had grown

with their years, insomuch, that their subsequent

attachment appeared rather the result of necessity


than of choice.

Meanwhile the Lord of the Woods


no account of
his son,

died, having heard

and

in

the

course

of a

few years his friend Frederick


already a playful young circle

married.

He had

around him.

Years passed

away, and

still

no

tidings arrived as to the fate of his

friend,

whom

he was at length reluctantly compelled to number


with the dead.

One

evening,

as

he was standing under the

tower of his castle, he observed a pilgrim approaching at some distance, in the direction of the castlegates.

The stranger was very

singularly dressed

his

whole appearance, and particularly


the

his gait, striking

young Knight

as

something odd and unac-

countable.

As the

pilgrim drew nigh, he went to

meet him

and, on examining his features, thought


'

he could recognize them.

He
:

looked again,
it

and

the whole truth burst upon him


other than his long lost friend
the

was indeed no
shuddered,

the young Lord of


and
in

Fir-woods himself.

Yet he

uttered

an exclamation of surprize, when he conthe

templated the ravages which time had made


noblest face and form
mirers,

the theme of

his former ad;

of which only the

ruins were to be traced

no, he

no longer appeared the same being.

TIECK.

83

The
gazed
at

two

friends

embraced,
as

while
perfect

they

still

each other

upon

strangers

newly introduced to each other.

Many

were the con-

fused (piestions and answers which passed between

them
wild

and Frederick often trembled at the strange


glances
in

of his
eyes.
;

friend

the

fire

seemed

to

sparkle

his

He

agreed, however, to sO'

journ

with him

but when he

had remained a

few days, he informed Frederick that he was about


to

go upon a pilgrimage as

far as

Rome.

Their acquaintance, in a short time, grew more


familiar,

and resumed

its

former happy and conthe mutual adven-

fidential tone.

They

recalled

tures

and plans of

their

early years,

though the

Lord of the

Woods seemed

to avoid touching

upon

any incident which had occurred since


disappearance from home.
derick's
curiosity

his late

This only raised Fre;

the

more

he entreated

to be

informed, and

still

with more

earnestness as

he

found their former regard and confidence increase.


Still

the stranger long sought, by the most friendly


;

appeals and warnings, to be excused

till

at last,
it

upon
so
!

fresh solicitation,

he

said, "

Now
;

then be

your wish shall be fully gratified


reproach me, should

only never

in future

my

history excite

feelings

lasting feelings of sorrow

and dismay."

Frederick took him in the most friendly manner

by the arm, and led him into the open

air.

They

J84

GERMAN NOVELS.

turned into a pleasant grove, and seated themselves

on a mossy bank

the

stranger then

giving his

hand

to his

friend, turned

away

his

head among

the soft leaves and grass, and, amidst


sighs and sobs, gave

many

bitter

way

to the sad emotions to


inspire.

which

the

recollection

seemed

His friend,

pressing his hand, tried every

means

to console

him

upon which the stranger, again


began
purport

raising his

head,

his story in a calmer voice, to the following


:

" Believe me,

my

best

friend, that there are

many of us who, from the day


and born subject to an
steps through
until
it

of their birth, are

made
their

evil spirit,

which dogs
to

life,

and ceases not

torment them

succeeds in bringing them within the sphere

of

its

predestined destruction.

Thus
life
is

it

has hap-

pened unto me, and


during penalty of
termittingly

my
;

whole

only one en-

my

birth

the labour-pains uninI

inflicted

and Avhen
I

awake

must
so

awake

in hell.

Therefore have
steps,

already

made

many
this

painful

and as many yet remain of


I

my

woful pilgrimage, should


the
at
feet

indeed be able

to

reach

and obtain

absolution of the
I

Holy Father

Rome.

Yes, at his feet must


sins, or lie

lay

the heavy burthen of

my

groaning under

the weight of them, and die

in despair."

Here Frederick renewed

his consolatory advice

but the lost Knight, appearing to pay no attention

85

to

it,

in
:

a short time proceeded in his narrative as

follows

" There goes an ancient tradition, that several

hundred years ago there


the

lived

a Knight

known by

name

of the Faithful Eckart.

It is farther believ-

ed, that there appeared a strange musician, at that

time, from one of the wonderful mountains,

whose

unearthly music awakened such strange delight and


wild wishes
in

the hearts of his audience, that they

would
in the

irresistibly follow

him, and lose themselves

labyrinths of the
hell
is

same mountain.
its

At that
portals

period,

supposed to have kept

open there,
sistible airs,

in

order to entrap, by such sweet irreinto its abyss.


I

unhappy mortals

Often

have

heard the same account when


it

was a boy,
In a

and sometimes
short time
it

used to make
if

me

shudder.

seemed as

all

nature, every tone,

and every flower reminded me,

in spite
it is

of myself, of

that same old fearful saying. Oh,

impossible for

me

to

convey to you what kind of mournful thought,


ineffable longing,

what strange
seized me,

one time suddenly


as
it

bound me, and


and the

led me,
I

were, in

chains

and particularly when


clouds,

gazed upon the


of
light

floating
real blue

streaks
;

ethe-

seen between them

and what strange

recollections the
in

woods and meadows conjured up


did
I

my

soul.

Often

feel

all

the

love

and
often

tenderness of nature in

my

inmost

spirit;

86

GERMAX NOVELS.

stretched forth
fly into

my

arms, and longed for wings to

the embrace of something yet more beau-

tiful

to

pour myself,
;

like the spirit of nature, over

vale

and mountain

to

become
mighty

all

present with
to breathe

the grass, the flowers, the trees,


in

and

the fulness

of the

sea.

When some
I

lovely prospects

had delighted me during the day,

was sure to be haunted with dark and threatening


images that same night,
in closing against
in particular,
all

of which seemed busy


life.

me

the gates of

One dream,
upon

made an
I

indelible impression

my

mind, although
"

was vmable

to recall

its

individual

features clearly to
I

my memory.
could see an immense concourse
streets,

thought
in

of people

the

heard unintelligible

words and languages, and


in the
I

turned away, and went

dark night, to the house of

my

parents,

where

found onlv
I

my

father,

who was

unwell.

The next
parents'
felt

morning
necks

threw

my

arms round both


tenderly, as
if

my
I

embracing
evil
I

them

that

some

power were about


to lose you,
I

to separate us for ever.

Oh

were

said to

my

dear father
I feel

how very lonely and unhappy should


world without you
tenderly
;
!

in this

They kissed and consoled me


in dispelling

but they could not succeed

that dark foreboding image from

my

imagination.

" As

grew

older,

did not mingle with other


I

children of

my own

age in their sports.

wan-

TIECK.

87

dered lonely through the


it

fields,

and on one occasion


way, and got into a
for

happened that

missed
I

my

gloomy wood, where


help.
in vain,

wandered about calling

After searching
I

my way

back

for

some time
Here
trees

all at

once found myself standing before


I

lattice,

which opened into a garden.


fruit

remarked pleasant shady walks,


flowers,

and

among which were numbers


in

of roses which

shone lovely

the sunbeams.

An

uncontrolable

wish to approach them more nearly seized me, and


I

eagerly forced

my way

through the lattice-work,


garden,
I

and found myself

in that beautiful

bent

down and embraced


lost in this
light,

the plants and flowers, kissed

the roses over and over, and

shed

tears.

While

strange feeling, half sorrow, half de-

two young maidens came towards

the walk, one older, and the other about


years.
I

me along my own
reeled
felt

was roused from


fresh

my

trance, only to yield

myself up to

amazement.
at that

My

eye
I

upon the younger, and


if I

moment
to

as

had been suddenly restored

happiness after
into the

all

my

sufferings.

They

invited

me

house

the parents of the

young people inquired my name, and were kind enough to send my father word that
I

was

safe with

them

and

in the

evening he him-

self

came

to bring
this
life

me home.
idle

" From
tenor of

day forth the uncertain and


;

my

acquired some fixed aim

my ideas

88

GERMAN NOVELS.

recurred incessantly to the lovely maidens and the

garden
wishes.

thither daily flew


I

my

hopes and

all
all

abandoned

my

playmates, and

my my

usual pastimes, and could not resist again visiting


the garden, the castle, and
its

lovely

young inmate.

Soon

appeared to become domesticated, and

my

absence no longer created surprise, while


rite

my

favou-

Emma

became hourly more dear

to

me.

My
tenI
it.

affection continued to increase in

warmth and

derness, though

I
!

was myself unconscious of


I

was now happy

had not a wish

to gratify, be-

yond that of returning, and looking forward again


to the

hour of meeting.

" About this time a young knight was introduced


to the family;

he was acquainted likewise with

my

parents, and he appeared to attach himself in the

same manner

as

had done
I

to

the fair
this,
I

young
began
feel-

Emma.
to hate

From
him
as

the

moment

observed

my

deadliest

enemy
bitter

but
I

my

ings were indescribably


I

more

when

fancied
I

saw that
as
if,

Emma

preferred his society to mine.

felt

from that instant, the music which had

hitherto accompanied me, suddenly died

away

in

my
my

breast.

My

thoughts dwelt incessantly upon


;

hatred and death

strange feelings burned within

breast, in particular

whenever

heard
I

Emma
did not

sing the well

known song

to the lute.

even attempt to disguise

my

enmity, and when

my

TIECK.

89

parents reproached

me

for

my

conduct,

turned

away from them with an obstinate and


1

wilful air.

wandered

for

hours together

in

the woods, and

among
upon

the rocks, indulging evil thoughts, chiefly


:

directed against myself

had already determined

my

rival's

death.

" Tn

the course of a few months the

young
and was

knight declared his wishes to

Emma's

parents, All that


all

they were received with pleasure.

most sweet and wonderful


ev^r influenced

in nature,

that
to

had
have

and delighted me, seemed

united in

my
I

idea of

Emma.
for

knew,

acknow-

ledged, and

wished

no other happiness
I

no-

thing more

nothing

but her.

had

even wilfully

predetermined

that the loss of her, and

my own

destruction, should take place on one

and the same

day

neither should survive the other a

moment.

"

My

parents were

much

grieved at witnessing

)ny wildness

and rudeness of manner;


it

my

mother

became

ill,

but

touched

me

not

inquired but

little after her,

and saw her only very seldom.

The

nuptial day of

my

rival

was drawing nigh, and


:

my

agony proportionably increased

it

hurried

me
if

through the woods and across the mountains, as

pursued by a grizzly phantom by day and by night.


I

called

down

the most frightful maledictions both


I

upon

Emma

and myself.

had not a

single friend

to advise with

no one

wished to receive

me

for

90

GERMAN XOVELS.
seemed
to

all

have given

me

over for

lost.

Yes

for the detested fearful eve of the bridal-day

was

at

hand
cliffs

I 1

had taken refuge among the rocks and

was

listening to the roaring cataract

looked into the foaming waters,


in
I

and started back

horror at myself.

On
rival

the approach of morning,

saw

my

abhorred
;

descending the

hill at

little

distance

drew nigh

provoked

him with
his

bitter

and jeering words, and when he drew


I

sword,

flew

upon him

like lightning

beat

down
once

his guard with

my

hanger, and

"

hastened

from
;

the

he spot

bit the dust.


I

never

looked back at him

but his guide bore the body


I

away. The same night

haunted the neighbourhood

of the castle where dwelt

my Emma

now.

few

days afterwards,
hand,
I

in

passing the
tolling,

convent near at

heard the bells

nuns singing funeral


in the

hymns, and saw death-lights burning


tuary.
I

sanc-

inquired into the cause, and was inform-

ed that the young lady

Emma

had died of the

shock on hearing that her lover had been killed. " I was in doubt what to think, and where
remain
;

to
all

doubted whether
I

existed

whether
;

were true.

determined to see

my
;

parents

and

the night after reached the phice where they lived.


I

found every thing

in

commotion
;

the street was

fdled with horses

and carriages

pages and soldiers


in

were

all

mingled together, and spoke

strange

91

broken words

it

was just

as

if

the Emperor were

on the eve of undertaking a campaign against his


enemies.
father's

single light
I

was dimly burning


a strange

in

my
like

house

felt

sensation,
I

strangulation, within

my
I

breast.

When

knocked,

my
had
that

father himself

came

to the door, with slow soft

steps,
in
it

and just then

recollected a strange
felt,

dream

my

childhood, and

with horrible truth,


I

was the same scene which


Quite dismayed,
I

was then going


:

through.

inquired

'

Why
me

are
in,

you up so
"

late to-night, father?'

He

led

saying, as he entered
'

may

well be
this

up and watching, when your


expired.'

mother has only

moment

" These words shot


soul.

like lightning

through

my
;

My

father sat himself thoughtfully


:

down

seated myself at his side

the corpse

lay

upon a bed,
fillets

and was appallingly covered over with white

and napkins.
burst.
*

My

heart struggled, but could not


'

myself keep watch,' said the old man,


sits

ibr

my

poor wife always

near me.'

My
up

senses here

failed

me.
1

raised

my

eyes towards one corner,


rising
like a mist

and there
it

saw something

turned and motioned, and soon took the wellof

known lineaments
regard

my

mother,

who
air.
I

emed

to

me

with a fixed and serious


I

attempted

to escape, but
to him,

could not

for the figure

motioned
his arms.

and

my

father held

me

fast in

; ;

yg

GERMAN NOVELS.
*

while he softly whispered me,


on, for you.'
I

She died of

grief,

my

embraced him with the most


I

terri-

Hc, soul-cutting emotion.

clung to him for protectears ran

tion like a feeble child,

burning

down
were

my breast
me, and
I

but

uttered no sound.
I felt

My father kissed

shuddered as

his lips, for they

deadly cold
dead.
'

cold
is

as
it

if I

had been kissed by the


I

How

with you, dear father,'


;

mur-

mured,

in

trembling agony
into himself, as

but he seemed to sink


were, and replied not

and gather
a word.
colder.

it

I felt
I

him

in

my

arms, growing colder and


it

felt

at his heart, but

was quite
I

still

yet, in the bitter


fast

agony of

my

woe,

held the body

clasped in
"

my

embrace.
first

By

a sudden glimmer, like the

break of

morning, which shot through the gloomy chamber,


I

there saw
;

my

father's spirit close to that of

my

mother

and both gazed upon


I

me

with a compas-

sionate expression, as

stood with the dear dethat

ceased in

my

arms.
I

From

moment

saw and
and yet

heard no more.

lay deprived of consciousness


delirious,

and

was found by the servants

powerless as a babe, on the ensuing morning."

The Lord
had

of the Forest

had proceeded thus

far

with his narrative, to which his friend Frederick


listened in the

utmost alarm and astonishment,


off",

when he suddenly broke


intensity of his feelings.

overpowered by the
silent

His friend was

and

93

thoughtful

then taking the unhappy

man by

the

arm, he led him back into the castle, and they


,went into a room, and seated themselves alone.

After remaining some time silent, the wretched


pilgrim resumed his tale.

" The memory of that hour


impressed upon
conjecture

is

still
I

as fearfully
at a loss to
it.

my

mind, and

am

how
and

was so unfortunate
this

as to survive

For
with

it

was now, indeed, that


all

once

fair

earth,

life,

that

life

had

to afford,

became

worse than dead, and perished for


lone waste and wilderness, with

me
all

became a
soft airs,

its

sweet flowers, pure streams, and blue starry skies.


I

stood like one, the last of a sudden overwhelming

wreck,

saved only to regret that he had not peall

rished with

that was dearest to


I

him on

earth.
;

How

lived

on from day to day,

know not

till,

at last, unable longer to

contend with the fiends of


I

remorse that grappled me,


lief.

flew to society for re-

joined a number of dissipated characters,

who
lies

sought, like me, to lose the sense of their fol-

and enormities
I

in the

most dissolute pleasures.

Yes,

sought

to propitiate the evil spirit within


its

me by

obedience to

worst dictates.
I

My

former

wildness and impatience revived, and

no longer

placed any restraint over

my

wishes.

"

fell

into the

hands of an abandoned wretch

of the

name

of Rudolf,

who

only laughed at

my

la-

94

GERMAN NOVELS.
More then
a year thus

mentations and remorse.


elapsed
;

my anxiety and

horror, in spite of all efforts

to control them, daily gaining


until
I

ground upon me,


Like
I

was seized with

utter despair.

all

who

experience that stage of such a malady,

took to

wandering without any object.

arrived at distant
feet

and unknown places


and often
I

spots unvisited by other

could have thrown myself from some

airy height, into the green

sunny meads and vales

below, or rushed into the cool streams to quench

my
I

soul's fiery
fear,
I

and

insatiable thirst

yet though
re-

had no

something unaccountable always

strained me.
close of the

made many attempts towards


;

the
:

day

for

longed to be annihilated
its

but

when the morning returned with


its

golden
I

beams,
1

fresh dews,

and odorous
;

flowers,

felt
life

could destroy nothing

and hope and love of

revived within
across me, that

my
all

breast.
hell
;

thought then came


to

was conspired together


that both

work

my utter perdition

my pleasures and
all

my

pains arose from the same fiendish source, and

that a malicious spirit was gradually directing

the powers and influences of

my mind
it,

to that sole

end.

yielded myself

up

to

in order to mitiit.

gate the various pains and agonies inflicted by

On

one dark and stormy night,


I

went

into the

mountains.
giddiest

mounted one of
where
foot

their highest

and

peaks,

of

man

never before

95

trod

and there, with


I I

my
in

whole strength of heart

and

soul,

invoked the foe of


called

God and man


I

to

appear.

him
and
I

language that

felt

he

must obey.
stood at

My
side,

words were powerful


I felt

the
in

fiend

my

no alarm.
feel

While coneach

versing with him,

could

my

faith

haunted

and wonder-working

mountain growing

stronger vvithin me, and the base

One taught me a
guide

song

sufliciently

potent of

itself to

me
;

the

right path into

its

labyrinths.

He

vanished

and

then, for the


I
I

first

time, since the day of


;

my

birth,

found myself alone

and now,
nature

for the first time,

comprehended

the

of

my

wandering
life,

thoughts,

which, from this middle point of


in pursuit of a

had been the whole time


ual world.
I

new

spirit-

set

forward on

my

way, and the song

which

sang with a loud fearless voice, conducted

me
find

easily over the

most strange desert places, such

as those possessed with


:

demons only know how

to

all else,

both within and without me, beside


;

the loud clear song, was buried in oblivion

it

bore

me, as

if
I

on lofty wings, back to


tried to avoid their
in

my

native spot

though
to

shadow, which seemed

frown

the strong moonshine,

and the wild

tones, which in their softest dying fall appeared to

upbraid me.

It

was thus

approached the strange


dark and tempestuous
a
;

mountain
the

the night was

moon glimmered through

mass of dusky

livid

96

GERMAN NOVELS.
yet boldly and loudly did
sing that song.
its

clouds

giant

form arose,
I

and motioned me with

sceptre back.

drew nigher

'

am

the faithful
;

Eckart,' exclaimed the supernatural form


praise
to

'

and,
I

the goodness of the blessed God,

am

permitted to hold watch here, to deter the unhappy

from rushing into the base


on.

fiend's power.'

rushed

On

passing,

found

my way
me

led through sub-

terraneous passages in the mountain.

The path

was so narrow, as
I

to

compel

to force

my way

heard the gushing of the hidden waters, and the

noise of the spirits engaged in forging steel, gold,

and

silver in their caverns, for


I

the temptation and

perdition of man.

heard, too, the deep clanging


their

tones
ers,

and notes

in

simple and secret pow;

which supply
I

all

our earthly music


it

and the

lower

descended, the more

seemed

to fall like

veil

from before
I

my

eyes.

"
other
J

pushed more impatiently forward, and beheld


forms hovering round
;

human

among whom
at a loss to

recognized

my
;

friend

Rudolf.

was

conceive

how they could

thus slip past

me

in that

narrow way

but they seemed to glide through the

crevices of the stones


all

and rocks, without being

at

aware of me. " Soon I heard other music, of quite an opposite


the
if

character to
struggled, as

last and
fly

my

spirit

within

me

eager to

nearer and catch the

97

notes.

came

into

more open space

and on

all

sides strange clear glowing colours burst


eye.
for
;

upon

my

This

felt

was what
heart
I

had

all

along sighed

deep

in

my
I

welcomed the presence


for
I

of something

had

long looked
of which
in

the

deepthe

seated master-passion,
ravishing

then
full

felt

powers playing
breast.

their

strength

within
deities,

my

A
me
;

swarm of the mad heathen

with the goddess Venus at their head, ran

forward to greet

all

demons, that assumed

those ancients' names, and were banished thither

by the Almighty, their career being


earth
;

fully

run upon

though they

still

continue to work in secret.


I

" All the delights so familiar to the world,


there found
zest.

and enjoyed
appetite

in their fullest

and keenest
as

My
was

was

as insatiable

the

de-

light

lasting.

The long-famed
all

beauties of the

ancient world were

there

all
;

which

my most

ardent wishes required was mine


that
in

and each day

world grew brighter,


colours.

and appeared arrayed


Streams of the most

more charming

costly wines slaked our thirst, the


delicious forms

most lovely and


air

played and wantoned in the

while a throng of naked Loves hovered invitingly

around me, shed perfumes over

my

head, and tones

of music burst forth from nature's inmost heart,

and

with their undulating freshness restored the ardour


of

our desires,

while

soft

mists and dews stole

VOL. IV.

98

GERMAN NOVELS.
flowery
fields,

over

giving

new essence
passed,
I

to

their

ravishing odours.

"

How many
state
;
;

years thus
for here

am

quite

unable to
divisions

was no time and no


virgin

the

luscious

charm of
and
in

beauty

burned

in

the flowers,

the forms of girls


;

bloomed the fragrant charm of the flowers


colours seemed to enjoy a peculiar language
;

their

tones

uttered
as
it

new words

the world of sense was inclosed,

were, within the glowing bloom of those luxuriflowers

ous

the
this

resident spirits within were ever

engaged
"

in celebrating their

triumphant delights.
I

How

was accomplished,
;

can neither
all

explain nor comprehend


sinful

but soon, amid


I

my
with

and outrageous pleasures,

began to sigh

for repose, for the innocent earth I


all
its

had and

left,

virtuous social endearments


as
it

my

desire

grew as violent
it

had formerly been


'

to leave

for

what

had there obtained. was

wished to lead
its

the same

life

as other mortals, with


I

mixed pains
and

and pleasures.
excess,

satiated with splendour

and

turned
native

with
land.

thoughts

of

pleasure

towards

my
I

mercy of the
returning.

Some unaccountable Almighty granted me the privilege of


found myself once more
in this pre-

sent world,

and dream only of expiating and

re-

ceiving absolution for

my

sins at the footstool of

the all-restoring Father in

God

at

Rome

that so

TIECK.

99

may

again

be numbered in the rank of other

living

men."
silent
;

Here the sad pilgrim became

and Fre-

derick fixed his eye upon him, with


glance, for
friend's

a searching

some time.
:

At

last

he took his poor

hand, and said


I

" Although

have not yet recovered from

my
all

astonishment, and cannot, in any way, comprehend

your narrative

yet

conceive

it

impossible that

with which you have been thus fearfully haunted

can be other than a strong delusion of the mind. For

Emma herself is

still alive,

she

is

my own

wife

we two have never

differed,

much

less

engaged with
lives.

our weapons, during the whole course of our

No, we never hated each other, as you seem to


think, though you were missing just before
riage from

my mar-

home.

Besides, you never, at the time,

gave
I

me

a single hint that you loved


it."

my Emma.

never heard a 'word of

Then he again took

his

poor bewildered friend by the hand, and led


into another

him
her

apartment to his wife,

who had
to

just returned from a visit of


sisters.

some days

one of

The pilgrim stood dumb and thoughtSoon shaking


his

ful in

her presence, though he examined the form

and features of the lady.

head
!

repeatedly, he said, in a low voice, "

By Heavens

but this
all
!"

is

one of the most wonderful adventures of

F 2

100

GERMAN NOVELS.
Frederick

now

related to

him every

thing-

which
at-

had occurred

to himself since they parted,

and

tempted to explain how he must have been labouring under a temporary delirium during
past.

many

years

"

Oh

know
it is

right well," answered the pil'


I

grim, "

how

am

still

bewitched and insane

but hell

will clear

up these juggling
lighten

tricks, unless I

go speedily
its

for

Rome and

my

conscience pf

desperate sins."

Emma
childhood
ceived.
;

tried to

withdraw his attention from the

subject, by recurring to scenes and incidents of his

but the pilgrim was not to be undeleaped up, declaring

One day he suddenly


set out,

he must instantly

and forth he went with-

out even saying farewell.


Frederick and his

Emma

often discoursed

of

the strange unhappy pilgrim.

few months had

scarcely elapsed, when, pale and worn, in tattered


attire

and barefoot,
apartment,

his poor friend entered Frede-

rick's

while

he

was yet

asleep.

He
The

pressed his lips to his, and exclaimed hastily, "

holy father will not forgive me.


seek

must away and


the castle, and

my

former abode."

He

then ran hastily back.


left

Frederick imagined he had

was going
agony of

into his wife's chamber,


all

where were her


in

women, who were


terror

running to find him,


fearful dweller

an

and alarm. The

of the

TIECK.

101

woods and mountains had been there


early
in

he had come
words

the

morning,

and uttering the


in

" This shall not stop

me

my

career!"

he had
felt.

despatched her upon the spot.


Frederick was
still

unable to account for the

strange feelings of dismay and uneasiness he

He

could not rest

and ran into the open

air,

and

when they wished


bitterly,

to bring

him back, he exclaimed,


kissed his lips,
until

" that the pilgrim had

and that he was burning inwardly


meet with him again."

he should

He

then ran rapidly in a variety of directions

in search of the

wonderful mountain, and he was


of.

never afterwards heard

It

was reported by the

people, that, whoever received a kiss from one of

the dwellers of that mountain, was unable to resist


the evil enchantment
;

which, with the same powers


its

of sorcery, tempted him likewise into

subterra-

neous depths.

102

GERMAN NOVELS.

TIECK.

AUBURN

EGBERT.

In the vicinity of the Hartz there once resided


a Knight, usually
the Fair, or

known by the name of Egbert Auburn Egbert. He was about forty


his pale

years old, of middle stature, and with short auburn


hair,

which hung thick and close over

and

somewhat emaciated countenance.


secluded
life,

He

led

a very

never interfered

in

the affairs of his

neighbours, and was seldom seen bevond the precincts of his

own

castle walls.

His wife was of as

retired a disposition as

himself, both were

warmly

attached to each
their union

other,

and only lamented that


blest with children.
still

had not been yet


little

Egbert saw
preparation did
to

company, and made


his
gi>ests

less

entertain
strictest

when

they

come

the

frugality being observed

tTiroughout his whole establishment.

In their pre-

sence he was cheerful and affable

but when alone


silent

he appeared a prey to a reserved and


lancholy.

me-

No
as

one was so frequent a

visitor

at

the castle

Philip Walther, to

whom

Egbert was greatly


tastes

attached, from the


feelings.

similarity of their

and

His chief residence

was

in

Franconia,

103

though he often sojourned, near half a year at a


time, in the vicinity of Egbert's
castle,
fossils,

where he

made

collections of

plants

and

which he

arranged for his amusement.

Being possessed of a small property, Walther


lived

quite

independent.
in

He was

frequently at-

tended by Egbert
to

his

solitary excursions,

owing

which

their intimacy

appeared to become yearly

stronger and stronger.

There are periods


less

in

which we

all

feel

more or

uneasy

in

concealing a secret from those

who

are dearest to us.

The
its

soul

feels

an

irresistible

impulse to confide

most treasured thoughts to

the breast of some friend

drawing

the bonds of

mutual confidence

still

closer.

In such
are

moments
open

the inmost recesses of our hearts

laid

and

it

sometimes happens that on these occasions


recoil
in

we inwardly
It

from each other.


twilight
his

was

the

of

misty

autumnal
were
its

evening,
seated

when Egbert,
the

wife,
fire,

and

friend,

round

cheerful

which cast

flickering lights

and shadows through the room

and upon the


only

ceiling.
in

The gloom of night was


distance,

perceptible

the

whence

came

the sound of the forest trees, waving in the cold

evening
stronger.

air,

the

breeze

becoming stronger and


after

Walther complained of weariness

his long walk,

and

his friend

Egbert proposed that

; ;

104

GERMAN NOVELS.
should

he

remain the night

with

them

they

might wile away the time


retire to their

in conversation,

and then

apartments.
offer
;

Walther accepted the


were brought
in
;

wine and supper


fire,

they stirred the

and by de-

grees the conversation


familiar.

became more animated and

Supper being removed, and the servants


missed,

dis-

Egbert took

his

friend

Walther by the
let

hand, saying, " Come, you must

my
;

Bertha
will

here relate the history of her early days

you

hear some very extraordinary adventures." "

Oh

with

much

pleasure," returned Walther


fire.

and they resumed


It

their places at the


;

was now near midnight


fleeting

the

moon shone
;

at

intervals through the

clouds

and Bertha

began her
portunate
is
;

tale.

"

You must not

think

me

too im-

but
;

my
all

husband's account of his friend

so flattering

your thoughts and opinions, he


;

declares, are so elevated


to ^disguise

that

it

would be unjust

any thing from you.

But you must not

regard

my
am

narrative in the light of a fiction,

how-

ever singular you

may

conceive

it.

"

the native of a

little

hamlet

my

father

was only a poor shepherd.

The domestic manageexcellent

ment of our house was none of the most

we hardly knew how


day to day.

to prolong our existence

from

But what most grieved me was the

TIECK.

105

incessant

bickerings of
;

my

parents, arising from

their poverty

when they would

load each other

with the severest reproaches.


I

In regard to myself,

was perpetually

reviled for being a dull

and

silly
;

child, incapable of fulfilling the

most simple duties

and,

in

fact,

I I

was excessively awkward and good


broke every thing put into

for nothing.
.

my hands
;
;

could learn neither to spin nor to sew

afforded

my
that
I

mother no assistance
I

in

the honse

and

all

comprehended was the wants of


sit

my

parents.

used often to

down

in a corner,

pleasing
I

myever

self

with the idea of assisting them, should


;

Jiappen to become rich

and enjoying

their surprize

when
roof.

poured showers of gold upon their humble

" Spirits appeared to

float
;

around

me

to point

out subterranean treasures


small pebble stones,

or presented

me

with

which were suddenly transIn


truth,
I

formed into diamonds.

only amused

myself with these dreams, which served to render

me awkwarder than
life

ever,

whenever
the

happened to
affairs

be called upon to assist in


:

common

of

for

my head began

actually to
notions.

swim with the

number of these whimsical


at having so useless

" Of course ray father was extremely irritated


a burthen in his house
:

he

invariably treated

me

with harshness, and a kind


his
lips.

word seldom issued from

In

this

way

F 5

106

GERMAN NOVELS.

approached

my

eighth year, and


I

it

became a

serious

question by what means

was

to be taught to

do

something.
or indolence,

Imagining

it

arose either from caprice

my

father
:

first

began by assailing me
all

with dreadful threats

finding they were


severe

to

no

purpose, he inflicted as

personal chastiseit
I

ment

each time concluding with observing, that

would be repeated the ensuing day as long as


"

chose to continue such a good-for-nothing creature.

My

pillow

was constantly steeped

in
I

tears

and

I felt

so desolate
die.
I

and wretched that

often

prayed to
light
;

shrunk from the approach of

was

at a loss

how

to begin

the day

longed to become as dexterous as other people, and

wondered why
children
;

was born more stupid than other

in short, I

was

in despair.

"

arose one morning early, and without


I

know-

ing why, opened our cottage door.


in the

found myself

open

field.

Soon

was

in the

wood, which

as yet was scarcely lighted up with the approach of day.


Still I
I

ran on,, without looking once betoo


to

hind me.

felt

much

afraid

lest

my
;

father
for I

should overtake

me

complain of weariness

knew that he would treat me with redoubled cruelty. The sun was mounted high, ere I reached the other
side of the

wood

and

saw some dark object

in
I

the distance, veiled in a thick mist.

Sometimes

encountered

hills, at

others paths that

wound among

107

the

cliffs

and rocks.

imagined

was drawing

nigh the neighbouring mountains; and the idea,

combined with the solitude around,


fears.
I

awoke
;

my

had never beheld

hills

before
like

even the

name

of mountains

had sounded

something

awful in

my

ears.

had not courage


it

to

go back

my
I

very fears giving wings, as

were, to
I

my

flight.

often gazed round

me

in

alarm, as

heard the
trees
:

wind whistling through the branches of the


I

listened to the echo of the

woodman's axe
silence

in the

distance, breaking

upon the deep


I

of the

morning

and soon

met

colliers

and miners going

to their labour,

whose foreign accent nearly made

me

faint with alarm.

"

passed through several villages, begging


I

my

bread as

went along
me.
I

for

hunger and

thirst

next

began

to assail

contrived to give pretty satisI

factory answers to the questions


ter,

had

to

encounor four

and by such means wandered three

days,
led

when

struck into

little

bye-path, which

me

farther
I

and farther from the main road.


proceeded, appeared to assume
still

The

rocks, as

more

fantastic forms.

Huge

crags were piled upon

each other so high, that the least wind seemed

enough

to

hurl

them from
to turn

their
steps.

airy
I

height.

knew not whither


reposed in the
shepherds' huts,

my

had hitherto
in

open woods^occasionally
it

the
of

being the

mildest

season

108

GERMAN NOVELS.
but here

the year

met with no human abode

a wilderness lay before me,

and the rocky heights


terrific.

appeared to grow more and more


I

Often

passed close under overhanging precipices, or at


I felt all

the edge of the yawning abyss.


ror of

the hor-

my

deserted situation
I

I
;

shed

silent tears

and then

screamed aloud

but

my

voice was

re-echoed only from the dark rocky valley, adding


fresh terror to all
I

had before
I

felt.

Night was
to
I

gathering round

and

now sought
rest.

find

some

mossy bed on which


sleep
:

to

Yet

could not

was haunted by the most unaccountable


I

sounds, which

successively attributed to the cry

of wild beasts, the wind moaning through the rocks,


or the note of

some strange and unknown


fervently,

birds.

"

now prayed
in

and towards morning


I

for the first time fell asleep.

When

awoke, the sun

was shining
me, which
I

my

face.

steep cliff rose before

climbed, in the hope of finding some

outlet from that horrid wilderness,


uig, perhaps, signs of

and of discern-

some human habitation.

On

gaining the summit,

could discover surrounding

objects only through a thick vapour as far as the

eye could reach.

Neither tree, nor shadow, not


:

even a bush was to be seen


tary shrubs were all that

a few sapless,

soli-

grew between the crevices

of the rocks.

longed with indescribable emotion

to behold the face of a

human

being, of whatever

TIECK.

109

character;
to
fill

though

his

presence

were
to

calculated

me

with alarm.
:

Hunger began

gnaw

ray

vitals

afresh

threw

myself upon the

ground,

resolving there to die.

Soon, however, the love


:

of

life

revived within

me

strove to

resume

my

courage, and continued


tears.

my

way, amidst sighs and


I
;

Towards the close of the day,


I

was so exI

hausted that
indifferent

hardly
life,

knew what

did

became
to
die.

about

and yet was

afraid

As evening gathered
wild and
feelings revived,

in,

the country assumed a less


;

gloomy character

happier thoughts and


life

and the desire of

seemed to
I
;

beat in

all

my

veins.

At length

fancied

heard
re-

the

murmuring sounds of a

distant mill

and

doubling

my
cliffs

speed,
:

soon reached the end of the

rugged

caught a view of woods


in

and

meadows, and mountains beyond


I felt

the distance.

as if

were suddenly emerging from the re-

gions of torment into paradise, and solitude and


destitution appeared

no longer awful.

"
I

My

delight was considerably diminished


waterfall instead of the
in

when
hoped
;

came towards a
I

for mill.

caught the water eagerly


I

my hand
gf ntly at

when suddenly
little

heard some one cough

distance from me.

Never was

I
I

so agreeably

surprised as at that very

moment

ran nearer to
I

the spot, and at the corner of the wood,

saw an
to rest

aged

woman who appeared

stooping as

if

HO
herself.

GERMAN NOVELS.
She was ahnost quite
in

black,

with a

black hood over her head, and the greater part of


her face, and she held a small crutch in her hand.

On

approaching nearer, and soliciting her

assist-

ance, she bade

me

seat myself at her side, at the

same time
wine.

offering
I

me some

bread and a cup of


in

When

was seated, she began,

a harsh

disagreeable tone, to sing a


rose up,

hymn.

After this she

and informed me that I might follow her. " Singular as the voice and manner of the old
I

crone appeared to me,

gladly accepted her offer.

She contrived
countenance

to hobble along at a pretty quick


staff,

pace with the help of her


in

but distorted het

so whimsical a
I

manner

at

every

step, that, for

some time,
sterile

could not refrain from

laughing.

The

rocks appeared to vanish by

degrees as

we proceeded.
its I

We

crossed over a fine

green meadow, and next through an extensive grove.

As we were approaching
went down, and
I

opposite skirts, the sun

never,

think, can cease to recol-

lect the lovely aspect of the scene

which that evening

presented
as
it

itself.

Every objected seemed dissolved,


;

were, in the softest vermilion and gold

the tree

tops were brightly tinged by the rays of the setting sun,


fields

the the vast

richest glow of

summer warmed the


if

arch of heaven was bright as


to

paradise were

unfolded

the

view.

Then the

trickling of the fountains, the

whispering of the

TIECK.

Ill

leaves,

produced a
to the

soft

music that added a new

charm

serenity of the scene,

more

allied to
It
first

pensive than

animated emotions of joy.


inexperienced heart for the

was
time
its

now

that

my

seemed
affairs.
all

to indulge a foretaste of the world

and

Heedless

both of myself and


eyes,
I

my
I

guide,

spirits

and

all

gazed until

wished to

lose myself in the vastness of the golden heavens.

But

was compelled
hill

to follow

and we now
trees,

as-

cended a

crowned with birch


full

and we
its

beheld a green vale

of the same trees from

summit.
a
shrill

Amid

these trees lay a small cottage, and


lively little

bark was heard, and a

dog came

capering and fondling towards the old woman, and

then towards me.


I

As we were descending the


I

hill,

heard a singular song, which


if

thought sounded

as

from the cottage, like the notes of some bird,


:

yet as distinct as here follows

The lonely ^YOod To me seems good,


So does the green wood-tree
;

The song by night, The pale moon-light, The lonely wood 's the home

for

me.

" The same simple words were incessantly repeated, and to describe

them

aright, I should say

they came like the music

of French
I

horns and

bugles mingling in the distance.

was very curious

lis

CtErmax novels.

to learn the cause,

and ran

into

the cottage withIt

out waiting for the old woman's permission.


already light
;

was
:

the inside appeared neatly arranged

a few glasses were lying

upon a

shelf,
;

with other
in

odd-shaped vessels upon a table


a beautiful cage, was the bird
I

and behold,

had heard, which

sang those very words.

The

old

woman coughed

and panted,
yet she
first

as if she

were about to yield the ghost,


little

stroked her

dog, and then talked

to the bird,

whose

sole

answer was the same pretin

ty

song

and she conducted herself just


I

the
I

manner she would had


looked at her,
I

not been there.

When

felt

a cold shuddering

come over
with
old

me

the muscles of her face were constantly work-

ing,

and her head shook so


I

strangely

age, that

could not conceive what she most lookshe

ed

like.

When

was a

little

recovered,

she

struck a light, spread a small table, and set out the

evening meal.
ordered

Then looking

at

me

intently,

she

me

to take

one of the reed-bottomed chairs,

and

sit

opposite to her.

The candle was placed


shrivelled

between us,

and she folded her lean


;

hands, and prayed aloud


tions of face
I

while the same distor-

were continued, so very ridiculous that

could hardly prevent myself from laughing, fearI was of exciting her anger. " Supper was no sooner over than she began
;

ful as

to

pray again

after

which she pointed me

to

my

low

113

narrow dormitory, while she occupied ihe eatingroom.

Being already

Ijalf asleep,

soon sunk into

profound repose. Yet I woke frequently during the night, and heard the old woman coughing and speaking to the dog, as well as to her bird, which

seemed

to

be dreaming, as

it

sang only

in

broken

accents, single words of the


this, the rustling

same song.

Add

to

sound of the birch-trees before the


of the distant nightingale, alI

window,

the notes
I

together forming such an odd concert, that


to think
into a
;

began
fallen

was not awake but each time had

more and more singular dream.


I
;

" At length
it

was awakened by the old woman


and she soon found some work
to spin, the
I

was morning

for

me.

She began by teaching me


I

me-

thod of which

shortly acquired.

was
;

also de-

sired to look after the bird

and the dog


of

and

in-

troduced into the management

housekeeping.

Every thing around soon became familiar to

me

and

it

now was
it

evident to

me

that

every thing

ought to be as
old

was.

no longer imagined the

woman

looked strange and whimsical, or that her

dwelling was odd, and lay remote from other


habitations
;

human
his

not even that there was any thing

unnatural in the bird.

Indeed

was struck with

plumage, which shone with a thousand dyes


richest azure,

the

and the most glowing

red, with alter-

nate streaks on his neck and body.

And when he

lli

GERMAN NOVELS.

sang, he spread his feathers both bold and proudly


to the eye,

which then assumed

their richest bril-

liancy.

" The old

woman was
I

in

the habit of leaving her

abode

in the

morning, and not returning until night.

On
me

these occasions,

was accustomed

to take the

dog, and go out to meet her, when she w^ould call

her pretty child and daughter.


;

Shortly

grew
child

quite attached to her


easily

the
to

mind of a mere
any thing.
which
In
I

accustoming
I

itself

the

evenings

was taught

to read, in
it

made
several

good progress, and soon

became a source of con-

stant pleasure to me, as the old

dame had

books, written in an ancient style, containing wonderful adventures.

my mode of life at that much affects me, even until now. Visited by no human being, and confined to so narrow a circle, even the bird and dog made an
" The remembrance of
period always

impression upon

me which

only long acquaintance,

in other instances,
I

can produce.

Never since have

been able to
little

call to
I

mind the singular name of


have called him so repeat-

the

dog, though

edly.

" Four years were thus spent, and


twelve years old,

was about

when the

old body began to give

me more
secret.

of her confidence, and told


I

me

a great

Indeed,

daily observed that she busied

115

herself with something; about

the cage,
it.

but had

never taken further notice of

It

now appeared,
In her ab-

that the bird every day laid an egg, always con-

taining either a pearl or a diamond.


sence,
I

was permitted

to take out the eggs,

and

to

deposit

them

carefully in

the odd shaped

vessels

before-mentioned.

She

left

me my
;

food,

and her
:

absence daily continued to grow longer and longer


first

weeks, then months, elapsed

my

Avheel

went

round, the dog barked, the wonderful bird sang his


old sOng, and
all

was
I

so lone

and

still,

that, during

the whole period,

do not remember a single tem-

pest, or rain, or thunder.

No

one wandered near

the spot

no, not a beast of the forest

drew nigh
and was con-

day followed day


tented.

pursued

my

toil

" Perhaps

if

we could contrive

to

spend our
in

whole

lives in this

manner, we should be happier

the end.

" From the


filled

little

read,

my

imagination was

with the most extravagant notions of the world

and of man.
myself and

My
my

views were borrowed only from


:

companions

my

idea

of lively

people consisted wholly in that of the


richly arrayed ladies were

little

dog

compared

to the beautiful

bird
1

and every old body to

my own
love,

ancient dame.
over,

had read something too of

and went

in

my

fancy, the most wonderful

scenes and ad-

IIG

GERMAN NOVELS.
I

ventures.

drew a picture of
;

the

handsomest
per-

knight
fection,

in

the world
I

endowed him with


after all
I

and yet

was unable,

my

trouble,
;

to understand the sort of personage

had made

was melted with compassion

at

my own

condition
to return

when, as was often the case, he refused

my

love.

began

to

pronounce long and affecting win him


of us

soliloquies, not unfrequently aloud, as if to

back

tee

you

smile, for

we

are truly

all

past this stage of youth.

" At length
alone, for
I

began to

feel

pleased at being

was then mistress of the house.


Avith

The

dog was quite a favourite


call
;

me, and obeyed

my
the

the bird answered


;

all

my
I

questions with his

pretty song

even

my
old

spinning-wheel

hummed

same assiduous music, and


of change.

indulged no desire

The

woman, returning from her


care and
atten-

long excursion,
tion,

commended my
her
I

observing

household

had been better

conducted since

arrived,

and she then praised


In short,
as
if
I

my

growth and

my good

looks.

she just

showed me the same kindness


daughter.

had been her

"

'

You

are

my good

child,'

she one day said to


'

me,

in

her harsh squeaking tone


will

if

you only go

on thus, every thing

be well with you.

But

we must keep
to follow,

the straight-forward path, or good

fortune will soon leave us, and punishment be sure

however

slow.'

117

"

did not pay

much heed
all

to this

good advice,
;

being extremely volatile in

my

motions

but

it

would often occur

to

me

at night,

though
I

was

at

a loss to conceive her meaning.

reflected, inlips.

deed, upon every word that dropped from her


I

had heard of

riches,

and

began to suspect that


This

her pearls and diamonds might be valuable.


notion soon appeared more clearly to
to the straight- forward path, there
loss.
I

me

but as
at a

was quite

Yet long

reflection even rendered this intel-

ligible to

me

in time.

"

was now fourteen years


it is,
it

old,

and

felt

what a

misfortune

that

we do but

attain our maturer

knowledge, as

were, at the expense of the innoI

cence of our souls.

became aware that

it

only
bird,

rested with myself to take possession of the

and

all

the precious stones in


visit

the

old

woman's
I

absence, and then

the world of which


I

had

heard so much.

