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Honeywell Process Solutions

Experion PKS
Overview

EPDOC-XX81-en-410A
R410
March 2012



Release 410
Honeywell

ii Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012


Notices and Trademarks

Copyright 2012 by Honeywell International Srl.
Release 410 March 2012

While this information is presented in good faith and believed to be accurate, Honeywell
disclaims the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose and
makes no express warranties except as may be stated in its written agreement with and for its
customers.
In no event is Honeywell liable to anyone for any indirect, special or consequential damages.
The information and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice.
Honeywell, PlantScape, Experion PKS, and TotalPlant are registered trademarks of Honeywell
International Inc.
Other brand or product names are trademarks of their respective owners.








Honeywell Process Solutions
1860 W. Rose Garden Lane
Phoenix, AZ 85027 USA
1-800 822-7673

R410 Experion PKS Overview iii
March 2012 Honeywell
About This Document
Provides brief descriptions of the functions and components that can be combined to
personalize your Experion system.
Release Information

Document Name Document ID Release
Number
Publication
Date
Overview - ovwm EPDOC-
XX81-en-
410A
410 March 2012


References
The following list identifies all documents that may be sources of reference for material
discussed in this publication.

Document Title
Control Building User's Guide
C300 Controller Users Guide
Control Hardware Installation Guide
Server and Client Planning Guide
Server and Client Configuration Guide
Experion Specification document


Support and Other Contacts
iv Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Support and Other Contacts
United States and Canada
Contact:
Phone:



Fascimile:
Mail:
Honeywell Solution Support Center
1-800-822-7673
Calls are answered by dispatcher between 6:00 am and 4:00 pm
Mountain Standard Time. Emergency calls outside normal working hours
are received by an answering service and returned within one hour.
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Mail:



Email:
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tac-be02@honeywell.com
Pacific
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Email:
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1300-364-822 (toll free within Australia)
+61-8-9362-9559 (outside Australia)
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Honeywell Limited Australia
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Burswood, WA, 6100, Australia
GTAC@honeywell.com
India
Contact:
Phone:

Fascimile:
Mail:


Honeywell Global TAC India
+91-20- 6603-2718/19
1800-233-5051
+91-20- 6603-9800
Honeywell Automation India Ltd
56 and 57, Hadapsar Industrial Estate
Hadapsar, Pune 411 013, India

Support and Other Contacts
R410 Experion PKS Overview v
March 2012 Honeywell
Email: Global-TAC-India@honeywell.com
Korea
Contact:
Phone:
Fascimile:
Mail:



Email:
Honeywell Global TAC Korea
+82-80-782-2255 (toll free within Korea)
+82-2-792-9015
Honeywell Co., Ltd
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Contact:
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Mail:


Email:
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+86- 21-2219-6888
800-820-0237
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33/F, Tower A, City Center, 100 Zunyi Rd.
Shanghai 200051, Peoples Republic of China
Global-TAC-China@honeywell.com
Singapore
Contact:
Phone:
Fascimile:
Mail:



Email:
Honeywell Global TAC South East Asia
+65-6823-2215
+65-6445-3033
Honeywell Private Limited
Honeywell Building
17, Changi Business Park Central 1
Singapore 486073
GTAC-SEA@honeywell.com
Japan
Contact:
Fascimile:
Mail:



Email:
Honeywell Global TAC Japan
+81-3-6730-7228
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20th Floor, 1-16-1 Kaigan, Minato-ku
Tokyo 105-0022, Japan
Global-TAC-JapanJA25@honeywell.com


Support and Other Contacts
vi Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Elsewhere
Call your nearest Honeywell office.
World Wide Web
Honeywell Process Solutions website:
https://www.honeywellprocess.com/
Training Classes
Honeywell Automation College:
http://www.automationcollege.com





Symbol Definitions
R410 Experion PKS Overview vii
March 2012 Honeywell

Symbol Definitions
The following table lists those symbols used in this document to denote certain conditions.

