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2014 CATALOG

Degree Programs

Aurora (Denver Area)

Colorado Springs

Virtual Campus

Denver North

Degree Programs

Kansas City

Associate of Science in Accounting (p.137) Associate of Science in Business Administration (p.139) Associate of Science in Electronics Technology (p.167) Associate of Science in General Studies (p.177) Associate of Science in Health Administration Services (p.175) Associate of Science in Information Technology (p.212) Bachelor of Science in Accounting (p.107) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Accounting (p.110) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Business Development (p.112) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Finance (p.114) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Health Care Management (Virtual Campus) (p.116) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Human Resource Management (p.118) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration International Business (p.121) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Information Technology (Virtual Campus) (p.123) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Logistics and Supply Chain Management (p.125) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Management (p.127) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Marketing (p.129) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Organizational Behavior (p.131) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Project Management (Virtual Campus) (p.133) Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (p.160) Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (p.152) Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Forensic Investigation (p.154) Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Homeland Security and Emergency Management (Virtual Campus) (p.156) Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Human Services (p.158) Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (p.162) Bachelor of Science in Cybercrime Investigation (p.150) Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (p.164) Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management (p.169) Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management Health Informatics (p.171) Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Security Information Technology (p.180) Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Security Computer Science (p.183) Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Security Management (p.186) Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Management (p.178)

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Sioux Falls

Pueblo

Aurora (Denver Area)

Colorado Springs

Virtual Campus

Denver North

Degree Programs

Kansas City

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (p.189) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Data Management (p.191) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Network Management (p.194) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Security (p.196) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Software Application Programming (p.199) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Software Application Programming (Virtual Campus) (p.202) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Software Systems Engineering (p.205) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Software Systems Engineering (Virtual Campus) (p.208) Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Web Development (p.210) Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Virtual Campus) (p.173) Bachelor of Science in Project Management (p.135) Bachelor of Science in Psychology (p.214) Bachelor of Science in Psychology Consumer Behavior (p.217) Bachelor of Science in Psychology Organizational Behavior (p.219) Doctor of Computer Science (p.32) Doctor of Computer Science Big Data Analytics (p.35) Doctor of Computer Science Digital Systems Security (p.38) Doctor of Computer Science Enterprise Information Systems (p.41) Doctor of Computer Science Emerging Media (p.44) Doctor of Computer Science Information Assurance (p.47) Doctor of Management Environmental and Social Sustainability (p.11) Doctor of Management Global Leadership (p.14) Doctor of Management Healthcare Management and Leadership (p.17) Doctor of Management Homeland Security (p.20) Doctor of Management Leadership (p.23) Doctor of Management Organizational Development and Change (p.26) Doctor of Management Project Management (p.29) Master of Business Administration (p.50) Master of Business Administration Accounting (p.52) Master of Business Administration Entrepreneurship (p.54) Master of Business Administration Finance (p.56) Master of Business Administration Global Leadership (p.58) Master of Business Administration Healthcare Management (p.60)

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Sioux Falls

Pueblo

Aurora (Denver Area)

Colorado Springs

Virtual Campus

Denver North

Degree Programs

Kansas City

Master of Business Administration Human Resource Management (p.62) Master of Business Administration Logistics Management (p.64) Master of Business Administration Marketing (p.66) Master of Business Administration Operations and Supply Chain Management (p.68) Master of Business Administration Project Management (p.70) Master of Business Administration Technology Management (p.72) Master of Science in Accounting (p.74) Master of Science in Computer Engineering (p.85) Master of Science in Computer Science (p.87) Master of Science in Computer Science Computer Systems Security (p.88) Master of Science in Computer Science Database Systems (p.90) Master of Science in Computer Science Software Engineering (p.92) Master of Science in Criminal Justice (p.147) Master of Science in Criminal Justice Homeland Security (p.148) Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (p.94) Master of Science in Homeland Security (p.141) Master of Science in Homeland Security Cybersecurity Policy (p.143) Master of Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management and Public Health (p.145) Master of Science in Information Technology (p.95) Master of Science in Information Technology Data Management Technology (97) Master of Science in Information Technology Network Management (p.99) Master of Science in Information Technology Project Management (p.101) Master of Science in Information Technology Security Management (p.103) Master of Science in Management (p.76) Master of Science in Management Homeland Security (p.77) Master of Science in Management Information Systems Security (p.78) Master of Science in Management Information Technology and Project Management (p.80) Master of Science in Management Organizational Leadership and Change (p.82) Master of Science in Management Project Management (p.83) Master of Science in Systems Engineering (p.105)

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Students may be required to complete some or all coursework for the program via online delivery

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Sioux Falls

Pueblo

Notice to Arkansas Residents Not all programs are available for students and applicants residing in Arkansas. information.

Please contact an advisor for additional

Concentration versus Specialization Concentration: Concentrations provide students exposure to subject matter through a series of focused courses within a given area of study. Specialization: Specializations provide students with in-depth knowledge in a given area of expertise leading to potential career opportunities within the specified field of study. Programs in Teach-Out at Colorado Technical University Some programs of study no longer accept new enrollments at certain CTU campuses. Below is a list of programs that are currently in teach-out at specific campuses but are still offered at another CTU location(s) and/or on the Virtual Campus. Other programs of study are in teach-out across the university and additional information on those programs is available in the Discontinued Program Directory. Colorado Springs Campus Associate of Science in Health Administration Services Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management with a Concentration in Health Informatics Aurora (Denver Area) Campus Associate of Science in Health Administration Services Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management with a Concentration in Health Informatics Denver North Campus Associate of Science in Accounting Associate of Science in Health Administration Services Bachelor of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Finance Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Healthcare Management Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Human Resource Management Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in International Business Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Management Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Marketing Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Project Management Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Forensic Investigation Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Human Services Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management with a Concentration in Health Informatics Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Security with a Concentration in Information Technology
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Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Security with a Concentration in Computer Science Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Security with a Concentration in Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Data Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Network Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Security Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Software Application Programming Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Software Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Web Development Bachelor of Science in Project Management Master of Business Administration Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Accounting Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Entrepreneurship Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Finance Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Global Leadership Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Healthcare Management Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Human Resource Management Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Logistics Management Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Marketing Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Operations and Supply Chain Management Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Project Management Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Technology Management Master of Science in Accounting Master of Science in Computer Science Master of Science in Computer Science with a Concentration in Computer Systems Security Master of Science in Computer Science with a Concentration in Database Systems Master of Science in Computer Science with a Concentration in Software Engineering Master of Science in Criminal Justice Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Homeland Security Master of Science in Information Technology Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Data Management Technology Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Network Management Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Project Management Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Security Management Master of Science in Management Master of Science in Management with a Concentration in Homeland Security Master of Science in Management with a Concentration in Information Systems Security Master of Science in Management with a Concentration in Information Technology and Project Management Master of Science in Management with a Concentration in Project Management Master of Science in Systems Engineering

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North Kansas City Campus Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management Pueblo Campus Associate of Science in Accounting Associate of Science in Business Administration Associate of Science in General Studies Associate of Science in Health Administration Services Associate of Science in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Management Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Human Services Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management with a Concentration in Health Informatics Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Data Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Network Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Security Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Software Application Programming Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Software Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Web Development Master of Science in Business Administration Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Entrepreneurship Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Healthcare Management Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Human Resource Management Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Project Management Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Technology Management Master of Science in Information Technology Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Data Management Technology Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Network Management Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Project Management Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Security Management Master of Science in Management Sioux Falls Campus Associate of Science in Accounting Associate of Science in Business Administration Associate of Science in General Studies Associate of Science in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Finance Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Healthcare Management
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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Human Resource Management Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Management Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Marketing Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Project Management Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Forensic Investigation Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a Concentration in Human Services Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management with a Concentration in Health Informatics Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Data Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Network Management Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Security Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Software Application Programming Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Software Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Web Development Bachelor of Science in Project Management Master of Science in Business Administration Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Accounting Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Entrepreneurship Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Finance Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Healthcare Management Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Human Resource Management Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Project Management Master of Science in Business Administration with a Concentration in Technology Management Master of Science in Computer Science with a Concentration in Computer Systems Security Master of Science in Computer Science with a Concentration in Database Systems Master of Science in Computer Science with a Concentration in Software Engineering Master of Science in Criminal Justice Master of Science in Information Technology Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Data Management Technology Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Network Management Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Project Management Master of Science in Information Technology with a Specialization in Security Management Master of Science in Management Master of Science in Management with a Concentration in Information Technology and Project Management Master of Science in Systems Engineering

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Programs Delivered via CTUs Virtual Campus Associate of Science in Information Technology Master of Science in Systems Engineering University Learning Outcomes Upon completion of their respective degree programs, Colorado Technical University graduates will possess: 1. Effective oral and written communication skills 2. A solid foundation in mathematics and science 3. Skills in critical thinking and creative problem solving 4. Technological literacy and competency 5. Skills to work effectively with different cultures locally and internationally 6. A practical understanding of professional ethics 7. Tools to sustain continuous, personal improvement and professional growth Masters Program Learning Outcomes 1. Demonstrate technical fluency and application of knowledge that contributes to their chosen field and is supplemented by broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines. 2. Utilize analytical and critical thinking skills in order to synthesize, evaluate, and integrate concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis and problem solving. 3. Apply effective leadership strategy and skills in such areas as ethics, team building, project management and planning. 4. Demonstrate an ability to convey professionally in written and verbal communications complex content reflecting key negotiation, conflict management, team-building and multi-cultural management skills. Doctoral Program Learning Outcomes 1. Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines. 2. Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities. 3. Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society. 4. Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research. General Education Requirements All Undergraduate degree programs offered by the University contain general education requirements. Many programs prescribe General Education courses and courses listed in the Courses: General Education sections of each degree program requirements page should be used to determine a programs specific requirements. Students are offered certain elective options in the general education disciplines, although course prerequisite requirements must be adhered to in course sequencing. Please note that the requirements listed below are the minimum required for undergraduate programs, and some CTU programs may require additional General Education courses than what is listed below.

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English Composition ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition Writing and Research Humanities Select 2 of the following: HUMN205 Introduction to Fine Arts I HUMN250 World Cultures and Values LITR201 Literature a Reflection of Life LITR203 World Literature PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals UNIV104 Academic and Career Success* Social Sciences Select 1 of the following: HIST 101 Modern American History GOVT 201 American Government Select 2 of the following: SOCL120 Sociology: Understanding Groups SOCL340 Diversity in American Life PSYC101 Psychology: Understanding Individuals PSYC102 Introductory Psychology PSYC201 Human Development ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics Mathematics Consult program requirements to determine required math courses. Sciences Select 2 courses and 2 corresponding labs: BIO120 Anatomy and Physiology Essentials BIO125 Lab: Anatomy and Physiology SCI101 Introduction to Sciences SCI103 Lab: Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab: Environmental Science Student Success UNIV104 Academic and Career Success* UNIV201 Career Planning and Management Electives Select courses from the list below or any course above that was not taken previously: BIO110 The Human Body and Wellness ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy
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Credit Hours 4.5 4.5

Required Credit Hours 9 Required Credit Hours 9

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5

Required Credit Hours 13.5

Required Credit Hours 9 Required Credit Hours 12

4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4

Required Credit Hours 8.5 Required Credit Hours 9

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5


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*UNIV104 cross-listed for Student Success and Humanities. Students entering Colorado Technical University without previously earned college credit are required to complete UNIV104. Students entering with previously earned college credit and students residing in the states of Minnesota and Arkansas will be scheduled for an alternative Humanities course. Students residing in the states of Minnesota and Arkansas may not utilize HUMN250 or UNIV104 to fulfill Humanities requirements. College of Business and Management Mission Statement The mission of the College of Business and Management is to offer professional market-driven business degrees that build business competencies transferrable to all industries. The College of Business and Management accomplishes this mission by offering curriculum that aligns to industry standards, remains relevant, and builds practical skills applicable to the competitive global business environment.

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Doctor of Management
Environmental and Social Sustainability Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Environmental and Social Sustainability (DM-ESS) is designed to encourage the professional development of managers through mentoring, action research, and practical projects; enabling them to make key leadership contributions in their area of expertise. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines. Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities. Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society. Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research. Outcomes: Concentration Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge in ESS in current management theory Distinguish a leadership style based on ethical and philosophical consideration Employ management change in ESS through strategic design and research Predict future trends in ESS through effective research and qualitative methods Develop a plan for the implementation of the triple bottom line in an organization Apply systems thinking to environmental issues Analyze and facilitate an entire cycle in action research in a complex organization Formulate policy agendas for inter-organizational collaboration among businesses, government, and advocacy organizations in the field of ESS Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812 MGMT814 MGMT818 MGMT822 MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832 MGMT860 MGMT861 Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development Application of Action Research Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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MGMT862 MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Dissertation Research Process Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

Courses: Concentration ESS870 System Thinking and Transformative Social Media Systems in Sustainability ESS872 Organizational Performance: Economic, Ethical, Technological, Social Justice, and the Environment ESS874 Trans-Organizational Policy and Governance Related to Sustainability ESS876 Current Topics in Environmental and Social Sustainability ESS878 Advanced Career Strategies in Environmental and Social Sustainability Total Program Credits:

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy.

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CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. This program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive a Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director for Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Management
Global Leadership Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Global Leadership (DM-GL) is designed to encourage the professional development of managers through mentoring, action research, and practical projects, enabling them to make key leadership contributions in their area of expertise. The concentration in Global Leadership provides the student with in depth knowledge of management theories and the background to successfully participate in global organizations. Studies include concepts of culture, values, and ethics, which differ among all peoples. The students develop an understanding of the moral dilemmas, choices, and challenges in melding these in organizations from around the world. Their knowledge expands to an understanding and enhancement of their own leadership characteristics and those of other successful organizational staff. Strategic designs are reviewed to ensure organization structures are understood. In addition, they need to develop change plans with consideration for implementation. Students gain an understanding of global groups through participation in action research projects in domestic organizations with international dealings or foreign organizations. They also participate in exercises to enhance their ability to think strategically within global organizations. Global leadership demands a perception of the future and the students project a plan for successful world-wide organizations in this dynamic environment and beyond. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research Outcomes: Concentration Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge in the areas pertaining to global leadership through written, presented and defended scholarly works Identify, summarize, hypothesize and prepare creative solutions for leadership problems and opportunities in cross-cultural, trans-national, multinational and other global contexts Investigate the strategic, social and financial implications of global initiatives from a global leadership perspective Distinguish and analyze globally influenced leadership styles taking into consideration a variety of ethical and philosophical frameworks Demonstrate the ability to assess the need for, design, strategize, facilitate and lead change initiatives in a global context
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Identify, interpret and evaluate emerging trends in global leadership Apply systems thinking to leadership in global issues Facilitate and lead, as well as analyze and document an entire cycle in action research in a complex international or multinational organization or alliance

Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812 MGMT814 MGMT818 MGMT822 MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832 MGMT860 MGMT861 MGMT862 MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development Application of Action Research Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography Dissertation Research Process Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

Courses: Concentration GL870 Culture, Values, and Ethics in a Global Environment GL872 Leadership in Global Organizations GL874 Current Topics in Global Leadership GL876 Trans-Organizational Leadership in Trans-National Settings GL878 Advanced Career Strategies in GL Total Program Credits:

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and

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doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. This program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director of Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Management
Healthcare Management and Leadership Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Healthcare Management and Leadership (DM-HCML) is designed to encourage the professional development of healthcare managers through mentoring, action research, and practical projects, enabling them to make key leadership. The concentration in Healthcare Management and Leadership provides the student with in depth knowledge of management theories and the background to successfully participate in healthcare organizations. Studies include concepts of culture, values, and ethics, which differ among all peoples. The students develop an understanding of the moral dilemmas, choices, and challenges faced by healthcare leaders. Their knowledge expands to an understanding and enhancement of their own leadership characteristics and those of other successful organizational staff. Strategic designs are reviewed to ensure organization structures are understood. In addition, they need to develop change plans with consideration for implementation. Students gain an understanding in health policy and regulations, healthcare economics and finance, healthcare informatics, and continuous improvements in healthcare systems. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research The Healthcare Management and Leadership Concentration prepares the student to become: An academic or administrative leader in the healthcare industry A strategic visionary to navigate the progressive healthcare organization A consultant for the improvement of healthcare systems Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812 MGMT814 MGMT818

Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development

4 4 4 4 4 4
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Effective January 5, 2014

MGMT822 MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832 MGMT860 MGMT861 MGMT862 MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Application of Action Research Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography Dissertation Research Process Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

Courses: Concentration HCML870 Health Policy and Regulations HCML872 Economics and Financing of Healthcare Organizations HCML874 Continuous Improvement for Systems in Healthcare HCML876 Informatics in Healthcare HCML878 Advanced Career Strategies in Healthcare Management Total Program Credits

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation.

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Page 18

Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. This program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive a Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director of Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Management
Homeland Security Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Homeland Security (DM-HLS) is designed to encourage the development of high-level expertise and strategic analysis and thinking in homeland security. The program will foster the development of policy leadership and academic expertise in this emerging field. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research
Outcomes: Concentration

Attain familiarity with the body of knowledge in current management theory Develop the capacity to employ risk management methodologies to understanding critical infrastructure, transportation security and border security vulnerabilities Create a conceptual framework that incorporates terrorism, security, emergency management and public health into a holistic system Create a policy framework for the use of technology in the homeland security enterprise Devise a conceptual framework for incorporating the private sector into the homeland security enterprise Interpret the impact of legal authorities and limitations on the functioning of federal, state and local agencies in the context of the homeland security enterprise Assess the structure and role of federal, state and local homeland security organizations and their respective impacts on the execution of homeland security polcies Evaluate the role played by emergency managers in preparing for, coping with and recovering from homeland security emergencies Assess the role of public health in general, and epidemiology and syndromic surveillance in particular, within the homeland security enterprise

Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812

Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods

4 4 4 4
Page 20

Effective January 5, 2014

MGMT814 MGMT818 MGMT822 MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832 MGMT860 MGMT861 MGMT862 MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development Application of Action Research Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography Dissertation Research Process Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

Courses: Concentration HLS870 Homeland Security Enterprise HLS872 Risk, Resilience and Innovation in Security Policy HLS874 Homeland Security Strategy and Policy HLS876 Issues in Public Health and Emergency Planning HLS878 Homeland Security Professional Development Total Program Credits:

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation.
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 21

Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. This program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive a Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director of Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Management
Leadership Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Leadership is designed to develop leaders in areas of core qualifications defined by the US Office of Personnel Management (OPM). The competencies are built around five core leadership qualifications: (1) strategic change; (2) management of individuals and teams; (3) accomplishment of goals; (4) proficiency in HR, finance, and IT; and (5) coalition building and networking with local, national, and international organizations. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research
Outcomes: Concentration

Design change management plans to meet organizational strategic vision and objectives Develop strategic objectives to meet institutional goals in a dynamic internal and external environment Apply leadership theories and team building principles to direct, develop, and guide diverse individuals and teams in meeting organizational goals Evaluate the internal and external environments and make HR, finance, and strategic decisions to ensure organizational goals are being accomplished in the most efficient and effective manner Use technology, social media, and other business tools to advance the mission and goals of an organization Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development Application of Action Research Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography Dissertation Research Process 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 23

Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812 MGMT814 MGMT818 MGMT822 MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832 MGMT860 MGMT861 MGMT862

Effective January 5, 2014

MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

Courses: Concentration LDR870 Self-Insight and Personal Development as a Leader LDR872 Leading Change LDR874 Special Topics in Leadership LDR876 Leadership, Technology, and Social Media LDR878 Advanced Career Strategies in Leadership Total Program Credits

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 24

This

appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive a Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director of Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Management
Organizational Development and Change Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Organizational Development and Change (DM-ODC) is designed to encourage the professional development of managers through mentoring, action research, and practical projects; enabling them to make key leadership contributions in their area of expertise. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research
Outcomes: Concentration

Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge in ODC in current management theory Distinguish a leadership style based on ethical and philosophical consideration Employ management change in ODC through strategic design and research Predict future trends in ODC through effective research and qualitative methods Develop a plan for the implementation of the triple bottom line in an organization Apply systems thinking to environmental issues Analyze and facilitate an entire cycle in action research in a complex organization Formulate policy agendas for inter-organizational collaboration among businesses, government, and advocacy organizations in the field of ODC

Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812 MGMT814 MGMT818 MGMT822 MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832

Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development Application of Action Research Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 26

Effective January 5, 2014

MGMT860 MGMT861 MGMT862 MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography Dissertation Research Process Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

Courses: Concentration ODC870 Organizational Strategy & Design ODC872 Current Topics in Organizational Development ODC874 Leading and Managing Large Scale Transformation ODC876 System Thinking and Decision Making ODC878 Advanced Career Strategies in Organizational Development and Change

Total Program Credits:

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy.
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 27

CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. This program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive a Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director of Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Management
Project Management Concentration The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The Doctor of Management with a concentration in Project Management is designed to expand the skills for senior level program or portfolio managers. The program is designed to integrate PM tools with management concepts giving practitioners the skills to manage an entire life-cycle of a product or program. Preparatory Requirements for DM in Project Management The DM in Project Management will focus on portfolio management and project-based program management. Although prior project management knowledge or experience is not required it is highly recommended. The program curriculum is designed for students with previous coursework and prior work experience in project management. Outcomes: Core Demonstrate fluency with the body of knowledge and demonstrate ability to of apply relevant knowledge to their chosen field, supplemented by a broad integrative understanding of complementary disciplines Utilize analytical and critical thinking proficiencies as a means of synthesizing, evaluating, and integrating concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis, and solution generation, in the context of their managerial interests and responsibilities Apply effective theories, models, skills, and competencies in the context of their interests and responsibilities within a multicultural society Contribute to the body of knowledge through research, scholarly writing and dissemination of research
Outcomes: Concentration

Examine the discipline of portfolio management and project-based program and the core competencies that are required to manage and lead complex projects in a multi-national organization/global environments Analyze opportunities for improving organizational project management and portfolio performance to increase market share and leverage enterprise environmental factors and organizational process assets Apply best practices in project management methodology (tools and techniques) to increase organizational success as it relates to managing the triple constraint (defined by PMBOK) Evaluate, assess and improve organizational project and portfolio management maturity in a global environment/market Management Theory Principles of Research Methods and Design Management and Ethics Qualitative Research Methods Quantitative Research Methods Leadership Theory and Development Application of Action Research 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 29

Courses: Core MGMT802 MGMT804 MGMT808 MGMT812 MGMT814 MGMT818 MGMT822

Effective January 5, 2014

MGMT824 MGMT828 MGMT832 MGMT860 MGMT861 MGMT862 MGMT863 MGMT864 MGMT865 MGMT866 MGMT867 MGMT868

Strategic Thinking and Organizational Alignment Practice and Theory of Consulting and Intervention Organization Innovation and Scenario Thinking Doctoral Research I: Principles of Research and Writing Doctoral Research II: Annotated Bibliography Dissertation Research Process Doctoral Research III: Dissertation Literature Review Doctoral Research IV: Dissertation Methods Doctoral Research V: Dissertation Introduction Doctoral Research VI: Dissertation Findings Doctoral Research VII: Dissertation Discussion and Conclusion Doctoral Research VIII: Dissertation Conclusion

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 76 4 4 4 4 4 20 96

Courses: Concentration PM870 Life-Cycle and Performance Management PM872 Portfolio & Program Management PM874 Special Topics in Project Management PM876 Risk and Quality Management PM878 Advanced Career Strategies in Project Management Total Program Credits:

The Doctor of Management (DM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for management professionals. The program prepares students to think and act strategically and enhance their abilities to make positive contributions in their chosen area of management expertise. The program emphasizes three sets of competencies: (1) Research and Writing; (2) Leadership and Change Management; and (3) the specific Concentration discipline. The program thus includes ten core instructional courses, five concentration instructional courses, plus nine doctoral research courses. Each class is conducted online. Students are required to attend an intensive two and half day residential symposium twice annually. The symposia are scheduled four times throughout the year and doctoral students are welcome to attend all four symposia available. First term doctoral students will have an additional required CTU student orientation the day prior to the residential symposium for returning students. In addition, graduation requires successful defense of a dissertation that requires a literature review and a research proposal. The research proposal must be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. The dissertation is an extensive document that incorporates the literature review, a major study, and a proposal for further investigation. The dissertation must be approved by the students committee. Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credit hours with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research with a dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until meeting all graduation requirements. A student who has not
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 30

completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for MGMT893 Dissertation Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. CTU offers a Post-Doctoral Certificate for applicants with a terminal degree from a regionally accredited program. This program offers accelerated applications of management theories and research design methods. Students must demonstrate advanced knowledge in a field of study through research and scholarship. Each candidate will be appointed a distinguished mentor at the beginning of their program to supervise research and guide scholarly goals. Candidates will be required to publish their research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. To receive a Post-Doctoral Certificate students must successfully complete the five concentration courses offered in their selected program of study. Students are required to produce and publish the results of their postdoctoral research in a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. Due to the temporary nature of postdoctoral programs, candidates must complete the program within a maximum of three years (extension may be granted by the Provost or Vice Provost). Candidates are required to be continuously enrolled in MGMT895 until their research publication is accepted by a CTU approved peer reviewed journal. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MBA or MSM while starting work on the Doctor of Management. The program outcomes remain the same for the DM and the MBA or MSM under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after completing ten of the twelve required masters courses. Program plans must be approved by the Provost, Vice Provost, Dean or Director of Graduate Programs. In no case will a masters concentration be awarded unless all of the concentration courses (with the exception of a capstone course) have been completed. The MBA or MSM degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus two approved DM courses.

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Doctor of Computer Science


The Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for computer science professionals, consultants, and academics. The program encourages students to think and act strategically and facilitates the ability to make positive contributions in their chosen area of technical expertise. Outcomes: Critically evaluate, analyze, and solve problems within broad areas of computer science and software engineering Demonstrate expertise within an area of computer science or software engineering by summarizing the state of the art, selecting an important problem, conducting research addressing the problem and extending current knowledge with the results Communicate research results and prepare them for publication Make well-founded forecasts about future challenges and developments in computer science or software engineering Demonstrate ethical behavior in all aspects of professional life including honesty, integrity, professional practice, and protection of research subjects Courses: Core CS801 CS803 CS806 CS807 CS811 CS812 CS816 CS821 CS826 CS831 CS836 CS837 CS841 CS846 CS851 CS854 CS855 CS856 Electives Research and Writing I Current Topics in the Discipline Research and Writing II Project Management and Process Engineering Research and Writing III Quantitative Analysis Research and Writing IV Research and Writing V Research and Writing VI Research and Writing VII Research and Writing VIII Requirements Engineering Research and Writing IX Research and Writing X Research and Writing XI Software Architecture and Design Futuring and Innovation Research and Writing XII Select six 5-credit hour courses* 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 3 5 5 3 30

*DCS students must complete six 5-credit classes that form a coherent area of study. These six classes can be selected from the list of elective courses below plus any other 800-level classes approved by the Dean. Courses: Elective Choices CS810 Simulation and Modeling CS820 Usability and Interaction CS825 Advanced Topics in Database Systems CS838 Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Effective January 5, 2014

5 5 5 5
Page 32

CS840 CS850

System Metrics and Risk Analysis Networking and Security

5 5 96

Total Program Credits:

Each of the three years of the DCS program is designed to provide candidates with theoretical, research, and application capabilities in the field. The organization of each year is described below. Year 1: Foundations Year one focuses on computer science and software engineering topics and an orientation to research and writing at the doctoral level. Coursework covers current topics in computer science and software engineering, requirements engineering, project management and process engineering, and research methods in computer science and software engineering. The research and writing component results in a broad overview of the students area of concentration in order to put the research into context and inform the students selection of a research topic. Students prepare research proposals and begin their programs of research. Year 2: Acquisition of Knowledge Once the foundations are in place, year two is where each student develops an in-depth understanding of the knowledge and research methods in their chosen area of study. Coursework includes one required course in software systems architecture and design, plus three courses chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the Dean. These three courses, plus three courses in the third year, must form a cohesive unit that increases the students knowledge in a chosen area of investigation. In addition to coursework, students conduct research and writing in their chosen area. Year 3: Leadership and Professional Advancement Coursework in the final year of the program includes one required course in futuring and innovation, plus three courses from the students selected area of study. The research component of the program results in documentation of the students applied research in either a dissertation or a series of articles. The program thus includes twelve 5-credit instructional courses, taken one per quarter for three years, plus a research-and-writing class taken each quarter. Each class is conducted online. Twice each year, students attend an intensive residential symposium lasting four and a half days. Graduation requires successful defense of a research proposal and final dissertation. be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. These documents must

Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credits with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research proposal and final dissertation.

Degree Completion and Post Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until all graduation requirements are fulfilled. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for CS893 Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. In addition, a student may achieve a Post Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 33

dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree while starting work on the Doctor of Computer Science degree. The program outcomes remain the same for the DCS and the masters degrees under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after ten of the twelve required masters courses have been successfully completed. Program plans must be approved by the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science. Note, however, that for the MSSE degree to be awarded under doctoral advantage the student must successfully complete SE600, SE610, SE612 (for CTU Virtual Campus students), and SE620. The MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus the first two courses in the doctoral degree program: one five-hour 800-level course plus one research and writing course.

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Doctor of Computer Science Big Data Analytics Concentration The Doctor of Computer ScienceBig Data Analytics (DCS-BDA) at Colorado Technical University is designed to develop leaders, data analysts, and data scientists in the development and use of tools and techniques to analyze huge amounts of distributed, unstructured data in order to produce meaningful insight and automation for their respective organizations. Outcomes: Critically evaluate, analyze, and solve problems within big data analytics Demonstrate expertise by summarizing the state of the practice, selecting an important problem, conducting research, addressing the problem, and contributing to the body of knowledge Synthesize research results and prepare them for publication Forecast and plan for future opportunities, innovations, and challenges Demonstrate ethical decision making and behavior, including honesty, integrity, professional practice, and protection of research subjects Courses: Core CS801 CS803 CS806 CS811 CS812 CS816 CS821 CS825 CS826 CS831 CS836 CS838 CS841 CS842 CS846 CS851 CS855 CS856 CS870 CS872 CS874 CS876 CS878 Elective

Research and Writing I Current Topics in the Discipline Research and Writing II Research and Writing III Quantitative Analysis Research and Writing IV Research and Writing V Advanced Topics in Database Systems Research and Writing VI Research and Writing VII Research and Writing VIII Concurrent and Distributed Systems Research and Writing IX Business Intelligence Research and Writing X Research and Writing XI Futuring and Innovation Research and Writing XII Advanced Quantitative Analysis Introduction to Big Data Analytics Advanced Topics in Big Data Analytics Analytics for Big Data Tools for Big Data Analytics Select one 5-hour course from 800-level CS/EM/EIS courses

3 5 3 3 5 3 3 5 3 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 96

Total Program Credits

Each of the three years of the DCS program is designed to provide candidates with theoretical, research, and application
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capabilities in the field. The organization of each year is described below. Year 1: Foundations Year one focuses on computer science and software engineering topics and an orientation to research and writing at the doctoral level. Coursework covers current topics in computer science and software engineering, requirements engineering, project management and process engineering, and research methods in computer science and software engineering. The research and writing component results in a broad overview of the students area of concentration in order to put the research into context and inform the students selection of a research topic. Students prepare research proposals and begin their programs of research. Year 2: Acquisition of Knowledge Once the foundations are in place, year two is where each student develops an in-depth understanding of the knowledge and research methods in their chosen area of study. Coursework includes one required course in software systems architecture and design, plus three courses chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the Dean. These three courses, plus three courses in the third year, must form a cohesive unit that increases the students knowledge in a chosen area of investigation. In addition to coursework, students conduct research and writing in their chosen area. Year 3: Leadership and Professional Advancement Coursework in the final year of the program includes one required course in futuring and innovation, plus three courses from the students selected area of study. The research component of the program results in documentation of the students applied research in either a dissertation or a series of articles. The program thus includes twelve 5-credit instructional courses, taken one per quarter for three years, plus a research-and-writing class taken each quarter. Each class is conducted online. Twice each year, students attend an intensive residential symposium lasting four and a half days. Graduation requires successful defense of a research proposal and final dissertation. approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. These documents must be

Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credits with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research proposal and final dissertation. Degree Completion and Post Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until all graduation requirements are fulfilled. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for CS893 Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. In addition, a student may achieve a Post Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree while starting work on the Doctor of Computer Science degree. The program outcomes remain the same for the DCS and the masters degrees under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after ten of the twelve required masters courses have been successfully completed. Program plans must be
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approved by the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science. Note, however, that for the MSSE degree to be awarded under doctoral advantage the student must successfully complete SE600, SE610, SE612 (for CTU Virtual Campus students), and SE620. The MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus the first two courses in the doctoral degree program: one five-hour 800-level course plus one research and writing course.

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Doctor of Computer Science


Digital Systems Security Concentration The Doctor of Computer Science Digital Systems Security (DCS-DSS) program at Colorado Technical University is designed to develop leaders in the implementation, evaluation, and analysis of digital systems in which security is a primary quality attribute. Outcomes: Critically evaluate, analyze, and solve problems within Digital Systems Security Demonstrate expertise within a sub-discipline of Digital Systems Security by summarizing the state of the art, selecting an important problem, conducting research addressing the problem and extending current knowledge with the results Communicate research results and prepare them for publication Make well-founded forecasts about future challenges and developments in Digital Systems Demonstrate ethical behavior in all aspects of professional life including honesty, integrity, professional practice, and protection of research subjects Courses: Core CS801 CS803 CS806 CS807 CS811 CS812 CS816 CS821 CS826 CS831 CS836 CS837 CS841 CS846 CS851 CS854 CS855 CS856 CS862 CS863 CS864 CS865 Electives Research and Writing I Current Topics in the Discipline Research and Writing II Project Management and Process Engineering Research and Writing III Quantitative Analysis Research and Writing IV Research and Writing V Research and Writing VI Research and Writing VII Research and Writing VIII Requirements Engineering Research and Writing IX Research and Writing X Research and Writing XI Software Architecture and Design Futuring and Innovation Research and Writing XII Foundations of Digital-Systems Security Enterprise Security Architecture Applications Security Communications Security and Countermeasures Select a minimum of two 5-credit hour courses 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 3 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 10 96

Total Program Credits:

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Each of the three years of the DCS-DSS program is designed to provide candidates with the theoretical, research, and applications capabilities necessary in the field of digital systems security. The organization of each year is described below. Year 1: Foundations Year one focuses on computer science and software engineering topics and an orientation to research and writing at the doctoral level. Coursework covers current topics in computer science and software engineering, requirements engineering, project management and process engineering, and research methods. Considerations of digital systems security are covered in each of these courses. The research and writing component results in a broad overview of current research in digital systems security and inform the students selection of a research topic. Students prepare research proposals and begin their research. Year 2: Acquisition of Knowledge Once the foundations are in place, year two is where each student develops an in-depth understanding of the knowledge areas and research methods in digital systems security. Coursework includes four pedagogy courses and four research and writing courses. Topics covered in the pedagogy courses include security foundations, developing secure systems, applications security, and communication security. The research and writing courses further develop each students research. Year 3: Leadership and Professional Advancement Coursework in the final year of the program includes a course in enterprise security architecture, a course on futuring and innovation, and two elective courses. The research component results in documentation of the students applied research in either a dissertation or a series of publishable-quality papers. The program thus includes twelve 5-credit instructional courses, taken one per quarter for three years, plus a research-and-writing class taken each quarter. Each class is conducted online. Twice each year, students attend an intensive residential symposium lasting four and a half days. Graduation requires successful defense of a research proposal and final dissertation. be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. These documents must

Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credits with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research proposal and final dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until all graduation requirements are fulfilled. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for CS893 Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. In addition, a student may achieve a Post-Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree. Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows:
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NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005 The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree while starting work on the Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) degree. The program outcomes remain the same for the DCS and the masters degrees under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after ten of the twelve required masters courses have been successfully completed. Program plans must be approved by the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science. Note, however, that for the MSSE degree to be awarded under doctoral advantage the student must successfully complete SE600, SE610, SE612 (for CTU Virtual Campus students), and SE620. The MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus the first two courses in the doctoral degree program: one five-hour 800-level course plus one research and writing course.

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Doctor of Computer Science


Enterprise Information Systems Concentration The Doctor of Computer Science--Enterprise Information Systems (DCS-EIS) program at Colorado Technical University is designed to develop leaders in designing, implementing and managing large-scale systems in their chosen profession. Outcomes: Critically evaluate, analyze, and solve practical technical and managerial challenges within multiple disciplines of Information Systems Demonstrate expertise within the Information Systems discipline by summarizing the state of the art, selecting an important practical problem or phenomenon, conducting research addressing it, extending current knowledge with the results, and developing a research program for further contributions Communicate by presenting research results and preparing them for publication Make well-founded predictions about future challenges and developments in Information Systems Demonstrate ethical behavior in all aspects of the program including honesty, integrity, professional practice, and protection of research subjects Courses: Core CS801 CS802 CS806 CS811 CS812 CS816 CS817 CS821 CS826 CS831 CS836 CS841 CS842 CS846 CS851 CS856 EIS800 EIS805 EIS810 EIS815 EIS820 EIS825 EIS830 MGMT852 Research and Writing I Qualitative Analysis Research and Writing II Research and Writing III Quantitative Analysis Research and Writing IV Foundations of Enterprise Information Systems Research and Writing V Research and Writing VI Research and Writing VII Research and Writing VIII Research and Writing IX Business Intelligence Research and Writing X Research and Writing XI Research and Writing XII Strategy, Alignment, and Portfolio Management Enterprise Management Concepts and Databases Managing, Planning and Integrating EIS Enterprise Tools, Concepts, and Processes Enterprise Architecture Technology Information Technology Service Management Governance, Quality, Compliance, and Ethics Enterprise Change, Innovation and Future 3 5 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 96

Total Program Credits:

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Each year of the DCS-EIS program is designed to provide candidates with the theoretical, research and application capabilities necessary in the field. The organization of each year is described below. Year 1: The Foundation The beginning of the program focuses on research. Each student will spend the first year learning about analysis and design from a user perspective while forming the ability to think critically and creatively. This experience will enable the student to complete a literature review and develop an enterprise information system designed to improve business processes. Year 2: Acquisition of Knowledge Once the foundation is in place, year two is the time the student chooses an area of concentration and gains an in-depth knowledge of four common areas: strategy, structure, requirements engineering, and decision support. This deeper level of understanding will result in a practitioner article and a proposal for research to be conducted in the third year. Year 3: Leadership and Professional Advancement The final year of the program involves developing a formal implementation program, taking into consideration budget, training and testing and developing a critical path to completion, anticipating and planning for the future. The deliverables in year three are an applied research project, to be submitted to an academic journal and a proposal for programmatic research. The program thus includes twelve 5-credit instructional courses, taken one per quarter for three years, plus a research-and-writing class taken each quarter. Each class is conducted online. Twice each year, students attend an intensive residential symposium lasting four and a half days. Graduation requires successful defense of a research proposal and final dissertation. be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. These documents must

Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credits with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research proposal and final dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until all graduation requirements are fulfilled. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for CS893 Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. In addition, a student may achieve a Post-Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree. The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree while starting (DCS) work on the Doctor of Computer Science degree. The program outcomes remain the same for the DCS and the masters degrees under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after ten of the twelve required masters courses have been successfully completed. Program plans must be approved by the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science.
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Note, however, that for the MSSE degree to be awarded under doctoral advantage the student must successfully complete SE600, SE610, SE612 (for CTU Virtual Campus students), and SE620. The MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus the first two courses in the doctoral degree program: one five-hour 800-level course plus one research and writing course.

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Doctor of Computer Science


Emerging Media Concentration The Doctor of Computer Science in Emerging Media (DCS-EM) at Colorado Technical University is the terminal degree for computer science professionals, consultants, corporate strategists, technology officers and academics with expertise in computer science. Emerging media uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine how social networks, new media, web science and virtual worlds are reshaping business, education, research and entertainment. Outcomes: Critically evaluate, analyze, and solve problems within emerging media Demonstrate expertise within an area of emerging media by summarizing the state of the art, selecting an important problem, conducting research addressing the problem, and extending current knowledge with the results Communicate the research results and prepare them for publication Investigate the strategic, social and financial implications of emerging media Make well-founded forecasts about future challenges and developments in emerging media Demonstrate ethical behavior in all aspects of professional life including honesty, integrity, professional practice, and the protection of research subjects Courses: Core CS801 CS802 CS806 CS811 CS812 CS816 CS820 CS821 CS826 CS831 CS836 CS841 CS846 CS851 CS855 CS856 EM820 EM822 EM830 EM835 EM842 EM845

Research and Writing I Qualitative Analysis Research and Writing II Research and Writing III Quantitative Analysis Research and Writing IV Usability and Interaction Research and Writing V Research and Writing VI Research and Writing VII Research and Writing VIII Research and Writing IX Research and Writing X Research and Writing XI Futuring and Innovation Research and Writing XII Business Strategies for Social Media Games, Gamification and Serious Games Virtual Economy and Business Information Accountability and Web Privacy Strategies Applications for Mobile Development Web Science and Technology

3 5 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5

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EM860 Elective

Virtual and Cloud Computing Architectures Select one 5-credit course from 800-level CS/EIS/EM courses

5 5 96

Total program Credits

Year 1: Foundations Year one focuses on computer science and software engineering topics and an orientation to research and writing at the doctoral level. Coursework covers current topics in computer science and business strategies for social media, strategic use of virtual worlds, and research methods in computer science and emerging media. The research and writing component results in a broad overview of the students area of concentration in order to put the research into context and inform the students selection of a research topic. Students prepare research proposals and begin their programs of research. Year 2: Acquisition of Knowledge Once the foundations are in place, year two is where each student develops an in-depth understanding of the knowledge and research methods in emerging media. Coursework includes four courses, such as Quantitative Analysis, Usability and Interaction, Virtual Economy, and Information Accountability. These courses form a cohesive unit that increases the students knowledge in a chosen area of investigation. In addition to coursework, students conduct research and writing in their research area. Year 3: Leadership and Professional Advancement Coursework in the final year of the program includes Futuring and Innovation, Virtual World Simulation, Web Science and Technology, and Virtual and Cloud Computing Architectures. The research component of the program results in documentation of the students applied research in either a dissertation or a series of articles. The program thus includes twelve 5-credit instructional courses, taken one per quarter for three years, plus a research-and-writing class taken each quarter. Each class is conducted online. Twice each year, students attend an intensive residential symposium lasting four and a half days. Graduation requires successful defense of a research proposal and final dissertation. be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. These documents must

Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credits with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research proposal and final dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until all graduation requirements are fulfilled. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for CS893 Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy. In addition, a student may achieve a Post-Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree.

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The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree while starting work on the Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) degree. The program outcomes remain the same for the DCS and the masters degrees under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after ten of the twelve required masters courses have been successfully completed. Program plans must be approved by the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science. Note, however, that for the MSSE degree to be awarded under doctoral advantage the student must successfully complete SE600, SE610, SE612 (for CTU Virtual Campus students), and SE620. The MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus the first two courses in the doctoral degree program: one five-hour 800-level course plus one research and writing course.

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Doctor of Computer Science


Information Assurance Concentration The Doctor of Computer Science Information Assurance program at Colorado Technical University is designed to develop leaders in managing enterprise information systems with an emphasis on information assurance. Outcomes: Critically evaluate, analyze, and solve problems within Information Assurance Demonstrate expertise within a sub-discipline of Information Assurance by summarizing the state of the art, selecting an important problem, conducting research addressing the problem, and extending current knowledge with results Communicate research results and prepare them for publication Make well-rounded forecasts about future challenges and developments in Information Assurance Demonstrate ethical behavior in all aspects of professional life including honesty, integrity, professional practice, and protection of research subjects Courses: Core CS801 CS802 CS806 CS811 CS812 CS816 CS817 CS821 CS826 CS831 CS836 CS841 CS846 CS851 CS852 CS856 CS862 CS863 EIS835 EIS815 EIS830 MGMT852 ELE Research and Writing I Qualitative Analysis Research and Writing II Research and Writing III Quantitative Analysis Research and Writing IV Foundations of Enterprise Information Systems Research and Writing V Research and Writing VI Research and Writing VII Research and Writing VIII Research and Writing IX Research and Writing X Research and Writing XI Information Assurance Research and Writing XII Foundations of Digital-Systems Security Enterprise Security Architecture Security Management Enterprise Tools, Concepts, and Processes Governance, Quality, Compliance, and Ethics Enterprise Change, Innovation, and Future Select a minimum of two 5-credit hour courses 3 5 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 10

The electives should be chosen from the following courses. (With permission of the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science, a student may choose other courses.) CS842 CS850 Business Intelligence Networking and Security 5 5
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CS864 CS865 EIS800 EIS805 EIS810 EIS820 EIS825

Applications Security Communications Security and Countermeasures Strategy, Alignment, Portfolio Management Enterprise Management Concepts Managing, Planning, and Integrating EIS Enterprise Architecture Technology IT Service Management

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 96

Total Program Credits:

Each of the three years of the DCS-IA program is designed to provide candidates with the theoretical, research, and applications capabilities necessary in the field of information assurance. The organization of each year is described below. Year 1: Foundations Year one focuses on introductory topics and research methods. Coursework covers introduction to enterprise information systems in general and security management in particular. In the research and writing component, students start identifying research-topic areas, analyze relevant literature and start preparing research proposals. Year 2: Acquisition of Knowledge With the foundations in place, each student develops an indepth understanding of the knowledge areas and res earch methods in information assurance. Coursework covers information assurance, security foundations, and enterprise security architecture. The research and writing courses further develop each students research. Year 3: Leadership and Professional Advancement Coursework in the final year of the program includes Futuring and Innovation, Virtual World Simulation, Web Science and Technology, and Virtual and Cloud Computing Architectures. The research component of the program results in documentation of the students applied research in either a dissertation or a series of articles. The program thus includes twelve 5-credit instructional courses, taken one per quarter for three years, plus a research-and-writing class taken each quarter. Each class is conducted online. Twice each year, students attend an intensive residential symposium lasting four and a half days. Graduation requires successful defense of a research proposal and final dissertation. be approved by the students committee, consisting of a mentor and two readers. These documents must

Graduation Requirements In addition to the successful completion of the above 96 credits with an acceptable GPA, students must also satisfactorily complete and defend their research proposal and final dissertation. Degree Completion and Post-Doctoral Study The student must be continuously enrolled until all graduation requirements are fulfilled. A student who has not completed the research requirements by the end of the formal coursework continues by registering for CS893 Research Continuation according to CTUs re-take policy.

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In addition, a student may achieve a Post-Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree. In addition, a student may achieve a Post-Doctoral Certificate if approved for that in advance by the doctoral dean. A typical program would include successful completion of four courses plus creation of two academic papers of publishable quality after the award of the CTU doctoral degree. Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005 The Doctoral Advantage While a relevant masters degree is ordinarily required for admission to CTU doctoral programs, there is also the option of completing a CTU MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree while starting work on the Doctor of Computer Science (DCS) degree. The program outcomes remain the same for the DCS and the masters degrees under this option, but the normal completion time for the degrees in the combined program is reduced. Through this program, doctoral work is started after ten of the twelve required masters courses have been successfully completed. Program plans must be approved by the Dean of Doctoral Computer Science. Note, however, that for the MSSE degree to be awarded under doctoral advantage the student must successfully complete SE600, SE610, SE612 (for CTU Virtual Campus students), and SE620. The MSCS, MSIT, MSM-ISS, MSM-IT/PM, or MSSE degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the ten approved masters courses plus the first two courses in the doctoral degree program: one five-hour 800-level course plus one research and writing course.