Besides,

might

there, perhaps,
still

meet with

brightly before

my handsome knight, who my imagination.


tike
I

floated so

" This thought came and went

any other

idea,

though

it

ever haunted

me

while

sat at

my

wheel.

Soon

became so absorbed
I

in its flattering pros-

pects, that

beheld myself magnificently attired,

surrounded by a train of knights and princely personages.


I

When

had

so

far

forgotten
still

myself,

became grieved

at finding myself

confined to

113

GERMAN NOVELS.
Yet
if
I

the same narrow spot.

only did

my

duty,

the

old

woman

troubled

herself very

little

with

other points of behaviour.


"

She one day went

forth, saying, that she


;

should
I

be away

much

longer than usual


article,

and that and


I

must
same

keep

my

eye upon every

at the

time contrive to amuse myself.


xious at
I

was more anfor


I
I

this

parting than before,

fancied

should never behold her again.


I
:

kept her in

view as long as
I

could, though
it

knew not why

felt so

uneasy

was just as

if

my

future

in-

tention stood forward to accuse me, without

my
dog

being exactly aware what

it

was.
to the little
;

"

had never before attended

and the bird with so much tenderness

they appearold

ed dearer to me than I can describe. The good dame had not been gone many days before

the

same thought returned

and

rose

one morning,

with the fixed resolution of forsaking the cottage,

and running away with the


fortune in the world.

little bird,

to seek

my

My

mind was

greatly per-

plexed

wished to persuade myself to stay, but

the very idea had

become hateful

to me.

There

was a struggle

in

my

soul

it

was

like the con-

tention of two rival spirits.

At one moment the


;

quiet solitude of the scene appeared so delightful

and the next


full

my

anticipation of a

new world,
to

so

of agreeable varieties,

seemed

beckon me

away.

; ;

119

"

was puzzled how


;

to act

the

little

dog

leapt

up and caressed me

the sun's

beams lay warm


the

upon the
leaves

fields,

and the bright green of the birch


in

glittered

the morning

light.

felt

pleasing sensation of having found something

new

something that was to be done, and done speedily.


Involuntarily
I

seized the dog,

bound him

fast in

the room, and, taking


forth.

down

the cage, proceeded


at being

The

little
;

dog barked and whined

thus treated

looked up in

my

face as
I

if

to entreat

me

to

take him with


I

me

but

was too much


to seize

afraid.

had courage, however,


precious stones
I
;

upon a
it

vessel filled with


into

and, putting

my

pocket,

left

the remainder of them where

they stood.

" In going through the door, the bird turned

round with a very odd expression,


bird
;

thought, for a
to follow

the poor dog

made many attempts

but he was compelled to remain in his prison.


I

sought to shun the path towards the wild and

sterile rocks,
I

by going directly the opposite way.

heard the dog's moans


to

and howls incessantly,


heart.

and the sound went


began
his song,

my

The
at last

bird often

but the motion of his cage seemed


it.

to interfere with

The barking
and soon

began to
:

die
I

away

in the distance,

entirely ceased

wept, and was very near returning, had not

my

wish to behold something new impelled


tinue

me

to con-

my

route.

]i20

GERMAN NOVELS.
" Already

had traversed the mountains and the

neighbouring woods, when the approach of evening

compelled

me

to enter a village.

As

walked into

an inn,

was overpowered with a

feeling of
in

shame
it,

they showed
I

me

into a

room with a bed


haunt

and

passed a tranquil night, except that the idea of


old

the

dame seemed

to

me

with

terrific

threats.

"

My
I

journey was rather uniform


went, the

only,

the

farther

more sadly was

tormented
her
little

with the thought of the old


dog.
unless
road,
I
I

woman and

was

afraid

he would be starved
;

to death

assisted

him

while, at every turn of the

fancied the old lady would suddenly start


I

out before me.

continued
;

my

route, sighing
I

and

weeping as

went
song

and whenever and

stopped and

placed the cage upon the ground, the bird began


his wonderful
;

recalled to mind, with


I

lively regret, the sweet secluded spot

had deserted.
I

So wayward
think

is

the

human mind,

that

began to

my

journey almost more wretched than the


in in

one

had made

myself once more

my my

childhood

and

wished

former situation.

"

disposed of some of

my
I

diamonds, and after


little vilI

proceeding for a few days,


lage.
I felt
;

arrived at a

myself strangely affected as

entered
I

the place

was dreadfully alarmed, though


I

knew

not wherefore, and

strove to recover

my

presence

121

I found I had returned to my native How astonished I felt Tears of delight ran down my cheeks, while a thousand tender recollections came across my mind. Many changes .had

of mind,
village.

when

taken place
into decay.

new houses were


I

built, others fallen

stood upon a spot where there had


all
I

been a

fire

and

around appeared more small


should have imagined.
I

and contracted than

an-

ticipated great pleasure in the idea of again behold-

ing

my

parents, after so
little

many

years.

Soon

dis-

covered our

cottage,

the

same threshold, the


1

latch of the door


left

all

was just the same as


I

had

them.

It

seemed but yesterday that

was lean-

ing against the door,


I

my heart beat with emotion.


and found myself amid a party

opened

it

in haste,

of strangers,

who
1

lixed their eyes

upon me

in

as-

tonishment.

inquired for the shepherd Martin

they answered that he and his wife had died some


three years ago
left
;

when, instantly withdrawing,

the village, weeping aloud.

" Alas
surprising

had pictured

to myself the pleasure of

them with my. wealth.


I

By a
I

very singu-

lar adventure,

had obtained what


;

only dreamed
in

of in

my

childhood

yet

all

was now
;

vain

they

could not partake


ing prospect of

it

with

me

and the most

flatter-

my
view.

whole existence suddenly va-

nished from

my

"

took a small house and garden, near a pleasant

VOL. IV.

122

GERMAN NOVELS.

country town, and also engaged an attendant.

was not half so much surprised with the world had fondly anticipated
to forget the old
life
;

as

yet,

by degrees,

contrived

woman, and my former mode of


and
felt

in fact, living very contentedly.


;

" The bird had long ceased to sing


not a
little terrified

when one night he suddenly


;

be-

gan

a different

song
wood

it

ran as follows

'

The

lone

side, the lone

wood

side

Lies very far from me.

Where late 1 loved to hide, And fain again would be. The lone wood side for me.*
"

could not compose myself to sleep


;

my me1

mory was too busy with the past


done wrong. " Tli sight of the bird when
ing seemed a reproach to

feared

had

I
;

rose in the

mornat

me

he looked

me

continually, and his presence grew irksome to me.

He now
at

never ceased his song, which was louder

and more sweet than usual.

The

oftener
;

looked
I

him the more uneasy

became

at length

opened the cage, and seizing him by the neck, pressed

my

fingers tightly together.


;

He
in

cast one im-

ploring look

loosed

my hold,

but he was already


the garden.
attendant,

dead.

then went and buried him

" Next

my

fears turned towards

my

TIECK.

123

when

reflected

upon what
it

had myself done.

thought she might take

into

her head to rob,


to

and, perhaps, to murder me.


this,
I

Sometime previous
gave him

became acquainted with a young knight, with


I

whom
in

was much pleased.

marriage

and
to

it is

thus, Mr. Walther, that

my hand my

story

comes

an end."

" Yes, you should have seen her then," cried


the fond Egbert eagerly
;

" you

should have seen

what youth, beauty, and inexpressible charms her


secluded kind of education had given her.

To me
I
:

she appeared most like a miracle her most devotedly. her love that brought
to this spot,
I

and
;

loved
it

had no property
prosperity

was

me

we withdrew

and hitherto we have had no reason

to regret our union."

" But," said Bertha, " we have continued to


prattle
until
it is

become very

late.

Suppose we

retire to rest."

Saying

this,

she rose and went to the door

Walther wished her a good night, adding, as he kissed her hand, " I return you thanks, my noble
lady.
I

think

can just imagine you with your


in

wonderful bird, and the way


pretty Stro/unian."

which you fed the

Walther,

then,

also

retired to

his

chamber
a

while Egbert walked


dissatisfied air.

up and down the


G 2

hall with

At length he stopped, exclaiming,

124

GERMAN NOVELS.
folly of

" To think of the


suaded

mankind

first

per-

my wife

to relate her history,

and such
it

confi?

dence now vexes me.

Will he divulge
is

to others

Will he not, perhaps, for such


ter

the

human
them

charac-

be
It

seized with a

fatal

wish for our diamonds,


?"

and contrive some plan

for obtaining

then occurred to him that Walther had not

taken leave of him as he might have done, after


receiving such a proof of confidence.

Once bent
Egbert
re-

upon
trifle

suspicion, the soul


into

is

apt to construe the least

a matter of importance.
himself for
so

proached

very undeserved a dis;

trust of his

excellent friend
it.

yet in vain he at-

tempted to banish

Full of these thoughts, he


little sleep.

ranged about the house, and got very

The next morning he heard Bertha was unwell


she could not appear at breakfast.

Walther seemthis
;

ed to trouble himself
leave of the

in

no way at

and took

knight with an

air of

indifference.
;

His friend was unable to account for this change

he went to inquire after his wife, and found her


a high fever.

in

She was of opinion that the long

nar-

ration of the preceding evening

might thus have

agitated her nerves.

From

this period,

Walther

seldom returned to the


his leave,
after a slight

castle,

and then soon took

unmeaning conversation.
;

Egbert now began to be greatly alarmed


concealed his feelings both

but he

from

his

friend

and

TIECK.

125

liis

wife,

though his anxiety must have been

evi-

dent to them.
Bertha's indisposition grew daily more serious
;

her physician expressed his fears


left

for the roses

had

her cheeks, while her eyes became more and

more inflamed.

One morning

she intreated to see

Egbert at her bedside, at the same time ordering


her domestics to withdraw.

When

her husband

drew nigh, she observed, "


is

My dear

husband, there

something which has very nearly deprived


quite

me
and

of reason, and
trifling as
it

destroyed
I

my
it

health;

may

appear,

think

my

duty to

confide

it

to you.

You may
little

recollect that, in giving


I

an account of

my

childhood,

never could call to

mind the name of the


with me.

dog, which was so long

But on that evening when your friend


I

took leave of me, he said, "


in

can imagine the way


little

which you used


this
?

to

feed the

Stru/mnan."

Could

be mere accident, or did he guess the real

name

Does he perhaps know the dog, do you

suppose, and could he

How

is

this
I

name him to me purposely man connected with my destiny


I

?
?

Sometimes

strive to believe that

do but imagine
it

this strange
is

circumstance

yet you perceive that

only too certain.

terrible

emotion overpower-

ed

me when

found myself so strangely reminded

of the name,

and by a perfect stranger.


'"
it

What

does

mv

Esrbert think of

126

GERMAN NOVELS.
Egbert gazed upon the features of his
suffer-

ing Bertha with tender compassion

but

for

some

time spoke not.


latory words,

At length he uttered a few consohis


leave.
in

and took

In unutterable

anguish he paced to and

fro,

one of the most

secluded chambers of the castle.

For several years

Walther had been

his sole
in

companion

yet now he

was the only being


distressed him.

the world whose existence

He

felt as if

he should never en-

joy happiness more until he were swept from across


his path.
his

To

dissipate his anxiety, he

took

down

fowliug-piece, and

bent his steps

towards the

moors.

The
lay

air

was

chill,

with a stormy sky


;

the snow

deep upon the ground

and the naked branches


it.

of the trees were covered with

The unhappy

Egbert walked hard, until the perspiration stood

upon

his forehead

and meeting with no game,

it

added

to his secret vexation.

Soon, however, he
;

perceived some object moving in the distance

it

was

his friend busied in collecting mosses.

Scarce-

ly conscious of

what he

did,

Egbert levelled his


silent,

piece

Walther looked towards him with a


It

but

threatening gesture.

was too

late

the fatal shot

was

fired,

and Walther lay


Egbert
felt

lifeless

on the ground.

At

first

easy, or at least

more com-

posed, though a feeling of alarm impelled his footsteps back towards his
castle.

long walk lay

TIECK.

127

before

him

for

he had wandered

far

across the

moors, and into the woods.

He was
expired
;

informed on his return that Bertha had

raving, in a strange unintelligible marmer,

about Walther and the old woman.

For some time

after this event,

Egbert buried

himself in the deepest solitude.


sive

Always of a pensingular
lest
;

cast of mind,

his wife's

story

had

often filled

him with uneasiness,

some untoward

occurrence was in store for them


quite overwhelmed.

and now he was

The
haunted

assassination
hira
;
;

of

his

friend

continually
to

his life

became a prey

remorse

and misery

and such were his


the

sufferings, that

he was

glad to seek the society of a neighbouring town,

and mix

in

reigning
in
;

amusements.

Still
;

he

wished to have a friend


felt

whom

to confide

he

a vacancy in his soul

and when he thought


for

of

Walther

his

terror

was redoubled,

what

friend could

alleviate

such misery.

Then he had

passed so

many
:

delightful days with his dear, un-

happy Bertha

but frjeudship
;

and love had both

vanished from his view


like a

and

his life

became more

strange tale that had been told, than a mere


career.

human

Soon he met with a young knight, named Hugo,

who appeared

to take an interest in the sad

and

thoughtful Egbert.

He

returned the knight's cour-

iZ

GERMAN NOVELS.
more
willingly,

tesies the

as he

had not expected


each other's com;

them pany

and ere long they were seldom separate.


in

They never rode out except


;

they visited in the same societies


far

and yet
he

Egbert was

from being happy.

He

felt as if

were imposing upon his friend Hugo, whose


tion for

affec-

him was founded

in error.

He

wished to

confide the secret of his destiny, in order to learn

whether his friendship would stand the


then
felt

test.

He

so completely

overwhelmed with a sense

of his infamy, that he believed no one could really

esteem him, to

whom
ride,

he was not totally unknown.

Nevertheless he could not resist the impulse, and,

during a solitary

he confided the history of his

adventures to his friend.

He

then inquired whether

Hugo could
was

retain his esteem for an assassin.

Hugo
Egbert

affected,

and

tried to console him, as

followed him, with lighter heart and feelings, back


to the town.

But, alas

it

was the curse of Egbert's nature

to

indulge suspicion, even, in the hour of confidence

and hardly had they entered the public rooms together, before the features of his friend

Hugo began

to alarm him.

He

fancied he detected a malicious


lips
;

smile playing upon his short


;

that he spoke very

conversing with other people present, with a

kind of marked neglect towards him.

Among

the

company was an

old knight,

who

129

had ever shown a decided enmity towards Egbert


often inquiring in a very peculiar

manner

respect-

ing his wealth and his wife.


to associate

much
him

with this
aside
;

Hugo was observed man frequently con;

versing with

while they directed their

looks towards Egbert.


his soul

Believing himself betrayed,


to the

became a prev

most violent rage-

While

siiU

gazing on them, what was his horror

suddenly to behold Walther's face, his exact features, his

well

known
looked

figure.
:

He withdrew
else

his

eyes

again he

it

was no one

but His

Walther whispering
terror

in the ear of the old

man.

was extreme

he darted from the room with


;

a look of distraction
that evening,
castle.

and, abandoning the place


in

immured himself once more

his

There, with the restlessness of a troubled

spirit,

he paced from room to room, his thoughts incessantly busied with horrible ideas
;

while slumber no

longer visited his eyes.


self insane
;

Sometimes he believed him-

that

it

was only imagination which had


;

produced so

many terrific, circumstances


;

yet, surely,

he recollected Walther's features


be no
illusion,

here there could


in-

and again every thing became


to try

explicable.

Soon he resolved
and society seemed

whether travel
;

would tend to dissipate these hateful feelings


friendship
to

for

be closed against

him

for ever.

Without having

fixed

upon any

set-

130

GERMAN NOVELS.
he instantly set forth, paying
little

tied route,

at-

tention to the country, and the objects before him.

When
gan

he had proceeded during some days, he be-

to enter

some

defile,

among
last

the rocks, whence

he found no
peasant,

outlet.

At

he met with an old

who

led

him

to a path opposite a waterfall.

He

wished to bestow some pieces upon his guide,

but he refused them.

"
" nay

I
I

could almost imagine," said Egbert to himself,

could lay a wager, that this


;

man
it

is

Walther."

Again he turned round to look


Walther
!

was indeed
worn down
and, half

Egbert stuck his spurs into his horse,


field, until,
fell

and sped through wood and

by

fatigue, the

noble beast

upon the ground.


;

He

then continued his route on foot

distracted,

he

ascended

hill

he thought he
;

caught the sound of a dog barking near him

but

the waving of the birch trees might, perhaps, deceive

him, which

interposed

between

the

spot.

Soon, however, he distinctly heard, in a kind of supernatural note, the following song
:

" The lonely wood

To me seems

good,
;

So does the green-wood tree The song by night,

The pale moonlight, The lonely wood for me."

At these sounds Egbert

lost all sense of reason

TIECK.

131

and
fear

consciousness.

Buried

in

the

labyrinth

of

and

mystery,

he was uncertain whether he

were awake, or whether he ever possessed such a


wife as Bertha.

He grew more and more


in

confused

variety of strange
;

fancies whirled through his

brain

he breathed

an enchanted world

he could

not rightly conceive or recollect

any thing.

Next he saw an aged woman, bent almost double, come creeping and coughing, with a crutch in her
hand, along the hill-side. " Dost thou bring back

my

dog;
"

my
see

bird

my
the

jewels ?" she shrieked aloud.

Now

how

unjust punish themselves

was thy

friend

Walther

was thy Hugo only I." " Gracious God," cried Egbert, "
;

in

what an
!"

awful wilderness then have

spent

my days

"

And Bertha was

thy own

sister !"

added the

old crone.

The unhappy Egbert

lay senseless on the earth.

" Why," continued the old woman, " why did


she so deceitfully abandon
this,

me

Had

she not done

every thing would have yet been well.


trial

Her

period of

was already

over.

She was the

daughter of a Knight,
of a herdsman

who

confided her to the care

thy own
!"

father's daughter."

" Alas

alas

exclaimed Egbert, "

why have

ever predicted this fatal consequence

ever

been

haunted by

this detested idea

132

GERMAN NOVELS.
said

" Because,"

the old
that

woman, " thy

father

himself informed

thee

he had a daughter,

whom
ther

he did not venture to bring up at home on


;

account of his wife

being his daughter by ano-

woman."
:

Egbert heard no more

he was lying in a raving


;

and dying

state

upon the

earth

the last voices that

broke upon his ear, were the screaming voice of the


old

woman, the barking

of the dog, and the strange

bird's reiterated sons:.

LANGBEIN.

1^33

GERMAN NOVELS.

LANGBEIN.
Augustus Frederick Langbein was born
at

Radeberg, near Dresden, the 6th day of Sep-

tember, 1757.

He was employed
produced 2
in

for

some time

as

a private tutor and censor of the press at Dresden,

where he

first

vols, of

poems, Leipsick,
wrote his " Taat Berlin,

1788; followed,
titled

1795, by 3 vols, of novels, en-

" Evening Pastimes."

He

lisman

against Ennui," in three parts,

1802, with " Ritter Gerhard and his Faithful One,"


a Romance, also in
vels

1802.

Another

series of no-

appeared

in

1804;
in

his " Ritter der


;

Wahrheit,

or

True Knight,"

1805

followed by a variety of

other works, chiefly belonging to the same class

but

all

remarkable for their

spirit,

and the ingenuity


are of
in

of their plots and incideuts.


a
light

Most of these

and humorous character, approaching

point of excellence nearer to the

manner of Wiethat can be

land, (though without either his classical or romantic


pretensions,)

than any other

Novels

mentioned.

134

GERMAN NOVELS.
In a work
like

the

present, however, only a

faint idea

can be conveyed of the qualities of his


;

more extended productions


though too

many

scenes and inci-

dents of which, are of a highly animated character,

diffuse

and national

to

prove wholly
Yet, exten-

acceptable to modern English tastes.

sive as they are, these novels constitute only a

few

of his lively and humorous compositions, both in


prose

and

verse,

many

of which are become

dethe

servedly popular with the lighter readers


author's countrymen
;

among

with those

who

delight ra-

ther in viewing the comic and burlesque, than the


terrific

and supernatural exhibitions of imaginative


Specimens of the former kind have here

power.

been selected, as affording at once the most amusing materials


author's

such

as are best adapted to display the

peculiar manner,
relief

and

as

offering

some

degree of

and contrast

to the

more powerful

and appalling pictures from the hand of Tieck,

As a novel writer, Langbein will be found to rank among the foremost who have infused a more
light

and animated

spirit

into

their productions,
literature of

since the revival of the

modern

Ger-

many.
liar

He

discovers less of a national and pecu-

tone than most writers of fiction,

who have
and
uni-

either preceded or followed

him

his delineation of
greneral

manners and characters

are

more

LANGBEIN.

135

Versal

the interest attaching to

them

is
;

more

in

unison with modern tastes and feelings

while the
of satire,

keen and

lively,

yet

good-natured

air

thrown over his

reflections,

presents us with

much

of the pleasure of ironical observation, without the


sting.

136

GERMAN NOVELS.

MARIANNE RICHARDS;
OR, MEMOIRS OF

AN ACTRESS.

The

Treasury-secretary Richards was a clever,

clear-sighted

man. by

On
all

this

account he was very

naturally disliked
racter,

those of an inferior chafor

who

are inclined to consider the project

some
cious

lucrative office, or the despatch of

some gra-

commands,

as the

most distinguished and ad-

vantageous triumph of the

human
!"

understanding,

"

mighty genius, to be sure


;

they would often

observe to one another


their shoulders, in
'

at the

same time shrugging


rather

way which

betrayed

their

own malice than


upon him.
it

the justice of their reflec-

tions

True

was that Mr. Secretary Richards had


in the eyes of

committed an unpardonable offence


these court pedants,

which they conceived quite


to

treasonable

he

had been long ago attached

polite literature,

and had even written verses and

comedies in his youth.

And though

he had long
discharg-

dismounted from
ing
his
official

this,

his early hobby,

duties with the utmost degree of

promptitude and care, they declared that the old

LANGBEIN.

137

sinner

had not
his

fairly

recanted his youthful error


theatrical

und that

love

for

exhibitions

still

kept possession both of his head

and
in

his

heart.
list

Worse than

all,

they found his

name

of

members
with

for a private theatre,


;

which he furnished

his advice

and,

if

the verses lied not, with


if

occasional prologues and epilogues, as


greater zest to the
stalk
sin.

to

give

To be

sure,

he did not

the

stage

but her

lady-secretaryship

was

known
ters,

to appear in certain fine maternal charac-

which she represented with much nature and

truth.

Such a penchant, however, did not seem


terfere with her other duties
;

to in-

for she very ably su-

perintended her domestic


live

affairs,

and continued

to

on the best terms with her consort.


;

This

highly-gifted pair possessed an only child


girl,

a lovely

who seemed
breast.

to have derived a taste, as well as

a genius, for theatrical performances, from her


ther's

mo-

Before she was four years of age,

Marianne displayed her infantine powers, with such


a

degree of excellence^

combmed

with

so

much

simplicity

and

ease, as to delight every

one who

beheld

her.

So

beautiful

and accomplished a

young

creature, thus early attracting the plaudits

of her parents and their friends,

became almost an

object of idolatry in their eyes, and they spared no

138

GERMAN NOVELS.
cultivating her

means of

uncommon powers

to

ihe

greatest advantage.

Nor did she disappoint


At
fifteen years of age,

their fond expectations.

Mariane spoke the French


;

and

Italian languages with fluency

painted beautiIn
all

fully,

and danced

still

more enchantingly.

the most pleasing feminine accomplishments,


far

she

surpassed her companions, for rivals


:

she had

none

there was an inimitable grace in her least

actions,

which appealed with

irresistible

power both

to the eye, and to the heart.

Her genuine

vivacity

and wit rendered her the

soul of the society in which she moved.

She could

enliven the most sedate and sorrowful groups of

antiquated belles and beaux

in

the world, by the


at the

magic of her looks and words, while,


time,

same
or

there was nothing approaching to levity

extravagance
refined

nothing
or
all
;

infringing

on

the
others.

most

manners,

the

feelings of

Of
of

course, with these shining qualities, she was cordially hated

by

the

awkward

or plain

women
all

her acquaintance

pitied

and condemned by

the

devotees

but vastly admired and prized by every


a
heart to give.
Yet, beyond the

man who had


circle

of her

own

family

and

most confidential
simre-

friends, did Mariane's true worth, the native


plicity

and tenderness of her whole character,


in

main unappreciated,

the recesses of her heart.

LANGBEIN.

139

The

truth of this she soon painfully experienced

in the loss

of an excellent mother, for


;

whom

she

was almost inconsolable


of her noblest and
fuller play.

but which brought some


into

most valuable feelings


opinions, would

Her devoted attachment


for all

to her father,

and her respect had he

his

now

have led her to renounce her theatrical taste and


pursuits,

at all insisted

on such a

sacrifice

but

in

about a year, he requested her to appear

once more upon the private boards.

Here

her

characters were always of the most pathetic and exalted cast.

The

hero's part

was

in

general played

by a

fine

promising young man, one of her father's

secretaries, in

whom

he placed

the utmost con-

fidence,

and whose talents he justly appreciated,

uniformly treating him less like an assistant than


like

a son.
Unfortunately,
there
are

always certain busy

and

officious people,

whose chief occupation seems

to be that of deciding

upon other people's

affairs,

without possessing, or wishing to possess, any competent information on the subject


in
:

so

it

happened

this instance.

Secretary Richards' real eleva-

tion of mind,

which induced him thus to indulge

his daughter's tastes

and

his

own, was regarded by

them

as absurd

and romantic extravagance, highly


his

unjust towards

daughter.

He

deigned not,

however, to notice any of these idle and injurious

140

GF.RMAX XOVELS.

reports,

though he well knew

their object,

and the

source whence they were derived.


It

did not escape him, likewise, that his

young
with

friend

Werner and Marianne were not


but, in

satisfied

strictly

confining their love-scenes to the circle of


;

the stage

order to perfect themselves in

such characters, held frequent rehearsals elsewhere.

And

this they

both frankly confessed on his

first

allusion to the subject.

From

this

time

he seemed to regard Werne^

as his son,

and the ne^v alliance soon became the


of every circle
in

familiar conversation

the

city.

This gave peculiar zest to the pleasure of the privileged few,

admitted to the private boards, who


lovers in their

watched the progress of the


characters, through
all

assumed

the difficulties and suffer-

ings

opposed to their mutual passion, until on

being sometimes eventually surmounted, the lovely


heroine
yielded

her hand, amidst the smiles and


;

whispers of the spectators


before she gives
or worse
:

"

How

long will

it

be,

it

him
will

for

good

When

at least for better


oflf

they leave

these heroics,
?"

and cease weeping, and making us weep thus

This was one of those prophecies, however, destined never to be fulfilled.


fell

Mr. Secretary Richards


apoplectic
seizure,

a sudden victim to an

un-

conscious even that he died in his unhappy daughter's

arms.

Young Werner,

too, beheld himself at

LANGBEIN.

141

once deprived of a benefactor and a father, at a

moment when he was


might shortly have
his son.

fast rising

into notice

and
of

laid claim to the legal

title
it

But

this

was not the

sole

change

pro-

duced
try

the noble Secretary had served his coun-

better

than himself, and had,


fortune.

consequently,

amassed

little

His influence no longer


;

promoted the young statesman's advancement

he

began

to question the policy of the

proposed

alli-

ance, and his attentions to the daughter of his


nefactor

be-

became

less

warm and

assiduous.

His lan-

guage assumed a more measured tone, and the

word of friendship was more frequently upon


lips.

his

In this manner did the ungrateful seek grait

dually to loosen those bands of affection, which

had

late

been his proudest ambition to form,

until,

at length,

he had the cruel audacity, within a few

months

after her father's decease, to write to her?

stating the insurmountable obstacles that

now

pre-

sented themselves to their union, which he express-

ed

in

the most cold and calculating language,

re-

gretting that
their

prudence would no longer sanction


Marianne, however, exhibit-

mutual regard.

ed

less

emotion at the reception of these tidings,


politic

than the

Werner had probably


spirit,

anticipated.

girl

of her sense and

possessed of so

many
due

and such varied accomplishments, thought


to her insulted

it

pride, rather

to

congratulate her-

142

GERMAN NOVELS.
on having detected the real character of such a
than to regret his
loss.

self

lover,
tives,

His interested mo-

and

his

bad

taste,

were conspicuously dis-

played shortly afterwards, in his marriage with the

daughter of a wealthy, but notorious usurer


as opposite to Mariane, as darkness to light,
ly inferior to her in person as in the

girl

equal-

endowments

of mind.

The

affairs

of the late Secretary had been

placed in the hands of Commissioners, appointed

on his sudden demise, who shortly informed his or-

phan daughter,

that,

after

the discharge of his

outstanding debts, a very small surplus was found

remaining due to her.

This wrought a complete

change
ty

in

poor Mariane's situation, bot4i in socieworld at large.

and

in the

At

first

she was ca-

ressed and consoled, then

pitied,

and by degrees,
despiI

she
sed.
to

felt

that she began to be forsaken and

This was too


shall
I

much

" Whither shall

turn

what

betake myself!" cried the lovely,

but unhappy Mariane, as she became daily more


sensible of the
altered

manners of her

late friends
ladies,
I

and

associates, the growing coolness of the


familiarity
will

and the

of the courtiers.
I

"

for this

cannot and

not bear

Let

me

rather perform
all trials

the most menial services, expose myself to

and

to every risk, than longer endure these painful

confiicts

of heart and soul.

Oh,

my

dear,

dear

father

could you see the cruel sufferings and temp-

LANGBEIN.

14J

tations

to

which

have been exposed here


toils

in the

very scene of your honourable


services,

and

faithful

from the very hearts which ought to have

been so truly bounden by them, how

much you
this hateful

would
scene,
steps,

pity

me.

But

must

fly

from

though penury and privation


if
I

pursue

my
have

would not become a voluntary victim,


to myself.

most

viie

and hateful

Henceforth

only to rely upon

my own

principles,

and

my own

powers of exertion."

True to these resolutions, she instantly aban-

doned the courtly mansion, where she was residing


on sufferance, without even consulting
rous owners, and took private lodgings
;

its

ungene-

where she
fu-

might

reflect

in

safety,
first

upon some means of

ture support.

She

sought refuge at the house


sole ambition cen-

of a wealthy tradesman, whose


tered in

adding fresh sums, however small, to his


This man, judging of her fortune

growing capital.

by her appearance,

had the conscience,

in

the

course of a few weeks, to present her with the most


unjust charges for her residence,
riety

making out a vawas not

of false items

at the

same time, giving her


his
bill

notice to leave the house,


tled within

if

set-

eight

days.

The wretched Maria ne,


it

almost reduced to extremities, found


to decide upon

expedient

new measures

and, in the hurry

and agony of her thoughts, the idea of the stage,

144

GERMAN NOVELS.
for the first time, since the loss of her father,

now,

recurred to her mind.

Scarcely had she adopted the resolution of applying to some theatrical manager,
able old

when

a respect-

man

of the

name

of

Oswald, who had been

an actor from his fifteenth year, announced himself,

and was gladly admitted.

He had

retired

from the stage, within the


taken

last five or six years,

and

up

his

residence

near that of Marianne's

father, with

whom

he had been on intimate terms,


inquiries, since
his

and had made repeated

death,

respecting his unfortunate daughter.

His appear-

ance, at this moment, was hailed with lively pleasure, as


it

was her

first

wish to consult him upon

her future prospects, and avail herself of his

known
!"

good-nature and experience.

" Welcome,
cried
;

a thousand times welcome


this
is

she

" how kind

of you

You

are

among
I

the few of

my

old friends

of my
affairs

father's friends,

mean, who have been


about me.
for
I

at the

trouble of inquiring
sit

But

sit

down, pray

down quickly

have most important


I

on which to con-

sult you,

do assure you."
!"

" Ah, indeed


teran, as

replied

the old dramatic


;

ve-

he seated himself laughing


!

" most im-

portant affairs

so,
;

so.

hope you don't want


else in reason."
;

me

to fight a duel

any thing

" No, no, you need not look so alarmed

but

LANt. BKI.V.

to

you know the whole history of

my unhappy
in

affairs.

You think
to

have been sadly wronged


property,

respect

my
let

father's

and that advantage has


intestate.
if I

been taken of his dying so suddenly, and

But

it
I

pass

heaven pardon

all

my

enemies,
I

have any
rely

It is

enough that henceforward


efforts
;

must

upon

my own

feel that

it

is

equally
comfort,

indispensable to

my

self-respect,

to

my

and

to

my

character, that I should no longer live


;

dependent upon the bounty of others


I

and, finally,

have resolved to lose no time

in

applying to your
sorry
to think

friend the manager,


it is

though

am

directly

against your last

advice

and

in-

junctions."

"

should be sorry, too,


in
jest.
!"

if I

did not believe you


forbid

were only

Ye Powers
replied her

that
friend.

you

should be serious

good old

" Very serious, dear Oswald."


" To become an actress "
stand
!

you alarm me."


I

Why
you
;

should

it?

But, perhaps,

misunderI

you doubt

my
I

talent

you think

shall not succeed,"

" No, not that

but

almost wish

it

were so,"

said the old player, with one of his

comic expres-

sions of face

"

if I

thought so

truly, I

would rate

you

well.

Unfortunately,

you possess too many

fine qualities,

without any

flattery, to give

me hopes

of that.

only fear you would assume too high a

VOL. IV.

146

GERMAN NOVELS.
in

rank

the annals of our stage, excite too


;

much

admiration, love, hate, jealousy


plots,

foment

divisions,

and

all

manner of

conspiracies, until
fire.

you had
then,
so

set the poor

manager's house on

Would

at this

moment, Marianne, that thou wert rather


and hearing, as
to render thee quite

dull of wit
fit

un-

to enact the least part of a poor

page or pedlar

and had such a villanous


halting
in

stuttering,

and such a

thy gait, as to mar the majesty of a

dumb

messenger,
;

who has

only to bear some royal

despatches

would that thy memory would not lead


;

thee three words running aright


!"

and

thai, withal,

thou wert darker than a gypsey, and plainer than


those that envy thee most

" Extremely obliged, Mr. Oswald


ly wishes."

very friend-

" Yes, friendly, by Heavens," repeated Oswald,


very earnestly
tages, with
;

"better you had

all

these disadvan-

indigence added to the number, than


to

expose yourself
not of."

the

dreadful

risks

you wot

" " But, good Mr. Oswald " Oh that private cursed

theatre
!

Oh

Mr.

Secretary,

Mr.

Secretary

A
;

thousand
" but you

pardons,

my
his
is

dear girl," interrupted

the old man,

drawing
see this

hands

across

his

eyes
I

the fruit of such tricks.

perceive that that


scale.

vou

have moulded your ideas upon

I.ANGBKIN.

147

There you had every advantage


study a character
pleasure,
all
;

whole

weeks

to

buoyed

up with

praise
;

and
and

grace and ease and confidence

applauded until your ears tingled with the sound.


Peace, pleasure, and affluenpe were around you, and thus a de;

such a theatre gave a zest to

all.

It is

lightful pastime deceives the heart of youth


will

it

always continue as enchanting as

it

now

is

we think

the same scene and season will recur, and

always please us as well.

Such now appear

to

you
it

the attractions of a public theatre, comparing

with that which you once enjoyed

and you would

encounter the cruel sport and violence of fortune,

upon a scene exposed


ations, while

to all her

most trying

vari-

you imagined you were perhaps flying

to a place

of refuge.

Too soon you


dream
; ;

are

rudely

awakened from a
bursts
life

delightful

the real truth

upon your

startled vision

the real evils of the storm grows


;

rise in succession before


;

you

louder and louder

you tremble,

you would
fly
;

you draw back


late.

fain vsrap
is

your cloak around you, and


In vain

when

it

perhaps already too


for the flowers

you look round


in

you once plucked

other
;

fields,

when they blossomed round your

home

thorns, sharp thorns, are strewed along your

path, which pierce you the more keenly, the more

tender your feelings are."

" Sufely your zeal

for

me
2

misleads you," replied

148

GERMAN

NOVKI.S.

Marianne, or

do not quite understand you.


is

do

hope your
travagant."

portrait

too liighly coloured and ex-

"

will

draw no

portrait then," replied original itself


;

Oswald

"

will

give
I

you the

and mark

me

well, while

honestly declare that an actor's


pitiable

life is

one of the most

and wretched, more espe-

cially for persons of

good family and education, to

whom

it

soon becomes wholly intolerable."


I

" But

think you ought at least to bring


assertions.

me
too,

some proofs of these harsh


!"

You

after playing for half a century,

you must be a very

old sinner

" Oh,
only

will

give

abundant proofs,
replied the

if

you

will

listen

patiently,"

humorous

old

actor, laughing,

"
is

My

first

evidence, short and conclusive enough,

in this single question

can you

bear up against

contempt ?" " As little as any one of honourable feelings." " Therefore, my dear girl, recant, recant quickly
these, your villanous errors.

For contempt,

bitter,

heavy contempt,
"

falls to

the lot of those

who

tread

the magic scene."

Who

despises
all

them

?"

" Nearly " Such a


I

the world."
is

feeling, then,

excessively unjust
in

as

suppose the world's opinions


is

general are.

Still,

every situation on earth

mingled with good and

LANGBEIN.

149

ovil.

The

profession

we speak

of must embrace

many worthy members ornaments to any society, who in no way merit the world's censure or scorn."
" That
is

very true

but the innocent very fre-

quently suffer along with those

who own

are

not so,

you know." " They must then assert

their

self respect,

and prove by

their actions

that they belong to the

better class, in defiance of the prejudices

and scan-

dal of the world,"

"

Why, you speak

like

a philosopher, like
surprise

man," exclaimed Oswald, with evident

and

pleasure, " but will this sage philosophy stand the


test?

Can

it

cope with

all

the difficulties which that

thousand -headed despot, the public, has prepared


for
it ?

Can

it

repress your just indignation,

when
pay-

the highest triumph of your art,


little

on which each
after

despot believes he

sits in

judgment

ing his entrance mite


impression,

shall either fail to

make an
Suppose

or be decried

by the worst portion of


?

an indiscriminate and

tasteless audience

some absurd, but -high-born and

influential leader
little

of the ton, with a vast deal of conceit, and as

sense or feeling, should take upon himself the part

of censor, and decide upon your best and most la-

boured

efforts in the

presence of the public, and in

favour of a party

who echo back

his

opinions

150

r.F.UMAN NOVELS.

pronounced, perhaps, too near, and loud enough to


be heard by the unhappy actress on the stage."

" The value of the praise or blame of such men,"


replied Marianne, "

must be pretty equal. The good

opinion of a few disinterested and able judges ought


to

be the great object of every first-rate actor." " So thought my much valued friend, the cele-

brated Ekhof,

whom

have often heard relate the


evening,

following anecdote.

One

when
in

represent-

ing the part of an honest countryman,

which he

studied to display strong and simple nature, there

happened to be an

original" of the
in the house,

sartne

class, as

one of the spectators


iiim.

not far from

He
at

gazed upon his counterpart long and in-

tently, with his


until

mouth
in

as wide

open as
to

his eyes,

neighbour

last
'

he

exclaimed

aloud

his

next

How
hearty

the world

have

they per'

suaded one of our chaps to come here V


simple

This

and
'

enquiry,'

added
to

my

friend

Ekhof,

was more gratifying

"my
in

pride, than

any compliment of the best


Unluckily,
tators

critic

the world.'

however, there
feel

are

not

many
In

spec-

who

so correctly, or explain themselves

so

clearly,

as

the

honest
is

rustic.

truth,

company of
tion,

players
several

a singular kind of corporaare generally at

whose

members
;

open

warfare with each other

while, at the

same time,
a

they must take care to

make up among them


Jealousy
of favourite

most

harmonious whole.

parts,

LANGBEIN.

151

iind of public favour, creates perpetual broils,

which

so far injure the temper of the

most mild and good


an ex-

humoured, as

to display itself to the eye of

perienced spectator.
sity of

Then the indispensable necesin opposition to

speaking and acting


is

your
are

better feelings

a painful task, to those


;

who

not naturally hypocritical


to

for

how

is

it

possible

go nobly through with scenes of splendid action,

of pathos, and of love, with actors whose whole


lives

and manners are perhaps

in direct contradic-

tion to the characters they sustain,

and such as
?

it

must be your object


is it

to avoid

and

to abhor

How

possible to express with spirit, characters full


is

of vivacity and humour, while the heart

oppress-

ed with

its

heavy burden of care and grief?

To

think of sporting, amidst the abundance of fancied

wealth and honours, while the contrast


libly

is

so inde?

impressed upon the mind, without a sigh


!

For

alas

penury and privations do not only dog the

footsteps of the grossly

abandoned or imprudent
economical frequently
fall

the most cautious and

victims to this d-angerons profession, without a single fault.

An

unsettled and wandering

life

renders
;

prudence and domestic happiness almost unavailing


the changes of war, of fashion, and the
of

humour
of

the great,

are not unfrequently the cause

suddenly reducing the most respectable members to


utter

wretchedness and ruin.

Should talent and

152

GERMAN NOVELS.
even triumph for a period, the
evil

Spirit

day

is

sure

to

arrive,

when, broken and

dispirited, the

aged

actor, with feeble,

and

still

feebler, efforts,

and with

shattered nerves, looks round

him

for

some sup-

porting hand in vain

and sometimes

faints, or ac-

tually dies, with intense exertions to maintain his

former fame.

Thousands, who gazed with pleasure


his art,

upon the triumphs of upon


his less vivid
;

look coldly
declining

down
and

scenes

^his

fire

pathos

nor are there wanting pharasaical friends

among them ready


length he yields

to
'

condole with him, when at


at

Ah, why not aim


"

something

beyond a comedian V
"

My

dear friend," exclaimed Marianne, " you

give a sad

a very

sad account."
it

" Nay,

have not completed

yet.

must
the

now

present
;

you with the foreground

of

picture

all

those disagreeable incidents and in-

conveniences
ticular to a

attending on such

life,

in

par-

young, unmarried actress; exposed to a

thoiisand perils and temptations,


parental support
;

when

destitute of

and these not only from her com-

panions on the stage, but from the most insidious,


violent,

and dangerous men of the world.


all

The

corruption, too, of manners in

great cities, creates


is

absolute disbelief in female virtue, and


as a matter of fashionable notoriety

treated

by young lords
This despicable

and gentlemen who lead the

ton.

;!

LANGBEIN,

153

feeling, arising out of sheer assurance

and the most


to

paltry vanity,

leads

these

young fashionables

imagine themselves possessed of


tions,

irresistible attrac-

and that they have merely

to to

make

their
see,

appearance, like the

Roman
their

hero,
is

'

come, to

and

to conquer,'

and

fame

achieved.

Such

worthies only laugh in their sleeve,


real merit expresses

when a man of
They seek

a nobler opinion of the sex

and

in particular, as respects the stage.

to confirm

existing prejudices,

and imagine that


In this perfor

every pretty actress will be glad to listen to the


best proposals she can

meet withal.

suasion,

these
:

little

heroes

arm themselves

conquest

with brazen front, bold eye, unblushing

cheek, they have recourse to the most despicable

manoeuvres;
they retreat,

they

lie

in

ambush, they advance,


once
lose

but never

sight of their

unfortunate prey.

Should some being of superior


views

character, of purer and loftier

than

those

by

whom

she

is

surrounded, present herself

; one

whose soul were capable of abhorring the beauty of


an Apollo, when, disguising the temptations of a

demon,
forfeit

what a
;

fate

is

reserved for her

She may
the humi-

her reputation, though pure and spotless as


she

the snow
liation of

may be condemned

to

hearing a repetition of proposals which

place her upon a level with the most abandoned

and unfortunate of

her

sex.

Yes, by Heavens

154

GERMAN NOVELS,
no deeper reproach and
life

were there no other

evil,

bitterness attaching to such a

than this

were

the stage a paradise of delight for the display of

female

talents

and

accomplishments

yet

this
it,

single source of

shame and sorrow must render

in the eyes of every noble

and pure-minded woman,

life

of incessant danger and anxiety


!"

perfect

purgatory upon earth

He
tions
;

ceased, but Marianne was unable to reply.


to repress her

She was evidently struggling


and Oswald did not
ings, in order that his
full

emofeel-

wisli to

check her

arguments might have

their

weight

but the next

moment

she burst into

a flood of tears.

" Wretch that


I

am," she cried; " on

all sides

am surrounded by precipices yawning me yet I must press forward. I must


;

to receive

encounter

all

those difficulties, severe and alarming as you

depict them.
for

For

tell
is
it

me, dear Oswald, decide


not more becoming,
difficulties,

me

yourself
to

and

nobler far,

contend with

however

great and appalling, than to live dependent

upon
us

the bounty of others, or to


die of despair
?

sit

down and weep, and


must come,
let

If destruction
;

not yield without an effort


it;

let

us have the price of

let

us

fall

at

conscious of one's
integrity to

least with one's own applause, own innocence; with honour and

embalm our names."

LANGBEIN'.

155

" Very good, very noble,


replied

my
;

poor Marianne,"

Oswald much

affected

and he pressed the

subject no farther.
*'

Yes,

mv

decision
;

is

made, irrevocably made,"

pursued Marianne
Yet,
believe

" seek to oppose

me no

longer.

me, your kind motives are deeply,

very deeply
lost

felt

and appreciated, nor

shall they
solicit

be

upon me.