Symbol Definition




ATTENTION: Identifies information that requires special
consideration.



TIP: Identifies advice or hints for the user, often in terms of
performing a task.



REFERENCE -EXTERNAL: Identifies an additional source of
information outside of the bookset.



REFERENCE - INTERNAL: Identifies an additional source of
information within the bookset.

CAUTION

Indicates a situation which, if not avoided, may result in equipment
or work (data) on the system being damaged or lost, or may result in
the inability to properly operate the process.





CAUTION: Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not
avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury. It may also be used
to alert against unsafe practices.
CAUTION symbol on the equipment refers the user to the product
manual for additional information. The symbol appears next to
required information in the manual.




WARNING: Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which, if not
avoided, could result in serious injury or death.
WARNING symbol on the equipment refers the user to the product
manual for additional information. The symbol appears next to
required information in the manual.




WARNING, Risk of electrical shock: Potential shock hazard where
HAZARDOUS LIVE voltages greater than 30 Vrms, 42.4 Vpeak, or
60 VDC may be accessible.

Symbol Definitions
viii Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Symbol Definition




ESD HAZARD: Danger of an electro-static discharge to which
equipment may be sensitive. Observe precautions for handling
electrostatic sensitive devices.




Protective Earth (PE) terminal: Provided for connection of the
protective earth (green or green/yellow) supply system conductor.




Functional earth terminal: Used for non-safety purposes such as
noise immunity improvement. NOTE: This connection shall be
bonded to Protective Earth at the source of supply in accordance
with national local electrical code requirements.




Earth Ground: Functional earth connection. NOTE: This
connection shall be bonded to Protective Earth at the source of
supply in accordance with national and local electrical code
requirements.




Chassis Ground: Identifies a connection to the chassis or frame of
the equipment shall be bonded to Protective Earth at the source of
supply in accordance with national and local electrical code
requirements.




R410 Experion PKS Overview ix
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Contents
1. INTRODUCTION .......................................................................... 19
1.1 Experion

Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution . 19


Introducing Experion PKS .................................................................................................... 19
Experion PKS basics ............................................................................................................ 20
Basic Control System topology ............................................................................................ 22
2. CONCEPTS AND FUNCTIONS ................................................... 27
2.1 Global Data Ownership ................................................................................. 27
Global ownership ................................................................................................................. 27
Data ownership .................................................................................................................... 27
2.2 Composite Data ............................................................................................. 27
2.3 Deterministic Control .................................................................................... 27
2.4 Redundancy ................................................................................................... 27
2.5 SCADA Support ............................................................................................. 28
2.6 On-Process Migration ................................................................................... 28
Redundant servers required ................................................................................................. 28
Experion controller migration ................................................................................................ 28
Safety Manager migration .................................................................................................... 29
2.7 Off-Process Migration ................................................................................... 29
2.8 Upgrade Tool ................................................................................................. 29
2.9 Custom installation path .............................................................................. 30
2.10 Configuration Studio ................................................................................. 30
2.11 Building an Enterprise Model ................................................................... 32
About the Experion Enterprise Model ................................................................................... 32
System model ...................................................................................................................... 32
Asset model ......................................................................................................................... 32
Alarm group model ............................................................................................................... 33
Network tree ......................................................................................................................... 33
2.12 Control Building......................................................................................... 34
Control Builder ..................................................................................................................... 34
Navigation improvements in the Control Builder .................................................................. 35
Search enhancements in the Control Builder ....................................................................... 35
Resize Control Builder Search windows .............................................................................. 35
Contents

x Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Control Builder enhancements in R410 ............................................................................... 36
Function blocks .................................................................................................................... 39
Control Modules ................................................................................................................... 39
Continuous control functions ................................................................................................ 39
Logic control functions ......................................................................................................... 40
Sequential control functions ................................................................................................. 40
Batch control functions ......................................................................................................... 40
Procedural operations .......................................................................................................... 40
Layered recipe functions ...................................................................................................... 41
Unit Control Function (UCF) ................................................................................................ 41
Support for Class-based recipes .......................................................................................... 41
Template and hierarchical build functions ............................................................................ 42
Qualification and Version Control System ............................................................................ 42
Peer Control Data Interface functions .................................................................................. 42
2.13 Identical Build/Operate Environments ..................................................... 42
Build environment ................................................................................................................ 42
Independent build capability ................................................................................................ 43
Multiple user access ............................................................................................................ 43
Operate environment ........................................................................................................... 43
2.14 Safety Builder ............................................................................................. 44
2.15 OneWireless integration ............................................................................ 45
2.16 Functional Logic Diagrams (FLDs) .......................................................... 47
2.17 Custom Display Building .......................................................................... 50
HMIWeb Display Builder ...................................................................................................... 50
Display scripts ...................................................................................................................... 51
2.18 Online Documentation ............................................................................... 51
Knowledge Builder ............................................................................................................... 51
KB mode .............................................................................................................................. 52
Internet-awareness .............................................................................................................. 52
2.19 Internationalization .................................................................................... 52
3. SERVERS AND STATIONS ......................................................... 53
3.1 Supervisory Infrastructure ........................................................................... 53
Components ........................................................................................................................ 53
Functions and features ........................................................................................................ 53
3.2 Server .............................................................................................................. 54
Capability ............................................................................................................................. 54
Alarm and event management ............................................................................................. 54
Alarm aggregation ................................................................................................................ 55
Historization ......................................................................................................................... 55
Contents

R410 Experion PKS Overview xi
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Trending ............................................................................................................................... 55
Reporting .............................................................................................................................. 56
Redundancy ......................................................................................................................... 57
Distributed System Architecture ........................................................................................... 57
Server scripts ....................................................................................................................... 59
Specialized server software options ..................................................................................... 59
3.3 Stations .......................................................................................................... 59
Flexibility .............................................................................................................................. 59
Flex Stations ........................................................................................................................ 60
Console Stations, Console Extension Stations, and Consoles............................................. 60
Multiple-window Station configurations ................................................................................ 60
Mobile Station ...................................................................................................................... 61
eServer and casual Web access .......................................................................................... 61
Specialized Station hardware ............................................................................................... 61
Station security ..................................................................................................................... 63
Integrated Security ............................................................................................................... 63
Signon Manager ................................................................................................................... 63
Electronic signatures ............................................................................................................ 64
High Security Policy ............................................................................................................. 64
3.4 Data Exchange ............................................................................................... 65
TPS Integration .................................................................................................................... 65
Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) Driver ....................................................................... 66
Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) Data Exchange ........................................................ 66
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange (MEDE) .............................................................................. 67
OLE for Process Control (OPC) ........................................................................................... 67
Experion Application Programming Interface (API) .............................................................. 68
Network API ......................................................................................................................... 68
4. PROCESS CONTROL HARDWARE ........................................... 69
4.1 Control Hardware Infrastructure .................................................................. 69
Basic Components ............................................................................................................... 69
Extension Component .......................................................................................................... 71
4.2 Process Controller ........................................................................................ 73
About the controller .............................................................................................................. 73
Chassis ................................................................................................................................ 74
Control Processor ................................................................................................................ 74
Controller redundancy .......................................................................................................... 76
Bumpless failure ................................................................................................................... 80
Chassis I/O ........................................................................................................................... 80
Chassis I/O terminal connectors .......................................................................................... 81
Series C I/O .......................................................................................................................... 81
4.3 Safety Controller ........................................................................................... 83
Safety Manager System Configurations ............................................................................... 83
Contents