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Master of Business Administration


The Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a professional degree intended for those who aspire to increasing levels of responsibility in business and industry. An MBA is an investment in the graduates future. This degree program is designed to provide each student with a breadth of skills ranging from accounting to project management. The program revolves around managerial skills required in planning, organizing and controlling work in organizations, and focuses on directing, coaching and motivating people for effective performance. In addition, this program is designed to help the student understand various management theories, essential management functions and their interrelationships, and the global environment of todays business. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization The Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a professional degree intended for those who aspire to increasing levels of responsibility in business and industry. An MBA is an investment in the graduates future. This degree program is designed to provide each student with a breadth of skills ranging from accounting to project management. The program revolves around managerial skills required in planning, organizing and controlling work in organizations, and focuses on directing, coaching and motivating people for effective performance. In addition, this program is designed to help the student understand various management theories, essential management functions and their interrelationships, and the global environment of todays business. MBA program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630 Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32

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Courses: Concentration ELECTIVE Select 12 credit hours from the list below MGMT655 Management Capstone Total Program Credits: Courses: Concentration Choices ACCT628 Financial Reporting ACCT644 Management Control and Auditing ENTR605 Integrated Marketing for Entrepreneurs ENTR610 Entrepreneurial Strategy, Planning & Leadership ENTR615 Entrepreneurship & Intrapreneurship: Skills for Success ENTR630 Entrepreneurial Business Planning Capstone FINC600 Financial Statement Analysis FINC605 Corporate Portfolio Management FINC610 Financial Management for Multinational Enterprises MKTG618 Marketing Research Methods MKTG628 Marketing in the Digital Age MKTG638 International Marketing IT600 IT Management MBA Foundation Requirements

12 4 16 48 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Master of Business Administration


Accounting Concentration An increase in the number of businesses, changing financial laws and regulations, and increased scrutiny of company finances will spur the job growth of accountants and auditors. Increasingly, accountants also are assuming the role of personal financial advisors. In response to market demand, these financial specialists will offer more financial management and consulting services as they take on greater advisory roles. In addition to openings resulting from growth, the need to replace accountants and auditors who retire or transfer to other occupations will produce numerous job openings. The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting (MBA-ACC) is a program for students with a Bachelors degree in accounting or closely related fields. This program provides students with strong theoretical foundations and professional skills in the main functional areas of accounting, including financial reporting, management control and auditing, and taxation. In addition, this program is designed to prepare graduates for careers in industry, government and not-for-profit organizations. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Accounting program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Perform an audit review and prepare the appropriate documentation. Examine how accounting information is used in decision making and in implementing management policy across industries. Assess information using accounting standards and regulations to formulate ethical business outcomes. Evaluate and interpret financial reports for problem solving and efficient decision making in the business environment. Apply taxation methods in the development of a budget incorporating strategic management principles. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Capital Human Management Applied Managerial Marketing

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Courses: Concentration ACCT618 Taxation and Business Decisions ACCT628 Financial Reporting ACCT644 Management Control and Auditing ACCT650 MBA Accounting Capstone Total Program Credits: MBA Foundation Requirements

32 4 4 4 4 16 48

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

Effective January 5, 2014

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Entrepreneurship Concentration The MBA in Entrepreneurship degree program provides a rigorous immersion into the entrepreneurial process, exploring both entrepreneurship theory and practice. Examination of the challenges of developing and operating small firms; achieving business growth; securing funding and managing a budget; learn problem-solving approach with emphasis on case studies and plans for new start-up ventures. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA Entrepreneurship program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Interpret and identify entrepreneurship characteristics, skills, knowledge and abilities needed to start and operate a new business venture. Develop and write an effective business and marketing plan for a new venture. Examine and implement the use of social media marketing for new ventures and the role of entrepreneurial decision making in marketing efforts. Effectively communicate new business ideas to investors, customers, and partners (elevator pitch and business plan presentation). Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630 Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4 4 16 48
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Courses: Concentration ENTR605 Integrated Marketing for Entrepreneurs ENTR610 Entrepreneurial Strategy, Planning & Leadership ENTR615 Entrepreneurship & Intrapreneurship: Skills for Success ENTR630 Entrepreneurial Business Planning Capstone Total Program Credits:
Effective January 5, 2014

MBA Foundation Requirements The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

Effective January 5, 2014

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Finance Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Finance (MBA-FIN) combines graduate business administration skills with an emphasis on finance. This concentration helps students understand how to analyze financial information to make decisions to enhance business success. Ethical issues in finance and financial management for multinational enterprises are also covered. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Finance program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Construct efficient decisions utilizing financial information for organizational growth, restructure, and operations. Apply financial reasoning when evaluating business planning, investments, and financial assessment. Review, analyze and interpret financial information to influence managerial decision making. Implement critical and creative thinking when assessing and analyzing financial information for problem solving and decision making for multi-national enterprise. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32

Courses: Concentration FINC600 Financial Statement Analysis FINC605 Corporate Portfolio Management FINC610 Financial Management for Multinational Enterprises

4 4 4

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FINC650

MBA Finance Capstone

4 16 48

Total Program Credits: MBA Foundation Requirements

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Global Leadership Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Global Leadership (MBA-GL) is a set of comprehensive and systematic courses in Global Leadership designed for graduate-level students. The most distinctive feature of the program is its integration between practical business leadership skills and advanced leadership theories. The Global Leadership concentration combines in-depth and systematic analysis of advanced leadership concepts and the examples of successful enterprises, the stimulation of students discussion through interactive learning modules and participatory teaching, and the fostering of students innovative thinking with comprehensive curriculum building. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Global Leadership program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Analyze and investigate leadership roles and responsibilities from a global perspective. Research and discuss cultural and ethical dilemmas for international businesses. Examine change management initiatives from a global perspective. Compare and contrast organizational design implications and strategy decisions in the global business environment. Interpret the philosophies and practices of global leadership for managing and leading in the international environment. Examine organizational behavior and development theory from and international perspective Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing

Courses: Concentration GL605 Perspectives on International Business GL610 Globalization and International Strategy
Effective January 5, 2014

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4
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GL615 MGMT655

Global Leadership Development Management Capstone

4 4 16 48

Total Program Credits: MBA Foundation Requirements

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Healthcare Management Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a Healthcare Management concentration (MBA-HCM) program combines graduate business administration skills with an emphasis on healthcare management. This concentration covers a range of skills relevant to the healthcare environment, including management concepts and processes, resource allocation, risk assessment, and financing. These concepts are applied within the ethical, legal, and policy framework of the healthcare environment. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Healthcare Management program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Apply sound business principles and practices to the unique field of healthcare. Demonstrate visionary leadership skills by creating innovative solutions. Analyze processes related to change management. Interpret and implement regulations affecting healthcare within ethical constraints. Compare and contrast reimbursement options to maximize profitability. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 HCM640 HCM641 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630 Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Healthcare Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making in Healthcare Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4 4 16 48
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Courses: Concentration HCM612 Managing the Healthcare Organization HCM632 Systems in Healthcare HCM650 MBA Healthcare Management Capstone ELE 600-level Elective Total Program Credits:
Effective January 5, 2014

MBA Foundation Requirements The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Master of Business Administration


Human Resource Management Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management (MBA-HRM) degree program is designed to prepare the graduate to integrate human resource functions into an organizations strategic plan. Every manager needs to be aware of the federal regulations that govern human resources and labor relations. In many companies, HR functions are being turned over to line managers and supervisors as a cost savings, while the actual HR functions are being outsourced to 1-800 numbers and Intranet sites. Thus, the department manager is being relied on more and more to be knowledgeable about HR issues. For this reason, the Human Resource Management concentration can be an excellent choice for those who wish to work in the management field. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Human Resource Management program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Develop change-agent skills, especially related to critical and creative thinking, regarding human resource management issues. Discuss the importance of strategic human resource planning and be able to participate in forecasting. Apply HR concepts, theories, and practices to address organizational HR challenges including ethical issues, diversity, affirmative action, and labor relations. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4
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Courses: Concentration HRMT645 Operational Human Resource Management HRMT650 Current Legal Issues in Human Resource Management HRMT655 Managing Organizational Development and Change
Effective January 5, 2014

MGMT655

Management Capstone

4 16 48

Total Program Credits:

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has acknowledged that Colorado Technical Universitys Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management fully aligns with SHRMs HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates. The HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates were developed by SHRM to define the minimum HR content areas that should be studied by HR students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The guidelines, created in 2006 and revalidated in 2010 and 2013, are part of SHRMs Academic Initiative to define HR education standards taught in university business schools and help universities develop degree programs that follow these standards. MBA Foundation Requirements The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

Effective January 5, 2014

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Master of Business Administration


Logistics Management Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Logistics Management (MBA-LM) is a comprehensive program that is designed to build a generalist foundation that emphasizes the application of critical thinking and management skills in todays business and organizational environment. Students will understand how to apply the detailed functional aspects of logistics management from a global, international, and domestic perspective as it relates to military, government, or the private sector MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Logistics Management program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Demonstrate competency in logistics methodologies and concepts for operating in a global environment (military, government and private sector business). Conduct research in the field of logistics as it relates to meeting standards in military, government or private business operations. Apply managerial logistics philosophy and concepts, as well as quantitative and qualitative methodologies to support procurement, acquisition, transportation and contract management. Design an integrated inventory and supply chain system from the raw material to delivery to the end customer/civilians/military personal/partnering agencies; including reverse logistics consideration. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630 Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 12 4 16

Courses: Concentration Logistics Track Choose a Logistics Track from the list below MGMT655 Management Capstone

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Government Logistics Track LOG672 Strategic Thinking in a Global Logistics Environment: Cultural and Legal Implications LOG674 Integrated Supply Chain Management in a Global Environment LOG676 Logistics Support Services in Impaired or Hazardous Environments Military Logistics Track LOG660 Intermodal Transportation/Logistics in inclement Environments LOG662 Transportation and Logistics Operations in Enriched and Impaired Environments LOG664 Transportation/Logistics security in Enriched and Impaired Environments Private Sector Logistics Track LOG666 Inventory Process Management and Control LOG668 Inventory and Supply Chain Management LOG670 Reverse Inventory Management & Financial Implications Total Program Credits: MBA Foundation Requirements

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 48

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

Effective January 5, 2014

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Master of Business Administration


Marketing Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing (MBA-MKTG) degree is focused on the skills needed to make critical marketing decisions for businesses and organizations. Marketing research is crucial to analyzing and understanding data and trends. As increasing numbers of companies look to expand into global markets, individuals with a grasp of cultural, ethical, and legal implications of international marketing will be in high demand. The field of marketing has been, and is being, transformed by technology; successful leaders need to be ready to adapt and leverage this technology to gain competitive advantage. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Marketing program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Demonstrate mastery of marketing research, international marketing, e-marketing, and customer relationship management skills. Construct marketing strategies globally using critical thinking, ethics, and cross-cultural understanding. Develop effective marketing plans including pricing, product placement, and promotion of goods and services utilizing critical and creative thinking. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4

Courses: Concentration MKTG618 Marketing Research Methods MKTG628 Marketing in the Digital Age MKTG638 International Marketing

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MGMT655

Management Capstone

4 16 48

Total Program Credits: MBA Foundation Requirements

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Master of Business Administration


Operations/Supply Chain Management Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Operations Management (MBA-O/SCM) degree program is designed to prepare students to lead organizations in the planning, development, operation, and management of business systems. The program combines the technical aspects of operating systems with the practical aspects of contemporary business environment. The curriculum blends skills, such as project management, system operations and business related with organizational skills in the major areas of business management. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Operations/Supply Chain Management program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Demonstrate a competency of operational considerations and logistics and supply chain methodologies to businesses operating in a global environment. Conduct research in the field of operations management. Apply managerial operational philosophy and concepts, as well as quantitative and qualitative methodologies to product design, warehousing, distribution, procurements, and contracting decisions. Design an integrated operating system from the raw material to delivery to the customer, including reverse logistics considerations. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4
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Courses: Concentration MGMT640 Operations Management MGMT647 Operations Strategy MGMT655 Management Capstone
Effective January 5, 2014

SCM610

Logistics/SCM Inventory and Distribution

4 16 48

Total Program Credits: MBA Foundation Requirements

The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Master of Business Administration


Project Management Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Project Management (MBA-PM) degree program is designed to provide the tools, techniques and skills needed to effectively manage projects. The curriculum covers in detail the nine knowledge areas specified by the Project Management Institute (PMI) in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), the industry standard for project management. In addition, the program integrates business foundation courses with the theory and the practice of project management in order to prepare well-equipped and skilled project managers. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Project Management program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Apply the project management process and knowledge areas to a project. Analyze project scope and identify project key tasks and stakeholders. Develop a detailed list of project tasks and arrange them in a project work breakdown structure. Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4 20 48

Courses: Concentration PM600 Project Management Processes in Organizations PM610 Project Planning, Execution and Closure PM620 Schedule and Cost Control Techniques PM630 Contracting and Procurement in Project Management PM665 Project Management Capstone Total Program Credits:

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This degree is accredited by the Project Management Institute's Global Accreditation Center (PMI-GAC). CTU is a recognized provider with the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Provider Program (PMI R.E.P.). MBA Foundation Requirements The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Master of Business Administration


Technology Management Concentration The Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Technology Management (MBA-TM) degree program is designed to prepare the graduate to assist and lead organizations in the planning, development, operation and management of information technology systems. The program combines the technical aspects of information systems with the practical aspects of contemporary business. The curriculum blends information technology skills, such as database management, networking and telecommunications systems, with organizational skills in the major areas of business. MBA Program prepares the student: to know how to manage across various business disciplines to apply business theories, concepts and methods to a current or future position to contribute to the enhancement of the mission and value-proposition of the organization MBA-Technology Management program competencies: Synthesize ethics, leadership, strategy, critical thinking and reasoning skills in a business environment. Integrate professional applied research in order to validate and justify decision making. Formulate information in order to communicate effectively across the appropriate channels. Utilize appropriate technology to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in order to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. Combine the major functional areas of business administration including the critical skills necessary to solve business problems, individually and collaboratively. Assess IT capabilities and competencies for a competitive advantage Manage and deploy technology to advance organizational goals and objectives Execute the SDLC and its variations Courses: Core ACCT614 ECON616 MGMT690 FINC615 INTD670 MGMT600 HRMT620 MKTG630

Applied Managerial Accounting Applied Managerial Economics Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Strategic Human Capital Management Applied Managerial Marketing

Courses: Concentration IT600 IT Management IT610 Relational Database Management Systems IT640 Networking and Telecommunications MGMT655 Management Capstone Total Program Credits:

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4 4 16 48

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MBA Foundation Requirements The Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is built upon the expectation that students will enter the program with a solid business background to succeed in some of the core MBA courses. Therefore the MBA requires students to have prior foundational knowledge in all core business disciplines to be successful. Students entering in the MBA program without an undergraduate degree in business will be required to successfully complete three MBA preparatory courses (MGMT501, MGMT502, and MGMT503) covering the following areas of business: accounting; economics; finance; marketing; statistics; management; business law; ethics; business policy; business strategy; information technology; operations management; and global leadership. If the student can show evidence of a GMAT score of 500 or above or has evidence of significant professional experience in all of the business discipline areas, the preparatory requirements may be waived. Students that can show evidence of successfully completed business law and business ethics courses may have the MGMT501 requirement waived. Students continuing from any of CTUs bachelor programs are exempt from the MBA Foundation Requirements. The preparatory courses are also available to students with an undergraduate business degree who wish to refresh their knowledge in these subject areas. MBA preparatory courses must be completed prior to respective MBA required courses that hold MGMT501, MGMT502, or MGMT503 as a prerequisite. Students who do not meet the MBA preparatory requirements will be withdrawn, canceled or transferred from the MBA program. Students are encouraged to work with the Student Advising department if they have questions regarding these preparatory courses, timeframes for completion, or for alternative programs of study as needed.

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Master of Science in Accounting


The Master of Science in Accounting (MS-ACC) is a degree for students with a bachelors degree in accounting or other closely related fields. This program provides strong theoretical foundations and professional skills in the main functional areas of accounting, including financial reporting and assurance, management control and auditing, taxation, and forensic accounting. In addition, this program is designed to prepare graduates for careers in public accounting, industry, government or not-for-profit organizations. Accountants are key players in the financial information arena of all organizations. They provide much of the information utilized by for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in the decision-making needed to help the organization attain its goals. Accountants and auditors help to ensure that organizations are run more efficiently, public records are kept more accurately, and taxes are paid properly and on time. They perform these vital functions by offering an increasingly wide array of business and accounting services to their clients. These services include public, management and government accounting, as well as internal auditing. However, accountants and auditors are broadening the services they offer to include budget analysis, financial and investment planning, information technology consulting and limited legal services. Beyond the fundamental tasks of the occupation preparing, analyzing and verifying financial documents in order to provide information to clients many accountants now are required to possess a wide range of knowledge and skills. Outcomes: Address the changing financial laws and regulations, and increased scrutiny of company finances Assume the role of a personal financial advisor to the business Offer financial management and consulting services while taking on a greater advisory role Perform an audit review and prepare the appropriate documentation Describe how accounting information is used in implementing management policy Utilize accounting information to evaluate how to organize the business for managerial control Discuss the ethical implications of taxation and business decisions Develop a practical understanding and application of specific actions, processes, and techniques needed to move into the next generation of organizations Develop financial reports to meet business expansion needs Apply product costing techniques in the development of a master budget from a strategic perspective Courses: Core ACCT614 ACCT618 ACCT624 ACCT628 ACCT634 ACCT638 ACCT644 ACCT648 ACCT655 ECON616 FINC615 MGMT600 Applied Managerial Accounting Taxation and Business Decisions Advanced Cost Accounting Financial Reporting Accounting Information Systems Advanced Auditing Management Control and Auditing Forensic Accounting International Financial Reporting Standards Applied Managerial Economics Applied Managerial Finance Applied Managerial Decision-Making 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 48

Total Program Credits:

Accounting courses at CTU align with the educational standards of the American Institute of Certified Public
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Accountants (AICPA). The student who meets the unique content and hours requirements of the State Board of Accounting in their state's Application for CPA Licensure is qualified to sit for the CPA exam. This program curriculum also integrates the competencies and body of knowledge in the Certified Managerial Accounting (CMA) exam. This program is not designed to prepare students for the CPA or CMA examination or any other certification exam, but covers the knowledge areas of the uniform CPA and CMA certification.

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Master of Science in Management


In order for an organization and its management to compete in todays global business environment, there is a great need for individuals who can both lead and manage technical initiatives and business operations. To help meet the need for this competitive new breed of technical leadership and management professional, Colorado Technical University offers a general Master of Science in Management (MSM) degree program. The program architecture consists of research methods, leadership, managerial decision-making and operations management integrated with a solid practical research foundation. Building on this program core, the student can tailor the degree program to meet individual job responsibilities, organizational needs, and career goals. Outcomes: Lead and direct technical initiatives and operations Analyze and develop strategies for improving business processes and operations Integrate technology and operational processes into the organization Evaluate emerging technologies and their impact across the organization Apply analytical and critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate emerging technologies Work effectively as problem-solving team member Conduct, use, and evaluate professional applied research Courses: Core FINC615 IT600 INTD670 MGMT604 MGMT690 MKTG630 PM600

Applied Managerial Finance IT Management Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Organizational Behavior Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Marketing Project Management Processes in Organizations

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28

Courses: Concentration Electives MGMT655 Select 16 credit hours of 600 level Business and Management Courses Management Capstone 16 4 20 48

Total Program Credits:

The 16 credits of 600 level Business and Management Electives must be approved by the chair or dean of management at the campus where the degree is being offered.

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Master of Science in Management


Homeland Security Concentration Homeland Security has become a concern at all levels of government and in a wide variety of organizations. The Master of Science in Management with a concentration in Homeland Security (MSM-HLS) program has been designed to combine essential organizational research and analysis skills with a deep understanding of the variety of threats facing the United States, its communities, and its organizations. The seven required courses in Homeland Security are based on the curriculum of the Masters of Homeland Security as developed by the US Naval Postgraduate School. CTU is a member of the Homeland Security and Defense Education Consortium. Outcomes: Lead and direct technical initiatives and operations Analyze and develop strategies for improving organizational processes and operations Work effectively as problem-solving team member Conduct, use, and evaluate professional applied research Analyze models of Homeland Security and effectively communicate them Demonstrate an understanding of terrorism and the psychology of fear Assess threats to the infrastructure Evaluate technological solutions to problems of Homeland Security Examine the relationship between Homeland Security-related organizations and government Courses: Core FINC615 INTD670 IT600 MGMT604 MGMT690 MKTG630 PM600 Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making IT Management Organizational Behavior Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Marketing Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4 20 48

Courses: Concentration HLS600 Homeland Security Fundamentals HLS610 Dynamics of Terrorism HLS640 Vulnerability Analysis and Protection HLS650 Homeland Security and Government HLS685 Homeland Security Capstone Total Program Credits:

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Master of Science in Management


Information Systems Security Concentration An almost continuous stream of security-related incidents is affecting millions of computer systems and networks throughout the world. Organizations are constantly experiencing these attacks and security incidents; they constitute a risk to their organizational mission. The loss or corruption of information systems can significantly impact the organization and result in a substantial loss of revenue. To address these threats, organizations, both private and government, are investing considerable funds to adopt security measures to make their organizations safe. Course content includes a solid core of project management curriculum plus courses in information systems security. This program is designed to provide the student with the information system security skills necessary to manage and protect the vital technology assets of todays organizations. The Master of Science in Management with a concentration in Information Systems Security (MSM-ISS) degree program is designed to prepare technical leaders in security management to combat threats in todays environment through an understanding of security management, network security principles, and certification and accreditation requirements. Outcomes: Plan projects effectively and successfully, taking into consideration the quadruple constraints of time, cost, resources, and specifications Develop from the basic project plan a work-breakdown structure to the lowest granularity permitted by cost Determine and calculate project risks according to classical risk analysis Plan and manage contractual purchasing issues, including, procurement and supply, outsourcing, and just-in-time acquisition Evaluate and present project objectives, requirements, scope, and budgeting effectively to upper management Define technical requirements for the implementation of an effective security infrastructure Identify and describe the impact of implementing security components at all OSI layers Develop effective enterprise level security policies, standards and procedures Identify and develop necessary enterprise/government systems certification and accreditation procedures and best commercial practices Courses: Core MGMT690 INTD670 PM600 PM610 PM620 PM630 IT697 Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Project Management Processes in Organizations Project Planning, Execution and Closure Schedule and Cost Control Techniques Contracting and Procurement in Project Management Information Technology Capstone 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4
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Courses: Concentration CS651 Computer Systems Security Foundations CS653 Network Security CS654 Security Management CS661 Software Information Assurance CS662 System Security Certification and Accreditation
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20 Total Program Credits: 48

This degree is accredited by the Project Management Institute's Global Accreditation Center (PMI-GAC). CTU is a recognized provider with the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Provider Program (PMI R.E.P.)

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Master of Science in Management


Information Technology and Project Management Concentration Explosive demand for professionals who can integrate and manage a companys information and technology tools has created an emerging new field in information technology. In the next decade, the demand is expected to double. To help meet the need for this competitive new breed of management professional, Colorado Technical University has introduced the Master of Science in Management with a concentration in Information Technology and Project Management (MSM-IT/PM) degree program. Course content includes a solid core of project management curriculum plus courses in computing platforms and network architecture designs. Software systems, both application and development, will be covered with emphasis on relational database and client/server technology. Information technology graduates will be prepared to design, build, integrate and manage the information technology systems and programs associated with todays organizations. Outcomes: Plan projects effectively and successfully, taking into consideration the quadruple constraints of time, cost, resources, and specifications Develop from the basic project plan a work-breakdown structure to the lowest granularity permitted by cost Determine and calculate project risks according to classical risk analysis Plan and manage contractual purchasing issues, including, procurement and supply, outsourcing, and just-in-time Evaluate and present project objectives, requirements, scope, and budgeting effectively to upper management Apply analytical and critical thinking skills necessary to design, build, integrate and manage the information technology systems and programs associated with todays organizations Design, develop and manage a database system Comprehend the concepts of telecommunications and networking systems design, development and management Work effectively as problem-solving team members Conduct, use, and evaluate professional applied research Courses: Core MGMT690 IT610 IT612 IT640 IT642 IT660 IT662 IT697 PM600 PM610 PM620 PM630

Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Relational Database Management Systems Database Analysis, Design and Implementation Networking and Telecommunications Network Administration Information Technology Systems Development IT Systems Implementation Information Technology Capstone Project Management Processes in Organizations Project Planning, Execution and Closure Schedule and Cost Control Techniques Contracting and Procurement in Project Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 48
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Total Program Credits:


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This degree is accredited by the Project Management Institute's Global Accreditation Center (PMI-GAC). CTU is a recognized provider with the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Provider Program (PMI R.E.P.). Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

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Master of Science in Management


Organizational Leadership and Change Concentration The Master of Science in Management with a concentration in Organizational Leadership and Change (MSM-OLC) degree program is well suited for individuals who are intending to be or are managers or scholar-practitioners. Graduates acquire knowledge and skills in organizational leadership (OL) theory, research, strategy, and methodology. The graduates can apply these competencies as managers, consultants, or leaders in the public, private, NGO, and non-profit sectors. The program emphasizes self-awareness as manager/leader in small groups, complex organizations, and organizational change in multicultural contexts. The degree program is designed for those who wish to broaden and expand on their experience in organizational leadership and change management, either as line managers or change consultants, as well as those making a transition into the profession. The Organizational Leadership and Change concentration develops skills and competencies in organizational leaders who seek to improve organizational effectiveness, enhance decision making, advance leadership skills, and develop analysis and research expertise. While this program is strongly grounded in organizational, strategic, and change management theory, the curriculum is focused on practical, growth-oriented activities to ensure educational relevance and applicability in today's challenging business and institutional environments. Strong theory-to-practice models ensure that students will acquire advanced research competencies, the ability to manage change effectively, and improve the performance and effectiveness of their organizations. Outcomes: Investigate and analyze leadership roles and responsibilities. Discuss organizational behavior and organization development theory. Research and discuss individual and group reaction to change. Correlate and examine various approaches to leading change initiatives. Differentiate between various organizational designs and strategic implementation. Courses: Core FINC615 INTD670 IT600 MGMT604 MGMT690 MKTG630 PM600 Applied Managerial Finance Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making IT Management Organizational Behavior Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Applied Managerial Marketing Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4 20 48
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Courses: Concentration MGMT655 Management Capstone MGMT671 Introduction to Organizational Leadership and Change MGMT672 Strategic Change Management MGMT673 Foundation of Organizational Design MGMT675 Leadership and Organizational Power Total Program Credits:
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Master of Science in Management


Project Management Concentration The Master of Science in Management with a concentration in Project Management (MSM-PM) program prepares the student with the skills and knowledge needed to become an effective project manager, including time/conflict management; teams and HR management; risk analysis and management; scheduling techniques; organizations and processes; cost, budgeting and scheduling; procurement and contracting; and control systems implementation. Program content covers key areas contained in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), considered to be the industry standard by the Project Management Outcomes: Plan projects effectively and successfully, taking into consideration the quadruple constraints of time, cost, resources, and specifications Demonstrate an understanding of effective, ethical leadership strategies and skills Utilize analytical and critical thinking skills in order to synthesize, evaluate and integrate concepts and knowledge for effective decision analysis and problem solving Communicate information professionally Work effectively as problem-solving team members Develop from the basic project plan a work-breakdown structure to the lowest granularity permitted by cost Determine and calculate project risks according to classical risk analysis Plan and manage contractual purchasing issues, including, procurement and supply, outsourcing, and just-in-time Evaluate and present project objectives, requirements, scope, and budgeting effectively to upper management Courses: Core MGMT690 MGMT604 INTD670 MGMT600 MGMT605 MGMT640 MKTG630 PM665

Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Organizational Behavior Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Applied Managerial Decision-Making Graduate Research Methods Operations Management Applied Managerial Marketing Project Management Capstone

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4 4 16 48

Courses: Concentration PM600 Project Management Processes in Organizations PM610 Project Planning, Execution and Closure PM620 Schedule and Cost Control Techniques PM630 Contracting and Procurement in Project Management

Total Program Credits:

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Registered by: Project Management Institute, Registered Education Provider. CTU is a recognized provider with the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Provider Program (PMI-R.E.P.).

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Master of Science in Computer Engineering


The computer industry is one of the fastest growing segments of our economy. To maintain a competitive edge, industry and commerce must continue to make creative scientific and engineering advances as well as produce high quality products. More than ever there is a demand for computer engineering professionals who can motivate and lead the technical workers responsible for these advances. The Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE) program emphasizes effective optimization of computer systems within organizations to strengthen competitive advantage. The program covers research, design, development and testing of computer hardware and software, along with the project management and leadership skills necessary for increased responsibility in the engineering field. Outcomes: Design advanced computer architectures Use advanced techniques for life-cycle design of software systems Use modern information system security techniques Design advanced CMOS circuitry Effectively use project management techniques Courses: Core CE605 CE660 CE690 CS651 CS671 EE600 EE660 INTD670 PM600 PM610 Modern Computer Architecture Modern Computer Design Computer Engineering Capstone Computer Systems Security Foundations Software Systems Engineering Process Modern Solid State Devices Modern Electronic Design Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Project Management Processes in Organizations Project Planning, Execution and Closure 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 40 4 4 8 48

Courses: Electives CS Elective Select one CS 600-level course EE Elective Select one EE 600-level course Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Computer Engineering degree program is designed to provide technical depth in engineering topics that require a solid foundation in advanced mathematics (including calculus, differential equations and linear algebra), engineering and physics. Students who possess this background but need to refresh their technical or mathematical skills are highly encouraged to take MATH500. Students who have the technical or mathematical background but possess an undergraduate engineering degree other than electrical or computer engineering are highly encouraged to take EE500. Students from a non-engineering undergraduate background should consult with an Engineering Chair or Dean to design an undergraduate foundation engineering program in preparation for this degree.
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Note: Students seeking dual degrees (MSEE and MSCE) are required to take one additional CS 600-level elective course instead of the graduate EE Elective in the MSCE program.

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Master of Science in Computer Science


The Master of Science in Computer Science program centers on a set of core courses which are designed to provide the student with an understanding of operating systems and networking, as well as knowledge of computer system architecture and the software system engineering process. The MSCS program is designed for Computer Science professionals seeking to advance their careers in a broad range of computer fields. Outcomes Apply effective leadership strategies and skills Critically evaluate the issues that affect the development and modification of complex software systems Conduct professional, scholarly, applied research Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the field of computer science Select analytical and critical thinking skills for effective decision analysis and problem solving in a specific situation Courses: Core CS627 CS630 CS635 CS651 CS660 CS672 CS698 Electives Design and Analysis of Algorithms Modern Operating Systems Computer Networking Computer Systems Security Foundations Database Systems Systems Engineering Methods Computer Science Capstone Choose five Electives from any 600-level course* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 20 48

*Non-Computer Science electives may require approval by the campus Program Chair or appropriate academic official.

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Master of Science in Computer Science


Computer Systems Security Concentration The Master of Science in Computer Science program centers on a set of core courses which are designed to provide the student with an understanding of operating systems and networking, as well as knowledge of computer system architecture and the software system engineering process. The MSCS program is designed for Computer Science professionals seeking to advance their careers in a broad range of computer fields. Building on the MSCS program core, the concentration courses provide the foundation and focused knowledge for those interested in the systems security field. Protecting vital enterprise computer systems from unauthorized change, improper access, theft of information and monetary theft has always been important. It is becoming more so with the rapid growth of networking, the Internet and e-business. This concentration presents an overview of computer systems security, together with the opportunity to attain education competencies necessary to develop a security policy, formulate an implementation plan, design and implement security measures, and monitor and manage computer systems security. Outcomes: Core Apply effective leadership strategies and skills Critically evaluate the issues that affect the development and modification of complex software systems Conduct professional, scholarly, applied research Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the field of computer science Select analytical and critical thinking skills for effective decision analysis and problem solving in a specific situation Outcomes: Concentration Assess the need for, and make recommendations on the technical requirements necessary for the implementation of an effective security infrastructure Recommend and defend the implementation of security components at the operating system and network level to include considerations for cloud computing and virtualization. Develop effective enterprise level security policies, standards and procedures including business continuity Courses: Core CS627 CS630 CS635 CS651 CS660 CS672 CS698 Design and Analysis of Algorithms Modern Operating Systems Computer Networking Computer Systems Security Foundations Database Systems Systems Engineering Methods Computer Science Capstone 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4
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Courses: Concentration CS652 Operating Systems Security CS653 Network Security CS654 Security Management CS661 Software Information Assurance
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Elective

Any 600 level course

4 20 48

Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Computer Science degree program is designed to provide technical depth in computer science and in the three concentration areassoftware engineering, security and database management systems. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in mathematics, computer science, and the students concentration area is required. In addition, the student must have an intermediate level of ability to program in a current object-oriented programming language such as C++ or Java, such as is provided by CS215 or IT215. Students who have the required background but need to refresh their mathematics skills are highly encouraged to take MATH501. Students who have the required background but need to refresh some of their computer science skills are highly encouraged to take CS500. Students who do not have the required background in mathematics, computer science, and the concentration or current object oriented programming skills should consult with an Admissions Advisor to design an undergraduate foundation program in preparation for this degree. A resume and entrance essay stating why the student wants to attend graduate school are required in order to successfully assess the students preparation for entrance into the MSCS program. Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

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Master of Science in Computer Science


Database Systems Concentration The Master of Science in Computer Science program centers on a set of core courses which are designed to provide the student with an understanding of operating systems and networking, as well as knowledge of computer system architecture and the software system engineering process. The MSCS program is designed for Computer Science professionals seeking to advance their careers in a broad range of computer fields. Building on the MSCS program core, the concentration courses provide the foundation and focused knowledge for those interested in the database systems field. Successful organizations recognize the importance of high-performance database management systems. The effective operation of these data resources offers strategic advantages in the competitive marketplace. Specialized skills are required to design, configure, and manage these data warehouses. The Database Systems concentration provides the opportunity to attain education competencies necessary to effectively analyze, design, implement and optimize complex data repositories and to transform data into powerful information systems for business. Outcomes: Core Apply effective leadership strategies and skills Critically evaluate the issues that affect the development and modification of complex software systems Conduct a professional, scholarly, applied research report. Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the field of computer science Select analytical and critical thinking skills for effective decision analysis and problem solving in a specific situation Outcomes: Concentration Analyze and compare database models, database languages, and database management systems Design and implement databases and data warehouses to support an organizations information needs Evaluate, monitor, manage resources of database systems with respect to availability, reliability, integrity, performance, and security. Assess design, implementation, use, and performance of distributed database systems. Courses: Core CS627 CS630 CS635 CS651 CS660 CS672 CS698 Design and Analysis of Algorithms Modern Operating Systems Computer Networking Computer Systems Security Foundations Database Systems Systems Engineering Methods Computer Science Capstone 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4 20 48
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Courses: Concentration CS681 Database Design CS682 Database Administration CS683 Data Warehouse CS685 Distributed Databases ELE Any 600 level course Total Program Credits:
Effective January 5, 2014

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Computer Science degree program is designed to provide technical depth in computer science and in the three concentration areassoftware engineering, security and database management systems. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in mathematics, computer science, and the students concentration area is required. In addition, the student must have an intermediate level of ability to program in a current object-oriented programming language such as C++ or Java, such as is provided by CS215 or IT215. Students who have the required background but need to refresh their mathematics skills are highly encouraged to take MATH501. Students who have the required background but need to refresh some of their computer science skills are highly encouraged to take CS500. Students who do not have the required background in mathematics, computer science, and the concentration or current object oriented programming skills should consult with an Admissions Advisor to design an undergraduate foundation program in preparation for this degree. A resume and entrance essay stating why the student wants to attend graduate school are required in order to successfully assess the students preparation for entrance into the MSCS program.

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Master of Science in Computer Science


Software Engineering Concentration The Master of Science in Computer Science program centers on a set of core courses which are designed to provide the student with an understanding of operating systems and networking, as well as knowledge of computer system architecture and the software system engineering process. The MSCS program is designed for Computer Science professionals seeking to advance their careers in a broad range of computer fields. Building on the MSCS program core, the concentration courses provide the foundation and focused knowledge for those interested in the software engineering field. The continued explosive impact of computers and information technology on our everyday lives has generated a need to design and develop new computer software systems and to incorporate new technologies in a rapidly growing range of applications. The tasks performed by software engineers evolve quickly, reflecting new areas of specialization or changes in technology, as well as the preferences and practices of employers. Software engineers apply the principles and techniques of computer science, engineering and mathematical analysis to the design, development, testing and evaluation of the software and systems that enable computers to perform their many applications. The Software Engineering concentration provides the opportunity to attain education competencies in the organization and control of software development and the use of industry-recognized software engineering techniques to successfully deliver software systems requiring a multi-person effort. Outcomes: Core Apply effective leadership strategies and skills Critically evaluate the issues that affect the development and modification of complex software systems Conduct a professional, scholarly, applied research report. Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the field of computer science Select analytical and critical thinking skills for effective decision analysis and problem solving in a specific situation Outcomes: Concentration Perform at the project lead level concerning software systems Formulate an approach for the organization and control of software development efforts Compose state-of-the-practice software engineering techniques requiring a multi-person effort Analyze the effective use of project management tools to provide for resource optimization to meet product delivery challenges Critically evaluate the software process improvement, quality assurance and risk management practices throughout the software development process Courses: Core CS627 CS630 CS635 CS651 CS660 CS672 CS698 Design and Analysis of Algorithms Modern Operating Systems Computer Networking Computer Systems Security Foundations Database Systems Systems Engineering Methods Computer Science Capstone 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4
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Courses: Concentration CS641 Software Requirements Engineering


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CS644 CS649 CS671 ELE

Computer Systems Architecture Software Design Software Systems Engineering Process Any 600 level course

4 4 4 4 20 48

Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Computer Science degree program is designed to provide technical depth in computer science and in the three concentration areassoftware engineering, security and database management systems. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in mathematics, computer science, and the students concentration area is required. In addition, the student must have an intermediate level of ability to program in a current object-oriented programming language such as C++ or Java, such as is provided by CS215 or IT215. Students who have the required background but need to refresh their mathematics skills are highly encouraged to take MATH501. Students who have the required background but need to refresh some of their computer science skills are highly encouraged to take CS500. Students who do not have the required background in mathematics, computer science, and the concentration or current object oriented programming skills should consult with an Admissions Advisor to design an undergraduate foundation program in preparation for this degree. A resume and entrance essay stating why the student wants to attend graduate school are required in order to successfully assess the students preparation for entrance into the MSCS program.

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Master of Science in Electrical Engineering


Advanced communications equipment, defense-related electronics and leading edge technologies in integrated circuit (IC) and computer system design have created an environment in which electrical engineers have enviable career prospects. The Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE) degree program is designed to provide state-of-the-practice knowledge in modern systems design as it is applied to emerging and evolving electrical engineering technologies. In particular, there is an emphasis on in-depth study of digital communications, CMOS technology and computer architecture. At the same time, MSEE students can acquire the valuable skills in project management and leadership necessary for increased responsibility in the engineering field. Outcomes: Design advanced digital, spread-spectrum and space communications systems Design advanced CMOS circuitry Design advanced computer architectures Effectively use project management techniques Courses: Core CE605 CE660 EE600 EE605 EE625 EE645 EE650 EE660 EE692 INTD670 PM600 PM610 Modern Computer Architecture Modern Computer Design Modern Solid State Devices Digital Signal Processing Spread-Spectrum Systems Digital Communications Space Communications Modern Electronic Design Electrical Engineering Capstone Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Project Management Processes in Organizations Project Planning, Execution and Closure 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 48

Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Electrical Engineering degree program is designed to provide technical depth in engineering topics that require a solid foundation in advanced mathematics (including calculus, differential equations and linear algebra), engineering and physics. Students who possess this background but need to refresh their technical or mathematical skills are highly encouraged to take MATH500. Students who have the technical or mathematical background but possess an undergraduate engineering degree other than electrical or computer engineering are highly encouraged to take EE500. Students from a non-engineering undergraduate background should consult with an Engineering Chair or Dean to design an undergraduate foundation engineering program in preparation for this degree. Note: Students seeking dual degrees (MSEE and MSCE) are required to take one additional CS 600-level elective course, instead of the graduate EE Elective in the MSCE program.

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Master of Science in Information Technology


The Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT) centers on a set of core courses designed to provide the learners with an in-depth understanding of both the ever growing challenges that enterprises are facing and the critical information technologies that they can choose and apply to effectively manage those challenges in a dynamic environment. The core courses provide a foundation in strategic management, project management, network infrastructure management, enterprise system architecture, systems security management, and enterprise data management technology. In addition, there is an option to select additional courses from a cross section of these disciplines, or to focus studies in just one specialization. The courses give the learners not only the professional skills necessary for consistently tuning IT strategies and offerings in alignment with the enterprises business goals and business processes, but also a strong foundation to embrace the latest IT technologies and services to assist the enterprise to serve its customers securely and efficiently. Outcome: Core Apply innovative leadership strategies and skills. Explain the concepts of telecommunications and networking, security, database design, and system architecture at an enterprise level. Demonstrate breadth of knowledge and understanding of the field of Information Technology. Employ project management techniques. Apply analytical and critical thinking skills necessary to design, build, integrate and manage Information Technology systems and programs necessary for the operation of an organization. Develop and implement plans and strategies for deployment of Information Technology Architecture within an enterprise. Critically evaluate issues and troubleshoot problems that affect the Information Technology infrastructure of an organization. Conduct professional, scholarly, applied research. Courses: Core CS651 CS663 IT621 IT640 MGMT690 PM600 Computer Systems Security Foundations Enterprise Systems Architecture Enterprise Data Management Networking and Telecommunications Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 16 4 24 48

Courses: Specialization ELE Select 4 credit hours from 600-level Business, CS or IT ELE Select 16 credit hours of electives from the list below IT697 Information Technology Capstone Total Program Credits:

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Courses: Electives CS631 Digital Forensics CS632 Data and Applications Security CS652 Operating Systems Security CS653 Network Security CS654 Security Management CS660 Database Systems CS683 Data Warehouse IT622 Business Intelligence Systems & Methods IT642 Network Administration IT643 Enterprise Network Architecture IT644 IT Governance and Risk Management IT645 Virtual Systems IT698 Advanced Research & Study in Data Management Other elective courses by approval only

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Information Technology degree program is designed to provide technical depth in the issues and concerns for enterprise level solutions. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in Computer Science (CS) or Information Technology (IT) is required. Students without a CS or IT undergraduate degree must demonstrate at least two years of work experience in the field. Students who have successfully completed Colorado Technical Universitys Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program meet the requirements necessary to gain entrance into the MSIT program.

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Master of Science in Information Technology


Data Management Technology Specialization Technological innovations provide ever-increasing amounts of data and information to organizations, for everything from local day-to-day operations, to enterprise-level strategic planning and decision support. Organizations will need skilled professionals who can manage high-performance database systems, design and implement data repositories for multiple formats, environments and locations, retrieve information from the repositories, and develop policies and procedures to protect and preserve the data. They will also need to identify, evaluate, and integrate innovative data management technologies to ensure the organizations competitiveness. The Master of Science in Information Technology with a specialization in Data Management Technology (MSIT-DMT) is a program for students with a desire to develop professional skills in the main functional area of data management and related data management technologies. Outcome: Core Design and implement databases and data warehouses to support an organizations information
needs or enterprise-level database considerations

Analyze risks and develop effective policies to maintain the integrity, security, and continuity of an organizations data across all enterprise locations. Define an enterprise-level data architecture/model including multiple types and formats of data that satisfy the organizations information needs. Plan and manage the development of applications that access data from multiple locations using different types of devices. Computer Systems Security Foundations Enterprise Systems Architecture Enterprise Data Management Networking and Telecommunications Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 48

Courses: Core CS651 CS663 IT621 IT640 MGMT690 PM600

Courses: Specialization CS632 Data and Applications Security CS660 Database Systems CS683 Data Warehouse IT622 Business Intelligence Systems & Methods IT697 Information Technology Capstone IT698 Advanced Research & Study in Data Management Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Information Technology degree program is designed to provide technical depth in the issues and concerns for enterprise level solutions. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in
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Computer Science (CS) or Information Technology (IT) is required. Students without a CS or IT undergraduate degree must demonstrate at least two years of work experience in the field. Students who have successfully completed Colorado Technical Universitys Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program meet the requirements necessary to gain entrance into the MSIT program.

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Master of Science in Information Technology


Network Management Specialization Networks provide the infrastructure to securely store, retrieve and transmit information throughout an organization, bringing people from remote locations together to securely, effectively and efficiently accomplish the mission of the organization. The Network Management concentration prepares competent and ethical professionals that are skilled in analyzing the needs of an enterprise-wide organization, designing the equipment and technologies required, and planning the implementation of the resulting infrastructure. New changes in technologies, such as cloud computing, virtual servers, wireless protocols, satellites, and the Internet are investigated. The Master of Science in Information Technology with a specialization in Network Management (MSIT-NM) is a program for students with a desire to develop professional skills in the main functional area of network management. Outcome: Core Analyze the needs and mission of an organization and document the organizations requirements for a network infrastructure. Evaluate the capabilities of various networking technologies, equipment and software and recommend their appropriate use in an enterprise-wide network. Design and plan the implementation and management of an enterprise network infrastructure for an organization, assuring its security, integrity and availability, while integrating successful new technologies, like wireless computing, virtual servers, cloud computing, and software as a service. Plan and manage the development of applications that access data from multiple locations using different types of devices. Courses: Core CS651 CS663 IT621 IT640 MGMT690 PM600 Computer Systems Security Foundations Enterprise Systems Architecture Enterprise Data Management Networking and Telecommunications Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 48

Courses: Specialization CS653 Network Security IT642 Network Administration IT643 Enterprise Network Architecture IT644 IT Governance and Risk Management IT645 Virtual Systems IT697 Information Technology Capstone Total Program Credits:

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Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Information Technology degree program is designed to provide technical depth in the issues and concerns for enterprise level solutions. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in Computer Science (CS) or Information Technology (IT) is required. Students without a CS or IT undergraduate degree must demonstrate at least two years of work experience in the field. Students who have successfully completed Colorado Technical Universitys Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program meet the requirements necessary to gain entrance into the MSIT program.

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Master of Science in Information Technology


Project Management Specialization
Increased demand for professionals who can integrate and manage a companys information and technology tools has created an ever emerging field in information technology. To help meet the need for this competitive new breed of project management professionals, Colorado Technical University has introduced the Master of Science in Information Technology with a specialization in Project Management (MSIT-PM) degree program. The specialization course content includes a solid core of project management curriculum plus a choice of two additional CS or IT courses to round out technical knowledge. The Master of Science in Information Technology with a specialization in Project Management (MSIT-PM) is a program for students with a desire to develop professional skills in the main functional area of Information Technology Project Management.

Outcome: Core Plan projects effectively and successfully, taking into consideration the quadruple constraints of time, cost, resources, and specifications. Develop from the basic project plan a work-breakdown structure to the lowest granularity permitted by
cost.

Determine and calculate project risks according to classical risk analysis. Plan and manage contractual purchasing issues including procurement and supply, outsourcing, and just-in-time. Evaluate and present project objectives, requirements, scope, and budgeting effectively to upper management. Computer Systems Security Foundations Enterprise Systems Architecture Enterprise Data Management Networking and Telecommunications Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 8 4 24 48

Courses: Core CS651 CS663 IT621 IT640 MGMT690 PM600

Courses: Specialization PM610 Project Planning, Execution and Closure PM620 Schedule and Cost Control Techniques PM630 Contracting and Procurement in Project Management ELE Select 8 credit hours from 600-level Computer Science or IT courses IT697 Information Technology Capstone Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Information Technology degree program is designed to provide technical depth in the issues and concerns for enterprise level solutions. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in Computer Science (CS) or Information Technology (IT) is required. Students without a CS or IT undergraduate
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degree must demonstrate at least two years of work experience in the field. Students who have successfully completed Colorado Technical Universitys Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program meet the requirements necessary to gain entrance into the MSIT program.

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Master of Science in Information Technology


Security Management Specialization Protecting the assets and information of an organizations vital enterprise computing infrastructure continues to be an area of large and growing concern. This concern gains greater momentum in the face of mobile and cloud computing. These courses are intended to develop, in the student, the ability to architect, plan, design, implement, monitor, and manage suitable computer security systems for such an enterprise. The Master of Science in Information Technology with a specialization in Security Management (MSIT-SM) is a program for students with a desire to develop professional skills in the main functional area of security management. Outcome: Core Assess the need for, and make recommendations on the technical requirements necessary for the implementation of an effective security infrastructure. Identify and describe the impact of implementing security components at the operating system and network level. Develop effective enterprise level security policies, standards and procedures. Courses: Core CS651 CS663 IT621 IT640 MGMT690 PM600 Computer Systems Security Foundations Enterprise Systems Architecture Enterprise Data Management Networking and Telecommunications Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Project Management Processes in Organizations 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 48

Courses: Specialization CS631 Digital Forensics CS632 Data and Applications Security CS652 Operating Systems Security CS653 Network Security CS654 Security Management IT697 Information Technology Capstone Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Information Technology degree program is designed to provide technical depth in the issues and concerns for enterprise level solutions. In order to achieve this depth a solid foundation in Computer Science (CS) or Information Technology (IT) is required. Students without a CS or IT undergraduate degree must demonstrate at least two years of work experience in the field. Students who have successfully completed Colorado Technical Universitys Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program meet the requirements necessary to gain entrance into the MSIT program.

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Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

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Master of Science in Systems Engineering


In the design of todays complex products and systems, too much is at stake not to approach product and system development in a systematic manner. Commercial and government contractor companies simply cannot afford design processes that do not provide for detailed analysis of the requirements, requirements traceability, detailed documentation, modern design synthesis techniques and a thorough validation that the design meets specifications. In addition, designers and managers must observe accepted quality assurance standards and employ appropriate project management techniques to ensure that budget, schedule and quality requirements are met. All of these skills may eventually be obtained by years of experience on the job, but todays companies cannot afford to wait! The answer is systems engineering education. The Master of Science in Systems Engineering (MSSE) program has been designed to meet industry needs for systems engineering skills. Outcomes: Plan, manage and participate in the complete SE life-cycle process and sub-processes from commercial industry and government contractor perspectives Select and apply modern SE tools, including operations research, system modeling/simulation/test methods, synthesis techniques, process control and system Define the role and scope of SE and its interface with the related areas of project management, operations, logistics, performance, test, manufacturing, training and support, reliability/maintainability, quality assurance and disposal Select and apply appropriate industry/government standards, models, metrics and documentation standards incorporated in SE practice Apply oral and written communications skills essential to the SE process Courses: Core MGMT600 PM610 PM620 SCM620 SE600 SE610 SE612 SE620 SE630 Applied Managerial Decision-Making Project Planning, Execution and Closure Schedule and Cost Control Techniques Impact on Design & Production Systems Engineering I Systems Engineering II Quantitative Analysis for Systems System Dynamics, Modeling, and Simulation Systems Acquisition Processes and Standards 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36 12 48

Courses: Electives ELE Select 12 hours of electives from CS/CE/IT/EE 600-level Total Program Credits:

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Systems Engineering degree program is designed to provide technical depth in engineering topics that require a solid foundation in advanced mathematics (including calculus, differential equations, Laplace and Fourier transforms, probability, and linear algebra), engineering and physics. Students who possess this background but need to refresh their mathematics/systems skills are highly encouraged to take MATH500 and SE500. Electives in CS may require additional background in undergraduate computer science topics. CS500, Foundations in Computer Science, and knowledge of a current programming language may be
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required to ensure an adequate foundation. These courses may be skipped with sufficient undergraduate preparation or life experience. Electives in EE or CE may require a background in undergraduate electrical or computer engineering. Students from a non-engineering undergraduate background should consult with an Engineering Chair or Dean to design an undergraduate foundation engineering program in preparation for this degree.

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Bachelor of Science in Accounting


An increase in the number of businesses, changing financial laws and regulations, and increased scrutiny of company finances will spur the job growth of accountants and auditors. Increasingly, accountants also are assuming the role of a personal financial advisor. In response to market demand, these financial specialists will offer more financial management and consulting services as they take on a greater advisory role. In addition to openings resulting from growth (projected at 18 to 26 percent through 2014), the need to replace accountants and auditors who retire or transfer to other occupations will produce numerous job openings. The Bachelor of Science in Accounting (BSACC) degree program is designed to equip graduates with a variety of skills including corporate accounting, taxation, governmental and not-for-profit accounting, and auditing. In addition, the curriculum provides students with an opportunity to develop intellectual, interpersonal and communication skills so that as graduates they can succeed in the business world. Outcomes: Apply the knowledge and skills of accounting, management, business mathematics, and the liberal arts to identify, resolve, and communicate relevant accounting issues Prepare, comprehend and interpret the required financial statements according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the importance of the moral standards embodied in the professional code of ethics Distinguish between financial, managerial, cost accounting and tax accounting principles and practices Distinguish the appropriate information to be used in managerial decision making Distinguish between the accounting principles used for federal income taxation of both individuals and business, and evaluate the impact of those differences on the financial statements and managerial decision making Identify, formulate, and communicate the relevant accounting issues in the Sarbanes-Oxley era Manage a complete set of accounts for a small to moderate-sized organization Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing HIST101 or Modern American History: 1950 to 21st Century or GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective or
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HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 ACCT203 ACCT210 ACCT220 ACCT225 ACCT300 ACCT305 ACCT325 ACCT330 ACCT340 ACCT351 ACCT410 ACCT420 ACCT430 ECON310 FINC225 FINC400 HRMT215 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 UNIV201

Humanities Elective

4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 113 4 4 183

Accounting I Accounting II Accounting III Computerized Accounting Introduction to Managerial & Cost Accounting Introduction to Tax Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Auditing Auditing Lab Advanced Accounting Cost Accounting Advanced Tax Government & Not for Profit Accounting Introduction to International Financial Reporting Standards Global Managerial Economics Financial Statement Analysis Financial Management Management of Human Resources Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Career Planning and Management

ELECTIVES Select a minimum of 4-credits from any 300- or 400- level Business course Total Program Credits:

*Students are required to complete courses ACCT201, ACCT202, and ACCT203 before progressing to the elective courses. Accounting courses at CTU align with the educational standards of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The student who meets the unique content and hours requirements of the State Board of Accounting in their states Application for CPA Licensure is qualified to sit for the CPA exam. This program curriculum also integrates the competencies and body of knowledge in the Certified Managerial Accounting (CMA) exam. This program is not designed to prepare students for the CPA or CMA examination or any other
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certification exam, but covers the knowledge areas of the uniform CPA and CMA certification.

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Accounting Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-ACCT Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of the functional areas of accounting The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting (BSBA-ACCT) is designed to prepare graduates for a career as an accountant. Students will develop proficiency in accounting and management. BSBA-ACCT program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Identify and resolve accounting issues ethically Analyze accounts for a small to medium-size organization Prepare financial statements for business according to US GAAP; and use accounting tools for decision making Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Accounting Concentration ACCT210 Computerized Accounting ACCT300 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT305 Intermediate Accounting II ACCT351 Cost Accounting ACCT460 Accounting Capstone FINC225 Financial Statement Analysis FINP310 Taxation in Financial Planning ELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours Total Program Credits

Accounting courses at CTU align to the educational standards of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The student who meets the unique requirements of the State Board of Accounting in their states Application for CPA Licensure is qualified to sit for the CPA exam.