And now
in

have to
in

your

friendly aid

and intercession,

obtaining for

me

such a situation

some respectable company, as


for

you may judge best adapted


''

me."

Then be

it

so,"

replied

Oswald
;

"

have

discharged

my

duty as an old friend


your present
I

and should
either

YOU

live

to

regret
I

decision,

sooner or
myself.

later,

hope

shall not
I

need to upbraid
;

For,

confess,

cannot augur good

the
too

words of Hamlet to Ophelia occur to


forcibly

my mind

upon

this occasion

Be thou as Thou shalt

chaste as

ice,

as pure as snow,

uot escape calumny.'

Perceiving,

however, that you


I

are

hxed

in
I

your

determination,

am happy
I

to think that

can be

of some advantage to you, in facilitating the object

you have

in

view.

am

well

acquainted with
is

Wolfram, one of our managers, who


guished for the maintenance of
propriety
;

tnost distin-

strict

order

and

and who,

know,

is

just

now

desirous

156

GERMAN NOVELS.
leading"

of engaging some lady of ability to take


parts
letter

as the heroine of the piece.

received

from him this very day, stating that he had

discharged the person

who had

hitherto conducted

them, on account of her


levity of her

presumption, and
I

the

manners

and entreating that

would

be on the fook-out to find him the best substitute


in

my

power."

" Oh,

how extremely
if

fortunate

!"

exclaimed
tears.

Marianne, brightly smiling through her


really

"

It

seems as

Heaven
I

meant to favour
only deceiving
like to

my
my-

attempt.
self;

Yet, perhaps,
friend

am

your

Wolfram may not

engage

with a mere novice." " Indulge no anxiety on that head.


I

have not
;

the least hesitation in recommending you

and

can vouch

for

your reception, should not the vato

cancy happen

have been already

filled

up."
I

" Ah, pray then write, write quickly.

will

not delay you a moment," cried Marianne, as she

reached her old friend

his

hat

and

stick,

and

almost hurried him away."

LANGBEINi

157

CHAPTER

II.

In a very few days Oswald

again
;

made
" Here

his
!

appearance, with a letter in his hand

have brought you friend Wolfram's answer,


dear; for henceforward
father.
I

my
a

must talk

to
;

you

like

Your wishes
you
;

are complied with


better."

he longs

to see

and the sooner the

The next
spi-

day was, therefore, appointed.


interval
rits,

Marianne spent the

in trying to

compose the hurry of her

and recalling

to

mind her most

favourite

and

successful efforts in other lime?.

Half smiles, half

tears, she received the

kind old
;

man, accompanied by

his friend the

manager

and

expressed her gratitude in the most lively terms.

Wolfram appeared delighted with her manners


and conversation
;

and

felt

no hesitation

in oftering
it

her the part of Emilia Galotti.*

She accepted
it

and on the important night, exhibited

with a de-

gree of brilliant power, which gained her undivided

applause.

She was equally happy


;

in

Minna of

Barnhelm
rare talent
to

and the public seemed and unequalled

to appreciate her

assiduity.

She seemed

penetrate into the inmost foldings of the pas-

One

of the most favourite pieces of Lessiug.

158

GERMAN NOVELS.
meaning of her characters;
;

sions, in developing the

she threw fervent lieart and spirit into their thoughts

and soared above

all

that conventional tone,


art,

and
with

mechanical play of the

which

rests satisfied

following the language, without the spirit of the

author;
verse.

much

as a

young

tvro repeats the

Psalms

in

At the same time, such was her correctness,


be able wholly to dispense with
;

that she was never observed to be at a loss for a


syllable, so as to

the presence of a prompter

often such an indis-

pensable requisite, even to good actors.

She was no

less correct

and

tasteful in her se-

lection of dramatic costume.

That vanity and co-

quetry which would have induced others, in playing


the character of village maidens, to array themselves
in

the dress of
;

countess,

never

occupied

her

thoughts

and she studied only

to adapt her dress

and whole appearance,


she had to sustain.

to the nature of the character

During the performance, she


in the

was wholly absorbed moment.


little

scene before her

nothing
for a

seemed capable of distracting her attention

Apparently, she regarded the audience as


there
her.

as

if

had been a wall of separation between

them and
monious

Even

in

the intervals, she was

still

busied with her part, and preserved the same harspirit until

the close
in

while

many

of her

com-

panions were jesting


times missing,

the green-room, and someto be ready to appear.

when they ought

LANGBEIN.

1.59

The manager was a very

different character to

the usual run of the profession, whose ideas are

wholly confined to the mechanical process of the


scenes.

He had
its

taste to appreciate the full

mean-

ing of the spectacle, and understood the laws by

which

most complete representation was to be


insomuch that the most experienced mem-

attained,

bers of his

company were glad

to avail themselves

of his suggestions.

This they did the more freely,

because they were discreetly and delicately delivered


in
;

even their most glaring errors were pointed out


spirit
:

a kind and friendly

though he could be
occasion required.

extremely earnest and severe,

if

This was particularly experienced by such members


of the

company

as were less assiduous,

and

less

attentive in rehearsal than the rest, thus requiring

frequent repetitions, which exhausted the time and


patience of the leading characters.

The

society, moreover, consisted, for tlje chief

part, of respectable

names,

of persons

who had acAt the head

quired general approbation and esteem by the propriety of their

manners and conduct.

of the female class, was a

widow lady of the name


intrusted the charge of

of Berger, whose virtues were justly appreciated by the manager.

To her he

Marianne, who took up her residence at her house,

and received the kindest proofs of her


regard.

affection

and

160

GERMAN NOVELS.
Several months elapsed

and Marianne conti-

nued

to please

and

to be pleased.

Not the
;

slight
fre-

est unpleasant incident

had occurred

and she

quently wrote to her old friend, Oswald, representing the advantages which she enjoyed, and rallying him, in the most amusing terms, upon his unjust
representations of the perils of a player's
life,

which

did not at
colours.

all

deserve to be depicted in such dismal


old actor's answers iniiformlv began,
all is

The

"

am

rejoiced to hear that

yet going well.

Still

you are only

at the foot of the

mountain, and

you have a long journey before you.


yourself/'

Look

well to

And

in

a short time, Oswald's histrionic pro'


fulfilled.

phecies began to be

Notwithstanding the

manager's utmost caution and reserve, there were


certain

young

lords

who found

their

way

into

the

green-room, and vied with each other in lavishing


applauses upon Marianne's theatrical genius and
skill.

Tliese, however, she


;

politely repelled or re-

fused to hear
easily

but her artful flatterers were not

repulsed,

and

their

commendations were

shortly directed to the

charms of her manners and

her person.

Marianne blushing, shrunk back, and made no


reply.

Such

discreet conduct, however, did not deter

them from again making their appearance behind

the

LANGBEIN.

IGl

scenes

and sometimes they even followed her into

the green-room,

when they were preparing


this uncivil

to dress.
fi-

At the head of

company, there

gured a smart young lord of the Prince's chamber,

named Windhorst, one


fortune,
qualities

of the most dissolute but


court.

successful intriguers of the

He

possessed
assurance,
entitle
in

a good

person,

and

.infinite

which he believed would invariably

him

to the admiration of the


life.

women, whether
his utter

single or married

At the same time


to

his deter-

mined perseverance, united


feeling, his audacity,

want of

and his wily experience, ren-

dered him one of the most dangerous characters,

dreaded by every

woman

of real virtue,

unfortunate as to attract his attentions.

who was so The city

annals of scandal were

filled

with his

evil exploits,

containing the number of wives


broiled with their

whom

he had em-

husbands

the
in

daughters

whom
More-

he had decoyed from


over,

their

parent's roof.

he had frequently betrayed the tender confiin

dence reposed

him

and

several instances,

where he had been repulsed and

foiled,

had boasted

of favours which he never enjoyed.

Such was the young


daily
tions,

lord's character,

who now
aflfec-

began

to lay closer siege to

Marianne's

sometimes attended by companions of the


;

same stamp, sometimes alone

but always inces-

sant in his visits to the theatre, behind the scenes,

lOH

GERMAN NOVELS.
in the

and

green-room.

Marianne, however, as

in-

variably

shunned

his approach,
listen

and even showed


him, than to any

greater reluctance to

to

others

who accompanied him.


:

But

in

vain

she

avoided him

he followed

" he insisted upon being

heard, let her only admit him in the rank of her


friends,

and he would require no more."

She

still

sought to avoid him, and at length complained


of his incessant persecutions to the manager.
instantly took the matter up, called
courtier,

He

upon the young warmly

and

after expressing his feelings

upon the
artful

subject,

concluded with repeating his

prohibition of his appearing behind the scenes.

The

young

courtier received his reproaches with

a good-natured laugh, treated the whole matter as

mere

jest,

and clapping the manager upon the

shoulder,

hoped that he Avould not


all

insist

upon

banishing him, and

his friends,

from the theatre.

The next day he presented


the side
gre'en-room, as

himself, as usual, at

entrance of the theatre,


if

leading to the

nothing had occurred.

This time,

however, the manager had been as good as his


word, and the young lord beheld
fierce
it

guarded by two

whiskered cherubims, with brandished swords,


like those forbidding a

which he imagined blazed


return to Paradise
;

and somewhat with the

feelings

of a foiled demon, he retraced his steps, without

venturing an attack.

LANGBEIN,

163

Marianne's persecutions appeared


ceased
;

now

to have

but, in a short while, she

remarked with

pain, that the manager's

manners towards her bedistant.

gan

to

grow more cold and


;

This she could


she one

not support

and with

tears in her eyes,

day pressed him

to give her

an explanation.
affair,

He

frankly confessed that the recent

on which

she had consulted him, had somewhat disconcerted

him.

True

it

was, that she was quite the innocent^,


;

occasion of what had occurred


suffered so

yet,

that he

had

much from
it

similar disagreeable occurhis temper,

rences, that he

was not always master of

and
to

that,

indeed,

was

neai'ly impossible for

him

do

strict justice in

these matters, and even to

escape the charge of confounding the innocent with


the guilty
:

that she must not imagine she had in


;

the least forfeited his esteem

and that she must


in his de-

judge nothing from any apparent change


portment
;

for

most assuredly, as long as she con-

tinued to conduct herself with so

much

discretion

and propriety, she might

rely

upon

his friendship

and protection.
After this conversation, the kind-hearted

ma-

nager sought to repair his unintentional injustice

and coolness, by lavishing more than usual attention

and commendations upon


its

her.

But

this
;

did

not produce on Marianne

intended effect

she

thought she perceived

a degree

of restraint and

164

GERMAN NOVELS.
in

ceremony

his

whole tone and manner

there

was more

politeness,

and

less

openness and freedom.


;

She

felt

anxious and distressed

she was more


secret cause

and more convinced there was some


of offence, and this feeling dwelt
gination.

upon her imaher feel-

She could scarcely conceal


was

ings

her sadness and uneasiness appeared in her


;

looks

it

in

vain that

her kind friend and

hostess,
sole her.

Madame

Berger, sought to cheer and con-

Henceforward her manner towards the


irresolute
;

manager became more timid and


hurt and displeased him

and

the change did not escape Wolfram's observation.


It
;

and the former good


kind
feelings

understaridifig

and

mutual

which

subsisted

between them,

were thus
evil

disturbed by

the machinations of one, whose


still

passions were

at

work

to effect

more extensive mischief than

he had already done.

CHAPTER

HI.
sitting in her

As Marianne was one day


room adjoining that
hastily withdrew.

own
and
to

of

Madame

Berger's, a mes-

senger was announced,

who

delivered a letter,
it

She saw that

was directed

her

but neither the hand nor the seal were

known

LA XG BEIN.

165

to her.

What

still

farther surprised her was, that

she

felt it

contained money, and she stood hesitait.

ting whether she should open

On

hearing

Mait

dame Berger
and opened

in the passage,
in

she ran towards her,

it

her presence,

when she found


Its

contained a large
epistle

sum

of money, together with an

from the young lord Windhorst.


:

tenor

was as follows
"

My

life

is

becoming a most
if I

intolerable bur-

then to me, charming Marianne,

debarred from your society.


refuse to hear

am longer to be How long will you


?

to

understand
vilely

me

fear

have

been calumniated,

calumniated, as a wTCtch
;

unworthy of your notice


ness

yet

Heaven be

my

witin

how much

honour
are.
I

virtue,

and doubly so
all

one situated as you

Believe me,

excellent
are,

and angel-minded as
that
trials

now am convinced you

my

late

apparent faults were merely meant as

of your exalted nature, affording proofs of


invulnerable excellence
to virtue.
;

your perfect and

a
I

tri-

umph due
disbelieve

to

honour and

Oh, no,

am

no longer a temj)ter
in

can no longer doubt, or


of female
I

the

perfection
it.

character,
entreat,

were

even capable of

would

still

conjure you, to persevere in your exalted and vir-

tuous path, inspiring me, as

it

does, with feelings

of such pure pleasure, admiration, and esteem for

your character.

know what

delight you take in

166

GEKMAN

NU\

Kl.S

dis'pensng happiness around you

blessings ought
for once, then,

every where to follow you.


to

Consent

become

my

almoner

do not refuse the enclosed

trifle,

and give me no thanks.

Apply

it

in

whatlet

ever

manner you judge best

and once more


in

me

beseech you ever to persevere


I

your virtuous

career.

know you will

yet ah

if

you should ever


it,
;

by any chance be led to swerve from

then re-

member me, most charming Marianne remember there is no one on earth who is half so devotedly?
so distractedly attached to you, as your unfortunate

Windhorst.
" P. S. Permit

me

to supply

you with the same

monthly donation
nevolent feelings."

for the

indulgence of your be-

Marianne could not peruse


feelings

this appeal to her

without

momentary
true

emotion

but

her

judgment remained
threw the
letter

and unperverted.

She

from her with an expression of

contempt and abhorrence, and instantly wrote the


following answer
:

" Sir,

"

stand in need of no encouragement to be


I

virtuous;

have therefore returned


I

to

you the

money which you enclosed me.


the treasures of
all

should esteem

the world utterly worthless, from


is

the hand of a

man who

known

to

reward vice

rather than virtue."

LANGBEIN.

167

She
of her
its

lost

not a

moment

in

returning the young


it

lord his insidious bribe, despatching

by the hand
informed of

own maid

Lisette, in order to be

safe delivery.

Hitherto the

girl

had been

in

the habit of decrying the character of the wicked

young nobleman
day
she

in the

most indignant terms, ex;

ceeding even those of her mistress


forth,

but from that


in

began to venture a few words

his defence,

and

at length related instances of his

charity,

generosity,
too, that

and great

disinterestedness.

She heard

he continued to bewail Marihe was very unhappy, and

anne's cruelty,

that

could never refrain from tears

when her name was


this

mentioned.

Her eloquence upon


while

theme con-

tinued so perfectly inexhaustible, as to rouse Marianne's suspicions


;

Madame

Berger remarked,

that she must have received a portion of the bribe

which she had carried back


farther confirmed

suspicions which were


it

by her hinting that

would only

be an act of

common justice
own

to hear the poor

young
should

gentleman
.

in his

defence.
silence, adding, that

Marianne enjoined

he again venture to make his appearance, he must


instantly, she insisted

upon

it,

be shovv^n from the

door.

One
closing

evening,
;

a gentle tap was heard

at the

room door
it

Lisette sprang up,

and hastened out,


lord

after her, while

the young

threw

himself at the feet of the terrified Marianne.

168

GERMAN NOVELS.
" Here, even here," cried the wretched
girl,

her

face glowing with


to

shame and anger, " do you dare


same time
flying to

intrude

!"

at the

an inner

room, which she locked before he had time to prevent


it.

He

long entreated to be heard and adreplied,

mitted.

Marianne

that she would rather

prefer dying of hunger, any death


palling,

the most

ap-

than think of listening to him for a moStill

ment.

he persisted, and on her replying to

his prayers

and threats with scorn, he attempted to

force

open the door.

At

this

moment Madame

Berger walked into the room, and after starting

back

in surprise, she

vented such a volley of hard


the

epithets

and reproaches upon

disappointed

lordling, as completely

astounded and disconcerted

him.

He

attempted to stammer out some excuses,

praised her kindness of heart, and her attachment


to

Marianne, and

finally entreated that

she would

use her best persuasions to reconcile them.

"Never!"
contrary,
cite
I

cried

will never cease

Madame Berger; "on my endeavours to

the

ex-

Marianne's hatred

deep

and lasting hatred

against you.

Should she think


impossible,

should
it

she dare,
single

which

is

surely

to

bestow a

friendly word, a single smile

upon you,

must be

the signal of a final quarrel and separation between

her and me."


"

great misfortune for Marianne, truly," ob-

LANGBEIN.

IfiO

served the youug courtier, in an iionical tone

'*

dreadful misfortune to be deserted by so douG^hty

an Amazon, armed proof against


pions, with

all

male chamill-

sword
boot.
I

in

tongue,

and

invincible

breeding to
boards,
I

Alas

great

heroine

of the

fear

am

not sufficiently tongue-valiant


1

to accept

your bold challenge, and that

might

earn too

little

honour

in the lists.

yield the field,

therefore,

most bright and venerable champion of


;

the stage

though, trust me, you shall hear from

me

again."

Then, taking up his hat without waiting a reply, he rushed out of the place, exclaiming " Fire and
fury
!

what a

spirit

these players have

!"

His loud tone, and the noise of his departure,


brought together the rest of the inhabitants of the
house, each of

whom

formed their own opinion


to the disadvantage of the
It

upon the subject

some
floor

young

lord,

and some

to that of the lady.

liap-

pened that the

under IMarianne's chambers,

belonged to a sober, fair-dealing, elderly


captain in the Prince's Guards,

man who had a parti-

cular aversion to the race of high-born gamblers,


spendthrifts, idlers, et hoc genus omne.

Hearing such a horrible tumult growing louder every moment

over

head,

fiercer

encounter

of tongues than had ever before dinned his ears,

he

felt

a great inclination to ascertain the cause


I

VOL. IV.

170

GERMAN NOVELS.

more particularly as he thought he recognized the


voice of Lord Windhorst,

and suspected him

to be

engaged

in

one of his usual adventures.


to him, for

Marianne

was quite a stranger

he seldom attended

the theatre, and had only occasionally passed her

though he was not ignorant of the reputation she

had acquired, and the propriety with which she


was
said to have conducted herself.

He

felt

greatly

hurt to perceive that so noble a creature had not

been fortunate enough to escape the fangs of a

man, whose

evil

conduct and success had rendered

him
and

so notorious.

Such was the anxiety he


all

felt for

her fate, that unable, after

he had just heard

seen, to unravel the mystery, he at length de-

termined to apply to the lady herself for an explanation


;

and

to offer his best advice

and

services, if

conceived requisite.

When

the uproar, therefore,

had a
owing

little

subsided, he sent in his name, and,

to

his general

good character, he was


still

in-

stantly admitted.

Marianne was

in

tears

as

she rose to receive him, and, appealing to him for


his

good opinion, began

to detail the history of her

sufferings,

and the scandalous proceeding that had

just occurred.

Her

friend confirmed the truth of

these statements, and at the


his protection.
'

same time besought

That you

shall have,"

he exclaimed with
it is

ferfirst

vour, " by Heavens you shall, though

the

LANGBEIN.

171

time that
Avhich
1

ever meddled in other people's affairs,

always avoided.

But, indeed,

it

thundered
unmerci-

so loud over

my

head
I

there was such an


I
it

ful uproar, that

could not refrain from looking

up

particularly

when

heard the voice of Lord


is

Windhorst.

Besides,

the

bounden duty of

every honourable mind to defend innocence against


the rapacious attacks of the destroyer.
In future

you need only give

me
I

a hint

say a

few taps

overhead, not quite so loud, though, as those this


afternoon
;

and should

be at
I

home you may

de-

pend upon seeing me.


any hazard of
his

expect

my

appearance

alone, will be sufficient to put


lives in

him

to flight, without

your presence, as rogues of

stamp are not overburthened with true courage."

With these words the


into his

old captain descended


easier in his

own rooms, much

mind than
more quiet

before,
for

and glad

to find every thing once


all

he was a declared enemy to


a regular
battle. for

turbulence and

noise, except in

The

ladies

now, rang
it

Lisette,

in

order to

take her to task, should

appear that she was an

accessary in the late proceedings.


cast

She

certainly

down her
young

eyes and looked a


;

little flurried

upon

being
the

summoned
lord

but she stoutly maintained that

had

never

tampered

with

her

ridelity.

Neither entreaties nor threats could preto confess


I

vail

upon her

the real truth, and such

172

GERMAN NOVELS.

was the vehemence with which she protested her


innocence, that they were obHged to confess themselves satisfied.

Madame

Berger,

however, advised

Marianne,

very seriously, to think of dismissing her as soon as


possible, a step

which the

latter felt rather unwilling

to adopt without

some

farther reasons, as she

had

uniformly conducted herself in a faithful and ex-

emplary manner.

" Don't
it

you

think,"

observed
to give

Marianne mildly, "

would appear too harsh

her notice to leave me, without affording her any


explanation, beyond entertaining mere suspicions ?"

head

Her more prudent companion only shook her in reply, but sought no further to prevail upon
Lisette,
after receiving

her to take her advice.


slight lecture,

was again restored

to favour,

and the
for-

whole transaction seemed to have been soon


gotten.
It

was not very long, however, before Madame


found
occasion
to

Berger

repeat

her warnings.

She kept her eye upon

Lisette,

and remarked that


fashions, of a style

she was frequently sporting

new

und quality that must have exceeded the reach of


her
little

income.
girl,

This the

nevertheless, asserted not to be the

case, confidently appealing to her relatives

and ac-

quaintance,

whom

she was continually in the habit


;

of stealing out of the house to see

while her un-

LANGBEIN.

173

settled

looks and her forgetfulness, seemed to be-

tray a

mind

ill

at ease.

Still

Marianne could not


in plot-

ersuade herself that the


ting

girl

was engaged

and intriguing with other persons against her

peace, after the

many

benefits

and favours which


this account, she

she had conferred upon her.


paid so
little

On

attention to the suspicious proceedings

of Lisette, that the more wary old


feel

lady began to

not a

little

chagrined that she did not show a

greater degree of respect for her opinions.

Her

ill-

humour appeared
mer suspicions
;

to be as well-founded as her for-

for,

on the very same day that poor

Marianne received a fresh lecture and more warnings, she experienced the unfortunate

consequences

of her too great confidence and indulgence.

She spent the evening of that day

in

company

with her kind and considerate hostess, during which

they had time to get reconciled, after the hasty and

unpleasant words which had passed between them


in the

morning.

Marianne, too, promised to watch

the motions of her very dangerous and mysterious

waiting-maid, as -her old friend generally characterised her,

more
this

attentively than she

had hitherto

done.
superior

With

concession, so flattering to the


hostess, after kiss-

judgment of her kind

ing Marianne,

as a proof of her satisfaction,

the

two friends
ger's

parted for the night.

Madame Ber
from

chamber lav

at a considerable distance

174

GERMAN NOVELS,

that of Marianne, which adjoined that of her maid


Lisette
;

both had retired early, and, before mid-

night, the house

was buried

in perfect repose.

About that hour, however, Marianne, who had


been
in

a sweet slumber, suddenly awoke, at the


felt

same moment that she


lips.

a slight pressure of her

Upon

looking up, she beheld a figure at her


its

bedside, in the act of stretching out

arms to em-

brace her.

It

was Lord Windhorst, and the next

moment she felt herself within his grasp. " Oh, God !" she exclaimed, in an agony of fear, " help,
help
!

am

betrayed,

vilely

betrayed

:"

at the

same time bursting, with almost supernatural energy,


from
her betrayer's
arms,
to reach the opposite

side of the couch.

" Be

still,
;

be

still,

my

angel
it

!"

whispered the

young Lord
Jt
,

" what would

avail

you

to

alarm
?

the whole house to come and witness such a scene


is

all

owing

to

that invisible
his

little

deity called

Love,

who has found

way, you

see,

through

three fast folded doors, into the very sanctuary of

beauty's repose.
lady,
is

Your champion, that good old


;

sound asleep
;

your faithful Lisette

have

sent

away

together,

we two are only conscious that we are and we may remain so, during many
your reputa-

hours, without the slightest risk to


tion."
.

Saying these words,

he again

sought

to

em-

LANGBEIN,

1/5

brace her,

when gathering
it

all

her strength into one

single effort, as

were, of despair and shame, she

actually hurled

him from her with such indignant


with a loud crash and fear-

passion, as to bring his head in contact with a chest

of drawers, and he
ful

fell

uproar to the ground.

At the same moment, Marianne began


for assistance
;

to shriek
rose,

and the incensed wretch again

grinding his teeth with pain and passion.

Agahi

he caught her

in his

arms, and again she struggled


in vain
;

and cried

for aid,

no longer
her

for

though he
fall

had now half


ed up

stifled

cries,

the sound of his

had reached the ears of the old captain, who leapin

fit

of irritation on hearing " such an in-

fernal noise." His long heavy steps already resound-

ed on the staircase, nearer and more near.

With

the same measured step, he marched into the room,


his

sword

in

" Be quiet, here," he cried


ing of
fiercely
all this

one hand, and his candle in the other. " what is the mean;

noise ?" at the

same time advancing

towards the young courtier,


-

who

retreated
light

into the corner.

Tiie old captain held

up the

to gain a full view of his figure,

and then brandish-

ing his sword, inquired into the nature of the business which had brought

him

there.

The wily young

lord shrugged

up

his shoulders,

giving the old gentleman to understand, both by

looks and signs, that he was not at liberty to state

\7C>

GFRMAX NOVELS.

the occasion of his presence, though he might judge


that
it

was by mutual appointment.

But the

vete-

ran refused to give any credit to such an answer.

" Pshaw," he cried, " none of these monkey tricks


will satisfy

me.

Speak

out, Sir

speak out,

say,

once for
Lord

all.

What

do you

here ?"
retreat

Windhorst attempted to

farther

back, as he stammered out, "

Would you

betray

our secret?

my

good captain, consider.

We
;

appeal

to your honour."

" Honour, faith

!"

replied

the captain

" the

honour of a
and
affrights

thief

who

steals into

strange houses,
!

poor maidens out of their sleep


qiiick
!

But

no more delay

out

of

march, double quick time my away And never venture


sight
;

to

cross this threshold again " forefathers

or by the soul of

my

The young

courtier did

not give him time to

proceed, but glad to escape on such easy terms, he

gained the door, and making his obeisance to the


old captain, he rejoined,
in
;

an ironical tone, "

hope you

will

pardon
to

me

for

had

known

that

you were engaged


lady,
I

keep an appointment with the

should certainly have postponed


villain !"

my

own."

" Ah,

cried the old officer,


flat side

suddenlv

catching him a blow with the

of his sword,
like poison."

" every word out of thy mouth stings

Without awaiting a

repetition of

it,

the disappoint-

LAKGBEIN.

177

ed lord disappeared, muttering curses as he went,


nor did he venture to reUix his speed until he found
himself safe in his

own mansion.
him very
close, regretting

The

old officer felt so incensed at his last ob-

servation, that he pursued

that he had
to so

shown

so great a degree of forbearance

hardened a wretch.

Meanwhile, Marianne's

friend

Madame

Berger hastened to her assistance,


grief,

when, bursting into an agony of

the poor
if

girl

threw herself into her arms, sobbing as

her heart

would break.

In vain she attempted to express her

gratitude for the protection so quickly afforded her

by the kind old officer

whom

at that

moment

they

heard returning with his usual measured step, a


slow march, from his pursuit of the routed enemy.

Marianne, attired

in

an elegant dishabille, received

him

at the request of her friend, in the adjoining

parlour,

though

ill

recovered from

the excessive
o^\^l

alarm, in order to express her thanks with her


lips.

" Only make yourself easy, dear


the old veteran, panting a
little

girl," replied
;

to get his breath

" he

is

far

enough,
?

assure you.

What
;

have

you
or

to

fear

it is

all

nothing, except a contusion


for, at

two on the young gentleman's shoulders


pressed him a
it

first, I

little

hard. Moreover, from the

sound

made,
fall
;

imagine you must have given him


1

a heavy

so that, between us both,


I

suspect

it

17y

GERMAN NOVELS.

is

he that has the greatest reason to complain.


distress yourself at this foolish
:

Then, pray, do not


affair
;

let

it

pass like an unpleasant dream

take

heart again,

my

good

girl,

and go and take a

fine re-

freshing sleep. Believe me, you shall always find

me
feel

ready to serve you on similar occurrences


quite convinced that such will never

only

more happen."

When

the good veteran had

retired,

Madame

Berger could no longer refrain from indulging her


self-complacency at Marianne's expense, gently re-

proaching her for not having placed firmer reliance

on her judgment.

Had

she duly appreciated the


in preference to in-

advantages of mature counsels,

dulging her own childish and mexperienced fancy


for

an

artful

girl,

so

painful,

so trying a

scene

could not possibly have taken place.

There could now no longer be any doubt of the


criminal conduct, the base treachery of Lisette, and of her having been accessary to the whole of the
vile plot

throughout.

That evening she had feigned

herself unwell,

and requested permission from her


rest.

indulgent mistress to retire earlier than usual to

They now summoned her


Stung with rage
Windhorst paced the
burning
servant,
for revenge.

in

vain

she had disap-

peared, and returned no more.

and

disappointment,

Lord

floor of his spacious

chamber,

He

roused his confidential


to

and despatched him, during the night,

LANGBEIN.

179

summon one

of his most villanous emissaries

the

abettor of his secret

schem

s.

This wretch, whose

name was Luchs, was a

disreputable and broken

tradesman, whose sole ostensible business was to

hawk about
to

the remnants of his wares from house


it

house

but whose real object

was

to

promote

intrigues,

and

to betray the folly and credulity of

those

who

confided in him.

He was

the same per;

son

who conveyed

the letter to Marianne

and was

calculated to carry on and accomplish almost any

kind of villainy or deceit, by successfully counterfeiting the

most opposite characters.

Thus

his vil-

lany was so perfectly unexampled, and his diabolical

machinations so secretly conducted, that he was


looked upon by his acquaintance as a mere boon

companion,

one

of those idle and unlucky wights

who have
ment

so often failed in their vocations, that


all

they get disgusted, and refuse

serious employ-

either to labour or to speculate

any more.

In
re-

Italy this

smooth

villain
;

became a
but
in

fierce

and

volting leader of banditti

Germany he contongue instead of

fined his triumphs to the assassination of character

and reputation
his dagger,

employing

his

and

inflicting tortures

and calamities

worse than death.

With the wings of Mercury

this prince of thieves

appeared before his lordly patron,


his

who

replied to

low and servile obeisance, by a severe slap on

180

OEKMAN NOVELS.

the cheek, on v.hich Luchs turned to him the other


also,

and then

lield

out his hand to receive the usual


this
!

price for them.

But
!

time Windhorst repulsed


art

him.

" Villain
?

dog

thou come for wages

before work

It

was only to rouse thee from thy

heavy, drunken shmrber that clouds thy brains."

Luchs clapped

his

hand upon

his dagger,

and

his lordship proceeded, in a

somewhat milder tone

" Nay, thou knowest,


sioned
I

Luchs,

how madly impas-

have been for that haughty beauty to

whom

thou hast carried love-letters and gold so long in


vain.

This heroine of the stage

still

aims at the
as the

ludicrous renown of setting herself

up

model

of theatrical virtue

and

treats

contempt. Fool

madman
;

that

me am

with sovereign
!

have failed,

egregiously failed

though admitted into her house,


fair

her

chamber,

beheld her more

and lovely

than an angel, as she lay buried


pose.

in

profound re-

Yet

bartered

all
;

my

happiness for one fatal


I

pressure of those lips

and as

stood

upon the

verge of Paradise, then, even then, a fiend, in the

shape of an old half-pay


with his

officer,

came rumbling
room.
;

drawn broad sword


villain

into the

It

was that hoary-headed

Nordheim

and he

presented the naked blade to


as
I

my

breast,

unarmed

was, and compelled

me
I

to quit the field.

the furies of love and vengeance are gnawing at


heart;

Now my

cannot rest;

shall

sleep no

more

until

LANOr.lN.

181

have chastised the old captain, and she


reputation, at least,
is

is

mine.

Her

now

in

my

power; and,

when once

that

is

gone, the pubHc idolatry, upon


herself,

which she has hitherto so much prided


shall likewise cease.

This

it

must be our object to


if

achieve;

and strange indeed

we cannot
all sides,

contrive

to catch her, as she falls


lic

from the pinnacle of pubshe sees

favour and esteem.

When, on

and hears herself proclaimed


ject of

as the unfortunate ob-

my

successful addresses,

when her name


from the

is

mentioned only with that of


all parties,

frailty,

lips of
is

when every
;

possible

means of escape

cut

off,

and the

airy castles of

fame and honour fade


Pervv'ill

from view

then comes

my

hour of triumph.

ceiving that she has nothing more to lose, she

no longer maintain the struggle


ing herself to
shall

no longer opposcharmer
still

my

wishes, the

repentant

come, and throwing herself into


solicit

my

arms,

open to receive her, shall


confess herself
tions
still

my

forgiveness,
all

and

happy, amidst

her persecu-

and

difficulties."

"

noble

plan,

indeed,"
skilful

muttered
I

Luchs

" more complete and


given you credit for."

than

should have

" Art thou


will

in earnest,

rogue

thinkest thou

it

succeed?"
"
It

cannot

fail

would stake
if

my

life

on
it

it."
is

'That thou shalt do,

need be;

for

182

(3EIIMAN NOVELS.

thou must proceed to carry the matter into execution.

Apply thy villanous wit

to the task

let

thy winks and nods cut sharper than thy dagger

evoke

all

the

demons of mischief
and that
is

to thy aid

make

secret oath that


to distraction
;

Marianne has long loved


all

loved me

this

grand theatrical

uproar and opposition


ances to the public.

merely to save appear-

At the same time, bind over


secresy,

your audience to
to

strict

which cannot
effectually

fail

give the fiction

wings, more
it

than
to

our utmost efforts to bruit


forge

abroad.

Take care
to

proper love-letters
or

from

Marianne
in

me.

Drop one

two by accident
offers
;

the street, or in

houses when occasion

and when questioned


fierce old captain

on the subject, give out that the


is

also

one of her favoured

lovers.

" In

short, mystify the truth in


lies,

such a manner
as to defy all
side,
I

with thy inextricable webs of

attempts at discovery

while, on

my

will
;

not

be

idle.

We will

play into each other's hands

and

bribe as high as thou wilt, the gold shall never be

wanting.
possible,

So now, Satan,

to thy

work

and

see, if

that thou excel thy former exploits

for

once surpass thyself."

With

these words,

Lord Windhorst dismissed

the infamous and abandoned minister of his more


fatal

and destructive pleasures

pleasures,

whose

cruel

and cowardly indulgence, while they evaded

LANCIBEIN.

183

or defied the laws

by the cool

villany, the

art

and

secresy with

which

they were accomplished, in-

flicted greater suffering

and calamity upon


less

society,

than numbers of

more open but

atrocious

offences against those laws.

CHAPTER
No
for

IV.

sooner had morning dawned, than the base

agent of his lordship's projects began to prepare


carrying

them

into

effect.

He resumed
chapman

his
in

character of wandering dealer and


variety of

cheap

articles best calculated to

attract

the eye.
cription,

Foreign silks and dresses of every desobtained

him

access

to

number

of

houses, where he contrived to ingratiate himself by


his accounts of the last fashions, scandal,

and any

kind of news.

He was

often even

welcomed by the
citizens

more opulent and fashionable


in

class of

particular
as

by the females, whose waiting-maids

had almost

much

occasion to amuse their hours

of idleness with the affairs of their neighbours as


their ladies themselves.
It

was

in these, his casual visits, that

he made

the

first

attack, by mingling anecdotes with insi-

nuations, upon the reputation of the noble-hearted

184

GERMAN NOVELS.
But
it

Marianne.

would be too weary and

dis-

gusting a task to follow him through his tissues


of villany and defamatory falsehoods
;

it is

enough

to be informed, that he executed the project of his

employer

-with

unexampled

effrontery

and treachery.

Within a few days Marianne became the general


topic,
city.

no

less of private

parties than of the

whole

At the same
the
as

time,

Windhorst himself exand vivacity


in

hibited
features,

utmost pleasure
if

his

he

had met with some

sudden

piece of good fortune.

He was

equally happy and


in

joyous

in his conversation,

which he displayed

the most pointed manner, and the change was not

allowed to pass unobserved.

His

uncommon good
rallied

humour was
dresses,

ascribed

to

the

success of his ad-

and he was frequently

upon the

subject, with allusions to Marianne.

In companies
air of sanction,

where he did not

like to give it

an

he assumed a reserved and grave look, which had


only the effect of confirming people's suspicions.

But such
ticularly

inquiries

in

other

parties,

more

par-

connected with him, excited merely ex;

pressions of mirth

while the young lord, in his


his

more elevated moments, would bring


ventures upon the tapis,

own

ad-

boasted
ladies

of his successes,

and sought
ing
letters

to confirm his

statements, by adduc-

from

the

themselves

among

which were the

fictitious

ones of Marianne.

LANGBEIN.

185

But, as

if it

were not enough thus gradually to

'indermine her reputation, he proceeded to mature


I)

is

diabolical project,

by acquainting
;

his devoted

victim with the loss of her reputation

thus rudely

tearing her from her last and sweetest solace

her

dreams of innocence and peace.

But who would

be guilty of the heartless cruelty of inflicting such


a

wound
?

to

whom

confide so hateful a commis-

sion
in

The deep

insatiable malignity of his nature,

the dread of implicating himself personally in

the transaction, determined that the avowal should

come from

a public audience,

and manifest

itself

on the very scene of her


her triumphs.

intellectual excellence

and

Here he vowed
;

to

humble her pride

of innocence and honour

here she must submit to

her fate, and hear herself censured and condemned

by the public voice.

With

this view

he brought the whole strength


:

of his party into action


pit
;

cabals were formed in the


all

other parts of the house were divided, but


to favour his object,

seemed

by fomenting the

spirit

of discord and desolation, in which he was to look


for the

triumph of his schemes.

The

chief leaders

of these self-elected critics were in the class of his


lordship's

own

friends, and, like puppets,

obeyed the
master

motion of the wires, drawn by the


spirit's

invisible

hand.
courtiers,

Those among the young

who hod been

186

GERMAN NOVELS.
to patronise,

most forward

and pay
if

their court to

the object of their idolatry, as

actuated by jea-

lousy and revenge at the supposed success of a

more favoured
enemies,

lover,

became Marianne's

bitterest

and omitted no occasion of

testifying

their feelings

by hooting

aiid

knocking, and even


in-

hissing her off the stage.

There was a party,


;

deed, that wavered and sought to support her


their efforts

but

were

in vain,

and only added

to the

tumult of the scene.


however, and
the manager,
all

Many

of her real friends,

who

acted under the influence of


to her, con-

and were best known

tinued to oppose the flood of popular clamour and


injustice
;

until

no longer able to witness the unretired

happy
house.

girl's

agony and alarm, they

from the

Such, indeed, was the pitch of treachery and


hypocrisy to which the artful villain carried his
designs, that he was almost the only one

who seem-

ed her friend, and continued his plaudits to the


last
;

a proceeding which led the audience to preprotector,


in

sume that he was her avowed


ly

and

secret-

upon the best terms with her


all

the world.

This

appeared to combine
strongly than before.
to

parties against her

more

There were no longer bounds


;

their

opposition

pale
in

and

trembling,

their

wretched victim appealed

vain to their mercy

and justice

in vain

attempted to walk through her

LANGBEIN.

187

part.

She was driven weeping and almost heart-

broken from the stage, and no longer able to control

her emotions, she fainted, just as she was going

to accost him, in the manager's arms.

With indignant

feelings,

but with mild

and

courteous demeanour, Wolfram himself came for-

ward, entreating to be heard a few moments, and


with

much

difficulty

he was heard.

He

respectfully

informed the audience of what had just occurred,

and inquired how the unhappy young lady could


have displeased the public, so as to incur such severity of treatment
?

He
to

waited a reply, but no

one spoke

and, for the next three minutes, a pin

might have been heard

drop

the whole house

was
for

silent

as the grave.

He

again looked round

an answer, and then with a slight shrug of the


fell.

shoulders, he retired, and the curtain

This seemed to be the signal for fresh disturbance, and some of the most riotous spirits repeat-

ed their clamour, both against the actress and the

manager, more loudly than before

but the manaas

ger permitted them to hoot and storm


as they pleased
in
:

much

the curtain was no longer raised,

spite

of

all

their calls
;

and murmurs

the boxes
;

were already empty

the lights were extinguished


parties,

and the disappointed

with the malignant


plot,

and abandoned author of the

and

his

myrmi-

dons, were at length compelled to resign their stations,

and the

ill-earned triumph of that night.

188

GERMAN NOVELS.
Poor Marianne lay half unconscious
in

a stupor
to di-

of astonishment and grief.

She was unable


;

vine the fatal cause of her persecution


led

her heart

her to pronounce mankind better than they


;

really are

and she indulged not the

least suspicion

of so foul a plot.

On

reverting to the whole of her

theatrical career, she in vain sought to ascertain in

what manner she could have forfeited public patronage and regard. She had ever studied correctness and propriety both in her language and costume
;

her efforts had been most earnest and incessant to


merit public approbation and good-will.
reception then, as she

Such a

had recently met with, was


and her surprise was only
grief.

to her a fearful mystery,

equalled by her heart-rending

Soon
males,

too, she perceived

a change

in the deport-

ment of the players themselves,

in particular the fe^

who had an

expression of saucy pleasure and

triumph in their eyes.


wise,

The younger members,

like-

who had

never ventured to address her, except

when
parts,

receiving her instructions in rehearsing their

now indulged themselves

in

taunting epithets

and

replies.
ill

Even Wolfram could


and brought

disguise

his

vexation,
to

and often cast glances which pierced her


heart,

the

tears into her eyes.

It is true

he then appeared to pity her, and would accost her " I am quite concerned for you. in a gentle tone
:

LANGBEIN.

189

Miss Richards

and

am

fully

convinced that the

enmity exhibited towards you by the tasteless public


IS

highly absurd and unjust.


I

On what
;

it

can be
I

founded

am

at a loss to

judge

for

confess

am

not one of those


idle gossip of the

who concern themselves with the day. The best plan would appear,
humouring the madness of the

after all, that of

multitude, and during the whole of the ensuing

week, they shall not be honoured at


pearance.

all

with your ap;

Pass the time as quietly as you well can

recruit your strength

and

spirits for

a fresh attempt,

and endeavour
dent, as
if

to appear as pleasant

and as

confi-

nothing serious had occurred. Evil-mindcontinue to delight in mischief, but,

ed

men

will

believe

me, they are not deserving of our notice,


less that

much

we should make
friend

ourselves miserable

on their account."

On
the

rejoining her
full

Madame

Berger,

Ma-

rianne gave

vent to her feelings, and deplored

unhappy circumstance which had compelled her


;

thus to surrender her rights

to

be suspended from

her former employments and privileges, and to suffer


this humiliation

without knowing the cause.

Upon

detailing the trying persecution

and ignominious

treatment of the last evening, her friend interrupted


her

with
:

observed
this
is

" That
work
!"

indignant exclamations,
is

and at length
!

like

him

Oh, the monster

his

190

GERMAN NOVELS.
"

Whose work

what can you mean

?"

inquned

Marianne.

" Poor innocent," replied


can you be so blind!

Madame

Berger, "

how
it.

You

had better know

Who

should be the author of such sufferings

who

should be capable of achieving such consummate


villany but

Lord Windhorst?

Yes,

it

is

he;

dare venture

my

life

upon

it.

Events

will

in time

show that

have not done injustice to the character

of that arch-fiend

capable of any enormity

insa-

tiable in his thirst for revenge."

During
in

this conversation, the subject of

it

was
in

truth

seated in his

own chamber, engaged

writing a letter to his destined victim.

In this mas-

ter-piece of deceit, he affected to lament the un-

happy occurrence of the other evening


countable but manifest injustice
;

its

unac-

an injustice which
avert.

he had exerted his uttermost


felt

efforts to

He

apprehensive from the violent opposition which


encountered,
that her

she had

next appearance

would be attended with a


agreeable result
;

similar or even

more

dis-

but, that he trusted there

might

be some method devised that would finally restore


her to public favour and admiration.
sake, therefore,
if

For her own

she wished once more to appear

with her accustomed triumph and eclat, he hoped


that she would not refuse to grant

him an

interview,
all

which would

clear

up

all

difficulties,

explain

LANGBEIN.

191

errors

and misunderstanding, and convince her that


in

she did not possess a more attached friend


world.

the

Conceiving that her pride and virtue would now be alike humbled, he entrusted
this epistle to

his

confidential emissary, with a commission to deliver


it, if

possible, in the absence of her friend

Madame

Berger,

and he would hold


less difficulty in

himself in readiness,

near at hand, to avail himself, either by guile or


force,

of the proposed interview,

when he should
off.

have the

carrying her

Luchs

again assumed his character of the wandering merchant, and announced his arrival at
ger's

Madame

Ber-

door, exhibiting to the maiden's astonished

eyes an assortment of the prettiest fashions in the


world.