xii Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Safety Manager basic architectures ..................................................................................... 84
Controller chassis ................................................................................................................ 84
Control Processor ................................................................................................................ 85
Quad Processor Pack (QPP) ............................................................................................... 86
Universal Safety Interface (USI)........................................................................................... 87
IO bus .................................................................................................................................. 87
I/O modules ......................................................................................................................... 88
IO FTA ................................................................................................................................. 90
4.4 Wireless Device Manager ............................................................................. 92
5. SUPPORTED EXPERION HARDWARE ...................................... 93
5.1 Supported Platforms ..................................................................................... 93
Supported server platforms .................................................................................................. 93
Supported workstation platforms.......................................................................................... 93
5.2 Support for new Matrox Extio2 Remote Peripheral Solution (RPS) ......... 94
6. PROCESS COMMUNICATIONS ................................................. 95
6.1 Communications Topology .......................................................................... 95
Plantwide communications .................................................................................................. 95
Scalable security inhibits unauthorized data access ............................................................ 96
Control level communications .............................................................................................. 96
Application and user interface communications for the Experion server .............................. 97
Foundation Fieldbus communications .................................................................................. 97
Redundant Fieldbus integrated architecture ........................................................................ 99
6.2 Network Platforms ....................................................................................... 102
Ethernet ............................................................................................................................. 102
Fault Tolerant Ethernet ...................................................................................................... 102
Supervisory Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE), ControlNet or Ethernet ................................... 103
Time Synchronization ........................................................................................................ 103
6.3 ControlNet .................................................................................................... 103
Open technology ................................................................................................................ 103
Devices .............................................................................................................................. 103
Control network redundancy .............................................................................................. 104
6.4 ControlNet Interoperability ......................................................................... 104
6.5 Connectivity ................................................................................................. 106
Background ........................................................................................................................ 106
Third-party networks .......................................................................................................... 106
6.6 Communications Model for the Control Processor ................................. 107
Reference model ................................................................................................................ 107
Contents

R410 Experion PKS Overview xiii
March 2012 Honeywell
Publish/subscribe transport layer ....................................................................................... 107
Publish/subscribe application layer .................................................................................... 108
Request/response application layer ................................................................................... 108
Report-by-exception ........................................................................................................... 108
6.7 Safety Manager SafeNet ............................................................................. 108
7. MONITORING PLANT PROCESSES ........................................ 111
7.1 Understanding Points ................................................................................. 111
Process points .................................................................................................................... 111
Flexible points .................................................................................................................... 111
Standard (Inbuilt) point types ............................................................................................. 111
Scanning ............................................................................................................................ 112
Point algorithms ................................................................................................................. 112
Scripts ................................................................................................................................ 112
User-defined parameters.................................................................................................... 112
7.2 Process Monitoring and Data Display ...................................................... 113
System displays for configuring your system ..................................................................... 113
System displays for managing alarms and events ............................................................. 114
System displays for monitoring your processes ................................................................. 114
Custom displays ................................................................................................................. 117
7.3 Operator Notification of Alarms and Events ............................................ 118
Alarm and event generation ............................................................................................... 118
Alarms ................................................................................................................................ 119
Filters and views ................................................................................................................ 119
Alarm suppression ............................................................................................................. 119
Alarm shelving .................................................................................................................... 120
Operator response ............................................................................................................. 120
7.4 Safety Manager Sequence of Events (SOE) support ............................... 122
SOE generation .................................................................................................................. 122
SOE reporting .................................................................................................................... 122
8. CONTROLLING THE PROCESS ............................................... 123
8.1 Understanding Supervisory Control ......................................................... 123
Supervisory control ............................................................................................................ 123
8.2 Examples of Process Control .................................................................... 124
Background ........................................................................................................................ 124
Process control using status points .................................................................................... 124
Process Control Using Analog Points ................................................................................ 125
Contents