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Business Development The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-BD Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of business development principles The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Business Development (BSBA-BD) will use psychological theories, data, and research to understand the personality, behaviors, motivation, and success factors of individuals who excel at creating and maintaining businesses. The program will apply psychological research on consumer behavior, innovation, leadership, and personality to the dynamics of entrepreneurship. BSBA-BD program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Describe the role of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship within and between organizations Identify the skills needed to start and grow a business Describe how to use trends in consumer behavior to leverage market opportunities and create new markets using relationship development, social media, and mass media Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences
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SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Business Development Concentration BADM475 Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship BHVS316 Psychology and Mass Media CB460 Sales and Advertising CB475 Consumer Behavior: Groups and Society PSYC305 Psychology of Entrepreneurship/Intrapreneurship PSYC325 Psychology and Social Media PSYC426 Leadership PSYC434 Stress Management Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Finance Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-FIN Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of financial management The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Finance degree (BSBA-FIN) is designed to prepare graduates for a career in financial management. Students will develop proficiency in financial accounting, capital and money markets, investments and risk assessment knowledge. BSBA-FIN program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Demonstrate the application of financial information systems including spreadsheets and database applications Evaluate ways in which monetary & fiscal policy can influence a nation's economic goals of achieving full employment, and controlling inflation Recognize the functions and roles performed by financial markets and institutions particularity as they relate to the flow of funds from lenders to borrowers within the global financial system Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making
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SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Finance Concentration ACC340 Financial Accounting ELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours FINC225 Financial Statement Analysis FINC310 Money and Capital Markets FINC320 Investments FINC330 Risk Management FINC410 Corporate Finance FINC420 International Finance Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Healthcare Management Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-HCM Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of healthcare management principles The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration Healthcare Management (BSBA-HCM) degree program is designed to prepare graduates for careers in the healthcare industry. Students will develop proficiency in healthcare management which includes the legal, ethical, and regulatory issues governing the healthcare field. BSBA-HCM program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Demonstrate the generalist skills needed in healthcare management Explain the functions healthcare organizations Analyze the regulatory requirements governing the healthcare field Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

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Courses: Healthcare Management Concentration HCM307 The Health Care Industry HCM337 Current Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues in Healthcare HCM367 The Healthcare Organization HCM387 Management Principles in Healthcare HCM410 Fiscal Management in Healthcare Services HRM335 Legal Issues in HRM ELE Select a minimum of 8 credit hours from upper division courses Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Human Resource Management Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-HRM Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge of the functional areas of HR management The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management (BSBA-HRM) is designed to prepare graduates for careers as a human resource generalist. Students will develop proficiency in employment law, staffing, job design, compensation, benefits, workforce development, and performance improvement. BSBA-HRM program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Analyze legal implications of employment and labor law in relation to HR policies and practices, applying principles of diversity management to HR policies and labor relations Demonstrate the ability to work comfortably and effectively in a multicultural workforce Apply strategic thinking to human resource planning and policy consideration Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences
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SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Human Resource Management Concentration HRM345 Building Effective Teams HRMT220 Staffing the Organization HRMT300 Managing Employee Performance HRMT330 HRM Legal Environment HRMT410 Training and Employee Development HRMT415 Compensation and Benefits HRMT420 Managing Labor-Management Relations HRMT485 Human Resources Capstone Total Program Credits

* Capstone class, HRMT485, may be conducted incrementally based on campus decision. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has acknowledged that Colorado Technical Universitys Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management fully aligns with SHRMs HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates. The HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates were developed by SHRM to define
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the minimum HR content areas that should be studied by HR students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The guidelines, created in 2006 and revalidated in 2010 and 2013, are part of SHRMs Academic Initiative to define HR education standards taught in university business schools and help universities develop degree programs that follow these standards.

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


International Business Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-IB Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of international business principles The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in International Business program (BSBA-IB) is designed to prepare graduates for careers in multi-national organizations. Graduates will develop proficiency in cross-cultural communication, global negotiation, global market acumen, international trade law, virtual-team participation and leadership. BSBA-IB program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Explain the impact a global marketplace has on management practices, human resources, and strategic decision making Develop an international market-entry strategy Identify the cultural, legal, political and financial issues associated with managing in global environments Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences
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SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 8 8 32 180

Courses: International Business Concentration FIN356 International Finance MGM336 Management in International Business MGM366 Legal Operations in International Business MKTG410 International Marketing ELE Select a minimum of 8 credit hours from upper division courses BUSELE or Select a minimum of 8 credit hours from Business or MGMTELE Management courses Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Information Technology Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-IT Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of information technology management The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Information Technology (BSBA-IT) is designed to prepare graduates for a career in the information technology field. Students will develop proficiency in information technology skills such as programming, networking, security, and database administration. BSBA-IT program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Develop the skills to address information systems and technology related issues such as spreadsheets and database applications Demonstrate the functional aspects of the information technology field and the application of critical thinking skills to technology related issues Create and apply data management tools Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making
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SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Information Technology Concentration CS251 Fundamentals of Database Concepts CSS150 Introduction to Computer Security IT106 Introduction to Programming Logic IT110 Introduction to Programming IT190 Introduction to IT IT245 Introduction to Network Management IT375 IT Management Strategy ELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Logistics/Supply Chain Management Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-L/SCM Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of logistics and supply chain management The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Logistics and Supply Chain Management (BSBA-L/SCM) is designed to prepare graduates for a career in supply chain management. Students will develop proficiency in qualitative and quantitative techniques for distribution management, inventory control, procurement, and supplier management from a global perspective. BSBA-L/SCM program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Demonstrate the application of supply chain and logistics management systems to business strategy and operations Discuss issues associated with integrating supply chain factors throughout the value chain from product design, through manufacturing, delivery, support, and disposal Apply quantitative and qualitative managerial methods to global supply chain management Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making
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SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Logistics/Supply Chain Management Concentration BADM370 Quality Management SCM220 Transportation and Distribution Management SCM310 Material and Inventory Management SCM320 Contracts and Procurement SCM330 Contract Pricing and Negotiation SCM410 Contract Management SCM430 Logistics/Supply Chain Management Capstone ELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours Total Program Credits *Capstone class, SCM430, may be conducted incrementally based on campus decision.

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Management Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-MGMT Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate the ability to manage teams in a diverse work environment The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Management (BSBA-MGMT) is designed to prepare graduates for a career in management. Students will develop proficiency in leadership and management practices for work in the public and private sector. BSBA-MGMT program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Demonstrate the ability to work comfortably and effectively in multicultural teams Facilitate collaborative team environments Identify supervisory skills to effectively manage individuals and teams Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 8 4 32 180

Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

Courses: Management Concentration ACCT351 Cost Accounting BADM370 Quality Management HRMT330 HRM Legal Environment MKTG320 Advertising and Public Relations MPM344 Project Risk Management BUS/MGMTELE Select a minimum of 8 credit hours from Business or Management courses ELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Marketing Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-MKTG Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of marketing principles The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing (BSBA-MKTG) is designed to prepare graduates for careers in marketing. Students will develop proficiency in sales, marketing communications, channel development (including multimedia) and consumer behavior. BSBA-MKTG program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Explain the fundamental concepts of marketing and their role in an organization Prepare marketing research, including problem definition, research design, data collection, data analysis, and the resulting communication Develop a strategic marketing plan, including e-marketing for a product or service Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Marketing Concentration MKT325 Consumer Behavior Fundamentals MKT380 Applied Marketing Management MKTG305 Marketing and the Virtual Marketplace MKTG320 Advertising and Public Relations MKTG330 Marketing Research MKTG410 International Marketing MKTG420 Product Service Planning BUS/MGMTELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours from Business or Management courses Total Program Credits 1. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Industry-Occupations Employment Matrix

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Organizational Behavior The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-OB Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Demonstrate knowledge and application of organizational behavior principles The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Organizational Behavior (BSBA-OB) will apply organizational development principles to effectively and efficiently run, change, and grow an organization through developing people, communicating vision, storytelling to establish culture, hiring the right people, motivating employees, building effective teams, and maintaining a healthy workplace. BSBA-OB program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Explain theories of organizational behavior, organizational development, and I/O psychology Examine personality dynamics and diversity issue in the workplace and how they impact the organization Demonstrate how to manage, motivate, and lead groups of people to achieve organizational objectives Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 180

Courses: Organizational Behavior Concentration BHVS215 Motivation and Emotion BHVS315 Interpersonal Communication and Dynamics HRM345 Building Effective Teams OB460 Creating Change in Individuals and Organizations OB470 Developing Human Resources PSYC310 Organizational Psychology PSYC424 Diversity PSYC426 Leadership Total Program Credits

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Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Project Management Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration provides students with foundational business knowledge, linking industry concepts with real-world examples that foster applied learning to prepare students for their chosen career. Students develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of management. The program builds on technical skills and soft skills to support the students professional growth. BSBA-PM Program prepares the student to: Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives Summarize how management knowledge and skills support organizational performance Apply basic project management fundamentals to business processes The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Project Management (BSBA-PM) is designed to prepare graduates for careers in project management. Students will develop proficiency in business tools/techniques and the principles/skills of project management. BSBA-PM program competencies: Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Explain how managers assist organizations, individuals, and teams to adapt to continuous change. Demonstrate competencies and professional skills in management and business. Analyze business organizations from a managerial perspective. Identify tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement Analyze project scope and identify project key tasks and stakeholders; manage scope changes Define a project, project management, and type of project structures, project life cycle phases, knowledge areas, and process Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications GOVT201 or American Government and Public Affairs or HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 BADM440 ECON310 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGM335 MGM355 MGM365 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Accounting I Accounting II Research Design Methods & Applications Global Managerial Economics Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 4 6 6 4 32 180

Courses: Project Management Concentration MPM332 Organizational Leadership MPM344 Project Risk Management MPM346 Contracts and Procurement MPM357 Project Performance and Quality Assurance MPM434 Project Scheduling and Cost MPM468 HR Project Management ELE Select a minimum of 4 credit hours from upper division Total Program Credits

This degree is accredited by the Project Management Institute's Global Accreditation Center (PMI-GAC). CTU is a recognized provider with the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Provider Program (PMI R.E.P.)

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Bachelor of Science in Project Management


The Bachelor of Science in Project Management (BSPM) is designed to prepare graduates for a career as project manager. Students will develop proficiency in effectively organizing/managing projects utilizing a practical approach that develops project leadership and team building skills. The BSPM Program prepares the student to: Understand how leadership and management influence project team and stakeholder engagement Apply best practices as described in the PMBOK guide to accomplish project work Identify and analyze project scope to meet customer expectations BSPM Program Competencies: Assess personal leadership style and adapt to needs of situations, employees, and co-workers. Evaluate the impact that a global marketplace and economy has on project management practices, human resources, and strategic decision making. Discover how project managers align organizational strategy with leadership and stakeholder needs to satisfy project requirements. Apply appropriate PMBOK Guide knowledge areas to project situations and work environments. Define a project, project management, and type of project structures, project life cycle phases, knowledge areas, and process. Explain management and integration of organizational programs and project portfolios. Identify tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement. Create and implement a proactive risk management and quality plan and develop contingency plans. Analyze project scope and identify project key tasks and stakeholders; manage scope changes. Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century HUMN250 or World Values and Cultures or LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH451 Data Driven Decision Making PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals PSYC102 or Introductory Psychology SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab - Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or HUMNELE Humanities Elective 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66

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Courses: Core ACCT201 ACCT202 ACCT203 BADM150 MGM335 MGM316 BADM440 FINC400 HRMT215 HRMT440 IT190 IT254 MGMT115 MGMT235 MGMT345 MGMT455 MKTG225 MPM210 SCM210 UNIV201

Accounting I Accounting II Accounting III Contemporary Business Trends Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Communications Research Design Methods and Applications Financial Management Management of Human Resources Managing Organizational Change Introduction to IT Spreadsheet Applications Introductory Business Practices Business Law I Operations Management Business Policies and Strategies Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Project Management Introduction to Logistics/Supply Chain Management Career Planning and Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 82 4 4 4 6 6 4 4 32 180

Courses: Concentration MPM344 Project Risk Management MPM346 Contracts and Procurement MPM357 Project Performance and Quality Assurance MPM434 Project Scheduling and Cost MPM468 HR Project Management PM220 or Project Management Tools MPM332 Organizational Leadership PM430 Project Management Capstone Total Program Credits:

This degree is accredited by the Project Management Institute's Global Accreditation Center (PMI-GAC). CTU is a recognized provider with the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Provider Program (PMI R.E.P.).

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Associate of Science in Accounting


Effective May 20, 2012, this program is no longer available for future enrollments at the Sioux Falls Campus. An increase in the number of businesses, changing financial laws and regulations, and increased scrutiny of company finances will spur the job growth of accountants and auditors. Increasingly, accountants also are assuming the role of a personal financial advisor. In response to market demand, these financial specialists will offer more financial management and consulting services as they take on a greater advisory role. In addition to openings resulting from growth (projected at 18 to 26 percent through 2014), the need to replace accountants and auditors who retire or transfer to other occupations will produce numerous job openings. The Associate of Science in Accounting (ASACC) degree program is designed to equip graduates with a variety of basic accounting skills that will be useful in an entry level accounting position. The curriculum provides students with an opportunity to develop intellectual, interpersonal and communication skills needed to succeed in the business world. The ASACC program prepares the student to: Demonstrate knowledge and application of the functional areas of accounting Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives The Associate of Science in Accounting (ASACC) is designed to prepare graduates for an entry level or generalist career in accounting. Students will develop proficiency in foundational accounting and business practices. ASACC program competencies: Identify and resolve accounting issues ethically Analyze accounts for a small to medium-side organization Prepare financial statements for business according to US GAAP; and use accounting tools for decision making. Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century or GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5
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SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core IT254 MGM255 MGMT235 UNIV201 ACCT201 ACCT202 ACCT203 ACCT210 ACCT225

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 1.5 4.5 57 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36 93

Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals Business Law I Career Planning and Management Accounting I Accounting II Accounting III Computerized Accounting Introduction to Tax

Total Program Credits:

Accounting courses at CTU align to the educational standards of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The student who meets the unique requirements of the State Board of Accounting in their states Application for CPA Licensure is qualified to sit for the CPA exam.

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 138

Associate of Science in Business Administration


The Associate of Science in Business Administration (ASBA) degree program is designed to provide a strong base consisting of business fundamentals that will prepare students to enter todays competitive business world. The program focuses on teaching students key business administration techniques, including critical thinking and decision-making skills, and incorporates that knowledge with the communication skills every student needs to be successful. Students will gain practical, real-world knowledge from our professorsall with extensive business experience. The ASBA program prepares the student to: Demonstrate knowledge and application of the functional areas of management Apply business skills and analytical problem-solving to support organizational objectives The Associate of Science in Business Administration (ASBA) is designed to prepare graduates for careers in office administration. Students will develop proficiency in the foundations of business and management. ASBA program competencies: Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of management. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of business administration to participate in effective, ethical decision making. Explain the nature and role of business in global markets. Employ tools, principles, and techniques of continuous process improvement in order to achieve quality and excellence in the workplace. Apply appropriate concepts and principles of finance, accounting, and statistics to make effective decisions. Demonstrate the application of management information systems including spreadsheets and database applications. Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications HIST101 or Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century or GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success HUMNELE or Humanities Elective Courses: Core ACCT201 Accounting I
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 57 4
Page 139

ACCT202 HRMT215 IT254 MGM255 MGM316 MGMT235 MKTG225 UNIV201

Accounting II Management of Human Resources Spreadsheet Applications Management Fundamentals International Business Communications Business Law I Introduction to Marketing Career Planning and Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36 93

Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 140

Master of Science in Homeland Security


(Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Master of Science in Homeland Security (MS-HLS) program is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the homeland security enterprise at the strategic policymaking level. The program will be geared towards homeland security practitioners and provide them with analytical and communication tools to allow them to become decision-makers in one or more areas of the field. The program will also expand their knowledge base of other disciplines within the larger homeland security enterprise thus helping them understand the role of a given discipline, such as law enforcement, fire, emergency services, public health, etc. in the larger homeland security picture. The program curriculum is designed for students with previous coursework and/or prior work experience in homeland security. Although prior knowledge or experience in the homeland security field is not required, it is highly recommended.. In addition to the broad-based core curriculum, students will have the option of choosing electives in particular subfields of homeland security. Outcomes (Core): Outline trends in the development and evolution of the HLS enterprise. Analyze current policy issues within the HLS enterprise and/or its sub-disciplines. Use research to suggest policy solutions to existing HLS problems. Explore strategies and institutional frameworks that affect HLS policy. Analyze the role of the intelligence community, first-responders, the military, the private sector and others in the HLS enterprise. Interpret, synthesize and critique the threat posed by terrorism, natural disasters and public health emergencies. Analyze the legal, institutional and policy barriers to unity of effort and enhanced HLS policy and the possible methodologies for circumventing or eliminating those barriers. Evaluate the impact of policies within HLS sub-disciplines on the creation of a common HLS strategy and effort. Courses: Core HLS601 HLS602 HLS603 HLS604 HLS605 HLS606 HLS616 HLS618 HLS689 Homeland Security Fundamentals Dynamics of Terrorism Technology Solutions for HLS Intelligence Organizational and Policy Challenges Vulnerability Analysis and Protection Homeland Security and Government Research, Writing, and Critical Thinking Private Sector Role in Homeland Security Homeland Security Capstone 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36 Courses: Concentration HLSELE1-4 Elective chosen from Emergency Management and Public Health track (listed below)
Effective January 5, 2014

4
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HLSELE2-4 HLSELE3-4/4-4 Total Program Credits:

Elective chosen from Cybersecurity Policy track (listed below) Elective chosen from any of the tracks listed below

4 8 16 52 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Courses: Emergency Management and Public Health track HLS621 Disaster Emergency Planning HLS622 Principles of Disaster Medicine HLS623 Emergency Management and Communication in Disasters HLS624 Introduction to Public Health Courses: Cyber Security track HLS641 Introduction to Cybersecurity Policy HLS642 Government and the Cyber Sector HLS643 Cyber Organizations and Structures HLS644 Emerging Initiatives in Cybersecurity Strategy

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 142

Master of Science in Homeland Security


Cybersecurity Policy Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Master of Science in Homeland Security (MS-HLS) program is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the homeland security enterprise at the strategic policymaking level. The program will be geared towards homeland security practitioners and provide them with analytical and communication tools to allow them to become decision-makers in one or more areas of the field. The program will also expand their knowledge base of other disciplines within the larger homeland security enterprise thus helping them understand the role of a given discipline, such as law enforcement, fire, emergency services, public health, etc. in the larger homeland security picture. The program curriculum is designed for students with previous coursework and/or prior work experience in homeland security. Although prior knowledge or experience in the homeland security field is not required, it is highly recommended. The Cybersecurity Policy concentration will focus on the challenges, laws and institutions that govern Cybersecurity policy and will delve into Cybersecurity strategy as well as the role of government and the private sector in Cybersecurity policymaking. Outcomes (Core): Outline trends in the development and evolution of the HLS enterprise. Analyze current policy issues within the HLS enterprise and/or its sub-disciplines. Use research to suggest policy solutions to existing HLS problems. Explore strategies and institutional frameworks that affect HLS policy. Analyze the role of the intelligence community, first-responders, the military, the private sector and others in the HLS enterprise. Interpret, synthesize and critique the threat posed by terrorism, natural disasters and public health emergencies. Analyze the legal, institutional and policy barriers to unity of effort and enhanced HLS policy and the possible methodologies for circumventing or eliminating those barriers. Evaluate the impact of policies within HLS sub-disciplines on the creation of a common HLS strategy and effort. Outcomes (Cybersecurity Policy Concentration): Compare competing Cybersecurity governance structures Evaluate challenges to establishment of comprehensive Cybersecurity policy within competing government agencies and the private sector Analyze the dynamics of security and privacy trade-offs as they relate to Internet governance Synthesize core components of law and policy that are implicated in inter-disciplinary approaches to Cybersecurity policy Justify the limits of government and industry roles in Cybersecurity, consistent with fundamental legal and cultural principles which form American society Synthesize multilateral approaches to suggest a framework for future government planning Develop recommendations for multinational approaches to Cybersecurity policy Courses: Core HLS601 Homeland Security Fundamentals HLS602 Dynamics of Terrorism HLS603 Technology Solutions for HLS
Effective January 5, 2014

4 4 4
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HLS604 HLS605 HLS606 HLS616 HLS618 HLS689

Intelligence Organizational and Policy Challenges Vulnerability Analysis and Protection Homeland Security and Government Research, Writing, and Critical Thinking Private Sector Role in Homeland Security Homeland Security Capstone

4 4 4 4 4 4 36 4 4 4 4 16 52

Courses: Cyber Security Concentration HLS641 Introduction to Cybersecurity Policy HSL642 Government and the Cyber Sector HLS643 Cyber Organizations and Structures HLS644 Emerging Initiatives in Cybersecurity Strategy Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 144

Master of Science in Homeland Security


Emergency Management and Public Health Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Master of Science in Homeland Security (MS-HLS) program is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the homeland security enterprise at the strategic policymaking level. The program will be geared towards homeland security practitioners and provide them with analytical and communication tools to allow them to become decision-makers in one or more areas of the field. The program will also expand their knowledge base of other disciplines within the larger homeland security enterprise thus helping them understand the role of a given discipline, such as law enforcement, fire, emergency services, public health, etc. in the larger homeland security picture. The program curriculum is designed for students with previous coursework and/or prior work experience in homeland security. Although prior knowledge or experience in the homeland security field is not required, it is highly recommended. The Emergency Management and Public Health concentration will focus on understanding challenges and best practices within the Emergency Management and Public Health fields including the management of disasters and public health emergencies. Outcomes (Core): Outline trends in the development and evolution of the HLS enterprise. Analyze current policy issues within the HLS enterprise and/or its sub-disciplines. Use research to suggest policy solutions to existing HLS problems. Explore strategies and institutional frameworks that affect HLS policy. Analyze the role of the intelligence community, first-responders, the military, the private sector and others in the HLS enterprise. Interpret, synthesize and critique the threat posed by terrorism, natural disasters and public health emergencies. Analyze the legal, institutional and policy barriers to unity of effort and enhanced HLS policy and the possible methodologies for circumventing or eliminating those barriers. Evaluate the impact of policies within HLS sub-disciplines on the creation of a common HLS strategy and effort. Outcomes (Emergency Management and Public Health Concentration): Explore the challenges and best-practices within the Emergency Management and Public Health disciplines. Analyze alternative approaches to strengthening Emergency Management planning and response and the preparedness of the Public Health system, particularly with respect to the managing of public health emergencies. Develop effective policies for enhancing emergency and disaster management, syndromic surveillance, quarantine and prophylaxis dispensing. Courses: Core HLS601 HLS602 HLS603 HLS604 HLS605 HLS606 HLS616 Homeland Security Fundamentals Dynamics of Terrorism Technology Solutions for HLS Intelligence Organizational and Policy Challenges Vulnerability Analysis and Protection Homeland Security and Government Research, Writing, and Critical Thinking 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Effective January 5, 2014

HLS618 HLS689

Private Sector Role in Homeland Security Homeland Security Capstone

4 4 36 4 4 4 4 16 52

Courses: Concentration HLS621 Disaster Emergency Planning HLS622 Principles of Disaster Medicine HLS623 Emergency Management and Communication in Disasters HLS624 Introduction to Public Health Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 146

Master of Science in Criminal Justice


The Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) is designed for criminal justice professionals seeking to advance their careers in law enforcement, corrections, court systems and academia. The curriculum serves as strong preparation for students interested in leadership and teaching roles in criminal justice. This program is designed specifically to develop the knowledge base and skills essential to those who will become the leaders in policy development, planning and decision making in the criminal justice system. The Master of Science in Criminal Justice reflects the balance needed for leadership, along with the information base necessary to enhance responsible policy-making. The MSCJ program prepares the student to: work in a leadership role in a criminal justice environment possess the knowledge and skills to secure a leadership position in the criminal justice field demonstrate and support the professional and ethical standards expected of criminal justice professionals possess the knowledge and skills to fulfill the policymaking responsibilities of a leader in a criminal justice related field Courses: Core INTD670 MGMT605 CJUS600 CJUS615 CJUS625 CJUS650 CJUS675 Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Graduate Research Methods Advanced Review of Criminal Justice Criminology and Public Policy Issues of Diversity in Criminal Justice Terrorism and Homeland Security Management Special Topics in Criminal Justice 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4 20 48

Courses: Concentration CJUS620 Court Services Management CJUS630 Law Enforcement Management CJUS640 Corrections Management CJUS685 Graduate Criminal Justice Capstone HRMT645 Operational Human Resources Management Total Program Credits

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Criminal Justice degree program is designed with an in-depth focus in the area of policy. Students from a non-criminal justice undergraduate background are required to successfully complete CJUS500 prior to taking CJUS600. Students who possess this background but need to refresh their knowledge of criminal justice concepts are encouraged to take CJUS500. This course is focused on giving students sufficient background on basic criminal justice concepts and terms common to the profession.

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 147

Master of Science in Criminal Justice


Homeland Security Concentration The MSCJ-HLS degree is designed to serve as a concentration option for students in the criminal justice discipline that are focused on careers/missions within the homeland security realm. The curriculum serves as strong preparation for students and professionals interested in criminal justice roles that align or interact with homeland security functions and organizations. The roles of criminal justice agencies and professionals as they relate to homeland security are ever evolving. This program is designed specifically to develop the homeland security knowledge base and skills essential to those who will become the leaders in policy development, planning and decision making in the criminal justice system. The Master of Science in Criminal Justice reflects the balance needed for leadership, along with the information base necessary to enhance responsible policy-making. Outcomes Work in a leadership role in a criminal justice environment, with a focus on homeland security Possess the knowledge and skills to be a competitive candidate to secure a leadership position in a criminal justice organization with a focus on homeland security Abide by the professional and ethical standards established by criminal justice and homeland security agencies Possess the knowledge and skills to fulfill the policymaking responsibilities of a leader in a criminal justice organization with a focus on homeland security Courses: Core INTD670 MGMT605 CJUS600 CJUS615 CJUS625 CJUS650 CJUS675 Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making Graduate Research Methods Advanced Review of Criminal Justice Criminology and Public Policy Issues of Diversity in Criminal Justice Terrorism and Homeland Security Management Special Topics in Criminal Justice 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4 4 4 4 4 20 48

Courses: Concentration HLS620 Technology Solutions for HLS HLS630 Organizational and Policy Challenges HLS640 Vulnerability Analysis and Protection HLS650 Homeland Security and Government CJUS687 MSCJ-Homeland Security Concentration Capstone Total Program Credits

Preparatory Requirements The CTU Master of Science in Criminal Justice degree program is designed with an in-depth focus in the area of policy. Students from a non-criminal justice undergraduate background are required to successfully complete
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 148

CJUS500 prior to taking CJUS600. Students who possess this background but need to refresh their knowledge of criminal justice concepts are encouraged to take CJUS500. This course is focused on giving students sufficient background on basic criminal justice concepts and terms common to the profession.

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 149

Bachelor of Science in Cybercrime Investigation


Computer-based crime has become an enormous global problem for business and law enforcement agencies at all levels. As a result, there is a growing need for individuals who combine criminal justice knowledge with computer technology skills to investigate this new and growing area of criminal activity. The Bachelor of Science in Cybercrime Investigation (BSCI) degree program is designed to equip graduates with a base of practical, real-world applications in the field of criminal justice with strong emphasis on foundational studies in the electronic criminal investigation of such crimes as fraud, identity theft, computer terrorism and other computer-related crimes that are committed in both a national and global environment. The investigation of computer-based crimes is not limited to federal, state, and local agencies, but is also increasing in organizations that conduct business in an electronic environment. Outcomes: Interpret the basic organizational structure and functionality of the criminal justice system Identify the phases of an ethical and legal criminal investigation conducted through the proper phases of the investigative process Explain the importance of security in an organization as well as an understanding of security architecture for common computer platforms and applications Analyze the relationship between criminal law, computer and cyber-crime, and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering and preserving computer forensic evidence Define and explain the fundamentals of current computer networks and protocols of data communications Explain database concepts and capabilities of modern database systems, and apply those concepts in identifying the use of database systems in criminal activity

Courses: General Education CJUS261 Ethics in Criminal Justice ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy ELE Humanities Elective MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab - Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 or Introductory Sociology or SOCL340 Diversity in American Life UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 150

Courses: General Education Humanities Elective Choices HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century HUMN250 World Values and Cultures LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life Courses: Core ACCT199 ACCT201 CJUS141 CJUS254 CJUS290 CJUS375 CJUS440 CJUS448 CJUS475 or CJUS484 CS104 CS146 CSS150 CSS200 CSS350 CSS351 HRMT215 IT140 IT205 IT235 IT254 IT340 IT400 MGM335 MGMT115 PBAD201 PSYC337 PSYC436 SOCL350 UNIV201

4.5 4.5 4.5 66 1-6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 116 182

Special Topics in Accounting Accounting I Introduction to Criminal Justice Introduction to Homeland Security Criminal Law Criminal Procedure The Laws of Evidence Criminal Investigation Internship Criminal Justice Capstone Problem Solving Concepts With C++ Introduction to UNIX Introduction to Computer Security Principles of Network Security Computer Forensics I Computer Forensics II Management of Human Resources Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments Fundamentals of Networking Database Applications With Access Spreadsheet Applications Client/Server System and Network Administration Information Technology Architectures Organizational Behavior Principles Introductory Business Practices Public Administration Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace Introduction to Criminal Profiling Social Psychology Career Planning and Management

Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 151

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice


The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ) degree program is designed for criminal justice professionals seeking to begin or advance a career in the law enforcement, corrections, or judicial fields. The curriculum serves as strong preparation for students interested in serving the diverse needs of the criminal justice system. It provides a solid foundation in the administration of justice, corrections, criminological theory, law adjudication, and law enforcement. The program emphasizes the development of communication skills and professional skills along with the technical knowledge that will prepare students for positions of responsibility and leadership within the criminal justice community. BSCJ Program prepares the student to: Possess the knowledge and skills to help secure a position in the criminal justice field Identify the diverse needs of the criminal justice system and the public it serves Apply communication, professional skills and technical knowledge in the criminal justice field Courses: General Education CJUS261 Ethics in Criminal Justice ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab- Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 Introductory Sociology UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Courses: Core CJUS141 CJUS201 CJUS254 CJUS263 CJUS280 CJUS285 CJUS290 CJUS343 CJUS375 CJUS440 PBAD201 PSYC337
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 152

Introduction to Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing Introduction to Homeland Security American Corrections Victimology Juvenile Delinquency Criminal Law Criminology Criminal Procedure The Laws of Evidence Public Administration Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace

SOCL350 UNIV201

Social Psychology Career Planning and Management

4 4 56 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 20 60 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 182

Courses: Concentration CJFI360 Intro to Criminalistics CJUS275 Security Management CJUS430 Data Analysis for Criminal Justice CJUS434 Terrorism and Organized Crime CJUS448 Criminal Investigation CJUS450 Forensic Criminology CJUS460 Interview and Interrogation CJUS475 or Internship or CJUS484 Criminal Justice Capstone PSYC436 Introduction to Criminal Profiling SOCL325 Licit and Illicit Drugs ELE* Select 20 credit hours of electives (note that all courses are not offered at all campuses. Consult with your academic advisor.) Courses: Elective Choices* CJFI430 Medico-Legal Death Investigations CJHS311 Study of Alcohol Use and Abuse CJHS315 Child Abuse CJUS350 Community Corrections CJUS352 Community Policing CJUS354 Criminal Courts CJUS356 Loss Prevention CJUS360 Legal Elements of Fraud CJUS380 White Collar and Financial Crimes CJUS385 Fraud Prevention and Deterrence CJUS420 Family and Domestic Violence CJUS422 Probation and Parole CJUS424 Constitutional Law LANG100 Survival Spanish Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 153

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice


Forensic Investigation Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with concentration in Forensic Investigation degree (BSCJ-FI) program is designed to provide a solid foundation in law enforcement, the courts, and corrections; it also equips the student with a foundational forensic investigative knowledge and skill base. Combining the best of theory and practice, the BSCJ with concentration in Forensic Investigation provides the student with exciting opportunities through lab and practicum experiences in the investigation of crimes and criminal profiling. BSCJ Program prepares the student to: Possess the knowledge and skills to help secure a position in the criminal justice field Identify/recognize the diverse needs of the criminal justice system and the public it serves Apply communication, professional skills and technical knowledge in the criminal justice field Demonstrate a foundational forensic investigative knowledge and skill base Courses: General Education CJUS261 Ethics in Criminal Justice ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 Introduction to the Sciences Lab- Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab- Environmental Science and Sustainability 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5

SOCL102

UNIV104 Courses: Core CJUS141 CJUS201 CJUS254 CJUS263 CJUS280 CJUS285 CJUS290 CJUS343 CJUS375 CJUS440 PBAD201

Introductory Sociology

Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5

4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Introduction to Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing Introduction to Homeland Security American Corrections Victimology Juvenile Delinquency Criminal Law Criminology Criminal Procedure The Laws of Evidence Public Administration

Effective January 5, 2014

PSYC337 SOCL350 UNIV201

Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace Social Psychology Career Planning and Management

4 4 4 56

Courses: Concentration CJFI360 CJFI410 CJFI420 CJFI430 CJFI440 CJUS448 CJFI451 CJUS460 CJUS475 or CJUS484 ELE HRMT215 IT254 MGM335 PBAD301 PSYC436 Total Credits: Introduction to Criminalistics Advanced Crime Scene Forensics Forensic Photography & Crime Scene Documentation Medico-Legal Death Investigations Bones, Bugs & Teeth The Recovery of Human Remains Criminal Investigation Introduction to Ridgeology Interview and Interrogation Internship or Criminal Justice Capstone Select 4 credit hours of electives from the list provided Management of Human Resources Spreadsheet Applications Organizational Behavior Principles Grant Writing Basics Introduction to Criminal Profiling 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 60 182

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 155

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice


Homeland Security and Emergency Management Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) To help students prepare to play a role in the vital effort to protect our nation, CTU developed the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Homeland Security and Emergency Management (BSCJ-HEM) program for the Online platform with the guidance of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security, Naval Postgraduate School. Its All-Hazards approach to Homeland Security training and education is designed to help students acquire an in-depth understanding of emergency management, technology, communications, intelligence, critical infrastructure, terrorism, and other knowledge needed in a wide range of government and private organizations. Students will also have the opportunity to develop essential skills in ethics, critical thinking, and strategic planning. BSCJ Program prepares the student to: Possess the knowledge and skills to help secure a position in the criminal justice field Identify/recognize the diverse needs of the criminal justice system and the public it serves Apply communication, professional skills and technical knowledge in the criminal justice field Apply the fundamentals of homeland security and emergency management to create plans, analyze risk, and propose solutions for technology and critical infrastructure protection Courses: General Education CJUS261 Ethics in Criminal Justice ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH106 Algebra for Business MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab- Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Courses: Core CJUS141 CJUS254 CJUS290 CJUS343 CJUS375 HLS110 HLS120 HLS200

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 156

Introduction to Criminal Justice Introduction to Homeland Security Criminal Law Criminology Criminal Procedure Terrorism: Origins, Ideologies and Goals Introduction to Emergency Management Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy

Effective January 5, 2014

HLS210 HLS300 HLS305 HLS310 HLS315 HLS320 HLS325 HLS330 HLS340 HLS350 HLS360 HLS400 HLS410 HLS420 HLS430 HLS450 HLS460 HLS470 HLS480 MGMT115 UNIV201

Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies and Applications HR and Administrative Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management Understanding Critical Infrastructures Comparative Approaches to Event Management Interagency Relationships in Homeland Security Private Sector Role in Homeland Security Research Methodology and Policy Analysis Advanced Application of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies Emergent Topics in Homeland Security and Emergency Management Introduction to Intelligence Counterintelligence Constitutional Law and Public Policy Analysis The Psychology of Fear Management and Terrorism Strategic Planning and Budgeting for Homeland Security and Emergency Management Planning for Homeland Security and Emergency Management Local Emergency Management and Civil Preparedness Advanced Application of Intelligence in Homeland Security Evaluating Risk in Critical Infrastructure Knowledge Into Practice: Communications and Emergency Planning Introductory Business Practices Career Planning and Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 116 182

Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 157

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice


Human Services Concentration The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with concentration in Human Services (BSCJ-HS) is designed to provide a solid foundation in law enforcement, the courts, and corrections, while equipping the student with a Human Services core that will prepare the student for Human Services work in the Criminal Justice context. Special emphasis is placed on working with youth. Additionally, the student will complete the coursework needed for professional work in chemical dependency. Students attending on campus will have the opportunity to participate in an internship. Students attending the program via the Virtual Campus will be required to complete the capstone in lieu of the internship. BSCJ Program prepares the student to: Possess the knowledge and skills to help secure a position in the criminal justice field Identify/recognize the diverse needs of the criminal justice system and the public it serves Apply communication, professional skills and technical knowledge in the criminal justice field Demonstrate knowledge of the core activities and skills of the human services professional in the context of the criminal justice system Courses: General Education CJUS261 Ethics in Criminal Justice ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 Introduction to the Sciences Lab- Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab- Environmental Science and Sustainability

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5

SOCL102

UNIV104 HUMNELE Courses: Core CJUS141 CJUS201 CJUS254 CJUS263 CJUS280 CUS285 CJUS290

Introductory Sociology

Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5

4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Introduction to Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing Introduction to Homeland Security American Corrections Victimology Juvenile Delinquency Criminal Law

Effective January 5, 2014

CJUS343 CJUS375 CJUS440 PBAD201 PSYC337 SOCL350 UNIV201

Criminology Criminal Procedure The Laws of Evidence Public Administration Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace Social Psychology Career Planning and Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 56 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 5 61 183

Courses: Concentration CJHS300 Human Service Practice in the Criminal Justice Setting CJHS311 Study of Alcohol Use and Abuse CJHS315 Child Abuse CJHS320 Alcohol & Drug Treatment Continuum CJHS325 Drug Use and Abuse CJHS337 Ethics for the CD Counselor CJHS399 Chemical Dependency Elective - Special Topics CJHS411 Foundations of Individual Counseling CJHS421 Foundations of Group Counseling CJHS425 Introduction to Family Counseling CJUS475 or Internship or CJUS484 Criminal Justice Capstone PBAD301 Grant Writing Basics PSYC301 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology Total Program Credits

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering


The Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCE) degree program is designed to prepare graduates to enter one of the newest and most exciting engineering fields. Computer engineers are not only involved in the design of the computer hardware essential to todays world, they may be called on to develop software, program microprocessors, or design wired or wireless networks. The BSCE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 telephone (410)347-7700. The educational objectives of the BSCE program are to provide graduates with: 1) the discipline and expertise to a sufficient degree to be productive, entry-level computer engineers within the industry; and 2) academic preparation for entry into the Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE) program. Outcomes: An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility An ability to communicate effectively The broad education necessary to understanding the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning. A knowledge of contemporary issues An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice Courses: Preparatory CS104 MATH112 MATH114 MATH116 Problem Solving Concepts With C++ Analytic College Algebra Analytic Trigonometry Foundations of Calculus 4 4.5 4.5 4.5 5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 5 5 4
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Courses: General Education CHE105 Introduction to Chemistry ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or HUMNELE Humanities Elective MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics MATH205 Differential Calculus MATH207 Integral Calculus MATH304 Linear Algebra
Effective January 5, 2014

PHIL306 PHY211 PHY212 PSYC102 or SOCL102 Courses: Core CE242 CE412 CS115 CS146 CS215 CS230 CS340 CS366 CS376 EE110 EE221 EE252 EE312 EE325 EE331 EE341 EE352 EE375 EE472 EE486 EE490 EE491 EM208 IT205 MATH302 MATH366 PM220 PHY350 Total Program Credits:

Ethics for the Information Age Physics I - Mechanics Physics II Heat, Light and Sound Introductory Psychology or Introductory Sociology

4.5 5 5 4.5 69.5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 2 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 121 190.5

Computer Architecture Advanced Computer Architecture Programming With C++ Introduction to UNIX Intermediate C++ Programming Data Structures Operating Systems Software Engineering Methods Object Oriented Methods Introduction to Engineering Circuit Analysis I Digital Design I Embedded Microcontrollers CMOS Design Circuit Analysis II Advanced Circuit Analysis Digital Design II Electronic Design I Advanced Digital System Design Impact of Global Issues on Design Product Design I Product Design II Web Development I Fundamentals of Networking Differential Equations Probability and Statistics Project Management Tools Solid State Physics

The BSCE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 telephone: (410) 347-7700.

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Computer Science


According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer science and software engineering are among the fastest growing career fields in the United States. Technology is pervasive and will continue to touch our lives on a daily basis. The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BSCS) program contains a set of core courses which are designed to provide an understanding of the varied aspects of technology, operating systems and networking, as well as knowledge of computer system architecture and the software system engineering process. Outcomes: Program in at least one high level programming language using programming fundamentals, abstraction modeling for problem solving, algorithms, data structures, and complexity Examine computer architecture, operating systems, and network-centric computing, including Internet technology Implement the goals and techniques of software engineering Demonstrate effective use of technical and professional communication Extend the breadth of computer science knowledge through the completion of various technical options, which include proficiency in another high level language and in database systems Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy LITR201 or Literature: A Reflection of Life HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH114 Analytic Trigonometry MATH116 Foundations for Calculus MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics PHIL306 or Ethics for the Information Age PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals PSYC102 or SOCL102 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core CE242 CS104 CS115 or
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 75 4 4
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Introductory Psychology or Introductory Sociology Introduction to the Sciences Lab - Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

Computer Architecture Problem Solving Concepts With C++ Programming With C++

CS116 CS146 CS215 or CS216 CS230 CS250 CS265 CS340 CS346 CS366 or SWE410 CS376 CS381 CS382 CS383 CS481 CS482 EM208 IT205 IT300 MATH201 MATH304 PM220 TECH ELE ELE

C# Programming Introduction to UNIX Intermediate C++ Programming Intermediate C# Programming Data Structures Fundamentals of Database Systems Algorithms Operating Systems User Interface Design Software Engineering Methods Software Processes Object Oriented Methods Software Requirements Engineering Software Design Software Testing Computer Science Project I Software Engineering Capstone II Web Development I Fundamentals of Networking Computer Networks and Communications Calculus I Linear Algebra Project Management Tools Select 12 credits of approved technical electives Programming Breadth elective: Select CS246 or CS316

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 12 4 108 183

Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 163

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering


The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) degree program is designed to prepare graduates to enter what is arguably the most diverse and useful engineering discipline in our world today. From global positioning technology that can track the location of a vehicle, to sub-micron, integrated circuit (IC) chips that power todays wireless technologies, electrical engineers are responsible for some of the worlds most exciting technological breakthroughs. The BSEE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 telephone: (410)347-7700. The educational objectives of the BSEE Program are to provide graduates with: 1) discipline and expertise to a sufficient degree to be productive, entry-level electrical engineers within the industry; and 2) the academic preparation for entry into the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE) program. Outcomes: An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, societal, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility An ability to communicate effectively The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning A knowledge of contemporary issues An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice Courses: Preparatory CS104 MATH112 MATH114 MATH116 Problem Solving Concepts With C++ Analytic College Algebra Analytic Trigonometry Foundations for Calculus 4 4.5 4.5 4.5 5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5
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Courses: General Education CHE105 Introduction to Chemistry ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or HUMNELE Humanities Elective LITR201 or Introduction to World Literature or HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts
Effective January 5, 2014

MATH205 MATH207 MATH304 PHIL306 PHY211 PHY212 PSYC102 or SOCL102 Courses: Core CE242 CS115 EE110 EE221 EE252 EE312 EE325 EE331 EE335 EE341 EE343 EE352 EE375 EE395 EE415 EE443 EE463 EE486 EE490 EE491 EM208 MATH302 MATH366 PHY340 PHY350

Differential Calculus Integral Calculus Linear Algebra Ethics for the Information Age Physics I - Mechanics Physics II Heat, Light and Sound Introductory Psychology or Introductory Sociology

5 5 4 4.5 5 5 4.5 69.5 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 2 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 113

Computer Architecture Programming With C++ Introduction to Engineering Circuit Analysis I Digital Design I Embedded Microcontrollers CMOS Design Circuit Analysis II Advanced Engineering Mathematics Advanced Circuit Analysis Signals and Systems Digital Design II Electronic Design I Electronic Design II Advanced Electronic Design II Communication Systems I Communications Systems II Impact of Global Issues on Design Product Design I Product Design II Web Development I Differential Equations Probability and Statistics Electromagnetics Solid State Physics

Courses: Electives ELE Select two courses, for a total of 8 credits, from the list of Senior level EE elective courses Total Program Credits: Elective Choices: EE472 Advanced Digital System Design EE473 Communication System Design EE474 Controls Systems Design
Effective January 5, 2014

8 190.5 4 4 4
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EE475 EE476 EE477 EE479 EE495 EE499

Advanced Electronic Systems Design Systems Design (Special Topic) Power Systems Design Advanced Systems Design (System Design Continuation) Advanced Research and Study in Electrical Engineering Special Topics in Electrical Engineering

4 4 4 4 1-6 1-6

The BSEE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 telephone: (410) 347-7700.

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 166

Associate of Science in Electronics Technology


Both private business and the government rely on sophisticated electronic equipment for a multitude of applications: manufacturing and production processes, communication systems, power plant operations, missile control and guidance, engineering test, and embedded control systems. Individuals with knowledge of analog and digital electronics are in demand, especially in commercial enterprises such as integrated circuit (IC) companies and telecommunications firms. This degree comprises the first two years of either the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) or the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCE) degree programs. Outcomes: Analysis of DC and AC circuits and electronics, including significant laboratory-based experience in each of these areas Analysis and design of digital hardware, as well as embedded microcontroller (software) Problem-solving and trouble-shooting techniques Design of integrated-circuit (IC) based digital electronics Use of modern, computer-based simulation tools Use of advanced laboratory instrumentation Communication skills essential to the workplace Courses: Preparatory CS104

Problem Solving Concepts With C++

4 4.5 4.5 5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 5 5 5 4.5 4.5 4.5 60.5 4 4 5 5 5
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Courses: General Education ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research CHE105 Introduction to Chemistry HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH114 Analytic Trigonometry MATH116 Foundations for Calculus MATH205 Differential Calculus MATH207 Integral Calculus MATH302 Differential Equations PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SOCL102 Introductory Sociology UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective or HUMELE Humanities Elective Courses: Core CE242 EE110 EE221 EE252 EE312
Effective January 5, 2014

Computer Architecture Introduction to Engineering Circuit Analysis I Digital Design I Embedded Microcontrollers

EE331 EE375 EM208 Total Program Credits:

Circuit Analysis II Electronic Design I Web Development I

5 5 4 37 97.5

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management


Healthcare management professionals work in a dynamic field that affects the wellbeing of individuals and families. The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management (BSHCM) degree program at CTU is designed to help students obtain the general education, didactic theory, and hands-on training required to work in management within a healthcare industry. The program offers instruction in the business and administrative side of the healthcare industry, including, but not limited to, patient access, revenue cycle management, project management, economics of healthcare, and fundamentals of marketing and human resource management. The program also includes Capstone courses that are designed to allow the student to integrate and apply learned concepts into case studies or a project. At the completion of the program, graduates who diligently attend class, study, complete their coursework, and practice their skills should be able seek employment in the field of healthcare management. BSHCM program prepares the student to: utilize theories and apply concepts related to the business of healthcare to influence their chosen profession integrate and apply healthcare management principles within the workplace BSHCM program competencies: Apply ethical and legal principles to the management of a healthcare organization Evaluate uses for various technology applications in the healthcare business Analyze the various types of reimbursement received for healthcare services and the effect on the financial operations of a healthcare organization Compare healthcare delivery models for its purposes and effectiveness Apply business principles to the management of the healthcare organization Courses: General Education BIO120 Anatomy and Physiology Essentials BIO125 Lab - Anatomy and Physiology ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing HSS261 Ethics in Healthcare GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SOCL340 Diversity in American Life UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or HUMELE Humanities Elective

4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 66

Effective January 5, 2014

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Courses: Core Lower Level ACC310 Accounting for Non-Accounting Majors HSS103 Introduction to Healthcare Delivery Systems HSS110 Concepts in Healthcare Organizations HSS121 Medical Terminology HSS210 Fundamentals of Reimbursement in Healthcare HSS215 Software Applications in Healthcare: Virtual Learning Experience HSS290 Certification Preparation MGM255 Management Fundamentals UNIV201 Career Planning and Management Courses: Core Upper Level BADM370 Quality Management HCM330 Healthcare Statistics and Research HCM307 The Healthcare Industry HCM410 Fiscal Management in Healthcare Services HRM335 Legal Issues in HRM HRMT215 Management of Human Resources HSA320 Administration in Healthcare Services HSS310 Economics of Healthcare HSS420 Global Health Systems HSS491 Healthcare Management Capstone IT254 Spreadsheet Applications MKTG225 Introduction to Marketing MGM335 Organizational Behavior Principles MPM210 Introduction to Project Management Courses: Concentration ELE Select 20 credit hours from 100-400 level courses Total Program Credits:

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 58 20 20 180

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management


Health Informatics Concentration Healthcare management professionals work in a dynamic field that affects the wellbeing of individuals and families. The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management (BSHCM) degree program at CTU is designed to help students obtain the general education, didactic theory, and hands-on training required to work in management within a healthcare industry. The program offers instruction in the business and administrative side of the healthcare industry, including, but not limited to, patient access, revenue cycle management, project management, economics of healthcare, and fundamentals of marketing and human resource management. The program also includes Capstone courses that are designed to allow the student to integrate and apply learned concepts into case studies or a project. At the completion of the program, graduates who diligently attend class, study, complete their coursework, and practice their skills should be able seek employment in the field of healthcare management. The Health Informatics concentration provides the students with the background in healthcare management and a greater understanding of how information technology is used within the healthcare environment. Emphasis will be placed on business intelligence and data analytics to assist decision makers with the tools necessary to make informed decisions and highlighting useful information for stakeholders.
BSHCM program prepares the student to:

utilize theories and apply concepts related to the business of healthcare to influence their chosen profession integrate and apply healthcare management principles within the workplace utilize data analytics and business intelligence to assist those making decisions about healthcare

BSHCM program competencies: Apply ethical and legal principles to the management of a healthcare organization Evaluate uses for various technology applications in the healthcare business Analyze the various types of reimbursement received for healthcare services and the effect on the financial operations of a healthcare organization Compare healthcare delivery models for its purposes and effectiveness Apply business principles to the management of the healthcare organization Courses: General Education BIO120 Anatomy and Physiology Essentials BIO125 Lab - Anatomy and Physiology ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing HSS261 Ethics in Healthcare GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5
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SCI201 SCI203 SOCL102 SOCL340 UNIV104 or HUMELE

Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Introductory Sociology Diversity in American Life Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 58 4 4 4 4 4 20 180

Courses: Core Lower Level ACC310 Accounting for Non-Accounting Majors HSS103 Introduction to Healthcare Delivery Systems HSS110 Concepts in Healthcare Organizations HSS121 Medical Terminology HSS210 Fundamentals of Reimbursement in Healthcare HSS215 Software Applications in Healthcare: Virtual Learning Experience HSS290 Certification Preparation MGM255 Management Fundamentals UNIV201 Career Planning and Management BADM370 HCM330 HCM307 HCM410 HRM335 HRMT215 HSA320 HSS310 HSS420 HSS491 IT254 MKTG225 MGM335 MPM210
Courses: Core Upper Level

Quality Management Healthcare Statistics and Research The Healthcare Industry Fiscal Management in Healthcare Services Legal Issues in HRM Management of Human Resources Administration in Healthcare Services Economics of Healthcare Global Health Systems Healthcare Management Capstone Spreadsheet Applications Introduction to Marketing Organizational Behavior Principles Introduction to Project Management

Courses: Concentration HCI300 Introduction to Health Informatics HCI310 DBMS for Healthcare HCI380 Security of Electronic Health Information HCI400 Health Analytics and Business Intelligence in Healthcare HCI490 Health Informatics Capstone

Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN completion) (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) As the largest group in the US healthcare workforce, nurses are challenged to make a significant difference in the health outcomes of individuals and populations. Nursing roles range from bedside care delivery to executive leadership in complex health systems. The RN to BSN degree completion program at Colorado Technical University is designed to prepare nurses with the knowledge and skills needed to expand their practice options for a variety of clinical and administrative leadership activities and to manage change in an increasingly complex and diverse environment. Building on a foundation of general education and core coursework, the nursing major courses range from a review of the challenges and trends in nursing care to a nursing capstone seminar that will synthesize and apply prior learning. The Colorado Technical University RN to BSN program furthers the mission of the university to teach real-world nursing that serves the needs of students, the population, and the healthcare industry and prepares highly qualified professional nurses at the bachelors level. Admission Requirements Admission to this program requires an unencumbered license to practice as a Registered Nurse (RN) in the United States. Students must have graduated from an Associate Degree in Nursing or a Diploma Registered Nurse (RN) Program, or a graduate-entry educational transition program preparing students for eligibility to become licensed as a Registered Nurse. International students must demonstrate proficiency in the English Language, as measured by a TOEFL score of 550 or above; 213 or higher on the computer based exam BSN Program prepares the student to: Care for complex needs of patients across the healthcare continuum and/or a variety of settings Be a leader in the profession of nursing BSN Program competencies: Assess the role of the nurse and the need for open communication, mutual respect and shared decision-making with other healthcare providers in the teams efforts to achieve quality outcomes for patient-centered care Apply knowledge of healthcare policy, finance, regulation, accreditation and trends in healthcare to active participation in the profession of nursing serving as a patient advocate Evaluate information and technology resources to communicate, manage knowledge, mitigate error and support decision-making in the delivery of healthcare Identify patient preferences, values and needs while recognizing the patient or their designee as the source of control in providing compassionate and coordinated nursing care Design strategies using continuous quality improvement processes to improve the quality and safety of healthcare systems Analyze strategies to optimize system effectiveness and individual performance that will minimize the risk of harm to patients and providers Design strategies using continuous quality improvement processes to improve the quality and safety of healthcare systems Analyze strategies to optimize system effectiveness and individual performance that will minimize the risk of harm to patients and providers Courses: General Education ENGL201 or Principles of Professional Writing or
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 173

ENGL203 GOVT201 or HIST101 PHIL301 SOCL340 Courses: Core ELE HRMT215 HSS205 MGM335 NRSG310 NRSG311 NRSG312 NRSG313 NRSG314 NRSG410 NRSG411 NRSG412 NRSG413 NRSG490 NRSG495 PSYC337

Professional Speech Communications American Government and Public Affairs or Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century Ethics for Professionals Diversity in American Life

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 18 12 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 72 90 180 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Select 12 credits from approved 300-400 level courses Management of Human Resources Technological Applications in Healthcare Organizations Organizational Behavior Principles Challenges and Trends in Contemporary Nursing Nursing Informatics Population-Based Nursing Alternative and Complementary Interventions Safety and Quality Improvement in Nursing Practice Health and Wellness Assessment Evidence Based Practice and Applied Nursing Research Leadership and Nursing Systems Management Innovation in Nursing Nursing Theory, Critical Thinking and Competency Nursing Capstone Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace

Courses: Degree/Cert Transfer ADN/RN Associate Degree or Diploma in Nursing Total Program Credits: Courses: Core Choices HCM307 The Healthcare Industry HRM345 Building Effective Teams HRMT440 Managing Organizational Change MGM316 International Business Communications MGM355 International Business Practices MGM365 The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business MGMT345 Operations Management

Notice to Registered Nurses Every States Nurse Practice Act has regulations pertaining to Online Nursing Degrees. Therefore, RN students need to be aware of the regulations in their own state. The Nurse Practice Act for each state is found on the website for that particular States Board of Nursing. Contact information for each States Board of Nursing is available on the website for the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). www.ncsbn.org

Effective January 5, 2014

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Associate of Science in Health Administration Services


The Associate of Science in Health Administration Services (ASHAS) program at CTU is designed to provide training in the principles and techniques used in the administrative side of the healthcare industry. The program offers instruction in several areas, including healthcare finance, human resources, healthcare administration, reimbursement systems and healthcare records, as well as regulatory, ethical and legal issues affecting healthcare organizations. However, it does not include medical coding instruction. At the completion of the program, graduates who diligently attend class, study, and practice their skills should be able seek entry-level employment in the field of health administration services. This program also fulfills associate level requirements for students seeking to continue on in the Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management (BSHCM) program. The ASHAS program prepares the student: For entry-level employment in the field of healthcare administration services To be a productive member of the healthcare team, in the current changing healthcare industry For the Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA) certification examination offered through the National Healthcareer Association (NHA) For the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Awareness examination For a bachelor level program in healthcare management It should be noted that the ASHAS curriculum is not designed to prepare students for a home-based working environment. Although it is possible to work from home, most employers allow remote work only after many years of experience in the industry. Courses: General Education BIO120 Anatomy and Physiology Essentials BIO125 Lab - Anatomy and Physiology ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs HSS261 Ethics in Healthcare IT101 Computers and Information Technology Literacy MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SOCL340 Diversity in American Life UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective HUMELE Courses: Core HSS103 Introduction to Healthcare Delivery Systems HSS110 Concepts in Healthcare Organizations
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 61.5 4 4
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HSS121 HSS210 HSS215 HSS290 MGM255 UNIV201

Medical Terminology Fundamentals of Reimbursement in Healthcare Software Applications in Healthcare: Virtual Learning Experience Certification Preparation Management Fundamentals Career Planning and Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 32

Total Program Credits:

93.5

Note: Graduates of the ASHAS program are eligible for and encouraged to take the Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA) certification examination offered by the National Healthcare Association (NHA). This exam is voluntary, but passing it can be a further indication that a graduate is capable of performing the tasks necessary to keep offices and clinics of physicians running smoothly. CTU does not guarantee third-party certifications. Certification requirements for taking and passing certification examinations are not controlled by CTU but by outside agencies and are subject to change by the agencies without notice to CTU. Therefore, CTU cannot guarantee that graduates will be eligible to take a certification examination, regardless of their eligibility status upon enrollment.