In an ecstasy of delight the girl 'ran to

acquaint the ladies,


to their tea.

who were just then sitting down Madame Berger's curiosity was too
her.

powerful to be resisted, and she persuaded Marianne


also to

accompany

Neither of them, however,


villain
in

at all recognized the

his

new

disguise.
all

The contents
nation,

of hrs pack, however, did not at


;

answer to the samples

and

after a critical

exami-

Madame

Berger shook her head and turned

away, affording an opportunity which did not escape


the false merchant's eye.
lord's letter into

He

slyly thrust the

young

Marianne's hand, giving her at the


as
if

same time a wink,

to

keep her own counsel.

192

GERMAN NOVELS.
Marianne, however, exclaimed aloud, "

What

is

that

or from

whom
letter,

My

dear

Madame

Berger,

come

here.

The

old lady looking back, and catching

the glimpse of a

snatched

it

out of Marianne's

hand, flung

it

at the rogue's head,

and cried out


!

in

a great passion, "

Away

with thee, villain

out of
;

my
to

sight

we

know
shall

the devil and his works


;

back
are

your master, slave


;

his

words and

gifts

poison

not contaminate

ourselves with

touching them."

Luchs affected the utmost surprize


ception, entreated the

at this re-

angry lady to be pacified,


in

and
letter,

promised,

that

case

they

accepted the
as

and returned such an answer

was ex-

pected, he would not reveal certain secrets, which

would wholly ruin the reputation of both the

ladies,

and

utterly destroy all

their prospects

but that

they must accompany him quietly back, without

murmuring, to

his master

and they would then

hear what plans he had to propose in order to restore the

young lady

to public favour.
B.'s

At these words Madame


a

rage

knew no
Oh, thou

bounds, and with a face flushed with passion, and


scornful
!

laugh,

she
I

exclaimed

*'

wretch
patron

thinkest thou
I

tremble before thy lordly


I

know him

too well.

insist

on your

repeating to

him every word of

scornful abhorrence,

of defiance, of ridicule, and contempt.

Say from

LANGBEIN.

193

me, that he
will

is

as

mad

as he

is

wicked

and that

proclaim his folly and wickedness to the world.


shall

He

no longer continue to

infest
:

society

he
Say,

shall

no longer betray and destroy

and know that

he must assassinate

me

before his vile and unhal-

lowed grasp can reach


too,

my dear young
forth
I

friend.

that

if

from

this time
will

he should not
solicit

cease to persecute us,


terference

go and

the

in-

and protection of our gracious Prince."

At the same time she indignantly dashed the


door
in

the face of his lordship's ambassador, and

led the terrified

Marianne away
their

in

triumph.

They

had scarcely reached


the
old officer,
left
:

own apartments before Nordheim, made his appearance,

with his
his

march

arm in a sling, and halting a little in " Pray don't be alarmed, ladies, at my
;

heroic

appearance
killed.

only a
I

little

love affair

and
have

nobody

Now

dare say you imagine

been fighting a duel, but you are quite mistaken,


for there

were three of
I

us.

brace of bullies set


street
;

upon me as
in the

was turning the corner of the


rather an unfair distance,
to cut at
I
I

dark

confess

and one began

my
1

arm, and the other at

my

leg, so that

thought they were actually going

to ham-string

me.

But
I

contrived to return the


1

compliment as well as

could, and

believe

have

sent both these uncivil gentlemen to the surgeon's.


I

am

sorry

have not the pleasure of knowing the

VOL. IV.

194

GER.MAN NOVELS.

parties,

though

strongly suspect that

am

ac-

quainted with the gentleman Avho sent to introduce

them

to

me.

For to-day

was upon parade, and


officers,

observed a group of ^young


greatly
it

who seemed
and
of Miss

amused

at

some observation
I

or other,

struck

me

that

overheard the
;

name

Richards frequently repeated


circle
It

but on joining their

they appeared to

me
I

to

change the subject.

looked suspicious, and

determined on return-

ing

home

this

evening to mention the matter to


all
~

you, and inquire whether anything at


sant had occurred, since
I

unplea-

saw you

?"

Madame
know.
teran,

Berger then repeated what we already


it

"

"

Is

possible," exclaimed the

good ve-

is it

possible that a
title,

man

boasting a good

education, fortune,

a high descent, and his

Prince's favour, can descend to such

mean and

trea-

cherous practices

The audacity

of the author of

such plots can be equalled only by his artful perseverance


;

but, in this instance, his


I

own overweening

confidence,

trust,

has betrayed him.

How

strange

that the spectators of so respectable a theatre as

Wolfram's,

should lend themselves, like puppets,

to the direction of an

abandoned

villain,

who

avails

himself of their folly and credulity to execute his

base designs.

And it is quite as unaccountable, why my young messmates should avoid conversing with me on the subject, when they must be aware
that
it

forms a topic of general conversation."

LANGBEINT.

195

" Oh,
ger, "it
is

my

dear Sir," exclaimed


;

Madame

Ber-

no longer a mystery
;

have long had

my

eye upon him

have traced the course of his de-

famatory plots and projects.


art,
it is

There
is

is

no degree of
;

and no baseness, of which he


he who has excited
all

not capable

and

the public prejudice and

opposition,

which has caused

my

angelic

young

friend such extreme suffering."

" Then how fortunate," " that we are aware of the

observed

Nordheim,

sort of animal with

which

we have
were
I

to deal.

should really be

much amused,

not too anxious respecting the feelings of

your excellent young friend, at the idea of exposing


this intriguing villain to the world, in all his

con-

summate meanness, impudence, and


I

baseness. Shall

do

it ?

shall

drive

my
it ?

sword deeper into the hor?

net's nest, that shall


1

has thus stung you to the heart

wholly destroy

" The attempt would be too dangerous


powerful," replied

he

is

too

Madame
ruin.

Berger, " and you would

only incur your

own

My
foil

advice

is,

on more

mature consideration, to
and
hostility

his inveterate malice


field
;

by quitting the

a measure which
Yes, Mari-

doubtless

he does not contemplate.

anne, let us leave a place where such irreconcilable


hatred, injustice, and prejudices of the Avorst kind,

such as thy gentle


arrayed against us.

spirit
1

could

ill

brook,

are all

am

sensible of the full ex-

198

GERMAN NOVELS.
evil

extent of the

and

it

will

be vain to contend

against the tide of general opinion, so foully tainted

and perverted

as

it

has been by the arts of this

unexampled

villain.

Even the most humane and


fear

reasonable portion of the community has been im-

posed upon, and

no explanation could be of

any

avail."

" Oh,

how
I

willingly," replied Marianne, "


I

how

very willingly would

fly for

refuge to the poorest

hut;
with

could
the

only retire with credit, or at least,


of public

feeling
like

approbation
;

No,

cannot

steal

a guilty thing away


;

it

would

look like self-accusation


to

it

would
it

afford a

triumph

my

worst enemies, and

would be nobler to
;

perish than to yield in such a cause


like

it

would look
I

betraying the cause of truth and virtue.


to leave the place, before
I

would scorn

have suc-

ceeded in recovering the public opinion, and completely established

my

innocence."
!"

" Very just, very noble


officer."

exclaimed the old

" Yes, indeed," interrupted


" and
I

Madame

Berger;

have only to wish

it

were as prudent.

But

you are too good and too young,

my

dear, to
really

know
are.

what the world and what


Believe

mankind

me, the most respectable, the most


all

dis-

tinguished families in

great cities are not free

from curiosity to hear jind entertain reports of an

LANGBEIN.

197

Injurious

and scandalous character, which passion

or interest

may

be led to disseminate at the expense


tales

of others.

These

of tatlers, most generally

published by anonymous authors, are received with

uncommon
public,

relish

and

avidity

they

are

looked
to the

upon as a kind of general present made


which
it

is

never

known

to refuse,

and

is

very loath to part with.

How

easily,

by such means,

may an innocent
reputation
;

person be deprived of an excellent


difficult

and when once attacked, how


it.

a task to recover

The former may be achieved


;

with the ease of childish sport

but the latter

is

one of those Herculean labours, which


efforts

calls for the

of a

giant

and the eloquence of Apollo

himself.

"

How
;

then can you hope,

my

poor dear

girl,

to maintain

such a struggle with the least chance


are all gentleness,

of success
heart.

you who You would

and

soul,

and

only provoke

still

more inveattempt."

terate hostility,

and perhaps perish


so," replied

in the in

" Then be

it

Marianne,

a tone of

sorrow that went to the heart.


to the
terrors,
I

happy and fortunate


can have none
still

"That death, which may boast so many


I

for

me.

am

resigned

but

must

persevere."

In this determination she continued to persist,

notwithstanding

the

persuasions

of

Nordheim,

and the

tears

and prayers of Madame Berger.

She

198

GERMAN NOVELS
letters

could not even be prevailed upon by the


of her old friend Oswald,

who had

regularly corassis-

responded with her, and aflorded her every


tance in his power.

At

this juncture,

though aged

and

infirm,

perceiving

that

his

letters

had not

made
order

the impression which he had hoped, he inset

stantly

out on
his

a journey of

many
to

miles, in

to

use

personal

influence.

But

this

interview,

though truly distressing


alter

the feelings

of Marianne, could not

her determination

while she refused with equal spirit

and firmness

every proposal of providing for her in some different


career, or for accepting a secure asylum.

CHAPTER
A month
fram,
still

V.
last

had now elapsed since Marianne's

appearance upon the stage.

The manager, Wol-

delayed to select any drama in which

she was to take the leading character, though he

had been frequently entreated by her not


her longer
in

to keep

suspense.

Reasons, however, were

advanced,
delicacy, to

though urged with great feeling and

show the advantage of postponing the


little

night yet a

longer.
liver]

Meanwhile Marianne

in

perfect seclusion.

LVNGBEIX.

199

seeing

few persons except her two kind friends,


It

Nordheim and Madame Berger.

was the object

of both to support her spirits for the approaching


trial

at the bar of tlie public

and

to prevent, as

far as possible,

any of those cruel and scandalous


at

reports, current

the theatre and other places,


ears.

from reaching her

She had recently exemissary

perienced no fresh alarm on the part of her persecutor,

though

it

was known that


place, as

his
if

had been lurking about the

desirous of

obtaining another interview with Marianne.


likewise,
in

One day,

Madame

Berger's

absence, a

man

in

genteel livery knocked at the door and


letter,

handed a
she was
at

which he requested might be immediately

delivered to Marianne.

On

perusing

it,

shocked
house
left

to find, that

it

was from the lady


intended to
call

whose

Madame Berger had


;.

when she
see her

home

and

stated, that she


ill,

had suddenly been


to

taken extremely

and had entreated

without a moment's delay.

Such was poor Ma-

rianne's anxiety, that she instantly hurried on her

shawl and bonnet, and without hesitating a single


instant, she

bade the footman walk

first,

and direct

her the very nearest path to the lady's dwelling.

Within a short distance they approached a gentleman's


carriage,

which her conductor informed

her had been sent for the sake of greater expedition


to convey her to her friend.

She was just on the

200

GERMAX NOVELS.
when she observed Mafew yards of her,

point of stepping into

it,

dame Berger
way.

herself, within a very

walking very leisurely along the other side of the


Uttering a sudden exclamation of joy, she
inquiring most tenderly

flew into her arms,

how
?

she had ventured to think of walking

home

alone

At

this discovery the


it

footman mounted behind


;

the carriage, and


the two

drove rapidly away

leaving
its

ladies to put

what construction upon

sudden disappearance they pleased.


" Oh,

what joy! what triumph!" exclaimed

Madame
" could
I

B.,

when an explanation had taken


villain's

place,

only witness the


;

disappointment

and despair

and

I,

too, to be the

happy cause of this

blessed result.^

How

very,

very providential,

my

sweet love

another minute, and you would have


irretrievably
!"

been utterly and

lost

lost

beyond

hope

fallen

undone
way

Marianne

shuddered,

and pressing

closer

to

Madame
of
tlie

B., gave

to her feelings in expressions

most

lively gratitude.

On

their return

home

they found a letter from the manager, containing

an invitation

to

resume one of her favourite cha-

racters, as soon as she pleased.

Wolfram himself
air

appeared shortly afterwards, declaring, with an

of good-natured satisfaction, that the offended gods of the pit seemed at length to be propitiated, and
that he had moreover received several

anonymous

LANGBEIN.

201

communications,

all

testifying

an anxiety
:

to
it

behold

her once more upon the boards

" Yet

remains

with yourself

would not be supposed


if it

to influence

your decision

but

be

still

your wish to appear,

you have only to mention your own day, and the


character you most approve."

Marianne's eyes sparkled with pleasure


lia,"

" Emiappear-

she said, " Emilia Galotti was


it

my

first

ance here, and


tion.
I

was played with general approba-

will

again introduce myself, under her aus;

pices, to the public


I

will strive to forget the trials


if I

have gone through, as much as


;

were a perfect

stranger

and

may

succeed, perhaps, in impress-

ing the spectators with


delusion.

some portion of the same


I

Heaven grant that

may be

so

happy as and
es-

to recover half that heartfelt approbation

teem, which
first

enjoyed on the fortunate night of

my
;

appearance.

This would be a double triumph

a thousand times more delightful than

my

former

one

it

would restore

me

to

new

life,

and with such

hopes

shall be cheerfully prepared to encounter

my
as

destiny without shrinking, on as early a night

you can mention."

The manager was pleased


sessed so

to observe she pos-

much

spirit,

and appointed the following

day

for the rehearsal of the play, certainly Lessing's


;

master-piece
to oblivion.

though now, alas

almost consigned

Though a man
K 5

of singular penetration

202

t.

KR.MAN

.N()VL-

and knowledge of the world, Wolfram,


sent instance,
horst's artifice.

in the pre-

had been made the dupe of WindDisappointed in his late attempts,


hostility

he now vowed more bitter

than before
final

and

with the view of accomplishing his

designs

by destroying the last hopes of Marianne, and proving to her that there was not a chance of her recovering her lost honour and celebrity, he contrived
to

have her invited, through the medium of anoletters, to

nymous
stage.

make
girl

her re-appearance on the

The unfortunate
distant suspicion

entertained not the most

of the scene preparing for her

she fondly believed, on the other hand, that the


public would seek to recompense her for her late
injuries,

by renewed acclamations.

She repeated

over her part with equal spirit and assiduity, de-

voting herself to the task both night and day, in


order wholly to disarm prejudice or criticism of their
sting,

and carry away public

feeling

by an union of

vivid strength, vivacity,

and correctness of repre-

sentation.

the

Above two hours before the curtain drew up, house was crowded to excess. Boxes were
and every cor-

taken at nearly double the usual price, nearly a


third part returned from the doors,

ner of the pit was

filled.

So great was the throng


all

and the curiosity that inspired

parties, that every

L/. NT.

p. F.

IV.

203

moment was numbered

until

the heroine of the

night should herself appear.

The wished-for moment


curtain was drawn
;

at length

arrived, the

but

still

Emilia does not


scene.
;

make

her appearance during the

first

This, then,

produced not the slightest impression

every eye

and every ear seemed intent alone upon hailing the


voice and features of Marianne.

And what

a picture

of truth and passion did her


hibit
!

first

appearance ex-

Rushing from the Prince's presence, who had


surprized and avowed his passion for her in the

church, she entered trembling and breathless upon,


the stage.

The resemblance was too


and
it

striking
in

not

to be perceived,

was played

the most

natural and affecting manner.


herself into Claudia's arms,
filled

Emilia then throws

matronly character,
;

that night by

Madame

Berger

and

this

was

done with such a masterly and touching expression


of alarm, that most of the spectators, impressed with
its

exquisite power and reality, loudly applauded

her, both with their

hands and

voice.

Alas

this

appeared only to act as a signal for

a burst of violence and clamour from the opposite


party,

more virulent and incessant than

it

had be-

fore been.

The

friends of the old officer

Nordheim

and of Madame, however, were not


dated
;

easily intimi-

they had been equally active in

appeal-

204

GERMAN

^'OVELS.

ing to public opinion, during Marianne's retirement,

by

their i)crsuasions

and explanations.

When
;

the

storm, then, had a


fresh, louder
a

little

subsided, it was followed by

and mdre continued plaudits

and on
it

second attempt to renew the clamour,

was

speedily
tion,

drowned

in reiterated bursts of

approba-

both of voice and hands.


silence
;

Thus
cruelly

was obtained

but Marianne was

agitated

and

her confidence seemed to

be gone.

The

first

violence of the clamour which

liad assailed her ears,

had nearly overpowered her

and when

this

was repeated, along with the struggle

that ensued, the applause proved nearly as trying


to her feelings,

and she

felt herself

sinking to the

ground.
rallied

Yet her

eflPorts

were great.
;

She again

her enfeebled powers

her soul was again

absorbed in the scene before her, and such was the

sudden transition of character as not only restored


her courcige, but
house.

seemed

to

electrify

the

whole

She had already begun

to

proceed with her

usual tone and spirit, and perfect silence appeared


to

have been restored, when once more summoning


strength, her enemies raised so violent

their

and

unexpected an attack as wholly disconcerted her,

and she was borne fainting from the


This occurred during the scene,
relates

stage.

in

which Emilia
she

to

the

Countess Appiani,

that

had

LANGBEIN.

205

dreamed she beheld the


Just as Marianne,

set of

diamonds, with which

she presented her, changed into so


filled

many

pearls.

with sorrowful forebodings,

with tears in her eyes, and trembling voice utters


the words
tears."
pit
:

" Pearls, dear mother; pearls betoken


there
burst,

At that moment
gallery, so loud
if

both from

and

a clamour, preceded by a

loud harsh voice, as

spoken through a speaking

trumpet, " Crocodile's tears,"

as to bid defiance

to all farther attempts at preserving order.

This savage remark was accompanied by peals


of laughter, succeeded by showers of oranges and apples
;

one of which unfortunately struck the

victim of their

inhuman persecution upon her


fell

fore-

head, and she


of

without a struggle into the arms

Madame

Berger.

Every spectator of any feeling and honour,


broke out into expressions of the most lively indignation, on witnessing the success of this detestable
project.
It

was only the particular partizans of


still

Lord Windhorst, who

ventured from the side

boxes, seconded by the most despicable portion of


the pit and gallery, to continue their discordant

hootings and shoutings, as base success. This brought

if

in

triumph at their
the

down upon them

indignant displeasure of the more numerous and


enlightened class
violence
;

and a scene of turbulence and


which beggars
all

ensued,

description

20G

GERMAX
in

xovri.s.

and which terminated


the interference of the

a contest which called for power.

civil

Meanwhile the unhappy Marianne was conveyed

home
was
before

in

state bordering

upon

distraction

she

seized with repeated faintings,

and

it

was long

she was restored to consciousness, in the

arms of

Madame

Berger.
instantly

The manager

came forward

after the

blow had been struck, and with scorn and indignation in his countenance, called loudly for Justice on

the offender, on the author of the atrocious plot


as destitute of honour as of

he might

i"

who He then withdrew, and commanded


humanity
;

be he

the curtain to be dropped for that evening.

Marianne's situation was now truly pitiable


the light of her last hopes, the
fire

of her soul,
late

was

quenched.

Her

features,

which

were

lightened up with the finest expression of intellectual vivacity

and joy, were now pale and sad and

motionless as death.

She gazed with

dull

and vacant

eye on

all

around.
;

Her

least accents were mingled

with her tears

and once, when she casually caught


Berger, she burst into an

a sight of the theatre, when accompanied by her


friend

Madame
flood

uncon-

trolable

of grief.

About a week

after this

occurrence, she was seized with

a violent fever,

which long baffled the


refused almost
all

skill

of the physician.
;

She

sustenance

could with

diflficulty


LANGBEIN.

207

be prevailed upon to listen to any kind of consolation,

and frequently rambled during her

sleep.

The

desire of death

seemed to be the prevailing tone of


;

her imagination

and

it

was only towards morning

that her excited feelings began to grow calm,

when
;

she would

fall

into a stupor, rather than

sleep

about the same hour, and resembling that which


occurred on the fatal night of her disappointment.

letter,

too,

which she had received from the


to ag-

manager on the ensuing day, was calculated


gravate her sufferings,

sufferings already rendered


their influence over the

more keen and

terrible

by

imagination and the heart.

This

letter, written

with

a view to dissuade her from again attempting to appear on the boards, ran as follows
:

"

am
;

truly concerned

on your account. Miss


compassion

Richards

but

may

also solicit your

for myself.

The past night has gone

far to destroy

the reputation of

my

theatre.

You may be
have incurred.

innocent,

and deeply wronged,


"

but
I

that does not relieve

me

from the weight of odium


It is quite

incumbent upon me

to declare, that

henceforth your connection with


cease.

my

theatre

must

At the same time,


months' salary,
in

am

prepared to advance

you

six

consideration of this sud-

den termination of our agreement.


"

Wolfram."

Short as

it

was, Marianne was unable to read this

208

GERMAN NOVELS.
She clasped her hands;
she

letter to the close.

writhed in the agony of her emotion and her despair.

" No, no," she cried, "

this
if

cannot survive

If

Wolper-

fram can write thus

he can question
believe

....
Windhorst,

Oh

what must the world


indeed

?Then my
trampled

secutor has

triumphed.

Yes,

thou hast triumphed


in the

thou hast
!

my

soul

dust

thou

hasjt

made me doubt

the worth of

virtue

and of truth
vile,

come, behold thy victim

come, claim the


hast

despicable creature which thou


to

made me appear
all

the whole world.

Of

what account are

my

long assiduous hours-

my

days,

my

nights of

toil

the

pure and honest


in-

hopes that once inspired me, of delighting and


forming
heart,

my own
and

and

others'

hearts

the human
Alas
I

faculties
!

almost
is

divine.

for

honour, virtue, truth


reap
;

this the
all

reward

am

to

are these the fruits of

my

studied efforts,

my

self-denial,

my

shrinking caution, and fear of


?

giving the least offence to any living soul

Away

then with these airy phantoms of honest virtue and

renown

away with these self-denying ordinances,


after all,

which cannot,
the

exempt

their votary

from

heart-rending

punishment,

the

scorn

and

wretchedness, due only to crime.


already

The world has

pronounced
contend
?

me

guilty

why should
continue to

longer

Why

should

be

better with lost

hopes and reputation, than those

LANGBEIN.

209

wlio

am

told are

much
this

worse, and are


?

still
I

ca-

ressed

and honoured by the world


in

feel

can-

not

long breathe
I

atmosphere of

reputed
like

vice, while

coldly sit a sullen sacrifice,


solitary fire.
is
I

the

vestal

watching her
state

To me

this half
it

and nameless

torture

must decide

am virtuous no more. They have pronounced me a meet companion for the author of my woes for him, whom I scorned and But now I am detested beyond all other men.
and they say that
;

no longer what

was.
;

need no longer care

for

honour or

for virtue
I

for

he has ruined

all

my my
;

dearest hopes.
his
feet
:

am

cast like a helpless victim at

he has broken

my
fear,

pride,

humbled

very heart with the fierceness of his persecutions

he

has

taught

me

to

to

submit to

his

wrongs, and to obey him.


the master of

Yes, he
let it

has become
fulfilled
!

my

destiny

and

be

welcome dishonour,
"

distraction,
!"

and despair

Oh my God, my God
unhappy
!

half wild,

girl,

"what have
;

then exclaimed the


I

said

what

have

thought

Save me, save

me !"

she con-

tinued, sinking

upon her knees, " from

madness and
was

evil despair

grant me, oh grant

my own me
Berger

patience, or relieve
It

in this

me from my doom." state of mind that Madame


side,

found her weeping by her bed


her, as she knelt

and conjured

down by

her,

to

become more

210

GERMAN XOVELS.
and resigned.
" Rest,

patient

my

dearest,

rest

your hopes on higher objects than any earthly

powers can give or take away


evil

than any

frail

and

mortals can disturb


of this
in

fix

them beyond the conThere


a reward

fines
is

imperfect,
will

perishable world.

one

which you

enjoy true peace

for all

your sorrows."
I

" Shall

?" said Marianne, in a sad

and almost

inarticulate tone of voice.

"

My

poor Marianne

oh

my God,

your voice,
not,
I

your look, pierce

me
may

to the soul.

Nay do

beseech you, continue to brood thus darkly over

your

griefs.
I will

All

yet be well.
;

Only speak the


he shall explain
.

word.
that
it

go to the manager
insisted

was you who

on retiring from the-

stage."

Marianne shook her head

but said
;

nothing.

Her
girl,

friend

insisted

upon going

when the poor


fell

pressing her

hand upon her bosom,


fast

weeping

upon her neck. She held her some moments


It
;

and

faster during

but neither could utter a word.

was

their last embrace;, they parted to

meet

no more.

Scarcely had

Madame

B.

left

the room,

before Marianne, springing from her couch, hurried

on her garments.
to die.

She was

fixed in her

resolution

She took down a poem of Burgher's, and reading the following lines, she transcribed them has-

LANGBEIN.

211

tily,

and leaving them on her


:

toilet,

quitted the

room
"

On

every side by treachery compass'd round,


l)y

Pursued, ensnared

ruthless
I

demon -arts

Pierced e'en to death

stood in cniel strife.

There was no
Save under

place of refuge

none
bled,

me

the grave.

The

laurel branch, for which I smiling Turn'd to the cypress dark, that deck'd

my grave."

There happened to be a pleasure party, consisting of Windhorst and other young lords, sailing on

the river
city.

v^^hich lies at

no great distance from the


remarked,

When
cliffs

from shore, one of them

as they were returning, something white fluttering

upon the

above.

The next moment

it

seemed

to descend with the rapidity of a bird,

diving into

the waves below.


it

"

What was
?

that

did you hear


?

dash into the water

can

it

be a sea-bird

See

it

has come to the surface

it

floats
it

on the

tide

and
;

now

it

dives again

!"

Again

appeared and sank


it

but before they reached the spot,


vanished.

had wholly

On

the same evening, at the

fall

of the tide,

two fishermen discovered the body of the hapless


Marianne, and conveyed
Full of anxiety for
it

back

into

the

town.
friend,

the sufferings

of her

Madame

Berger had hastened to the manager's

house, in order to prevail upon him to recall the

212

GERMAN NOVELS.
letter,

purport of his hasty


turning

and she was just

re-

home with

tidings of her success.

She ob-

served a crowd of persons engaged in earnest dis-

course as she passed, and heard some one mention

aloud that a very beautiful well-dressed young woman

had been found drowned.


her
;

These words startled

and she quickened her steps without making


;

any farther inquiry

until with beating

heart she

knocked
but ran

at her

own

door.

She spoke not a word,

almost breathless into Marianne's room.


object that

The

first

met her eye was the paper


;

containing the above lines

she seized

it,

and

in

her terror ran back to Wolfram's house, without

venturing even to look at

it.

It

was enough that

Marianne was no more


to the

she handed the fatal paper


tears.

manager, and burst into a flood of


little less

His sorrow was

than her own, while his

feelings of indignation
bitterly to leave

knew no bounds.
and
to spare

He vowed
in

no means untried to bring the base


;

delinquent to justice

no pains

procuring evidence of his

guilt.

In this laudable attempt he succeeded.


very respectable persons
that they
in his

Three

came forward

to declare,

had seen a man with a speaking-trumpet


riot,

hand, on the night of the

extremely ac-

tive in assailing the heroine

both with his voice and

missiles,

one of which

last

had struck the lady on had made

the head.

That

instantly afterwards he

LANGBEIN.

213

his escape, but that they should

easily

recognize

him again.
he had
his
in

Here Wolfram ordered a man


custody to be brought forward
emissary, Luchs,

whom
it

was
ar-

lordship's

who had been


verified

rested on the charge of attempting Marianne's ab-

duction
as the
trate,

and the gentlemen instantly

him

same man.
and deposed

They then went before a magisto that effect


;

and when the

vil-

lain perceived that all his farther subterfuges

were

in vain,

he confessed
instigated

in his

examination that he

had been

by Lord Windhorst, and on


full

promise of pardon by making more

confession,

he detailed the whole history of his master's nefarious plots.

The

friends of Marianne, having taken a

copy of
in

these depositions, forwarded them,

drawn up

simple, but heart-rending narrative, to the Prince's

Secretary.

His Highness perused


;

it

with expres-

sions of surprise and displeasure

he then sent for

the

manager and

for

Madame

B.,

and

after esta-

blishing the accuracy of the facts stated from their


lips,

he dismissed them without making any comreport.

ment on the
his

Meanwhile Lord Windhorst, boldly relying upon


rank and influence, and quite unconscious that
afi'air

the

had reached the Prince's

ear,

had

arrived

in the royal

ante-room, and stood jesting with other


for admission.

courtiers,

who were waiting

214

GEllMAX NOVELS.

But suddenly the


Prince himself

state doors

opened, and the

made

his appearance.

With a quick
where his
"

step he walked

directly

up

to the spot

lordship was engaged in conversation.


believe, Sir,"

Am

to

he exclaimed

in

a stern and threat-

ening voice, " that your present good-humour proceeds from the accomplishment of your late atrocious villany
?
;

Yes, Sir,
I will

am

acquainted with

all

you have done


lady's

become the avenger of that

injured

innocence.
in
trial

You

are

a prisoner

your guards are


prepare for your
that you were

attendance at the door.


;

Go,

you

shall not

have to assert

condemned unheard.

Should you be

unable, however, to clear your character from the


foul charges advanced, prepare likewise for a visit
to a distant fortress
;

you are no longer a favourite

of ours.

can yet scarcely credit such accusations,


too,
.

and against you,

Windhorst
.
.

... I

am deeply con-

cerned and shocked

but away," added the Prince,

checking the milder tone he had begun to assume " away. Sir my utter contempt accompanies you."
;

Mute and deadly


other
courtiers,

pale.
;

Lord Windhorst

slunk
to his
terror

from the Prince's presence

who then turned


that

with a frown

struck

to their hearts.

He

fixed his eyes

upon some of

Windhorst's nearest friends.

" Let that serve as a

mirror for you, gentlemen, to view yourselves.

Take
little

example from his destiny, and

try to

become a

LANGBEIN.

215

wiser and bet.

r,

while

it

is

yet time.

am

well

aware that many of you were

accessaries

to his

crimes, and feasted at the cowardly assassin's board.


I

will

have you instructed in the history of more


;

chivalric times

go

read the lives of your truly

brave and gallant forefathers, whose sword was ever

ready

in

the cause of injured innocence and beauty,


assassi-

but

who would have scorned to destroy and nate innocent women with their tongues.
officer in

" Let me ever hear of a similar piece of treachery on the part of any
shall share the

my

service,

and he
as

same disgrace and punishment

must

fall to

the lot of the heartless Windhorst."


left

The Prince then


tions.

them

to their

own

cogita-

Windhorst and his emissary expiated some

portion of their offences

by a long and severe imcity

prisonment, and perpetual banishment from the

and the

court.

The

sole distinction

between the

punishment of the emissary and


sisted in the former being

his master, con-

condemned

to the house

of correction, and the latter to a fortress.

216

GERMAN NOVELS.

SEVEN MARRIAGES AND NEVER A HUSBAND.


Adeline was
merchant
dent,
;

the daughter of a rich French


if

a young lady, who,

not quite as pru;

was perhaps as beautiful

as Penelope

and

could number almost as

many

admirers soon after


In truth, she

she had entered into her teens.


a great favourite
;

was

and advocates, court


officers,

retainers,
officers,
;

members of parliament,
seemed
to vie with

and general

each other
all

for her

good opinion

but they had, hitherto,


ception
;

met with the same


officer of the

re!

namely, that

flat little

monosyllable, no

At length a handsome young


graces, but her father

name

of

Alson, had the happy fortune to obtain her good


still

shook

his head.

He was

of a good old family, he

admitted, only he had

hardly a stiver to bless himself withal, except what

came out of the


and noble

military chest

and why

this

should

entitle him to a preference over so


offers,

many wealthy
account.

he was at a loss to

M.

Molines, however, did not belong to that class

of cruel fathers, "who boast of the right divine of


tyrannizing over their children
effect of
;

and by the combined


confinement and

frowning and fuming, and fretting and


little solitary
fit

petting,

mixed with a

low

diet, bring their girls into a

frame of mind to

LANGBEIN.

217

bear the matrimonial yoke along with some ugly,


hateful-looking wretch,

whom

they would otherwise,


So, without
this

perhaps, have by no means admired.

making much ado about


French

nothing,

sensible

father, after a few imprecations,

which helped

him

to recover his gaiety, no longer withheld his

consent.
said
;

" The young fools

like

one another," he

" and the boy wants nothing but money,


I

which,
supply.

dare say, he will allow

me

the honour to

By such means,
till

his valour will entitle

him
not

to a captain's commission, at a

jump
;

another and
it

another,

he reaches a colonel's
in

and

will

sound amiss, when the world,


designate the

my

hearing, shall

commander

of a whole heroic regi-

ment with the dear name of son


merchant's son."

the wealthy old

In a short while. Lieutenant Alson's promotion

began, and kept pace with his father-in-law's prophecies of his valour.

When

he had

risen a few

degrees, Molinet agreed to celebrate his marriage

with his daughter, in a magnificent manner.


the young lady, however, was only yet in her
teenth year, and her father quite doated

As
fif-

upon

her,

he had so contrived

it,

in consideration of her youth,

and

his

own

old age, to have her


;

company a year
regiment
re-

or two longer

and on the same morning that the


his son's

ceremony was solemnized,


ceived orders to

march

and he peremptorily
L

insisted

VOL. IV.

218

GERMAN NOVELS.
its

upon

commander marching along with


truly tender

it,

upon

a foreign destination.

The parting scene was


was doing
his

and

ro-

mantic, but the old merchant conceived that he

duty

(for

he believed that she was

too young to encounter the trials of the married


state)
;

and

it

did not

move him a

whit.

Alson's

sole

consolation was in the hoped-for termination

of the American war, which would enable return speedily to his

him

to

own country

at all events, secured his prize,

while he had,

^barring the

usual

chances of being drowned, shot, captured, or knocked upon the head.

And
tiny

truly his

name seemed

to

have been en-

tered upon the debit side of the


;

Day-book of des-

for

though his regiment joined the party of

the English colonists, in their contest against the

mother country,

it

so

happened that our hero was

wounded and taken


allies

prisoner

by a troop of Indians,
first

of the British forces, in the

engagement.
nor eat him,

Fortunately, they neither

sacrificed

contenting

themselves with the torture of curing

him of
left

his

wounds, which, with


life.

their

assistance,

him a

cripple for

This he found to be a
the

serious

impediment

in

way

of

making
;

his

escape from the swift-footed sable chiefs

though

he was over-persuaded

to

one of his fellow-prisoners.

make The

the

attempt by

latter

was quick

LANGBEIN.

219

enough

to secure his retreat, but the

unlucky Alson

was overtaken while limping

at

an extraordinary

pace, in the hope of rejoining his young bride and


his

wealthy father-in-law, with the addition of enlife.

joying a quiet pension for

Poor fellow

he

was caught when within a

stone's

throw or two of

the American lines, and immediately compelled to

limp his way back again, with an Indian spear, by

way

of goad, pricking him in the rear.

On

his

arrival

he was thrown into a large wooden cage,

with orders to be fattened, as soon as possible, for

one of the

chiefs'

tables,

whose stomach refused

almost every other kind of food.

Meanwhile Victor, the young


companied him
in his
flight,

officer

who

ac-

under plea of extreme


obtained leave of

sickness and his late

sufferings,

absence, and proceeded back to his

own

country.
in

During

his captivity

he had heard a great deal

praise of the beauty


line,

and accomplishments of Ade-

while conversing with the unfortunate Alson.

Aware, at the same time, of her vast fortune, a


thought now struck him on which he continued to
ponder during his whole voyage home.

He

con-

ceived that he might possibly be fortunate enough


to supply Alson's loss
;

for

he had

little

doubt but

that the sable heroes would very quickly dispose of


their prisoner, in

such a way as to leave him no

source of uneasiness on that head.

L 2

220

GERMAN NOVELS.
this, at all events,

Taking

for granted,

and

flat-

tered with the idea of his future prospects, he has-

tened with the rueful looks of an undertaker, to the

house of M. Molinet, and, without much ceremony,


regretted that he
little

was the bearer of

ill-tidings.

shocked, the good merchant began to pull al-

most as long a face as his own.


wishing to make a
still

The wily

Victor,

deeper impression, so as to

introduce himself in the character of a comforter,


entreated that he would not alarm himself;

and

drawing his hand across his eyes, at the same time


heaving a few sighs, he observed that his poor friend

Alson had unfortunately been scalped and murdered before his eyes, by a party of wild Indians.

M. Molinet
young.

uttered an exclamation of horror,

that brought his whole household together, old and

Victor was

still
;

singing his doleful dirge

as they gathered round

and he next drew


This, however,
to

forth a

packet of forged
air

letters,

in order to give

a greater

of veracity to his story.


;

was su-

perfluous

no one offered

question the truth

of his

statements, while his well-feigned


to his

sorrow

recommended him strongly


flattered himself that

new

friends, as

Alson's companion and fellow soldier.

Here he

he had
;

laid a
in

good founda-

tion for his future plans

and

a few days he repleasure of being

peated his

visit,

when he had the

introduced to the lovely Adeline.

Langbein.

221

Mutual sorrow and sympathy

in

regard to the

young

soldier's

fate,

drew them

into conversation,
;

and Victor was quite charmed with her manners


while her beauty surpassed his expectations.

By

degrees, his person and language appeared equally


interesting to Adeline,

and not many months had


began to ripen

elapsed before their acquaintance


into a
tisfied

more tender regard.

M.

Molinet, being sa-

that his connections were respectable, and

not in the least aware of the stratagem which he

had adopted
his views,

in

order more effectually to succeed in


to

was shortly afterwards prevailed upon

give his consent.

The mourning having


the

at length ceased, Adeline

cast aside her widow's weeds,

and gave her hand

to

happy Victor, who now fancied he had secufair prize for life.

red the
hitherto

But Fortune, that had


favourable,

shown

herself so remarkably

now, when he stood on the very brink of Paradise,


began, like a
vile jilt as in

she

is,

to

change her

tone.

He was much
when
he
as he
fell,

the situation of a spoiled child,


its

the careless nurse slips

leading-strings

not figuratively,

but actually and heavily,


in the plenitude

was cutting too high a curvet

of his satisfaction in the bridal dance.

He

fell

on

the smooth chalked floor, and disjointed one of his


thighs
:

a compound fracture, which would require one position


for the period of

him

to lie in

one or

222

GERMAN NOVELS.
What
a horrible contrast
into a sick-room
all

two months.

the bridal
;

chamber was turned


appeared

his bride

became head nurse, and

his fondest

hopes dis-

in surgical operations.

His recovery was equally tedious and vexatious,

and before he grew

at all

convalescent, another
scene.
V^ictor
felt

character appeared upon

the

not a
ther

little

alarmed on learning that Clermont, anoofficer,

young

who had been captured by


arrived in Paris.
at the hotel,

the

Indians,
tion,

had just

His

first

ques-

on arriving

was respecting the

residence of

M.

Molinet, and he did not long leave

Victor in suspense, as to the particulars of his escape, and the fate of Alson.

In fact, he was the

bearer of letters from the latter to his wife, and he

was naturally somewhat surprized on hearing from


his

host that the lady had contracted a second

marriage.
that Victor

He was

still

more astonished
;

to find

was the second husband

but he re-

vealed nothing of what he


first

knew

to his host, being

determined to have an interview with the wily

usurper of Alson's rights, of

whom

he knew enough,
all

before delivering his letters.


rage,

Victor lost

cou-

and looked quite

crest-fallen as

Clermont was

announced, and briskly followed up his name with


the familiarity of a former comrade, into the sick

man's chamber, " Oh, Victor


wretch you are
!

!"

he cried, " what a


villany you have

what a piece of

LANGEEIN.

223

committed against Alson

he

is

alive,

poor fellow

and

have brou^^ht

letters

from him for his wife

im-

must go and deliver them."


" Alive ?" exclaimed Victor, " Alson alive
possible
!

why he was
in

overtaken and put to death


while

by the Indians,
to

my company,
;

we were

trying

make our

eecape."

" Stop there, Victor


killed
;

he was overtaken, but not


too,

though he would have been, and eaten


not been for a party of the colonists,

had
fell

it

who
I

on the Indians during the night, and rescued

our friend from his perilous situation.

But come,

must deliver my letters." " For God's sake my good Clermont,"


!

cried the

wretched Victor, at the same time tumbling headforemost in his hurry to prevent him, " for God's
sake,

help
;

me up

fear I

have broken

my

leg

again

beseech you not to put the climax to

my

misery.

Truly, take half of

not betray me.


ever after
;

but

all I am worth, and do Command me in every thing for do spare me and try to raise me
;

upon

the sofa before Adeline


pity
at

comes
his

in."

Touched with

helpless

situation,

Clermont assisted the unlucky patient from the


ground, who feigned a vast deal more pain than he
really felt.

Meanwhile, Adeline, who had heard from one


of the maidens that a stranger had arrived, and was

224

GERMAN NOVELS.
in

then
liig-h

her husband's room


full

and likewise hearing

words, ran

of anxiety to inquire.
in

Victor was

now

momentary dread of behold-

ing the fatal letter drawn from Clermont's pocket;

but the latter was too magnanimous, and too


delighted
at

much
any
he

the

sight

of Adeline's

surpassing

charms and

loveliness to think of causing her


It
is

such alarm and unhappiness.

true that

enjoyed the unhappy man's suspense and tortures,

and would then burst out

into

an uncontrolable

fit

of laughter to see the rueful faces which he made,

and which
his

his lovely bride put to the account of

lame

leg,

no better

for his. fall.

Clermont

lin-

gered long enough to catch the fascinating poison


that lurked in Adeline's bright eyes
fired
;

his soul

was

at the first interview

and

it

was

clear that

Victor's last sands of promised happiness

and good

fortime
run.

most tantalizing good fortune


longer
felt

were nearly
ought
him, been

He no

so indignant as he

at Victor's base

conduct; he rather sighed more


it
;

effectually to imitate
in

and having,

like

the habits of pleasing himself whenever he well

could,

a thought suddenly struck him to

avail

himself, as far as possible, of the information

and

influence which he possessed.

Adeline, pleased to observe that there seemed

nothing unpleasant between the two gentlemen, as


she had feared, soon after
left

the room.

Clermont

LANGBEIN".

225

again turned to kis companion with a portentous

frown upon his brow:


Sir,

"

am

thinkiuf^,

my good
is
it

that you have

brought yourself into a very

pretty
rate
;

dilemma indeed.
and besides,
I

Your

situation

despeto

never could reconcile

my
I

conscience to become the means of concealing your


treacherous conduct from the parties concerned.
say, Sir, too, that
trust reposed in
in
it

would be

ill

discharging the

me by
No,

our unhappy friend Alson,

any degree to countenance so base a conspiracy


I

against his peace.


I

am

decided in the course

shall take

to deliver his letters, along with other


is still

proofs,

showing that, though infirm, he

in

existence.
I

The

sole lenity

which

in

such an

affair

can be induced to grant, would be to postpone

the communication until you were sufficiently reco-

vered to be removed

and the sooner you can save


better
it

yourself by flight, the


afford

will

be.
;

can

you no greater proof of

my

regard

for if

you continue here much longer,


reluctantly, be compelled

I shall,

however
to

to

expose you

the

world.

Spare yourself the trouble of any farther


;

intreaties

cannot

listen to

them

cannot con-

sent to
tion."

become accessary

to so cruel an imposi-

Having come

to

this

explanation,

Clermont

took his leave, leaving the unlucky patient in no


very enviable state of mind.
L 5

He was

unable even to

226

GERMAN NOVELS.
his

make

escape;

and

he

lay

ruminating

all

possible plans, either for counteracting Clermont's

influence or for effecting an able retreat.


in vain, however, that

It

was

he beat his brains


his
difficulties.

for a sa-

tisfactory solution

of

The only
seemed

resource

that offered itself to

his choice

to be that

of throwing himself

voluntarily

upon

Adeline's mercy, and relying upon the strength of

her attachment,
business.

for

a happy termination of the


in his

Should he, however, be successful

appeals to her tenderness and compassion,

still

he

would have
incensed

to

encounter the storm, raised by her

friends

and her

father,

which

in

his

present helpless situation would be doubly trying.

At

length, finding nothing that was likely to relieve


his

him from

awkward dilemma, he resigned himonly of getting


little

self quietly to his destiny, desirous

his

head out of the scrape with as


;

damage
fell

as possible
asleep.

and, wearied with conjectures, he

Adeline remarked that there was something or


other pressing upon his
spirits,

and with a thousand

endearing words she sought to discover the cause.

But he only
lavished
affection

affected

greater

cheerfulness,
for
all

and
the

fresh

thanks

and caresses

and devotedness which, he

said, she

had
re-

so generously

shown him.
suspicions
;

By such means he
and
she

moved

her

regarded

the

LANGBEIN.

227

assiduous
the
light

visits

on the part of Clermont, only


after

in

of friendly inquiries

his

friend's

health.

Entertaining, however, the designs before


it

mentioned,

was

his object not to permit Victor's

health to get so fully established, as to take a final

and affectionate leave of


pose Clermont

his

young bride
For

he must
this pur-

be removed suddenly and secretly.

now

daily

made

his

appearance with

Alson's letters in his hand, which he held before


Victor's eyes
;

while he threatened the unfortunate


if

wight with instant exposure,


to quit the field.

he longer refused

This, after

many

vain appeals for pity, he

was
first

compelled to do.
airing,

Under pretence of taking a


important

Clermont provided him with a conveyance,

and then destroyed those


which he had held up,
sword behind our
first

documents

like

the angel's flaming

parents, to drive the unlucky

Victor out of Paradise.

Having accompanied him


his parting letter

some distance, Clermont received


for Adeline,

and returned

in

the same carriage to

M.
the

Molinet's house.

