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1870-1950

Ethnic Enclaves & Minority Neighborhoods

HONORS THINK TANK

Enclaves & Minority Neighborhoods HONORS THINK TANK Greektown The Greek- owned businesses along 2 n d
Enclaves & Minority Neighborhoods HONORS THINK TANK Greektown The Greek- owned businesses along 2 n d
Enclaves & Minority Neighborhoods HONORS THINK TANK Greektown The Greek- owned businesses along 2 n d
Enclaves & Minority Neighborhoods HONORS THINK TANK Greektown The Greek- owned businesses along 2 n d
Enclaves & Minority Neighborhoods HONORS THINK TANK Greektown The Greek- owned businesses along 2 n d

Greektown

The Greek- owned businesses along 2 nd south made appeals to icons and imagery from the home country.

“Ergatis,” meaning “The Worker,” was the city’s first Greek newspaper The numerous cafés along 2
“Ergatis,” meaning “The
Worker,” was the city’s
first Greek newspaper
The numerous cafés along
2 nd South formed the center
of Greek life in the city, along
with the Holy Trinity Church,
originally along 4 th South.
Cruise lines advertised regularly in the
Greek-language newspapers, offering
transportation for friends and family to
Ameriki, where there was work.
Patriotism drew these men to fight for
Greece in the Balkan wars of 1912 and
1913, below in front of the Holy Trinity
Church
Leonidas G. Skliris
This padrones or “Czar
of the Greeks” was
responsible for
bringing thousands of
Greeks to Utah in the
first part of the 20 th
century. He secured
them jobs on the
railroad or in mines in
turn for one dollar a
month for the rest of
their lives, or until his
power was broken by a
strike in 1912. His
offices were on 507 W.
2d S.
Little Tokyo
Salt Lake’s many Japanese
residents settled mainly on 100
South between West Temple and
Third West, the area now occupied
by the Salt Palace. Many worked on
the railroads or in factory jobs such
as chick sexing, advertised at right.
In addition, they operated many
businesses located across the
valley, including the Fujimoto Soy
company, located on 302 S. and 4 th
West, just opposite the Rio Grande
Depot.
Lebanese immigrants in
Greektown in early 1900’s.
The Utah Nippo,
Japanese-language
newspaper published
until 1990s. Below,
the composing room
in 1917.
(future site of Fujimoto
Soy Company
Little Italy
John Attey and his bride,
Sarah George, in 1909
“Italian-owned gorcery stores,
saloons, restaurants, and
other shops were part of ‘Little
Italy’ that emerged along Salt
Lake’s 200 South Street
between the Union Pacific
and Denver and Rio Grande
Western railroad depots.”
John McCormick, A Gathering Place.
Import stores provided a taste
of home, advertised at right.
The Corriere d’America,
headquarted at 253 Rio
Grande Avenue, an important
part of the Italian community.
The Catholic Church established a
mission to help out in this struggle, called
Our Lady of Guadalupe after 1930, and
located at 524 W. 400 South. It was led
by Father James Collins, pictured below
with the nuns from the Order of the
Perpetual Adoration, who arrived in 1927.
“The Sisters of Perpetual Adoration
helped the children of the west side by
teaching religion classes, Sunday school,
and arts and crafts,” according to Jorge
Iber of the Oral History Institute.
(future site of Our
Lady of Guadalupe
mission)
Institute. (future site of Our Lady of Guadalupe mission) Although mostly Catholic, a significant number of

Although mostly Catholic, a significant number of Hispanics converted to the LDS faith, prompting the formation of the Mexican Branch, or Rama Mexicana, in 1921 (pictured at left by 448 South Third West wardhouse).

1921 (pictured at left by 448 South Third West wardhouse). An Italian saloon, central to the
1921 (pictured at left by 448 South Third West wardhouse). An Italian saloon, central to the
1921 (pictured at left by 448 South Third West wardhouse). An Italian saloon, central to the
1921 (pictured at left by 448 South Third West wardhouse). An Italian saloon, central to the

An Italian saloon, central to the life of the community. This left a negative impression on the more bigoted parts of the population. One University of Utah student thesis stated: “The Greeks and Italians are perhaps the most careless and shiftless people found… Comfort to them is unknown unless it is in the form of a smoke by the

fire or a drink. Quoted from Peoples of Utah.

a d r i n k . ” Quoted from Peoples of Utah . The Bikuben,
a d r i n k . ” Quoted from Peoples of Utah . The Bikuben,

The Bikuben, Danish for “Beehive,” was both a Salt Lake City newspaper and a bank made to facilitate payments to those wishing to travel “with the Latter-Day Saint emigration” from Scandinavia.