Effective January 5, 2014

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Associate of Science in General Studies


The ASGS Program prepares the student with: A solid foundation for future learning The professional skills necessary to begin or advance in a career The Associate of Science in General Studies (ASGS) program is designed to provide a foundation for future learning and to teach the professional skills necessary for students to begin or advance in a career. ASGS Program Competencies: Identify ethical standards appropriate to academic and professional settings Write appropriately for academic and professional situations Demonstrate effective oral communication skills Recognize different perspectives and identify strategies for effective interaction Demonstrate the ability to locate, evaluate, and utilize information effectively Recognize complex problems and apply logical strategies to solve them Demonstrate the rhetorical ability to shape perception in professional settings Courses: Core ENGL101 ENGL103 HIST101 or GOVT201 LITR201 or LITR203 MATH102 MATH106 PHIL101 PSYC102 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 SOCL102 UNIV104 UNIV201

Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century or American Government and Public Affairs Literature: A Reflection of Life or Introduction to World Literature Introduction to College Math Algebra for Business Introduction to Ethics Introductory Psychology Introduction to the Sciences Lab - Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Introductory Sociology Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Career Planning and Management

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4 61 32 93

Courses: Electives ELE Choose a minimum of 32 credit hours Total Program Credits:

*This degree program may not fulfill the prerequisite requirements to fully matriculate into all of CTU bachelor degree programs. Contact your admissions representative for additional information or if you have any questions.
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 177

Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Management


Most organizations have invested significantly in computer hardware and software systems. Today, the need is for professionals who can align and manage technology in harmony with human resources. The Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Management (BSISM) provides a mix of technical and business coursework that provides a balance of skills. Outcomes: Plan, implement, maintain, and manage computing and information systems Demonstrate an understanding of current computer networks and protocols of data Explain database concepts, discuss the capabilities of modern database systems, and apply those concepts in the design, implementation, and querying of a database to support a Apply the skills necessary to manage people and to use technology to support business goals through team projects Apply the tools and techniques of project management Courses: General Education ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals PSYC102 or Introductory Psychology or SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab - Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Courses: Core ACCT201 CS104 CS146 CS246 CSS150 ELE EM208 or EBUS208 EM218 EM228
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Accounting I Problem Solving Concepts With C++ Introduction to UNIX Structured Query Language Introduction to Computer Security BSIT Elective Web Development I Web Site/Portfolio Development Web Development II Scripting for the Web

EM270 EM420 FINC200 IT140 IT190 IT205 or IT245 IT225 IT235 IT254 IT300 IT340 IT400 IT485 IT486 MGM335 MGM355 or MGMT235 MGMT115 PM220 Courses: Electives ELE Total Program Credits:

Emerging Media and Technology Web-Based Database Applications Applied Finance and Managerial Accounting Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments Introduction to IT Fundamentals of Networking or Introduction to Network Management IT Support Systems Database Applications With Access Spreadsheet Applications Computer Networks and Communications Client/Server System and Network Administration Information Technology Architectures ISM Capstone I ISM Capstone II Organizational Behavior Principles International Business Practices or Business Law I Introductory Business Practices Project Management Tools

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 108

Technical elective: Select 8 credits of approved technical electives

8 182

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 179

Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance Security


Information Technology Concentration Information assurance and security professionals design, install, configure, manage, and troubleshoot an organizations security policies, processes, network, hardware, and software infrastructure. They apply tools and technologies to ensure that the organization is secure. The Bachelors of Science in Information Assurance and Security degree allows undergraduate learners to acquire and apply various processes, tools, technologies, and methods of securing an enterprise; including security policies, social engineering, access control, authentication, perimeter security, disaster recovery and business continuity, risk management, incident response, viruses, malware, spam, encryption, and other infrastructure security techniques that include governance and strategic alignment of IT and business. In addition to information assurance and security expertise, learners in this concentration demonstrate the business, interpersonal, and communication skills required to influence internal decision making and overall organizational effectiveness. Successful graduates of this concentration are prepared to pursue careers as information security consultants, managers, or security administrators. Outcomes: Explain how security can be implemented through network communication protocols and supporting network hardware. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate secure practices into the design and development of software programs, database architecture and web-based applications using a security development lifecycle model. Describe how the interaction of computer architecture, operating systems, networking components and databases result in the achievement of an organizations mission. Demonstrate the proficiency of both a current programming language and scripting language. Examine and explain the benefits of a Computer Incident Response Team and demonstrate the use of tools to audit, detect and investigate the elements of an attack. Recognize, explain and analyze regulations, statutes and laws regarding computer systems security compliance issues. Employ techniques for the collection, analyzing and reporting of digital evidence captured from computers, mobile devices and storage systems to support criminal investigations. Describe and plan the formation of security polices resulting from a comprehensive risk assessment analysis. Explain how an organizations digital assets are protected by the development of both a Business Continuity Plan and Disaster Recovery Plan. Apply and demonstrate critical thinking skills in areas of advanced research through the design of research papers that could benefit the industry. Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics MATH301 Data Driven Statistics
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5


Page 180

PHIL301 or PHIL306 PSYC102 or SOCL102 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 Courses: Core CSS150 CSS200 CSS250 CSS260 CSS280 CSS300 CSS321 CSS332 CSS340 CSS350 CSS351 CSS370 CSS380 CSS410 CSS430 CSS441 CSS450 IT254

Ethics for Professionals Ethics for the Information Age Introductory Psychology or Introductory Sociology Introduction to the Sciences Lab - Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 72 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4


Page 181

Introduction to Computer Security Principles of Network Security Security Risk Management Scripting with Perl Ethical Hacking Vulnerability Assessment and Management Software Assurance Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security Operating System Security Computer Forensics I Computer Forensics II Security Architecture Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management Security Compliance Security Capstone Spreadsheet Applications

Courses: Concentration CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++ CS115 or Programming with C++ IT115 or Programming with Java CS116 C# Programming CS146 Introduction to UNIX CS215 or Intermediate C++ Programming IT215 or Intermediate Java CS216 Programming or Intermediate C# Programming CS246 Structured Query Language CS250 Fundamentals of Database Systems CS352 Advanced Database Systems IT205 Fundamentals of Networking IT300 Computer Networks and Communications IT340 Client/Server System and Network Administration IT375 IT Management Strategy
Effective January 5, 2014

IT400 Total Program Credits:

Information Technology Architectures

4 48 186

Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 182

Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance Security


Computer Science Concentration Information assurance and security professionals design, install, configure, manage, and troubleshoot an organizations security policies, processes, network, hardware, and software infrastructure. They apply tools and technologies to ensure that the organization is secure. The Bachelors of Science in Information Assurance and Security degree allows undergraduate learners to acquire and apply various processes, tools, technologies, and methods of securing an enterprise; including security policies, social engineering, access control, authentication, perimeter security, disaster recovery and business continuity, risk management, incident response, viruses, malware, spam, encryption, and other infrastructure security techniques that include governance and strategic alignment of IT and business. In addition to information assurance and security expertise, learners in this concentration demonstrate the business, interpersonal, and communication skills required to influence internal decision making and overall organizational effectiveness. Successful graduates of this concentration are prepared to pursue careers as information security consultants, managers, or security administrators. Outcomes: Explain how security can be implemented through network communication protocols and supporting network hardware. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate secure practices into the design and development of software programs, database architecture and web-based applications using a security development lifecycle model. Describe how the interaction of computer architecture, operating systems, networking components and databases result in the achievement of an organizations mission. Demonstrate the proficiency of both a current programming language and scripting language. Examine and explain the benefits of a Computer Incident Response Team and demonstrate the use of tools to audit, detect and investigate the elements of an attack. Recognize, explain and analyze regulations, statutes and laws regarding computer systems security compliance issues. Employ techniques for the collection, analyzing and reporting of digital evidence captured from computers, mobile devices and storage systems to support criminal investigations. Describe and plan the formation of security polices resulting from a comprehensive risk assessment analysis. Explain how an organizations digital assets are protected by the development of both a Business Continuity Plan and Disaster Recovery Plan. Apply and demonstrate critical thinking skills in areas of advanced research through the design of research papers that could benefit the industry. Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5


Page 183

MATH301 PHIL301 or PHIL306 PSYC102 or SOCL102 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104

Data Driven Statistics Ethics for Professionals Ethics for the Information Age Introductory Psychology or Introductory Sociology Introduction to the Sciences Lab - Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66

Courses: Core CSS150 CSS200 CSS250 CSS260 CSS280 CSS300 CSS321 CSS332 CSS340 CSS350 CSS351 CSS370 CSS380 CSS410 CSS430 CSS441 CSS450 IT254

Introduction to Computer Security Principles of Network Security Security Risk Management Scripting with Perl Ethical Hacking Vulnerability Assessment and Management Software Assurance Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security Operating System Security Computer Forensics I Computer Forensics II Security Architecture Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management Security Compliance Security Capstone Spreadsheet Applications

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 72 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 184

Courses: Concentration CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++ CS115 or Programming with C++ CS116 C# Programming CS146 Introduction to Unix Intermediate C++ Programming CS215 or CS216 Intermediate C# Programming CS230 Data Structures CS246 Structured Query Language CS250 Fundamentals of Database Systems CS340 Operating Systems CS345 UNIX Systems Programming CS352 Advanced Database Systems IT205 Fundamentals of Networking
Effective January 5, 2014

IT375 Total Program Credits:

IT Management Strategy

4 48 186

Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 185

Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance Security


Management Concentration Information assurance and security professionals design, install, configure, manage, and troubleshoot an organizations security policies, processes, network, hardware, and software infrastructure. They apply tools and technologies to ensure that the organization is secure. The Bachelors of Science in Information Assurance and Security degree allows undergraduate learners to acquire and apply various processes, tools, technologies, and methods of securing an enterprise; including security policies, social engineering, access control, authentication, perimeter security, disaster recovery and business continuity, risk management, incident response, viruses, malware, spam, encryption, and other infrastructure security techniques that include governance and strategic alignment of IT and business. In addition to information assurance and security expertise, learners in this concentration demonstrate the business, interpersonal, and communication skills required to influence internal decision making and overall organizational effectiveness. Successful graduates of this concentration are prepared to pursue careers as information security consultants, managers, or security administrators. Outcomes: Explain how security can be implemented through network communication protocols and supporting network hardware. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate secure practices into the design and development of software programs, database architecture and web-based applications using a security development lifecycle model. Describe how the interaction of computer architecture, operating systems, networking components and databases result in the achievement of an organizations mission. Demonstrate the proficiency of both a current programming language and scripting language. Examine and explain the benefits of a Computer Incident Response Team and demonstrate the use of tools to audit, detect and investigate the elements of an attack. Recognize, explain and analyze regulations, statutes and laws regarding computer systems security compliance issues. Employ techniques for the collection, analyzing and reporting of digital evidence captured from computers, mobile devices and storage systems to support criminal investigations. Describe and plan the formation of security polices resulting from a comprehensive risk assessment analysis. Explain how an organizations digital assets are protected by the development of both a Business Continuity Plan and Disaster Recovery Plan. Apply and demonstrate critical thinking skills in areas of advanced research through the design of research papers that could benefit the industry. Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective MATH112 Analytic College Algebra
Effective January 5, 2014

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5


Page 186

MATH203 MATH301 PHIL301 or PHIL306 PSYC102 or SOCL102 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203

Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics Ethics for Professionals Ethics for the Information Age Introductory Psychology or Introductory Sociology Introduction to the Sciences Lab - Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 66

Courses: Core CSS150 CSS200 CSS250 CSS260 CSS280 CSS300 CSS321 CSS332 CSS340 CSS350 CSS351 CSS370 CSS380 CSS410 CSS430 CSS441 CSS450 IT254

Introduction to Computer Security Principles of Network Security Security Risk Management Scripting with Perl Ethical Hacking Vulnerability Assessment and Management Software Assurance Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security Operating System Security Computer Forensics I Computer Forensics II Security Architecture Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management Security Compliance Security Capstone Spreadsheet Applications

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 72

Courses: Concentration BADM150 Contemporary Business Trends CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++ CS115 or Programming with C++ CS116 C# Programming CS215 or Intermediate C++ Programming CS216 Intermediate C# Programming CS250 Fundamentals of Database Systems IT205 Fundamentals of Networking IT375 IT Management Strategy MGM335 Organizational Behavior Principles MGMT235 Business Law I
Effective January 5, 2014

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 187

MGMT345 MPM332 BADM370

Operations Management Organizational Leadership Quality Management

4 4 4 48 186

Total Program Credits:

Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows: NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 188

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are in top demand. The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) curriculum includes both a common core, as well as specialization-specific courses. The BSIT core provides a strong foundation in the key information technology areas of programming, systems administration, security, architecture, databases, and ethics. This core centers on an enhanced view of the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) as a rational, systematic and repeatable process of systems implementation and is project management applicable across the spectrum of information technology careers. Outcome: Core Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization and maintenance of modern database systems Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology Create and design Enterprise Architecture Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 or Literature: A Reflection of Life or HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts MATH109 Introduction to Algebra MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PHIL306 Ethics for the Information Age SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success OR HUMNELE or Humanities Elective 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 189

Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210

Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54 40

Courses: Specialization IT Professional Track Select 40 credits from any BSIT specialization course offerings (as long as pre-requisites are met) * IT Technical Related Select 16 credits from one specific BSIT specialization course offerings track that is technically related (i.e., Programming, Security, Networking, Software Engineering, Web, Database, Data Management, etc.) ** Technical Electives Select 8 credits of technical electives Total Program Credits

16 8 64 184

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 190

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Data Management Specialization The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with a specialization in Data Management (BSIT-DM) provides a core curriculum which includes an introduction to key topics and technologies such as database systems, SQL, security, programming logic, operating systems, network management, architecture, and project management. A unique approach to the systems development lifecycle is also fully employed and utilized. The data management specialization focuses on the application of data management to the enterprise. Along with increased knowledge of databases and structure, students also examine important areas including business intelligence, data warehousing, data mining, analytics, visualization, master databases, and data quality assurance. In the data management concentration, the student obtains a deeper understanding for applying data management concepts and analytical tools to support the decision-making processes used for mission critical functions such as accounting, management, marketing, operations and the enterprise in general. Outcomes: Core Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization and maintenance of modern database systems Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology Create and design Enterprise Architecture Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan

Outcomes: Specialization Demonstrate data management techniques through the logical design of data information repositories such as data warehouses, data mines, and master databases for structured and unstructured data. Evaluate and apply data analysis and quality assurance techniques that lead to effective business intelligence, decision making, and visualization across multiple business operating units. Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 ENGL101 ENGL103 ENGL206 HIST101 LITR201 or HUMN201 MATH109 MATH112
Effective January 5, 2014

Principles of Macroeconomics Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Technical and Professional Writing Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century Literature: A Reflection of Life or Introduction to the Fine Arts Introduction to Algebra Analytic College Algebra

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5


Page 191

MATH203 MATH301 PHIL306 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 OR HUMNELE Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210

Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics Ethics for the Information Age Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54

Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

Courses: Specialization ACCT370 or IT Elective BADM150* IT265 CS352 CS455* CSS335 EBUS310 IT424* IT476* MGMT345* MKTG330* IT415 IT416 IT418 MPM357 or IT Elective

Accounting Information Systems or IT Elective Contemporary Business Trends Data Structures For Problem Solving Advanced Database Systems Software Requirements Engineering Data Security, Quality, and Integrity e-Business Data Analysis Systems Acquisition and Sourcing Quantitative Data Analysis Operations Management Marketing Research Business Intelligence Data Extraction, Transformation, and Loading Decision Support Systems and Data Warehousing Project Performance and Quality Assurance or IT Elective

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 192

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM344 MPM346 MPM434 MPM468 Organizational Leadership Project Risk Management Contracts and Procurement Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management 4 4 4 6 6 64 184

Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 193

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Network Management Specialization Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are in top demand. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization, and maintenance of modern database systems Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology Create and design Enterprise Architecture Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan Define and explain current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 ENGL101 ENGL103 ENGL206 HIST101 LITR201 or HUMN201 MATH109 MATH112 MATH203 MATH301 PHIL306 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 OR HUMNELE Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150
Effective January 5, 2014

Principles of Macroeconomics Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Technical and Professional Writing Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century Literature: A Reflection of Life or Introduction to the Fine Arts Introduction to Algebra Analytic College Algebra Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics Ethics for the Information Age Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4
Page 194

Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security

EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210 Courses: Specialization CS345 CS352 CSS200 IT190* IT205 IT225* IT300 or IT302 IT326 IT327

Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

UNIX Systems Programming Advanced Database Systems Principles of Network Security Introduction to IT Fundamentals of Networking IT Support Systems Computer Networks and Communications Network Infrastructure Administration Implementing, Managing and Maintaining a Network Infrastructure IT329 Network Infrastructure Design IT458 Disaster Recovery IT487* IT Capstone I IT488* IT Capstone II EBUS308* Introduction to e-Business MPM344 or IT Elective Project Risk Management MPM357 or IT Elective Project Performance and Quality Assurance or IT Elective

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM346 MPM434 MPM468 Total Program Credits: Organizational Leadership Contracts and Procurement Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management 4 4 6 6 64 184

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 195

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Security Specialization Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are in top demand. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations. Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements. Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems. Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization, and maintenance of modern database systems. Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology. Create and design Enterprise Architecture. Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language. Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan. Define and explain the fundamentals of computer system security requirements. Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 ENGL101 ENGL103 ENGL206 HIST101 LITR201 or HUMN201 MATH109 MATH112 MATH203 MATH301 PHIL306 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 OR HUMNELE Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150 EM208 IT106
Effective January 5, 2014

Principles of Macroeconomics Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Technical and Professional Writing Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century Literature: A Reflection of Life or Introduction to the Fine Arts Introduction to Algebra Analytic College Algebra Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics Ethics for the Information Age Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4
Page 196

IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210 Courses: Specialization CSS200 CSS250 CSS280 CSS300 CSS321 or IT Elective* CSS332 CSS350 CSS410 CSS430* CSS441 CSS450* IT326* IT454* IT456 IT458* MPM357 or IT Elective

Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54

Principles of Network Security Security Risk Management Ethical Hacking Vulnerability Assessment and Management Software Assurance or IT Elective Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security Computer Forensics I Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management Security Compliance Security Capstone Network Infrastructure Administration Security Management Security Architecture Disaster Recovery Project Performance and Quality Assurance or IT Elective

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM344 MPM346 MPM434 MPM468 Organizational Leadership Project Risk Management Contracts and Procurement Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management 4 4 4 6 6 64 Total Program Credits: 184

Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows:
Effective January 5, 2014 Page 197

NSTISSI-4011 National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994 CNSSI-4012 National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4013 National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004 CNSSI-4014 Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997 CNSSI-4016 National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 198

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Software Application Programming Specialization Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are valued employees. The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) curriculum includes both a common core, as well as concentration-specific courses. The BSIT core provides a strong foundation in the key information technology areas of programming, systems administration, security, architecture, databases, and ethics. This core centers on an enhanced view of the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) as a rational, systematic and repeatable process of systems implementation and project management applicable across the spectrum of information technology careers. The Software Applications Programming (SAP) concentration focuses on the JAVA programming language as the core programming language supported by a curriculum focused on software engineering courses, including requirements, analysis, design, testing, and overall implementation. This exceptional critical thinking combined curriculum serves as a strong foundation in helping organizations solve business problems using Information Technology. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations. Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements. Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems. Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization and maintenance of modern database systems. Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology. Create and design Enterprise Architecture. Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language. Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan. Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 ENGL101 ENGL103 ENGL206 HIST101 LITR201 HUMN201 MATH109 MATH112 MATH203 MATH301
Effective January 5, 2014

Principles of Macroeconomics Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Technical and Professional Writing Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century or Literature: A Reflection of Life Introduction to the Fine Arts Introduction to Algebra Analytic College Algebra Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5
Page 199

PHIL306 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210 Courses: Specialization CS346 CS455 CS457 CS459 CS376* ELE SWE400* SWE410* SWE440 or IT Elective* SWE441 or IT Elective* SWE481* Programming Track

Ethics for the Information Age Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 20

User Interface Design Software Requirements Engineering Software Design Software Testing Object Oriented Methods BSIT Elective Software Construction Software Processes Software Project Management or IT Elective Human Elements in Projects and Organizations or IT Elective Software Engineering Capstone I Choose a Programming Track from the list below

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM344 MPM346 MPM357 MPM434 Organizational Leadership Project Risk Management Contracts and Procurement Project Performance and Quality Assurance Project Scheduling and Cost 4 4 4 4 6
Page 200

Effective January 5, 2014

MPM468

HR Project Management

6 64

Courses: Software Application Programming Tracks Java Track IT151 IT152 IT251 IT252 IT351 C++ Track CS104 CS115 CS215 EM Elective C# Track CS116 CS216 CS316 EM Elective Visual Basic Track EBUS115 EBUS215 IT410 EM Elective Introduction to Java Programming I Introduction to Java Programming II Intermediate Java Programming I Intermediate Java Programming II Advanced Java Programming Problem Solving Concepts with C++ Programming with C++ Intermediate C++ Programming Choose 2 courses in Emerging Media from list below C# Programming Intermediate C# Programming Advanced C# Programming Choose 2 courses in Emerging Media from list below Visual Basic Programming Intermediate Visual Basic Programming Web Page-Based Database Application Programming with Visual Basic Choose 2 courses in Emerging Media from list below 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 4 4 4 8 4 4 4 8 4 4 4 4 184

Emerging Media course electives EM218 Web Development II EM228 Scripting for the Web EM325 Multi-Media Development for the Web EM328 Server-Side Scripting for the Web Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

Page 201

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Software Application Programming Specialization (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are valued employees. The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) curriculum includes both a common core, as well as concentration-specific courses. The BSIT core provides a strong foundation in the key information technology areas of programming, systems administration, security, architecture, databases, and ethics. This core centers on an enhanced view of the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) as a rational, systematic and repeatable process of systems implementation and project management applicable across the spectrum of information technology careers. The Software Applications Programming (SAP) concentration focuses on the JAVA programming language as the core programming language supported by a curriculum focused on software engineering courses, including requirements, analysis, design, testing, and overall implementation. This exceptional critical thinking combined curriculum serves as a strong foundation in helping organizations solve business problems using Information Technology. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations. Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements. Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems. Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization and maintenance of modern database systems. Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology. Create and design Enterprise Architecture. Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language. Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan. Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 ENGL101 ENGL103 ENGL206 HIST101 LITR201 or HUMN201 MATH109 MATH112 MATH203 MATH301 PHIL306
Effective January 5, 2014

Principles of Macroeconomics Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Technical and Professional Writing Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century Literature: A Reflection of Life or Introduction to the Fine Arts Introduction to Algebra Analytic College Algebra Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics Ethics for the Information Age

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5
Page 202

SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success OR HUMNELE or Humanities Elective Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210

4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

Courses: Specialization CS346 User Interface Design CS455 Software Requirements Engineering CS457 Software Design CS459 Software Testing CS377* Object Oriented Methods ELE BSIT Elective IT151 Introduction to Java Programming I IT152 Introduction to Java Programming II IT251 Intermediate Java Programming I IT252 Intermediate Java Programming II IT351 Advanced Java Programming SWE400* Software Construction SWE410* Software Processes SWE440 or IT Elective* Software Project Management or IT Elective SWE441 or IT Elective* Human Elements in Projects and Organizations or IT Elective SWE481* Software Engineering Capstone I

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM344 Organizational Leadership Project Risk Management 4 4
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Effective January 5, 2014

MPM346 MPM357 MPM434 MPM468

Contracts and Procurement Project Performance and Quality Assurance Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management

4 4 6 6 64

Total Program Credits:

184

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Software Systems Engineering Specialization Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are in top demand. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations. Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements. Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems. Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization, and maintenance of modern database systems. Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology. Create and design Enterprise Architecture. Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language. Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan. Implement the goals and techniques of software engineering through the development of a complex application Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 or Literature: A Reflection of Life or HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts MATH109 Introduction to Algebra MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PHIL306 Ethics for the Information Age SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success OR HUMNELE or Humanities Elective Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362
Effective January 5, 2014

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Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management

CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210

Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54

Courses: Specialization CS346* CS376* CS455 CS457 CS459 ELE MPM344 or IT Elective MPM357 or IT Elective SWE311 SWE410 SWE440 SWE441 SWE481* SWE482* Programming Track

User Interface Design Object Oriented Methods Software Requirements Engineering Software Design Software Testing BSIT Elective Project Risk Management or IT Elective Project Performance and Quality Assurance or IT Elective The Software Engineering Profession Software Processes Software Project Management Human Elements in Projects and Organizations Software Engineering Capstone I Software Engineering Capstone II Choose a Programming Track from the list below

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM346 MPM434 MPM468 Organizational Leadership Contracts and Procurement Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management 4 4 6 6 64 Courses: Software Systems Engineering Programming Tracks Java Track IT151 IT152
Effective January 5, 2014

Introduction to Java Programming I Introduction to Java Programming II

4 4
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C++ Track CS115 CS215 C# Track CS116 CS216 Visual Basic Track EBUS115 EBUS215 Total Program Credits

Programming with C++ Intermediate C++ Programming C# Programming Intermediate C# Programming Visual Basic Programming Intermediate Visual Basic Programming

4 4 4 4 4 4 184

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Software Systems Engineering Specialization (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are in top demand. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations. Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements. Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems. Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization, and maintenance of modern database systems. Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology. Create and design Enterprise Architecture. Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language. Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan. Implement the goals and techniques of software engineering through the development of a complex application Principles of Macroeconomics Composition and Critical Thinking Composition: Writing and Research Technical and Professional Writing Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century Literature: A Reflection of Life or Introduction to the Fine Arts Introduction to Algebra Analytic College Algebra Applications of Discrete Mathematics Data Driven Statistics Ethics for the Information Age Introduction to the Sciences Lab Science and Technology Environmental Science and Sustainability Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4
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Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 ENGL101 ENGL103 ENGL206 HIST101 LITR201 or HUMN201 MATH109 MATH112 MATH203 MATH301 PHIL306 SCI101 SCI103 SCI201 SCI203 UNIV104 or HUMNELE Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150
Effective January 5, 2014

Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security

EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210 Courses: Specialization CS346* CS377* CS455 CS457 CS459 ELE IT151 IT152 MPM344 or IT Elective MPM357 or IT Elective SWE311 SWE410 SWE440 SWE441 SWE481* SWE482*

Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54

User Interface Design Object Oriented Methods Software Requirements Engineering Software Design Software Testing BSIT Elective Introduction to Java Programming I Introduction to Java Programming II Project Risk Management or IT Elective Project Performance and Quality Assurance or IT Elective The Software Engineering Profession Software Processes Software Project Management Human Elements in Projects and Organizations Software Engineering Capstone I Software Engineering Capstone II

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM346 MPM434 MPM468 Organizational Leadership Contracts and Procurement Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management 4 4 6 6 64 Total Program Credits: 184

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Information Technology


Web Development Specialization Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to use technology to contribute to productivity and the bottom line are in top demand. Outcomes: Differentiate between current computer networks, protocols, and the role of network management software in organizations. Categorize the fundamentals of computer system security requirements Distinguish between the principles, concepts, and fundamentals of operating systems. Apply database concepts and capabilities through the creation, organization and maintenance of modern database systems. Differentiate and categorize the legal, ethical, and social issues of information technology. Create and design Enterprise Architecture. Solve complex problems through the ability to program in at least one high level programming language. Implement the goals, processes and techniques of software engineering through the development of a software application supported by a project plan. Investigate the applications, technology and devices that support Web development. Critically evaluate, analyze and solve problems with Web development technologies. Integrate and use databases to enhance the dynamic and interactive capabilities of a Web site. Research, plan and create a multi-media Web site that integrates images, sound, animation and video and use them effectively while keeping in mind customer requirements and competitive advantage business requirements. Develop a senior level project that incorporates both the Web development aspects and the technology behind Web sites including Web design, software, Web security along with other topics as specified in the project specifications. Courses: Gen-Ed ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 or Literature: A Reflection of Life or HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts MATH109 Introduction to Algebra MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PHIL306 Ethics for the Information Age SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success OR HUMNELE or Humanities Elective
Effective January 5, 2014

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Courses: Core CS126 CS250 or CS251 CS362 CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 IT140 or IT Elective IT245 IT254 IT401 IT425 MPM210 Courses: Specialization
CS347 DMD225* DMD242* DMD480* EBUS308 or IT Elective* IT Elective EM209 or IT Elective* EM218 EM228 EM270 EM325 EM326 EM328 EM420 EM425 IT470*

Unix Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Structured Query Language for Data Management Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments or IT Elective Introduction to Network Management Spreadsheet Applications Information Technology Architectures Systems Analysis, Design and Integration Introduction to Project Management
Web User Interface Design Computer Illustration I Digital Imaging Senior Design Project Introduction to e-Business or IT Elective IT Elective Digital Media and Intellectual Property or IT Elective Web Development II Scripting for the Web Emerging Media and Technology Multi-Media Development for the Web Multi-Media Development for the Web II Server-Side Scripting for the Web Web-Based Database Applications Mobile Web Design Advanced Web Technologies

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 54
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

*Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of the courses listed above with an asterisk (*): MPM332 MPM344 MPM346 MPM357 MPM434 MPM468 Total Program Credits: Organizational Leadership Project Risk Management Contracts and Procurement Project Performance and Quality Assurance Project Scheduling and Cost HR Project Management 4 4 4 4 6 6 64 184

Effective January 5, 2014

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Associate of Science in Information Technology


Successful organizations use technology to find solutions to all kinds of business challenges. Individuals who understand how to work with information and technology to support a companys operational goals are in demand in all types of businesses and industries. The Associate of Science in Information Technology (ASIT) program satisfies the course requirements for the first two years of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) or Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Management (BSISM) degree programs. Outcomes: Demonstrate an understanding of current computer networks, protocols of data communications, and the role of network management software Explain database concepts, discuss the capabilities of modern database systems, and apply those concepts in the design, implementation, and querying of a database to support a business Write programs in at least one high level programming language using programming fundamentals Courses: General Education ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics ENGL101 English Composition I ENGL103 English Composition II HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century LITR201 or Literature: A Reflection of Life LITR203 Introduction to World Literature MATH112 Analytic College Algebra MATH301 Data Driven Statistics PHIL306 Ethics for the Information Age PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab - Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Courses: Core CS126 CS250 CSS150 EM208 IT106 IT110 or CS110 or CS111 IT140

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 57 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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UNIX Fundamentals Fundamentals of Database Systems Introduction to Computer Security Web Development I t Introduction to Programming Logic Introduction to Programming Introduction to Programming with C++ Introduction to Programming with C# Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments

Effective January 5, 2014

IT245 Courses: Electives SPZ ELE

Introduction to Network Management

4 32

** Select 4 credits from one specific BSIT Specialization track that is technically related (i.e., Programming, Security, Networking, Software Engineering, Web, Database, Data Management, etc.). See Specialization courses found with the BSIT programs listed elsewhere in this catalog

4 4 93

Total Program Credits: ** Please work with Student Advisor to determine course track

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Bachelor of Science in Psychology


(Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The Bachelors degree in General Psychology is designed to prepare students to successfully navigate in the 21st century workplace, in a variety of careers that focus on the business of people, including but not limited to work in management, administration, research, and sales. It is positioned to provide an overview of the major psychological concepts, perspectives, and skills that explain human behavior. The degree has four themes threading through it: workplace application of psychology, career advancement, technological acumen, and service to society. The degree prepares students with the critical thinking, problem-solving, analytical frameworks, communication, and leadership skills which define success in todays marketplace. The program builds on students prior learning and experience and will provide the foundation for professional success and lifelong learning in an array of careers. Program Outcomes: Students are prepared to utilize psychological theory and apply concepts to influence their chosen profession. Students are prepared to integrate and apply general psychology principles within the workplace. Courses: General Education ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century ELE Humanities or Social Science Elective MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SOCL340 Diversity in American Life UNIV104 or Academic and Career Success HUMELE Humanities Elective Courses: Core BHVS205 BHVS215 BHVS315 BHVS316 BHVS320 BHVS400 BHVS410 HUMN400

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 66 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Managerial Psychology Motivation and Emotion Interpersonal Communications and Dynamics Psychology and Mass Media Analytical Reasoning and Presentation of Data Psychology of Creativity and Ingenuity Positivist Psychology and Leadership Psychological Aspects of Cinema

Effective January 5, 2014

ELE PSYC125 PSYC205 PSYC210 PSYC310 PSYC315 PSYC320 PSYC337 PSYC355 PSYC360 PSYC446 RES305 RES310 UNIV301

Elective Historical Perspectives on Modern Psychology Psychology in the Workplace (Pro-Seminar) Social Psychology Organizational Psychology Biological Foundations of Behavior: The Brain Theories of Personality Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace Learning & Cognition Psychological Test and Measurement Applied Psychology Capstone Introduction to Social Science Research Methods Applied Research Methods in Psychology Careers in Psychology

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 88

Courses: Concentration ELE 24 credits from the Concentration Elective Choices PSYC499 Change and Emerging Trends in the Field of Psychology Total Program Credits: Courses: LITR201 PSYC201 Courses: PSYC350 PSYC405 General Education Humanities and Social Science Elective Choices Literature: A Reflection of Life Human Development Core Elective Choices Human Sexuality Psychology of Health and Well-Being in the Workplace

24 4 28 182

4.5 4.5 4 4

Courses: Concentration Elective Choices CB450 Orientation to the Consumer Behavior Profession CB455 Marketing Management, Strategy and Research CB460 Sales and Advertising CB465 The Psychology of Consumer Economic Behavior CB470 Consumer Behavior: The Individual CB475 Consumer Behavior: Groups and Society PSYC420 Communication and Interviewing Skills PSYC422 Community Psychology PSYC424 Diversity PSYC426 Leadership PSYC428 Neuroscience: The Brain PSYC430 Spirituality and Faith PSYC432 Sports Psychology
Effective January 5, 2014

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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PSYC434 PSYC405 OB450 OB455 OB460 OB465 OB470

Stress Management Psychology of Health and Well-Being in the Workplace Orientation to the Organizational Behavior Profession Consulting Skills Creating Change in Individuals and Organizations Adult Learning: Corporate Training and Development Developing Human Resources

4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Psychology


Consumer Behavior Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The study of consumer behavior examines how individuals relate to the goods and services available to them. The psychology of consumer behavior examines issues such as consumer decision-making and problem solving, judgment and motivation, marketing and advertising, internal and external impacts on behavior, and the interactions between the consumer and society. The fields of psychology, marketing, advertising, economics, anthropology, and sociology help identify the many factors that influence consumers. Tools such as surveys, experiments, and focus groups help researchers better understand consumer behaviors. The study of consumer behavior can be applied to improving marketing strategies, shaping public policies, influencing society, and improving consumer knowledge. Educators, consultants, managers, and policy makers utilize consumer behavior information. The goal of consumer behavior studies is to better understand consumers and apply that information in business, education, sales, services, public affairs, marketing, and advertising. Program Outcomes : Students are prepared to utilize psychological theory and apply concepts to influence their chosen profession. Students are prepared to integrate and apply consumer behavior principles within the workplace.

Courses: General Education ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century HUMELE Humanities or Social Science Elective MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SOCL340 Diversity in American Life UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective Courses: LITR201 PSYC201 General Education Elective Choices Literature: A Reflection of Life Human Development

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 66 4.5 4.5 4 4
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Courses: Core BHVS205 Managerial Psychology BHVS215 Motivation and Emotion


Effective January 5, 2014

BHVS315 BHVS316 BHVS320 BHVS400 BHVS410 HUMN400 ELE PSYC125 PSYC205 PSYC210 PSYC310 PSYC315 PSYC320 PSYC337 PSYC355 PSYC360 PSYC446 RES305 RES310 UNIV301 Courses: PSYC350 PSYC405

Interpersonal Communications and Dynamics Psychology and Mass Media Analytical Reasoning and Presentation of Data Psychology of Creativity and Ingenuity Positivist Psychology and Leadership Psychological Aspects of Cinema Elective Historical Perspectives on Modern Psychology Psychology in the Workplace (Pro-Seminar) Social Psychology Organizational Psychology Biological Foundations of Behavior: The Brain Theories of Personality Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace Learning & Cognition Psychological Test and Measurement Applied Psychology Capstone Introduction to Social Science Research Methods Applied Research Methods in Psychology Careers in Psychology Core Elective Choices Human Sexuality Psychology of Health and Well-Being in the Workplace

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 88 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 182

Courses: Concentration CB450 Orientation to the Consumer Behavior Profession CB455 Marketing Management, Strategy and Research CB460 Sales and Advertising CB465 The Psychology of Consumer Economic Behavior CB470 Consumer Behavior: The Individual CB475 Consumer Behavior: Groups and Society CB480 Capstone in Consumer Behavior Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

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Bachelor of Science in Psychology


Organizational Behavior Concentration (Program delivered via Virtual Campus) The study of organizational behavior examines workplace issues that impact individuals, groups, and organizations. The psychology of organizational behavior examines issues such as developing human talent and resources, consulting, coaching and mentoring, creating learning organizations, dealing with change, promoting organizational improvements, and fostering personal growth and professional success. The fields of business, management, leadership, labor and industrial relations, ergonomics, physiology and medicine, and law help identify the many factors that influence organizations. Tools such as assessment, intervention, consultation, and evaluation help researchers better understand organizational behavior. Managers and leaders in government, community, business, industrial, health, educational, consulting, labor, research and other work-related organizations regularly utilize organizational behavior information. The goal of organizational behavior studies is to better understand the changing nature of the workplace and apply that information to organizations. The success of your organization doesnt depend on your understanding of economics, or organizational development, or marketing. It depends, quite simply, on your understanding of human psychology: how each individual employee connects with your company and how each individual employee connects with your customers. from Follow this Path, How the Worlds Greatest Organizations Drive Growth, Coffman and Gonzalez-Molina, Warner Books, 2002 Program Outcomes : Students are prepared to utilize psychological theory and apply concepts to influence their chosen profession. Students are prepared to integrate and apply organizational behavior principles within the workplace. Courses: General Education ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century HUMELE Humanities or Social Science Elective MATH102 Introduction to College Math MATH106 Algebra for Business PHIL301 Ethics for Professionals PSYC102 Introductory Psychology SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences SCI103 Lab- Science and Technology SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability SCI203 Lab Environmental Science and Sustainability SOCL102 Introductory Sociology SOCL340 Diversity in American Life UNIV104 Academic and Career Success or Humanities Elective

4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 1.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 66

Courses:

General Education Elective Choices


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Effective January 5, 2014

LITR201 PSYC201 Courses: Core BHVS205 BHVS215 BHVS315 BHVS316 BHVS320 BHVS400 BHVS410 HUMN400 ELE PSYC125 PSYC205 PSYC210 PSYC310 PSYC315 PSYC320 PSYC337 PSYC355 PSYC360 PSYC446 RES305 RES310 UNIV301 Courses: PSYC350 PSYC405

Literature: A Reflection of Life Human Development Managerial Psychology Motivation and Emotion Interpersonal Communications and Dynamics Psychology and Mass Media Analytical Reasoning and Presentation of Data Psychology of Creativity and Ingenuity Positivist Psychology and Leadership Psychological Aspects of Cinema Elective Historical Perspectives on Modern Psychology Psychology in the Workplace (Pro-Seminar) Social Psychology Organizational Psychology Biological Foundations of Behavior: The Brain Theories of Personality Abnormal Psychology in the Workplace Learning & Cognition Psychological Test and Measurement Applied Psychology Capstone Introduction to Social Science Research Methods Applied Research Methods in Psychology Careers in Psychology

4.5 4.5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 88 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 182

Core Elective Choices Human Sexuality Psychology of Health and Well-Being in the Workplace

Courses: Concentration OB450 Orientation to the Organizational Behavior Profession OB455 Consulting Skills OB460 Creating Change in Individuals and Organizations OB465 Adult Learning: Corporate Training and Development OB470 Developing Human Resources OB475 Advanced OD Skills: Organization Interventions OB480 Capstone in Organizational Behavior Total Program Credits:

Effective January 5, 2014

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Course Descriptions
ACC310 Accounting for Non-Accounting Majors This accounting course is designed for non-accounting majors. Students learn the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and begin to learn about internal control and accounting for assets. Students will explore accounting examples from their major area of study. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ACC340 Financial Accounting This course covers the concepts and standards underlying the preparation and analysis of external reports. Students will review the elements, structure, interrelationships of financial statements and the tools necessary to understand and interpret them. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACC341 Financial Accounting This course covers the concepts and standards underlying the preparation and analysis of external reports. Students will review the elements, structure, interrelationships of financial statements and the tools necessary to understand and interpret them. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered ACC350 Managerial Accounting Practices This course provides students with an understanding of the role of accounting information in support of decision-making and planning. Students learn accounting methods for planning and controlling operations through budgets, responsibility centers, and cost management. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ACCT099 Special Topics in Accounting This course addresses issues of current interest in accounting. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ACCT199 Special Topics in Accounting This course addresses issues of current interest in accounting. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Kansas City Effective January 5, 2014 Page 221

ACCT201 Accounting I This course introduces fundamental accounting concepts and explores the accounting environment. It covers the basic structure of accounting, how to maintain accounts, use account balances to prepare financial statements, complete the accounting cycle, and introduces the concept of internal accounting controls. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT202 Accounting II This course covers accounting for balance sheet items for partnerships and corporate entities. In addition, students will be exposed to accounting for the capital structure, inventory, long-term liabilities, payroll, investments and international operations of a firm. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT201 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT203 Accounting III This course completes the fundamentals of financial accounting and includes managerial cost accounting through job costing and process costing applications. Topics covered include the financial analysis of financial statement information, the contribution margin approach to decision-making, and the budgeting process. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT202 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT210 Computerized Accounting The course provides an introduction to utilizing the computer in maintaining accounting records, making management decisions, and processing common business applications with primary emphasis on a general ledger package. Students will utilize an integrated general ledger software package, including accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventories, and payroll systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT201, ACCT202 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT220 Introduction to Managerial & Cost Accounting This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of managerial and cost accounting concepts. It discusses the determination and the study of financial data required by management for budgeting, reporting, and analyzing performance. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT225 Introduction to Tax This course is designed to introduce students to basic tax concepts such as: tax rate structure, losses, tax credits, withholding, and computation of the personal and corporate income tax. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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ACCT299 Special Topics in Accounting This course addresses issues of current interest in accounting. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ACCT300 Intermediate Accounting I This course covers the basic financial statements with emphasis on the accounting principles and procedures relating to current and long-term assets. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT203 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT305 Intermediate Accounting II This course focuses on the financing and investing activities of the business enterprise, as well as special accounting topics, i.e. earnings per share, pensions, employee compensation, error corrections, and income taxes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT300 or ACCT341 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT320 Forensic Accounting In this course the student will gain an understanding of forensic accounting and the differences between financial statement auditors, anti-fraud professionals, and forensic accounting professionals. The course covers the various types of forensic accounting engagements: damage claims, economic damages related to work-place issues, matrimonial investigations and assets and business valuations. The student will develop an understanding of fraud prevention, deterrence, detection, investigation, and remediation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT202 Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus ACCT325 Auditing This course is an introduction to the primary work of the certified public accountant. It covers examination of financial statements for the purpose of rendering an opinion on the fairness with which they present an entitys financial position and the results of its operations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Co-requisite: ACCT330, for Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo and Virtual Campus students in BSACC program only Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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ACCT330 Auditing Lab This lab represents a simulation of audit planning and implementation. Students will plan for and then audit various balance sheet and income statement accounts. The lab will conclude with the preparation of audited financial statements including audit opinion and appropriate footnotes. Prerequisite: None Co-requisite: ACCT325, for Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo and Virtual Campus students in BSACC program only Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Virtual Campus ACCT340 Advanced Accounting This course covers special accounting problems related to the preparation of combined and consolidated financial statements for accounting entities with branch offices and subsidiaries, both domestic and foreign. Also covers accounting for partnerships. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT305 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT341 Intermediate Accounting I This course provides an in-depth analysis, assessment, and implications of information found in corporate financial statements, as well as a history and applications of underlying accounting principles and procedures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT203 Availability: No longer offered ACCT351 Cost Accounting This course focuses on accounting for costs in a manufacturing environment. Various techniques for estimating and accounting for costs are employed. Students will be involved in the budgeting and cost allocation processes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT203 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT361 Tax Accounting I This course introduces the principles of individual income tax based on the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and supporting authority. Students will acquire a theoretical as well as practical understanding of the tax law as applied to individual U.S. taxpayers. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT203 Availability: No longer offered ACCT362 Tax Accounting II This course provides an overview of the principles of taxation for various business entities based on the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and supporting authority. Students will acquire a theoretical as well as practical understanding of the tax law as applied to U.S. business entities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT361 Availability: No longer offered