"

Where

is

Victor

what has happened


farewell !"

?"

was

first
'

inquiry.

He

bids
;

you an eternal

replied

Clermont

" and you

may

rejoice

that you will


letter
;

never behold his face again.

His own

will

inform you that he basely deceived you

that he

228

GERMAN NOVELS.

forged the account of Captain Alson's death, and

married Adeline during his life-time.

threatened

to reveal his treachery, and he quickly


-well

decamped,
to

knowing that he was not

legally united

your daughter, nor entitled to her person any more

than to her fortune. " Poor Alson, indeed,


is

since

dead

but this
or ratify

does not in any degree diminish his


his marriage.
It
is

guilt,

now
'

just three

months since

my
'

friend died in prison,

where we were both con-

fined for above a year.

Should you

ever,' said he,

be fortunate enough to

reach our dear country,

salute

my

excellent

Adeline,

my

dearly

beloved
last
;

wife

!'

Shortly afterwards he breathed his


to the ashes of

and peace be

my

respected friend

He

beguiled the hours of our imprisonment with

his sweet

and noble discourse, and he even watched


I

over me,

may

say, after his decease

for as
I

they
con-

were carrying his remains out of the prison,


tri^^d to
.
.

make

m'^lescape."

At

this

account,

both

father

and daughter
in

stood wrapt in

astonishment,
in

and

particular

Adeline fixed her eyes

breathless

wonder upon

the ingenious inventor of so


tailed

many

fictions.

He

re-

them with

so

much

ease and confidence, an-

swered everv question, and gave the whole fable so


natural an
air,

as to carry conviction to their hearts,


felt

equal to any thing that was ever


of the (iospel.

for the truth

LANGBEIN.

239

The
for

lovely linde

of two

absent husbands then

expressed her lively gratitude to the intended third,


his timely interference in

rescuing her out of

the hands of so base a character, while the good


old merchant begged for the favour of his friendship,

and more frecjuent


artful

visits.

But the

Clermont checked his wishes

for

a short period, in order not to betray his


ject.

own

pro-

He

called so very seldom, that, being bent


their gratitude, they were obliged to

upon evincing
send him

formal invitations.

In

fact,

so deeply

was he smitten with the charms of Adeline, that he

was almost
her,

afraid

of anticipating his views upon

and

tried to accost her with all the starched

politeness of
first

some grey-haired matron

during his

visits.

Yet he was handsome and entertainlittle

ing

and Adeline, a

piqued at his excessive


icy region about

indifference, sought to
his heart

thaw the

by her sunny smiles and glances, and a


little

thousand delicate

attentions.
in

He

replied,

however, very cautiously, though

such a way as

showed he was quite sensible of her power, and


feared to trust himself within the enchanted circle

of her charms.

To smooth the way more

effectually

to

his
in-

wishes, he next brought forward the agreeable


telligence of the rogue Victor's death.
It

was ap-

parently

under the sign manual and seal of the

230

GERMAN KOVRLS.
who had
confessed him, during his last

curate

mo'

ments, stating

how he had

fallen

sick

at

a
;

little

village, as the curate

was passing through


;

how
This

he had received sacrament


in

and how he had died

peace and blessedness shortly afterwards.


decease he, the curate,

account of his

had been

induced to furnish at poor Victor's request, which


duty he had discharged
interment.
after giving

him decent

Adeline was again free

and how happy that she


Clermont was soon
;

was released from so awkward a kind of engage-

ment

Of

this the arch-traitor

assured, by the

manner of

his reception

it

was
diffi-

no longer

difficult to

perceive that his artful

dence and constrained demeanour, had pleaded his


cause more effectually than, in such circumstances, his

utmost assiduities could have done.


;

The
he

coldness of his manner gradually died away

began to assume

his real character

every day they


to

grew more and more passionately attached


other
;

each

and Adeline gave him her hand with greater

pleasure than she did to either of her other hus-

bands.

splendid banquet
altar
;

welcomed the happy pair

from the

the guests

made

their

appearance
advanced.

and the afternoon was

at

length

far

The sound
at a

of a carriage was

now heard advancing


and
it

smart pace up the

street,

drew up at

LANGBEIN.

281

M.

Molinet's door.
idle guest,

"

Ha

!"

cried the

good host

" an
up."

by Our Lady, but he drives briskly

All eyes were

now turned towards


all

the door

it

opened

and, to the surprize of

the company, in

rushed the deceased Victor, with his drawn sword


in his

hand, which
:

he pointed with

threatening

gesture at Clermont
life!"

" Up, up, and defend your


the same time dragging the

he cried;

at

astonished bridegroom with firm grasp out of the


hall.

Every guest
appearance to
it

sat too

much

terrified at his

ghastly

interfere,

feeling

quite assured that


that, with

was wholly supernatural.

So

the as-

sistance of his servant, Victor

had thrust the uncarriage,

lucky bridegroom

into

his

and driven

away with him, before any body had

sufficiently re-

covered his senses to think of a rescue.

When

arrived a short distance

from the

city,

Victor called to the

coachman

to halt,

and burst-

ing into a loud laugh, he said, " Well, friend, there


are

now two knaves


little

instead of one, and one raven


other's eyes.

must not
be

pull out the

There would
if

use in

hanging ourselves,

others will

save us that trouble, for what


object
in

we have done.
arises

My

carrying you
;

off,

from the most

disinterested motives

it

will save

you from a great


to

deal of plague

for, as

you were kind enough

232

GERMAN NOVELS.
me
have now to inform

bring

tidings of Alson,
is

you that he

actually in Paris,

and would speedily

have fallen upon you


ficed both his wife

like a thunderbolt,

and

sacri-

and you

to

his

farv.

We

have

both of us the best reason in the world for keeping


out of his

way

for

he

is

already half-witted from

the effect of his Indian adventures, and being fattened, during the course of a whole month, for the
chief's table."

'

wish he had eaten him, then," exclaimed


;

Clermont, in very ill-humour

" the fellow must

have as

many
it

lives as a cat."
!

" So

seems

but we must wait patiently


;

till

the affair has

blown over

and meanwhile seek


kingdom, and
should run

some

safe retreat, in a corner of the

near a sea port, in case the

madman

desperate, and proceed to extremities against us."

Now

this

was

all

fresh

tissue of lies,

in-

vented by Victor to revenge himself.

So

far

from

being in Paris, Alsoa had been taken prisoner during


his

voyage home, and was now passing his

time in England.
left

Having given out that he had


after

France under an assumed name, Victor,


rival,
all

parting with his

had returned, and kept a


his

watchful eye upon

proceedings.

In order
to

more
rival

effectually to screen himself,

and

get his

completely into his power, he permitted him

to

accept the hand of Adeline,

and

then

seized

LANGBEIN.

233

upon him
lated.

in

the

manner that has


easily fell into

just been
;

re-

Clermont

the snare

and

no longer ventured to think of retracing his steps


to Paris,

when he

believed that Alson,

whom

he had

disposed of in so

summary a manner, had again


Half stupefied
be rolled
bridal

appeared on the scene of action.


with the news, he
suffered

himself to
in his

away, as he had been taken,


parel, without hat or gloves,

rich

ap-

and arrayed from head

to foot in silk

while the lovely Adeline was thus

deserted by her third husband

and

left

to reflect

upon her wayward Such a


alarmed

lot alone.

series of

unexpected occurrences almost

turned the old merchant's head.


lest

He began

to be

they should afford a topic of scandal


;

to the whole city

and

after

a short consultation

with his daughter, he came to the resolution of


quitting Paris,

and

retiring into the country for a

short time.

So having
companied by

settled his affairs,

he proceeded, aceighty leagues

his daughter, about

into the country, "where he purchased an agreeable

residence,

and spent a whole

year,

more

to his

own,
stri-

than to Adeline's satisfaction.

So sudden and

king a contrast was too trying and too


after the loss of three

solitary,

husbands, though she had

already almost banished them from her mind.

For

no one any longer doubted the decease of Captain

234

GERMAN NOVELS.
first
it

Alson, her
the others,

betrothed

while, in regard to both


in

was currently reported, and


by each

a short

while generally credited, that they had fought a


duel,

and

fallen

other's hands.

Since the

night of their strange disappearance, they had neither of

them been heard of

until

one day in a
w^ere

wood, at some distance from Paris, two bodies


found dreadfully mangled,

and there seemed no

longer any doubt of their being the two ill-fated


lovers
;

at least, such

was the account that reached


It

M. Molinet and
that the bodies

his daughter.

was
after

also stated

had been
their

interred,

remaining

above-ground until
discernible,

features were

no longer
to lay

and no persons coming forward

claim to them.

However, to

set the

matter at

rest,

M. Molinet

sent for the chief witness

who had

given evidence

on the inquest

and having received from him an


it

account of the persons of the deceased, he found


agree, in

many

points, with his

two sons-in-law

discovery which so greatly delighted him that, in the height of his satisfaction, he cried out
the knaves
!

" Aye,

you describe them


?"

to a hair

and both

dead and buried, you say

With
his

this consolatory assurance,

he hastened to
visit

daughter Adeline, and they now began to


little

with their neighbours, and see a

more of the

world

while they even talked of returning the ensu-

LANGBEIN.

235

ing winter to Paris. Before that period arrived, however, the old
his consent
;

gentleman had been again

solicited for
!

his consent for the fourth time

and

he gave

it

with

much

the same easy temper as on

former occasions; only his daughter was this time


to

be united to a young nobleman, Baron Marly.

The marriage ceremony was performed without


the slightest interruption.

The

feast

and the dance

passed pleasantly away

and the bride-maids were


of

already busied in disarraying the fair Adeline

her

ornaments and jewels


it,

when, as

fate

would

have
heard
vous
too
to
;

a long and loud resounding knock was


hall-door,
into
tits.

at the

enough
It

to

throw a nermidnight

patient

was

just

yet one of the footmen had courage


;

enough

open the door

and
;

in

stept

shabby-drest

man

with a wooden leg


hall,

and, limping as fast as he

could along the

begged

lo

be allowed an

interview with the host.

The servant grinned


and said that
No,
;

at

him over

his shoulder,
it

it

would be better

to postpone

to

the following day.


'*

stranger

my good friend, " my atlair will


this

it

will not,"

replied the
I

admit of no delay.

must see your master


contempt of
flying

moment."
his head,
this,

But the man only stared and shook


as
if in

his request.

Upon

the

stranger,

into a passion, raised his crutch.

2.36

GERMAN NOVELS.
varlet,

" Go, thou base


in

or

will

break every bone


to acquaint his

thy skin

!"

and the footman ran

master with this very unseasonable

visit.

M. Molinet made his appearance in his nightgown and slippers. With a presentiment of something wi'ong,

he looked

the

stranger sharply in

the face, as he limped towards him, with a black

patch over his


other cheek.

left eye,

and a great plaster on the


old host uttered an excla-

The good

mation of alarm

at the very sight of

him.

"

Who
me ?"

are you. Sir ?" he inquired in a


;

subdued

and quivering tone


with

" and what

is

your pleasure

" Alas
stranger
;

don't

you

" don't you

know me," sighed the know your own son-in-law,


back several yards
hands
in

Alson ?"

Poor
at

M. Molinet
;

started

one bound
;

raised

up

his

perfect

wonder

and then called out

to a servant at

some
call

distance from

them

" For God's sake, run,


;

my

daughter and her husband


haste
!"

and make haste

make

" Nay, /

am

already here, father," observed the

one-legged man.

" Oh, unhappy wretches as we


poor distracted father of so

all

are !" cried the

many

sons, pacing back-

wards and forwards, and looking ruefully up the


staircase,

to see

whether they would ever come.

LANGBEIN.

237

Baron Marly

first

made

his appearance, attired in


;

a rich and elegant undress


glorious as

looking as proud and

Mars

himself, just before

he was caught
:

with the lovely wife of ugly limping Vulcan

who

could scarcely have cut a more sorry figure than


the one-legged

man now

did.

The Baron could


:

not help smiling at the stranger, as he said

"
I

What
I

are your

was just
" But

this

commands with mc, father ? moment retiring for the night."


never shall,"
striking his
at the

will take care that ,you


;

cried the

lame man

same time

crutch in most threatening style upon the ground.


" Is the fellow out of his senses?"

returned

the Baron, with a glance of contempt.

Poor M. Molinet was now quite beside himself.

He

trembled sadly at the necessity he was under

of introducing the gentlemen to one another, on


this occasion.

He

did

it,

but

it

was with a very

ill

grace.

" Fine doings, indeed

!"

exclaimed the crutch-

man, again stamping his wooden leg, more fiercely


than before, upon the ground.
ever, that I

"

It is

lucky,

how-

am

arrived in time to prevent this Ba-

ron from casting a stain upon


of

my

honour, and that


to

my

family.

You

will

please, father,

show
keep

him

to the very farthest

chamber from

my wife's and
;

mine, that you can find in the house


strict

shall

watch on the outside."

238

GERMAN NOVELS.
At these words, Baron Marly
instantly

mounted
an

his high horse of noble-blood,


air of disdain
:

and

replied, with
fellow,

" Night watches,

my good

do

not seem very well adapted to your present crippled


condition, and
I

will spare

you that trouble.

As

matters turn out, you are quite welcome to your


first

bargain, with

all

the manorial rights and appurI

tenances thereto belonging. In fact,


to

shall be

happy

make
untie

the transfer

by which you
I

will help

me
I

to

a knot, which
to

was beginning
tight.

to fear

might chance

be tied too
;

For

my

part,

am

a friend to freedom

and there are some of


have had very

my

relations at court,

who

will

not be sorry to hear of


I

what has happened,


peace since

for truly

little

my

alliance with this very v/orthy faI

mily, because they imagined that henceforward

was about

to unite myself with that less shining, but

useful class of honest citizens.

They solemnly de-

clared that
rier

my

marriage had raised an eternal bar;

between
;

me and them

between the city and


to respect their

the court

and that they knew how

own

station, if I did not.

This was a sad blow in


;

the face of

my escutcheon
me
to

and

should, doubtless,

soon have died of mortification, had not this lucky


incident restored
pride.

my
I

injured nobility

and

This somewhat consoles

me

for the personal

loss of a lady, for

whom

entertained the greatest


I

tenderness and esteem.

But

am no

sentimental

LANGBEIN.

239

worshipper of sighs and tears.


fore,

entreat you, therelittle

my

dear

M.

Molinet, to break this

matter
parting

to

your daughter

to present her with


all

my

regards, and wish her

happiness and good for;

tune.

So

farewell,

gentlemen
I

if

you have any

commands
the bearer.

to Paris,

shall feel

most happy to be

There

shall take out a formal divorce,

and

so

the matter rests."

With an

air of lordly
left

nonchalance, he turned upon his heel, and


father-in-law lost in astonishment at
situation in

his

the strange

which he stood.
the nimble puppy rim," cried the
;

" Nay,

let

man
I

with the crutch

" and cheer up, old gentleman,


;

you see you have got me quite safe


could add quite sound
again.
True,' I
I
;

wish

but any

how

safe

home
I

am

a bit of a cripple

that

am none

of your noble impostors


I

but what of am
hope Adeline
I

Alson, your honourable son-in-law.


will not think the
I

worse of

me
it

though,

confess,

do not much
:

relish the

thought of our

first inter-

view

better perhaps to put


will

off until to-morrow.

You

thus have time to reconcile her to the


;

change of partners

but, as

you seem rather weary


chamber.

and nervous, you had


and
let

better yourself retire to rest,


to

me, likewise, be shown


I

To-morrow
be

wi'l

amuse Adeline and you with


in

some account of my adventures


will

America.
;

You
but

much

astonished,

if

not entertained

^40

GERMAN NOVELS.
dear father, not a word more

for to-night,

let

us

get a

little rest."

M.

Molinet, like one half moon-stricken, totter:

ed out of the room

he replied not a word

and

his

son was obliged to shake him well by the shoulders

and stamp
chamber.
Just
at

his

wooden

leg,

before he could
to

make

him comprehend that he wanted


this

be shown to his

moment one

of Adeline's maids

came running,
fallen into
fits.

to say that her

young mistress had


;

She had heard the uproar


instantly attired, in

and

insisted

upon being

order to

arrive in time to prevent

any

fatal

consequences
fallen a

having already

lost

two husbands, who had


;

sacrifice to their

mutual fury

but such was the tu"


in the bride-

mult of her emotions, that she fainted


maid's arms.
Greatly concerned
at
this

event, the cripple

bridegroom observed, that


so shabbily dressed,

had he not unluckily been


dis-

and altogether cut so very


figure, with the

mal and forbidding a


wounds, and
his

patches on his

wooden leg
fits

which might perhaps


" Be-

frighten her into

again as she was recovering

nothing should keep him from her presence.


sides,
in

my

crutch makes such a plaguey loud noise

walking,

she might

imagine some kobold

or

house-goblin was coming into her chamber.


things

Such

she must

get used to by degrees; so

my

LANGBEIN.

241

good
ing

girl,

must be content with thy recommendaffectionately to thy sweet mistress,

me most
is

and here
you."

my

father-in-law will go

along with

Poor M. Molinet, quite puzzled what


or

to think

what

to do, suffered himself to be led, like a


in his sleep, into his daughter's

man

walking

chamber
into his

while his son-in-law walked another

way

own.

At

this

moment, the Baron's servants having


his wardrobe,

packed up

and brought the coach, he


two
his

was heard giving


most
important
;

his orders respecting these

and

favourite

subjects

of

thoughts
ment, in

and then he rattled

off

along the pave-

all

the offended, yet newly recovered, dig-

nity of his ancient house.

Adeline,

on her

side,

again passed a lonely


;

night, on the very

day of her fourth nuptials

be-

sides being half frightened to death.

On

the

morrow of

this

eventful

evening,

Molinet's

household was early in motion.


at length to console

M. The

good host himself began


self with the idea,

him-

that even a wooden-legged son-

in-law was preferable to none, and hastened


stairs

down
how-

with a fixed determination to welcome him

in a hearty

and hospitable
to think

style.

The

latter,

ever,

seemed

more of a good

night's rest,

than rising at an early hour to reclaim the hand of VOL. IV.

242

GERMAN NOVELS.
betrothed.

his beautiful

The clock had already


;

struck nine

breakfast Avas waiting

yet the

slug-

gard showed no signs of appearance.


even rung his bell
;

He had

not

and the old merchant, beginfirst

ning to

feel
;

impatient for his

meal, waited and

grumbled

until, declaring that

he must be one of

the seven sleepers, he ordered one of the servants to

knock, and to knock hard, at his door

for

it

was

now near
in

eleven o 'clock, and the old gentleman,


his spasms,

momentary dread of an attack of


fast helping

was
to

himself to whatever

came nearest

him.

Before he had half done, however, the

lacquey came to inform him that he had knocked


repeatedly at the lame gentleman's door, but had
received no answer.

His master shook

his

head

wistfully, and,

or-

dering the servant to walk


stairs,

first,

followed him
;

up

and bade him enter the room

not liking

the risk of receiving any farther sliock, added to

that of the former night.

So he stationed himself
stairs,

at the

head of the
to
!"-

and called out

to the

man, from time


" No, Sir
is

time, "

Now, John,
?"'

is

he asleep ?"
Sir!"

"

Is

he awake

" No,

" What,
is

he
at

dead, then ?"


least
I

"

Oh

no. Sir, he

only gone

cannot find him."

" Gone

!"

repeated the

merchant, advancing a
crutch, and leg, and

little

more boldly, " What,


" No, Sir
;

all ?"

his leg

is

LAN(iHF.I.V.

24^

here

only

it

is

nothing but a cork

!"

" Nothing
I
is

but a cork," repeated the old merchant, " then

dare say he must have a stock of them, and


that,

it

perhaps,
!

which

makes him
!

so hght afoot.
to think of run-

The scoundrel
morning

the base deserter


own
them.
is

ning away from his

wife and father, the very

after returning to
all

Surely
It

am
;

be:

witched, or this

a dream.

cannot be

am
into
his

perhaps too hard upon him to suspect him

he

has, perhaps, only got

up

in

the night,

and gone
to find

the

garden

and then been unable


and

way back

into the right room.


I

Do you

run

into the garden, John,

will

examine the other

bed-rooms

he must be somewhere
Adeline, call
all

he
;

cannot be
the

gone

call

the

women, and
bid

men, and the children, about the place


look sharp every where

them

he cannot be gone."
and the
;

There was soon a general muster;


house was searched from top to bottom

but he
the

was neither in the garret nor the cellar


son-in-law was gone
!

new

At

the old porter's turn to

when it came to be examined, who kept the


length,

lodge gates, and just then came hobbling up, he


declared that about day-break a lame, ill-favoured

kind of man, with black patches on

his cheeks,

most

like a

broken-down

soldier,

had ordered him


to see after

to tnibar the gate,

as he

was going
2

244

GERMAN NOVELS.
his

some of

luggage which was

left at

the next inn,

but he said nothing about coming back.

With

this

gleam of hope M. Molinet despatched

a messenger to the place, but no person answering


the porter's description had been there.

The lovely Adeline sat pale and weeping in her chamber until this trying moment she had borne
:

lier

strange adventures and vicissitudes with the


;

sweet temper and patience of an angel

but this
in her
;

was too much.


sufferings
;

There

vras

no aectation

her tears and sighs were genuine

for

she had really loved Alson

he was her
grief, loss.

first

choice,

and she sank overpowered with


this his

on learning

second and more cruel

Her

father, little less affected at witnessing her

grief, retired

with downcast looks, and

full

of per-

plexing thoughts, to devise some method of proceeding,

to

his

own chamber.
left

The

reader, however,
;

shall not be

in

the same dilemma

but shall

forthwith be introduced behind the curtain of the

mystery

as here follows

In

the

first

place he

need hardly be informed, that those two arch-hypocrites


still

and impostors, Victor and Clermont, were


In truth, they were far too invillains to think

in existence.

terested

and notorious

of sparing

the criminal law any trouble by honestly knocking

one another's brains out

and

in fact

were on the

best terms, for persons of their stamp.

As

fortune,

i..\NGBF.i>r.

245

too,

would have

it,

M.

Molinet, in retiring to the

country, had settled not far from the place of their


retreat,
less

which they kept as secret as possible

no

from fear of Alson's return, than from that of

being brought to account for having deserted their


military duties.

They

vi^ere,

likewise, enabled,

from

this spot, to observe the proceedings of

M. Molinet,
affair

their father-in-law,

and

to learn

whether the

had at

all

subsided.

The

report of the fourth marriage

acted

like

poison upon their jealous and revengeful feelings

and not venturing, from a sense of mutual

safety, to

wreak them upon each other, they swore to prevent

any other person availing himself of any advantage


which they had
forfeited themselves.

With

this

view, they pitched

upon a wily young mendicant,

who
could

in

some degree resembled Alson, and who


stated, their base stratagem

assume any character, and, equipping him

in the

manner already

turned out completely successful.

About the period that Baron Marly forwarded


a copy of his divorce to his father-in-law, the
latter

became aware of the

species of imposture that

had

been practised upon him, owing to the recognition

and the subsequent confession of the roguish mendicant himself.


ployers,
Still

he did not betray his emto

and M. Molinet, supposing them

be deto

ceased, was

now more

at a loss than ever

what

conjecture on the subject.

246

GERMAN NOVELS.
Adeline, on her part, seemed inclined to

make

no farther adventures
finding a

in the

matrimonial lottery

while her father was more intent than ever upon


real

and bona de son-in-law.


to

Suitor.s

again began

make

their

appearance, and he

allowed her no peace, until she agreed to

make

fresh choice, for the fifth time, in the person of the

Marquis

Gilles.

The marriage ceremony was fixed to take place at a country-seat at some distance, belonging to the new bridegroom. Every thing appeared in a good
train
;

the day, the dinner, and the dance were

all

happily concluded.

M. Molinet had himself seen


and windows, and
after that

to the security of all the doors

given orders to
hour, be they

admit no more guests


they would.

who

The house was


when, horrible to

just beginning to settle to rest,


relate,

a cry of

fire

was heard,
to

and the room next the


be
in

bridal

chamber was found

flames.

The Marquis ran down

stairs half

undrest, and disappeared through the

front-door.

The

fire

was fortunately got under, but the brideno


longer
to
;

groom was
befallen
secret
;

be

seen.

What had
remained a

him no one knew


and
all

his destiny

that could be gathered was, that


a

some countrymen had beheld

carriage driving

with great rapidity from the castle.

Two

days of grievous anxiety elapsed, when a

LANGBEIN.

247

tourier
Jotter,

made
and

his

appearance with
its

the

following

after

delivery

instantly

galloped

away

" Madam,
" Your bridals are surely bewitched, and some

dragon guards the entrance of the bridal chamber.


I

am no
tilt

St.

George, and
;

feel

no inclination

to run

with the monster


I

very willingly

making room
takes a fancy

for the sixth fool, as

am

told,

who

for

such an adventure.

GiLLES."

M. Molinet
rage
;

tore this precious epistle in a great

then ordered his carriage to the door,

and

taking his daughter along with him, ordered them


to drive quick towards
Paris.

He
;

left

a letter
to

behind him

for his son-in-law,

summoning him
marriage
affair,

appear and answer for his conduct


never did
annulled.
;

but this he

and consequently the


But,
in

was
an

the

course of this
so

aged

advocate

became

deeply

smitten

with

Adeline's charms, -as to be quite unable to devote

himself longer to his profession, without


client's

his

fair

consent and

assistance.

The
it,

lady,

how-

ever,

would certainly have refused

had not her


at last, over-

father,

an old friend of the lawyer's, kindly stepped


;

in to second the plea

and she was,

persuaded to yield her hand.

248

GERMAN NOVELS.
This time the ceremony was performed in as

private a

manner

as possible.
it

Only a few persons


to take place,
it

were aware that

was about

and
until

the domestics were in perfect ignorance of


all

was concluded. The supper-table had been removed, and the happy old bridegroom was just
thinking of moving after
it,

when

the waiter entered,


!

and announced

the Marquis

Gilles

What
party
!

a thunder-bolt of surprise for the whole


of

M. Molinet alone had presence


:

mind
!

to

cry out

" Let the Marquis go to the Devil


to say to

tell

him we have nothing

each other."
in

But the noble Marquis was already

the

room

" First,

my

dear father," he said, " do

me

the justice to hear


afterwards.
riage,
I

my

defence, and send


eventful

me

there

On

the

night
in

was seized by robbers


into

of my marmy own court,

and kidnapped blindfolded


proceeded the whole night.

a carriage, which
It

When

stopped,

was

conducted into a place up steps, and down


until

steps,
;

they took the bandage from


little

my

eyes

of

very

service to

me,

in a

dark room, with iron


villains

door and windows.

Here the

compelled

me, by dint of threatening


false

and wicked

epistle to

my life, to indite that my beloved Adeline,

but which procured


haps, saved

me

better treatment, and, per-

my

life.

Shortly afterwards they pro-

mised to release

uie,

which they only did, however.

LANGEEIN,

249

within these last few hours.


bh'nd folded
;

Yesterday they again


;

and conveyed
bourhood.
said to

me brought me out of the labyrinth me in a carriage to this very neighBidding me alight in some fields, they
" That
is

me

your road to Paris


it

put your

best foot foremost, and try to reach


fall
;

before night-

for

your young bride

is

celebrating her nup-

tials

to-day with an old Parliament Advocate.


haste, or

So

make

you

will

have no chance of avoiding


Tliey then
I

the honours that are in store for you."


directed

me

to this

house

and, before

had time

to recover

from

my

astonishment, they dragged

me

out of the carriage, and drove

me

with bitter mocks

and gibings from their presence." " A fine romantic history," exclaimed the old
Advocate
;

" but,
all

my
?
?

Lord Marquis, who


Besides,
if

will

bear

witness to

this

you could, what

would that help you

Your former marriage with

my

present bride. Sir, has been formally revoked,

rescinded, cancelled, and annulled."

"

know nothing

of your quirks of law


;

and
put

I it

should be a fool to contend with you


into the

will

hands of some

skilful

expounder of justice

like yourself.
is

My

present object in coming here,


all,

loudly to protest, once for


to usurp

against your preI

suming

my

place

for

neither can nor

will listen to it."

" Good," replied the Advocate

" and

that

250

(lERMAN NOVELS.

you likewise

shall
I

not venture to sport upon

my

manor, Marquis,
"

hereby appeal to the sovereign

fount of justice, to his Majesty the King."

most

servile appeal ;"

exclaimed the Marquis.

" Ami, moreover," continued the lawyer, "

my

wife shall be entrusted, as a sacred deposit, until

the decision of the


father.
I

case,

into

the

hands of her
con-

will

soon get your

bill

of divorce

firmed."

The noble Marquis expressed himself


with these terms.

satisfied

Both the

litigants
left

then

took
in

leave of their fathei--in-lavv, and

his

house

company with the


in

other guests.

The poor merchant,

the bitterness of his feelings, pronounced his

malediction upon the whole tribe of suitors, sonsin-law,

and husbands

in

the world.

He had
them had
also

not
set

the least idea, however, that two of


fire

to the

mansion of the

third,

and

abducted

the unforturiate Marquis from his bridal chamber.

Such information would doubtless have driven him


stark

mad

for,

hard as the case was, he had not

the least idea that he was


sons-in-law,

now

the father of six

while

his

only

daughter

remained
fatality
;

without a husband.

Yet such a strange

had fortune,

in the variety of her vagaries,

produced

though she spared the unlucky old gentleman the


additional torment of hearing that so

many

of his

sons were

still alive.

The two

traitors, his

second

LANGBEIN.

251

and

third sons, instantly fled from the country, after

the success of their last exploit, leaving the young

Marquis and the old decayed barrister to


differences as they pleased.

settle their

They forthwith proceeded


of e thoro
et

to try the question

mensa, as respected the rich old mer;

chant's daughter
other,

but the cause, from one reason or

was protracted so long, that the old advocate


;

died before the conclusion


hailed with
quis.

an event which was

singular pleasure by the

young Marthe Mar-

Finding that the aged barrister was too


trial,

impatient to await the result of the


quis,

on

his side,

began

to sue for a restoration of

conjugal rights, but met with unexpected difficulties

from the young lady, no

less

than from her

father.

They refused
family, in
;

to give credit to the story of

his abduction, insult the

and declared that he had meant to


order to afford

grounds

for

future separation

as he

had before pleased himself


this time

by taking French leave of them, he might

take himself off again in order to please them.

The sighing shepherd, shocked


ing

at this reception,

pleaded his perfect innocence of the charge, invokall

the saints to bear witness to the truth of his

assertion.

But

the

young lady was inexorable,

declaring that she would rather die than think of


receiving so ungallant a swain,

who had once

so

basely deserted her.

2o2

OEllMAX NOVELS.

So the Marquis went


counsel
;

to take the opinion


:

of

whose

first

question was

" whether he

could procure any witness or witnesses to his forcible abduction


'("

He

replied in the negative,


;

and

the lawyers shrugged up their shoulders


vised

and ad-

him

to

think of proceeding no farther with


in

such a case

a legal form.

The same opinion


lordship's friends.

seemed

to be entertained

by

all his

They attempted
coming
with

to impress
it

upon him how unbe-

his dignity

was, to sigh and languish for

the daughter of a citizen,


indifference
;

who rewarded him only


His pride took

and contempt.

the alarm

and, shifting his afTection for Adeline as

well as he could, he disposed of his possessions in

France, and set off in a great huff on a tour into


Spain.

How

m.ust

we account, however,
to

for the

sur-

prising coolness and cruelty, evinced towards

him
most

by Adeline, unless we believe her


variable of her sex
in this
in
;

have been

quite of a heartless, jilting disposition, and the


?

There was something, indeed,

but

it

must, at the same time, be observed


she had never been seriously

her praise, that

attached to any of^her six husbands, except the


first,

having yielded her hand more

in

compliance

with her father's wishes, and a transitory feeling of


regard, than from sentiments of esteem and love.

Besides, in regard to the Marquis, her recollections

LANGBEIN.

253

were soon effaced by the appearance of a


very

rival,

handsome young

officer

of Hussars,

which

made her more anxious than


sion, her father

before to break off

her engagements with the former.

On

this occa-

had

less difficulty

than on any of

the preceding, in persuading her to listen to the

young man's vows

and she accepted him with the

same

dutiful sentiments as heretofore.

Previous to the ceremony, the good old mer-

chant took
aware,
the

his future

son-in-law aside

"

You

are

my

friend,

that you are only following in


are

wake of six other lovers, who now deceased. Theirs has been
I

most of them
strange
fate,

and
If

imagine they must

all

have been bewitched.


risk,

you are bent upon running the same


not be advised to think better of
little

and
is

will

it,

there

one

piece of advice which

shall give you,

and which may perhaps serve


charm.
love
All manoeuvres,
;

to

counteract the
in
I

you know, are lawful

and war

and, after you come from church,

would have you never once lose sight of your bride,


until

you have secured her

for

your own."
altar,

Adeline was conducted from the

between

her father and her seventh husband, and was just

proceeding up the steps into the house.

Suddenly

hasty footsteps were heard behind them, and some

one inquired

for

M. Molinet.

Upon

turning round,

the bridal party beheld a pale, haggard

young man,

"

25i

GERMAN NOVELS.
officer's

in

an "

faded uniform,

who

stood looking at

them supported upon a

crutch.

Who
what
I

inquires

for

me,"

said

M. Molinet,
:

trembling in every liml) as he spoke

" who are

you

is

your business with

me ?"
;

"

am

an unfortunate being," murmured the

stranger, " betrayed

by

false friends

don't you re-

cognize me."

" No, Sir,"

said Molinet

as the
;

wedded

pair

were hurrying him up the steps

"

know nobody

now." " What," replied the stranger, " have


sufferings so completely

my
?

long

metamorphosed me
?

Are
I

you too a stranger


by

to

me, Adeline
first

not recognized
love,

my own
!"

wife

My
!"

and only

am

Alson

" Just Heavens


voice

cried the bride, " surely that

"

Away
away,

with you
girl

!"
!

exclaimed M. Molinet
is

" do

not listen to him,


her

he

only an impostor. Take

my

dear

son-in-law,

and follow

my

advice."

At the same time, M. Molinet pushed the


his

young Hussar and


the house.

daughter before him into

The
ther,

stranger here clapped his


rival
:

sword, and confronting his

" Not a

hand upon

his

step farguilty of

on your

life.

Sir.

Would you be

eloping with

my

wife before

my

eyes ?"

LANGBEIN.

255

With enraged
sword
;

looks, the

Hussar (hew
"

his broad-

but Adehnc arrested his arm.

No
!

blood-

shed," she cried, with entreating accents, " for that

man

is

Alson.

My

first

and best beloved

indeed can scarcely recognize you, but

my eye my heart
Yet
I

speaks the truth too feelingly

it

is

you.

have already been so


that
I

vilely

deceived in this manner,


;

am become

suspicious of every one


still

must,

therefore, insist

upon receiving
nor deem

more

positive

proofs of your existence, than your mere appear-

ance

will afford

it

want of

aftection that

dictates our separation until the period

when
to

these

can be adduced.
least suspicion
;

Believe me,

indulge not the

but

owe thus much

character,

and

to the world.
to

When

once

my own I am

happy enough
yours,
live
I

be pronounced yours, lawfully

will

most joyfully give you


you alone."

my

hand, and

and

die with

Adeline then retired weeping into her chamber.

The young Hussar

left

the place with a bitter curse


his

and M. Molinet, with

eyes fixed in mute and

perplexed dismay upon the features of Alson, after

some cogitating and talking with


reached out his hand, saying,

himself, at length

"The

longer

puzzle
I

myself with your face and figure, the more


to
it

seem
think
that,

recollect

somebody very
in

like

you; but

must have been


it

some other world.

Be

however, as

may, you are heartily welcome,

my
and

boy

my

poor son Alson

if

you are Alson

256

GER MAX NOVELS.

forgive
for

me
I

for giving

you so rude a reception, and

having you sent, so soon after your marriage,

abroad.

had no idea you would stay so long."


in fact
it

Alson, for

was no one

else,

had no

very great ordeal to undergo, before he succeeded


in establishing proofs of his identity.

Wherever

he appeared, the resemblance between him and his


former self became more and more apparent, on
slight examination.

The strange
for the ear of

history of his capture


final release,

and

his sub-

sequent adventures, and Adeline


;

are reserved

and would, perhaps, appear

tedious to any one else.

By

her he was received

with

unaffected

tenderness,

and

they

had

the

pleasure of being twice married to each other, the


old

gentleman insisting upon a repetition of the


after so long

ceremony

an absence

and

it

was the

only real marriage out of seven, or rather eight.

They were now


other's society
;

truly

happy and
the
a

blest with each

and, had not

poor

broken-

down
monv,
longer.
tears
;

soldier died about


their happiness

month

after the ccre-

might have continued much

Adeline lamented him with true widow's


yet, after

wearing her weeds awhile, being


volatile

of

a somewhat

and

easy

temper,
to

she

suffered the

handsome young Hussar


tears.

come and

wipe away her

She consented

to

become

his,

as usual, at her

LANGBEIN.

2')7

father's request

and she was too sweet-tempered


resisted

and gentle, long to have

the request

of

any one who bespoke her kindly.


happily together,

They
had

lived very

though

she

wed

seven

husbands

in

about the space of

six years;

and

she spent about half a century with her last consort.

258

GERMAN NOVELS.

THE IRRECONCILEABLE MAN.


Away
with insults, hate, oppression;
;

Reach me still the friendly hand Soon we part unreconciled,


Travellers to a distant land.

Feel

we

not

life's

bridge beneath us,


tide
?

Trembling 'mid the o'erwhelming


See

how fast it rushes over Say we loved before we died.


!

With

these words the unfortunate Counsellor


letter to

Lambert despatched an appealing


Dornfeld, one
rable friend

President

who had

formerly been his insepa-

and companion, but who had become

estranged, and was


foes.

Their acquaintance had


;

now even one of his bitterest commenced at colwas only the


self-willed

lege

amidst study or amusement they were ever at


;

each other's side

and

it

and

somewhat overbearing

disposition of Dornfeld that


;

had, at any time, interrupted their mutual regard

but they were always reconciled in a few hours.

And

it

was Lambert's gentle and noble


to this reconciliation
;

feelings

which usually led

he reco-

vered his friend's affection and esteem without


bling himself to his whims.

hum-

Their friendship followed them into the affairs


of
life,

and, what

is

more, continued
left college.

during the

space of ten years after they

Although

LANGBEIN.

259

ureatly inferior to his friend, both

in

knowledge
in

und

in

talent,

Dornfeld

had the advantage

point of wealth and influence, and by such a lever

quickly assumed a situation

life

somewhat higher
was assigned
to

than the former.


its

This, however,

real cause,

and pronounced unjust; but Lamat his friend's

bert
it

was rejoiced

good fortune, and

only served to increase their attachment.

They had
five,

severally attained to the age of thirtyin all their pursuits


it
;

connected together

but a

dark cloud hung over them, and love

was that

threw the apple of discord across their path.

On
house
in

the same day, and in the same hour, they beheld the beautiful

Amelia,

and both

left

the

where they had seen her with a burning secret


their breasts.
It

was then

first

they had kept from


it

each other, for both were deeply smitten, and

was long that night before they could close


eyes.

their

They had
;

leisure

enough

to

think of the

lovely lady

they had never seen any so attractive


;

and beautiful

and

their

whole thoughts were ocif

cupied with the means of again seeing her, and


possible of engaging her affections.

Each proceedconfided to the


in view.

ed

in his

own way, without a word


end he had

other, to accomplish the

Dornfeld,
raised

whose busy influence had already

him

to the level of nobility, considered wealth


irresistible attractions

and rank as boasting the most

260

GERMAN NOVELS.
He imagined
that a

for the female heart.

man

of

his vast consequence, united to his person, must be

the object of admiration and of the secret wishes of


all

young unmarried

ladies

whom

he knew.

Under

this impression, his attentions to

Amelia betrayed
;

any thing but diffidence and doubt

he appeared to
first,

make

quite sure of success from the

while his

manner expressed all the confidence and triumph which he really felt. His proposal assumed the
air

of condescension, and he could not conceal his

astonishment on receiving a refusal.


highly offended
;

He

left

her
into

his admiration

was converted

a feeling of hatred and revenge.

Amelia's heart was already


gentle

won by
indeed,

the

more

and modest
little

assiduities

of his friend.

He
vain

had displayed

or

nothing,

of those
;

shining qualities

so

highly valued by the

but in every word and action was the evidence of a


gentle and noble mind, which drew
its

source from
It
;

the purest and best feelings of our nature.

was and

thus their mutual esteem ripened into love

their
;

thoughts and feelings knit in unison together


Amelia's parents approved her choice.

Delighted beyond his hopes, Lambert hastened


to

acquaint his friend,

entreating his

attendance

at their marriage in quality of bridegroom's

man.
and

What was
made

the

new
of

President's

(for

he was just

President

Council)

astonishment

LANGBEIN.

261

chagrin, on hearing this request


his

he

leapt from

chair,

and loudly inveighed against Amelia's


In a
fit

character.

of scorn and passion, he likesecret, until then

wise betrayed his

own
;

unknown

even to his friend

and concluded by beseeching

him, as he valued their long friendship, not to prosecute his suit


;

to

abandon one scornful woman


for

out of pity to the agony of his feelings,

he

could not yet bear the idea

and that every thing

he had in the world he might consider as his own. " Ah, you require too much, my dear Dornfeld,"

replied

his

friend

" Do

not refuse

me
as
I

possession of a blessing which Fortune has denied

you

think

how many

others

you possess
to

would have done were she about


" Nay,

become yours."
going to hang
;

do not imagine

am

myself," cried Dornfeld with a bitter laugh

"it

is

not that, but the scornful simpleton ought to be


well punished for her airs
;

and you,

my noble friend,
let

can do
pride
:

it.

Let us be revenged upon her heartless

for
!"

my

sake,

draw back, and

her die an

old maid

Lambert,
sorrow
at

while he expressed his surprise and

such

words, attempted to inspire him


all

with nobler feelings, and to dissuade him from


idea of taking revenge where no injury

had been

intended.

Yet he could not

in

the least soften

him.

Dornfeld insisted upon revenge; aud spoke

2G2

GERMAN NOVELS.
from a
slave.
free,

as if he were extorting

it

Lambert

then directly declared that he was


please
himself, without

and should
your risk,"

binding himself down to


"

the consent of any one.

Do

it

at

thundered

Dornfeld, while

scorn

and rage shot


reply,

from his eyes.

Without deigning a

Lambert

turned his back upon him, and walked away.

Not long

after

this

separation, followed

the

nuptials of Lambert and the lovely Amelia.

The
this

name

of President Dornfeld was never omitted in


;

their cards of invitation to their friends

and

they did out of respect, but he never came.

This scornful conduct served the President as


a declaration of hostility.

He

even broke off


;

all

kind of communication with his old friend

and

when he once
order

called to inquire after his health,

the President being unwell, he told his servant to

him from the


;

door.

Nor was he content


in public',

with this
affairs,

he opposed him

and

in

all

his
his

crossing
like

him on every
evil
spirit,

side,

and dogging

steps,

an

resolved to embitter his


likewise, enabled

whole existence.
to do,

This he was,

owing
:

to their respective

situations

in

the
to

council

the most heavy and laborious share


;

fell

the lot of Counsellor Lambert

a sort of conspiracy

was at work against him

yet he cheerfully perse-

vered in his duties, though he had hardly an hour's


relaxation

thai

he could

call

his own.

He was

LANGBEIN.

263

employed

in

writing-

incessantly,
It

often

whole

nights as well as days.

hurt him, however, to

tind that his best exertions

were not appreciated

that they were even reviled, and rejected in favour

of those of

known

inferior worth.

Yet the Presi-

dent's opposition

and aversion did not stop here.


all societies

He spoke
when
profit,
it

ill

of the Counsellor in
;

where

he could venture to do so

and on one occasion,

was expected that he would be raised to a

higher rank in the Legislature, and one of greater

such were the representations

made
all

to the

Prince that another was elected, and

his just

hopes of promotion disappointed.


Until this occurrence, he
sults that

had borne

all

the in-

had been heaped upon him with patience.

But he was now the father of a family, and he began


to find his present

means inadequate

to their

support.

He had

never wished to become the ene;

my
he
to

of the President

he had never retaliated

and

now more than


him
for the

ever wished to

become reconciled

sake of his family, as he found that

he had both power and inclination to injure him.

So he resolved
with
his bitter

to

come

to

an open explanation
foe,

and unrelenting

and he wrote
of this

the letter mentioned at the


account.
while he

commencement

He
still

sent

it,

but received

no answer-;

continued to receive the same harsh


usao-e at his hands.

and ungenerous

He had

then

264

GERMAN NOVELS,
methods of
resisting or of soften-

recour:>e to other

ing his hostility

but they proved equally abortive.


fresh

Here was only a


President,
friends

source of triumph to the

who

loudly boasted

of

it

among

his

and dependants.

" Counsellor Lambert had


his rival
;

humbled himself before


and he was now
in

he had
there,

resisted,

disgrace."

And

he had

the unfeeling malice to add, that he would leave

him, as a punishment for venturing to become his


rival

would

leave him, without giving

him a help-

ing hand, though he lay there until the day of

judgment

About the same time, Lambert was


evening engaged as usual at his desk

sitting
;

one

suddenly,

one of his most intimate college friends, Counsellor

Von Buhren,
emotion.
breath, "
*'

entered his apartment.