“with the Latter-Day Saint emigration” from Scandinavia. This 1891 Rio Grande railway schedule was printed in
“with the Latter-Day Saint emigration” from Scandinavia. This 1891 Rio Grande railway schedule was printed in

This 1891 Rio Grande railway schedule was printed in German in the Beobachter, a newspaper which served the still- small yet growing German population, most having arrived due to LDS missionary work.

population, most having arrived due to LDS missionary work. Plum Alley, home to Salt Lake’s Chinese

Plum Alley, home to Salt Lake’s Chinese residents

“On West 200 South between 400 and 600 West, was Greektown, the most extensive of Salt Lake’s ethnic neighborhoods… Along its two-block area were small hotels and boardinghouses, coffeehouses, saloons, grocery stores, bakeries, and import stores selling octopus, Turkish tobacco, olive oil, goat cheese, liqueurs, figs, dates, and Greek-language newspapers. In 1911, nearly sixty Greek businesses occupied the two blocks.”

“The coffeehouse in particular was an important institution… the real home of many Greeks… It was a community center often providing their only social life.”

“Thirty or so buildings were once part of Greektown. All were constructed between 1900 and 1910… Only a dozen buildings remain today. Most of the others were demolished in the 1980s, and those left are not likely to survive much longer.”

John McCormick, A Gathering Place: An Illustrated History of Salt Lake City

Little Syria/Lebanese Town

“A miniscule Little Syria blossomed during the 1920s and 1930s in the vicinity of the residences and stores centered on Third South and Fifth West.”

Robert F. Zeidner, “Immigration from the Middle East,” in The Peoples of Utah, ed. H. Papinakolas.

Sarah Attey, an early Syro-Lebanese immigrant, describing her experiences in Utah:

“We lived on the west side, by Greek Town, with Lebanese neighbors. You know, when you are far from home, you want to be with your people. Lebanese Town it was Called. Three Lebanese were very succesful. Bonos Shool had a grocery store in Greek Town, on Second South. George Katter and Kalil Fadel also, dry goods, stores. George Katter got men jobs at Bingham copper mine.

“Lebanese men peddled, sold lot of jewelry to Greeks. They peddled lace, linens, cloth, bedspreads all over Utah. They bought from New York stores. Lebanese men in some labor jobs made ten cents an hour for ten hours a day. That’s why some Lebanese women took in boarders. They had to.”

Interview with Sarah Attey, quoted in The Peoples of Utah, ed. by H. Papanikolas.

Hispanics

Spanish-speaking immigrants did not begin to settle in the area in large numbers until the 1930’s and 40’s. However, even before that, and certainly ever since, they have formed an important part of the community.

As the latest immigrants, the Hispanics were often shoved to the bottom of the economic ladder. “In one interview, John Florez summarized his experiences: “People who talk about the ‘good old days’ do so because they didn’t have to live it.” He recalled that his father, Reyes Florez, came to Utah after World War I to work for the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad. During the Depression he managed to hold on to his job as a “traquero,” and family members supplemented his salary by working the beet fields as “betabeleros” during the summer and early fall. The family lived on Salt Lake’s westside in a boxcar divided into kitchen and living areas. The “house” was only twenty feet from the tracks.”

John McCormick, A Gathering Place.

from the tracks.” John McCormick, A Gathering Place. Others A large Scandinavian population supported many local
from the tracks.” John McCormick, A Gathering Place. Others A large Scandinavian population supported many local

Others

the tracks.” John McCormick, A Gathering Place. Others A large Scandinavian population supported many local Nordic
the tracks.” John McCormick, A Gathering Place. Others A large Scandinavian population supported many local Nordic
the tracks.” John McCormick, A Gathering Place. Others A large Scandinavian population supported many local Nordic

A large Scandinavian population supported many local Nordic newspapers. They worked mainly in the mines or on the railroad but also in local factories such as the Jensen Creamery.