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ACCT370 Accounting Information Systems This course provides a survey of several Accounting Information Systems (AIS). These types of systems collect and store data then process it into information used by decision makers. This courses focus will be on the conceptual foundations around utilizing accounting information system applications for retrieving accounting information and processing it in business intelligence formats. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH103 or MATH112 or MATH143 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT399 Special Topics in Accounting This course addresses issues of current interest in accounting. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ACCT410 Advanced Tax This course provides an overview of the principles of taxation for various business entities based on the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and supporting authority. Students will acquire a theoretical as well as practical understanding of the tax law as applied to U.S. business entities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT225 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT420 Government & Not for Profit Accounting This course provides an overview of accounting for governments and not-for-profit entities. It discusses accounting principles and practices used in not-for-profit organizations. Topics include accounting, budgeting, financial reporting, and auditing required of both government and not-for-profit organizations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT430 Introduction to International Financial Reporting Standards In this course the student will gain an understanding of the history of international accounting standards and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), the structure and standard setting process of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), the differences between financial statements prepared on the basis of United States generally accepted accounting standards (U.S. GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), requirements of IFRS 1 First-time adoption of IFRS, how to evaluate financial statements prepared under IFRS, and potential issues facing US companies adopting IFRS. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT300 or ACCT341; and ACCT305 or ACCT342; and ACCT340 or ACCT421 or ACC340 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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ACCT460 Accounting Capstone This is an integrative and interactive capstone course in which the student uses the functional skills acquired from previous courses to formulate decisions within a business entity and analyze the financial implications of those decisions. Individual and team participation are imperative for this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT342; Last Quarter Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT495 Advanced Research and Study An independent in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the project, which must be pre-approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ACCT499 Special Topics in Accounting This course addresses issues of current interest in accounting. Course topics will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ACCT614 Applied Managerial Accounting This course focuses on using available accounting information to help managers of the firm make relevant decisions. Examines how the financial information developed for external users forms the basis for the managerial accounting system. Explores costing systems, cost behavior analysis, responsibility accounting and volume-profit relationships. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MGMT502 for MBA program only Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ACCT618 Taxation and Business Decisions The course covers the relationship between managerial decision-making and taxes. Students will explore the taxation of different types of business entities and the individuals involved with the entities. Emphasizes the impact of tax considerations in business decisions such as compensation, mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus ACCT624 Advanced Cost Accounting This course examines strategic cost management theories and applications required in management planning and control. Topics include cost allocation, product costing, activity-based costing, operation control and other cost control systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT614 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North

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ACCT628 Financial Reporting This class focuses on a comprehensive examination of financial statements and accounting reporting standards. Students will gain an understanding of the information provided in corporate annual reports and how to evaluate the financial performance of an entity. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT614 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus ACCT634 Accounting Information Systems The student will examine advanced concepts, skills, and applications of accounting information systems. The course provides an examination of database systems, security methods, and advanced technology in accounting systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT628 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North ACCT638 Advanced Auditing The student will cover advanced topics on auditing procedures and standards. Topics include audit objectives and planning, transaction cycles, audit review and documentation, and the preparation of the final audit report. Additionally, the student will become familiar with audit theory and professional code of practice. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT614Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North ACCT644 Management Control and Auditing This course covers advanced auditing procedures and standards, as well as management control systems. Audit objectives, cycles, review, documentation, theory, and professional code of practice are covered. Other topics include risk assessment techniques, management control systems, and organization for control. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT638 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus ACCT648 Forensic Accounting This course is a comprehensive exploration of forensic accounting as a proactive approach to preventing, detecting, and investigating accounting disputes or irregularities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT638 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North ACCT650 MBA Accounting Capstone The MBA Accounting Capstone uses the functional skills students have developed in previous core and concentration courses in this program - including accounting, business management and business strategy - to complete an in-depth project. The course requires the student to perform comprehensive research, analysis, and study on either a desired area of interest or a major business problem or issue that impacts the students own company or organization. The student will utilize research methodologies to prepare a formal research report. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Last Quarter Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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ACCT655 International Financial Reporting Standards This is a graduate level overview of International Financial Reporting Standards intended for students in the Master of Science in Accounting program who are preparing for the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examinations. The course will cover the structure of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), similarities and differences between IFRS and United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP), issues for U.S. companies arising out of converting to IFRS, issues for converting accounting information systems to IFRS and regulatory issues for global IFRS reporting. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT614 and ACCT634 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North ADV221 Advertising Principles This course establishes a broad understanding of the importance of marketing and advertising in todays world. Market research, consumer behavior and a variety of advertising techniques are discussed. Communication skills and design techniques that are necessary for creating promotional materials and advertising campaigns are explored. Case studies are used to demonstrate how to develop advertising strategies. Students learn how to apply advertising concepts. Individual and team activities are an important part of this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BADM100 or MGMT115; ENGL111, DMD120 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North ADV231 Virtual Advertising Students explore the marketing, planning and analyze the various implications of internet advertising versus traditional advertising strategies. Students research new media used in advertising and create a variety of projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM208 or EBUS208; ADV221 or VC221 Availability: Colorado Springs ADV321 Global Advertising This course features the marketing process and services with a global perspective. Students explore the design and modifications of products for an international market. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ADV221 or VC221 Availability: Colorado Springs ADV331 Ethics in Advertising This course provides students with a basic understanding of ethical advertising & social communication while using digital media as the vehicle of persuasion. Digital media technology is a powerful force shaping attitudes and behavior in today's world making ethical decision making even more essential given the impact of those design decisions in a diverse global environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ADV221 or VC221 Availability: Colorado Springs

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BADM099 Special Topics in Business Administration This course addresses issues of current interest in Business Administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BADM150 Contemporary Business Trends This course introduces the student to emerging business trends. It covers how these trends act as competitive advantages as well as market disruptors. Emphasis is on how they impact businesses and how an organization must adapt or respond to these from both a strategic and tactical perspective. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus BADM199 Special Topics in Business Administration This course addresses issues of current interest in business administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BADM299 Special Topics in Business Administration This course addresses issues of current interest in business administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BADM305 Organizational Behavior This course addresses some tools and insights necessary to understand and analyze the characteristics of human beings and organizational situations. It further explores both organization structure and human variables within that structure to contribute to the long-term survival of an enterprise and include team building. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: no longer offered BADM350 International Business During this course the student studies the international business environment as it relates to global competitiveness. This course explores strategy, organizations, operations, finance, marketing, and coping with different economic systems. Differences between foreign and domestic environments and the impact of these differences on managing in an international business setting are examined. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: no longer offered

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BADM370 Quality Management During this course, the student investigates the emerging principles of quality and its implementation. Explores the processes and values for implementing quality, self-managed work teams, principles of quality, and the importance of including quality as a business strategy. Covers how to examine and improve work processes in the organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus BADM399 Special Topics in Business Administration This course addresses issues of current interest in business administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BADM440 Research Design Methods and Applications This course provides the basic of research needed to successfully complete their business capstone courses. It covers the full cycle of research starting with a qualitative examination of an organizational phenomenon and then addressing how to measure it via survey, experiments, or other designs. It concludes with issues of verification and implementation based on the outcome of the quantitative phase. It also includes the topic of scale development, reliability, validity, confirmatory factor analysis, and issues of survey development and implementation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH306 or MATH301 or MATH305 or MATH451 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus BADM460 Business Capstone This is an integrative and interactive capstone course in which the student uses the functional skills acquired from previous courses to resolve issues or take advantage of opportunities faced by business leaders. Students will assess general business problems and develop courses of actions to address those problems. Specifically, the course focuses on how to create and sustain strategies that create value to the business, consumers, and society as a whole. The primary focus is on crafting an effective policy and implementing a strategy. Individual and team participation are imperative for this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Completion of all Business Concentration Courses Availability: no longer offered BADM475 Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship During this course, the student will explore the fundamentals of business organization, operation and management. The course deals with the characteristics and activities of the business executive, managerial relationships, accountability and the entrepreneur. It requires the student to conduct application and synthesis of other material in order to create a business plan. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls

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BADM485 Senior Project This course provides a forum for senior status students to refine and enhance their organizational, research, writing and presentation skills. The instructor approved topic is chosen by the students because of its real world relevance, application and connection to the students major area of study, interest and workplace relevance. Students will be working under the guidance of a skilled faculty member. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BADM495 Advanced Research and Study This course is an independent in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the research project, which must be preapproved. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BADM499 Special Topics in Business Administration This course addresses issues of current interest in business administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course BHVS205 Managerial Psychology This course examines how to supervise others through delegation, expectations, performance and feedback. It exposes students to Theory X:boss versus Theory Y:coach, contingency theories of adaptive learning, and situational leadership, concluding that there is no one right way to supervise others. Students compare and contrast ways of managing staff, managing upwards, managing relationships with peers, colleagues, suppliers as well as clients. This course focuses on learning clear expectations and how to communicate back and forth in respectful, direct, specific and non-punitive ways. Because of varying backgrounds, students will participate in this course based on their own level of experience. The course is designed for experienced managers as well as those who have not managed people before. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: PSYC125 Availability: Virtual Campus BHVS215 Motivation and Emotion This course addresses the critical aspects of emotion and motivation in the real world of work. Even though most literature on work focuses on thought rather than feeling, people do not leave their human needs and emotions at the door when they come to work. Building on the work of Maslow, Herzberg and McClelland, the course examines human needs, satisfiers versus motivators and how people differ in what energizes them and how they experience and deal with emotions. What are the roots, functions and psychological explanations for emotions in human beings? The course examines comparative perspectives on these questions. Psychological insight into what motivates others will help each professional in our program understand and respect the drives and needs of the people they work with, rather than project their own values onto others. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: PSYC125 or approval Availability: Virtual Campus

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BHVS315 Interpersonal Communication and Dynamics This course defines two-way communication a critically important capacity for anyone at work. Just as in real estate its location, location, location, in the workplace dealing with people, its communication, communication, communication. Communication is not just broadcastingit is sending and receiving a message on the same wavelength. The course focuses on framing clear messages as well as listening with clarity and compassion. It provides a model for how to engage in authentic and powerful conversations and to facilitate dialogue in a large or small group. Conflict if unaddressed does not go away, it merely goes underground and becomes toxic and destructive to an organization or relationship. The course addresses conflict and how to air, and resolve it in a civilized manner, without destroying the quality of the human relationship. Negotiation strategies and techniques for achieving win-win solutions will also be presented. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus BHVS316 Psychology and Mass Media This is a relatively new area of study in the field of psychology. It focuses on understanding how psychology and media work together and how people perceive, interpret, use and respond information and images that come to them from television, radio, movies, texts, and the Internet. So much of our behavior is shaped by messages we receive from mass media, e-learning, cyber networking and digital technologies. This course uses a socio-psychological perspective to understand the dynamics of persuasion and propaganda. It applies selected theories and research on social influence, persuasion, and attitude change to such areas as political and educational campaigns, product advertising, mass media and public opinion. Students examine how their own behavior is influenced by the cyber-age of popular media and mass communication. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENGL211 or Approval Availability: Virtual Campus BHVS320 Analytical Reasoning and Presentation of Data The world is full of numbers. But, what do the numbers mean? Statistical approaches dominate the field of social scientific inquiry and psychological research. Not a day goes by that we dont hear a pundit say, Research shows This course addresses the fundamental principles of statistics, emphasizing not how to do the quantitative mechanics of it, but rather how to interpret statistical studies and cull the insights for action or decision-making. This course emphasizes statistical reasoning and when causality can be claimed, as well as how to work with statisticians to set up meaningful inquiry and valid data collection and analysis. Students practice effective ways to display and present data as well as analytics, in support of research findings including how to use graphs, charts and data representation to formulate a position or hypothesis. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: RES305 Availability: Virtual Campus

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BHVS400 The Psychology of Creativity and Ingenuity This course presents the psychology of out of the box thinking and coloring outside the lines. As Albert Einstein said, you cannot solve problems with the same thinking that created them. Most of us would say that we were creative as children, but what happened? This course provides a variety of methods for energizing creativity, as well as providing tools to work with individuals and groups to solve problems with fresh perspectives and limited resources. The psychological concept of re-framing, as well as looking at the same thing as other people and seeing something different, will be the cornerstone of this learning experience. Students learn to make work engaging, fun and uplifting, re-kindling the child within spirit of creativity we were all born with and harnessing that brain power for practical organization purposes. These are times that call for creativity and ingenuity. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: PSYC355 and PSYC315 Availability: Virtual Campus BHVS410 Positivist Psychology and Leadership There is a new, but powerful wing of psychology called Positivist Psychology. The course is based on compelling research that people thrive when they feel good self-esteem and receive positive encouragement from others around them. The Pygmalion Effect, or the Power of the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, teaches us that students are more likely to learn when their teachers believe they can do it, and, similarly, workers are more likely to perform well when their leaders hold out positive expectations of their performance. This course builds upon the insights of positivist psychology to study the concept of value-based servant leadership, a philosophy and practice defined by Robert Greenleaf which has gained st prominence over the end of the last century and the beginning of the 21 . The philosophy resonates with the popular work of Stephen Covey on the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and the best-selling business book Good to Great by Jim Collins. By examining these approaches, students develop their own personal creed or leadership mantra based on the psychology of the positive and the seven key practices of servant leaders. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BHVS205 Availability: Virtual Campus BIO110 The Human Body and Wellness The Human Body and Wellness is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the concepts of health and wellness from a holistic perspective. Students will learn about the structure and function of the human body from a systems perspective and how the body regulates homeostatic function through the body systems. Separate laboratory sessions will explore anatomical dissections, and relate alterations that may occur in the body as a result of suboptimal health. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered (check availability with campus) BIO112 Lab Human Body The Human Body and Wellness is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the concepts of health and wellness from a holistic perspective. Students learn about the structure and function of the human body from a systems perspective and how the body regulates homeostatic function through the body systems. This lab course will explore anatomy of the human body, and relate alterations that may occur in the body as a result of suboptimal health. Credits: 1.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered (check availability with campus)

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BIO120 Anatomy and Physiology Essentials This course will provide the student with general knowledge of the human body. Each body system and the organs making up that system will be discussed. The normal functioning of each body system will be described. Structural and functional changes within the body systems that may occur throughout the lifespan will be discussed. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus BIO122 Anatomy and Physiology This course introduces the student to the study of the human organism in health and disease. Learning will be organized into units, which will include major body systems, as well as drug and alcohol abuse. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo BIO125 Lab Anatomy and Physiology This course will provide the student the opportunity to understand the structure and function of the human body through experiential learning. The student will use learning resources in the lab setting to identify the structures and function of the body systems. Credits: 1.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus BIO141 Human Anatomy & Physiology I This course focuses on the structure, function and interrelationship of the organs and systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the integumentary, musculoskeletal and nervous system. This course includes a lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo BIO142 Human Anatomy & Physiology II This course focuses on the structure, function and interrelationship of the organs and systems in the human body. Emphasis is placed on the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. This course includes a lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIO141 Availability: Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo BIO143 Anatomy and Physiology I This course focuses on the structure, function and interrelationship of the organs and systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the integumentary, musculoskeletal and nervous system. This course includes a lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered

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BIO144 Anatomy and Physiology II This course focuses on the structure, function and interrelationship of the organs and systems in the human body. Emphasis is placed on the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. This course includes a lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIO143 Availability: No longer offered BIO161 Pathophysiology With Pharmacology I This course discusses the common disease processes affecting the human body. Etiology, signs, symptoms, and treatment associated with cardiovascular, lymphatic, reproductive, digestive and integumentary systems will be identified. The student will also study the treatment of diseases with pharmacotherapeutics with a basic understanding of drug classifications. An association with diagnoses and coding of diseases will be discussed. The knowledge gained in this course will facilitate professional communication in the healthcare environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HSS121, BIO144 Availability: No Longer Offered BIO162 Pathophysiology With Pharmacology II This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology with Pharmacology I. The students will continue to discuss the common disease processes affecting the human body. Etiology, signs, symptoms, and treatment associated with the neurological, endocrine, musculoskeletal, urinary and respiratory systems will be identified. The student will also study the treatment of diseases with pharmacotherapeutics with a basic understanding of drug classifications. An association with diagnoses and coding of diseases will be discussed. The knowledge gained in this course will facilitate professional communication in the healthcare environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIO161 Availability: No Longer Offered BIO200 Applied Microbiology This course focuses on the basic principles of microbiology, particularly on the principles of cellular function. Students then learn to apply these principles in the study of the specific therapies for the treatment of bacterial, parasitic, and viral infectious diseases. Students will also learn the causes and complications of antibiotic resistant strains and their role in compromising patient safety. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIO141 Co-requisite: BIO142 (for the AD Nursing program only) Availability: Denver North, Pueblo BIO210 Pathophysiology This course offers an introduction to the basic concepts of pathophysiology. Students examine the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function and the resulting immune response. Upon completion of the course, students will understand pathophysiological changes, including how pathological processes are manifested, progress in the body, and typical course of management.. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIO141, BIO142, and BIO200 Availability: Pueblo Effective January 5, 2014 Page 235

BSRT350 Bone Densitometry This course explores the basic concepts and technical principals of bone densitometry. This course explores the basic concepts and technical principals of bone densitometry. Related densitometry techniques, skeletal anatomy and interpretation of standard densitometry reports are introduced. Basic computer skills and radiation safety procedures will also be discussed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Be a Registered Radiologic Technologist or Enrolled in a Radiologic Technology Program Availability: Kansas City BSRT351 Bone Densitometry Externship This course explores the clinical applications of bone densitometry. The students will apply knowledge of bone densitometry in the clinical environment under the supervision of a registered technologist. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT350 Co-requisite: Be a Registered Radiologic Technologist or Enrolled in a Radiologic Technology Program. Student must have a Sponsoring Institution with Bone Densitometry Capabilities Availability: Kansas City BSRT360 Cross Sectional Anatomy This course introduces the human anatomy as viewed in sectional planes. Students will compare and contrast planar anatomy to cross sectional anatomy and recognize anatomical structures as viewed in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Be a Registered Radiologic Technologist or Enrolled in a Radiologic Technology Program Availability: Kansas City BSRT361 An Introduction to CT Procedures This course introduces computed tomography as an imaging modality and its practicality within the radiology profession. Students will discuss and review patient history taking skills, the use of contrast media enhancements and adverse reactions within the clinical setting. Students will also learn routine protocols for imaging of the brain, facial bones, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and spine. Students are also recommended to observe techniques for special procedures such as CT guided interventional examinations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT360, SUR150 Co-requisite: Students must have a Sponsoring Institution with CT Capabilities Availability: Kansas City BSRT362 CT Physics and Instrumentation This course explains the basic imaging principals of CT scanning. Computer technology, components, imaging procedures, techniques and quality control methods are introduced. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT360, SUR150 Co-requisite: Be a Registered Radiologic Technologist or Enrolled in a Radiologic Technology Program Availability: Kansas City

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BSRT363 Computed Tomography Externship This course explores the clinical applications of computed tomography. This course is designed to help meet the clinical competency requirements established by ARRT for the CT registry. Students will apply knowledge of computed tomography in the clinical environment under the supervision of a registered technologist. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT361, BSRT362 Co-requisite: Students must have a Sponsoring Institution with CT Capabilities Availability: Kansas City BSRT370 An Introduction to MRI Procedures This course introduces magnetic resonance imaging as an imaging modality and its practicality within the radiology profession. Students will discuss and review patient history taking skills, the use of contrast media enhancements and adverse reactions within the clinical setting. Students will also learn routine protocols for imaging of the brain, neck, spine, extremities, and joints. Students are also recommended to observe techniques for special examinations such as breast imaging and magnetic resonance angiography procedures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT360, SUR150 Co-requisite: Students must have a Sponsoring Institution with MRI Capabilities Availability: Kansas City BSRT371 MRI Physics and Instrumentation This course explains the basic principles of MRI scanning. Computer technology, components, imaging procedures, techniques and quality control methods are introduced. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT360, SUR150 Co-requisite: Be a Registered Radiologic Technologist or Enrolled in a Radiologic Technology Program Availability: Kansas City

BSRT372 MRI Externship This course explores the clinical applications of MRI. This course is designed to help meet the clinical competency requirements established by ARRT for the MRI registry. Students will apply knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging in the clinical environment under the supervision of a registered technologist. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT370, BSRT371 Co-requisite: Students must have a Sponsoring Institution with MRI Capabilities Availability: Kansas City BSRT380 PACS This course focuses on the concepts of picture archival and communications systems and its affect on health care. Students will compare computerized and digital record keeping to traditional film based systems. PACS, teleradiography, digital acquisition systems, and image storage and retrieval will also be discussed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Kansas City

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BSRT381 PACS Externship This course explores the clinical applications of PACS within imaging departments. The students will apply knowledge of PACS in the clinical environment while working along-side health information or radiology information technology staff. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BSRT380 Co-requisite: Students must have a Sponsoring Institution with HIS or RIS Capabilities Availability: Kansas City BSRT450 Quality Improvement in Radiology - Capstone During this course the student investigates the emerging principles of quality management and its implementation into the area of diagnostic imaging. Student will explore the processes and values for implementing quality, self-managed work teams, principles of quality, and the importance of quality management in a healthcare business strategy. Students will be mentored in real world projects that integrate program content to solve problems in healthcare. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Kansas City CB450 Orientation to the Consumer Behavior Profession This course will launch the concentration in Consumer Behavior. It will begin with defining what is consumer behavior and what career opportunities exist for those with a concentration in this field. The course introduces the basic theories, concepts, and findings within key areas that consumer behavior practitioners address: marketing, strategy, research, sales, advertising, the economy, public policy, household economics, individual consumer behaviors, and group/society influences. Because the field of Consumer Behavior draws upon an array of diverse disciplines, this orientation to the landscape will touch upon psychology, management, sociology, economics, anthropology, and ethics, among others. The insights from these disciplines will provide a tool chest of the skills consumer behavior practitioners regularly utilize. Students will be exposed to quantitative and qualitative approaches to the study of consumers and apply that knowledge to better understanding consumer behaviors. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: PSYC446 Availability: Virtual Campus CB455 Marketing Management, Strategy, and Research This course examines best practices in marketing, development and management of effective marketing strategies, and the use of research to understand consumer behaviors. An emphasis will be placed on identifying those practices that lead to positive results in reaching target markets and building market share. Retailing practices are examined in this course, along with electronic commerce and online customers, to identify the most efficient and effective ways to reach consumers. Opinion research, such as surveys and focus groups, will be presented as a method for gathering valuable consumer behavior data useful in marketing efforts. The course explores marketing conditions that demonstrate the success or failure of marketing strategies based on the principles of consumer behavior and marketing sciences. This course focuses on the interplay of consumers and organizations and the importance of market research for understanding consumers. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CB450 Availability: Virtual Campus

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CB460 Sales and Advertising This course delves into the principles of sales and advertising within psychological and sociological contexts. The course examines sales, sales force management, and factors related to improving sales within organizations. Advertising, brand promotion, image development and maintenance, and customer awareness of branding are presented to further understanding of consumer behaviors. Students evaluate the advertising and promotion processes, as well as, the implementation and evaluation of advertising strategies. Students explore how customer satisfaction can be obtained and measured. Students learn of the many ways that consumers develop awareness of their choices of goods and services. The course focuses on utilizing knowledge of consumer behaviors to drive improved sales and critically evaluate advertising options. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CB450 or approval Availability: Virtual Campus CB465 The Psychology of Consumer Economic Behavior This course explores the economic theories and current research in consumer economics. Students develop the analytical skills necessary to interpret economic research, including family and consumer economics. Consumer economics over the lifecycle and consumption theories are explored as they apply to economic theory and household resource decisions. Public policy implications, social and legal aspects of consumer economics, and the changing economic situation are studied. The focus of the course is on improved understanding of consumer economic behaviors within the psychological context. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CB450 Availability: Virtual Campus CB470 Consumer Behavior: The Individual This course explores the external and internal influences of consumer behavior and asks students to consider aspects related to individual consumer behavior and the psychology of those behaviors. Topics reviewed in the course include: the basic motivations underlying consumer purchasing behavior; consumer perception, judgment, and persuasion to respond to products and services; problem-solving, information, and decision-making; and, how individuals vary in their learning, attitudes, beliefs, feelings, and intentions to use these products and services. This course focuses on understanding the cognitive and emotional factors that influence consumers and the use of this knowledge to increase customers, customer retention, purchases, and our understanding of consumer behavior. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CB450 Availability: Virtual Campus CB475 Consumer Behavior: Groups and Society This course investigates the social and anthropological views of consumer behavior and helps students make sense of consumer psychology from a group and societal perspective. The effects of social class, family structure, cultural backgrounds, and group identification are examined. Topics reviewed in the course include the technological, economic, and political factors that influence consumer behavior. Consumer influences on sustainability, social justice, and globalization are also considered as well as consumer politics and legislation. This course focuses on understanding the social factors that influence consumers and the use of this knowledge to increase customers, customer retention, purchases, and our understanding of consumer behavior. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CB450 or approval Availability: Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 239

CB480 Capstone in Consumer Behavior This Capstone course provides the culminating learning experience in the Consumer Behavior concentration. In this class, students integrate the information they have learned, reflect on that knowledge, synthesize their knowledge-base and evaluate their skill-base. Capstone students develop a plan to support their careers, further their professional brand identities, and determine their continuing professional development and lifelong learning plans. This course features presentations and stories from talented consumer behavior leaders. Students demonstrate synthesis and integration of their learning and experiences to- date by creating a culminating project applied to the field of consumer behavior. Students review their own professional mantra, a personal set of goals and values that will guide their professional career journey. Resources for continued professional development and joining communities of practice are also presented. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Last Quarter Availability: Virtual Campus CE242 Computer Architecture This course studies computer organization and design. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, memory system organization and architecture, computer interfacing and multiprocessing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CE412 Advanced Computer Architecture This course covers advanced hardware design techniques and control strategies employed in modern computer systems. Topics include advanced memory design, instructions sets, benchmarking, pipelining, advanced network architectures, and high performance computing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE312 and MATH366 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs CE495 Advanced Research and Study in Computer Engineering This course provides the opportunity for an independent, in-depth research project and/or study in an area of student interest. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the project, which must be approved the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CE499 Special Topics in Computer Engineering This course addresses issues of current interest in computer systems. Course content varies as determined by student interest and the evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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CE605 Modern Computer Architecture This course examines the nature of computing and its impact on the design of computer systems. Topics include basic function building blocks of computer design, benchmarks and performance metrics, instruction set architectures, hardware/software structures, memory choices, and emerging technologies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CE242 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs CE660 Modern Computer Design This course explores the issues, methods, tools and processes in the design of modern computer systems. Students will research and integrate information, identify and apply models, consider experimental design through simulation and evaluate design alternatives in a just-in-time approach to design. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CE605 Availability: Colorado Springs CE690 Computer Engineering Capstone The Computer Engineering Capstone course provides the student the opportunity to integrate skills developed throughout the MSCE program by completing a project or study that focuses on a technical problem or current issue in engineering. The students will define the problem or opportunity, identify constraints, complete an analysis, and prepare and deliver a professional report and presentation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs CE699 Special Topics in Computer Engineering This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer systems. Course content varies as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CHE105 Introduction to Chemistry This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding types, reactions, equation and stoichiometry (a mathematical approach to solving problems involving chemical phenomena). Credits: 5 Prerequisite: MATH103 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls CHE499 Special Topics in Chemistry This course addresses issues of current interest in computer systems. Course content varies as determined by student interest and the evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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CJFI360 Introduction to Criminalistics This course examines the theories and concepts of criminalistics through the application of scientific methods that are necessary to effectively examine, analyze, and reconstruct a major crime scene. Specifically, the course will address legal issues that are related to search and seizure of physical evidence; crime scene documentation techniques including (a) information gathering to enable report writing, (b) photographic composition concepts, and (c) crime scene measurement and diagramming; latent print processing and enhancement; and basic crime scene reconstruction methods. Included will be lab exercises that complement text and lecture. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJFI410 Advanced Crime Scene Forensics Throughout this course, the student will examine the skills and procedures employed by crime scene technicians utilized in processing crime scenes. The class will emphasize special chemical enhancement, alternate light source discoveries, and cast/molding recovery procedures for fingerprints, bloodstain/blood spatter artifacts, tool, tire, and shoe impressions. Lab exercises will be included that complement text and lecture. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls CJFI420 Forensic Photography & Crime Scene Documentation The course is designed to provide the student with the basic concepts of crime scene photography and documentation techniques for homicide scenes, autopsies, and suicides, other dead-body scenes, assaults, burglaries, injuries, sex offenses, arson, and accidents. Lectures will address the use of Polaroid cameras, videotaping, copy stand photography, blood stain documentation, tool mark analysis and court presentations. The digital camera format is also part of the curriculum. Basic techniques of photography and camera operation, application of film/digital application, lighting techniques including low light and electronic flash will be part of the discussion and the laboratory component of the course. Laboratory exercises will be conducted to reinforce class lectures and demonstrations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS360 Required Equipment: 35mm digital camera with manual controls; Video camera (any model); detachable electronic flash; sync cord; tripod; spare batteries. Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls CJFI430 Medico-Legal Death Investigations This course will provide a foundation for understanding death scene analysis. The manner, mechanism, and cause of death are explored, as well as postmortem changes. The course emphasis will be on investigation of sudden or unexpected deaths, homicides, suicides, accidental deaths, and trauma; this will include SIDS and child abuse cases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls

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CJFI440 Bones, Bugs & Teeth The Recovery of Human Remains This course provides students with a series of lectures and field exercises when permissible, using various methods of recovery of human remains. The emphasis will be on scattered surface remains and the detection of clandestine graves. The techniques presented will include scene documentation, basic forensic anthropology, odontology, and entomology as they apply to recovery techniques that are utilize as an aid in identification and criminal prosecution. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls CJFI451 Introduction to Ridgeology This class is intended to be an introduction to the biological development of friction ridge skin, fingerprint pattern interpretation, and fingerprint comparisons. Lecture and laboratory practicums will include the history of fingerprint identification, obtaining fingerprints with ink, the ACE-V methodology and an overview of AFIS. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls CJFI455 Courtroom Presentation of Scientific Evidence This course provides a comprehensive view of the components of criminal trials and will focus on the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and specialized expertise that contribute to credibility as a witness. Specific topical areas of discussion will include types of questions asked of witnesses, strategies and tactics of the prosecution and defense, and, effective methods for improving skills on the witness stand. Additionally, students will learn how to effectively prepare for courtroom testimony by recognizing the critical value and importance of all reports. As part of the course, students will have the opportunity to participate in a moot court exercise. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls

CJFI456 Forensic Investigation of Dynamic Events This is a survey course encompassing forensic investigative inquiry into the dynamics of arson, post-blast investigations, and vehicular incident investigations. Students will be introduced to scientific procedures for determining the cause of fires and will learn to recognize the fire scene, burn patterns, thermal indicators, arson indicators and the dynamics of fire development. A second section of the course is designed to educate the student in the proper investigation of any post-blast explosives incident. Areas addressed include explosives recognition, improvised explosive devices, and scene processing and evidence collection. The third section of the course involves the examination of the skills required to systematically investigate a traffic accident by being able to recognize critical evidence at the accident scene, and to preserve and record it properly. When possible, labs will be conducted to demonstrate, re-enforce, and emphasize key considerations presented during lecture. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls

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CJFI457 Taphonomy Applied Decomposition Research This course is interdisciplinary and will introduce students to field-based research in taphonomy--the post-mortem history of organisms. Students will obtain hands-on experience in extracting and interpreting biological and environmental information gained from the investigative process of decomposition in an outdoor environment using pigs as human models. The research project will require daily collection of specific samples; i.e., soil samples, fly larvae, flies, beetles, maggots, soft tissue samples, etc Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJFI360 CJHS300 Human Service Practice in the Criminal Justice Setting This course introduces the student to the work of helping professionals in the context of the criminal justice system along with identifying the theory base and skills involved in Human Services. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS311 Study of Alcohol Use and Abuse This course surveys the use, abuse, and addictive nature of ethyl alcohol, and the treatment of alcoholism. The student will gain a basic knowledge of alcohol use and abuse, alcoholism, and the broad range of current approaches to prevention and treatment. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS312 Special Topics: Alcohol Use and Abuse This course is designed to supplement CJHS310, Alcohol Use and Abuse. In this directed study course, the student will analyze a current issue related to alcohol use and abuse. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: CJHS310 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls CJHS315 Child Abuse This course provides an in-depth study of child abuse in the context of the criminal justice and social welfare systems. Students will learn to identify risk factors, signs and symptoms of child abuse as well as the legal requirements for interventions in child abuse cases. Students will use case studies to analyze the problems in child abuse investigations and the treatment methods and services available to abused children. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS320 Alcohol & Drug Treatment Continuum In this course, the student will gain a basic knowledge of a range of therapeutic interventions involved in alcohol and other drug abuse in society, in families and with individuals, as well as how these interventions address a variety of problems. Students will be introduced to the continuum of care covers care from prevention through rehabilitation. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CJHS311 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 244

CJHS325 Drug Use and Abuse This course provides a survey of use, abuse and the addictive nature of mood altering chemicals outside the use and abuse of alcohol. Students will gain a working knowledge of factors affecting the abuse of a wide variety of legal and illegal drugs along with the influence of drug use on behaviors. Approaches to prevention and treatment and available resources will be discussed. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS337 Ethics for the CD Counselor This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they related to the practice of counseling and client/counselor relationships. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for counselors, client rights and legal implications, and what defines quality client care. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS338 Special Topics: Ethics for the CD Counselor This course is designed to supplement CJHS336, Ethics for the CD Counselor. In this directed study course, the student will analyze an ethical issue that may be encountered while practicing as a chemical dependency counselor. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: CJHS336 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls CJHS399 Chemical Dependency Elective - Special Topics This course will be specifically devoted to addiction- related contemporary issues. Appropriate topics may include: special populations; diagnosis, assessment, advanced counseling for individuals, groups, or families; theory, research, and practice in addictions; practice or policies relating to addictions; scientifically supported models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention; continuing care for addiction and substance-related problems; dual diagnosis issues; addictions and domestic violence, violence in the workplace, criminal activity, sexual abuse, child abuse and neglect; counselor wellness, and professional development. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS411 Foundations of Individual Counseling This course serves as an introduction to a variety of counseling theories, therapeutic approaches and counseling skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of the theoretical and foundations of counseling and basic counseling skills. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CJUS300 and CJHS337 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CJHS412 Special Topics: Individual Counseling This course is designed to supplement CJHS410, Introduction to Individual Counseling. In this directed study course, the student will analyze a topic related to the challenges associated with family counseling for chemical dependency issues. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: CJHS410 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls CJHS421 Foundations of Group Counseling Foundations of Group Counseling provides an introduction to the dynamics of group counseling theories, therapeutic approaches and facilitative skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of, and experience with, the theoretical foundations of group counseling and group counseling skills. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CJHS300 and CJHS337 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS422 Special Topics: Group Counseling This course is designed to supplement CJHS420, Introduction to Group Counseling. In this directed study course, the student will analyze a topic related to the challenges associated with group counseling for chemical dependency issues. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: CJHS420 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls CJHS425 Introduction to Family Counseling This course provides an introduction to family systems theories, therapeutic approaches and counseling skills. The student will gain a basic knowledge of the theoretical foundations of family counseling and specific family counseling skills. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CJHS337; CJHS300 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJHS480 CJ Human Services Capstone A capstone course that focuses on chemical addiction issues and facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in the program courses. The course focuses on the application of skills through case study, application of law and ethical rules in a human services context. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Senior Status or Approval Availability: Virtual Campus CJUS141 Introduction to Criminal Justice This course surveys the agencies that comprise the criminal justice system which are primarily law enforcement, the courts and corrections. The student will learn the processes of these components and their relationship to one another as well as the roles of related agencies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CJUS201 Law Enforcement Operations and Report Writing This course is an introduction to the role of law enforcement and police processes. Students will examine organizational structure, supervision and administration of law enforcement agencies as well as the day-to-day field operations, leadership, policies, procedures, communication, information and performance evaluation process. Special emphasis is placed on writing skills such as report writing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS250 Homeland Security This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to the changing dynamics of homeland security at both the national and state levels. The student will explore the various dynamics of providing security in different settings. The history and future of terrorism will be examined in a global context. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered CJUS253 Homeland Security This course introduces the changing dynamics of homeland security at both the national and state levels to the student. It explores the various dynamics of providing security in different settings. The history and future of terrorism are also examined in a global context. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: no longer offered CJUS254 Introduction to Homeland Security An introduction to the theory and practice of homeland security in both the public and private sector at the national, regional, state, and local level. An overview of the administrative, legislative, and operational elements of homeland security programs and processes (including a review of homeland security history, policies, and programs) is provided. The course will touch on the following sub-disciplines within the enterprise: counterterrorism, emergency management, public health, transportation security, maritime security, border security, and critical infrastructure protection, as well as the agencies, organizations and institutions involved in these fields. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 or approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CJUS260 Criminal Justice Ethics This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they relate to the field of criminal justice. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for criminal justice professionals, and the student will apply ethical standards to different situations they may encounter working in the criminal justice professions. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered

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CJUS261 Ethics in Criminal Justice This course explores the ethical and legal issues as they relate to the field of criminal justice. The student will gain a foundational understanding of the ethical standards for criminal justice professionals, and the student will apply ethical standards to different situations they may encounter working in the criminal justice professions. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS263 American Corrections The student will conduct a comprehensive examination of the adult corrections process and the history, sentencing alternatives, and future direction of correction modalities. The course also explores community corrections and the various methods used outside traditional correctional institutions. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS275 Security Management This course provides an overview of principles and issues in business and organizational security management. Students can examine the challenges embodied in various aspects of security such as personnel, facility, and information. Principles of loss prevention and the protection of assets are also covered. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CJUS280 Victimology This course addresses victimology as an emerging area of study in the field of criminal justice, and surveys society's emotionally and politically complex issues as they relate to victims of crime. Victimology is an objective and scientific approach to the study of victims of various forms of crime, from battered women to auto theft, with special emphasis on victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CJUS285 Juvenile Delinquency During this course, the student will survey the area of juvenile delinquency through the study of the theories of juvenile misconduct, the juvenile court system and methods of rehabilitation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CJUS290 Criminal Law This course is a study of the general principles of criminal law. Specifically it includes both the policy and procedure of criminal law, giving students the ability to apply the essential elements of general criminal law principles to specific substantive crimes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CJUS300 Victimology This course addresses victimology as an emerging area of study in the field of criminal justice, and surveys societys emotionally and politically complex issues as they relate to victims of crime. Victimology is an objective and scientific approach to the study of victims of various forms of crime from battered women to homicide, with special emphasis on victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CJUS342 Juvenile Delinquency This course surveys the area of juvenile delinquency through the study of the theories of juvenile misconduct, the juvenile court system and methods of rehabilitation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CJUS343 Criminology Criminology surveys the motivations of the criminal mind using both sociological and cognitive restructuring theories. It presents an overview of the meaning of crime, crime statistics, theories of causation, criminal thinking and major offense areas, and describes methods for changing criminal behavior. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS350 Community Corrections This course will provide a review of corrections in the community, including programs such as probation, parole, and other alternatives to incarceration, intermediate sanctions, and diversionary programs. Emphasis in this course will be placed on alternatives to incarceration, intermediate sanctions and diversionary programs, and offender acceptance into these programs. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CJUS352 Community Policing Examines the history of community policing as well as challenges, benefits and current applications used by law enforcement agencies. Topics include traditional policing versus community oriented policing, need for community policing and its benefits, problems solving methods such as the SARA model, methods and applications, collaboration between police and citizens. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141, CJUS201 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus

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CJUS354 Criminal Courts What actually goes on in a criminal courtroom? Who are the players? What is the process involved in a criminal trial from start to finish? These questions and others will be answered in this course. Criminal courts will introduce the student to the issues criminal courts face, as well as the structure of the typical criminal court. The student will also walk through the entire process of a typical criminal trial from arrest through post-conviction. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS375 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CJUS356 Loss Prevention This course focuses on preventing loss and protecting assets in the private sector. Retail and other losses can drive a business into bankruptcy if not dealt with properly. This course introduces the student to the realities of business losses due to theft and teaches the student the strategies necessary to develop an effective loss prevention program in a business (to include retail) setting. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS290 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CJUS360 Legal Elements of Fraud This course provides an overview of the legal frameworks for addressing fraud, as well as special topics in evidence and expert witnesses as they pertain to fraud cases. Students will learn to identify different types of fraud, legal concepts relevant to fraud and the rules of evidence specific to fraud investigations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CJUS365 Criminal Law This is a study of the general principles of criminal law. Specifically it includes both the policy and procedures of criminal law, giving students the ability to apply both the policy and procedures of criminal law principles to specific, substantive crimes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 or PBAD200 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CJUS375 Criminal Procedure Criminal Procedure provides an in-depth study of the criminal court system and Constitutional law. The defendants Constitutional rights are explored through case-law study and includes the basic underlying concepts of search and seizure, self-incrimination, the right to counsel, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonableness, and the rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS365 or CJUS367 or CJUS290 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CJUS380 White Collar and Financial Crimes This course introduces the student to the nature and scope of white collar and financial crimes. Students will learn how to identify the various types of financial crimes and the methods and techniques used to investigate and prosecute this type of criminal activity. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS385 Fraud Prevention & Deterrence This course provides an in-depth study of the investigative techniques specific to fraud investigations, and methods for prevention and detection of fraud. Students will learn investigative procedures appropriate for fraud investigations, how to prepare appropriate reports, and practices that serve to reduce and prevent fraud and corruption in the workplace. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CJUS399 Advanced Topics in Criminal Justice This course addresses issues of current interest in the field of criminal justice. The course content will vary based on the evolution of the discipline. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CJUS420 Family and Domestic Violence An examination of the complex phenomenon of family and domestic violence and its impact on individuals, families, our society, and the legal system. Topics include a historical perspective, present-day approaches to combating family/domestic violence, psychological/physical abuse, abuse related to partners, elderly and children, response systems and mechanisms to prevent and treat. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS290 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CJUS422 Probation and Parole This course provides an in-depth evaluation of probation and parole systems in the United States. Topics include pre-sentence investigations, duties and responsibilities of parole and probation officers, and offender evaluation, supervision, treatment and release. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS350 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CJUS424 Constitutional Law In this course, the student will discuss and analyze concepts of Constitutional Law as they apply to criminal justice. The student will analyze criminal justice policies in terms of their effects on civil liberties and their impact on law enforcement and correctional practices. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS350 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus

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CJUS430 Data Analysis in Criminal Justice This course is designed to introduce students to decision-making based on criminal justice research and data. Students will explore the use of criminal justice data in crime analysis and justice administration. Students are introduced to strategic resource and asset allocation decision making based upon statistical analysis and predictive analysis. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CJUS434 Terrorism and Organized Crime This course is designed to introduce the criminal justice student to terrorism, terrorist organizations and criminal organizations. Students will learn about the targets and tactics of these organizations. Students will compare and contrast these organizations and analyze the nexus between terrorism and organized crime. The student will learn how these two types of organizations function, the differences and similarities in how they function, and how law enforcement and homeland security agencies deal with these organizations today. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS254 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CJUS440 The Laws of Evidence In this course, the student will be provided a thorough examination of the laws of evidence for criminal justice professionals. Topics include circumstantial and opinion evidence, hearsay, character evidence, relevancy and materiality, privileged communications, expert witness testimony, objections to and exclusion of evidence, and chain of custody. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS375 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS448 Criminal Investigation This course examines the skills needed to become a criminal investigator and the procedures criminal investigators use to manage a criminal investigation and prepare a case for court. The course also introduces the student to interview and interrogation techniques. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS440 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS450 Forensic Criminology This course is designed to help develop an appreciation and understanding of crime scene analysis and management. Students will document, collect, preserve, and process physical evidence correctly, analyze it thoroughly, and understand its relevance to the case with special emphasis on forensic science application and physical evidence recognition and collection. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS448 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Virtual Campus

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CJUS460 Interview and Interrogation This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge base of general issues regarding effective techniques which apply to both accusatory and non-accusatory intake/interviews/interrogations. The course includes information on the legal aspects of interrogations and the admissibility of confessions. In addition to methods of achieving successful outcomes, topics include physiological and psychological aspects of interviews and interrogations, detecting deception, non-verbal behavior, and persuasion. Students will train via recorded practicum of mock interviews and interrogations in an interrogation room setting. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS448 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS475 Internship An internship in criminal justice provides the student with the opportunity to work in the criminal justice field under the supervision of a criminal justice professional. The student will synthesize the experience by completing weekly logs and assignments designed to complement the internship experience. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CJUS480 Criminal Justice Capstone The criminal justice capstone facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in other courses. The student will focus on the application of skills through case study, interviewing, application of law, and report writing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: No longer offered CJUS482 Criminal Justice Capstone A capstone course that facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in other courses. The course focuses on the application of skills through case study, interviewing, application of law, and report writing. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: Senior Status Availability: no longer offered CJUS483 Criminal Justice Capstone II A capstone course that facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in other courses. The course focuses on the application of skills through case study, interviewing, applications of law and report writing. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CJUS482 Availability: no longer offered CJUS484 Criminal Justice Capstone The criminal justice capstone facilitates the integration of the knowledge gained in other courses. The student will focus on the application of skills through case study, interviewing, application of law, and report writing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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CJUS495 Advanced Research and Study This course provides the student an opportunity to engage in an independent, in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the research project that must be pre-approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CJUS500 Foundations of Criminal Justice This course provides a thorough foundation in the concepts of criminal justice. The focus is on understanding the primary components of the criminal justice system. This course assumes no prior knowledge of these areas and is an excellent refresher course for those with some familiarity with criminal justice. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS600 Advanced Review of Criminal Justice This course provides a thorough review of the primary components of criminal justice: law enforcement, courts and corrections. The focus is on analyzing the primary components of the criminal justice system, their relationship to one another, and to the policy-making process. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS610 Crime Laboratory Management Taking this course the student will cover key issues related to the professional management of the crime lab in the administrative, political and operational environment. Ethical, quality and personnel issues are also examined. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS615 Criminology and Public Policy This course examines the current discipline of criminology based on current research and its applications, in a variety of contexts such as Victimology, crime prevention, juvenile justice, and other issues. Students will analyze crime policy and synthesize existing and emerging criminological theory affecting the development of criminal justice policy. Students will utilize contemporary criminological theory and research to inform and develop public policy designed to address the causes and concerns of contemporary crime. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MGMT605 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CJUS620 Court Services Management This course will cover the use of effective tools for case management and process analysis in the judicial system. It includes court performance standards and explores the roles and purposes of courts, the internal and external environments in which they operate and management theory as applied to courses. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS625 Issues of Diversity in Criminal Justice Regardless of age, race, gender, sexual orientation, political or cultural affinity, crime has an impact on all of our lives. Todays criminal justice practitioner must understand the reality of a globally connected world, and appreciate how our differences can affect the way we deal with crime and criminal justice. The focus of this course is to analyze how issues of diversity influence all aspects of the criminal justice system, and to develop ways to effectively and ethically address issues of diversity to achieve positive outcomes in a variety of criminal justice settings. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS630 Law Enforcement Management This course will blend law enforcement theory and practice to create a proactive approach for successful management of personnel, resources, and services to the community. The student will be involved in an in-depth study of management in law enforcement including operating principles, communication and the future of law enforcement. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS640 Corrections Management This course provides comprehensive coverage of correctional administration. It focuses on problem solving with real-life applications of issues for correctional administrators. Additionally, it includes the historical perspective of correctional administration, the management of offenders, the prison setting, the correctional staff and an overview of the future in correctional administration. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS650 Terrorism and Homeland Security Management This course covers security management, including risk assessment, planning and program administration, and explores the intergovernmental system relationships in homeland security. The course will provide the student with an interdisciplinary approach in defining terrorism in analysis of counterterrorism strategies for planned responses. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CJUS675 Special Topics in Criminal Justice This course addresses topics of current interest in the field of criminal justice, with an emphasis on research, and the application of research results to drive policy. The course content will vary based on the evolution of the discipline. The syllabus for a particular session will announce the topics for the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS685 Graduate Criminal Justice Capstone The course is designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in the Criminal Justice graduate program and related areas allowing the student to demonstrate the professional competencies associated with a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the criminal justice field. Students will evaluate case studies and other materials to demonstrate written competency in the areas of research, professional responsibility, and management in the criminal justice field. Students will analyze issues of law, policy, and society, allowing students to incorporate knowledge and experience as they apply ethical principles in developing effective strategies to confront issues facing practitioners within the realm of criminal justice. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS675 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CJUS687 MSCJ-Homeland Security Concentration Capstone The course is designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in the graduate Criminal Justice Homeland Security concentration program and related areas, allowing the student to demonstrate the professional competencies associated with a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the criminal justice field as it relates to homeland security. Students will evaluate case studies and other materials to demonstrate competency as a leader in criminal justice fields where they interrelate to and interact with homeland security issues. Students will analyze issues of technology, government and policy, intelligence, and vulnerability analysis, allowing students to incorporate knowledge and experience as they apply ethical principles in developing effective strategies to confront issues facing practitioners within the realms of criminal justice and homeland security. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS675 Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus CRPT100 Realtime Theory I This course provides an introduction to the careers in realtime reporting information systems and communication technology. The student is introduced to the concepts associated with the ability to write a conflict-free theory on a computer-compatible stenography machine. Reading skills for stenography notes on literary, jury charge, and testimonial material are developed. The student will practice dictation for reinforcement of theory. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course)

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CRPT102 Realtime Theory II This course is a continuation of Realtime Theory I. The student will continue to develop proficiency in the ability to write a conflict-free theory on a computer-compatible stenography machine. Reading skills for stenography notes on literary, jury charge, and testimony material are further developed. The student will continue to build proficiency through the practice of dictation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT100 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT104 Realtime Theory III This course is a continuation of Realtime Theory I and II. The student continues to develop proficiency in the ability to write a conflict-free theory on a computer-compatible stenography machine. Reading skills of stenography notes on literary materials are further developed. The student continues to build proficiency through the practice of dictation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT102 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT200 Realtime Writing I This course continues development of conflict-free theory for writing on a computer-compatible steno machine. The student will develop reading and writing skills on literary, jury charge, and testimony material with emphasis on high realtime translation rates. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT104 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT201 Vocabulary for Court Reporters During this course, the student studies and builds vocabulary relative to terms used in the court reporting profession. Emphasis is placed on spelling, usage, and commonly confused words utilized in the court reporting profession. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT200 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT202 Realtime Writing II This course continues development of conflict-free theory for writing on a computer-compatible steno machine. The student will develop reading and writing skills on literary material with emphasis on high realtime translation rates. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT200 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT250 Punctuation and Proofreading This course provides instruction on the ability to effectively punctuate the spoken word. Skills from composition instruction are applied to the spoken word as delivered in testimony and court proceedings. The student will learn techniques to sharpen proofreading skills to produce an error-free document. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Sioux Falls Effective January 5, 2014 Page 257

CRPT298A Realtime Writing I Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 80 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT200 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT298B Realtime Writing I Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 80 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT200 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT299A Realtime Writing II Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 100 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT202 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT299B Realtime Writing II Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 100 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT202 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT300 Realtime Writing III This course continues development of reading and writing skills on literary, jury charge, and testimony material with emphasis on high realtime translation rates. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT200 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT302 Realtime Writing IV The student will continue to develop reading and writing skills on the steno machine on literary material with emphasis on high real time translation rates. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT300 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course)

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CRPT350 Legal Procedures and Terminology This course provides an introduction to the legal system with an overview of all aspects of the law discussed. Through the discussion of the areas of the law, the student will learn legal terminology that will be integrated throughout the program and the reporting profession. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT398A Realtime Writing III Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 120 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT300 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT398B Realtime Writing III Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 120 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT300 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT399A Realtime Writing IV Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 140 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT302 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT399B Realtime Writing IV Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 140 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT302 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT400 Realtime Writing V This course continues development of conflict-free theory for writing on a computer-compatible steno machine. The student will develop reading and writing skills on literary, jury charge and testimony materials with emphasis on high realtime translation rates. Students will be given assignments and current events dictation to improve their vocabulary and punctuation usage. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT302 Availability: Sioux Falls