His manner

was hurried, and

his features bore traces of strong

My

best friend," he cried, half out of

am
am

in

one of the most awkward predi;

jcaments you can imagine


support.
dollars
;

to

you only

look for

just

now

in

want of

five

hundred
;

my life and
;

honour are both

at stake

save

me,

beseech you."
for

Lambert expressed

his asto-

nishment

Buhren did not stand

first in

the

list

of his friends.

On the

contrary, he
;

was extremely
till

in-

timate with the President

and,

this

moment,
ill-will

had

either slighted, or given


latter.

him proofs of the

of the

Yet the weakness of Lambert's heart

LNGEIN.

265

was not able


in distress
;

to resist the appeal of

one apparently

and he did not now even reproach him.


console him
in

He

sought to

the

most friendly
glad
to

manner, declaring he would have been


assist

him had

it

been

in his

power

but

for

a truth

he did not possess the tenth part of that sum, just


then.

This was the simple fact


in

though he had cash


higher amount, some
in

his

possession to a

much

of which

he was employed

counting.

Now
still

Buhren,
persisted

aware that
in

it

was public property,


and prayers,

his

lamentations

be-

seeching that he would' save^him from despair, even

by such a method.
"

No; excuse me,"

said Lambert;

"

would

myself prefer dying of hunger, to touching the least


portion of any property entrusted to

my

hands."

Notwithstanding

this

honorable avowal, the other

persisted in his entreaties, taking a

most solemn
fail,

oath that he would restore the


within eight days
;

sum without

threatening at the same time to


if

despatch himself,-

Lambert did not consent

to

him that very moment.

The kind-hearted Lambert was


ed between
his feelings of

greatly distress-

duty and compassion.

The

last at

length obtained the victory,


it

and he

tried to reconcile

to his conscience,

by thinking

that Buhren was one of the President's chief favou-

266

GERMAN
and would be able

N'OVELS.

rites,

to

smooth the way, more


with

than any one he knew, to a him, when occasion

final reconciliation
offer.

should

Full

of this

hope, he opened the iron chest with a trembling

hand, and took out a bag of " Behold then," he cried, "
for

five
I

hundred

dollars.

am now

doing that

you,

which nothing on earth should induce


Breathe
it

me

to think of doing for myself.

not to

any one, but keep your word, and restore me the

money, or you
embraced him

will

assuredly ruin me."

Buhren
and

in

the excess of his gratitude,

hastened with the money home.

Overwhelmed with

business,

Lambert had no

time to indulge in reflections upon the possible con-

sequences of what he had done.

He

again sat

down
until

to his desk,

and wrote without interruption


feel-

midnight.

At length, however, uneasy


upon
his

ings began to prey

mind

and the thought


to his

of having disposed of property entrusted

hands,

upon

his

own

responsibility,

now

filled

him

with alarm and remorse.

He

could not sleep, or

when he
his rest,

closed his eyes, unpleasant dreams haunted

and he fancied he beheld himself


in a

in

chains

and wasting

dungeon.

He
in

rose on the break

of day, like some wretch released from the rack. In


his anxiety,

he could remain

no one place

he

went out
and
to

to find one of his

most

faithful friends,

him he communicated the cause of

his un-

happiness, and entreated his advice.

LANCilililN.

267

" Bad, very bad," said his friend, shaking his

head

" you have permitted your goodness of heart


We
can do nothing

to blind your understanding.

but provide, as soon as possible, against the wors^


that can happen, and replace the

amount you have


have no means
;"

advanced instantly." " There is the


replied Lambert.

difficulty

" Then
friend
this
;

will

tell

you how," continued


five

his

"I am barely master of moment but in two hours


;

hundred

at

they shall be at
farther anx;

your disposal.
iety about
it.

So
I

give yourself no

will

send

it

to

your house

go

home."

Lambert thanked him, and went away.


hardly eight o'clock

It

was

when he

returned.

On

enter-

ing the room, he found two state officers of rank

with his Amelia, waiting for him.


at their sight
;

He was

startled

and they requested

to speak with

him

alone.

They then submitted


for

to his inspection

an order from the government,


of the

an examination
to his care.
;

amount of cash entrusted


eyes
like

It

met

his

a thunderbolt
It

and he had

was only the concommitted no premeditated sciousness of having


nearly fainted in his chair.
villany that supported him.
fers,

He opened
with the

the cof-

and acquainted the

officers

^noney that was wanting

(concealing the

sum of name of

n2

268

GERMAX NOVELS.
and
besought them not to make the
it

Buhren)
affair

pubHc, as

was

certain of being replaced

within a very few hours.


their shoulders

They only shrugged up


;

by way of answer
;

took items of

all

the other sums

put the royal seal upon the coffers,

and took

leave, without

committing themselves by

any promise.

Two
him the
at the

hours
five

afterwards, Lambert's

friend

sent

hundred according to agreement.

But

same moment entered an


was placed before

officer of police,

who handed him


sentinel

the order for his


his door.

arrest,
It

and a

was now

made

evident that the president was in the plot,

and directed every movement.

Lambert instantly
:

wrote to him in an indignant tone

"

know

you,

my my

lord President

you are the

sole author of all

You plotted the vile conspiracy of which I am made the victim, by means of your creature, Counsellor Bohren. My intention, much
misfortunes.
injured as
I

have been, was to hold out to you once


fellowship,

more the right hand of


I

and

hoped

was conferring a favour upon you by assisting


favourite

your

Buhren

in his misfortunes.

You

have rewarded

me by

disgrace and imprisonment.

When

will

your revenge be satiated? Surely you


Free

are not quite lost to humanity.

me

from the

net in which you have entangled


it;

me

You can do
before
I

you can stem the

flood of ruin,

am

LANGBEIN.

269

engulfed.

Think that

only disposed of the

mo-

ney, during a few hours,


yours."

and

to

serve a friend of

No

answer was returned

though

it

was

in-

tended, on the ensuing day, to remove the sentinel

from his door; serving an order at the same time

upon the

prisoner,

to forbid his entrance into the

council chamber, and removing

him from the

office

he enjoyed.

The

affair

quickly took wind, and

Lambert was every where held up as an unprincipled

man, unworthy of the confidence of governwhich greatly surprised


he had been submitted
all

ment

classes

of the

people.

When
lowing

to this species of
fol:

moral torture for about a month, he received the


letter,

from one of his few

faithful friends

"
is

am
;

this

moment informed

that your destiny


will

decided.

The prosecution against you

be

dropped
offices.

but you will be deprived of your rank and

Yet the President Dornfeld has


to rescue
;

it

in his

power

you from
to

this last

degrading puis

nishment

if

you apply

him there
it

not a molate."

ment
'

to be lost.

To-morrow

will

be too

Lambert was no longer proof against


it fell

this last
felt

blow,

too heavy

upon him, and he


it.

that

he could never survive

He had no hope
:

in ap-

pealing to the stony heart of the President

yet

it

was

his last resource

his family

were on the edge of

270

GEHMAK NOVELS.
and he
:

ruin

sat

down once more

in the bitterness

of his soul

he

-wrote,

and despatched

his letter

by a

trusty messenger.

He
it
;

not only entreated him to

put

it

into the President's

own hand, but


it

to be-

seech him to read


life

for that

was a matter of

or death

Dornfeld was that day engaged

in celebrating
It

his birth-day with a party of friends.

was

al-

ready evening, and the Lord President was seated


at the card table,

when
the

the messenger arrived.


it

He
Lamspot.

took the

letter,

and put

unopened

into his pocket,

notwithstanding

earnest

entreaties

of

bert's bearer to consult the contents

upon the

" There
gave
it

will

be time enough," he answered, and

not a second thought.

About eleven o'clock the party broke up cards,


and went
vessels
to supper.

Among

the costly drinking


tables,

which decorated the


that

was a grand
to the Presi-

crystal vase,

had been presented

dent many years ago by Lambert, on his birth-day. What is more, the names of the donor and the receiver were to be seen in gold characters, apparent
to every eye
:

it

had never before been permitted


it

to

appear

and strange that

should be thus exposed,


that

strange, thought every


feelings can sustain

one,

the

President's

such a sight.

An
felt

uneasy and

indescribable kind of emotion


sent,

was

by

all

pre-

which they sought

to banish by forced gaiety.

LANGBEIN.

271

nnd, as
to

tlie

clock tolled twelve, the host, according


filled it

an old German custom,

with wine, to be

passed round from guest to guest.


Just as the Lord President was going to drink a
health to his friends,
crystal with his
his ear, glass.
lips,

and touched the edge of the


a sharp, shrill sound struck

and rung with a tremulous tone round the


It

was heard by
;

all

the guests with an ex-

clamation of surprise
the lights
;

the vase was examined by


visible in
it

and a fresh flaw was very

running through the part where Lambert's

appeared upon the

crystal.

The

letter

name now oc;

curred to Dornfeld's memory, and he shuddered

he had already had


his

it

for

more than

six

hours in

pocket.

He

rose

from table, and went into


it.

another room to peruse


read
:

He

broke the seal and

"

stand upon the brink of a precipice, be-

tween
heard,

life

and death.
I

The

tidings

have just
to

that

am

to-morrow, without

trial,

be

deprived of

my

last

means of
;

livelihood,

and overin the list

whelmed with disgrace


of beggars
reer,
;

to

be ranked only

has brought

me

to the close of

and

am
:

resolved to free myself from


effort.
is

my camy sufis

ferings

by one resolute
but there
fate
;

This, Dornfeld,

your work

yet time to
will,

snatch

me
it,

from inevitable
Dornfeld,
in
if

and you

you must, do

a drop of

human blood

yet courses

your veins.

Send me, then,

as a token of your

272

GERMAN NOVELS.

good -will, one word subscribed with your name, and


let
it

be " Yes!"

will wait

most patiently

for this

single

word of comfort,
it

until midnight.

Yet do not
wish to
death.

delay

longer, as you

would not

in future

associate your birth-day with the

day of

my

For the morning


is

will

never shine upon 7ne Avhich

to hold

me up

as an

adjudged criminal to the

world."

Now,

for the first time,


;

Dornfeld

felt
:

the pangs of
it

conscience

he looked at his watch

was past

midnight, and he dreaded the worst.


of remorse,
terrific as it

In an agony
out,

was sudden, he rushed

in order to prevent

a deed, which seemed to threaten

to

stamp

his forehead, like that of Cain, with the

indelible

mark of muj'derous shame.


too late
:

He was
Before

that deed

was already done.


found
a

Lambert's

residence

he

crowd

of neighbouring people assembled,

drawn

thither

by the report of
face,

who had been a pistol. With his


asking a

hands over

his

Dornfeld, without
his

single question,

made

way through the crowd.


smote his ear as he

Loud and
entered
:

bitter lamentations

guided only by such sounds, he found his

way

to the fatal

chamber

and, with the impulse of

agony and despair, he opened the door.


of Lambert, bathed in blood, was the
that

The body
first

object

met

his sight

Amelia, his wife, was kneeling,

convulsed with heart-breaking sobs apd moans, be-

l-ANGBtlX.

273

fore the

couch on which he
;

lay.

She heard some


if

one approaching
to

she looked round, as

expecting

behold a

spirit,

and

there

upon the threshold

stood the deadly

nigh, but she beckoned

enemy of the deceased. He drew him wildly away, for she


;

could
she

not

speak

yet he
:

came

nearer,

and then
!

made an

effort

"

beseech you to be gone


is

the blood of my husband


to

crying out for vengeance


fly !"

Heaven

save yourself
as
if

He He

felt

the voice
;

of

the

Omnipotent

were addressing him


hastened

and trembling, he obeyed.


his

back
to

to

own

house,

but

he

had not courage


guests.

go and take leave


to

of his

He

sent

word
;

them that he had been

taken suddenly unwell


every eye as
if

and concealed himself from

he had been convicted and shunned

by

all.

The
;

fate of
real

Lambert was universally comcause


of
his
afflicting

miserated

the

end

remained no

secret.

Every humane and


society.

honest

man

avoided

the President's

His rank
;

protected him, indeed, from open punishment

but

a more

terrific

species

of justice took possession


to ex-

of his breast, and

condemned him never more

perience another hour's peace upon earth.

Sorrow

and remorse consumed him

and insanity only

came

to his relief.

At length he imagined he was

incessantly pursued by the angry spirit of his friend.

Often was he heard wildly conversing with

it

aloud,

N 5

274

OERMAK NOVELS.
in

and always
hands

a beseeching tone, stretching out his


;

in supplication

and then he would break


crying out that he
!

out into the ravings of despair, and beat his head


against the walls of his
cell,

Avould never, never be reconciled

Years did he

continue in this state

and often his keepers were

fompelled to have him chained down to his bed,


until

the powers of nature

being at length

ex-

hausted, he was suddenly restored to perfect rea-

son for a few moments, uttered a prayer, and feebly


adding, "

He

is

reconciled

!"he

died.

Away with insults, hate, oppression Give me still the friendly hand
;

Soon we part unreconciled,


Travellers to a distant land. Feel

we not

life's

bridge beneath us,


tide ?

Trembling 'mid the o'erwhelming Think how fast it rushes over ;


Say they loved before they died
!

T-ANOBEIN.

275

ALBERT LIMBACH
OR, A

MARTYR

TO THE FAIR.
flatter

All the am bound


truth
I

world agrees to
to

women.
;

only

swim against the stream

for of a
in

have been singularly unfortunate


sex,
I

my

dealings with this idolized


too

have suffered

much

to

become

their

second panegyrist, like


love-

that

happy genius, the sweetness of whose

songs so far entitled him to their gratitude, that

with their
last

own

soft

hands they carried him to

his

home.
Perhaps
I

may have been condemned

to all

the pains they have inflicted upon me, for having

innocently caused the death of one of them in the


first

instance,
birth.
I

my

poor mother dying at the period

of

my

Yet surely that was not


deserve to be punished
;

my
for

fault

surely
I

did not-

what
it

could not help

but

know

not.

Certain

is,

that from

my

youth upwards,

the

daughters

of
ex-

our

first

mother began to play

tricks at

my

pense, not sparing


clothes
;

me

even when in

my

swathing

as

my

father, a very respectable

merchant,

by the
^'

bye, has often informed me.


never," he said, " so fortunate,

You were

my

276

GERiMAN ICOVELS.

dear boy, as to be nurtured at a mother's breast;


I

was compelled,

alas

to

entrust

you

into

the

hands of a nurse.

She was a young, good-looking


just given birth to a boy, said to

woman, and had

have survived only a few hours, on the same day


that you were born.
I

believed myself very for-

tunate in having met with her, as she exhibited the


affection of a tender mother, rather than the hired

attentions of a menial.

And

in fact

she was the

mother of the boy

whom

she had introduced into

my
son.

house to receive a princely education,


three years,
still
I

and

whom, during
This
I

caressed as

my own

might

have continued to do, had

not the sudden

approach of death extorted the

guilty secret from the nurse.

She was taken

ill

at

my

house, and begged to be removed to her re-

lations,

which

granted.

As she grew

daily worse,

she sent to inform

me, that she had something


I

very important to communicate, and


her.

went

to visit

She was become a mere skeleton, and stood

on the brink of the grave. " I feel I cannot die,' she sobbed out
'

in

feeble tone,

'

until

have informed you of a secret


soul
;

that weighs

upon my

and perhaps the Lord


would
if

and you will forgive me.' " Touched at her sufferings,


forgive her, as

said that

Heaven would doubtless do,


confession of
all

she

would make

full

that grieved her.

LANGBEIN.
"

277

Prepare then,' she continued

'

do not be

too greatly shocked

when

I tell

you, that the child

nursed by me, during the last three years, as your


son,
is
'

my own
my

boy,

who was
!'

given out to be dead.'


I

"
then

Gracious
son,

Heavens

exclaimed,

where

is

my

Albert?

Base

wretch! have

you destroyed him V " ' No, I have not that


replied
:

sin to

answer

for,'

she

'

he

lives

in the Foundling.'
!

"
ble
?'

In the Foundling Hospital

how

is

it

possi-

I
'

exclaimed, in astonishment.
I will

"

confess

all,

while

I
1

have yet strength,

if

you

will

permit me.

When
I

accepted the place

of nurse at your house,


to the care of

committed
relatives.

one of
it

of

its

death,

my was my
;

In

my own child my account


remove
all
I

sole object to

kind of suspicion

and no sooner did

remark the
own, than

resemblance between your child and

my

my
I

resolution
it

was taken.

abhor myself, when

think that

was not

real affection that


I

induced

me, but pride and ambition that

might behold
means, some-

him a great man, and through


time perhaps, be
"
'

his

made a

lady.

On

returning with

the clothes of yours, from

my own child, dressed my relations, I met you


lest

in

in

going up the steps, and trembled


detect the

you should

imposture; but you embraced him as

your own Albert, who was that very night conveyed from

my

relation's

house to the Foundling.'"

278

GERMAN NOVELS.
" The dying wretch here ceased; and
instantly

sent for a legal witness to take

down her account


to

and she was fortunately permitted time


plete

com-

and substantiate her confession.


in the

" Her accessary

crime was speedily se-

rured, and her confession agreed in every point with


that of the deceased
;

while the register of the Found-

ling contained the fact of a

male child having been

found and taken in on the day mentioned.


this I received

Upon

you back

to

my

arms

yet so strongly

had your young


that
I

rival laid

hold on

my

affections,

ctjuld

not discard him without settling upon

him

sufficient to protect

him from ignominy and

want.

" Thus,

my

son," he continued, " you see in

what a scandalous manner these women treated


you
I

so

early

made

sacrifice
will

to

their

vanity.

only trust, that you

not be condemned to

receive further proofs of their enmity in the course

of your future

life."

Such were my
to

father's hopes,

doomed never

be

fulfilled

nor did he,


for,

indeed, do

much

to

promote them

after

remaining about

ten

years a widower, he entered into the bonds of

ma-

trimony a second time, with a young woman,


united
first,

who
At

all

the

ill

qualities of a step-mother.

she seemed tolerably well-disposed towards

nie, until

an unlucky occurrence deprived

me

of her

LANGBEIN.

279

good countenance
not so

and she

led

me

such a

life

much
who
One
1

like life, as a very hell

upon

earth.

Among my
officer,

father's

acquaintance was a young

often frequented our house, and

was

always received with marks of pleasure and attention.

day,

when my

father
into

was gone

to the

exchange,

saw his guest step


and

my

step-mother's
I

chamber.

There was nothing remarkable,


;

then

thought, in this

continued to play for about

an hour, until
to

beginning to
to

be hungry,
let

went

ask

my new mamma
fastened.

me have
is

some

breakfast.

Her door was


ter

"
is

What

is

the officer gone, and


I,

mamma

the matgone too ?"


I

thought

as

looked through the

key-hole.

then became convinced that they were both there

and laughed very hard

to

think that they should

be playing together, Like children, on the sofa.


I

So

knocked, but knocked

in vain,
I

and was compelled

to

go away as hungry as

came.
father returned,

Soon
had seen
I

afterwards

my

when

ran and told him with great simplicity every thing


I
;

laughing heartily at the very amusing

account

gave, and wondering that

my

father did

not do the same.

But no

he frowned, and wit

hasty step advanced towards his wife's sitting-room.


In about
seizing
five

minutes

the

lady

came

out,

and

me by my

hair with a furious

look, she

280

GEKMAK
me

>JOVELS.

treated
less

so roughly, that

soon lay almost sense-

on

the

ground.

Even the young lieutenant

did not spare me, dealing


stick across

me

a sharp blow with his

interpose

my my

neck.

In vain

my

father offered to

mother

knew and

exercised her

power, and he played the pitiable part of a tame

hen-pecked husband.

From

this

unlucky period,
if

my

step-mother seemed determined,

possible, to

torture

me

out of
like

my

existence

she struck and


I

chaced me,

a dog, whenever

came

'in

her

way, and hardly gave

me

food enough to keep body


father occasionally

and

soul together.

Though my
for

ventured to drop a word in

mined upon no measures


she seized and carried
often as he interfered.

my defence, he determy relief, even when


his presence,

me from
Once,

as

also,

he took a long

journey, leaving

me

in

the claws of this savage

animal, this hyena of her sex, who, the


his

moment
cellar,

back was turned, immured me

in a

dark

fed

me upon

bread and water for about a month,

with a threat

when she

released me, that

if I

whis-

pered a word of what had

passed to

my

father,

she would again imprison me, and never permit

me

more

to behold the light of day.


;

My

health was

nearly ruined

yet

my

tyrant was studying fresh

plans for ing

my

perdition.

She succeeded
I

in

impresshis son
;

my

father with the idea tliat

was not

and that the nurse had only invented the story

to

LANGBEIN.

281

provide for her child before her death, at the ex-

pense of the real

heir.

She declared

it

was an

heinous sin to be thus educatinsj a young bastard,


while his son continued
plied to

a beggar.

She then apand

some abandoned
;

practitioners of the law to


;

draw out a process

witnesses were suborned

some of the
I

nurse's relations took their oath that


;

was a changeling
once

and

should doubtless soon


for their

have been disclaimed to make room


relation

young
at

more, had not

length interfered and opened

my good genius my father's eyes.


so

The lady and her young hero presumed


upon
their

much

own

security

and

my
fell

father's submis-

sion, as to suffer themselves

on one occasion to be
from his eyes,

surprized by him.

The

scales

and he summoned some of


ance,

his friends to his assist-

who

advised a separation.

This he effected,
this

and

was no longer an object of

female's re-

venge and oppression.

The

third scene of

my martyrdom

was someand two

what more short and pleasant.

My

father

other merchants maintained the same teacher for


their children.

We

went daily

to his house, learned

very

little,

and cried a great

deal.

One

of

my

fellow pupils

was a
I

fair little girl

about eleven years

of age, to

whom

was excessively attached, though

only about a year older.

One day Annie came

to

me

with tears in her eyes, complaining that the master

2B2

GERMAN

NOVfeLS.

had been

scolding her, in such a


it

way

that she

should never forgive nor forget


lived.

as long as she

" Only think,"


!

she

continued,

" what a
of
a
!"

clown

He

said

need not

be

so proud
I

pretty face, that was not so pretty as

imagined

and again she wept

as loud

as
I

though her father


her

and mother were just dead.


vanity

tried to console
Still

by abusing the school-master.


would never

she

cried, declaring that she

rest until she

was revenged upon the old pedant, and entreating


that
1

would play him some

trick,

were

it

only to

pull off his wig.

"
will

And what

if

undertake
?

it,"

said

" what
be too

you give me, Annie

much,
I

my

pretty

Annie V " Do " do

will three kisses


it

nrst

you know
shall see."

am not

pretty," she replied laughing, while the tears


;

were in her eyes


I

it,

and then we

entreated for payment beforehand, but this was

refused.

The design
anxiety

against the great wig which

ornamented the head of our great pedagogue gave

me no
to

little

for

he was so horribly

tall

as

have well merited the post of leader among any

corps of imperial guards.

No,

it

was impossible
;

could succeed

in

an open attack

I I

must have
took advan-

recourse to more wily measures.

So

tage of a

moment when

his eyes

were fixed upon


his

an

arithmetical problem,

and slipping behind

chair, carefully stuck a small hook,

tied to a piece

LANGBEIN.

283

of pack-thread, into his wig, without being in the


least observed.

The other end


sat

fixed to the door

latch,
1

and then

down

very quietly in

my

place.

had scarcely cast

my

eye upon

my

book, before

heard one of the boys coming up the steps very

hastily to

make up

loss of time.

He snapped
;

off the
it

wig as quick as a
high in
air as

star falling

from the sky

flew

the door opened, and found a resting-

place on the dusty floor.

With grim looks the bare-headed


from his
little

giant rose

seat,

and hastened

to seize

the unlucky
of

wight,

who he imagined had robbed him


fled,

the honours of his graceful locks.

Innocent of the
in

deed, the urchin


pursuit of him.

and Dominie Bald-paterau


in

He came

contact with the fatal


like

thread, stumbled, lost his balance, and then,


a fallen tree, measured his length

upon the ground.

He was
had
fled, as

thus feelingly convinced that he

who

he entered the door, could not be the

author of the plot, and have hooked him as he sat


in his chair
;

so he directed his rage against those

who were
play

within his grasp.

His looks were more


I

especially bent

upon me

and though

affected to

an innocent part, the blood rose into


"

my

cheeks.

Ah young
!

Mr. Albert," he exclaimed


vile

"am
but
at

I to

charge you with this


I

impious act?"
I

" No, Sir,"


the

stammered out as well as

could,

same time involuntarily took

to flight.

284

GERMA>f NOVELS.

Armed
as
I

with his cane, the giant pursued


steps,

and just
in

had got half down the

and he was
and
I

the act of griping me,

my

foot sUpped,

broke

one of

my

arms

in the fall.
I

The
to

first

visit

paid after

my

recovery was
to

my

favourite
I

Annie,

intending
in

claim

my

due reward.
smelling

found her

company
to

of a sweet

courtier,

who had deigned

borrow a

loan from her rich father, and was thus pleased to


express
his little

his

gratitude

by calling and humouring


Flattered with this glimpse of

daughter.

court favour, the young puppet hardly condescended


to look at

me

as

entered.

waited impatiently
;

for the seat.

empty chatterer
I

to retire

but he kept his

stood upon thorns, and at length some-

what

pettishly entreated that she

would allow me

to

speak to her.

She followed me quite out of hu-

mour, and very snappishly inquired what I wanted ? " You know, Annie, you have to give me .... dost not thou recollect ?" " I recollect nothing and
;

will not be thou'd by thee," retorted the

little

vain

thing, as she flung

away from me

in

high dudgeon.

Quite shocked,

ran after her whispering

" Are
or

you no longer
I

my

good and gentle Annie


kiss

must

come and claim my promised


a mocking tpne.

some other

time?"
in

" Give yourself no trouble," she exclaimed " So," I cried, in a bitter voice,
to attack the

" then, who persuaded me

Great Do-

LANGBEIN.

minie's

wig? who was the cause of


will kill

my broken arm V
if

"

Oh you

me

with laughing
I,

you talk so,"


to

she tittered out.

" Did

then,

command you
little

get that unlucky tumble,


I

you clumsy

fellow."

was

fairly

struck

dumb

with astonishment, and

the

little

pert jade took advantage of

my

confusion

to rejoin her flattering guest, taking

no notice of

me

during the rest of the evening.

From

this

period

we

never spoke; and in the


fate of all coquettes.
in

end she experienced the

At

the age of thirteen, she delighted

the complire-

ments of Counts and Barons, and subsequently


fused the best offers from
herself.

men

of equal rank with


all

Thus, in time, ridiculed by


arrived to a

ranks, and

pitied

by none, she

good old maiden

age,

with the loss both of her temper and her

charms.

From

the time of our quarrel until

my

twentieth year, there was a cessation of hostilities

between
occurred

me and my
little

fair foes

at least there only

skirmishes

scarcely

deserving of

mention, and which led to no serious detriment on

my

part,

though

had invariably the worst of


father died, leaving

it.

Meanwhile

my

siderable a fortune as to have permitted

me me
for

so conto live

without engaging in any profession.


career, however,

The

military

had too great charms

me

I
it.

applied for an officer's commission and obtained

Yet soon wearied with the

idle

bacchanalian

life

286

GERMAN NOVELS.
companions,
;

of

my boon
feelings

sought occupation
fair

for

my

and the image of the

Rosalie

next haunted

my

fancy both by day and night.


beautiful girl in the city,
life,

She was the most

and led
that the

so very retired and simple a kind of

most vain-boasting and abandoned of our regiment


ventured not to asperse her
fair
1

fame.
in

With much
like

difficulty
;

succeeded

obtain,

ing an introduction

and the modesty of


I

this

dove-

creature quite enraptured me.

had come

with intentions, perhaps none of the best or purest

but

took a solemn vow as

departed, never to

dream of injuring such innocence and heavenlymindedness.


to
It

became my
;

first

object honourably

win her affections

for Rosalie

was poor, and


by her
skill in

maintained an aged mother


embroidery
;

solely

became prodigal of my money


;

in

order to improve her circumstances

her

humble
;

dwelling was exchanged


seated at the side of
I

for

little

palace

and

my

chaste and honoured love,


all

deemed myself happier than

the princes upon


life

earth.

This paradisaical kind of

had

lasted for

about two months, when

my

affairs called

me from
in

home.

But

promised Rosalie, who seemed quite


at

overwlielmed

my
;

departure,

to
1

return

ten

days at the farthest

and, in fact,
earlier.
I

more than kept


all

my

word by arriving

rode post

the

way, and threw myself from niy horse about ten

LANGBEIN.

287

o'clock in the evening.

flew like a special mes-

senger to her house, ran over twenty people in

my
It

way, with
I

my

eyes fixed upon her windows, which


to see very brilliantly lighted.

was surprised

at first struck me, to confess

my

egregious vanity,
tidings

that the dear soul

had

in

some way gathered

of

my

early return, which


little festival
I

was thus honoured with

some

and an ilhmiination.

With

re-

newed delight

flew through the door,


stairs,

which her
into her

maid that moment opened, up


favourite apartment.

and

One
hold, for

step
I

only did

advance over the thresfilled

beheld a sight that


grief.

me

with equal

astonishment and

Rosalie lay in the arms of


pleasure.

young Count Osseck, a notorious man of


I

stood fixed as a statue

while the faithless, guilty


if

girl

sprang up, looking as


his seat,

she had seen a spectre.

The Count kept

and somewhat haughtily


In about half a mi-

measured me with

his

eye.

nute, the false one recovered her presence of mind,

and approaching me as
stranger to her,

if

had been a perfect

who had madly broken into her presence, she said sharply, " What is your business, You have most probably mistaken the Sir?
house
!"

" No, not the house," replied

"I am
retorted

deceived in the lady Rosalie."


the
girl,
I

with a bold laugh,

" how

" In

me?"
"

can that be,

when

am

not acquainted with you ?"

Do you

288

GERMAN NOVELS.
?"

deny that
tience
:

exclaimed, provoked beyond

all

pa-

" you must be an abandoned, wicked,

t'allen

creature to assert the falsehood with such an unblushing- front."


I

trembled with
:

rage

could

have torn her to pieces


chair,

she cried out in


!

running behind the Count's help great alarm, " Help


!

me, Count " Pray


the bell
;

the

man

is

stark

mad."
the Count, as he rang

retire. Sir," said

and a servant made his appearance. " What do you mean by this V I inquired

in

decided tone.

" To throw you down

stairs,"

was the answer,

"

if

you do not walk down instantly." " You see me here. Count," I replied, with as
as
I

much calmness
velling dress,

could assume, " only

in

my trasome

and perhaps mistake


Sir
!

me

for

adventurer.

am

an

officer,

and a man of

honour
nity.

one who
shall

will

not be insulted with impu-

not condescend to enter into any


;

vulgar contest with you and your lacquey


shall expect to

but

meet you as early as

six o'clock
in

to-morrow morning
park.

to adjust our difference

the

" Certainly

will

be

there,"

replied

the

Count, coolly, as
I

walked away.
I

passed one of the most uneasy nights

ever

recollect,

and

at

dawn
his

of day

was

in

the park.

The Count made

appearance;,

and

my

blood

LANGBEIN.

281)

boiled as he approached.

abhorred him as the

cool deliberate assassin of

all

my

promised

bliss.

drew

my
all

sword like a madman, and fought with


It

the blindest rage and passion.

was such as

to

defy

science,

and

in a

few moments

my enemy

lay bleeding on the ground.

" Fly

!"

he cried out,

in

a faint voice

" you
I

have killed
I

me

!"

had a horse waiting ready saddled, and


;

sought the nearest boundary

on reaching which
the despair
I felt.

had

full leisure to

indulge
I

all

In

the last twelve hours,

had not only


dear
;

lost

every

thing that rendered

life

had

fallen

from

my

station in society,

and become a vagrant and a


which ever

murderer, for the sake of one false woman.


I

had no motive, no
to turn
:

inclination
to

way
The

but
I

wanted

dissipate

my

cruel

thoughts, and
idea

bent

my way
;

towards the capital.

of

being there

secured
for
I

and punished
set little store

was not enough to deter me


by existence then.
miles,

The distance was about

forty
dress,
in

and yet
out
I

sold

my
I

horse,

changed

my

and

set

on foot; and instead of mixing


reached,
led the
life
I

society

when

of a solitary,
in

and some months expired before


public.
I

walked out

received

no tidings from

my
I

native

place,

and no one knew, nor perhaps cared what

was become of me.


VOL. IV.

One

evening,

when

had been

290

GERMAN NOVELS.
during more than

leading this uneasy kind of


half a year, as
alleys not
far
I

life

was walking
from the

in
I

one of the deserted


observed a figure
at a quick pace.

city,

wrapped
I

in

a mantle, following

me

redoubled
in

my

haste,
:

when my pursuer
" Limbach
!

called after
!"

me

a mild voice

Limbach

Still I

only hastened forwards, while

my

pursuer

running faster than before, again dried out, " If

you are
for

really

Limbach, stop

1
is

have good news


alive

you from Count Osseck


It

he

am

he."

was

like
;

the voice of an angel awaking

me

from the tomb

my

conscience was freed from a


sin
:

murderous weight of

sprung towards him with


all

an exclamation of joy, and burying


oblivion, accepted his proffered hand.

enmity in " to

"

Ah

what

fools

we have been," he
like

said,

have attacked one another


for

two wild beasts,


Let
us thank

such a

vile creature as Rosalie,

Heaven that the hypocrite


in time.

herself let fall her

mask
na-

To you she displayed her heart in


at the very

all its

ked deformity,
self she

moment

she flattered her-

was making a sure conquest of me.


her lovers
life
;

Since
hardly
of,

then she has often changed

for

had you taken

flight,

and

my

been despaired

before she had supplied our places with other simpletons, simple as ourselves.

But

let

us vvaste no
quarrel
is

more words upon the


followed

little

wretch.

Our

by happier

results

than we

could have

LANGBEIN.

291

expected.

You worked me
be sure
less
;

pretty smartly,

my

hot-

headed

friend, to

yet in a week's time

my

wounds gave me
you had banished
lord

pain than the thought that

yourself,

and were wandering the

knows where, without any occasion.


I

So

had

scarcely recovered before

resolved to set out in

search of you.
attempt, had
I

It

would have been truly a Quixotic


all

gone to

quarters of the globe,

without knowing any thing of your whereabout


but, trust me,
I

had already got into your

track, even
I

to the place where you are standing.

also
I left,

put
that

our

affair into

such a train at court, before

you can either return into your regiment or

retire,

which ever you please."


" Then what a wretch

am

to think of
!

having
I

your

life

you who have done


as
I I

all this

No,

shall

never forgive myself,


generosity, Count.

shall never forget

your

accept your good offices at


I

court with thanks, and of the two


retire
;

think

shall

as

can never think of returning to a place

where the women have used


I

me

so

ill."

enjoyed the Count's society during several

days, and experienced the truth of tbe observation,


that

men

of

spirit,

if

we except the extravagances

of which they are guilty, and which most injure


themselves, are generally

men

of excellent hearts.

On

his return,
it
;

wrote to request

my

dismission,

>ind obtained

thus cutting off

all

kind of con-

o 2

; -

GERMAN NOVELS.

nection with

my

native place, on account of a

wo-

man.

It

now

struck

me
I

that

could not do better

than resume the sword


for

had
;

laid aside in our state,

the service of another


to obtain the rank

and

was fortunate

enough

of captain in a newly

raised regiment from

my

recommendations to the

war-minister.

With dread of
before

the police and a

trial

no longer

my

eyes,

again mingled in the world and

enjoyed the acquaintance of


characters
;

many

brave and noble

but

avoided that of women, as a


It

scalded dog the sight of cold water.


vain

was

all in

my

evil

star

brought

me

into the society of


ladies,

some, not very lovely, yet very learned


could give excellent rules,

who

how

the Greek and Rorepasts

man

voluptuaries prepared their delicate


to

though they did not know how


water-gruel.

In this

make German way they contrived to make


their repeated

their poor husbands'

mouths water by

descriptions of the alluring dishes enjoyed by

some

ancient gourmand,

and then, by way of contrast,

serving up some of the more modern, by no

means

so savoury and inviting.

Exactly at the hour when

the dinner should have been prepared, they were


busiest

with some
laid

important
in

oracle

of receipt,

which being

aside

a moment, their poor

persecuted spouses found they had nothing to eat.

These celebrated

ladies

were members of a weekly

LANGBEIN.

293

society of Blues,
rals,

which discussed philosophy, mo-

criticism,

&c. pouring forth such a torrent of

declamations, as completely defied the gravity of the

most serious personage present.


I

On

one occasion

was unlucky enough

to

laugh out aloud, which


the thunder
difficulty

naturally brought

down upon my head


it

of their indignation, and

was with some

they were appeased.

Still I

ventured in different
tone,

companies to animadvert,
iheir proceedings,

in a jocular

upon

which coming to the ears of the


as one of their

party,
tical

was singled out


I

most here-

enemies, though

continued to be invited,
their meetings.
I

under the mask of friendship, to

now approached them with some degree


for they consisted of twelve experienced

of awe

old Blues,
all

the youngest at least


uglier,

fifty,

and the others


she.

older,

and more dangerous than


entrance,

Tliey rose

at

my

from a long table groaning under

some hundred weight of books.

One whom

best

knew advanced and


and
surprise

led

me

imagine

my

horror
full

tO"

a seat prepared for me, in

view of the assembly, at the same time addressing


the society, " Here,

my

friends,

you behold the

vile

defamatory carper who dares to asperse the noble


proceedings of our institution.
"

"Then,
a
**

this isthat paltry critic,"

exclaimed one
:

in

shrill voice,
let

who appeared

to be lady president
in

him wait a moment," she continued,

still

294

GERMAN NOVELS.
tone, "

more portentous

it

is

our wish to

embue

him with a

little anti-critical

taste."

Upon

this

hint,

the whole assembly

made a

simultaneous rush, each armed with a rod, towards


their victim,

and just as the


the neck,
I

first
I

was on the point

of seizing

me round

started back, reach-

ed the door, crying out as


anti-critical

ran, " These are truly


;

weapons, ladies

and should you have

any

to spare, restore

them

to the witches'

besoms

on which they ride over the Blocksberg, on the last

Walpurgis night,"

Such an imputation roused


highest degree
I
:

their anger to the

they attempted to follow me, but

held the door.

As they were about


I

to

make a

fresh

onset, however,

took to

flight,

when they

burst through in such force, as to disconcert each


other's

measures,

and many of Apollo's ancient


floor.

daughters measured their length upon the


I

did not abate

my

speed, until

found myself
;

standing pretty secure

upon

the

steps

though,

even

here

heard a

torrent of abuse,

of rods,

books, slippers, ink-stands, and sand boxes,

come

pouring after me.


missiles
rest at
I
I

To

shield

myself from these

seized a large paper roll, flung with the

my
it

head, and at length


consisted of a

made

off with
title

it.

found

MS. under the


into

of

Lina's Poems, altogether so wretched in point of

composition, that

put

it

the hands of

my

LANGBEIN.

295

frizeur

the next the


I

morning

to

dress

my

hair,

re-

serving

remainder to
this,

light

my

cigars with.

Just as

was doing

a messenger from the


in the idea that
I

war minister was announced, and


he was charged with
ordered him up into

my new appointment, my chamber. He had


;

no

message from the minister


nister's

it

was from the miif


I

lady,

requesting to

know
in

had not

found a certain MS. (describing the place), consisting of

poems, which was then

This was a staggering

my possession " What the question.


?

deuce could the minister's lady have to do with so


stupid a
trifle

as this ?" thought

and

was on But the


I

the point of answering in the affirmative.


idea of having applied
it

to

the purposes

had
and

done

the
made

heinous

sin,

the scandal of

such a
;

fact, if
I

public, all induced

me

to pause
all

soon mustered courage enough to deny

know-

ledge of the transaction.

" Then,

am

to understand
;

poem," said the messenger


it

you found no such " that is unlucky, for

is

then

doubtless

lost.
:

Her Excellency
is

will

be greatly disappointed
of
it."

she

herself the author

" Her Excellency an author great alarm


;

!"

exclaimed, in

this

was a thunderstroke upon me,


" and

with a vengeance.

" Yes, a great poetess," was the reply

:C

GERMAN
lady
president

i;OVr.LS.

moreover,

of

the learned society

lately instituted."

A
terrific

second thunderstroke
than
the

and a third

more

former

followed, as the special

messenger, fixing his eyes upon

exclaimed
hold
!

in

a
is

terrified

my hair en papillotfes, accent, " What do I beI

there

a piece of the MS.,


!

dare swear,
;

now

visible.

Gracious Heavens
!"

it is

the title-page

the
it

title-page in your hair

and he pointed with


I

his finger to one of

my

front locks.

snatched

it

with an

involuntary motion, bringing along with


it

half the hair, and found

unluckily so disposed

as to place the large


circled " Lina's

court letters,
in full view.

grandly en-

Poems,"

The

special

messenger wrung his hands in despair. " Alas with what fatal tidings must
!

return to

her

Excellency,"

he cried

and away he went.


I

Such was my confusion, mind


sult

that

had not presence of

to detain him, even to put a bribe into his


I

hands.

instantly dressed myself,

and went

to con-

some of

my

friends

upon

this very

awkward ochad bruited


and
I

currence.

Most, however, were already acquainted


adventure
;

with
their

my

the injured

fair

wrongs throughout half the

city,

was

strongly exhorted to appeal for mercy to the minister's lady.

But

felt

no

inclination,

and

re-

turned
I

home again

to consider the matter.

Here
all

found a note from the minister, which removed

; ; ;

LANGBEIN.

29]

my

doubts

for

he wrote without the least exI

planation,
farther

that

had

no

occasion

to

count

upon the commission, or

to think of calling

at the office more.

" As your Excellency


with a loud laugh, which

likes best,"

exclaimed

made

the walls of

my
I

room echo
For
I

" this will spare

me

a deal of trouble."

had now reason

to conclude, that since

had thrust

my hand
in

into, a

wasp's nest,

should

have them continue buzzing about


as
I

my

ears as long
it

remained
little

the vicinity, and that

would be

to very

purpose to attempt to conciliate them


I

insomuch that
as

was resolved

to live

henceforward

man upon my fortune. I led this independent mode of life, and was a happy man
a
private
for the

two

subsequent years

and though the


buzzed about

wasps of
ears,
I

literature occasionally

my

was too

firmly
to

cased in a coat of indiffeel their

ference and scorn

powerless stings

and the Lady President continued to preside, as before, over

her stupid Blues.


!

But, alas

man

never knows

when he
rest.

is

well

he wants to be better, for he cannot

He

be-

comes ambitious of

raising the brittle fabric of his

happiness to so high a point that the whole tumbles


to the

ground together
I
I

and such was the

result of

my

attempt.

began to quote some good old au^


it is

thorities, as

thought, that "

not good for

man

o 5

GERMAK NOVELS.
to be alone,"

and that
;

it

would be better
I

for

me

to
all

have a helpmate

and

ran over in the

my head
I

the good qualities of


seen.

all

women

had ever
run your
arts

But

gave the flattering picture to the


I

winds.

" No,"
;

exclaimed, " you have


all

all

town career

you have
from
it
;

imbibed the
all

and

evils that arise

and you are

cold and

heartless.
ters
;

Give

me one

of nature's simple daugh-

an innocent
than
all

rural lass,

one who

will

restore

me more
Upon
after

the happiness of which you artful

creatures have deprived me."


this hint of

my
I

own,

proceeded to beat

up the country round,

to find, if possible, a girl

my own
and
in

heart.
all

took a female survey of

all

the farm and


nity,

the parsonage houses in the vicilatter

one of the

found a young bloom-

ing maiden,

who appeared

in every respect a part-

ner adapted to

me

for life.

She was, moreover, a


and

very quiet, harmless creature, with no kind of pretensions, confining her observations to yes
no.
I

Now

this

good and simple-minded

being

wished to make

my own

so

solicited the

hand

of the pastor's daughter and

met with no
I

refusal.

During the

first

year of our marriage,

had every
rustic

reason to feel happy in

my

choice.

My little

was an excellent housewife, agreed


I

to every thing

said,

and appeared desirous of pleasing no one

but myself.

To

so exemplary a pitch did she carry

LANGBEIN,

299

this latter point, that she

looked exceedingly bluff


to direct
their
It
is

at the

young men who ventured


some very

glasses at her in the course of our walks.

true that

artful

coquettes can do the

same

yet certainly only such as have some parview,


or
are beginning
to

ticular

age,

On

this

ground, however,

my

rural love

had no occasion

to

dread the most inquisitive eye, as she barely numbered seventeen summers, and bloomed as rosy as
the flower whose namesake she was.

Her

aversion

to ogling, then, could only be referred to her ex-

treme delicacy and good behaviour.


only

In fact, the

man

with

whom

she conversed, and that was

seldom, was

an elderly gentleman, whose optics

were chiefly directed towards the heavens,


their revolutions of every period.

and
next

He was my

neighbour, and a professor of astronomy.


evening,
host,

Every

when he was not


in

at a review of the starry

he spent

my

house,

when he was

in the

habit of looking as intently at


as
if

my

wife's

black eyes,

he had discovered two new constellations every

time he gazed.
Certainly
I

was not inchned


;

to be jealous of the

old gentleman

yet

felt

little

curious to

whether he entertained any sort of designs.


this view, I

know With

one evening snuffed the candle out


I I

and saying,
fire

would

find

my way

to the kitchen-

myself,

contrived to blacken

my

wife's

red

OO

GERMAN NOVELS.
I

cheeks, as

went, with the snufF.


in

It

was natural
I

enough to run against a person

the dark, and

found from the result that she had not remarked

my new
it

style of painting, as

by the time

returned

with the light, she had communicated a portion of


to the lips of the astronomer.