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CRPT405 Computer-Aided Transcription In this course, the student will develop writing and editing skills for computer-aided transcription including realtime and closed captioning. The student builds the CAT dictionary. Accuracy in realtime and using the CAT software and each special feature is developed through considerable skill practice. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT302 Availability: Sioux Falls (Check with individual campus for availability of this course) CRPT410 Realtime Writing VI This course continues development of conflict-free theory for writing on a computer-compatible steno machine. The student will continue to develop reading and writing skills on literary, jury charge, and testimony material with emphasis on realtime translation rates. Students will be given assignments and current events dictation to improve their vocabulary and punctuation usage. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT400 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT414 Reporting Procedures and Business Applications This course will focus on the profession of reporting including responsibilities, certification, professional associations and ethics of reporters. The student will prepare transcripts from a variety of legal proceedings. The information necessary in establishing and operating a transcript production business will be explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT400, CRPT405 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT450 Realtime Writing VII This course continues development of conflict-free theory for writing on a computer-compatible steno machine. The student will continue to develop reading and writing skills on literary, jury charge, and testimony material with emphasis on realtime translation rates. Students will be given assignments and current events dictation to improve their vocabulary and punctuation usage. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT410 Availability: Sioux Falls

CRPT460 Realtime Writing VIII The student will continue to develop reading and writing skills on literary, jury charge, and testimony material with emphasis on realtime translation rates. The student will also complete simulated Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR) exam and Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) exam. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT450 Availability: Sioux Falls

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CRPT475 Internship/Externship This course is the final course in the core court reporting curriculum. The student will apply skills and knowledge learned in the classroom to the practical reporting profession. Must have achieved a minimum of 180 wpm prior to commencement of the internship/externship. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CRPT410 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT496A Realtime Writing V Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 160 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT400 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT496B Realtime Writing V Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 160 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT400 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT497A Realtime Writing VI Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 180 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT410 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT497B Realtime Writing VI Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 180 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT410 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT498A Realtime Writing VII Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 200 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT450 Availability: Sioux Falls

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CRPT498B Realtime Writing VII Lab2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 200 words per minute Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT450 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT499A Realtime Writing VIII Lab 1 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 225 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT460 Availability: Sioux Falls CRPT499B Realtime Writing VIII Lab 2 This course is designed to allow the student to continue to build their speed to achieve a speed of 225 words per minute. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CRPT460 Availability: Sioux Falls CS099 Special Topics in Computer Science This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer Science. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++ This course covers the fundamental problem solving approaches that lead to solutions suitable for implementation with a computer programming language. Solutions will be implemented using the essential elements of a modern programming language. Students will also be introduced to the techniques of designing and documenting a problem solution. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH103 or MATH112 or MATH143 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS106 Problem Solving Concepts With Programming The course covers the fundamental problem solving approaches that lead to solutions suitable for implementation with a programming language. It introduces the basic concepts of object-oriented programming. It includes control structures, data and program design, objects and classes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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CS110 Introduction to Programming With C++ The course is an introduction to C++ programming and object-oriented techniques. This is designed for students just starting out in programming. Fundamental programming concepts such as Data type declarations, control statement structures, string manipulation, file input and output, data structures, and Visual Studio compiler utilization are incorporated in lab assignments. These concepts provide the framework for the development of a very basic C++ / DOS application. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CS111 Introduction to Programming With C# The course is an introduction to C# programming and object-oriented techniques. This is designed for students just starting out in programming. Fundamental programming concepts such as Data type declarations, control statement structures, string manipulation, file input and output, error handling and object-oriented techniques are incorporated in lab assignments. These concepts provide the framework for the development of a very basic Graphical User Interface (GUI) application. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT106 or CS106 or CS123 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CS115 Programming With C++ Students are introduced to the C++ programming language in this course. The course includes the basic concepts of both the structured programming and object-oriented programming models. Emphasis is on applying sound software engineering principles. Basic declarations and statements, control structures, data and program design, arrays, text strings, pointers, abstraction, classes and objects are covered. Students are required to complete several programs. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or Approval; MATH103 or MATH143 or MATH112 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS116 C# Programming This course introduces computer programming using the C# programming language. The basic concepts of object-oriented programming are discussed. Topics studied will include an introduction to managed (programming) languages, the Microsoft Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE), program control structures, data and program design, objects and classes, methods, arrays and object-based applications. Students will complete several C# programs while completing this course. The course will also prepare students to take CS216: Intermediate C# Programming. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CS104; MATH103 or MATH143 or MATH112 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CS125 UNIX Fundamentals In this course, students explore end user interaction with the UNIX operating system. This course examines the basic features of the UNIX operating system, UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, the UNIX shells, and shell programming. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS106 Availability: No Longer Offered Effective January 5, 2014 Page 263

CS126 Unix Fundamentals In this course, students explore end user interaction with the UNIX operating system. This course examines the basic features of the UNIX operating system, UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, the UNIX shells, and shell programming. It also draws comparisons between UNIX and Linux. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CS104 or CS106 or IT110 Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus CS146 Introduction to UNIX This course introduces the UNIX operating system and examines its basic features. Students learn common UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, UNIX editors, and the UNIX shells and are introduced to shell script programming. The course requires the preparation of several exercises using the UNIX environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT110 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS199 Special Topics in Computer Science This course addresses issues of current interest in computer science. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming This course builds upon the fundamental topics covered in CS115. The focus is on the more powerful features of C++ including I/O formatting, file I/O, overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, templates and exceptions. A major emphasis is on object-oriented program design, construction and test. Students are required to complete numerous programs using these advanced features. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS115 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS216 Intermediate C# Programming This course builds on the foundation established in CS116. More attention is given to C#s object-oriented features of inheritance and polymorphism, graphical user interfaces, basic generic collection data structures, overloaded operators, multithreading, exceptions, files and streams. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS116 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CS230 Data Structures In this course a student learns the principles behind both simple and advanced data structures. Study includes data types, arrays, stacks, queues, lists and trees. Students demonstrate understanding of these principles through the completion of several programs. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS215 or CS216 or IT215 or IT252 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CS246 Structured Query Language This course gives complete coverage of the SQL database programming language and studies the concepts involved in the relational database model. Storage, retrieval and manipulation of data are emphasized using SQL (Structured Query Language), DDL (Data Definition Language) and DML (Data Manipulation Language). Students will complete several database projects using SQL. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS250 or CS251 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS250 Fundamentals of Database Systems This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT110 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CS251 Fundamentals of Database Systems This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT110 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS265 Algorithms Students are introduced to the basic concepts of algorithm design analysis, including searching and sorting, hashing and information retrieval. Average and asymptotic behaviors are discussed. Complexity issues are explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS230 or approval, and MATH200 or MATH203 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS299 Special Topics in Computer Science This course addresses issues of current interest in computer science. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS310 Programming Mobile Apps This course addresses the commonalties and differences between the development process and workflow, application design methodology and principles, as well as the implementation tools for mobile computing as contrasted with those for desktop computing. A project that considers the development processes and constraints of mobile computing will be undertaken. Each student builds a solution to a problem involving mobile computing, which is then presented to the simulated concerned stakeholders. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS215, CS216, or IT215 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 265

CS316 Advanced C# Programming Extends and integrates much of the C# programming knowledge presented in previous C# courses. Advanced topics are covered along with proven design and implementation rules-of-thumb (i.e., idioms). Practical aspects of using C# for industrial-strength software production are emphasized. Advanced coverage of object-oriented software concepts; reflection, attributes and dynamic programming; windows graphics and multimedia using Windows Presentation Framework (WPF); multithreaded solutions for multi-core hardware architectures; web services using the Windows Communications Framework (WCF); and ASP.NET Ajax and Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) using Silverlight are discussed. Emphasizes the use of the components of the C# standard Base Class Library. Requires completion of several challenging programs as well as a final software project. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS216 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls CS340 Operating Systems In this course, analysis of the design of modern operating systems is emphasized. The topics covered include basic capabilities of multi-program operating systems, virtual memory, resource allocation and management, concurrent processes and threads, protection, file systems, batch and interactive subsystems. Completion of the course requires the student to perform several lab exercises that investigate and exercise key operating system features. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CE242; CS215 or CS216 or IT215 or IT252 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS345 UNIX Systems Programming The student is introduced to the basic concepts of UNIX programming, including pipes, filters, concurrency and management of processes and resources. The design and implementation of UNIX Perl programs are discussed. Several programming projects are required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS146 or CS126 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS346 User Interface Design Developing usable software products is vital in todays competitive marketplace. This course provides in-depth coverage of the computer human interface, user interface design, user profiling, prototyping and usability testing. Note: this class does not require programming skills. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT110 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS347 Web User Interface Design Developing useable software products is vital in todays competitive web marketplace. This course provides in-depth coverage of the computer human interface, user interface design, user profiling, prototyping and usability testing with special emphasis to web interface for multiple technologies (example: mobile web devices, nettops, tablets, smart phones, speech recognition and navigation, etc.). Note: This class does not require programming skills. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CS104 or IT106 or IT110; EM208 or EBUS208 Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 266

CS352 Advanced Database Systems This course continues the study of database design and implementation, emphasizing data warehousing, online analytical processing and distributed databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS362 or CS363 or CS246 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus CS362 Structured Query Language for Data Management This course gives complete coverage of SQL, with an emphasis on storage, retrieval and the manipulation of data. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS250 or CS251 or CS252 Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus CS366 Software Engineering Methods Software Engineering Methods introduces students to the basic concepts of software engineering including lifecycles, methodologies, techniques, and tools. This course provides an overview of requirements engineering, software design, implementation, testing, and the maintenance of software development products. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS215 or IT215 or EBUS215 or CS216 or IT152 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS377 Object Oriented Methods Object Oriented Methods introduces the student to the basic concepts of object-oriented analysis and design. Use case modeling, class modeling and state modeling using common notations are covered. Completion of several exercises and a final project are required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EBUS215 or IT152 or CS115 or CS116 or IT115 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS381 Software Requirements Engineering Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, software analysis, and the specification of software requirements. The additional topics covered during this course include requirements traceability, software quality, and use case scenario development. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS377 or CS376 or CS366 or CS475 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls CS382 Software Design Software Design defines and describes the behavior of the software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS366 or CS475 or SWE410 or CS376 or CS377 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls

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CS383 Software Testing Software Testing provides an overview of a variety of testing practices and methods. It gives students the opportunity to apply the theory as they perform software tests. This course explores a variety of tests, including unit testing, usability testing, operational testing, integration testing, and system testing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS377 or CS376 or CS366 or CS475 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls

CS399 Special Topics in Computer Science This course addresses issues of current interest in computer science. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS455 Software Requirements Engineering Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, identification, definition, and documentation. Students will explore and practice elicitation techniques, define functional and non-functional requirements, write use-case scenarios, explore user interface alternatives, learn how to analyze and model requirements, and develop a requirements traceability matrix that spans the software development lifecycle. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS366 or CS475 or CS377 or IT422 or IT425 Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus CS457 Software Design Software Design defines and describes the behavior of a software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course. Requirements are incorporated into the design and traced to ensure completeness, correctness and consistency via the requirements traceability matrix. Students apply the theory by developing a software design specification. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS455 Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus CS459 Software Testing Software Testing provides an overview of a variety of testing practices and methods, and then gives the students the opportunity to apply the theory as they perform software tests. This course focuses on the types of tests that are conducted during the software development lifecycle, such as unit testing, usability testing, operational testing, integration testing, stress testing, and system testing. Students develop a test procedure, a test plan, conduct system and usability testing, and write a test report that documents the results. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS457 or CS366 or CS475 Availability: Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Virtual Campus

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CS481 Computer Science Project I Software Engineering Capstone I is the first course in a two-course sequence that involves the development of a software product. Working in teams, students design and develop a software system based on user requirements. This course reinforces the principles of requirements engineering and software design. It includes the analysis and design of a software product. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Senior Status or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls

CS482 Software Engineering Capstone II Software Engineering Capstone II continues the software product development that began in CS481. Working in teams, students use their requirement and design specifications to develop and test a software product. This course requires the development and test of a software product. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS481 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls CS495 Advanced Research and Study in Computer Science This course gives the student an opportunity to conduct an independent in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the research project, which must be pre-approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS499 Special Topics in Computer Science This course addresses issues of current interest in computer science. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS500 Computer Science Foundation Topic This course provides foundational knowledge in computer science. The topics include operating systems, computer networking, database systems, object-oriented design, and software engineering principles. It addresses basic information, preparing students for participation in the MSCS graduate program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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CS615 Data Management This course focuses on management of data in organizations of all sizes. Concepts and techniques for content management and data governance are studied. Analysis and development of data architecture, data management policies and procedures and data security throughout the data life cycle are explored. Preparation of a significant project is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS627 Design and Analysis of Algorithms This course involves both the design and analysis of classic and other useful algorithms which includes the necessary treatment of graph theory and algorithm complexity analysis. Students will design and code many of the algorithms and measure their performance to compare them to one another and to analyze the effect of scale. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS630 Modern Operating Systems This is an advanced operating systems (OS) course to present the current progress of modern OS. Internal structure and mechanisms as well as the design principles of multi-processor and multi-core OS are evaluated. Technologies of extending the kernel OS functions to solve technical challenges associated with concurrency, synchronization, virtualization, scheduling, clustering, security, client-server, service-orientation, communication and distribution, etc. are discussed. Students will also conduct an applied research or a case study on extending OS to support various types of computing technologies, such as grid computing, cloud computing, embedded computing, distributed and network computing, and/or any new type of computer system architecture. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS631 Digital Forensics This course covers the theory and techniques that one employs to determine the cause of and sequence of events leading up to a security breach in computer systems. This includes the identification of clues and their locations on the offended system, in the associated local network, and into the Internet itself. Techniques to prevent or migrate such breaches are explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS632 Data and Applications Security This course covers aspects of security that apply to creation, deployment, and maintenance of applications and data bases, including the practical and regulatory concerns of information assurance. Included also are the security concerns in this domain as pertains to cloud computing and virtualization. The system vulnerabilities of poor programming practice are examined and suggestions for mitigation developed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CS635 Computer Networking Emerging technologies continuously change the way we network. This course analyzes the foundational concepts in computer networking along with the current state of the practice and assesses the changes required by new technologies. The layers of the OSI Reference Model are compared and contrasted with the TCP/IP protocol suite. Network issues, such as addressing and routing, security, and reliability are appraised. Emerging technologies, such as Voice over IP, Multimedia on Demand, Cloud Computing and Virtualization will be evaluated and incorporated into design projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS640 Software Project Management Advances in Agile Project Management utilizing methodologies such as Scrum has redefined the more traditional approaches to Software Project Management. This course presents the principles and concepts associated with software development projects applying agile project management approaches. Students are given the opportunity to apply project planning, risk management, estimation, cost modeling, scheduling, control, resource management, and utilize project management tools and techniques in the context of developing software projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS641 Software Requirements Engineering With the continued demand to develop software applications faster and for more emerging media environments, requirements engineering is essential to the overall software development process. Software Requirements Engineering focuses on the elicitation, analysis, and specification of software requirements with the end goal of developing a quality product with high customer satisfaction. Topics include requirements traceability, requirements management, software validation and verification, use case scenario development, software quality, configuration management and quality control. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS644 Computer Systems Architecture This is an advanced computer software architecture course. The course presents the current progress of the architectural paradigms for various types of software systems. In addition to the fundamentals of software architecture, the course will discuss the impact of a software architecture on the software development process, teach various principles, methods and techniques commonly used in software architecture analysis, design and validation, such as architectural styles, frameworks, and patterns. Students will also be required to explore how to apply architectural strategies to address technical challenges associated with web services, mobile computing, virtualization, cloud computing, security and trust in computing systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CS649 Software Design This course provides in-depth knowledge to analyze and transform functional and nonfunctional requirements into well-designed, scalable and cost-effective workable software. It evaluates software design processes, design principles, design methods, design patterns, design tools, design quality and metrics, software verification and validation, software architecture, software framework, and modeling languages. Students will apply this knowledge to create a software design for a real world software application. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS651 Computer Systems Security Foundations This course introduces the overall foundations required for the understanding of, and further study in, information systems security. It reviews the history of security and computer systems security in particular to develop a set of models to guide the approach to realizing computer systems security. An overview of current security technologies is presented. A research project and formal paper are required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS652 Operating Systems Security Operating Systems Security provides an in-depth analysis of the security components at the operating system level. The focus is on the development of a security policy and the basic elements that provide identification and authentication, access control and security auditing. In addition to general concepts, both the UNIX/Linux and Windows operating systems are studied. Students participate in hands-on lab assignments to reinforce the material as well as to gain familiarity with a number of available operating system security products and tools (both freeware and commercially available). Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS653 Network Security Students are provided with a brief overview of the basic elements of networking concepts, topologies, protocols and threats necessary to understand network security issues and make security relevant decisions. An in-depth analysis of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model and layered network security mechanisms needed to provide Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability, Authorization, Authentication and Non-repudiation within a network environment is included. This course includes a thorough treatment of cryptography and cryptographic services. An implementation plan and formal paper are required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CS654 Security Management This course covers a variety of issues relating to the management of information systems security. The topics covered include development of policies, standards and procedures, risk analysis methodologies, contingency planning and disaster recovery. Additional topics covered include legal and ethical issues, incident reporting, security auditing, computer crime, and security awareness and training. Implementation issues, potential conflicts and tradeoffs are also discussed. A project is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS660 Database Systems This course explores current database systems and provides a foundation for future study. Techniques for the design and implementation of relational databases are presented and applied using SQL and a DBMS. Other data models such as the object-oriented and object-relational models are examined and compared to the relational model. Database systems using data warehouses and data marts, distributed databases, and web-based databases are discussed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS661 Software Information Assurance Attacks on enterprise level systems can be focused on many targets. Some of the targets, such as WEB servers are at the perimeter of the network. Others occur at the applications running on various operating systems. This course examines vulnerabilities caused by both scripting errors or poor scripting techniques on WEB based applications. Further, vulnerabilities created in custom developed applications written in high level programming languages are examined. SQL problems and architecture design flaws in relational database systems that contribute to vulnerabilities are also analyzed. A whole new set of intrusion risks present themselves with the newer emerging media and application environments such as cloud computing, social media venues, and mobile computing. Students will also conduct research into these areas. The need for security driven life cycle development models and security standards for programming and scripting languages are presented. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS662 System Security Certification and Accreditation A system that performs mission-sensitive operations requires access to sensitive resources. The owners of these resources require a measure of the risk assumed in allowing access in the intended manner as well as an assessment of how well the system implements its requirements. The DOD was first in evolving strategies and methods to formally address these tasks, most recently by the DITSCAP and its civilian counterpart, NIACAP. This course addresses each of these topics and standards and how they may lead to a higher level of assurance systems development. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS651 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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CS663 Enterprise Systems Architecture Presents current approaches to an enterprise level design of systems architectures. Emphasis is placed on high-level design issues and opportunities for long-term systems planning. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS671 Software Systems Engineering Process This course presents the current research and application of the principles of the software development process and process improvement. The in-depth analysis of the basic principles behind software process improvement provides a framework for further investigation. The software engineering integrated approach focuses on the concepts of software development, configuration management, quality assurance, metrics and risk management. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS672 Systems Engineering Methods Systems engineering methods provides a robust focus on functionality, design, creation, operational performance and operating systems that address the needs and requirements of customers. SEM provides an overview of techniques, methodologies, and approaches to system engineering. Topics include SE foundational models and the newest concepts, evaluation methods and key tools. Focus also includes key stages in SEM such as system processes, eliciting customer requirements, system design, system quality, system integration, and deployment, maintenance, and system disposal. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS500 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS676 Real-Time Systems This course covers various aspects of real-time systems including hardware issues, language issues, specification and design, concurrency, memory management, performance and reliability. Concurrency constructs are studied in some detail, and different examples are given. Given the move toward multi-core processor architectures, performance issues and measurement approaches are also emphasized. Various examples of specification and design approaches are discussed and analyzed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS630 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS681 Database Design This course provides an in-depth study of various aspects of database design. The principles, processes and tools used for transforming business and system requirements into conceptual, logical and physical designs for relational, object-oriented, object-relational, and semi-structured databases are evaluated. Requirements capture and analysis, data modeling, schema normalization are discussed. Advanced topics such as data model conversion, schema evolution, database refactoring, and database integration are explored. Completion of a significant project is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS660 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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CS682 Database Administration This course explores activities and responsibilities of a database administrator (DBA). Topics include physical database design, transaction management, query processing, concurrency control, back-up and recovery, performance monitoring and tuning and security. Techniques and implementation strategies used by open-source or commercial database management systems are studied. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS660 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS683 Data Warehouse This course provides an in-depth study of data warehouses and data marts. Specific techniques for conceptual, logical, and physical design of data warehouses are presented. Other topics include extraction-transformation-load (ETL) techniques, online analytical processing (OLAP), data warehouse applications, and the relationship between data warehouses and traditional database. Completion of a significant project is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS660 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS685 Distributed Databases This course explores distributed database systems from design through operations and maintenance. Topics include design and implementation of a distributed database, distributed query processing, and database management in a distributed systems environment. Examples from open source and commercial database management systems are discussed. Completion of a significant project is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS681, CS682 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS686 Fundamentals of Big Data Analytics This course introduces the subject of big data and associated analyses. This includes how the exponential growth and availability of digital content provides organizations the opportunity to exploit it for commercial or other organizational gain. The nature of unstructured data is explored and compared to relational database management systems and other traditional technologies. Architectures used in the associated infrastructure are explored. Tools commonly used for the analysis of big data are surveyed and used. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CS697 Advanced Research and Study in Computer Science This course is an opportunity to do independent, in-depth research and/or study of an area of student interest. Enrollment in this course requires a research or study plan. It may be used as a masters elective in computer science. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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CS698 Computer Science Capstone The Capstone course demonstrates mastery and critical knowledge from the MSCS program. The content, concepts, and knowledge from the MSCS is critically applied by completing an in-depth project focusing on a major technical problem or major issue that impacts the students own organization or in a desired area of study. The course gives the student the opportunity to perform a comprehensive analysis and study in a selected area of interest. The student will prepare a formal technical report of the detailed research and application of prior course concepts. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Senior Status or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CS699 Special Topics in Computer Science This course addresses issues of current interest in computer science. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS799 Special Topics in Computer Science This course covers advanced topics in management. It may be substituted for one of the research and writing courses in the DM programs. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CS801 Research and Writing I This course is one of a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses) is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS802 Qualitative Analysis This course presents topics on a variety of qualitative analysis methods and techniques. The methods include structured interviews, surveys, action research, and case studies. Perspectives include ethnography, grounded theory, soft systems methodology, and deductive reasoning. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS803 Current Topics in the Discipline This course provides an overview of current topics in the disciplines of computer science, software engineering, and sub-disciplines such as security. A high-level view of where topics fit helps students to better understand how the disciplines relate to one another. Students also discuss the state of the practice for selected disciplines and sub-disciplines and narrow their area of concentration for the remainder of the degree program. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS804 Research Methods This course introduces experimental design and analysis of data. Topics include independent and dependent variables, how to collect data, hypothesis testing and other forms of data analysis. You will be expected to design and conduct an experiment, collect and analyze data, and then write a technical report on your effort. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS806 Research and Writing II This course is the second in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by the faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS807 Project Management and Process Engineering This course provides an understanding of the technical and managerial processes involved in planning and conducting projects to develop and maintain complex, software-intensive systems. Students prepare project plans and critically evaluate process models such as the SEI Capability Maturity Models, ISO/IEEE Standard 12207, and the PMI Body of Knowledge. Emphasis is placed on project management, system development, information security, and other process areas. In addition, trends in software development methods, tools, and techniques that support these processes are covered. We also discuss how the software lifecycle relates to business process improvement and why many process improvement initiatives fail. Students perform research into current best practices, prepare a project plan for a realistic software project, conduct an assessment of selected processes in their organizations, and recommend improvements for the software processes they have selected. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS810 Simulation and Modeling Complex computing applications are launched system wide only after simulation, modeling and testing have been conducted and the results analyzed. This course addresses fundamental issues in developing those processes and prepares students for their own project simulation or model. Students will be able to describe differences in various methods of central tendency, effectively use ANOVA and GLM for data analysis and demonstrate how different testing variables can affect simulations or models. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS811 Research and Writing III This course is the third in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS812 Quantitative Analysis You will learn fundamental concepts of parametric and non-parametric statistics and develop a thorough understanding of the primary theorems of statistics. This course covers measures of central tendency, various forms of probability, ANOVA and GLM. Exploration of multivariate statistics will be practiced via large datasets in live research projects. Particular attention is given to scale and survey development. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS816 Research and Writing IV This course is the fourth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS817 Foundations of Enterprise Information Systems This course provides an overview and introduction to the breadth of research in enterprise information systems. The purpose of this overview is to ensure you are familiar with the entire discipline and to help you establish where your interest fits into the discipline. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS820 Usability and Interaction This course investigates what qualities of a software product make it usable. Emphasis is placed on how one includes usability concerns throughout the software life cycle, how one designs for usability, how to determine experimentally the usability of a product, and the importance of early usability testing on a simple prototype. Students will be expected to design and conduct usability experiments and then analyze the data in order to refine product design. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS821 Research and Writing V This course is the fifth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS825 Advanced Topics in Database Systems Computer Science is dynamic; Moores Law tells us that todays standard could very well be obsolete in 18 months. This course addresses the top three issues of current database theory and practice, identifying current trends and near future changes in the field. As such, the course content will vary according to the evolution of the discipline. Students will research major literature sources that address issues and trends, compare and contrast centralized database systems with distributed databases and identify principles behind database warehousing and data mining. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS826 Research and Writing VI This course is the sixth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS831 Research and Writing VII This course is the seventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS836 Research and Writing VIII This course is the eighth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS837 Requirements Engineering This course presents the state of the practice in requirements engineering for software-intensive systems, emphasizing distributed systems and information security. Topics covered include requirements elicitation, feasibility analysis; cost-benefit analysis; the operational concept document; the requirements specification; verification; preparation for validation; requirements management; reconciling requirements with development constraints; and trends in requirements methods, tools, and techniques. Students will discuss the role of requirements engineering in the system lifecycle, with emphasis on quality considerations such as security, reliability, and scalability. Students perform research into current best practices and conduct a term project that incorporates requirements for a realistic system. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS838 Concurrent and Distributed Systems This course covers the fundamentals of concurrent and distributed systems including threading, synchronization and deadlock prevention as well as logical clocks, group communication and distributed transactions. It also covers current topics such as web services and software for multiprocessors and multicore processors. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS840 System Metrics and Risk Analysis Software development has risks time, resources, and change. Measuring and managing risk is essential to successful software development. In this course, students will investigate and analyze current and emerging best practices for managing risk and learn how a good metrics program can be developed. Students will also use metric data to support risk exposure, while developing a risk mitigation plan for their organization. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS841 Research and Writing IX This course is the ninth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS842 Business Intelligence This course presents decision making frameworks, their advantages and limitations. Topics include constructing a data warehouse and its use for data mining in order to do trend analysis; the development and protection of business intelligence; and knowledge management within an enterprise. These topics will lead a student to appreciate the value of the knowledge contained in the data gathered by an organization and its impact on the business. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS846 Research and Writing X This course is the tenth in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS850 Networking and Security A generation ago, business referred to the shop owner down the street. Todays business is global; companies have offices around the world, processing data twenty-four hours a day. Keeping software synchronized, online and secure is the ongoing challenge of computer professionals. In this course, students will assess the impact on security concerns when an organization moves from a centralized system to a distributed system. This includes describing emerging security issues and risk factors and designing a secure information system. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS851 Research and Writing XI This course is the eleventh in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS852 Information Assurance This course presents techniques and methods for building a strategic plan for an enterprise. This includes identifying potential strategies and evaluating their alignment with business goals and vision and approaches to bring IT into alignment with business goals. The discussions cover how to set a benchmark and its proper use; what are reasonable metrics for a business to use and their proper use; and environmental scanning. Students evaluate current research on IT strategy and business alignment. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS854 Software Architecture and Design Architectural frameworks and patterns are often used in the design of software systems. This course teaches students to understand commonly used frameworks and patterns and how to tailor framework and combine patterns in software design. Students will also study the role of software architects in the development of software systems and the advantages of systematic development processes that include an architectural design phase. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS855 Futuring and Innovation Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Develops the skills in futuring through a variety of techniques. Introduces formal methods of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS856 Research and Writing XII This course is the final one in a series of twelve research and writing courses that result in publishable projects. The projects are selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor and two readers. The project is intended to demonstrate an increasing mastery of an area of expertise within computer science and demonstrate the ability to write in a style consistent with the expectations of the target audience for the project. Upon completion, each project (which may span two or more research and writing courses), is reviewed by a faculty mentor and two additional faculty members, and is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. A grade of pass certifies that the project has been judged as making progress but not necessarily of publishable quality until the committee signs off on the final paper. Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS862 Foundations of Digital-Systems Security This course explores the fundamental topics in digital-systems security. Classical access control models and policies for a secure environment are analyzed. Current cryptographic algorithms are studied as means to ensure data confidentiality and integrity and for authentication. Techniques for secure software design, implementation and maintenance are discussed. Information assurance is examined as applied to the corporate environment. Malware attacks are examined and vulnerability analysis and risk assessment are discussed. Enterprise-level digital forensics is briefly discussed. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS863 Enterprise Security Architecture This course examines enterprise-level security architecture and its relationship to physical security. Security as related to service-oriented architecture (SOA), software-as-a-service (SaaS), business-to-business architectures, cloud computing and virtualization is covered. Topics include security infrastructure, policy and procedures, assessment, baselining and auditing. Secure communications, defense in depth, multiple security zones, multi-level security, cross-domain solutions and the unique challenges of advanced architectures are discussed. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS864 Applications Security This course covers building security into software products including data bases during the software design and programming. Vulnerabilities related to poor programming techniques and data structure design are examined. These deficiencies can occur in custom code, web scripting languages and database structures. Information in memory and storage are both susceptible to attacks both internally and externally. Life cycle security development models are presented in addition to verification and validation strategies. The role of the security professional in the creation and management of software security policy is examined. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS865 Communications Security and Countermeasures Network security internal and external to the enterprise is presented. Security components of the individual layers of the OSI model are examined. Strengths and weaknesses of secret-key and public-key encryption are investigated. The use of certificates supporting cryptography is analyzed. The uses of security in key functional areas such as email and web services are discussed. Protection of corporate assets by use of intrusion protection, intrusion detection and firewalls is presented. RFC standards approved by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) are emphasized. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS870 Advanced Quantitative Analysis This course builds on the foundation of quantitative analysis by delving into advanced techniques associated with operations to be performed on massive amounts of data rather than on samples. Topics include correlation, prediction, confidence intervals, and regression analysis. Methods used in operations research are addressed. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CS812 Availability: Virtual Campus CS872 Introduction to Big Data Analytics This course introduces the subject of big data analytics, emphasizing how scale affects the very nature of the problem. Conventional computing technologies, methods and models are recast in light of that fact. The nature of common instances of unstructured data is explored including; the roles of various tools used for capturing, storing, searching, processing, sharing, managing, displaying and analyzing such a massive amount of data. Remote sensor data and transactional data are examined. The tools of big data analytics are used. The opportunity for students innovatively to improve or propose a solution to any subject related to big data analytics is also provided. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus CS874 Advanced Topics in Big Data Analytics This course addresses advanced topics in big data analytics, particularly those that emphasize performance. The architecture of the World Wide Web is examined in light of performance bottlenecks. Techniques to mitigate those, such as in-memory data and massively parallel computation, are covered. The use of big data analytics to help defend the computing infrastructure of an organization from security threats is explored. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CS872 Availability: Virtual Campus CS876 Analytics for Big Data This course covers analytical techniques for big data. A review of applied statistics is included. Then methods of prediction are incorporated. The particulars of health informatics are addressed to include diagnostics and detection of fraud. Case studies are used to illustrate the wide range of big data analytics in use today and in the past. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CS872 Availability: Virtual Campus CS878 Tools for Big Data Analytics This course addresses and uses tools for big data analytics. The use of XML for transactional and sensor data is examined and exercised. Hadoop and related tools are used to determine the nature of large amounts of unstructured data. The role of artificial intelligence is explored. Techniques for visualization of big data and its analyses are reviewed and exercised. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CS872 Availability: Virtual Campus

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CS893 Research Continuation This course is for students who have completed their research and writing courses but need additional time to finalize their dissertation research. The doctoral candidate will enroll in this course to maintain registered status at CTU. Course is pass/ no-pass. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: CS856 Availability: Virtual Campus CS895 Dissertation Research Continuation The doctoral candidate will enroll in this course to maintain registered status at CTU and to provide extended time to complete his or her dissertation research. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: No Longer Offered CS898 Advanced Topics in Computer Science and Information Systems I Taught on demand, this course covers advanced topics in computer or information science. The course may substitute for any course in the DCS programs and may be taken individually with approval. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Virtual Campus CS899 Advanced Topics in Computer Science and Information Systems II Taught on demand, this course covers advanced topics in computer or information science. The course may substitute for any course in the DCS programs and may be taken individually with approval. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Virtual Campus CSS099 Special Topics in Computer Systems Security This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer System Security. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CSS150 Introduction to Computer Security This course provides the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the ten domains comprising the Information Security Common Body of Knowledge. Topics include access control systems, telecommunications and network security, cryptography, operations security and business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Students will be exposed to security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, investigations and ethics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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CSS199 Special Topics in Computer Systems Security This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer System Security. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CSS200 Principles of Network Security This course identifies and explains technical issues involved in network security. It also covers the fundamentals of wireless networking protocols, their security issues and threats. Covered topics include cryptography applications; access control; firewalls; key management network security issues; application, e-mail and middleware security; wireless local area network technologies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT200 or IT203 or IT205 or IT245; CSS150 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Virtual Campus CSS250 Security Risk Management This course addresses the concepts of risk management. The course explores general methodologies used to assess and manage risks to information security. The course also identifies the activities involved in the process of information security risk management for a business organization. Activities such as detection, recovery and damage control methods will be explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS200 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS260 Scripting with Perl This course will introduce students to using Perl, a popular and flexible scripting language, to manipulate the principle types of structured data encountered in library work: delimited, MARC, and XML. Students will learn the ability to read and understand Perl programs for maintenance and update purposes. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CS115 or IT115; CS250 or CS251 or approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS280 Ethical Hacking This course covers ways that computers and networks are attacked by hackers using techniques and common utilities. Learners explore security threats and ways that system vulnerabilities are exploited to attack systems. Topics include Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), ethical hacking techniques, sniffers, protocols, social engineering, vulnerability analysis, and penetration testing to ensure infrastructure security. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CSS250 or approval; PHIL340 or PHIL310 or PHIL306 or PHIL301 or PHIL101 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS299 Special Topics in Computer Systems Security This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer System Security. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course Effective January 5, 2014 Page 287

CSS300 Vulnerability Assessment and Management This course surveys tools and techniques designed to detect intrusion into an organization's computer systems. In the hands-on lab component of the course, students will use a number of public domain and commercially available security tools. The course examines common attack methods, general inadequacies in various systems to include commercial intrusion detection systems. Utilization of the risk assessment process for determining cost effective vulnerability solutions is emphasized. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS200 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS320 Process Engineering In this course students will learn to describe process requirements for developing and maintaining a consistent security posture throughout the corporate enterprise. The fundamentals of process engineering as related to security requirements will be discussed. It includes the integration of plans, systems and development requirements and the processes necessary for them to maintain maximum functionality. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS150 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North CSS321 Software Assurance Software is essential to the operation of the commercial, government and military sectors of our nation. It is estimated that 90 percent of reported security incidents result from exploits against defects in the design or code of software. Therefore, ensuring the integrity of software is imperative to protecting the infrastructure of these sectors from threats and vulnerabilities. This course uses the Security Development Model to identify and implement security activities that must be applied during each phase of a software development lifecycle model. Static analysis tools, testing strategies, and auditing processes used for verification of secure code are applied in a test environment. Managements role in the development of techniques for the enforcement of software assurance processes is explored. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CSS150; CS215 or CS216 or IT215 or IT110 Availability: Virtual Campus CSS330 Database Security This course is the study of security issues related to databases. The student will learn to identify security issues in a database environment, design and implement techniques to protect the database and the user, design a database with security in mind, and resolve database security issues. Students will demonstrate their competencies by developing real world projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CS246 or CS363 or CS362; CSS300 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability CSS332 Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security This course is the study of security issues related to databases and web applications. The students will learn to identify security issues related to both environments, understand the impact and the dangers of the vulnerabilities, and design and implement techniques to protect the database, the web application and the user. Students will demonstrate their competencies by developing real world projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CSS300 and CSS321 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 288

CSS335 Data Security, Quality, and Integrity This course studies how to manage, store, retrieve, enforce data integrity, and protect business data and information. Other topics covered in this class will include business continuity and disaster recovery, data encryption standards and techniques, data privacy, data reliability, business ethics as it relate to the use of business data, compliance, and mitigation strategies for preventing and recovering from security issues. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CSS150 and CS250 or CS251 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus CSS340 Operating System Security As society becomes more dependent on technology, protection against intrusion is an absolute must. Vulnerabilities in standard configurations of operating systems can lead to unnecessary security threats against the networks of corporations, governments, and individuals. This course will provide in-depth examination of operating system security features and vulnerabilities in Windows and UNIX/Linux operating systems. Learners will study various techniques to harden and secure operating systems and learn to employ the same techniques to mitigate operating system vulnerabilities. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CS146 and CSS200 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS350 Computer Forensics I This course introduces the student to the field of computer forensics. It covers the history of computer forensics and how the use of electronic evidence can support criminal investigation. The course examines procedures for investigating computer and cybercrime and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering and preserving forensic evidence. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CJUS141 or CSS150 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Virtual Campus CSS351 Computer Forensics II This course is a more in-depth study of the technical aspects of computer forensics. Its focus is the examination and analysis of data on computer storage media. It covers current computer forensic tools, digital evidence controls, computer forensic analysis and recovering files. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS350 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Virtual Campus CSS370 Security Architecture This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of security architecture and it leads to an understanding of how networks function and behave in supporting the requirements of people, processes, and the technology required to build security architecture. Topics included in this course are requirements analysis, network architecture, security architecture, network analysis, and systems methodology. This course will also draw upon and integrate knowledge from previous courses in networking, operating systems, database management and programming. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS330 or CSS332 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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CSS380 Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning This course provides students with a background on each of the following topics: disaster recovery issues as they impact business, possible threats, categories of disruptions, results from the assessment, disaster recovery plan, developing a recovery team, backup alternatives, facility backups, electronic vaulting, off-site storage, testing and drills, maintenance, phases of planning for recovery, preventions. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS150 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS399 Special Topics in Computer Systems Security This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer System Security. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CSS410 Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security This course examines cloud computing: risk management; compliance and legal responsibilities of remotely stored, processed and maintained data; life cycle management; and disaster recovery planning from the perspective of the user and the cloud provider. The course also addresses handling of incidents and remediation, application security, encryption issues, storage, virtualization mechanisms and vulnerabilities, and access control in the cloud environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS300 or CSS370 or CSS380; IT245 or IT200 or IT203 or IT205 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS430 Advanced Research in IAS and IT Management This course focuses on research in system and software planning, delivery, management, and security. It also reviews research focused on the infrastructure components hardware, software, data, communications technology, and specific applications and the economics of IT. In particular, topics are chosen that reflect the current or future concerns of technology. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CSS380 or CSS410 or IT458; ENGL112 or ENG112 or ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L or ENGL103 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS440 Security Policy and Leadership This course focuses on the design process used by an organization as it implements a security policy. This includes key policy considerations of acceptable use, remote access, information protection, perimeter security, wireless communications, and e-mail. Emphasis is on the procedures to be considered for the implementation of policy and leadership required to enact and maintain security within the organization. Selected case studies and security policies will be reviewed and analyzed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSS300 and CSS380 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North

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CSS441 Security Compliance This course covers the identification, interpretation and application of federal and state government regulations, directives and acts as they apply to the security of digital systems. The course also examines the application of hardware and software tools in the monitoring and auditing of employee behavior to enforce compliance of an organizations policies, procedures and guidelines. Applicable certification and accreditation processes are researched including commercial certifications, ISO 27002 and DIACAP. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CSS200 Availability: Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS450 Security Capstone The capstone applies and integrates the contents of classes taken throughout the program. Projects will simulate a professional work environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Senior Status Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus CSS495 Advanced Research and Study in Computer Systems Security This course gives the student an opportunity to conduct an independent in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the research project, which must be pre-approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course CSS499 Special Topics in Computer Systems Security This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer System Security. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course DMD099 Special Topics in Digital Media Design This course addresses issues of current interest in Digital Media Design. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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DMD120 Design Fundamentals Elements of two- and three-dimensional design are introduced through the exploration of various media in the design studio. Topics include line, form, texture, color, balance, scale, and proportion as they apply to working and finished design projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT080 or Approval Availability; Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD130 Typography I This course provides an introduction to the aesthetics, mechanics, history, terminology, specifications, and use of type in design. Typefaces will be evaluated and rendered in a variety of studio assignments using both hand written and computer techniques. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD120 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD199 Special Topics in Digital Media Design This course addresses issues of current interest in Digital Media Design. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course DMD225 Computer Illustration I This course introduces vector-based computer illustration and type layout techniques. Software, terminology, and illustration techniques are learned through the completion of both print and Web design projects. Software such as Adobe Illustrator or other industry standard software is used in this class. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD120 or VC120 or Approval; VC210 or Approval; EM208 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus DMD230 Typography II Advanced typographic issues are explored through the completion of a variety of advertising/marketing projects. The appropriate use of fonts, styles and compositional techniques within diverse layouts are discussed and applied. Components of digital typography, including font libraries, font types and styles, and their divergence from traditional typography are also presented. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD130 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North

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DMD242 Digital Imaging This course utilizes digital imaging software such as Photoshop or other industry standard software. Students are required in other degree related courses to create, edit and enhance a variety of images and this course provides an introduction to those skills. Students learn about software-based digital image generation and editing techniques. Orientation to digital camera terminology and technology, camera settings, and file formats are introduced in this course. It is important that students have an appreciation and understanding of the characteristics that are required to produce quality digital images. Students apply digital image editing techniques to student created photographs through the completion of projects, tutorials, and hands-on practice. A point and shoot digital camera is required for the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD120 or VC120 or DMD225 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus DMD243 Digital Photography Advanced techniques in digital image editing and digital photography are explored through the completion of computer design projects. Cross-platform, hardware and import/export issues are discussed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD242 or VC242 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD270 Desktop Publishing I This course is an introduction to desktop publishing software and procedures as used by the graphic design industry. Printing options, color management systems, page layout techniques and software integration are discussed. Text editing and electronic typography are also emphasized in studio projects. A professional graphic design studio environment is emulated in order for the student to explore industry related issues. These issues include: Computer equipment, budgeting, project management and industry standards for printing intellectual property. This course focuses on learning software such as Adobe InDesign or other industry standard software, CG, and print theory and terminology to ready the student for DMD370. Design is not an emphasis in this class. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD130, ENGL111 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD290 Portfolio Development This course provides instruction in the final preparation and presentation of an individual portfolio. Resume preparation, job search procedures, interviewing skills, marketing strategies, aesthetic principles, presentation techniques, and portfolio critique and revision are emphasized. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North

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DMD295 Design Studio This course provides an in-house ad agency environment for students. Using an activity-based learning approach, students are given the opportunity to work on real-life client projects that meet client specifications and deadlines. Projects may include: brochures, catalogs, posters, web sites, and other advertising related projects. Students gain experience working with clients, budgets, change orders and may have the opportunity to provide service to the community by working with non-profit organizations as needed. A portfolio review is required prior to the admittance to this class. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval, Portfolio review required prior to acceptance Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD296 Internship This course allows students to utilize the skills gained during their associates degree in an actual work setting. The internship is designed to provide an opportunity to work with clients or companies on entry level graphic design/Web related projects. Students gain valuable work experience and have the opportunity to apply career related skills. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD297 Digital Media Capstone This course allows students to research, plan, and implement a detailed project that covers the main concepts in the associates degree. Each student works with the assigned instructor to determine project scope, deliverables and timelines. The capstone project is incorporated into the students portfolio. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD299 Special Topics in Digital Media Design This course addresses issues of current interest in Digital Media Design. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course DMD310 Corporate Identity Development This course investigates the development and use of corporate logos, letterhead, style sheets, marketing materials, and advertising techniques to effectively establish and promote corporate identity both internally and externally. Case studies are examined and discussed. Individual and group projects are required. Research, Corporate Identity briefs and understanding the client are an integral part of this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ADV221 or VC221, DMD242 or VC242, DMD225 or VC225 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North

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DMD322 Production Standards Methods used to successfully transfer images from the computer to print and digital media are explored in depth. This is a process-based course that concentrates on the numerous technical design choices that need to be made to produce well-crafted page layouts. Students complete a variety of projects and print mock-ups. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD225, DMD242, DMD370 Availability: Colorado Springs DMD325 Computer Illustration II Advanced techniques in computer illustration are explored through the completion of integrated design projects. Using an activity-based learning approach students create a variety of illustrations utilizing Adobe Illustrator or other industry standard software. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD225 or VC225 Availability: Colorado Springs DMD340 Branding and Packaging This course explores the use of product branding to promote corporate identity and the sale of manufactured goods. Students are introduced to advanced techniques for the design of various packaging materials and the application of these techniques toward the development of product identity and consumer recognition. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD310 Availability: Colorado Springs DMD370 Desktop Publishing II This course further explores properties of electronic publication, including printing options, file conversion and distribution procedures, font management, master pages and templates, and creative page layout techniques. A professional design studio environment will be emulated during the completion of individual and group projects. This course presents researching target audience, budgeting, project management, and industry standards for printing and intellectual property. A focus on quality craftsmanship and attention to detail is emphasized, as this is critical to the success of projects and is a defining characteristic of excellent designers. Students are expected to understand terminology and software used in this class. Adobe InDesign or other industry standard software is used. Design is an integral part of DMD370. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD270, ENGL112 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD371 Desktop Publishing III This course focuses on advanced desktop publishing techniques in the production of a variety of digital media. This course continues to explore budgeting, project management, and industry standards for printing and intellectual property. Students create high quality work that is ready for press and various other digital media. An emphasis on professionalism in design, research, budgets, intellectual property and project management is expected. Advanced topics such as paper properties, preflighting, working with professionals, how to improve oneself and get work, licensing and contracts are addressed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD370 or VC370, DMD230 or VC230 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North

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DMD375 Digital Video Editing This course examines photography and post-production technology and techniques used to deliver quality digital video. Projects will include capturing and editing Mini-DV footage using video editing software. Students will learn project planning and design, photography, importing digital video and stills, sound tracks, and special effects. Students author a DVD project of their work. A digital mini-DV video camera is needed for the course. Mini DVD format is highly recommended, as other video camera formats such as flash drive technology may work but are not supported in the lab environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD242 or VC242 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD399 Special Topics in Digital Media Design This course addresses issues of current interest in Digital Media Design. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course DMD465 Editorial Design This course explores in depth the design issues related to the publishing industry, such as magazine, catalog, newspaper and other various editorial uses. The focus in Editorial Design is on brand identity, editorial presentations, content and the necessary production requirements. Students discuss budgetary and structural concerns related to the digital design process. The course includes print and web-based approaches to this specific industry. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: DMD371 Availability: Colorado Springs DMD480 Senior Design Project This course will combine design and technical skills to create a custom senior level project. This course will enhance software skills, processes, and procedures used by the industry. Students will apply layout techniques for web/print media, or new media/new technologies. Web/Print production, chromatics, digital image formats, and software integration are reinforced. A professional web/graphic design studio environment is emulated; topics explored are: understanding project specifications, critical thinking, terminology related to web/print and layout, project management, and intellectual property. Creating and completing projects in a timely fashion is an integral component of this course. Technique, enhancing the software, managing workflow, and mechanical layout requirements are emphasized. Under faculty art direction, students will complete an independent design project that demonstrates their theoretical and technical proficiency in relation to the total project design process. In the beginning of the course the project will be discussed and customized, dependent upon each student's portfolio needs. Each student will create an individual project including: research, project specifications, project budget and/or resource planning, and technical requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Must have all 100, 200, 300 level courses completed. Availability: Virtual Campus

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DMD496 Internship This course allows students to utilize the skills gained during their bachelors degree in an actual work setting. The internship is designed to provide an opportunity to work with clients or companies on graphic design/Web related projects. Students gain valuable work experience and have the opportunity to apply career related skills. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD497 Digital Media Capstone This course allows the student to research, plan, and implement a detailed project that covers the main concepts in the bachelors degree. Each student works with the assigned instructor to determine project scope, deliverables and timelines. The capstone project is incorporated into the students portfolio. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North DMD499 Special Topics in Digital Media Design This course addresses issues of current interest in Digital Media Design. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EBUS099 Special Topics in e-Business This course addresses issues of current interest in e-business. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EBUS115 Visual Basic Programming This course provides an introduction to Visual Basic programming, emphasizing fundamentals that are common to both structured and object-oriented programming. Students use graphical controls to create and enhance the user interface, create control structures to handle decisions and iterations, and decompose complex programs into forms and subprograms. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104; MATH103 or MATH143 or MATH106 or MATH112 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EBUS199 Special Topics in e-Business This course addresses issues of current interest in e-business. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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EBUS208 Web Site/Portfolio Development The fundamentals of web servers, web sites, HTML, XHTML and web authoring are presented in the context of using the technology to craft a message for an audience. It also includes fundamentals of linking, graphics, and other media. The creation of a career portfolio is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs EBUS215 Intermediate Visual Basic Programming This course continues the study of Visual Basic programming, emphasizing the implementation of Windows-based database applications. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EBUS115 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EBUS299 Special Topics in e-Business This course addresses issues of current interest in e-business. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EBUS308 Introduction to e-Business The intent of this course is to provide many more opportunities than merely selling products electronically. It covers how to integrate suppliers, customers and employees into a community of partners working toward business success. Additionally, during the course, the student will investigate how to create and market new products and services, manage supply chains, foster organizational change, improve communication, and establish electronic customer service. Case studies are used to investigate successful and unsuccessful e-Business practices. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus EBUS310 e-Business Data Analysis The intent of this course is to develop of knowledge of tools to extract and analyze business data such as customer, product, inventory, sales, and suppliers being generated in an e-Business setting. This knowledge could enable a business to be more agile in making decisions based on customer buying trends and inventory control. The course also covers the data that can be tracked and analyzed in search engine optimization (SEO), such as visits, referrals, bounce rates, conversions, and competitors in the same space to enable a business to plan to execute revised SEO strategies based on this information. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS251 and EM208 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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EBUS399 Special Topics in e-Business This course addresses issues of current interest in e-business. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EBUS495 Advanced Research and Study in e-Business This course may be used for an independent in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the research project, which must be approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EBUS499 Special Topics in e-Business This course addresses issues of current interest in e-Business. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ECO201 Macroeconomics The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered ECON201 Macroeconomics The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution, and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real vs. potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Kansas City ECON202 Microeconomics An introductory course in the tools of economics as they apply to the operation of market economy. Includes supply and demand analysis, consumer behavior, economic nature of production and costs, behavior of firms in both competitive and monopoly environments, income distribution theory and effects of government intervention in the market system. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH103 or MATH143 or MAT143 or MATH140 OR MATH140-L Availability: Kansas City