Yes

the old starrural spouse,

gazing satyr had assuredly saluted


while
I

my
;

went

to light the candle

there was

most

dark and diabolical evidence upon the very face of


it
;

he looked more
;

like

an harlequin than a wise


droll a figure,

astronomer

and altogether cut so

that I could not avoid bursting into a laugh, though


I

had perhaps the worst of


I

it.

placed the candle on the table with as


possible,

much

composure as

when the astronomer, throw-

ing his eyes on a looking glass opposite to him, rose

with a sudden exclamation from his chair, and cast


a side look towards

my

wife.
;

threw myself in

fit

of laughter on the sofa

while the star-gazer,


off.

taking up his hat, at once marched

Rosa cast
had a

down her
"

eyes very demurely, and did not laugh.


see,

Now

my

dear,"

said,

when

little

recovered myself:

"

What

have you done at the

poor professor ?"

" Nothing,
" he only asked " So
give
!

my me

dear," replied
for a kiss."

Rosa blushing,

do you

call

that nothing

And

did you

him one

LANGBEIN.

301

" Yes
I

Would you have had me


is

refuse

him

could not have had the heart."

" But that

not proper for a married


I

you know, Rosa,"

cried,

woman, stamping my foot. " Not


an old gentleman
!

to refuse a gentleman
is

and
as at

it

a great weakness

which you must overcome.

You must treat him men when they look the way to keep them
I

you do the young gentleyou as we walk

that

is

at a distance." to regret the loss of the to while

had henceforward

professor's

company, which had served


;

away many of my winter evenings


more, leaving
trick.
I

he came no

me

to repent at leisure of

my

knavish

grew hipped and unwell, and was advised by

my

physician, the ensuing spring, to visit a water-

ing place, at

some distance,
yet not

to

which

agreed.

Intending to return shortly,

my

wife did not ac-

company me

much

liking

the

idea

of
I

leaving her amidst the society of a great city,

took a pretty country-house for her, in a secluded


situation,

and provided an excellent old duenna


I

for

her companion while

was away.

" Farewell,
said,

for a short time,

my

dear Rosa,"

" and promise

me one
?"
to

thing."

"

"
silly

What is that, Mr. L. Why, promise me

say,

No, should any

impertinent fellow, whether an astronomer or

302

GERMAN NOVELS,
ask you any kind
of

not,
will

questions whatsoever,

you " It

?"
is

very odd," replied Rosa;


if is

"but

I will

do

it

certainly

you please."
like

" That
that one

my
?/o,

good
there

faithful
is

Rose

for in

little

word

included a great deal


as a nut in a shell.
will

of wisdom, as close and

safe
it

Just

let

me

hear you repeat

how
till I

you say ?"

" No, no, no !" she replied very resolutely. " Quite right quite right, my own love take

care of yourself, and good bye,

come again

soon."
I

then jumped into the coach in a very good

humour, and proceeded on

my

way.

was not
wife, dur-

surprised at receiving no letters from

my

ing
less

my
;

short stay, for she spoke

little

and wrote

and with renewed health and

spirits, I

was

preparing for

my

return.

soon bade the waters


at

and invalids

farewell,

and found myself seated


table
at

mine

host's well-furnished

an excellent

hotel, about half


rest of the guests

way on my journey home.


were
full

The
and

of

life

and

spirits,

were amusing themselves with repeating a variety


of

anecdotes,

among which was

the

following.

" Only a short time ago, resumed one of

my com-

panions, there was a very amusing incident occurred


at
,"

mentioning the place of

my

country resi-

dence.

"A

certain adventurer, under the

assumed

LANGBEIN.

303

title

of Baron, was the other day exploring; this


in

neighbourhood
oould find.

search of any kind of booty he


to cast his eye

Happening

upon a

rural

residence close at hand, he drew near, and observed


a pretty looking

woman,

quite alone, gazing out of

one of the windows.

" He stopped, and entered


inform

into

conversation
'

under the plea of inquiring his way.

Can you

" "

'

me V No
!'

replied the

young

lady.

'

cannot.'

'

village

Can you inform me V

of the

name

of the next

"
ed

'

No

!'

answered the lady

and

this she follow-

up with a

string of negatives for every question.


this

" Surely, thought our soi-disant Baron,


pretty creature
is

either

dumb,

or there

is

somethen
hope,

thing

do not comprehend
his

in all this.

He
'

changed

tone of inquiry,

saying,

dear lady, you are not offended with the freedom


I

have thus taken


" "
'

in

addressing you V

'

No And perhaps you


!'

will

not be offended

if I

dismount to " 'No!'


"
'

rest

myself a

little

And you
;

will

not forbid

me

to take a little

efreshment

presenting,

at the

same

time,

my

humble compliments and thanks.


"
'

No

!'

301

GERMAN NOVELS.
"The happy traveller
then dismounted, and pro-

ceeded, without farther ceremony, into the house.

Here, with similar questions, he arrives at a knowledge of every thing he wishes to know, the lady
still

expressing

all

her wishes

through the same


;

monosyllable, a> she had before done


tive

the nega-

answering every purpose of an affirmative from

the lips of any other person, exactly as the Baron

could have wished."

During

this recital,

was

sitting

upon thorns.
its

The country-house,
gative
all

the beauty and simplicity of

inhabitant, her puppet-like reiteration of the ne;

convinced

me

that

it

could be no other

than
last

my own

tender-hearted wife.
like a

The
;

relater's
I

words went

dagger to
it

my

heart

but

con-

cealed

my emotion, and

was not observed. All eyes


:

were fixed upon the speaker, who thus continued " So far you see
love adventure
;

my
it

anecdote resembles a mere


is

and

not to be wondered
tell

at.

The remaining

portion, however, does not

quite

so well for our hero, the

Baron

who, not contented

with the lady, and the injury inflicted upon her absent husband, prevailed
liis

upon her

to rob

him

of

property, and

accompany him

in his flight."

Here

uttered an exclamation of horror,

and
had
;

ran out of the

room

as

if

a legion of devils
I

been at

my

heels.

" Horses, post horses,"


I

cried

and while they were preparing,

locked myself up

LANGBEIN.

305

in

my own
I

room.
titters

Then leaping
and

into

my

chaise,

amidst the
spectators,

curiosity of the surrounding

gave the postiUon a douceur,


;

and told

him

to drive hard
I

and

this

repeated at every
I

stage, until
wife.

reached the place where

had

left

my

The doors were


pelled to force our

fastened,

and we were com-

way

into the house.


;

With trem-

bling step,

paced

its floors

there was no one, and


rifled,

nothing to be seen. Every place was opened,

and made away with.


guard of
all

Even the old dragon,


had absconded
all
;

left in

my

treasures,

desks,

chests, drawers, papers,

had
I

become
!

their prey

my

property was gone

was a beggar

" Wretch that

am," exclaimed

I,

wringing

my hands in bitterness of soul. " Now I see too well that I am destined to become the sport and prey of every woman I approach, whether wily, stupid, garrulous, or dumb. What remains for me, but to
seek a refuge from their hatred and persecution in

some

far desert,!"

where they can find nothing on

which to prey

While thus giving vent

to

my

despair,

cast
I

my

eye upon a sealed letter in a window corner.


it

opened

hastily
in

it

was from an uncle, a

rich old
I

merchant

Russia.

He

entreated that
I

would

come and
he was

see

him (though

had almost forgotten

in existence)

once more before he died, as

S06

GERMAN NOVELS.
live

he could not expect to

much

longer, feeling

himself daily growing worse.

At the same time, he


for

promised that

should not take the trouble

nothing, as he meant to leave


possessions.

me

heir to his whole

In

my

present

destitute

condition,

this
I

was

a most fortunate circumstance for me.

set out

without farther
almost to beg

delay,

though

was compelled

my way

to reach

my

uncle's resi-

dence, which lay above an hundred miles beyond


the city of Petersburgh.

Here

was reinstated

in

my

former prosperity

a few weeks after

my kind my arrival,
;

relative died, within


in

my

arms, and

found myself possessed of a greater fortune than


before.
in
I
;

determined to pass the rest of

my

days

Russia

and the better to avoid


in

my

female perI

secutors,

as retired a

way
this

as possible.

as-

sumed the fashion of

the country, and permitted


In

my

beard to grow.

respect

soon vied
I

with some of the best -bearded natives.

looked as

reverend as an aged Bramin, and as awful in the


sight of children, as a bull-beggar, or

King Blue-

beard himself.

took a poor boy into

who played
and

the part of

my
I

cook,

my

lacquey, with gratitude

my service, my washerwoman, and delight. What


to

degree of intercourse

was compelled

keep up

with the other sgx, was restricted to the agency of


Jacob, and never disturbed the peaceful tenor of

LANGBEIN

307

my

days.

The dangerous

creatures were not per;

mitted to cross
habit of casting

my threshold up my eyes in

and

was

in

the

prayer, and stopping

my

ears,

when
to

passed by any of the more tempt-

ing of these syrens.

Owing
comfort

this

wholesome

discipline,

con-

trived to pass the next thirteen years in peace


;

and

and was beginning

to

grow

grey-

headed, respectable old gentleman, free from the


storms and anxieties of
with
life,

and

flattering

myself

the prospect of reaching the haven of

my
I
I

final rest

by the same even and easy course.


!

But, alas

one evening, towards midnight,

heard a thundering knocking at

my
;

house-door.

jumped out of bed and looked out


the place

of the

window;
called

was beset with

soldiers

and

was

upon

to surrender, in the

name

of the Empress.
;

My

faithful

Jacob opened the door


:

they entered,

seized,

and bound me

then, thrusting

me
Here

into a

vehicle well guarded, they drove off with me, day

and night,

until

it

reached the capital.

was

consigned to a dreary dungeon, where


fect leisure to reflect

had per-

upon
I

my

past

life

without in-

terruption.

At

least

had never violated any of


1

the laws,

concluded; and how could

have merit?

ed
I

my

present residence and


trial
:

my

chains

At length

was brought up to

" Confess your crimes,"


to

was the only examination

which

was subjected.

308

GERMAN NOVELS.
begged the favour of

Appealing to the Judge,


being informed

why

had been brought before him.

" That,"

replied the Judge, with an infernal laugh,

" we intend you to confess, you old rascal, or we


shall help

you to skip a

little.

Mark, we give you

three days' grace, to think of your sins, and to confess

them
I

if

not, prepare for the knout."

was then carried back


I

to

my

prison,

remained until

was again brought up.

where " Will

you be wise and make confession yet

?" cried the

same

tyrant.

"

with the tears in

my
ay
;

innocence

What must I confess," I replied, my eyes. " Heaven is witness of I am guiltless of any crime, even in
way
affecting the laws."

thought, or in any
that
is

" Ay,

the usual song of an old bird, like yon.

But

stop, ^ve will soon

make you

sing to another

tune.

Off with him, and give him the knout, until

he confesses the truth to a hair."

The

ruffians

forthwith

proceeded

to

try

the

strength of their arms, and of their knout straps, for

the space of
I

five

minutes,

when they took


it

breath.
perfect

bore the operation, sharp as


while the

was,

in

silence;

hard-hearted judge stood by,


out for mercy.
I

expecting

me

to

call

at

least

compelled him to order


his

my

executioners to stop of
to

own accord
There
I

and

was sent back

my

dun-

geon.

lingered during the space of six


all

months, enduring

the horrors of solitary

ira-

LANGBEIN-

309

prisonment, added to the uncertainty of


I

my

fate.

repeated

daily

inquiries

of

my

gaoler,

who

brought

my
;

bread and water, as to

my

ultimate

destination

whose constant reply was, that he


it
;

knew nothing about


mention made of
length he

as there

was no farther

me

in the court of justice.

At

one day entered


great

my

apartment at a

very unusual hour, in

haste,
;

and

pantingto be

exclaimed

" Up, up

and turn out

you are

taken before the Prince


diately !"

Prince Potemkin immethis dreadful

Trembling at the sound of


I

name,

was borne, between a party of


alive,

soldiers,

more dead

than

into the palace.

They

led

me

into

state hall,

where a splendid assembly of courtiers


;

was collected

all

glittering with stars or ribbons

of different orders.
their

They gathered about me.


stroked

At

head stood a young creature of astonishing

beauty,
lily

who

smiled,

my

beard with her

hand,
:

as she said with heavenly mildness of


;"

manner
and

" Oh, what a beautiful, respectable beard


she laughed.

again
I

Upon

this

the

Prince,

whom

easily recognized
all

from the great respect

shown him by

around, turned towards

me

with

a gracious expression and added, "


free."

Go

you are now

Filled with

astonishment

left

the hall

my
long

guard had disappeared, and the sense of

my

310

GERMAX NOVELS.
me
with fresh
I

wished-for freedom seemed to inspire


life

and strength.

With the vigour of youth,


;

ran
I

down

the palace steps

and the next moment


name.
I

heard myself called by


in great alarm,

my
in

looked back

and saw a Russian


the

officer,

whom

had already observed


ed," he said, " don't you

Prince's

audience-

chamber, hastening towards me.

" Don't be alarmwhile he

know me again?"
a few
to

shook
I

me

very friendly by the hand.


at

looked

him

stedfastly
I

moments,

and then assured him that


ledge seen him before.

had never

my know-

"

And

yet

we have seen

one another nearer than we well liked," was the


reply.
I

thought and thought

but he

still

remained

a stranger to me.
said

" What
?"
*'

He

then began to laugh, and

don't you really then

know Count

Osseck
"

Osseck,'

repeated, as

threw myself upon


;

his neck,

"

is

it,

indeed, possible

how came you


I

here ?"

" Shortly after our duel," he replied, "


into the Russian
service,

entered

and have been fighting

hard with the Turks ever since."


*'

Only with the Turks,"

replied

"I

have

been engaged with women,

who have used me most


I

scandalously and barbarously since

saw you
parted.
as

last,

^nd you know they began


length
I

before

we

At

was compelled

to avoid

them

one would

LANGBEIN.

^H

snakes and wild beasts.

Yet, worsted and trampled

upon as

have been, this day seems to reconcile


Yes, for once, at least,
I

me

to

them once more.

have met with a kind-hearted, excellent woman, the

young and
stroked

fair princess,

who spoke

so softly
I

and

my

beard.

To

her, doubtless,

owe

my
re-^

freedom."

" There, friend, you are in a great error,"


plied the Count, with a compassionate smile;
this angelic creature

"to

you owe your torture and your


"

chains

!"
I

" Banter not so cruelly," hope that one good being


racter of her sex."

cried

still let

me

lives to

redeem the cha-

" Doubtless,
seck
;

my
;

whimsical friend," replied Osirre-

" there are thousands of excellent,

proachable
fine

women
is

though the eulogist of your

beard

certainly not

among

the

number

but

a cold-hearted, vain, dissipated creature."

"
little

How

will
; '

you convince me of that


for,

?" said
I

I,

warmly

old as

am,

confess

was

nearly falling in love with her wonderful beauty,

united to so

much

kindness."

"

can easily convince you," replied the Count,


little

" by explaining some

of the affair of your


:

own

sufferings

and imprisonment, much as follows

About
temkip.

seven

months

ago,

certain

young

prince happened to be dining with the great Po-

He was just

returned from a tour through

132

GERMAN NOVELS.
and could
find no-

some of the Russian provinces


a man,

thing more remarkable to relate, than his meeting with

who wore an
it

extraordinary long beard, and

dwelt upon
in

as a kind of

phenomenon.
:

The lady
Oh, of
this.'
all

a jocular tone, directly exclaimed


I

'

beards in the world,

should like to see

" This wish was no sooner uttered, than Potemkin, a great admirer of the Princess, ordered

particular inquiries to be

made
*

when the young


There he
to

Prince, taking out his note-book, read aloud the

place of your abode, adding,

is

be

found.

don't
;

know

his

name, but no one can


to boast of

mistake him
like his.'

no one being able

a beard

" The proud


dered
place
;

favourite, calling his Secretary, or-

him

to write to

the

commandant

of the

giving

him

instructions, without loss of time,

to secure

and forward the said long-beard, as soon

as he could find him, to the capital.

" From that time forward, neither the Princes?


nor
the
it

Prince

dreamed any thing about you

and
first

was not

until to-day that the former, for the

time, recurred to the subject


'

"

How

does

it

happen, then, that your Excel-

lency has never shown


nishing long- beard as
I

me

the

man

with the asto-

expected V
his Secretary,
:

" The Prince immediately sent to

and

in

a savage tone, cried out as he entered

LANGBEIN.

^13

'

Have
"

not

already

commanded

that the

man

with a long- beard should be forwarded hither V


'

It is true, please

your Excellency, and he has

already had the knout, and been for the last six

months

in

close imprisonment

yet he refuses to

confess his crime.

Your Excellency has never since


;

been applied to on the subject


trial are

the process and

yet remaining in the chancery.'


it

"

'

Let

be brought

and order the delinquent

up

into the audience chamber.'

" The lady was now as


with some

much delighted as
;

a child

new play-thing
;

she ordered you to be

brought round

and

at last she

came towards me,

when
bach

recognized, with surprise,

my

friend Lim:

in the prisoner.

The

rest

you know
?

and what

think you

now

of the court-lady

How

tender and

humane, out of mere

jest to seize a to

worthy man,
like a

consign him to a dungeon,


wild beast,

show him

and dismiss him without offering

to to

make

the least reparation for his wrongs.

Then

be called a guardian-angel by her victim, who, you

know, had very nearly


I

fallen in love with her !"

stood mute with astonishment

was buried

in

deep thought over

my
I

strange fate.

The count

roused me, and entreated

would think no more of


like

what was
whole of

past, but

come

an old friend with


give

him home,

refresh myself, and then


history.

him the

my

VOL. IV.

314

GERMAN XVELS.
I

agreed to accompany him, remained with him


in order to

some weeks, and


sat

amuse my brave
on

host,

down

to write

my own
I

history and adventures.


set out

Having concluded them,


to

my way back

my

native place, rejoicing in the idea of again

meeting, at least,

my

faithful Jacob.

But no
for

this

good man never saw him more

when he reached the house, which he supposed


for hira, a

was ready prepared


long face came

neighbour with a

out and handed saying

him the key, again


Poor Limbach
;

retiring without

a word.

walked

in,

but there was no Jacob

the house

was

robbed and deserted like his former one.

number

of people collected on hearing him shouting "Jacob!

Jacob

!"

and he inquired of them, " What

is

be-

come
"

of

him ?"
is

" Oh, he

gone."
;

Gone
dead

!"

he exclaimed

"do you mean


:

that

he

is

?"

" No, not dead," was the answer


run away."

" he
!

has

" Nay, good people

that

cannot be

Jacob

would not

treat

me

so

never."

LANBEIX.

315

AN HOUR'S INSTRUCTION
IN POLITICAL ECONOMY.
("In the

manner of Philander Von Liltewald.


earlier years,

)*'

In

my

says Philander,
it is

was

cer-

tainly a merry blade,

and

no

less certain that I

dissipated

my

paternal inheritance,
to

and at length

found myself compelled


sure, as
I

make

business a plea-

had formerly made pleasure


life

my
:

business.
fact,
I

court

looked the most inviting

in

longed to become a statesman, and to


litical

offer

my

po-

services to

some foreign
I

prince.

So leaving
tour, in the

my

native place,

set out

upon
in

my

course of which

I lost

my way

going through a
to find
asleep.
it,

wood
I

and losing

it still

more by trying
fell

lay

down out

of sheer weariness and

* His real name, however,

was Hans lichael Moscherosch,


several
satires

He

lived in

the

17th centiiry, and wrote

under the

title

of Extraordinary and Real Apparitions, re:

specting which he observes in his preface

"

I cannot believe

that I have injured any one

my

purpose, on the contrary,

ha\'ing been to promote the good of aU.

Such

as do not find

my

writings to their taste, are either incapable of under;

standing them, or find themselves disagreeably pourtrayed


their conscience accuses them.

Throughout the whole range of my productions, there is not a word that can be construed into a reflection upon a worthy man."

p2

316

GERMAN NOVELS.
In a
little
;

while

felt

a gentle tap upon

my

shoulder

opened

my

eyes,

and beheld a strange

oddly dressed old man, with a long beard, standing


before me.

" Come, get up," he said, " and

will

conduct you to a place where you may learn the


whole
art of

government

in a single hour."

This proposal was extremely agreeable to


so
I

me

got up and followed the old man, step by step,'

He

bent his path over a steep mountain, covered


city,

with mist, which finally led into a stately


corated with

de-

my

and towers. " Here, son," resumed the old man, " is the court resi-

many

lofty spires

dence of a mighty German Prince, who can reach

an extraordinary way with his long grasping hands,


wherever
dainty
in

he

may happen

to

observe

something
shall be-

the great state dish.

But you

come personally acquainted with him.


privy counsellors
is

One

of his

dead within these few days past,


fill

and another

is

to be chosen to

his place

we

shaH now have an opportunity of witnessing the


proceedings
;

the real actuating motives on

these

occasions being thrown into the shape of questions

and
will,

befitting answers, for our better edification.

It

however) be as safe to be invisible

;"

and saying
as imper-

this,

he touched

his

own forehead and mine with


Yet we contrived
to see

some balsamic drop, and we both became


ceptible as the wind.

one
like

another

and thus prepared, we wafted ourselves

LANGBEIN.

317

a summer breeze through a thick crowd of people,


rolling
this

up and down the

street.

The

farther

end of

brought us close up to the palace, and so into

the hall of state, where shone the Prince surround-

ed by his grand

officers of state,

in the full splen-

dour of his power,

sitting

upon

his throne.

Well,

before him stood three figures, singled out of half hundred lots of candidates,
all

some

eagerly on the

scent for office, and their qualifications were

now

about to be proved,
itself.

if

not

approved

by royalty

"
of

What

is

the

first

and most indispensable


Sir ?"

virtue

a privy-counsellor,

inquired the Prince

of one

who

stood with

folded hands, and

eyes

upon the ground,


preacher.

most resembling a Moravian

" The

fear of

God," replied the man, bowing


he laid his hand

submissively,
heart.

while

upon

his

" What

is

the second virtue ?"

The
"

fear -of

God."

And

the third ?"

" The fear of God," and there he stuck fast. The Prince laughed, bade him begone, and
turning to his privy-counsellors,
said,

" See and

find this holy, simple-spoken chucklehead, a school-

master's birth."

He

next turned to the second of the three, and

318

GERMAN NOVELS.
"

inquired,

What

are the

principal

qualifications

of a good governor ?"

This candidate,
air,

who had

a peculiarly pedantic
glis-

and the very essence of self-complacency

tening in his eyes, bowed

much

less

low than the

former, cleared his throat, and seemed to be pre-

paring for a long set speech, which began as

fol-

lows

" Plato, Aristotle, &c.,


is

maintain that a prince


bit,

only the minister of his people," (devil a

thought the Prince) " and consequently bound to


exercise

only justice and equity

to

promote the

welfare of the state by every

means

in his

power
like

and so

to treat his subjects as

he would himself

to be treated were he a subject.


'

What
Be

you'd from others take amiss,


this.'

not guilty thou of


is

"

Now

this proverb
;

the golden text to try

all

human

proceedings

and one which

nature im-

planted in our hearts.

Let a prince direct his conwill

duct by this

rule,

and he

be honoured and beLet him, on the

loved as the father of his subjects.


other hand, give
sion,

way

to selfish violence

and pasmere

and exhaust the labour of


show,

his people in

extravagance and

and

it

must necessarily

follow, as the poet says


'

That men whom princes teach to fear, " They teach to hate, and hating hear.^

LANGBEIN.

319

The
state, as

Prince, during

this discourse,

frequentlyofficers of

fixed his eyes

upon

his council

and great

much

as to say,

"

How
!"

sounds that,

my

Lords
of

this bird sings

a very different tune to that

my

faithful privy-council

Lord Pakomus, High Privy President, as he

was anciently

called, of the secret council


courtier,

chamber,

was an old wily


this office,

who,

in the

enjoyment of
riches.

had accumulated immense


his

He

concealed

feelings

under a smiling counte-

nance, shook the honours of his mighty wig with a scornful


air at

the speaker, and

whan

the Prince
at

began to express his great astonishment


heard, the Lord President, biting his
in

what he
chimed
!

lips,

with the words

" Enough of this audacity

our royal master stands in no need of lessons, like


these,

on the

art of

government."

This conclusive piece of flattery had the intend-

ed

effect

it

brought

all

the Prince's notions back


;

again to the monarchical level


look upon
the.

he threw a black

young
off.

Liberal,
It

to stand farther

and commanded him now came to the third


youth,

place-hunter's turn, a poor beardless

but

one who had

fashioned his court thoughts

and

phrases upon the model of the Lord President, and

brought out every other word with a shake of his


shoulders or of his empty head, as
if

to

recommend

this illustration of his reasoning to the Prince.

The

320

GERMAN NOVELS.
question put to him was

first

" To what,

Sir,

ought

the chief aim of the sovereign to be directed ?"

" To three points," he replied rather pertly, as

he bent himself,

at the

same time, twice double

in

token of respect; "


royal

viz., first to

the increase of the

finances;
;

secondly, to the enlargernent of

his boundaries

and
the

thirdly, to the support of his

prerogative,

as

Almighty's

vicegerent

upon
the

earth."

" Very

properly

remarked,"
;"

exclaimed

Prince, " very properly indeed

and

in spite of his

youth he nominated him one of


sellors

his privy-coun-

upon the

spot.

We
this

invisibles

exchanged a meaning look upon

speedy appointment,

and the old man whis-

pered

me

" The young hypocrite, who has thus


ear, is son-in-law to the

caught the Duke's


President.
self dictated

Lord

The

old

experienced

court-fox

him-

both the question of the Prince and


;

his son's

answer

so you see they were like to


as

fit

as

close as

cup and cover,


will

hand and

glove.

Now
doors
it

mark, he

next proceed to give the lad


in

an hour's instruction
;

his

business with closed

which, however,

we

will contrive to hear, as


visit hither."

was the main object of our

The Prince dismissed


along,

his council,

and the Lord


:

President took his relative under his arm

"

Come

my

dear boy," said he, "

will

give you a

LANGBEIN.

321

proof of

my

paternal regard
the

will

disclose
secrets

for

your edification,
ministerial

most important

of

management, and the

art of governing."

Saying

this,

he led him through some dark, narperfectly familiar to him, into

row passages,

one

of the most secluded wings of the palace, at the

end of which he entered into a chamber, enclosed


on
ly
all

sides with iron bars


s i.all

and doors.
into

He
this

cautiouspolitical

unlocked a

aperture
it

sanctuary, and secured

after

him, in order that

no uninitiated wretch, by any chanc', might happen to have slipped into any of his state
secrets.

But he could not contrive


derful revelations from his

to bar us out,

and we

had the advantage of hearing the following wonlips.

But
smooth

first

the Lord President proceeded to open

a chest, containing a vast variety of cloaks, of


velvet, silk, or fine

spun cloth.

They were

all richly

lined on the exterior, but within they were

made
hair,

of nothing better than raw, coarse wool and

and

in part

sewn

fast

and strong with wolves


disguise.

and fox hides, forming an impenetrable


"
the
Is

that

the

Prince's

wardrobe?" inquired
" they are

young

privy-counsellor.
;

" By no means," replied the old one

only state cloaks, intended to be worn according


to the fashion in

which we wish to impose upon

the people; whether

by a grand ceremony
p 5

or

by

322

GERMAN NOVELS.
For
this last, there
is

a side wind.

nothing like a
if

smart, flashy cloak, which looks as

there were
fine

nothing under

it.

So

this

you see with

gold

fringes, this light, innocent-looking scarlet coat

is

called the

'

Peoples Favour.' *
is

A
the
'

second here, of
;'

green velvet,
flounced with

the

'

F/eur du Pays

and a

third,

silver, is entitled

Common Best ^
noviciate

and

so

on with these."
earnest
all,

With
them
cloak.

gaze did the

young

measure them
on.

one

after

another, eager to try

At

last,

however, he could not restrain his

mirth, as his eyes encountered an old faded tattered

" Lord

!"

cried

the

young counsellor

" what

can

this dirty, ill-looking hide

be doing here, among

these fine state garments ?"

komus

" Wonder not at that," replied President Pa" once this same mantle shone as bril; ;

liantly as its neighbours

and

it

is

only the long,


it

valuable services

it

has seen,
exterior.

that have given


It
is

so very shabby an

called

'

Good

Intention
life.

;'

it

is

like

our daily bread for a court


state should be

For

if

by chance the helm of

guided by the hand of a fool instead of a states-

man, and the ship run clean upon the rocks


*

then,

Whether

the Ijord President means here to allude to the

service military,

we do not presume

to be sufficiently

versed

in his state secrets to decide.

Kn.

LANGBEIN.

323

while the said

ship

is

going to pieces, he takes

care to conceal himself

under

this cloak, crying

out from some safe corner that his intentions were

good

Upon

this the
;

poor drowning passengers have

no more

to say

but, as

some
is

falling ministers are

like giants, the

mantle

not sufficiently long to

reach, in which case his colleagues are compelled


to cover

him with the whole

princely wardrobe, and

bury him in state."

Lord Pakomus opened

The examination of the cloaks being concluded, a court bandbox full of


!"

masks. " What noble masks


counsellor
;

exclaimed the young

"

I
;

suppose these are only worn upon


at court festivals,

grand occasions " That


ing,
is

and so

forth."

good," cried his father-in-law, laugh-

" they are to be worn as often as we want

them.

They
to

are state masks,


its

boy

that belong to
this

the mantles, each to


are

own.
the

It is for

they
ex-

made
;"

resemble

human

features,

pressing, as

you
"

see,

nothing but openness and


this

honesty

and saying

he placed one of them


tell

upon him.
between
life for

Now, can you

the

difference

me and

a famous patriot,

who

devotes his

the good of his country ?"


!"

" Noble, indeed

cried

the

young mocking-

bird, imitating the old

one

and clapping his new-

fledged wings.

324

GERMAN" NOVELS.

The

noble

pair

then

entered

an

adjoining^

chamber, apparently a bathing and dressing-room.


There were razors, lancets, and cupping glasses,
lying round in abundance.

" These
in

articles," said

Pakomus, "

are the stock

trade

of

our

financiers,

our collectors,
officers.

and,

indeed, of

all

our receivmg

With these

shears they are accustomed to

shear their flocks,

both citizens and peasants

with the glasses they

contrive to extract both blood and bone,

and cup

them

frequently.

When
fill,

these leeches, however,


still

have sucked their

stronger

hand

often

compels them to

regurgitate,

and then throws

them

aside."

The old president then


back into the
spectacles
:

led his

young

friend

hall,

where he opened a box of

"

Now

observe," he said, " there are


state

three sorts

of these

spectacles.

The

first

kind are meant to magnify objects exceedingly


they will

make a gnat
a

into

an elephant, or a

silver

penny

into

round

dollar.

With
and

these

they

bewilder the eyes of the subject, and can turn an


old rotten tree into a large forest
;

in particular,

magnify a small alleviation of the people's burdens


into an incalculable benefit.

The second
to mole-hills,
to

pair will

as easily

reduce mountains
useful
in

and

is

particularly

regard

diminishing the

apparent

amount

of

new

rates

and

levies

but

LANGBEIN.

325

the

third

pair

fairly

convert black

into white,
to,

and cover every thing they are applied


fine dazzling polish."

with a

"

What
;

rare spectacles !" exclaimed the

young
pre-

counsellor

entreating,

at the
for

same time, that he

might possess a pair

himself.

The

old

sident, however, before venturing to try

them on,
round the

cast a sharp look,

and took a turn


low tone said,

all

room

and then

in a

" These specenlighten

tacles, besides their diminishing powers,

us in other matters, which we do not always think


it

necessary to communicate to our good master,

or to trouble

him with a long-winded


for

illustration.

These glasses are not


instance,

his

eyes.

This,

for

we only do when

the Prince does

not

judge proper to countenance a new impost.


give
as

We
such

him a view of the matter, very

different to

he would take with his mere scanty natural


"

vision."

And

does this answer?" inquired the young


face.

man, with a solemn


" Prohaim

est /"

cried

Pakomus, with energy,


cordially

and

they
;

shook

each

other

by the

hand

" are you not elected a privy-counsellor,

my

son ?"

" But what


inquired

is

that fine rose-coloured powder?*'

the docile

and

inquisitive

pupil;

"

it

seems

like tooth-powder."

326

GERMAN NOVELS.
" You are quite wrong, my boy," said the old " do you imagine government would trouble
;

courtier
itself

with furnishing tooth-powder for


it

its

subjects
all,

No

were better they had no teeth at

and

they would consume less."

" Then, what can


statesman, a
little

it

be for ?" said the young-

dashed.
it

" Dust, man, dust!" returned the old fox; "


is

eye-dust, intended to be thrown into the people's

eyes,

when we have no

other

way of blinding them.


is

And

that fast-corked and sealed bottle there,


It

ready for a similar kind of emergency.


the celebrated blue mist."

contains

"

must confess,"
to blind

said the counsellor, " here


;

is

enough
good."

a whole nation

but

it

is

for its

The president laughed


assent.

bitterly,

and

nodded

His son next remarked a large velvet bag; and


thrusting
his

hand

into

it,

drew out a gigantic


ell

gold tuning-hammer, near an


tionally thick.

long,

and propor-

" Let that alone


in

!"

exclaimed the old courtier,


to put
it

an angry tone

and wished
it

up again

but the other held

fast, insisting

upon knowing

what

it

was

for.
first

The

lord president at

refused to say

but at

LANGBEIN.

32/

length confessed, that on one occasion, a certain


foreign power

had

insisted

upon the grant of some


interests of the state.

privilege from his

gracious master, which was es-

teemed incompatible with the


" Soon

after, I received this large

tuning-hammer, of

massy gold, accompanied by


me,

a very gracioiis

and

facetious epistle, from the foreign prince, entreating


in a jocose

way, to influence
in

my

master's ideas

on the subject,
into unison

such a manner, as to bring them

and perfect-accordance with his own.


can
resist

Now who

curiosities

of this kind

who can refuse to unlock the door of his confidence, when knocked at with so powerful a hammer as
this?"

" All that

is

very true," said the young courtier.


lastly

Lord Pakomus
filled

showed him a

little

cask,

with peas

observing, " These once innocent


to fall into the

grains

happened

hands of a very

roguish black-dealing statesman, and became more

dangerous than musquet


clined' to let

balls,

am

almost in-

you
I

into the secret of such a devilish

trick

yet

may
if I

not reasonably fear,

lest

you may

some time,

continue too long upon the stage^

think of turning the story against myself?"

His

son-in-law here, striking his hand upon his heart,


protested that he

was an honest man.


this.;

"

No more

of

but hear the

affair.

It is

only

328

GERMAN NOVELS.
villains that will

he most abandoned of

consent to

make
cil

use of these bedevilled grains in furtherance

of his designs.

He
in the

strews

them

in the Privy

Coun-

Chamber,
over

Chancery

Office,

and
in

in parti-

cular

the smooth foot -cloths,

order that

the secret enemies of the villanous seedsman

may

tumble over those


their necks.

politic peas,

and

infallibly

break

And

this

always

first

occurs to the
inter-

most upright and excellent men, who, being

nally supported by a good conscience, are the less

cautious

how

they walk

marching bolt upright."


words,
I

At hearing these
mausler

last

shuddered, and

sighing, thought of the lines of the excellent Frosch-

" Court-sweets, however sweet

to taste,

Are fraught with

poisons

fear the feast

!"

Suddenly,

the

whole

flattering

prospect

of

State Government,

together with the

Lord High

President
view.

and his son-in-law, disappeared from


!"

" Well

inquired

my

aged conductor, " and


in

how
this
I

are

you pleased with an hour's instruction


art ?"

grand

only shrugged up
to reply.

my

shoulders, and

knew not

what
"

Had you any

idea," he continued, " that

LANGBEIN.

329

liad

brought you here to witness what you have


;

seen
false

this

grand

political

game

of hiding cloaks,

eye-glasses,
?

and tuning hammers of massy


!

gold

No, Heavens forbid


in

You had

not.

point-

ed out to you

time where the poison lay, in the


in

costliest dish of all,


it.

order that you might avoid


all

have exposed to you

the secret arts of the

unprincipled minister, in order that you

may form a
whose
first

more correct judgment than the ignorant crowd,


respecting

many noble-minded

princes,

object would

be the welfare of their people, were

they not unhappily misled from the path of integrity

and justice by corrupt and evil-minded mi-

nisters,

whose

selfish

views wear the cloak of faithuntil they bring

ful counsel

and advice,

both prince

and people

into a situation of great jeopardy.

Avoid

the example of such,

and

bless thy stars,


If

good

youth, that thou hast learnt so much.

you meet

with a prince

who

is

inclined to lay the burden of

his subjects' welfare


faithfully.

on your shoulders, serve him


selfish-

Grasp with a strong hand the

ness and avarice that propel the secret wheels of

the political machine, and expose them to reprobation.

But keep a wary eye where you walk


pit-falls

be-

ware of the

strewn on

all

sides of you,
!"

and

of a host of enemies eager to devour you

With the

last

dying echo of these words, the

330

GERMAN NOVELS,
my aged conductor fled like a vapour from my eyes and I found myself lying under
;

figure of

before

the tree vphere

I
:

had
yet

fallen asleep.

roused myself

and stood up
under

I felt

as

if

the court peas were

my
my

feet,

and

this deprived

me

of
;

all

courage
I

or inclination to proceed in

my

journey

so

mea-

sured

steps back.

I.ANGBKIN.

331

THE LADY'S PALFREY.


(a

tale of the court.)

To

escape Love's magic chain,

Everj-^

mortal art

is

vain

Who that made


Ever won
it

the foohsh bet,


?

yet

The icy region round man's To thaw and part

heart

Asunder with her sunny smiles Is woman's sport, and woman's wiles ; This truth trips up an old court sage,

The last

step of his pilgi-image,

A prosing moralist
As, reader, you

may

plainly see

In

this his

merry history

courtly jest, I wist.

There was
who
of"

once a young good-natured monarch

never so

much
;

as

dreamed of vexing the

least

his subjects

and yet he did not please them.

He was
gative,

too eas,y in the exercise of his royal prero-

and treated them rather


hirelings
to

like

spoiled chiluntil

dren, than

and apprentices,

they

almost began
like

think of assembling in parliament,

the frogs, and of petitioning Jupiter to grant

them a proper king.

The

truth

is,

that state busi-

ness boasted less attractions than a very

handsome

young lady of the court,

named Adelaide, who had

332

GERMAN NOVELS.
herself

made

completely

mistress

of the young

King's heart, as well as of his time.


influence over him, that
sellors

Such was her


old privy-coun-

some of the

began

to

take the alarm, and tried every

courtly

means of enticing him out of the paradise


in

which he seemed to enjoy

her society

for

it

was not without a good deal of


signing his

difficulty that they

could prevail with him even to take the trouble of

name to a sentence

of execution.

To most

state ministers, perhaps, this bitter aver-

sion to business might have been highly agreeable,

and they would have turned


to very

his delegated authority to that

good account.

Bat these belonged

more

rare class of statesmen,

who have
its

rather a dis-

like to office,

and who discharge

functions purely

for the benefit of the people.

They were only ambilover from his trance


his

tious of rousing the royal

young

and inspiring him with a sense of

dignity

to

wield his sceptre with becoming majesty and power,


so as to convince his subjects that they had a king.

They assembled,

therefore,
;

and

laid their

heads to-

gether in a cabinet council


to

the result of which was,

delegate one of the oldest and wisest of their

sapient

body

to bear their grievances

and remon-

strances to the ear of their enchanted

young Prince.

Now, Privy Counsellor Alphonso,


on
this occasion,

the ambassador
old

was no sneaking soft-tongued

courtier,

who would hardly

venture to call his soul

LANGBEIN'.

333

his

own

but bold, blunt,

stiff,

and unbending as a

poker, he marched forthwith to seek an audience,

and roundly stated the object of

his visit.

He

de-

clared in the most earnest manner, with due

com-

mendations on the virtues of princes who never


neglected
their royal duties,

that both the capital


to feel very

and the country were beginning

much

dissatisfied with his style of governing, or rather of

not governing at

all.

They thought

it

odd enough,

he continued, that his attachment


should absorb that due to
all

to a single girl

his people, for


flea.

whom
it

he did not seem to care a

Indeed,
little

was

thought that he would not give his


save
all

finger to
;

his subjects

from eternal condemnation

such was the perfect indifference he displayed to-

wards them, as well as to his own royal dignity, to


the power and splendour of a crown.

The Prince seemed


serious charges,

quite

dumb-founded

at these

and

it

was

clear that his conscience


to say in inter-

was

at

work,

for

he had not a word

ruption.

He

listened earnestly to the

whole sermon,

which
try,

insisted greatly on the necessity of indus-

temperance, self-control, and other great and


virtues

princely

of that

kind.

" Very

true,

my

good Alphonso," replied the good-natured monarch, " only I fear you have never been in love." The old
minister, with a shrug of his shoulders, confessed

that he

had never yet found time

to

fall

in

love.

334

GERMAX NOVELS.
time, having delivered his sermon, he
if

At the same

took his leave, shaking his head as

he entertained

no great hopes of reaping any harvest from the good


seed vphich he had just sown.

For once, however, the wise old counsellor was


mistaken
;

the

Prince awoke, at

it

were,

out of

a dream, became sensible of his royal duties, and never went near his beloved during the next three
days.

Meanwhile

it

would be impossible
tears

to

form

an idea of the number of

shed by Adelaide, as

she sat in her lonely chamber.


picture of
it it

She was the

living

gi'ief,

until

about the fourth day, finding

began to border upon despair, she conceived that

would be the most prudent course, before she


of her garter,
to

made a noose
narch a
prise
visit.

pay the young Moand

He

uttered an exclamation of surin

on beholding her
before he

his royal presence,

at his feet,

had a suspicion of her aphow she could have


of-

proach,

softly

inquiring

fended him.

Touched

to the very soul at these

words, the Prince pressed the weeping beauty to


his breast.
"'

" Adelaide,

my own
all.

Adelaide," he cried,
girl,

pray be calm.

You

are an excellent
I

and you

have not vexed


ever,

me

at

love you as

much
I

as

and
I

shall never cease to love

you

only

must

not,

dare not, see you any more."

Tliis

was
:

at

once delight and torture to Ade-

laide's heart

his first

words were balsam, but

his

LAXGBEIN.

o35

last

were daggers.

flood of tears

was her only

reply, for her grief

was too great

for utterance.

At

length, with
out,

abundance of broken

sighs, she
I

sobbed

" You would see


of your love!

me no more
roses
?

and yet assure

me

would
with

you hand me a bowl of

poison

garnished

Away

with

such

flowers for sorrow,

and

tell

me
is

frankly that you hate


dictated by a frigid
for

me, and that our parting


heart
!

Alas

it

must be

so,

who would be

found bold enough to check the ardour of a monarch's soul


?"
in a very

The good King now found himself


fess that

perplexing situation, for he was ashamed to con-

he had been tutored by an old moralizing

minister,

and sought every means of disguising


real truth.

from her the

But her sighs and

tears

again appealed so powerfully to his feelings, that

he could not refrain from relating the whole history


of his short-lived efforts to vanquish his love.

This confession removed a load from Adelaide's


heart.
affairs

With the

joyful
in so

consciousness that her


hopeless a state as she
all

were not quite

had pictured them, she recovered


mation and good-humour.

her usual ani-

This charming vivacity

was as formidable
" and

as her tears.

" Stop a

bit,

you

sulky old pedant," she cried, laughing through her


tears,
I

will

reward you well

for the
!

three

days' anguish you inflicted

upon me

With your

336

GERMAN NOVELS.
will play off

royal permission,

a trick upon the


save him
the

old

grudging

churl,

which

shall

trouble in future of preaching his prosing sermons


in

your Majesty's ear.

No, he

shall never indulge

the least inclination to moralize any more.


hit

upon

it

already

I have most excellent plan. If

your Majesty

will please to slip into the castle gar-

dens about sunrise to-morrow, and conceal yourself

near the pavilion,

which

this

old

notorious
resi-

peace-breaker has converted into his


dence, you shall see a sight which
fail
I

summer

think cannot

to

amuse you

heartily.

If

my

plan succeed,
this

you

shall

have the pleasure of seeing

most

sage and philosophical greybeard play such pranks


before high Heaven, that you

may

easily repay

him,

with interest,

all

the fine speeches and reproaches

which he has so philosophically bestowed upon


you."

The King, much amused, seemed


the

to approve of

idea, with the single condition that


far,

the joke

should not be carried too

Adelaide promised,

and ran joyfully home.


Early the
court lay
intent

ensuing morning, while the whole


the

buried in repose,

malicious

lady,

upon

revenge, took her

way towards the


young
roe.

castle gardens, with the speed of a

She

was

attired

in

a charming morning dress, whose

exquisite whiteness might have

shamed the snow.

LANGBEIN.

367

Her raven

hair

floated

loose

upon the breeze, or


eye of the

wantoned over her swan-like neck, while her bosom


itself

was but

lightly

veiled from the

young god of day.


Thus
ductive
cruelly

armed with the weapons of


the lovely nymph began

se-

destruction,

to

wander round the immaculate minister's

abode.