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ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics Knowing how the economy actually operates is critical for success in any career and as an educated person. Every day, the economy is in the news, governing what happens in politics, in the workplace and in the quality of individual lives. This course will address the dynamics of how our economy works (or does not work.) The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real versus potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy. Students will learn the impact of the economy on different economic sectors that affect their career paths. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ECON212 Principles of Microeconomics Knowing how the economy actually operates is critical for success in any career and as an educated person. Every day, the economy is in the news, governing what happens in politics, in the workplace and in the quality of individual lives. This course will examine the tools of economics as they apply to the operation of a market economy. It covers supply and demand analysis, consumer behavior, the economic nature of productionincluding costs and profits. The behavior of firms in competitive and monopolistic environments will be studied, as well as income distribution and the effects of government intervention on the free market system. Students will have a new perspective and deeper ability to understand the impact of current news events as they impact everyday problems and situations as well as be able to see their own economic behavior with a fresh perspective. This topic applies to all career areas, not just to business. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ECON299 Special Topics in Economics. This course addresses issues of current interest in economics. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ECON310 Global Managerial Economics In this course students will apply the theory and tools of micro and macroeconomics and research to the formation of business decisions in the global environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ECON399 Special Topics in Economics This course addresses issues of current interest in business administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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ECON616 Applied Managerial Economics During this course the student will study the practical aspects of both micro- and macroeconomics and how they are applied to the managerial environment. The students investigate the role of economic principles in management analysis and decision making: the study of demand, cost, and supply concepts from a business viewpoint; and the application of national income measures to strategic planning and the future. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MGMT502 for MBA program only Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ECON699 Special Topics in Economics This course addresses issues of current interest in business administration. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EE110 Introduction to Engineering This course provides the beginning engineer with fundamental knowledge and skills associated with the electrical or computer engineering professions. It will introduce common electronic components, basic circuit configurations, and laboratory instruments. Bench practices and lab reports will be introduced along with computer aided analysis. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs EE221 Circuit Analysis I This calculus-based course introduces analysis and relationships of voltage, current, resistance and power. Series, parallel and complex circuits are analyzed with Ohms Law. Kirchhoffs voltage and current laws and network theorems are studied. Laboratory circuit construction, tests and measurements are performed using the appropriate components and equipment. Circuit simulation tools used in industry are also introduced. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE110, MATH201 Availability: Colorado Springs EE252 Digital Design I EE252 is an introduction to the analysis and design of combinational and sequential digital systems. Number systems, Boolean switching algebra and Karnaugh mapping are presented as basic tools used in the design of digital systems using SSI and MSI level components. Lab activity, using TTL ICs, emphasizes the design and analysis techniques presented in lectures. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE110, CE242 Availability: Colorado Springs

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EE312 Embedded Microcontrollers Embedded microcontroller development processes and tools are introduced. The hardware and software architecture of a contemporary off-the-shelf microcontroller is analyzed to determine its functional role as an embedded controller in the design of a digital system. An assembly language program development and simulation system introduces students to embedded system development environments. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE252 or CE242 Availability: Colorado Springs EE325 CMOS Design This course introduces the design and performance of complementary MOSFET devices and circuits. Emphasis is on digital circuit performance as it relates to the physical layout of the integrated circuit (IC). Projects include layout of digital circuits, from individual devices to multi-transistor elements, and analysis of the resulting circuit performance. Exercises include computer simulation and system integration as a tool for design. Lab projects provide experience with layout, extraction and analysis of circuits designed to meet given specifications. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE375, EE252 Availability: Colorado Springs EE331 Circuit Analysis II This calculus-based course covers circuit analysis related to AC and transient signals. Resistance, reactance and impedance parameters are analyzed in series, parallel and complex circuits. Trigonometrics functions, AC network theorems, transformer and passive filter theories are applied. Laboratory circuit construction, test and measurements are performed using the appropriate components and equipment. Laboratory emphasis is placed on the knowledge and use of test and measurement instruments. Circuit simulation tools used in industry are employed. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE221, MATH302 Availability: Colorado Springs EE335 Advanced Engineering Mathematics The purpose of Advanced Engineering Math is to present and use mathematical techniques that provide alternative, simpler methods of solving engineering problems. This advanced applied math course investigates the areas of Vector Calculus (including gradient, divergence, and curl), Partial Differential Equations (including Separation of Variables), and Complex Analysis (including graphical representation with conformal mapping). Techniques are presented in the three most used coordinate systems: Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: Approval, MATH304, MATH302 Availability: Colorado Springs EE341 Advanced Circuit Analysis Introduces Laplace transform and frequency domain methods to model, analyze and design electrical circuits. Additional topics include Bode analysis techniques, Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Methods studied are applied in passive and active filter design. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE331 Availability: Colorado Springs

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EE343 Signals and Systems This course provides fundamental analysis tools in preparation for the Communications System courses. Includes the classification of continuous-time and discrete-time signals and basic operations on these signals. Investigates the behavior of continuous and discrete-time systems by use convolution, differential and difference equations, block diagrams, and state-variable methods. Emphasizes Fourier analysis to characterize signals in the frequency domain and to determine linear time-invariant system frequency response. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE341or MATH304 Availability: Colorado Springs EE352 Digital Design II A continuation of the study of digital system design emphasizing the use of programmable logic devices and modern design methods. Contemporary logic families are reviewed along with practical design limitations. Computer simulation tools are introduced in the design process. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE252 Availability: Colorado Springs EE375 Electronic Design I This course provides a foundational knowledge for analyzing and designing electronic circuits as well as an intuitive approach to the design process. Discrete components and circuits are analyzed and designed to develop an understanding of how these components and circuits have led to the fabrication of integrated circuits (ICs). Computer aided circuit stimulation, as well as hands-on applications of analysis and design theory, validates theoretical concepts. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE331 Availability: Colorado Springs EE395 Electronic Design II Single and multiple stage amplifiers are analyzed and modeled in terms of amplifier parameters such as gain, input and output impedances and frequency response. Lab projects require designing, constructing and demonstrating circuits to meet selected specifications and objectives. Lab projects must be satisfactorily completed to meet course requirements. Circuit performance is measured against the design objectives and specifications. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE375 Availability: Colorado Springs EE415 Advanced Electronic Design II This course investigates the extended analysis of feedback effects in circuits as a basis for the design of amplifier systems, filters and analog systems. Designs are modeled and then implemented in the laboratory. Circuit performance is measured against the design objectives and specifications. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: EE395 Availability: Colorado Springs

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EE443 Communication Systems I This is an introductory course in communications theory emphasizing the correlation between signal information in the time domain and frequency domain. Basic signal filters are developed and applied. Basic principles of linear and angle modulation and demodulation are presented. Concepts of analog communication systems are introduced. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE343, MATH366 Availability: Colorado Springs EE463 Communications Systems II A continuation of basic communications theory and principles, emphasizing digital communications. Concepts in representing digital signals are studied along with techniques for digital modulation and multiplexing. Spread spectrum system fundamentals are introduced. Use of a contemporary software application for system modeling and simulation is expected. Student research on a contemporary communications system culminating with a professional paper and presentation is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE443 Availability: Colorado Springs EE472 Advanced Digital System Design The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. A student will be required to define the problem specifications in the form of a project plan that must be approved by the course faculty mentor. The project plan serves as the framework for the students efforts to satisfactorily solve the design problem. The resulting design may be in the form of a hardware implementation, computer simulation, or both. A professional final report and briefing are required at the end of the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH366 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE473 Communication System Design The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. A student will be required to define the problem specifications in the form of a project plan that must be approved by the course faculty mentor. The project plan serves as the framework for the students efforts to satisfactorily solve the design problem. The resulting design may be in the form of a hardware implementation, computer simulation, or both. A professional final report and briefing are required at the end of the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs

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EE474 Controls Systems Design The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. In EE474, students independently advance their knowledge of Control Systems through a sequence of directed design projects that entail the use of a computer modeling tool. Professional reports are required for each design project and an oral briefing is required for defense of the final project. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE475 Advanced Electronic Systems Design The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. A student will be required to define the problem specifications in the form of a project plan that must be approved by the course faculty mentor. The project plan serves as the framework for the students efforts to satisfactorily solve the design problem. The resulting design may be in the form of a hardware implementation, computer simulation, or both. A professional final report and briefing are required at the end of the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE476 Systems Design (Special Topic) The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. A student will be required to define the problem specifications in the form of a project plan that must be approved by the course faculty mentor. The project plan serves as the framework for the students efforts to satisfactorily solve the design problem. The resulting design may be in the form of a hardware implementation, computer simulation, or both. A professional final report and briefing are required at the end of the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE477 Power Systems Design The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. In EE477, students advance their knowledge of Power Systems design and demonstrate their understanding by designing a complete system which includes the power generating facility, power line transmission system, and load terminating equipment. A professional final report and briefing are required for defense of the design. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs

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EE479 Advanced Systems Design (System Design Continuation) The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. A student will be required to define the problem specifications in the form of a project plan that must be approved by the course faculty mentor. The project plan serves as the framework for the students efforts to satisfactorily solve the design problem. The resulting design may be in the form of a hardware implementation, computer simulation, or both. A professional final report and briefing are required at the end of the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE486 Impact of Global Issues on Design This course explores global, economic, environmental, societal, and political issues that impact problem solutions. Students will be expected to consider the interaction of human issues and technology alternatives when deploying hardware and/or software solutions in differing environments and cultures. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: CS115 or IT115 or CS116; ENGL206; ECON210 or ECON212; HIST101 Availability: Colorado Springs EE490 Product Design I This is the first course of a two-course capstone design sequence that integrates students into product design teams comprising engineering, engineering technology and logistics students. Each team is given a conceptual problem to be solved by the creation of a new product. This practicum exposes the team to current product development methods and issues beyond functionality, such as human factors, safety, engineering economics, maintenance and manufacturing. Students completing EE490 are expected to take the follow-on course, EE491 in the next term. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE375, EE312, ENGL210, ENGL240 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE491 Product Design II This is the completion of a two-course series capstone, design sequence. Student enrolled in EE491 are expected to have completed EE490 in the previous term. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE490 (The previous term) Availability: Colorado Springs EE495 Advanced Research and Study in Electrical Engineering This course provides the opportunity for independent, in-depth research and/or study in an area of student interest. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the project, which must be approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs

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EE499 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering This course addresses issues of current interest in electrical engineering. Course content varies as determined by student interest and the evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE500 Foundations in Electrical Engineering This course provides an extensive overview of the relevant undergraduate engineering background required for the MSEE and MSCE programs. Topics include basic signal representation and manipulation, application of Laplace and Fourier transforms in analysis of linear time-invariant systems, fundamentals of amplitude and exponential modulation and demodulation, and an overview of solid-state fundamentals. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH500 or Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EE600 Modern Solid State Devices This course provides an introduction to the basic physics, principles of operation, and applications of digital IC devices and circuits. The student will relate physical layout of the integrated circuit to functional and performance models, and relate these to performance and reliability. Students will evaluate current research and alternate technologies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE605 Digital Signal Processing This course develops the principles of digital signal processing. Topics covered include discrete-time signals, the Z-transform and discrete-Fourier transform, the finite impulse response (FIR) and infinite impulse response (IIR) filters and methods of digital filter design. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH500 Availability: Colorado Springs EE625 Spread-Spectrum Systems This course addresses the principles of spread-spectrum communications systems. Topics include spread-spectrum concepts, direct-sequence and frequency-hop systems, finite-field math to include generator polynomials, maximum-length sequence generators, code-tracking loops, receiver synchronization and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) digital cellular communication systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE645 Digital Communications Present advanced techniques for transmitting digital data. Topics include formatting and transmission of data, channel coding techniques and signal recovery methods. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs Effective January 5, 2014 Page 307

EE650 Space Communications Addresses the principles of modern communication methods using the space arena as a practical theater of application. Topics include modulation/demodulation techniques, digital encoding/decoding, error detection and correction, interleaving methods, antennas, channel characteristics and multi-access techniques. Specific satellite communication systems will be discussed to amplify applicability and establish a real-world appreciation for the theory presented in the course Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE660 Modern Electronic Design This course explores the issues, methods, tools and processes in the design of modern electronic systems. Students will research and integrate information, identify and apply models, consider experimental design and devaluate design alternatives in a just-in time approach to design. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EE600 Availability: Colorado Springs EE692 Electrical Engineering Capstone The Electrical Engineering Capstone course provides the student the opportunity to integrate skills developed throughout the MSEE program by completing a project or study that focuses on a technical problem or current issue in engineering. The students will define the problem or opportunity, identify constraints, complete an analysis and prepare and deliver a professional report and presentation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Colorado Springs EE695 Advanced Research and Study in Engineering This course provides the opportunity for independent, in-depth research and/or study in an area of student interest. A research or study plan is required. The course is usable as a masters elective in engineering. Credits: 1 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EE699 Special Topics in Computer Engineering This course addresses issues of current interest in Computer systems. Course content varies as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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EIS800 Strategy, Alignment, and Portfolio Management This course presents techniques and methods for building a strategic plan for an enterprise with a strong emphasis on portfolio management. This includes identifying potential strategies and evaluating their alignment with business goals and visions, and approaches to bring IT into alignment with business goals. The discussions cover how to set a benchmark and its proper use; what are reasonable metrics for a business to use and the proper use of those metrics; and environmental scanning. Students evaluate current research on IT strategy and business alignment. Alignment is examined in detail and encompasses portfolio, program, project management and establishment of Project Management Office (PMO). Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EIS805 Enterprise Management Concepts and Databases This course examines key management concepts such as enterprise information systems and e-logistics, global/virtual e-supply chain management, supplier relationship management (SRM), customer relationship management (CRM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), data warehousing, data mining, and relational data bases. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EIS810 Managing, Planning and Integrating EIS Managing EIS includes evolution and management of enterprise leadership, computing systems, information, infrastructure, application, security architecture, technology, processes, data, and people. Enterprise information systems' designs, applications, implementation, deployment and impacts are examined in view of a need for a strong systems development process. This course covers enterprise integration, which includes integration of (legacy) enterprise applications and information, integrated systems, e-factories, integrated manufacturing systems, industrial informatics. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EIS815 Enterprise Tools, Concepts and Processes This course examines enterprise tools and realization technologies for enterprise computing, including ontologies and semantic web support; middleware standards and systems, such as CORBA and J2EE; modeling and description languages such as XML, RDF, OWL, and UML. In addition, Enterprise computing concepts for specific domains such as electronic and mobile commerce, vertical domains such as finance, telecommunications, automotive, aerospace, command and control, defense, healthcare, and government are reviewed. Business process and workflow modeling, analysis, integration, monitoring, and management are also examined in view of the enterprise. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls

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EIS820 Enterprise Architecture Technology This course presents current approaches to the high-level design of enterprise architectures. The emphasis is placed on high-level design issues and opportunities for long-term systems planning. Concepts examined are enterprise architecture modeling, model-driven architecture (MDA), component-oriented architecture, service-oriented architecture (SOA), collaborative development and co-operative engineering. Software as a service along with extreme programming is examined as are technologies such as virtualization, grid computing, and cloud computing. Software architecture, software product lines, methodology overview, agile architecture and modeling, presentation tier architecture, usability and user experience are also examined. This course also examines enterprise level security architecture and its relationship with and impact on many of the above technologies such as virtualization, grid computing, and cloud computing. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EIS825 Information Technology Service Management This course focuses on frameworks such as Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) and the concepts, practices and models that help manage IT services, development and operations. Several organizational models such as COBIT and ITIL are studied relative to their impact on the enterprise. Topics include service support, service delivery, security management, and infrastructure management. In addition, service strategy, service design, service transition, service operations, and continual service improvement are examined in detail as they pertain to ITIL and the enterprise. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EIS830 Governance, Quality, Compliance, and Ethics This course presents an overview of the major structures, such as Sarbanes-Oxley regulations and their impact on the enterprise. The course also explores governance and ethics relative to policies and control within the enterprise. In addition, topics such as trust, security, and privacy issues in enterprise computing and quality assurance issues in enterprise computing are closely examined. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EIS835 Security Management This course focuses the student on a broad range of topics relative to managing security at the enterprise level. The intent is focusing on creating a security management framework, so that organizations can build up and sustain security for their enterprise. This approach integrates policies, best practices, guidelines, procedures, and regulations while incorporating a broad range of security topics. This broad outlook covers not only security but also any other risks to an organizations core business relative to people, processes, data, facilities, and technology. This course examines external and internal security threats, failed systems development and system processes, employee mistakes and their respective risk mitigation. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls

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EM099 Special Topics in Emerging Media This course addresses issues of current interest in Emerging Media. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. This course cannot be used to satisfy any degree requirements. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EM115 Programming with Scripting Languages Students are introduced to Python or other industry standard scripting language in this course. The course covers terminology, theory, uses for scripting languages and explores compiled programming languages versus scripting languages. Students are required to complete several scripting related projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104; MATH103 or MATH143 or MATH106 or MATH112 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EM199 Special Topics in Emerging Media This course addresses issues of current interest in Emerging Media. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EM207 Introduction to Website Development Web development is a broad field and this class provides a basic foundation for follow-on web related classes. The focus for this class is to produce and manipulate actual code creation with HTML5 and CSS3 (or updated industry web standards) for structuring/presenting content on the web. W3C provides industry guidelines related to current web design practices and standards. Students employ, interpret, manipulate and generate HTML5 and CSS3 code using Notepad++ or TextWrangler (Mac platform). Students will learn the history of the Internet, the various iterations of HTML web mark-up language to the current version, HTML5. The use of Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) Language for formatting web content will be emphasized. Students will utilize a web server provided by CTU for the hosting of individual student websites. The creation of several web pages and a complete functional web site will be required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT101 or approval Availability: Colorado Springs EM208 Web Development I The fundamentals of web servers, web sites, HTML, XHTML and web authoring are presented in the context of using the technology to craft a message for an audience. Also includes fundamentals of linking, graphics, and other media. The creation of a Web Site Project is required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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EM209 Digital Media and Intellectual Property In this course students will explore intellectual property and the impact it has on the internet, interactive media, and on individuals. Starting with an understanding of the historical context of how intellectual property developed, the class then moves into the current state of intellectual property. Students will distinguish between copyright, trademark, trade secrets and other types of property. The importance of protecting ones own work will be emphasized and students will learn about copyright basics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM208 or EBUS208 Availability: Virtual Campus EM210 Introduction to 3D Virtual Worlds Discover virtual worlds using current virtual environments tools, such as Second Life. Featured topics include navigation, camera controls, object design and texturing, gestures, animations, sounds, basic use of tools and scripts. Using an activity-based learning approach, students create 3D virtual world content. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM208 or EBUS208; EM270 Availability: No longer offered EM215 Intermediate Programming with a Scripting Language This course builds upon the fundamental topics covered in EM115. Topics include Abstraction with Objects and OO programming and the usage of the Python Library. Students are expected to complete numerous programs using the new concepts covered in this course. Python or other industry standard scripting language is used in this course. Several programming problems will be required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM115 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EM218 Web Development II EM218 expands the principles and techniques introduced in EM208 by using professional software Web Site Development Tool. The course also examines many design principles specifically aimed at enhancing the presentation and usability of an industrial strength web site. Information architecture is touched upon. Further, the course addresses the usage and placement of various Multimedia elements on a Web site. Software such as Dreamweaver or other industry standard software is used in this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM208 or EBUS208 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus EM228 Scripting for the Web Scripting for the Web provides an introduction to client-side scripts used to create dynamic web pages. Form validation techniques, script control structure syntax, image rollovers, auxiliary windows and web page objects. The Ajax protocol between client and server will also be explored. Other industry standard scripting languages may be explored based on local industry. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104 or CS106 or IT106; EM208 or EBUS208 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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EM270 Emerging Media and Technology Information can be shared and utilized in a variety of ways. New technologies and new uses for information/data have a direct impact on the personal, social and business aspects of our lives This class explores the various new technologies and the effects on consumers and businesses. Case studies are utilized along with research to explore new topics. Students gain a basic understanding of emerging media as it relates to web standards, social networking, mobile computing, collaboration environment, and a variety of other current topics. This class features current trends in social media. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM208 or EBUS208 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus EM299 Special Topics in Emerging Media This course addresses issues of current interest in Emerging Media. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EM301 Foundations in 3D Computer Graphics EM301 provides an introduction to the world of 3D computer generated graphics. Utilizing industry standard software such as Maya, students explore both the technical aspects and the creative side of computer graphics. Using an activity-based learning approach, students create projects that feature basic modeling skills and simple animation techniques. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: VC242 or EBUS218 or CS115 or Approval Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North EM302 3D Modeling 3D Modeling is a continuation of the skills and concepts covered in EM301. Students review and expand their knowledge of the 3D modeling process. This class covers a variety of modeling techniques: polygons, NURBS, image planes, Boolean operations, and the export/import of objects into other scenes. Using an activity-based approach, students apply the concepts and theory to create 3D content. Several modeling projects are explored including 3D architectural modeling. Each student creates one or more portfolio quality projects based upon original student designs that feature texturing, lighting/camera setups, and basic animation techniques. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM301 Availability: Colorado Springs EM303 3D Character Rigging 3D characters come alive through animation. This course covers the process involved with animating a biped character. Topics featured: joint placement, skeleton creation, control structures, and skinning. Using an activity-based learning approach, students complete a variety of projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM302 Availability: Colorado Springs

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EM304 3D Animation Animation creates the excitement in a story and provides the action for the characters or objects in a scene. This course covers theory, terminology, key frame animation, hierarchical animation, creating skeletons, and forward kinematics versus inverse kinematics. Using an activity-based approach, students create one or more animated projects for their portfolio. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM302, PHY130 Availability: Colorado Springs EM310 Introduction to Maya Programming With MEL This course provides an introduction to Maya 3D computer graphics development using the MEL (Maya Embedded Language) scripting language. This is an overview course to the world of 3D computer generated graphics using the MEL Scripting language as an additional tool for developing and enhancing Maya 3D Animated Graphics. Students continue to explore both the technical side and creative side of Maya computer graphics as well as animation programming. Basic programming principles will also be addressed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CS104, EM301 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EM315 Scripting for Gaming and Simulation This course covers advanced scripting techniques and builds upon the knowledge gained in EM215. Python or other industry standard scripting language is used in this course. For Python, GUI Interface and event driven programming will be addressed. Also Database support, Network Programming and application of Python for the Web. Several Scripting projects will be required. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM215 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EM325 Multi-Media Development for the Web A continuation of EM218. This course features elements and principles of Animation with FLASH. Using FLASH or other industry standard software students create multimedia animation projects for Web Sites. An introduction to Action Script, and Motion and Shape Tween Animation will be addressed. Client interaction is touched upon along with Digital Media Design principles. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM218 or EBUS218 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus EM326 Multi-Media Development for the Web II A continuation of EM325. In this course students will explore and utilize advanced and new topics related to web animation with Flash or other industry standard software. Various software and techniques are covered in this course as they apply to industry standards and current industry practices. Flash or other industry software will be incorporated into various course projects. Students are required to complete one or more projects in this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM325 Availability: Virtual Campus

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EM328 Server-Side Scripting for the Web Server-Side Scripting for the Web provides an introduction to server-side scripts using a current language such as C#, VB.Net or PHP. Students will learn the basic syntax and constructs of the language and use it to develop applications that interpret information from a Web form and respond by creating a dynamically generated Web page based on the forms values. Students are also introduced to reading and writing files on the Web server and accessing databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: EM228 Availability: Virtual Campus EM360 Programming for Mobile Computing This course explores programming for mobile devices. Students explore the history, terminology, theory, and the wide range of uses for mobile computing. Topics may include: programming a variety of mobile devices such as the iPhone, android mobile devices and windows mobile devices. Actual mobile computing technologies covered in this may vary based on campus offerings and advances in mobile computing technologies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls EM399 Special Topics in Emerging Media This course addresses issues of current interest in Emerging Media. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EM405 3D Environments This course features scene creation/environment as it relates to 3D objects or characters. Scenes tell the story or present a concept to the viewer. Scenes set the mood for the viewer through use of lights, textures and shadows. Students explore the use of lighting, textures and cameras in a 3D scene. Every object in a scene needs to be created by the digital artist including lighting. Featured topics include: terminology, light theory, color theory, shadows, types, lighting types, paint effects and textures. Using an activity-based learning approach, students are required to complete a variety of projects using Maya or other industry standard 3D software program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM302 Availability: Colorado Springs EM406 Advanced 3D Projects This course provides students the opportunity to further explore 3D graphics using industry standard software such as Maya in order to produce a portfolio quality project of their choice. Students will be allowed to select areas of interest on which to design the project. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and advances in 3D computer graphics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM304 Availability: Colorado Springs

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EM420 Web-Based Database Applications This course is an in-depth study of creating dynamic Web applications using a database and advanced topics in Web programming. Web user interface design, along client/server side script form validation and server-side script database access, will be presented. This course requires the completion of a functioning Web-based application using a database. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EBUS228 or EM228 ; IT235 or CS250 or CS251 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus EM425 Mobile Web Design This course explores designing for mobile web devices. Students explore the wide range of uses for mobile web. Topics may include: designing for a variety of mobile devices such as the iPhone, android mobile devices and windows mobile devices, and the impact of local and global demographics on the design of web pages for mobile devices. Actual mobile computing technologies covered in this may vary based on campus offerings and advances in mobile computing technologies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: EM326; EBUS208 or EM208 Availability: Virtual Campus EM499 Special Topics in Emerging Media This course addresses issues of current interest in Emerging Media. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EM820 Business Strategies for Social Media This course examines the impact of social media on people, business processes, culture and Web 2.0 technology. It uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine how computer science, social psychology, business and management integrate to create collaborative business solutions. Students use a problem-based learning approach to explore the risks and benefits of social media for business use. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM822 Games, Gamification and Serious Games This course explores the rise in gamification and how it is used in emerging media to support education, business, nonprofit and research communities to solve complex organizational and societal problems. Gamification builds upon the design features used in commercial games, and this course leverages the game design logic and how it can increase the level of motivation in Web technologies by offering measurable and compelling incentives. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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EM825 Strategic Use of Virtual Worlds Virtual worlds feature vibrant online communities with benefits for business, education, research, entertainment as well as individual and social use. This course examines the terminology, skills, culture and strategies that promote expertise and successful business in virtual worlds. Students use a hands-on approach to develop virtual world skills, explore virtual business solutions, investigate the risks and benefits of social networks and identify strategies for enhancing business communication. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM830 Virtual Economy and Business As real and virtual world goods and services are marketed, sold and supported within virtual communities, virtual economies and their currency exchanges provide a financial infrastructure for managing these international marketplaces. Students analyze and critically evaluate how Web commerce strategies are evolving to support a global economy and what the impact will be for business. The shift from electronic commerce sites to virtual marketplaces as well as the financial and social implications of this evolution are also examined. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM835 Information Accountability and Web Privacy Strategies Information accountability focuses on the appropriate use of publicly available Web information, and how it contrasts with information security and restricted access. This course examines the technical, legal, ethical and social issues associated with the appropriate use of personal and business information. The implications of persistent Internet information as well as privacy protection strategies are investigated using a problem-based learning approach. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM840 Virtual World Simulation As virtual worlds grow in sophistication, business opportunities emerge for creating virtual spaces for collaboration and communication. These virtual spaces are extensible environments that are populated by 3D content and object behavior. Within these simulated scenes, users can work cooperatively to visualize and share their ideas, interact with objects as well as other users and store their content for use at a later date. Students explore the state of the practice as they investigate the simulation techniques, elicit the requirements for a business, scientific, entertainment or educational simulation, and apply 3D modeling techniques to design a solution. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls

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EM842 Applications for Mobile Development With the rise in mobile technology for ubiquitous computing, this course features the use of emerging media for mobile application development. It features the strategy and tactics needed to design mobile applications, the tradeoffs between rapid and native programming tools and how to scale the software development lifecycle to support mobile application development. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus EM845 Web Science and Technology Augmented reality, new media, semantic applications and mirrored environments are emerging across the Internet. This course takes a broad look at web science and technology, exploring the design and integration of real environments with virtual objects, data and other artifacts. The featured topics include the technical and strategic issues associated with the design and use of these emerging technologies for business, scientific, entertainment and educational use. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM850 Strategic Thinking for EM Develops and expands students ability to think strategically within the discipline of Emerging Media. This will involve various typologies and methods of exploration and an examination of heuristics and biases. Students will develop the capacity for concurrent action and birds-eye perspectives of ongoing organizational activity. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM855 Futuring and Innovation in EM This course develops skills in futuring via Delphi, Future Search, scenario building and other techniques. Students will talk with futurists and futures organizations, becoming involved in the World Futures Society and tech trending with leading electronics and aerospace companies. They will develop a socio-technology plan for the future of their area of EM and will also look at formal models of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls EM860 Virtual and Cloud Computing Architectures This course examines the technical, legal and social implications of the design and integration of virtual world and cloud computing architectures. The topics include grid computing, portability and interoperability of 3D content between virtual worlds and geopolitical issues, such as the globalization of cloud computing content. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls

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EMBA630 Decisions in Management: Navigating Uncertainty Students in this course will be introduced to three perspectives on decision-making: the rational choice model, a competing values model, and a model grounded in an understanding of the processes of judgment heuristics and bias. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EMBA640 Entrepreneurship/Intrapreneurship and Innovation This course is designed to introduce the student to the idea of Intrapreneurship and the opportunities for innovation that exist within an existing corporation. These same skills apply to those mavericks who would pursue the same innovation outside of mainstream business community as Entrepreneurs. The similarities and differences will be addressed along with the necessary multidisciplinary and dynamic skill-sets required to build a successful enterprise from within and outside the traditional business structures. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EMBA650 Emerging Markets Students in this course will learn how to identify and analyze the various governmental, business and political challenges and opportunities that exist when operating within emerging international markets. International law, business ethics, policy options, tariffs and operation of existing economies and organizations are examined. The roles of history and tradition are also explored in light of their potential impact on various emerging global market economies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course EMBA690 Strategic Management in Dynamic Environments Students will master analytical and integrative tools to perform in-depth analyses of industries, firms, and competitors. Course material includes methods to predict competitive behavior and develop and implement strategic plans to achieve and sustain a competitive profile in the emerging global marketplace. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered ENG111 English Composition I During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered

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ENG112 English Composition II During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts will be used as models for student writing. Finally students will learn advanced document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENG111 Availability: No Longer Offered ENG202 Professional Writing and Composition The course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document. Credits: 6 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered ENG210 Professional Communications This foundational course provides students with an overview of the methods and media of business communications, concentrating on preliminary applications of communication rhetoric, theories, and principles. Specifically, learners will examine the basics of business communications, analyze communication elements, explore issues related to audience diversity and sensitive topics, and develop written and oral messages to various audiences using the three-step writing process. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered ENGL080 English Composition Preparation This course is a preparatory course designed to meet the individual students needs in preparing for ENGL111, English Composition I. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, spelling, diction, sentence structure, paragraph formation, and essay organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered

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ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking This course addresses how to write and speak to make a point; how to use good grammar, vocabulary and logical thinking; as well as how to find a suitable topic for writing assignments. The course begins with an introduction of the writing process and gives students the opportunity to practice writing in different modes. Students learn to develop their grammar and writing concepts to enable them to write effectively both in academic and professional contexts. This workshop course is highly experiential, supportive, and collaborative, as students read and critique each others' work. This is the first in a sequence on Composition and Writing skills. The second course, ENGL103, in this series will build upon this oneaddressing how to research and use resources without plagiarizing, how to utilize the APA formatting for documentation and how to make a persuasive argument. Our view of the required composition sequence is that it is essential for all who want to become skilled critical thinkers and educated people. In both st Composition courses, Research Skills/ Information Literacy workshops will introduce students to the critical 21 century skill of research: how to use dictionaries and other reference books and how to access online databases of the CTU library for academic and professional inquiry. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research This course builds upon ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking. Students practice drafting progressively complex papers, demonstrating college level research skills and writing essays that convey information, make a point, or provide an opinion. Students study the APA Handbook, learn about plagiarism, and conduct research accurately and citing CTU resources. In addition, this course uses readings to demonstrate excellence and eloquence in speaking and writing, emphasizing the crucial synergy between learning to write and developing the practice critically reading and evaluating texts. This is a highly collaborative course, with students reading and critiquing others work, as a means to create a learning community as well as develop critical thinking and reading. Research/Information Literacy Skills: The Information Literacy workshops challenge students to use the librarys resources to find credible resources, and allow them to learn about important writing and research skills such as evalutating and summarizing information from sources. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: ENGL101 or ENGL111 or ENGL125 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ENGL111 English Composition I During this course the students will review the writing process (prewriting, researching, drafting, revising, editing, and assessing) and covers documenting sources. The course also introduces students to four basic writing strategies used in effective writing (exemplification, description, compare and contrast, and process). Additionally the student will review basic grammar, punctuation, spelling and sentence structure by using literary excerpts. Students also learn basic document preparation skills using Microsoft Word in the lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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ENGL112 English Composition II During this course the student will review critical thinking, the writing process, and integrating sources, while being introduced to two basic writing strategies used in effective writing (definition and cause and effect). Additionally there will be work in two advanced methods of effective writing (combining devices and strategies in a formal argumentative / persuasive research paper). The reviewing of persuasive appeal and argumentative structure will also be studied. Literary excerpts are used as models for student writing. Finally students learn advanced documentation preparation skills suing Microsoft Word in the lab. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENGL111 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course ENGL125 OR ENGL125-L Real World Writing This is one of the most important courses you can takeit will lay the foundation for your entire college and professional career as an educated person. In it, we will address how to write and speak to make a point; how to use good grammar, vocabulary and logical thinking; as well as how to find a suitable topic for your writing assignments. We will start with the basics: reviewing sentences and paragraphs, and then move on to the classic five-part college essay or theme. There are different rules of the game for writing academically than writing for business. We want to teach students the culture of being solid college-level communicators and successful professionals. This workshop course is highly experiential, supportive, and collaborative, as students read and critique each others work. This is the first in a sequence on Composition and Writing skills. The second course, ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L, in this series will build upon this oneaddressing how to research and use resources without plagiarizing, how to utilize the APA formatting for documentation and how to make a persuasive argument. Our view of the required composition sequence is that it is essential for all who want to become skilled critical thinkers and educated people. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L Sound Writing Skills: Research and Writing With a Purpose This course is a workshop that builds upon ENGL125 OR ENGL125-LReal World Writing. It is a workshop formathighly experiential and hands on. Students practice drafting progressively complex papers, demonstrating the capacity to do college level research and write essays that convey information, make a point or provide an opinion. They will study the APA Handbook, learn to do research (beyond Wikipedia!) and cite resources without plagiarizing them. In addition, this course uses readings to demonstrate excellence and eloquence in speaking and writing, emphasizing the crucial synergy between learning to write and developing the practice of intelligent reading of texts. This will be a highly collaborative course, with students reading and critiquing others work, as a means to create a learning community as well as develop critical capacities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENGL125 OR ENGL125-L or ENGL111 or ENG111 or ENG115 Availability: No longer offered

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ENGL200 Professional Writing This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENGL112 or ENG112 or ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L Availability: Kansas City ENGL201 Principles of Professional Writing In today's business environment, it is more important than ever for successful professionals to be excellent communicators - and the challenges are even greater in this world of cyber-communication and virtual workplaces. This course sharpens students' abilities to use critical thinking skills to solve problems and write for specific business audiences and purposes and to adapt business messages for various situations and print and electronic media. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience; adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose; formatting design elements in a consistent, professional manner; and integrating meaningful graphics into a document. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: ENGL103 or ENGL112 or ENG112 or ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ENGL203 Professional Speech Communications Brevity, precision and adherence to common formats are hallmarks of clear, consistent and concise communication. Successful professionals are excellent communicators. This course sharpens students skills in oral communication with a focus on professional speaking. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ENGL205 Technical Writing and Speaking This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents, including mechanical process descriptions, instructions, proposals, recommendations, letters, memos, and electronic mail. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENG112 or ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L Availability: No longer offered ENGL206 Technical and Professional Writing This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents including abstracts and/or executive summaries, mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, requirement specifications, test plans and procedures, and technical datasheets. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document. The course also emphasizes oral communication through the incorporation of both formal and informal presentations throughout the course. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: ENGL103 or ENGL112 or ENG112 or ENGL126 OR ENGL126-L Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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ENGL210 Professional Speaking During this course the student will learn the essentials of business and professional presentations, including extemporaneous, introduction, demonstration, informative (business briefing) and persuasive (argumentative on controversial issue) presentations. Additionally, students will study information on word choices, organization, audience analysis and graphics and use them in several evaluated experiences in speech preparation and presentation. Both theoretical understanding and practical experience will be critiqued often. These concepts and skills (or principles and techniques) are adaptable to platform speaking, boardroom discussions, class interactions, and personal conversations. Further attention is given to models, elements, principles and procedures of public communication. Special attention will be given to the presentation and delivery mix of several student presentations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENGL112 or ENG112 or ENGL126 or ENGL126-L or ENGL103 Availability: Kansas City ENGL211 Professional Communications In real estate, the mantra is location, location, location. In business and the world of work, it is communication, communication, communication. Brevity, precision and adherence to common formats are hallmarks of clear, consistent and concise communication. In todays business environment, it is more important than ever that successful professionals be excellent communicatorsand the challenges are even greater in this world of cyber-communication and virtual workplaces. This course sharpens students abilities to write and speak for specific business purposes and to target clientele across all industries. Effective written and oral messages are essential; both are examined in depth. Students finish the course by demonstrating their understandings of how to adapt communication for different contexts, diverse audiences and sensitive topics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered ENGL240 Professional Communication for Technical Careers This course covers the preparation of a wide variety of technical documents, which include but is not limited to, abstracts and/or executive summaries, mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, requirement specifications, test plans and procedures, and technical datasheets. Particular attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document. The course also emphasizes oral communication through the incorporation both formal and informal presentations throughout the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENGL112 Availability: No longer offered ENTR605 Integrated Marketing for Entrepreneurs This course will present the new media to students of entrepreneurship. The course will offer a practical look at the market in terms of what tools have worked, what tools currently work, and how to use these tools for marketing success. This course will focus heavily on web-based communication, including the social media, wikis, blogs, audio/video, podcasts, viral content, and content rich websites. A key element of the course will be writing an individual digital marketing strategy, and integrating it into the business plan. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MKTG630 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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ENTR610 Entrepreneurial Strategy, Planning & Leadership This course will shape students business plans through market analysis, financial analysis, and an analysis of support organizations. This course will address the various sources and uses of funding, including a look at the processes, risks and rewards of working with venture capital, angel investors, private equity groups and various loan origination organizations. At the conclusion of this course, students will have the strategic and financial components of their business plans articulated and included in the framework of their business plans. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENTR615 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ENTR615 Entrepreneurship & Intrapreneurship: Skills for Success This course will facilitate student exploration into the mindset of being an entrepreneur or intrapreneur. Students will explore their own personality and determine matches with the core attributes of being a successful entrepreneur. In this course students will understand and conduct the venture product/service development process. This process will include a basic operational plan. At the conclusion of this process, students will have established the basic framework of their business plans. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ENTR630 Entrepreneurial Business Planning Capstone This capstone course will require students to finalize all components of their business plan. Students will be required to present their plan to a venture capitalist or angel investor for feedback and comments. Students will be required to complete initial processes for establishing their business as well as a strategic plan to launch their business after the course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENTR610 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus ESS600 Foundations of Sustainable Business This course addresses the various definitions of sustainability in the context of business organizations. The triple bottom line (people, planet and profits) is introduced. Through an examination of recent policy changes and case studies of environmentally and socially responsible organizations, this course lays the foundation for understanding sustainable business. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered ESS610 Implementing the Triple Bottom Line This course examines the inherent difficulties in implementing the triple bottom line. It will focus on making the difficult decisions that simultaneously address economic, ethical, technological, social justice, and environmental concerns. The focus is on developing a plan for an organization that makes progress in all of these areas. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered

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ESS620 Sustainable Operations Best practice in the production and distribution of goods and services requires an understanding of process analysis, quality improvement, planning and control, risk management, and supply chain management. These topics will all be covered in this course, but instead of using the traditional measure of economic success, solutions will be evaluated against their impact on social justice, environmental responsibility, and economic success. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered ESS870 System Thinking and Transformative Social Systems in Sustainability This introduction to systems thinking in the context of sustainability issues will introduce students to both core sustainability content and systems thinking skills. We will focus attention particularly on issues of global resource flows, energy, toxicity and habitat. In addition we offer direction on how to transform social systems toward sustainability, taking the organization and its value chain as the primary level of analysis. Given the experiential nature of the course, students will be required to complete a personal sustainability project of their choosing in their organizational setting. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ESS872 Organizational Performance: Economic, Ethical, Technological, Social Justice, and the Environment This course examines the inherent difficulties in implementing the triple bottom line. It will focus on making the difficult decisions that attempt to simultaneously address economic, ethical, technological, social justice, and environmental concerns. The focus is on developing a plan for an organization that makes progress in all of these areas as well as a means of measuring improvement on all three outcomes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ESS874 Trans-Organizational Policy and Governance Related to Sustainability The course will explore how trans-organizational policy is formed and created. Using the case study method, students will analyze multiple cases from diverse perspectives. The course utilizes an intentional interdisciplinary focus (sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, and political science). Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ESS876 Current Topics in Environmental and Social Sustainability This course covers advanced topics in environmental and social sustainability (ESS). Course topics will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of ESS principles. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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ESS878 Advanced Career Strategies in Environmental and Social Sustainability In this course students will expand career options by exploring a variety of careers that are consistent with their management concentration areas. Students will be engaged in defining career aspirations, mapping professional goals, and creating strategies for performance enhancement. This course places emphasis on professional development by evaluating personal strengths and identifying opportunities to doctoral experiences. Students will leave this course with a direction for life after the DM program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ESS820 Systems Thinking for Sustainability This introduction to systems thinking in the context of sustainability issues will introduce students to both core sustainability content and systems thinking skills. We will focus attention particularly on issues of global resource flows, energy, toxicity and habitat. In addition we offer direction on how to transform social systems toward sustainability, taking the organization and its value chain as the primary level of analysis. Given the experiential nature of the course, students will be required to complete a personal sustainability project of their choosing in their organizational setting. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus ESS825 Organizational Performance and the Triple Bottom Line This course examines the inherent difficulties in implementing the triple bottom line. It will focus on making the difficult decisions that attempt to simultaneously address economic, ethical, technological, social justice, and environmental concerns. The focus is on developing a plan for an organization that makes progress in all of these areas as well as a means of measuring improvement on all three outcomes. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls ESS830 Advanced Action Research for ESS This experience centers on guiding the participants through an advanced action research project domestically of internationally in an organization. Students will learn about the culture and the organization prior to entrance. The class will monitor and guide the entire action research cycle from diagnosis through evaluation and reflection during the class. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls ESS835 Policy and Governance in Trans-Organizational Collaboration for ESS This course will explore how trans-organizational policy is formed and created. Using the case study method, students will analyze multiple cases from diverse perspectives. The course utilizes an intentional interdisciplinary focus (sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, and political science) and requires students to do a project with a client organization engaged in Environmental and Social Sustainability. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls

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ESS850 Strategic Thinking for ESS This course develops and expands students ability to think strategically within the discipline of ESS. This will involve various typologies and methods of exploration and an examination of heuristics and biases. Students will develop the capacity for concurrent action and birds-eye perspectives of ongoing organizational activity. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls ESS855 Futuring and Innovation in ESS This course develops skills in futuring via Delphi, Future Search, scenario building and other techniques. Students will talk with futurists and futures organizations, becoming involved in the World Futures Society and tech trending with leading electronics and aerospace companies. They will develop a socio-technology plan for the future of their division of ESS and will also look at formal models of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls FIN310 Financial Management Principles This course examines the key components of financial decision-making: valuation and risk management. Students will examine the implications of forecasting, capital budgeting, working capital management, and project risk management. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered FIN322 Investments This course focuses on investments and investment strategies. Various investment vehicles such as stocks, bonds and commodities are examined. Students will explore the principles of security analysis and valuation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered FIN356 International Finance This course focuses on the workings of international financial markets, the risks of doing business in the international area, and the management of exchange risk exposure. Student will examine valuation and portfolio analysis of foreign investments. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: FIN310 or FINC390 or FINC400 Availability: no longer offered FIN495 Advanced Research and Study in Finance This course addresses issues of current interest in finance. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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FINC200 Applied Finance and Managerial Accounting This course represents a survey of current financial and managerial accounting techniques used to efficiently manage organizations. The student will be introduced to basic financial statements and their analysis, operational and capital budgeting techniques, business operations and funding along with cost-volume-profit analysis and scheduling issues. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH143 or MATH103 or MATH106 or MATH112 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City FINC210 Financial Management Principles This is an introductory course that examines fundamental components of financial decision-making. Students will examine the components of an effective financial system, the process of financial statement analysis and capital budgeting, and the role of risk and return in finance. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered FINC225 Financial Statement Analysis This course is a basic introduction to the concepts of finance. An overview of financial statements and financial statement analysis are presented. Specific topics include ration analysis, trend analysis, ethics, and financial proformas. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT254, ACCT201 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus FINC310 Money and Capital Markets In this course, students will focus on the capital structure of financial institutions and the flow of funds through our economic system. The course emphasizes concepts such as the creation of money, the impact of savings and the interrelation of interest rates and inflation. The financial system is examined to understand the roles played by consumers, businesses and government, particularly the Federal Reserve System. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus FINC320 Investments This course focuses on investments and investment strategies. Various investment vehicles such as stocks, bonds and commodities are examined. Students will explore the principles of security analysis and valuation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus FINC330 Risk Management In this course, students will explore personal and corporate exposure to risk, as well as the tools used to manage risk. The management of organizations and individuals exposure to property damage and legal liability will be covered. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 329

FINC350 Financial Institutions This course provides an explanation of how the banking industry operates, both within the U.S. and internationally, the history of the U.S. monetary system, and an overview of Federal laws, regulations and statutes as they relate to financial institutions. Topics covered include the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) and the USA PATRIOT Act governing banks and other financial institutions. Developing an acute comprehension and application of these sources is vital to conducting financial investigations. Upon completion of this course, students will have developed a detailed understanding of the U.S. banking system and the laws and regulations governing the banking industry. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus FINC355 Risk Management In this course, students will explore corporate exposure to risk, as well as the tools used to manage risk. The management of organizations exposure to portfolio, cash flow, and project risk are some of the topics covered. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered FINC390 Introduction to Corporate Finance In this course, students will learn the financial concept of time value of money and discounted cash flow analysis. Students will apply this knowledge to the valuation of common stocks and bonds. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Availability: no longer offered FINC400 Financial Management This course examines the process of budgeting. Students will examine the components of and develop budgets. Students will also utilize capital budgeting tools to evaluate investment opportunities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT201, ACCT202, ACCT203 Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Kansas City, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus FINC410 Corporate Finance The financial dimensions of business decisions are studied. Topics covered will include financial statement preparation and analysis, risk and return, the time value of money, the valuation of stocks and bonds, cost of capital calculations and capital budgeting. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus FINC415 Advanced Corporate Finance The financial dimensions of business decisions are studied. Topics covered will include capital budgeting, cash flow analysis, project analysis & evaluation. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: FIN322; FIN412 or FINC310 Availability: Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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FINC420 International Finance This course focuses on the workings of international financial markets, the risks of doing business in the international area, and the management of exchange risk exposure. Students will examine valuation and portfolio analysis of foreign investments. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus FINC440 Financial Modeling and Forecasting In this course, students will learn the techniques of creating financial models and applying standard forecasting techniques in a corporate setting including trends, seasonality and forecasting cycles. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT254; MGM330 or MATH301 or MAT306 or MATH306 or MATH305; FIN310 or FINC390 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINC445 Derivatives This course presents and defines derivatives such as forwards, futures, swaps and options. These financial instruments are commonly used to structure and modify the risk profile and exposure of firms and investors. Derivatives are used to hedge unwanted risk and to increase risk exposure for speculative motives. No prior knowledge of options and futures markets is assumed. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: FIN310 or FINC390 or FINC400; MAT306 or MATH306 or MATH305 or MGM330 or MATH301 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINC450 Fixed Income In this course, students will study fixed income securities with an emphasis on understanding yield spreads, bond risk, valuation, and interest rate volatility. Bond derivatives will be examined and the dynamics of mortgage and asset backed bond funds will be analyzed. Credit analysis will be introduced as well as bond portfolio management issues. Hedging of fixed income securities will be briefly reviewed. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: FIN310 or FINC390 or FINC400; MAT306 or MATH306 or MATH305 or MGM330 or MATH301 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINC455 Portfolio Analysis In this course, students will learn the management process for individual and institutional investment portfolios in domestic and international markets. Capital market expectations and asset allocation will be examined. Fixed income, equity and alternative investment portfolio management techniques will be reviewed. Portfolio risk management, performance measurements and decision making will also be studied. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: FIN310 or FINC390 or FINC400; MAT306 or MATH306 or MATH305 or MGM330 or MATH301 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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FINC460 Finance Capstone This is an integrative and interactive capstone course in which the student uses the functional skills acquired from previous courses to formulate decisions within a business entity and analyze the financial implications of those decisions. Individual and team participation are imperative for this course. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINC495 Advanced Research and Study An independent, in-depth research project. Credits are assigned based on the complexity and depth of the project. The project must be approved by the department chair. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINC499 Special Topics in Finance This course addresses issues of current interest in finance. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINC600 Financial Statement Analysis In this course, students will analyze financial statements and examine methods used to value companies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus FINC605 Corporate Portfolio Management This course provides a study of investment alternatives, the workings of investment markets, and the management of investment portfolios as they relate to corporations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus FINC610 Financial Management for Multinational Enterprises Within the context of the multinational firm, the course examines the development of policy, financing options for international business, and the making of standard financial management decisions. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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FINC615 Applied Managerial Finance Emphasizes management decision making utilizing accounting and finance concepts. The following subjects are addressed in the course: financial reports and metrics, financial analysis and planning, financial forecasting, financial markets, financial leverage, working capital management, capital budgeting processes, cost of capital and long term financing. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a financial strategy report and accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of financial analysis from either the academic or professional literature. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MGMT502 for MBA program only Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus FINC650 MBA Finance Capstone The MBA Finance Capstone uses the functional skills students have developed in previous core and concentration courses to complete an in-depth project. The course requires the student to perform comprehensive research, analysis, and study on either a desired area of interest or a major business problem or issue that impacts the students own company or organization. The student will utilize research methodologies to prepare a formal research report. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Last Quarter Availability: No longer offered FINC699 Special Topics in Finance This course addresses issues of current interest in finance. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINF320 Financial Investigation Technologies This course provides an examination of the technologies used by financial investigators. Students will use spreadsheet, database, and other types of software to gather and organize data for investigations. The course also addresses the prevention, deterrence, and detection of the use of IT systems to commit fraud and other criminal acts. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: IT254 or Approval Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINF370 Financial Investigations This course provides students with the foundational knowledge of how to conduct forensic financial investigations. Students will learn how to analyze patterns of suspicious activity and report their findings based on strict analysis of financial transactions observed during the course of their investigation. Methods used in gathering source information, analysis of financial documentation, use of law enforcement contacts, and other investigative tools such as data mining and the use of Internet resources and software interdiction systems, will be examined, enabling students to produce meaningful and substantive Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) used in reporting suspicious financial activity to FinCEN. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course Effective January 5, 2014 Page 333

FINF420 Financial Statement Fraud In this course the student will gain an understanding of the major areas of financial statement fraud, fraud risk assessment, and fraud examination procedures. The course will cover procedures available to proactively search for financial statement fraud, as well as methods by which financial statement fraud is concealed. Students will gain an understanding of working paper development and documentation necessary during an investigation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT202 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINF430 Money Laundering Detection and Reporting This course will extend the students knowledge of the regulatory and legal framework in place to combat money-laundering, and provide the student with the necessary tools to identify and effectively investigate the wide array of money laundering methods being employed throughout the world. Students will develop a detailed understanding of the three levels of laundering money: placement, layering and integration. Types or methods of money laundering include drug trafficking, human smuggling, trade-based, terrorist financing, charities used as funding mechanisms, use of off-shore shell companies, wire transfers, informal value transfer systems (IVTS) such as Hawalas, Black Market Peso Exchange (BMPE) and the most recent threat in money laundering stored value gift cards. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP300 Personal Financial Planning In this course, students will gain an understanding of the financial planning process; client/planner interactions; time value of money applications; personal financial statements development and assessment; cash flow and debt management; asset acquisition; education planning; planning elements of risk management; investment planning and retirement planning; special needs planning review; integrating planning recommendations; financial planning ethics review; and an overview of practice management concepts. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP310 Taxation in Financial Planning This course provides an introduction to the taxation of individuals. Particular attention is placed on tax planning concepts and responsibilities of the tax planner. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT362, FINP300 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP315 Principles of Risk Management and Insurance This course covers non-speculative risk management, with emphasis on risk minimization and risk control. Topics also include a study of the various insurance vehicles from both the personal and business perspective. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MGM365 or BADM410 or MGMT235, FINP300 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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FINP320 Investments This course examines various investment vehicles such as stocks, bonds and commodities in light of their role in the personal financial planning environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP399 Special Topics in Financial Planning This course addresses issues of current interest in financial planning. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: (Check with campus for availability of this course) FINP420 Employee Benefits and Retirement Planning This course provides a study of the financial and non-financial aspects of planning for retirement and other lifetime goals. Particular attention is given to the role of employer-provided benefits in the personal financial planning process. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: FINP300, FINP310, FINP315, FINP320 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP430 Estate Planning This course examines the various tax and legal impacts of protecting an individuals estate to provide for their beneficiaries. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: FINP300, FINP310, FINP315, FINP320 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP450 Financial Planning Capstone This course is a comprehensive application of the personal financial planning process. The role of the personal financial planner is considered as well as the various legal, ethical and professional aspects of their relationship with their clients. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: FINP300; FINP310, FINP315; FINP320, FINP420, FINP430 Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course FINP499 Special Topics in Financial Planning This course addresses issues of current interest in financial planning. Course content will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of the discipline. Credits: 1-6 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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FPM300 Facility and Property Management Technologies This course will address the profession of facility and property management, including space regulations, finance, project management, and other current practices. Current trends and practices of Computer-Aided Facility Management (CAFM), Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS), and Integrated Computer-Aided Design (CADD) applications and databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus (Check with campus for availability of this course) FPM310 Property Manager Responsibilities This course is an introduction to basic property manager responsibilities and duties. It provides information on the impact of the legal system, maintenance, operation, and marketing responsibilities of the manager, maintaining satisfactory tenant relations and other managerial techniques for the real estate professional. The role and process of property management rights, responsibilities of managers and tenants, competencies necessary for managing properties, and social services are examined. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus (Check with campus for availability of this course) FPM320 Capital Planning and Asset Management The course will examine the operational and financial aspects of commercial and residential property management, including budgeting and purchasing decisions, maintenance management, optimizing rents, and property evaluation. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus (Check with campus for availability of this course) FPM330 Property Management Operations This course in property management will examine current issues affecting the property manager, marketing trends, demographics, legal issues and economic factors. The course culminates in the analysis of a property and development of a comprehensive operational, marketing and cash flow plan. The course will review and address the fundamentals of commercial real estate investment, market influences, contracts and, property portfolio management. It will also address the concept of useful life of building and infrastructure systems and the process of managing their life cycles. There is an emphasis on justifying and funding capital projects. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus (Check with campus for availability of this course) GL605 Perspectives on International Business This course provides students with both a theoretical and practical introduction to international business. Topics covered include risk and opportunity management, operations, cultural and ethical considerations, and appropriate organizational designs. Students will be required to analyze and evaluate international business cases as well to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of international business. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus

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GL610 Globalization and International Strategy This course takes students through the strategic process of global management by assessing global business forces then applying this assessment to the analysis and evaluation of global business strategies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus GL615 Global Leadership Development This course will help students to develop the skills required of leaders and mangers for the global economy, and will enable the students to understand the factors that shape a global outlook. In addition, it will develop the key skills for the global context, and will prepare them for leading cross-cultural and trans-organizational initiatives in the global marketplace. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus GL820 The Influence of Culture on Global Organizations Cultures, values and ethics differ among Eastern, Western and indigenous peoples. Students will develop an understanding of the moral dilemmas and behavioral choices and challenges in melding these in organizations from around the world. Differences and similarities in social responsibility are reviewed and students will prepare plans for individuals and organizations to ensure equitable values are recognized by all members of the organization. This plan addresses conducting business cross-culturally. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls GL825 Global Leadership and Trans-organizations Individuals and organizations strive for positions of leadership in domestic and international organizations. Students will develop an understanding of leadership strategies for global corporate executives to enhance their own characteristics and those of other leaders in organizations to achieve success. Strategic designs are reviewed to ensure organization structures are understood and plans for change and implementation are developed to achieve optimum performance. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls GL830 Advanced Action Research This experience centers on guiding the participants through an advanced action research project in a domestic organization with international dealings or a foreign organization. Students will learn about the culture of the organization and of the country(ies) prior to entrance. The class will monitor and guide the entire action research cycle from diagnosis through evaluation and reflection during the class. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls

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GL835 Special Topics in Global Leadership This course covers advanced topics in global leadership. Course topics will vary as determined by student interest and evolution of global leadership principles. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls GL850 Strategic Thinking in Global Organizations This course develops and expands students ability to think strategically within GL. This will involve various typologies and methods of exploration and an examination of heuristics and biases. Students will develop the capacity for concurrent action and birds-eye perspectives of ongoing organizational activity. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls GL855 Futuring and Innovation for Global Leadership This course develops skills in futuring via Delphi, Future Search, scenario building and other techniques. Students will talk with futurists and futures organizations, becoming involved in the World Futures Society and tech trending with leading electronics and aerospace companies. They will develop a socio-technology plan and will also look at formal models of innovation and diffusion of innovation. Credits: 5 Prerequisites: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls GL870 Culture, Values, and Ethics in a Global Environment Cultures, values and ethics differ among Eastern, Western and indigenous peoples. Students will develop an understanding of the moral dilemmas and behavioral choices and challenges in melding these in organizations from around the world. Differences and similarities in social responsibility are reviewed and students will prepare plans for individuals and organizations to ensure equitable values are recognized by all members of the organization. This plan addresses conducting business cross-culturally. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GL872 Leadership in Global Organizations Individuals and organizations strive for positions of leadership in domestic and international organizations. Students will develop an understanding of leadership strategies for global corporate executives to enhance their own characteristics and those of other leaders in organizations to achieve success. Strategic designs are reviewed to ensure organization structures are understood and plans for change and implementation are developed to achieve optimum performance. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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GL874 Current Topics in Global Leadership This course covers advanced topics in global leadership. Course topics will vary as determined by emerging issues on the global scene. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GL876 Trans-Organizational Leadership in Trans-National Settings GL876 focuses on scholarly preparation for navigating complex systems wherein Leaders must successfully execute trans-organizational projects and initiatives, situated in trans-national settings, utilizing geographically dispersed alliances, coalitions, and partnerships. This course explores the dynamics of the stakeholder types listed above, requiring synchronous and asynchronous execution of societal, transnational, and other crosssystemic initiatives. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GL878 Advanced Career Strategies in GL In this course students will expand career options by exploring a variety of careers that are consistent with their management concentration areas. Students will be engaged in defining career aspirations, mapping professional goals, and creating strategies for performance enhancement. This course places emphasis on professional development by evaluating personal strengths and identifying opportunities to doctoral experiences. Students will leave this course with a direction for life after the DM program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GLIP870 Integrating Evidence Based Practices This course will cover research, controversy, and emerging themes of evidence based practices in higher education. The course will review best practices of integrating evidence based learning in classroom instruction to enhance the students experience. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GLIP874 Managing Curriculum Development This course will give students the tools and methodologies to create, manage, and teach courses that would enhance the educational experience for adult learners. The course will focus on research and writings on the student-centered approaches to learning including case-based learning, active learning, and assessment focused learning. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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GLIP876 Instructional Design with Technology and Media This course will give students the tools to use digital resources to enhance learning and student engagement in higher education. The course will cover approaches to using online learning tools in instructional design and delivery. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GLIP878 Advanced Career Strategies in Graduate Level Instructional Practices In this course students will expand career options by exploring a variety of careers that are consistent with their higher education concentration areas. Students will be engaged in defining career aspirations, mapping professional goals, and creating strategies for performance enhancement. This course places emphasis on professional development by evaluating personal strengths and identifying opportunities to doctoral experiences. Students will leave this course with a direction for life after the DM program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus GOVT201 American Government and Public Affairs This course provides the student with an overview of the framework and basic functions of the various branches of government, the role of politics in democracy, and the relationship of government and public policy. Students will also consider the similarities and differences between national, state, and local governments. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCI300 Introduction to Health Informatics This course will provide the fundamentals of Healthcare Informatics including the roles of healthcare information and management systems professionals, the organizational structures in which they work, and fundamentals of IT project management and implementation techniques. Tools for optimizing electronic access and analysis of health information for improving outcomes of patient care will be emphasized. Topics of discussion will include current IT tools being used in the healthcare industry as well as emerging trends and the IT Future of healthcare and how to manage these within the healthcare environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCI310 DBMS for Healthcare This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems (DBMS) with a focus on healthcare. Databases in healthcare form an integral part of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information systems (HIS) as well as important tools for decision making. Students will learn basic, conceptual, logical database design, and the file/data acquisition process. With the constraints on healthcare IT staff (ICD 10, HIS implementations, meaningful use, etc.), understanding these processes is extremely valuable. In addition, topics will include implementing these designs using a database management system and developing healthcare applications that access these databases. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 340

HCI380 Security of Electronic Health Information This course provides a survey of several Health Information Systems (HIS) for securing healthcare data. These types of systems collect and store data then process it into information used by decision makers. Storing health information in electronic form raises concerns about patient privacy and data security. Adequate protection of the confidentiality and integrity of patient information needs to be insured for HIPAA/HITECH & compliance while keeping the patient information readily available to authorized healthcare personnel. This courses focus will be on the conceptual foundations around utilizing health information system applications for securely storing, retrieving health information and processing it in business intelligence formats. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCI400 Health Analytics and Business Intelligence in Healthcare Students will understand how to provide historical, current and predictive views of business operations using Business Intelligence. In this course, students investigate the process of planning, designing, building, populating, and maintaining a successful Data Warehouse (DW). Students focus on the implementation of a Data Warehouse as an essential decision-support tool needed for healthcare. Students examine various forms of graphical modeling methods, including business modeling, entity relationship diagramming, dimensional modeling, physical modeling, and Warehouse metadata management. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCI490 Health Informatics Capstone The Capstone course demonstrates mastery and critical knowledge from the Health Informatics concentration. The content, concepts, and knowledge from the Health Informatics concentration is critically applied by completing an in-depth project focusing on a health analytics and business intelligence project that impacts the students own organization or in a desired area of study. The course gives the student the opportunity to perform a comprehensive analysis and study in a selected area of interest. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCM307 The Health Care Industry This course provides a comprehensive overview of the healthcare industry, with an emphasis on the development of diversification of health care organizations, different management structures, the process of health policymaking and basic healthcare operations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HCM325 Policy and Ethical Issues in Healthcare Services This class surveys current issues facing healthcare managers and practitioners. Topics to be considered include: health care reform; right to life; euthanasia; healthcare rationing; termination of medical treatment; right-to-die; patient advocacy and long term care issues. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Kansas City

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HCM330 Healthcare Statistics and Research This course is a study of healthcare statistics. The student will learn methods for collection of data, effective use of data, presentation of data, and verification of healthcare data. Students will relate statistical concepts to the operations of a healthcare organization. Emphasis in statistical applications on thinking about research issues in a statistically sound and practical fashion. Students will learn to formulate and ask questions, how to collect data effectively, how to summarize and interpret information, and how to understand the limitations in statistical inferences. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls HCM337 Current Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues in Healthcare This course is an introduction to legal, ethical and regulatory standards governing healthcare organizations. Topics include legal requirements, responsibilities, and constraints related to the health care provider/patient relationships, medical records, malpractice insurance, and licensure of health professionals as well as unique ethical dilemmas in the healthcare field, such as those related to patient privacy, confidentiality and informed consent. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HCM307 Availability: Virtual Campus HCM367 The Healthcare Organization In this course, students will explore the organizational structure of healthcare institutions and healthcare delivery. This course will emphasize the interrelatedness of psychological, social, cultural, and political factors in healthcare delivery, organizational culture, and healthcare management. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HCM307 Availability: Virtual Campus HCM387 Management Principles in Healthcare This course explores management issues in healthcare related to financial, physical and human resources. This course will emphasize planning in areas such as risk assessment, technology, information systems, staffing requirements, unique needs of specialized providers, and resource allocation. It will also emphasize the importance of sensitivity and competency in managing a diverse workforce, including an overview of essential skill and knowledge requirements for cultural competency both as managers and as members of a healthcare organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HCM400 Healthcare Management and Supervision Learners examine motivation theory and its application to group functioning in the work environment. Leadership styles related to particular circumstances are analyzed. Negotiation is covered through readings and in-class participation and includes an analysis on the effectiveness of negotiation on overall productivity. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HRMT210 or HRMT215 Availability: Kansas City

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HCM410 Fiscal Management in Healthcare Services This course introduces concepts and techniques of managerial accounting for general health services managers. Topics covered include: fiscal planning and performance, budgeting, control and reporting. Financial management in long-term care facilities, home health agencies, and hospitals are discussed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ACCT201 Availability: Virtual Campus HCM415 Health Information Systems In this case-oriented course, students will apply management information system principles to healthcare management systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Kansas City HCM612 Managing the Healthcare Organization This course provides a general orientation to management practices in the healthcare field. The focus is on applying essential management concepts and processes to the unique social, physical and emotional environments of healthcare organizations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCM621 Ethics, Policy and Law in Healthcare Management This course examines key ethical, regulatory, and legal issues related to healthcare management and delivery of healthcare services. Emphasis is placed on the interface of ethics, policy, and law on medical negligence, malpractice and professional liability, medical records, medical records management, patient consent, confidentiality, privacy, patient rights and responsibilities, contracts, labor relations, and other current issues. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered HCM631 Systems in Healthcare This course focuses on issues facing healthcare systems in a changing environment. Students will examine resource allocation, risk assessment, and financing. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered HCM632 Systems in Healthcare This course studies healthcare systems and the delivery of healthcare. In addition, factors such as access, population health and health policies will be examined to assess their influence on healthcare systems. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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HCM640 Applied Healthcare Managerial Finance Emphasizes healthcare management decision making utilizing healthcare accounting and finance concepts. The following subjects are addressed in the course: financial reports and metrics, financial analysis and planning, financial forecasting, financial markets, financial leverage, working capital management, capital budgeting processes, cost of capital and long term financing. The student will apply the knowledge learned by completing a financial strategy report and accomplishing a research report summarizing an application of financial analysis from either the academic or professional literature. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus HCM641 Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making in Healthcare Course will review and analyze the concepts of leadership versus managerial roles and responsibilities and examine how societal expectations for ethical behavior and regulatory scrutiny affect both leaders and managers in a healthcare organization setting. This course will differentiate among decision problems and ethical decision-making processes in the healthcare setting. Students will also examine a variety of complex ethical issues confronting healthcare industry professionals as they work with various stakeholders of a healthcare organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus HCM650 MBA Healthcare Management Capstone The MBA Healthcare Management Capstone uses the functional skills students have developed in previous core and concentration courses in this program including healthcare, business management, and business administration - to complete an in-depth project. The course requires the student to perform comprehensive research, analysis, and study on either a desired area of interest or a major business problem or issue that impacts the students own company or organization. The student will utilize research methodologies to prepare a formal research report. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Denver, Denver North, Pueblo, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HCML870 Health Policy and Regulations Health Policy and Regulations shape the operations of health care, in all sectors, in all delivery models. This course will explain the construct of Health Policy and compare and contrast the effects that regulations have on health care. Students will be exposed to health policy formulation in order to assess and understand what role healthcare leaders contribute to the process Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HCML872 Economics and Financing of Healthcare Organizations This course will provide the students with a comprehensive view of healthcare as a mix of capitalism and socialism and the emerging trends for payment of services. Economics and finance of healthcare organizations affects the efficiencies and effectiveness of that organization. Students will assess how economics influence a persons health and how the patients health influences finance. The impact of financial matters on service delivery, reimbursement, performance, and quality will be examined Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HCML874 Continuous Improvement for Systems in Healthcare Performance improvement measures are utilized in healthcare organizations in strategic planning, to evaluate operational effectiveness, and to make improvements and evaluate those strategies implemented for improvements. This course will examine selection and use of measures designed to improve operations of the healthcare organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HCML876 Informatics in Healthcare This course will evaluate the advanced infrastructure of Healthcare Informatics including the application of healthcare information and management systems. Tools to develop, implement and evaluate informatics algorithms and technologies for improving healthcare delivery will be evaluated. Topics of discussion will include current Information systems being used in the healthcare industry as well as emerging health information systems and how to manage these within the healthcare environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HCML878 Advanced Career Strategies in Healthcare Management In this course students will expand career options by exploring a variety of careers that are consistent with their management concentration areas. Students will be engaged in defining career aspirations, mapping professional goals, and creating strategies for performance enhancement. This course places emphasis on professional development by evaluating personal strengths and identifying opportunities to doctoral experiences. Students will leave this course with a direction for life after the DM program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HEDL870 Higher Education Organizational Structure and Design In this course students will explore the historical and current structure of higher education. The course will emphasize how external environmental changes impact the structure and design of higher education institutions. Students will explore current and emerging changes in the organization and design of higher education. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HEDL872 Higher Education Learning Outcomes Higher education institutions are faced with an increasing pressure to measure and provide evidence of outcomes based learning. The courses will look at best practices in assessment and approaches to analyzing data to ensure learning based outcomes. The course will cover developing assessment strategies, building an assessment culture in higher education institutions, and documenting student learning. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HEDL874 Policy and Regulatory Practices in Higher Education In this course students will expand career options by exploring a variety of careers that are consistent with their higher education concentration areas. Students will be engaged in defining career aspirations, mapping professional goals, and creating strategies for performance enhancement. This course places emphasis on professional development by evaluating personal strengths and identifying opportunities to doctoral experiences. Students will leave this course with a direction for life after the DM program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HEDL876 Managing Resources in Higher Education This course covers the challenges of managing and balancing priorities for operational resources in higher education institutions like HR, finance, IT, and administration. The course will cover topics such as working with faculty, alumni, and boards. Students will review best practices and case studies. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HEDL878 Advanced Career Strategies in Private Sector Higher Education Leadership In this course students will expand career options by exploring a variety of careers that are consistent with their management concentration areas. Students will be engaged in defining career aspirations, mapping professional goals, and creating strategies for performance enhancement. This course places emphasis on professional development by evaluating personal strengths and identifying opportunities to doctoral experiences. Students will leave this course with a direction for life after the DM program. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HIS120 American Culture in Transition This course will focus on the relationships between our government and its citizenry, and the resulting social, cultural, economic and political issues within differing historical periods in 20th century America. Covered subjects will include social movements and programs, civil rights and social justice, the political and cultural isms, and Americas relationship with the world. The end goal is to not only understand the significance of a historical event, but also to appreciate alternative viewpoints and their impact or influence on contemporary American society. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered

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HIST101 st Modern American History: 1950 to the 21 Century Todays news is tomorrows history, a maxim that strikes at the heart of our historical experience and how it affects current events. This course focuses on the key people, social experiments and technologies that continue th to impact our lives. Particular attention is paid to the latter half of the 20 Century and the dawn of a new millennium in America a time that that, through the lens of history, both gives us pause and inspires hope for the future. Credits: 4.5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Sioux Falls, Virtual Campus HIST125 American Culture in Transition Todays news is tomorrows history, a maxim that strikes at the heart of our historical experience and how it affects current events. This course focuses on the key people, social experiments and technologies that continue th to impact our lives. Particular attention is paid to how the latter half of the 20 Century and the dawn of the new millennium both give us pause and inspire hope for the future. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No longer offered HIST150 World History Since 1500 This course introduces the student to most significant events, personalities, trends and issues associated with the historical development of world civilization in the five centuries since the Middle-Ages, beginning with an overview of the Renaissance and Reformation and concluding with an assessment of the contemporary legacy of the Cold War. It explores the rise of capitalism and the modern nation state, the expansion of Western Europe, advances in science and technology, the impact of industrialization, and the global conflicts of the 20th Century. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course HIST210 World History and Culture I HIST210 covers major cultures and civilizations of the world from ancient times to the birth of western imperialism in the 16th Century. Topics include cultures and historical experiences representative of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and pre-Columbian America. Of particular interest is the evolution of world religions or philosophies that prevail and are still critical in the modern world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference for the historical events which shaped the modern world outside Indo-European civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course

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HIST250 World Cultures and Values This course helps the student to develop the global viewpoint appropriate for the business and technology leaders of the 21st Century. It develops an appreciation for the variations in culture across the worlds regions and people. Additionally, it helps the student to develop a framework for understanding the elements and expressions of culture, and how culture shapes and is shaped by historical trends, events, situations, climate, geography, beliefs and values. Emphasis is placed on driving political, intellectual and technological forces as shapers of culture and values, especially those that have influenced the development of the global marketplace. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENGL112 or ENGL126 or ENGL126-L or ENGL103, HIST150 or HIST210 Availability: Kansas City HIST310 World History and Culture II This course presents an examination of world history from the 16th century to the present. These topics include the birth of western imperialism, the fall of the Islamic Empires, the African Kingdoms and the slave trade, and the collapse of traditional China. Other topics include the rise of Japan in the New Imperialism and industrialization of the 19th Century, the decolonization process, the Cold War, Latin American Revolutions, conflicts in the Middle East and other contemporary issues. Driving political, intellectual and technological forces are also explored as shapers of culture and values, especially those that have influenced the development of the global marketplace. Western Civilization is used as a timeline and a reference to the impact of non-Western cultures on Indo-European Civilization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Check with individual campus for availability of this course HIT100 Health Services and Organization This course provides an introduction into healthcare organizations. Students are introduced to the wide ranging types of health delivery organizations including hospitals, ambulatory care programs, physician offices, surgicenters and allied health providers. Topics include organizations, health care personnel, finance, public health, Medicare, managed care and nursing homes. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered HIT103 Introduction to Healthcare Delivery Systems This course provides an introduction into healthcare organizations. Students are introduced to the various types of health delivery organizations including inpatient and outpatient facilities. Legal and regulatory influences on the delivery of healthcare will be discussed. Healthcare providers and the role on the delivery of healthcare will be identified. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: None Availability: No Longer Offered

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HIT105 IT for Healthcare Professionals This course is an introduction to Information Technology (IT) for Healthcare Professionals. Topics include operating systems, introduction to networking, the Internet, database concepts, radiological information systems, and hospital information systems. We will examine the future of IT in the health sciences by looking at Internet information, ethical and security issues. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: no longer offered HIT115 Healthcare Management This course provides students with a general understanding of the management of healthcare organizations. Management practices relating to performance, budgets, teamwork, accreditation, and coding and revenue cycles are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on management within professional healthcare settings including hospitals and large clinic settings. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT101 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT120 Introduction to ICD-9 Classification and Reimbursement This course provides an introduction into the processes used in the health care industry for disease classifications and reimbursement. Students are introduced to disease, diagnostic procedures, and the processes used to classify, identify, and categorize procedures. Topics include introduction to classification systems, coding, ICD-9 coding, and inpatient reimbursement methods including Fee for Service, diagnostic related groupings (DRGs), All Inclusive Rates, Risk Assignment and outpatient reimbursement. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIO121, BIO142, HSS121 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT125 Introduction to Classification and Disease Coding This course provides an introduction to the use and application of medical classification systems, nomenclatures and other terminologies, including ICD-9-CM or current version (ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS). Principles and guidelines for utilizing ICD-9-CM to code diagnoses and procedures in the hospital setting is introduced. Emphasis is placed on ICD 9-CM official coding guidelines, coding conventions and principles. Students will practice code assignments using coding manuals and software tools in coding and sequencing diagnoses and procedures from various sources of healthcare documentation (i.e. inpatient, outpatient, physician office records). Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HSS121, BIO 143, BIO 144, BIO161, BIO162 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT130 Introduction to CPT Coding/Billing This course introduces students to coding and billing for medical insurance. Students are introduced to Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) processes and using CPT errata. Topics include coding systems and traditional reimbursement methods. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT120, BIO122, HSS121 Availability: No Longer Offered

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HIT135 Introduction to CPT Coding/Billing This course builds on skills learned in HIT 120 of clinical classification systems and is expanded through the study of the principles of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) . In depth review is dedicated to complex ICD-9-CM coding as well as accurate assignment of all major coding systems (ICD-9-CM, CPT and HCPCS). Students will assign codes manually and through the use of an encoder. Coding skills will be enhanced with a variety of health records. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT125 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT140 Healthcare Management This course provides an introduction to the management of healthcare organizations. Management practices relating to organizational planning, organizing, controlling and motivating are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on management within professional healthcare settings including hospitals, large clinic settings, for-profit and non-profit organizations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: no longer offered HIT145 Health Data Management This course focuses on the structure and content of health data used in the management of health information. The elements used to create a health record, the collection of data and the organization of health data for a variety of purposes will be identified. Students will utilize a variety of applications through available technology to facilitate the use of health information. The components of and security processes of an information management system will be identified. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT125 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT201 Healthcare Reimbursement This course is designed to be a comprehensive overview of healthcare reimbursement. The student will apply billing and reimbursement procedures specific to a variety of payer sources, relate the effect of coding on reimbursement, and study the financial implications of reimbursement on the healthcare organization. Reimbursement methods and procedures for inpatient and outpatient facilities will be addressed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT145 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT210 Healthcare Economics This course provides an introduction to the economic forces facing the healthcare industry on a micro-economic level. Students learn how economic principles, forces and market conditions impact healthcare providers, organizations, and patients. Topics include market conditions, supply and demand, consumer demand, competition, monopoly, government intervention and aggregate supply and demand. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT100 Availability: No Longer Offered

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HIT233 Fundamentals of Health Technology Systems This course introduces system support operational practices and theory as used in large enterprises. Students are introduced to the skills, concepts, and knowledge needed to provide and maintain high quality customer service in an IT system support organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT100, HIT105 Availability; No Longer Offered HIT245 Advanced Coding This course is an advanced study of coding and billing practices. The student will apply coding conventions and general guidelines to assign ICD-9-CM/ICD-10, CPT and HCPCS codes to complex case studies using simulated medical records. The necessity of proper coding and sequencing according to government and third party regulations will be emphasized. The student will apply prior learning to address more complex case scenarios Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT135 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT251 Electronic Health Records I The course will focus on the electronic health record (E.H.R.) and health care information systems. The student will cover the definition, benefits, standards, functionality, confidentiality and security, and impact of the E.H.R. in the healthcare environment. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT145 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT252 Electronic Health Records II This course will expand on HIT251. It emphasizes the management and processing of health information, health record communication, security and storage. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT251 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT261 Healthcare Legal Concepts This course provides an introduction into the legal forces facing the healthcare practitioner and organizations. Students identify laws specific to healthcare organizations, liability, medical records, and ethical standards. Students will be expected to design policies relevant to legal issues affecting the practice of the health information technician. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HIT115 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT262 Healthcare Legal Concepts This course provides an introduction into the legal forces facing the healthcare practitioner and organizations. Students identify laws specific to healthcare organizations, liability, medical records, and ethical standards. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered

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HIT280 Healthcare Statistics and Research This course is a study of healthcare statistics. This course is designed for health information practitioners to understand the concepts of healthcare statistics and know how they are generated. This course introduces the learner to the basics of statistical computation. The student will learn how and why statistics are calculated and uses of the statistical data. The student will learn methods for collection of data, effective use of data, presentation of data, and verification of healthcare data. Students will relate statistical concepts to the operations of a healthcare organization. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: IT254 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT297B Virtual Practicum I This course is a culmination of the studies of the student designed to prepare the student for practice as a health information technician. The student will practice coding complex cases by applying the correct coding conventions and guidelines to assign ICD-9-CM, CPT and HCPCS codes and apply the correct reimbursement methodology. The student will utilize the virtual lab to demonstrate an understanding of coding and billing processes used by the health information technician. Students will be tasked with managing and utilizing data found through various health information sources. Part 1 of 2. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HIT245, HIT252 Availability: No Longer Offered HIT297C Virtual Practicum II This course is a culmination of the studies of the student designed to prepare the student for practice as a health information technician. The student will practice coding complex cases by applying the correct coding conventions and guidelines to assign ICD-9-CM, CPT and HCPCS codes and apply the correct reimbursement methodology. The student will utilize the virtual lab to demonstrate an understanding of coding and billing processes used by the health information technician. Students will be tasked with managing and utilizing data found through various health information sources. Part 2 of 2. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HIT27A or HIT297B Availability: No Longer Offered HIT298 Preparing for a Career in the Medical Billing and Coding Profession This course provides students with a general overview of professional concepts and skills that can be found on a national certification exam. Resume writing and career search methods are also discussed. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: No Longer Offered HLS110 Terrorism: Origins, Ideologies and Goals This course is designed to introduce the student to the study and history of terrorism. Students will learn the ideologies of many of the terrorist organizations that have impacted the United States and other nations. Students will also gain an understanding of the motivations and goals of many terrorist organizations. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CJUS253 or CJUS254 Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS120 Introduction to Emergency Management This course is designed to give the student an introduction to emergency management an all-hazards approach: definitions of important terms; types and history of hazards; and organizational responses to natural, accidental, and man-made hazards. Students will be introduced to the concepts of preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CJUS253 or CJUS254 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS200 Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy This course is designed to introduce the student to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Strategy. This is the process an organization uses to determine its direction, and make decisions to pursue this direction. Students will be introduced to resource allocation, including capital, technology, and human resources. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS110 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS210 Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies and Applications This course introduces the student to the technology and systems utilized by Homeland Security and Emergency Management organizations. This course also looks at how terrorist organizations have and do use technology to their benefit. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS110 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS300 HR and Administrative Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management This course introduces the student to the many human resource and administrative issues as they relate to Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about diversity in the Homeland Security workplace, as well as how diversity impacts how homeland security and emergency management personnel do their jobs. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS110 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS305 Understanding Critical Infrastructures This course introduces the student to the protection of critical infrastructures, one of the core functions of Homeland Security. In this course, the student will learn how to identify the different sectors of critical infrastructure, and the assets within various sectors that must be protected. The student will also be introduced to strategies utilized to protect various key assets. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS120 Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS310 Comparative Approaches to Event Management This course introduces the student to the role of Emergency Management in dealing with both natural disasters and man-made attacks. In this course, the student will learn the similarities and differences in dealing with different types of catastrophes, and the challenges faced by each type. Students will also consider the implications for strategic planning presented by both natural disasters and manmade attacks. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS120 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS315 Interagency Relationships in Homeland Security This course is designed to introduce the student to the nature of the relationships that exist between the various agencies involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Federal, state, and local agencies all play a role in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and this course helps the student to understand how the various agencies interact with each other and work together to protect this nation from all types of hazards and threats. Students will also develop their leadership skills, a vital component to successful communication and coordination with other agencies. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS200 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS320 Private Sector Role in Homeland Security This course introduces the student to the role of the private sector in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The student will learn about the functions of private organizations involved in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, including collaboration between public and private agencies. The student will also develop a strategic plan for a private agency. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS200 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS325 Research Methodology and Policy Analysis Understanding the role of research and policy analysis in homeland security and emergency management is incredibly critical. Students will learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the homeland security and emergency management system and become familiar with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. This course will assess the homeland security and emergency management system including research theory, inquiry structure, and modes of observation, data interpretation, program evaluation, and policy analysis. This course is designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of statistical analysis, developing and constructing a research plan, and evaluating the results of said research in the context of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CJUS343 and MAT306 or MATH305 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS330 Advanced Application of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Technologies This course takes a practical look at the limitations presented by current technology. Also, this course introduces the student to the concept of interoperability, which addresses the ability of diverse agencies and jurisdictions to communicate, to exchange data, and to use that information effectively. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS210 Availability: Virtual Campus Effective January 5, 2014 Page 354

HLS340 Emergent Topics in Homeland Security and Emergency Management This course introduces the student to topics on the forefront of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. This course is designed to reflect the most current state of discourse on topics relating to Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS210 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS350 Introduction to Intelligence This course introduces the student to the principles of intelligence, the different intelligence disciplines, the intelligence cycles, and the intelligence community. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS200 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS360 Counterintelligence This course introduces students to counterintelligence concepts, such as counterintelligence basic principles, concepts, missions, and functions. Students will also be introduced to counterintelligence operations and techniques. Students will also learn the history and evolution of counterintelligence in the United States. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS350 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS400 Constitutional Law and Public Policy Analysis In this course the student will discuss and analyze concepts of Constitutional Law and Public Policy as they apply to Homeland Security. The student will evaluate homeland security policies in terms of their effects on civil liberties, and the publics involvement in homeland security. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: CJUS375 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS410 The Psychology of Fear Management and Terrorism This course looks at the motivations of terrorist groups, and the psychological impact of terrorist attacks. It will aid the student in understanding the role of government and the media in shaping the public perception of, and response to, terrorist events. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: PSY105 or PSYC120; Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus HLS420 Strategic Planning and Budgeting for Homeland Security and Emergency Management This course further develops the students knowledge base for strategic planning and budgeting, building on the concepts learned in HLS200, Introduction to Homeland Security Strategy, taking a more in-depth look at the strategic planning process. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS200; Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS430 Planning for Homeland Security and Emergency Management This course is designed to introduce the student to the planning process for Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Students will be introduced to the how-to aspects of planning. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus HLS450 Local Emergency Management and Civil Preparedness This course develops the students knowledge in the area of local emergency management. Students will learn of the challenges faced by local agencies, such as communication and coordination. The student will develop strategies to implement at the local level to enhance civil preparedness. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus HLS460 Advanced Application of Intelligence in Homeland Security This course looks at the relationship between local law enforcement and the intelligence community. It introduces the student to state and local intelligence activities, and it discusses policing and actionable intelligence. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus HLS470 Evaluating Risk in Critical Infrastructure This course introduces students to the fundamentals of risk assessment. At the completion of the course, students will be able to understand the value of various risk tools, and apply those tools to any critical infrastructure to reduce the risk associated with future terrorist attacks. The aim of this course is to show how to analyze critical infrastructure systems, their weaknesses, and how to formulate strategies that allocate resources in the most efficient and effective manner. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: HLS305; Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus HLS480 Knowledge Into Practice: Communications and Emergency Planning This course integrates many of the primary areas of focus in Homeland Security and Emergency Management, such as: intelligence, strategic planning, critical infrastructure, research and analysis, technology and strategic communications. The student will develop an emergency plan in one of the four primary areas of preparedness, response, mitigation, or recovery. Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Upper Division Status Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS600 Homeland Security Fundamentals This course provides an overview of the essential ideas that constitute the emerging discipline of homeland security. It has two central objectives: to expand the way participants think, analyze and communicate about homeland security; and to assess knowledge in critical homeland security knowledge domains. These domains include strategy, history, terrorism, fear management, crisis communication, conventional and unconventional threats, network leadership, weapons of mass destruction, lessons learned from other nations, civil liberties and security, intelligence and information, homeland security technology, and analytics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus HLS601 Homeland Security Fundamentals This course provides an overview of the essential ideas that constitute the emerging discipline of homeland security. It has two central objectives: to expand the way participants think, analyze and communicate about homeland security; and to assess knowledge in critical homeland security knowledge domains. The course will involve exploring and critiquing national strategies in the area of prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. The course will also explore how ideas are translated into theory, theory in to strategy, strategy into policy and policy into operations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

HLS602 Dynamics of Terrorism The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. It considers those who act as individuals, in small groups or in large organizations; it considers indigenous actors as well as those who come to the United States to raise money, recruit or commit their acts of violence. In every instance, its focus is on violent clandestine activity that, whatever its motivation, has a political purpose or effect. The course addresses such specific topics as suicide terrorism, the role of the media, innovation and technology acquisition, the decline of terrorism and ways of measuring the effect of counterterrorism policies and strategies. The course also looks briefly at sabotage. By the end of the course, students should be able to design effective measures for countering and responding to terrorism based on an understanding of its organizational and operational dynamics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS603 Technology Solutions for Homeland Security In todays information age, homeland security (HLS) professionals and the agencies they lead are more dependent than ever on technology and information-sharing to strengthen national preparedness. The need to share information through the use of interoperable technologies and to collect and synthesize data in real time has become critical to our national security. This course provides HLS professionals with the requisite knowledge to be able to leverage technology to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from terrorist and natural-born incidents. It also provides an in-depth understanding of: inspection, detection, and surveillance technologies; information sharing and knowledge management systems; and communication systems. Students explore and analyze management challenges currently facing HLS professionals, such as: Information Assurance; voice, data and sensor interoperability; and technology implementation and acceptance. This knowledge will facilitate HLS professionals to become more effective technology consumers and help them to recognize opportunities where the application of technology solutions can provide a strategic advantage. Students will also employ project management techniques to address potential solutions to technological challenges in HLS. The ultimate objective of the course is to enable HLS professionals to effectively evaluate, select, and implement technology to better strengthen capability-specific national priorities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS604 Intelligence Organizational and Policy Challenges This course examines key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense. Students will have the opportunity to fully address policy, organizational and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support. Course reference materials will provide an overview of diverse intelligence disciplines and how the intelligence community operates. Course emphasis will be on issues affecting policy, oversight, and intelligence support to homeland defense/security and national decision-making. The 2004 Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 is addressed and the course is shaped to focus on homeland intelligence support issues at the state/local/tribal levels. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS605 Vulnerability Analysis and Protection Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) is one of the cornerstones of homeland security. HSPD-7 lists the following critical infrastructure and key resource sectors: agriculture and food, banking and finance, chemical, commercial facilities, communications, dams, defense industrial base, emergency services, energy, government facilities, information technology, national monuments and icons, nuclear reactors, materials and waste, postal and shipping, public health and healthcare, transportation systems, and water. The course begins with an overview of risk, its definition and application to critical infrastructures as it relates to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP). We then investigate measures, tools, and techniques for CIP assessment. The course develops a network theory of vulnerability analysis and risk assessment called Model-Based Risk Assessment (MBRA) used to extract the critical nodes from each sector, model the nodes' vulnerabilities by representing them in the form of a fault-tree, and then applying fault and financial risk reduction techniques to derive the optimal strategy for protection of each sector. Students will also apply project management methodologies to approaching challenges in the critical infrastructure sectors. The sectors are studied in detail in order to learn how they are structured, how regulatory policy influences protection strategies, and how to identify specific vulnerabilities inherent to each sector and its components. At the completion of the course, students will be able to apply CIP techniques (MBRA and others) to any critical infrastructure within their multi-jurisdictional region, and derive optimal strategies and draft policies for prevention of future terrorist attacks or natural disasters. The course also looks at the issue of public-private partnerships and the larger role of the private sector in homeland security. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS606 Homeland Security and Government The purpose of this course is to provide participants with an insight into the structural, conceptual and intellectual underpinnings and implications of the homeland security project. This course will focus on identifying the various sub-disciplines within the homeland security field and understanding the roles of each. The course will also focus on legislative and policy frameworks (including the US Constitution, the Patriot Act, relevant presidential policy directives, and the national strategy for homeland security, etc.) within which the homeland security enterprise operates as well as the relationship between the relevant federal entities and those entities and their respective state and local counterparts. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS607 Introduction to Research Methodologies This course will focus on the mastery of basic quantitative research and analysis methodologies including: statistical analysis, survey research and modeling. The course will also focus on the mastery of basic qualitative research and analysis methodologies including: case study, policy options analysis, grounded theory, qualitative interview coding and content analysis as well as Mixed-Methods. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS608 Writing the Thesis Proposal This course will focus on the development and writing of the thesis proposal to include the: problem statement, research questions, literature review, hypothesis, methodology, bibliography, significance of research section and research plan. The final course requirement will consist of the submission of a complete thesis proposal vetted and approved by the students thesis advisor and thesis reader. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HLS607 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS610 Dynamics of Terrorism The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. It considers those who act as individuals, in small groups or in large organizations. It also considers indigenous actors as well as those who come to the United States to raise money, recruit or commit their acts of violence. In every instance, its focus is on violent, clandestine activity that, whatever its motivation, has a political purpose or effect. The course addresses such specific topics as suicide terrorism, the role of the media, innovation and technology acquisition, the decline of terrorism, and ways of measuring the effect of counterterrorism policies and strategies. The course also looks briefly at sabotage. By the end of the course, students should be able to design effective measures for countering and responding to terrorism based on an understanding of its organizational and operational dynamics. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus HLS611 Research and Writing 1 This course is one in a series of four research and writing courses that will result in a completed and approved Masters thesis. This course will focus on the implementation of the thesis proposal as a road map. The student will be expected to conduct much of the initial research and some of the initial writing of the thesis, as per the expectations of the course instructor (who is also the thesis advisor). Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HLS607, HLS608 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS612 Research and Writing 2 This course is one in a series of four research and writing courses that will result in a completed and approved Masters thesis. This course will focus on the writing of the first chapters in the body of the thesis as well as the completion of the bulk of the research. The course instructor will be the students thesis advisor. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HLS611 Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS613 Research and Writing 3 This course is one in a series of four research and writing courses that will result in a completed and approved Masters thesis. This course will focus on the writing of the final chapters in the body of the thesis and the revision, where appropriate, of previous chapters. Much of the analysis in the thesis will be conducted in this course. The course instructor will be the students thesis advisor. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HLS611 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS614 Research and Writing 4 This course is one in a series of four research and writing courses that will result in a completed and approved Masters thesis. This course will focus on the completion of the conclusion to the thesis, the updating of the thesis introduction and the revision of the thesis based on the feedback from the thesis advisor (who is also the course instructor). Final credit for the course will be dependent on the submission and approval by the students thesis committee of a complete and final thesis. Course is pass/fail. Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HLS613 Availability: Virtual Campus HLS616 Research, Writing and Critical Thinking This course will focus on the mastery of basic quantitative research and analysis methodologies including: statistical analysis, survey research and modeling. The course will also focus on the mastery of basic qualitative research and analysis methodologies including: case study, policy options analysis, grounded theory, qualitative interview coding and content analysis as well as Mixed-Methods. Finally, the course will challenge students to develop their critical thinking and analytical abilities, while maturing their APA-style writing skills. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS618 Private Sector Role in Homeland Security This course focuses on the role of the private sector in Homeland Security. The student will learn about the role of corporations and non-profit entities in the larger homeland security enterprise, including collaboration between public and private agencies. The student will also develop a strategic plan for a corporation in terms of continuity of operations as well as collaboration and coordination with public and private entities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS620 Technology Solutions for HLS In todays Information Age, Homeland Security (HLS) professionals and the agencies they lead are more dependent than ever on technology and information-sharing to strengthen national preparedness. The need to share information through the use of interoperable technologies and to collect and synthesize data in real time has become critical to our national security. This course provides HLS professionals with the requisite knowledge to be able to leverage technology to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from terrorist and natural-born incidents. It also provides an in-depth understanding of: inspection, detection, and surveillance technologies; information sharing and knowledge management systems; and communication systems. Students explore and analyze management challenges currently facing HLS professionals, such as: Information Assurance; voice, data and sensor interoperability; and technology implementation and acceptance. This knowledge will facilitate HLS professionals to become more effective technology consumers and help them to recognize opportunities where the application of technology solutions can provide a strategic advantage. The ultimate objective of the course is to enable HLS professionals to effectively evaluate, select, and implement technology to better strengthen capability-specific national priorities. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus HLS621 Disaster Emergency Planning This course will focus on the principles and strategies behind the management of Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs). The course will address and evaluate existing national strategies for disaster as well as focus on methodologies for disaster and other forms of strategic emergency planning. The course will also look at legal, organizational and other factors that impact emergency planning and apply Project Management techniques to addressing emergency planning. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS622 Principles of Disaster Medicine This course focuses on the medical management of Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs). It will address issues of methodology and planning in disaster medicine, the medical system in the United States and the role of health response plans and epidemiology. In addition, the course will focus on risk assessment and vulnerability analysis in disaster medicine, fundamental ethical issues facing practitioners of disaster medicine and the organization of hospital-based responses to disasters. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS623 Emergency Management and Communication in Disasters This course will focus on the role of the various responses and healthcare agencies in Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs) as well as the role of public communication in disasters. The course will also look at the principles of emergency management, risk analysis and hazard mitigation. The course will assess the psychological impact of disasters on the public and a range of crisis communication strategies for minimizing panic and fostering resilience within communities affected by disasters. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS624 Introduction to Public Health This course will provide the homeland security practitioner with a basic understanding of the field of public health and its critical role in the homeland security enterprise. The course will deal with the role of public health in the past and present, explain its core functions and agencies. It will also deal with the structure of public health in the US and overseas, understand the impact of infectious diseases, epidemiology and surveillance and the interrelationship between public health and medicine. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS630 Organizational and Policy Challenges The War on Terror has focused the nation's attention on homeland security. This course examines key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense. Students will have the opportunity to fully address policy, organizational and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support. Course reference materials will provide an overview of diverse intelligence disciplines and how the intelligence community operates. Course emphasis will be on issues affecting policy, oversight, and intelligence support to homeland defense/security and national decision-making. The 2004 Intelligence Reform and Prevention of Terrorism Act is addressed and the course is shaped to focus on homeland intelligence support issues at the State/Local/Tribal levels. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus HLS640 Vulnerability Analysis and Protection Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) is one of the cornerstones of homeland security. HSPD-7 lists the following critical infrastructure and key resource sectors: Agriculture and Food, Banking and Finance, Chemical, Commercial Facilities, Communications, Dams, Defense Industrial Base, Emergency Services, Energy, Government Facilities, Information Technology, National Monuments and Icons, Nuclear Reactors, Materials and Waste, Postal and Shipping, Public Health and Healthcare, Transportation Systems, and Water. The course begins with an overview of risk, its definition and application to critical infrastructures as it relates to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP). We then investigate measures, tools, and techniques for CIP assessment. The course develops a network theory of vulnerability analysis and risk assessment called Model-Based Risk Assessment (MBRA) used to extract the critical nodes from each sector, model the nodes' vulnerabilities by representing them in the form of a fault-tree, and then applying fault and financial risk reduction techniques to derive the optimal strategy for protection of each sector. The sectors are studied in detail in order to learn how they are structured, how regulatory policy influences protection strategies, and how to identify specific vulnerabilities inherent to each sector and its components. At the completion of the course, students will be able to apply CIP techniques (MBRA and others) to any critical infrastructure within their multi-jurisdictional region, and derive optimal strategies and draft policies for prevention of future terrorist attacks or natural disasters. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus

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HLS641 Introduction to Cybersecurity Policy This course explores the policy contours of Cybersecurity. It reviews the dimensions of the field, including Cybersecurity as an evolutionary period of change, converging disciplines and established institutions and frameworks, and the challenges of integrating Cybersecurity policy horizontally across the verticals of other disciplines and governance structures. Topics include: national security and homeland security dimensions, privacy, public-private partnerships, information sharing, and asymmetric challenges of the Internet. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

HLS642 Government and the Cyber Sector This course explores the fundamental roles of government and industry for Cybersecurity; expectations of society; and the regulatory, technological and cultural constraints and obstacles that exist for government and industry, respectively. These roles are explored by comparison against historical models, core principles of American society, and legal and policy considerations. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

HLS643 Cyber Organizations and Structures This course delves into the cyberspace domain to identify and analyze government and private sector organizations, missions, and approaches to security and compliance within the government and private sector spheres. Organizations, roles, and focus areas will include: Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, law enforcement, leading industry elements engaged in Cybersecurity and information assurance, as well as privacy and security compliance regimes in the private sector. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

HLS644 Emerging Initiatives in Cybersecurity Strategy This course will study the Cybersecurity strategies and plans of the U.S. government, including the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative, White House 60-day Cyberspace Policy Review, and national military strategy. Students will review and consider non-U.S. Cybersecurity strategies and plans. National plans, as well as private sector initiatives, will be assessed with a view toward encouraging critical thinking about security in the Digital Age. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus

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HLS650 Homeland Security and Government The purpose of this course is to provide participants with an insight into the structural, conceptual and intellectual underpinnings and implications of the homeland security project. Looking at a wide range of topics and problems, the course seeks to stimulate a comprehensive discussion of how homeland security professionals and the general public think about homeland security; whether/why there may be significant differences in professional and public perceptions of homeland security; and how those differences constrain/leverage various elements of the homeland security effort. By incorporating a selection of key texts in Western political and social thought alongside current topical writings, the course seeks to equip participants with a deeper understanding of the prevailing discourse and its impact on the homeland security project. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus HLS660 Psychology of Fear Management This course serves as an introduction for homeland security professionals to terrorism as a psychological phenomenon. Government agencies involved in homeland security need to understand the psychological consequences of mass-casualty terrorist attacks and other disasters. This course provides a broad overview of psychological effects of terrorism; the status of and fallacies related to the interventions applied to victims of terrorism and the generalized fear and anxiety experienced by the public at large; current government strategies used to disseminate information to terrorist groups; psychological phenomena related to media coverage of terrorism; misconceptions and inaccuracies about the socio-political and religious motivations of terrorist groups; "profiling" and the typical psychological and cultural makeup of modern terrorists; and the social and cultural psychology of public conceptions of terrorists and acts of terror. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Virtual Campus HLS685 Homeland Security Capstone The Homeland Security Capstone is designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in the MSM-HLS program and related areas, allowing the student to demonstrate the professional competencies associated with a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the homeland security field. Students will evaluate case studies and other materials to demonstrate written competency in the areas of research, law, policy, critical infrastructure protection, and planning, allowing students to incorporate knowledge and experience as they apply ethical principles in developing effective strategies to confront issues facing practitioners within the realm of homeland security. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Denver North, Virtual Campus

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HLS689 Homeland Security Capstone The Homeland Security Capstone is designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in the HLS program and related areas, allowing the student to demonstrate the professional competencies associated with a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the homeland security field. Students will evaluate case studies and other materials to demonstrate written competency in the areas of research, law, policy, critical infrastructure protection, and planning, allowing students to incorporate knowledge and experience as they apply ethical principles in developing effective strategies to confront issues facing practitioners within the realm of homeland security. Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None Availability: Virtual Campus HLS820 Contemporary Issues in Homeland Security Using large scale systems thinking this course will explore the current reality of HLS challenges that embraces tribal, state, municipal, national, and private efforts. This team-taught class uses a diverse cohort across representative organizations, enabling knowledge sharing and complex problem solving. The role is to create practitioners who not only create theory in HLS but understand the immediate application of large scale change techniques to complex crises that have no clear solutions and span numerous organizations. Credits: 5 Prerequisite: None Availability: Colorado Springs, Denver, Sioux Falls HLS825 Network Organizations and Other Large Scale Intervention Network Organizations are developing quickly throughout the world and are becoming increasingly important in how work gets accomplished. Network organizations have been growing in t