He was

already seated at his

official

desk,

and
de-

fronj time to time cast longing glances at the


licious gardens,

which seemed to

invite

him down.
began to
:

To

entice

him

to the windows, Adelaide

sing a song, sweet at least as the nightingale's


'

was a

little lively

thing

To

school each moi'n


I

upon the wing

Yet loved

something better
for alphabet,

Than sugar bread

And And
If

learnt no words that I was set

Save that of Love


fain 1

Love-letter.
wit apply.

would

my

some loved one would love as I, And wear with me love's fetter." notes of the decoy bird attracted the
attention.
little

The
old

first

courtier's

He

laid his

pen down,

elevated his wig a


listened.

above his right ear, and


the world can be sing-

"

Who

in

all

ing so prettily ?" thought he, as he rose from his


desk.

He
little

crept softly to the window, peeped be-

hind the curtain into the garden below, and was


not a
surprised to observe the very

young lady

VOL. IV.

338

GERMAN NOVELS.
he had served so
ill

whom
before.

a turn only a few day

At

first

he turned once more to his desk


he again
rose,

but

his curiosity being piqued,

he peeped,

he gazed

he admired, he longed, he

lost himself.

Love pinned him to the spot, or at


" You old fool
''
;

least

he was
other

only able to turn one eye to his seat

the
to

was

in the garden.

!"
I

at length
fear

he

began, half laughing to himself

thou art
be thy

bewitched with
grand-daughter.

girl

young enough

But zounds, she looks so desold father Nestor himself might

perately beautiful,

well fall in love with her.

Zounds,
in
!

never envied

my royal master so much How happy he must be

my life as I do now. What wonder that in


the

her society, he should forget that he wear's a crown,


or that he has any subjects except herself in

kingdom

!"

During

this

monologue, the wicked Adelaide


fix

had contrived

to

her basilisk eyes upon him

through the window, and played the part of a lovesick damsel to admiration.

She plucked roses and

forget-me-nots, which she

made

into a wreath

and sighed.

Added

to such artifices, she kept


:

draw-

ing nearer, and sang again


Here, here

was captured

By Love's mighty power, And wander enraptured


Till life's latest hour.

LAN'O JiElN.

339

would thou might'st

feel,

Love,

What
I

I suffer

now

would

might

steal,

Love,

To

offer

my

vow.

The

old courtier

was enraptured too

and his

head turned so giddy with the deUcious song, that


he could no
sense
;

longer

distinguish

sense from nonit

but took the compliment as


as

was meant.
colt,
felt

He grew merry and wanton


gan to

a young

quite feverish, and his long ossified old heart be-

grow tender, and melted away


fish

like

wax.

Greedier than a

devours the bait, his eye fas;

tened on the lady's charms


pike, he
gullet.

and

like soaie fierce


in his

was caught with the hook sticking

The next moment he threw


he began

his
;

morning

gown

aside, seized his best court suit

yet recol-

lecting, just as

to decorate himself, that

she might perhaps

retire,

he resumed his morning


his

gown, and ran


Alas
his
!

to

the mirror to adjust


;

wig.

he was shocked at his own figuie


flat

never had

cheeks looked so

and

fallen,

nor so deeply
re-

ploughed by the hand of years.

Indeed they

sembled shrivelled parchment so much, that the


voice of reason exclaimed
fool,

" Thou
\

art playnig the

old greybeard

What

in

the winter of thy

days to think of making love to a blooming flower


of spring
years
!

Down

to

thy desk again

where

for

thou hast sat turning the rudder of the Q 2

340

GEllMAX NOVELS.

state,

and heed not the song of any

siien

that

attempts to bring the vessel


rocks."

of thy fame upon the

So argued reason, and would have


but the nightingale again
trilled

said

more

her tender song

from the garden,

and three times sweeter than


:

before sang her third song

Fonder than the fondest dove, Once within a leafy grove. Sat a maiden fresh and fair,
"Watching for her one beloved
:

Yet ere from that spot slie moved, Came woe and death to end her care.

This was too


dence, and
it

much

for the sage statesman's pru-

turned his head.

His passion escap;

ed quite beyond the bounds of reason


rudder and compass, and
horse,

he

lost

both

ran like a

broken loose

down

the steps into the garden, and never


feet.

stopped until he dropped at Adelaide's

She

had purposely averted her


plumped down before
matter ?" at the
her.

face,

and

started, as if

suddenly taken by surprise as her unwieldy lover

" For Heaven's sake," she

cried,

" what

is

the

same time taking the old


if

courtier

by the shoulders, as

to raise

him up.
in the

" Nay, most lovely lady," he exclaimed,


looks, " suft'er

most tender accents, and gazing on her with melt


iner

me

to

remain where

am

kneel-

J.AXCJBEIN.

34-1

ing, in the dust, until I obtain

your

full forgiveness,

your smiles, your love."

" You surprise, you distress

me

greatly,"

re-

plied the artful Adelaide, biting her lips to avoid

bursting into a
treat

fit
;

of laughter

" but

rise, I

en-

you

to rise

for I

must

first

learn whether

you

be jesting or in earnest."

" In earnest, upon


truth
insult

my

soul

doubt not the


it

and fervour of

my
all

passion

would be an

upon that divine

that
a

exquisite

that angelic

beauty which compels


I, I

men

to adore you.

Even
must

who have

ever boasted perfect freedom,

now submit myself


" Truly,
I feel

happy

slave

and prisoner,

ready to wear your chains."

proud of such a conquest

yet

cannot consent to deprive you of your freedom


dare not."

me
if

" But you must," replied the enraptured lover,


*'

you cannot avoid

it;

for

death only can rid

of your chains.

This, too, he will shortly do,

you should not quickly take compassion on me,

and consent that you will be mine." " Such a formal declaration," replied Adelaide, " from your lips, almost makes me imagine I am in
a dream,
before
I

a delightful
;

dream.
!

Leave me, pray,

awake

for,

alas

fear

you are very


I

far

from being indifferent to me.


it
!

Must
;

then confess
I

have long sighed for this hour

and besides,

342

GERMAX
this

NOVF.LS.

have been haunted

some

time

past

by the

strangest emotion, the oddest wish, yon can imagine, the


gratification

of

which depends wholly

upon you." " Name


" Indeed

it,

entreat you

only

name

it,

my
in
;

adored Adelaide."
I feel

some

diffidence
it

do indeed,

mentioning
yet
I

it

you

will think

so very singular

feel

cannot be happy unless you consent


in
it.

to indulge

me
yes
!

So

think

had

better tell

you."

" Oh,

give

yourself

no anxiety, not a
your wish, and
funeral

moment's
have
pile
it
:

hesitation.

Only
town
fire

state

bid

me mount

the scaffold
hall

or the top of the

the and
I

will

do

it.

would march through


'sdeath, but
I

and

flood to reach

you

would."
really
?

" Would you


boldly
;

then

will

mention

it

for

require no such terrible proofs of your


I

affection.

Freely and frankly, therefore,


desire,

have a

most inexpressible

were

it

only for a few

minutes, to take a short ride round these fine gravel


walks."

" Whimsical
your head
vent
it
;

girl!

what can have put


is

this into

However, there
shall

nothing shall pre-

you

have a pad to carry you round

the walks instantly."

" No, there

is

no occasion

for that

it

would

LA NO REIN.

343

most

gratify

me
;

to be borne
it

upon your own Right


long for
if
;

Hon. shoulders
be the price of

is

that

that

must

my

affections

you would only go

down upon your hands and


" Cruel, cruel
girl
!

knees."

surely

you are

jesting,

you

mean
in the

to

make
;

a fool of me.

Ask any
;

other favour

world

only spare
to

would not wish


sider

my

dignity

my feelings I know you make me a laughing post conmy official character I am a


:

minister."

" So then," cried Adelaide, " you would permit


these cold haughty maxims of yours to stand in

the way of true passion and devotedness to the


object of your love
:

how can

it

make you ridiculous


?

when

there

is

no one to see you

vow

eternal
;

si-

lence on the subject, as you

may

well believe

and

the pretty birds and squirrels in the trees above us


will surely tell

no

tales."

The poor
time
;

lover stood in great perplexity

some

till,

at length,

the violence of his

passion

mounting

into the sublime, quite

overpowered his

sense of the ridiculous, and he bent

down upon

his

hands and knees with

all

the grace and agility of


little

an octogenarian, though he was


sixty.

more than
and bitted
reins,

The lady then took a


;

silk sash,

him very dexterously

and next seizing the

she lightly sprang upon his back, almost convulsed


with laughter, so that she had

much

difficulty in

keeping her

seat.

344

GERMAN NUVELS.

Scarcely, however, had he crawled at a snail-Hke

pace, a few yards,

when suddenly the King sprang

from his ambush among the shrubs, and confronted his old minister upon his servile career. "Ah, ah !" quoth he, " such scenes are worth my whole
treasury in gold
!

To

see such a philosopher


fair

and

avowed enemy of the


hobby-horse.
It is

sex converted into an old

too

much

too much,"

and he

held his sides for laughter.

The

old Privy Counsellor gave a shriek of hor-

ror, just as if

the sky had fallen, at his sight.

Yet,

after a long struggle, he tried to force a smile,

and

exclaimed, in a tone of mingled chagrin and good-

humour, "

know
knew
if
it

am

ridiculous

enough, but

never before
I

the enchanting power of love.


the
little

see

now

that

imp spares us

in our

youthful days,
us in old age.

is

only to
jest
;

make a

greater fool of

So

and laugh,

my
;

Prince, to

your heart's content

you must
:

find

some other
I

court preacher in future


"

have done

have sur'

rendered without discretion to love

that

mighty

conqueror of hearts.'

TALES BY M.

E.

ENGEL.

Dr. (Mor. Erdm.) Engel, professor of philosophy,

and towns-deacon

at

Planen,

was born
is

at that

place in the year 1767.


prize poet
in

His

name
for

mentioned as
author
of

that university, and

the

Moral Tales, Tables, and Mottos

Youth, &c. &c.

He

ranks in the
;

list

of the celebrated writers of


his

modern Germany

though

lighter productions
in

do not appear to so much advantage


nal and national point of view.
are spirited

an origi-

few, however,

and elegant.

Q 5

34G

GERMAX

novi:ls.

ENGEL.
THE AXTI-SPECULATOR.

There was
a

once a very reputable citizen of the

name of Mr. Joseph Teinne.

He was

at

one time
;

man

of considerable

landed property

Avhich,

upon symptoms of
converted
interest of

agricultural depression, he

had

mto a

large

monied

capital,
live.

upon the

which he contrived to
fall

Thus

se-

cured against a
as

of prices, he began to indulge,

he grew

older, a violent antipathy to all species

of gambling, and speculation of every kind.


the mere word, with
relatives

Indeed,

the whole

of

its

dangerous

and

derivatives,

whether
effect

bulls or bears,

mines or consols, had such an

upon

his

mind,

that he sometimes appeared to be labouring under

a temporary derangement of his

affairs

He
in the
;

had, con-

some time

before, deposited a large

sum

cern of one of his most particular friends

but this
it,

he now very suddenly withdrew, and along with


*

of

We would

beg leave humbly, to recommend the very


this

edifying example above afforded us, to the consideration of

monied men just


In particular, to

at

period,

upon the Stock Exchange.

all rich

mercantile fathers,
speculative

whom we

advise

to disinherit all the

more

membors

of their family.

E^TGEL.

347

course, the particular friendship subsisting between

the parties

his

friend

having happened,

in

the

simphcity of his heart, to communicate some excellent speculation

which he had

in view.

The same

feeling extended even to his politics

he heard that the French Government, whose cause

he had before advocated on


tated

all

occasions, medi;

some speculative views upon Egypt

and

forthwith he changed sides, and went over to the


Allies.

He

likewise refused to subscribe a single

sixpence for the erection of a


in

new parsonage house,

the good parish of St. Paul's, merely on account

of the

Rector having mentioned his intention of


it

adding to

a Speculum or Observatory (for in fact

he was a much better astronomer than preacher), a


plan to which the rest of the parishioners had consented.

He

next determined to

make

his will, while

of

sound mind, being desirous of leaving the whole of


his property to his
fellow, at th

nephew, a steady, plodding young

expense of his two sons, who were

of a very different disposition.


transfer the

To make such a

more

sure,

he went to consult a certain


celebrity,

Doctor Glau, of legal

who
:

replied to his

singular communication as follows

" But have you maturely considered the matter,

my

dear Mr. Teinne


strong

such a measure ought


it,

to

possess

arguments to back

or

the

34S

(iER.MAN NOVELS.

validity of your will


after

might be brought

in

question

your departure.

Yes, Sir, even wholly set

aside."

"

What

do you imagine

my

will

can ever be

invalidated

by

my own
will

sons ?"
it

cried

Mr. Teinne,

indignantly

" let

them do

at their risk."
of,

" But you


friend
;

be safely disposed
first,

my

good

they will bury you


's

Mr. Teinne."

" Tlien there


that
is

an end

to all subordination,

and

the difficulty

first
!

bury

me

and then go

and invalidate
measures, Mr.
cordingly
;

my

will

Glau,

But we must take some we must take measures ac-

and I trust you will be able to provide." " Why," replied Mr. Glau, '' you must give good

reasons for refusing to bequeath your property to

your own children; that

is

all.

Show
I

us some

sound, conclusive arguments.

" Undoubtedly

most
;

assuredly

can,"

inter-

rupted Mr. Teinne, " and you will find them well-

founded too. Doctor

as

know

to

my

cost."

Here

he greatly resembled the Knight of the

Rueful

Countenance

he adjusted his velvet cap again and


agitation, while his

again, with a sort of nervous


face continued
to lengthen as

he pronounced the
sons. Doctor,
all

names of
must
let

his sons.

" Yes,

my

if

you into the entire secret of

our quarrels
rascals,

and miseries

my sons,

young headstrong

as they are, have ventured to speculate. Sir."

349

" Speculate
Glau.

and what of

all

that ?" repeated

"

What

of

all

that

what of
:

all

that

Why,

Doctor, you surprise


clined to speculate,
fession
?

me

fancy you are not inin

are you, Doctor,

your pro-

Do

you belong to the company, Doctor,


?"
!

a speculator "
bid
I
!

hey

A
not

speculator
I.

no, Mr. Teinne, the Lord for-

assure

am no castle-builder no aeronaut. Sir, you. I am a plain man, one who likes to


I

follow his nose, and walk

upon

solid

ground,

Mr.

Teinne." "

And Heaven
!

long preserve you, then, in so

noble a resolution

and no

fool will

catch you ha;

zarding your neck for his amusement


silly

like

that

adventurer

who conceived

that pretty piece of

speculation,

you know, of transporting himself to


say no more

England across the channel


" Say no more
! !

Mr. Teinne,

grow

dizzy at the mere mention of the subject; seized

with an involuntary ague

fit.

Pray

let

us confine
to dis-

ourselves to the present question.


inherit

You wish
last will

your sons

very good
in

but what valid objec-

tions

have you to insert


?"

your

and

testa-

ment againsb them


Doctor
to

" ^Vhat, but their infernal rage for speculation,


!

Their ungovernable

folly,

which leads them

imagine they are greater wiseacres than their

"

."JSO

GERMAN NOVELS.
and meddle with adventures they do not
in

fathers,

the least understand.

The

truth

is,

Sir,

they have

clean overstepped the bounds of moderation and com-

mon-sense
ture,

such

little

as they received from na-

and

to

which they ought to have confined their

active labours

and exertions.

They
I

left their

native

sphere

and

have heard

my
!"

eldest son, as

dare say you must

" Oh, yes

interrupted the Counsellor


to

" that
his

he was compelled
affairs

decamp

he was
in

mean

were deranged."
;

" Right, exactly so


pose the
lent
evil

but whence do you sup?

originated

He was

an excelprofitable

concern
;

a
it

very

desirable

very

one. Sir

and
it.

only wanted tolerable good mathe whole of his mother's joinhis father, in

nagement.
ture
;

He had
Sir
;

and a very pretty capital from


his

addition to
able

connexions were as respect-

as heart could wish,

and he had a host of


Respectable,

customers and chapmen at his beck.


did
I

say? nay, between friends, Counselloi, his


were always snug
;

transactions

his

drafts

upon

houses were sure


to deal with

cocksure.
;

Never required. Sir,


no, nor with

Polish Jews

Russians

either."

" Then

how

the deuce

came
? it
it

it

to pass,

Mr.

Teinne, that your son failed


really very difficult.

must have been

Indeed,

surprised both

me

NGEL.

351

and the commercial world


?"
it

at large not a little


;

his

establishment was not expensive

pray

how could

he contrive

it

" Contrive
head
full

with a vengeance

he had his
;

of prodigious speculations

quite prodilive
;

gious, Sir.

He might have

continued to

long
but,

and happily with

his family, here, in

Europe

no forsooth, he must go and invest the whole of his


readv cash in lands
;

exported

it,

Sir,

by

all

that

's

mad,

to

North America, upon


!

speculation."

" Indeed
his

do you mean that he actually sent

money

to

North America ?" cried the Counsellor,

amazed. " I have a shrewd suspicion he did


likewise

and he
shortly

speculated

upon paying a

visit

after to his fair

and flourishing principality."


?

" Principality, say you, Mr. Teinne


prise

you sur-

me

!"
it
:

" Yet

is

true,

Mr. Glau

nothing

less

than a

principality

do you suppose

his grand,

compre?

hensive schemes would grasp at any thing less

He

wished to purchase vast domains

a track of
;

country embracing about thirty square miles

much

more
of.

in fact

than

many

principalities

have to boast

Had

there only been one living being to every

square mile, or even a single blade of corn, enough


to afford a full hearty

meal to a country mouse,

there might have been as


it is
:

some ground
lifted

for

hope

"

and he

up

his eyes.

"52

GERMA"N- NOVELS.

"
sellor.

It is

a chapter of miracles," replied the Coun-

"

chapter of accidents, dismal accidents, you


citi-

should have said, Mr. Glai," replied the old


zen.
evil.

" At least
Sir,

it

was no miracle

to

me

for
;

the

was hereditary on

his mother's side

she

was

specu/alive,

you understand me.


I

sore af-

fliction,

Sir;

but, in general,

believe folly

and

madness are found to be hereditary." " What, Mr. Teinne," replied the Counsellor
parted lady ?"

" do you really mean to allude to your dear, de"


I

Why,
you

Doctor, what would you have


that,

me

say

tell

though my

eldest
for

son
in

fancied

himself somewhat hampered

room

Europe,

the world ing

itself

appeared too narrow for the aspir-

intellect of

my

deceased wife.
in

She was so
or

completely absorbed

eternal

speculations,

speculations upon eternity, that our whole domestic

economy was neglected

in fact,

was deprived

of every matrimonial comfort during this


ful
tity

my

pain

pilgrimage upon the earth.

The odour

of seme

was so great that

it

completely overpowered

me." " There now, Mr. Teinne,

can sympathize with

you
the

my

late dear wife

being likewise afflicted in

manner you
" So be
it
!

describe."

and Heaven

rest their souls," said

Mr. Teinne.

" Heaven's
sellor,

will
!

be done

!"

rejoined the

Coun-

"

Amen

To

return to our question, the

case of your youngest son, the Aulic Counsellor,

Mr. Teinne, gives


I

me

the most uneasiness.

For,

if

am

rightly informed,

he has obtained

for himself

some reputation."
" Reputation, with
a vengeance
!

Luckily,

have been undeceived on this point by our good

Dean.

He

has

let

me

into the
!

meaning of
as
it is.

this

reputation

reputation forsooth such


set of
I

To
is

attract the admiration of a

raw juveniles

no very

difficult affair,

as

dare say you know,

counsellor.

But

let

me

see

him win golden


;

opi-

nions from wise men.

Listen to me, Doctor

and

remember
let
it

it

is

only between friends.

So do not

take wind
fools,

among

babblers,

and become a
people in
I

feast for

town

fools,

of

all

the

world

let it rest, let it rest.

But, as

say, the

Dean

of our chapter showed


;

me
I

one of his publi-

cations the other day

and

had no sooner got

through

it

than

was quite alarmed, confounded.

Doctor

!"

"

How
!

so

alarmed
I

Mr. Teinne."
it

" Yes

and well

might,

contained such innever have

conceivable

nonsense

such

as could

entered the skull of a sensible man,

or,

indeed of

any man.

For the young gentleman not only finds


for him, like his

Europe too narrow

elder brother

354

GERMAN XOVELS.
like his
is

or this long vale of tears, ther


;

more pious mo;

the whole creation


faculties

too

little

and

his in-

finite

have invented a system

mundane system
"

which engrosses
my
"
I

trans-

his

whole soul."
I

He

is far

beyond

comprehension, then,

confess," said the Counsellor.

cannot imagine

ail

never heard of such a system


it

what

sort of

one can "

be

V
!

What

sort, forsooth

As

far as I

can gather,

his brother's

American

tracts are nothing to this

tract of his.

They

are Elysian Fields

compared with
His bro-

his invisible world

of his
solid

own

creation.

ther

still

sticks
:

to

ground, though not very


air to

productive

he has a sun to shine,


to

breathe,
;

and things

revive his

animal functions

but

this poor devil has

reduced himself to such a state

of absolute destitution and forlorn hope, that he

does not allow himself so

much

as a bare inch of

space, or a second of time, or a particle of earth,

which he does not


bankrupt reason."

first

borrow from his beggared,

" This

is

quite unintelligible to
if

me

give

me

case, something gratia exempli,

you please," said


can recollect,"

Mr. Glau.
" To be sure
said the other.
I

will,

as far as

" For instance, you perhaps ima-

gine that this said corporeal substance, you are at the trouble of carrying about with you,
is

a body."

355

"

To be

sure

do."
flatter yourself that
;

" You perhaps farther

you

have a head, Mr. Counsellor


legs
;

a heart, hands, and

you have laboured


How
the devil
!

at least

under that delu-

sion."

"
argue

surely he

would not

try to

me out of my senses." " He would though," cried Mr.


;

Teinne, with

a woeful expression of face

" he would convince " not

you that you had no sense at all." " Would he so ?" exclaimed the lawyer
in

a hurry."

" Yes, he would


self; that
it

tell

you not
a dream.

to deceive yourIt

might be

all

may be your
;

dream, or that of some other person


to the

it

comes

same thing

for

you cannot by any means

make

yourself sure of your existence."

" Heaven
lawyer, " can

have mercy upon

us

!"

cried

the

my young

learned friend be in his

senses ?"

"

A philosopher
!"

to be out of his senses, indeed

the Lord forbid

cried

Mr. Teinne

"

it

is

only

your idea.
life
;

Still

you must not actually despair of

for as long as
I

my

son exists, he will supply

you,

doubt not, with some scheme or other to

preserve vitality."

"

Upon my word,"

replied

the

counsellor,

" such a delusion looks very


alarmins:."

serious,

not to say

35

ERMAN VOVELS.
suspect
in

" Indeed, you are right there,

but

you know he has only


earnest,

to

cogitate

downright

and he can soon bring us

haps, not his wits

though, perhe make

into existence."

" But

am

an old

man

will

me

anew

?"

" Oh, he can perform far greater miracles than


that.

Why,

Sir, in this

manner he can
is

create sun

and moon and


his thought,

stars

every thing

the offspring of
his

and so he can create you or

own
little

father.

His reasoning powers resemble the

box

in possession of old grannum Nixus.* " Let him only whirl it round sufficiently, and

make a few
I

incantations,

and he

will

make

ajiy

thing bounce out of his pericranium that he pleases.

have a shrewd suspicion that he

will

one time

or other be inventing a small

bedlam

for himself,

where, should his father happen to see him, he will

fancy or dream that he


guish."

is

overwhelmed with an-

" Indeed, Mr. Teinne, your case


trying:

is

peculiarly

you are greatly


will

to be pitied.

But what

does your son imagine

become of
"

this

mundane
said

system after his departure ?"


*

Why,"

Mr.

Alluding to a description of

its

powers contained in a
of the Fountain."

story of Musaeus, entitled

" The

Nymph

Ed.

357

Teinne,
say, that

''

he

will

perhaps think that people

will

it

did once exist."


;

" Very strange

one would fancy

it

made

of

more durable

stuff."

" Yet we need apprehend nothing.


create

He can
and
you whirl

a fresh

generation

of necromancers,

teach them

how

to sport their reason, as

round a dice box."

"So
on
its

in that

ancient footing, which


I

way every thing may be continued To is what I wish.


had some scruples
at

speak frankly, Mr. Teinne,


first

as to the propriety of cutting off your sons


will
;

in

your

but

now

find that

property could
If

not be safely entrusted into such hands.


please,
I will

you

proceed to execute your will further."


friend,

"

Do
it is

so,

good Doctor," replied his

" and

when

finished,

and the witnesses are


sealed, let

in readiness,

and the whole signed and


pen when
lamity of
it

my

death hap-

will, I shall

be contented.

For the ca-

my

sons has rather embittered

my

exist-

ence

one dunning

my

ears with his

American spe-

culations,

and the other with speculations upon

the invisible world.

One has
I

lost all

he had

in the

world

and the

other,

find,

has cruelly deprived

himself of the small portion of


nature srave him."

common

sense which

358

GERMAN NOVELS.

TOBY WILT.
One
cial

of the chief ornaments of a Httle provinhis native

town,

place,

flourished Mr,

Toby

Wilt.
travel,

At no period had he evinced a

desire to

and never, on any occasion, exceeded his


hamlets.

prescribed limits round the adjacent


spite of this,

In

however, he knew more of the world


travelled a great deal farther,
their

than

many who had

and some who had expended the best part of


fortune on a fashionable trip to Paris or Italy.

He

was possessed of a
and

rich

fund of

little

anecdotes of

the most useful class, which he had obtained by observation,


edification.

retailed for his

own and

his friends'

And though

these showed no great stretch

of genius or invention, they possessed considerable


practical merit,

and were, and two.

for

the most part, reto-

markable

for

coming before company, coupled

gether, always two

Among

his

acquaintance was a careful young


Till,

gentleman of the name of

a great admirer of

Mr. Toby Wilt


of observations.

for his

known prudence, and


one occasion,
he

stock

On

ventured

to express his high opinion of them, to

which his
"

old

friend

replied, in his

stuttering

style,

Ha

KNEL.

35

hem

what,
all

do you indeed think me such a wise-

acre, then ?"

" Why,

the world says so, Mr. Wilt

and

should be glad to become your pupil."

" Would you


easy.
If

so,

young man
to study the

Nothing more

you really wish to become a prudent youth,

in fact,

you have only

conduct and de-

portment of fools."
" In what manner do you mean ?" " What manner by trying to act differently, to
!

be sure." "

May
I

beg an anecdote, or example,

for the

sake of illustration

V
was a young man, there resided
old
sort

"

believe

can accommodate you with one,


I

Mr.

Till.

When

in this

town a Mr. Veit, an


a meagre and

mathematician,
of personage.

rather
I

morose

used often to see him walking about, muttering to

himself as he
salute

went along, and never stopping


his neighbours

to

any of
less

and acquaintance
in

much

would he look them

the face and

converse with

them

being always too earnestly

engaged
tions.

in solving the

problem of his own perfecTill,

Now what

do you suppose, Mr.

that

people were in the habit of saying of him ?"

" Most probably that he was a very shrewd,


wise old gentleman," said Mr.
Till.
;

"

No

you are somewhat on the wrong side

360

GKll-MAK NOVELS.

they called him an old


think within myself
general,

fool.

So, so

used to

for this sort of title,

however

was not
I

at all to

my

taste

must take
I

care

how

imitate
;

my

old friend Mr. Veit.

see

that will never do


full

one must not appear to be too


it is

of oneself.

Perhaps

not well-bred, at
I

all

events, to go muttering Avith one's self;

see
to

we
our

must be more
neighbours.
ject,

sociable,

and talk a

little

Let
;

me
I

hear your notion on the sub-

Mr.

Till

did

judge rightly?"
;

" Oh, indisputably


right."

think you were

in

the

" Nay,
so, as

am

not so sure of that; not exactly

you

will find.

For we had another genius,

a finical kind of personage, and a dancing-master,

the very converse of the old postulating mathematician


;

and yet he did not please

though he used

to stare in every body's face as

he skipped along.

He was
to him,

glad to talk to every one


as long as their

who would
lasted.

listen

patience

Well,
to

Mr.

Till,

and what do you suppose people used

say of him."

" Most likely they would


sort of fellow
;

call

him a wild, merry

somewhat of a bore withal."


they called him a
title
!

" There you are not so very wide of the mark,


Mr.
Till
;

for

fool.

You
this

see he
merit.
is

won
Here

the same
's

by a very opposite kind of


thought to myself
;

for us

odd

3G1

enough.

What must
to
It is plain

one do? how

in

the world

must one contrive

win the reputation of a wise

man
Till,

one must take neither Mr. Veit,

nor Mr. Slight for our model.

No,
full

first

of

all,

Mr.

you must look persons

in

the face and

salute

them

like the

dancing-master, and then you


yourself,

must have your eyes upon


riously
;

and

reflect se-

talk with your neighbours, like

Mr. Slight,
like

and think of your own


Veit.

affairs afterwards,

Mr.

That was my mode of arguing, Mr. Till. I compounded the gentleman. Sir people called me a
:

prudent long-headed fellow


of the mystery."

and

this

is

the whole

On

another occasion, our prudent citizen revisit

ceived a of Flau.

from a young merchant of the name


and, after

He, too, came to consult;

making some wry faces, he began to lament the


extent of his losses and misfortunes.
'

Well," replied old Witt, giving him a tap on

the shoulder, " and

what does all


She

this

amount

to

" You must, be on the


fortune

alert,
is

Sir,

and pursue
;

more

diligently.

a shy bird

and

you must be on the look-out,


" So
all
I

like a

sportsman."

have,

my dear Sir, this


fairly tripped

long time past, but

to

no purpose.
till
I

One unlucky blow followed


up by the
arms,
heels.
rest

another,

was
I

For the future,


quietly at

shall

fold

my

and

home."
II

VOL. IV.

362
" In
;

GERMAN NOVELS.
tliat

you are wrong again, young gentlebe on the look-out,


I tell

man you must


head."

you

you

need only to have a care how you carry your


" How I carry my head !" repeated Mr. Flau " what do you mean, Mr. Witt, by that ?" " Only what I say ; you must have a care how
;

you carry your head, and the


course.

rest

will

follow of

Let

me

explain how.
in

When my left-hand
new house,

neighbour was employed

building his

the whole street was paved with bricks and beams

and rubbish, not

very' pleasant to pass over.


to

Now

one day, who should happen


fashionable alderman.
high, and thus he

be going that way

but our worthy mayor, Mr. Trick, then a young

He

always carried his head


along, with his

came skipping
his side,
;

arms dangling by
towards
the

and
the

his nose elevated

clouds

yet

next

moment he
;

found himself sprawling upon the ground


contrived to trip up his

he had

own

heels, to break

one of

his legs, arid obtain the advantage of limping to

the end of his days, as you

may

often

see.
?"
'

Do
Take

you take

do you comprehend me, Mr. Flau


"

" Perhaps you allude to the old proverb,

heed not to carry your head too high.' " To be sure, but you must likewise contrive not
to carry
it

too low

faults

on both sides

If

you

ENtiEL.

363

have borne

it

too high, don't bear

it

now

too low

you comprehend

me

and you

will

do

yet.

" Not long afterwards, Mr. Schale, the poet, was


passing the same dangerous way, Mr. Flau.

He

was, perhaps, spouting verses, or brooding over his


res angttstm doyni but he I know not which came jogging forwards with a woful aspect, eyes
: '

bent on earth,' and a stooping, slouching gait, as


if

he would be glad
Sir.

to

lower

himself into

the

ground,
ropes
;

Well
it

he walked over one of the

smack

went, and one of the great beams


his

came tumbling about


ing above.
killed
;

ears from the scaffoldto be

But he was too miserable a dog


;

he unluckily escaped
devil,

but was so

terrified

and nervous, poor


fainted

with the shock, that he

away,

fell

sick,

and was confined

to his

garret for several weeks.

"
Flau

Do you comprehend my meaning yet, Mr. How would you carry your head when you

passed

V
!

"
sure."

would keep

it

in just equilibrium, to

be

" True

we must not

cast our eye too


it

ambi-^

tiously towards the clouds, nor fix

too demurely

upon the ground.


or before us,

Whether we look above, around,


let

Mr. Flau,

us do

it

in

a calm,
shall get

becoming
on
in

sort of

manner,

and then we

the world, and no accidents will be likely

364

GERMAJI NOA-ELS.

to befal us.

Let us preserve our equanimity


?

you

comprehend me

Good morning, Mr. Flan."


occasion,

On

third

a certain Mr. Wills

waited upon his friend Mr. Witt, for the purpose


of borrowing a
little

sum

of

money
in

to complete

some

speculation he
It is quite

had

hand.
;

"

to old

a prudent step very sure," he said Mr. Witt, " though I am sensible it is not one
;

of your lucrative" speculations


to

but, as

it

happens
it

come very apropos,

should like to turn


it."

to

account, and

make

the most of

Old Witt did rot much


lutation,
''

relish this style of sait

and seeing whither

would lead

how much money, do you think, will serve your turn ?" " It is nothing much of a sum, a mere trifle
Pray,
;

my

dear Mr. Wills," inquired he, "

some hundred dollars will suffice." " So if it be no more, I will


!

directly

comply

with your request.


I

Indeed,

to
I

show how much


will

have your interest at heart,


else,

also present

you with something


is

which, between ourselves,

worth more than a thousand dollars."


"

Ah

pray

explain

yourself,

my
;

dear Mr.

Witt."

" Nay

it

is

only a short story

but

it

will

serve our turn.

In

my

younger days,
for

had rather

an eccentric kind of

man

my

neighbour, a Mr.

365

Grell.

He had

continually a certain cant phrase

at his tongue's end,

which at
!

last

proved his ruin."

You " You


casually

"

surprise
shall.

me

should like to
his

know

it."

When

any of

acquaintance used
'

to accost

him,
;

observing,

Well, Grell,

how does
by your
that V
Grell,

business go on

last

bargain

'

how much did you clear Pshaw he would say, a


!'
*

mere trifle some

fifty

dollars or so, but


:

what of
'

Then again when he was asked

Well,

how much are you minus by the ruptcy V Pshaw he would answer,
'

last
'

bankis

!'

it

not
per

worth speaking of;


cent.'

a mere
Grell

trifle,

some

five

Now, though

was a wai-m man

in his

day,
his

can assure you, this cursed foolish phrase of

brought him to ruin.

He was

at length

com-

pelled to

decamp.

Sir,

bag and baggage.


Mr, Wills, which you
loan of one hun-

"

What was
I

the sum,

stated ?"

"

think

requested

the

dred dollars."
''

Exactly so

but

my memory
I

is

growing

treacherous.

Well, Mr. Wills, but

had another

neighbour,

one Mr. Tomms,


sort

corn-dealer.

means of another

of saying, did that

By man
its

build the fine mansion you see yonder, with


offices

all

and warehouses

to boot,

Sir.

What

say

you

?"

R 3

3C)Q

GERMAN NOVELS.
"
I

say

it

is

very strange, indeed, Mr. Witt

have a great curiosity to hear this second phrase." " You shall, Mr. Wills. Why, when his friends
accosted him,
ness proceed
?
'

Well, Mr.

Tomms, how does


last

busi-

what cleared you by your

con I

cern
did
!'

'

good round sum, a hundred, that


high glee.

was

his invariable answer, at the


in

same time

you might see that he was

When
What
lost
is

they perceived on the other hand that he was low,


very low in spirits, they would inquire
the matter, Mr.
'

'

Tomms ? how much


!

have you
;

No

joke indeed
I

a good round

sum

some

fifty

dollars,

assure you.'

Now
that

this
;

man began
I

his

career with very small capital


before,

but, as

told

you
all

he has
I

built

large

house

with
it.

its offices,

say,

and warehouses round

Now,

Mr. Wills, which of these two phrases seems best


suited to your taste

V
old

"

Why
not

the last of them, Mr. Witt, of course."


replied

"Yet,"
does

Witt,

"

this

Mr.

Tomms

quite

suit

me.

He had

the knack

of saying

good round sum,


his

to be sure, even

when he was paying


Then,
I

poor-rates

or his taxes.

think, he ought to have employed, like a

humane and
neighbour
of.'

loyal

man, the saying of


trifle,

my

other

'

a inere
is,

nothing worth speaking

The

truth

Mr. Wills, that as they were


I

both

my

near neighbours,

carefully preserved both

3G7

their phrases,

and apply them according


;

to the cir-

cumstances of time and place


like

sometimes speaking

Mr. Grell, and at others like Mr. Tomms." " Not so with me," cried Mr. Wills " I admire
; ;

Mr. Tomms' phrase I do from my soul, Sir." " What was your demand the sum you have

occasion

for,

Mr. Wills

?"

"A
dollars
:

good round sum of money

one
!"

hundred

no trifle, my dear Mr. Witt " There you talk like a man of sense
:

very

prudent man, Mr. Wills

you have

really learned

your monied catechism very well.

Your answer
to
rechnest

was quite
really

correct.

Had you come


trifle,
I

only a small

might perhaps have


it

listened to

you

but, as

you obsen'e
I

is

a good

round sum, allow

me

to pause.

wish you a good


thus amused

morning, Mr. Wills."

But, having

himself, old Mr. Witt lent

him the sum of money.

'

368

GERMAN NOVELS.

LADY ELIZABETH

HILL.

There was formerly a wealthy young widow, who

formed the chief attraction of a small provincial

town

in

Swabia, where she had lately taken up her

residence, to the no slight perplexity of the inhabitants


a
;

for she puzzled

them exceedingly

in gaining

knowledge of her character.


;

She was never what

she appeared to be

she w^as constantly playing a

double game, or suddenly assuming some new shape


or

some

fresh pursuit.
aulic

During the period that a

certain

counsellor had resided at the

same

place, being a

man

of taste and letters, her ladytill

ship was occupied from morning

night in read-

ing novels and romances

but the

moment he took

himself

off,

she

bestowed

her \vhole admiration

upon one of the medical


of
all

faculty, a great frequenter


;

kind of routs, assemblies, and festivals


all

her

books were

thrown

aside,

and she had not a movisiting,

ment

to spare

from dancing,

and

dress.

Shortly afterwards came a pious dignitary of the

church, appointed to the post of superintendant by


the reigning Prince himself; so that the town had

never before been honoured by so very reverend a


personage.
Li a day or two, her young ladyship
attired
in

was observed modestly

a sober suit of

ENGEL.

3G9

mourning; no more music and dancing was heard


in her house,
all

and

it

became the blessed

resort of

kind of saintly characters.

The change was


that
all

this

time so very remarkable,


place

the

professional gentlemen in the


it;

were struck with


for so

they were at a loss to account

sudden a revolution, and canvassed the sub-

ject at

some length.
:

There was a great diversity of


school rector
(a

opinions

First, the

man

of wit
in

and very good


ship
ther

parts,

which he displayed

one

of the literary journals) was positive that her lady-

had no character
fit

at

all

that she

was

nei-

for
little

poet nor a

novelist,

and that she


in
fact,

was as

adapted

to the stage;

in

literary point of view, she

was good

for nothing.

Secondly, the superintendant, with his spiritual


friends,

hazarded more speculations upon the sub-

ject

the theatre and the novels forming no part

of their lucubrations, they doubted not but that

Lady Elizabeth had,


minded
and
;

at

one time, been carnally

devoted to the perusal of ungodly books,

to other

pomps and
into
at

vanities of the world, she

was thus betrayed


ing

open acts of impiety, havdances

been

seen

public

and

festivals,
felt

the very gayest of the gay.

At length she

the
to

grace
resist,

of God,

which she had been too wise

and they doubted not her conversion was

sincere.

370

GERMAN NOVELS.
But
it

was now the doctor's turn


concerns of
as

and

fixing

his eyes

upon the animal system of her ladyship,


the

leaving

her soul

quite
said,

out
to

of the

the question,

he

presumed,

he

office of neither critic

nor divine, his opinion was,


in the
first

that

Lady Elizabeth had,


by hard
day
;

place, hurt

her constitution

reading

and studying

romances
tion

in the

and secondly, by dissipa-

and

revelling

at night.

He

added,

that

course

of bleeding
in

and frequent

use of mineral
sei^vice

waters
to her.

the spring,

might be of great

These gentlemen had thus adopted


peculiar systems,

their

own
as
if

much
their

in the

same manner
any object

they had provided themselves with false glasses,

which prevented
but reflected
it

seeing

clearly,

only in one light and colour.

Nor
ac-

was

this all

for the rest of the citizens, conscious

of the weakness of their

own

organs, Avere
in

customed

to

repose

implicit

confidence

those

of their superiors.

Each contented himself with


swayed by motives

embracing one or other of the previous opinions, as

he happened to be more or
of private interest.

less

Thus, the bookbinder, who had cleared a good

sum by equipping
dress,
at

for

her

ladyship a library of
folios,
all

religious works, quartos

and

in a

superb

once declared himself

in

favour of the

NGEL.

371

clergy,

and very sincerely congratulated the lady


were
for-

upon her conversion. But the linen-draper, whose


profits

merly very considerable, finding his custom dwindled


almost to nothing, declared for the doctor's more
uncivil

hypothesis, and

magnified a slight

fit

of

religious

melancholy into downright insanity.


;

Next came the shoemaker

and he having

lost

only about one half of his former earnings since her


ladyship had ceased dancing, embraced the more

moderate opinion

of the

rector,

lamenting

only

that so excellent a lady as her ladyship should be


so very changeable in
as

her plans, and not so

much

know her own mind.


There was only one
tailor,

and that was the

man in the whole place, who having never injured


use of

the natural strength of his optics by the


glasses,

and having had no dealings with her lady-

ship, as she

was accustomed

to wear

Dutch

linen,

showed more sagacity than


ticians

all

the rest of the poli-

put together.
the matter in a clear light
;

He saw

and one

Sunday evening, when these worthy

citizens of the

second class were assembled at a tavern, their usual


place of resort after service, the bookbinder broke

out into this

pious exclamation

" The grace of

God
Lady

is

said to have

wTOught miracles upon good

Hill."

37^

GERMAN^ NOVELS.

The
all

tailor positively contradicted

such an asserat

tion, declaring that there

was no kind of grace


This brought as
;

concerned

in the business.

flat

a denial again from the bookbinder


retorted

while the other


to

that she had plainly lost her senses,

which the shoemaker agreed, adding, that she did


not so

much
is

as

know her own mind.


and
if

" The lady," he continued, " knows very well

what she

doing

you had

all

of you the

proper use of your eyes, you might perceive what


she
I
is

aiming

at, as w-ell as

she does, or as well

as

do.

"

When

the late aulic counsellor was here,

who

do you suppose was the most important personage


in the place
?

Why,
upon

the aulic counsellor to be sure.

" Now,

his departure,

when

the

doctor

came

to reside here,

who

then, pray, was the perall

son before w hose face one and

of us were accushats
?

tomed

to

bow and take


sure
!

off our

Why,

the

doctor to be

And

again,

when our good

prince was pleased to appoint a superintendant to


visit us,

who then was

the person
all
?

who took
is

place

of the doctor, and topped

that

had come before


the superin-

him
upon

in

dignity and grace

This
let

tendant himself; and only


all

us seriously reflect

these circumstances, and

we

shall

pre-

sently find,

my

friends, a

key to the whole of the

mystery."

373

The others laughed


they were
all

at

the tailor's joke,


little

and

of opinion that the

fellow

was a

much more shrewd long-headed


had given him
gave him no
credit for.
little

fellow than they

Their open admiration


as he

satisfaction,

was always

mightily pleased to find himself in the right.

with his

" Gentlemen," he continued, striking the table " genfist, and in a more assured tone
;
!

tlemen

say,

that

if

the good superintendant

should happen to die, and no one should be appointed in his place,


I
'11

wager

my

life

upon

it

we

shall see

her ladyship taking the side of the

doctor again."
This, however, did not exactly
luckily for the

come

to

pass,

superintendant

though

a fresh

revolution took place.

The

prince,

being a truly
his

godly prince,

recalled the

superintendant to

own

court,

in

order to

make him

his confessor.

Instead of him, however, he quartered a regiment

upon the town, the command of which was entrusted


to a major, a fine bold-looking fellow of his cloth.

In the course of a
vited
to dine

month the major was


Hill,

in-

with

Lady

and her ladyship

soon began to dine with other


major's.

company

at the

Now

the major's

mired

for her elegant appearance, especially

on horseback.
charms,

own lady was much adwhen Lady Hill, sensible of her own
on
s

took

airings

horseback, joined the

VOL. IV.

374

GERMAN NOVELS.

major's lady, and was dressed in a green habit richly

decorated with gold lace.

" That lady has no character, assuredly," cried


the rector, as she was riding past his school.

" Say, she

is

no longer under the influence of

grace," said a clergyman, just then returning from


visiting the sick.

" The lady now adopts a proper regimen, and


takes exercise," cried the doctor,
cigar.

as he

smoked

his

"

No

fear but she

will at last recover hei

health."

Thus did each of these self-complacent

gentle-

men way

try to justify his

particular system, in such a


it

that the very incidents which went to refute


it.

were employed to confirm


fortunate,

The

tailor

was more

and meeting Lady Hill upon the bleach" Behold what Vanity can do
!"

ing-green returning from her ride, he shook his

head, and said

The reader may perhaps be


the trivial character of
tlie

inclined to laugh at
it

my
;

story, but
if

has at least

merit of being true

and

he be an attentive

observer,

he

will

not want occasions on which to

apply some of the foregoing remarks.

THE END.

LONDON
IKINTED
IJY S.

AND

R.

BENTLEY, DORSET

SI

REET.

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