xiv Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
9. ANALYZING PROCESS DATA ................................................. 127
9.1 Understanding Reports ............................................................................... 127
Background ........................................................................................................................ 127
9.2 Process History Analysis and Archiving .................................................. 127
History ................................................................................................................................ 127
PHD integration .................................................................................................................. 128
Analyzing process history .................................................................................................. 128
Archiving process history ................................................................................................... 129
Event archiving and storage .............................................................................................. 129
10. STANDARD COMPLIANCE ...................................................... 131
10.1 Safety Manager compliance .................................................................... 131
10.2 Experion compliance ............................................................................... 131
Contents
Tables
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Tables
Table 1 Safety Manager System Configurations .......................................................... 83
Table 2 System Manager Architectures ....................................................................... 84


Contents
Figures
xvi Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Figures
Figure 1 - Experion Platform Architecture ...................................................................... 20
Figure 2 - Basic Experion System Topology with C200 Process Controllers ................ 24
Figure 3 - Basic Experion System Topology with C300 Process Controllers ................ 25
Figure 4 - Example SafeNet Topology ........................................................................... 26
Figure 5 - Configuration Studio ...................................................................................... 31
Figure 6 - Typical Control Builder view with open Control Module. ............................... 34
Figure 7 - Sample Safety Builder Function: Network Configurator ................................ 44
Figure 8 Experion OneWireless integration topology .................................................... 46
Figure 9 - Sample Functional Logic Diagram (FLD) ...................................................... 47
Figure 10 - Typical custom display ................................................................................ 51
Figure 11 - Typical trend display .................................................................................... 56
Figure 12 - A geographically distributed system ............................................................ 58
Figure 13 - A plant-wide distributed system ................................................................... 58
Figure 14 - Honeywell's Icon Console ........................................................................... 62
Figure 15 - Sample Upgraded System with Experion Controller Expansion ................. 65
Figure 16 - C200 Control Processor .............................................................................. 75
Figure 17 - C300 Control Processor .............................................................................. 76
Figure 18 - Redundancy Module For C200 Controller Redundancy ............................. 77
Figure 19 - Module redundancy for C200 Controller in redundant supervisory
ControlNet networks ............................................................................................... 78
Figure 20 - C300 Controller redundancy in supervisory Fault Tolerant Ethernet network79
Figure 21 - Chassis I/O Module Basic Layout ............................................................... 80
Figure 22 - Typical non-redundant Series C I/O configuration ...................................... 82
Figure 23 - Front and Rear View of the CP chassis ...................................................... 85
Figure 24 - Safety manager Control Processor Modules ............................................... 86
Figure 25 - Back View of Typical Safety Manager with Redundant Controller and I/O
Chassis ................................................................................................................... 88
Figure 26 - Example of the High Density SAi 1620m Module........................................ 89
Figure 27 - Some Terminal Type FTA's ......................................................................... 91
Figure 28 - Scalable Architecture for Plantwide Communications. ................................ 95
Figure 29 - Control Level Communications Network for C200 Controllers using
ControlNet media .................................................................................................... 96
Figure 30 - Supervisory Level Communications Network .............................................. 97
Figure 31 - Foundation Fieldbus Level Communications Network using a Chassis I/O -
Series A Fieldbus Interface Module ........................................................................ 98
Figure 32 - Foundation Fieldbus Level Communications Network using a Series C
Fieldbus Interface Module ...................................................................................... 99
Figure 33 - Sample system architecture for redundant Fieldbus integration using a
Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Module ................................................ 100
Contents

R410 Experion PKS Overview xvii
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Figure 34 - Sample system architecture for redundant Fieldbus integration using a
Series C Fieldbus Interface Module ..................................................................... 101
Figure 35 - Control Network Redundancy ................................................................... 104
Figure 36 - Connectivity System .................................................................................. 106
Figure 37 - Experion versus ISO-OSI Communications Model ................................... 107
Figure 38 - Example Safety Manager Topology .......................................................... 109
Figure 39 - Typical configuration display ..................................................................... 113
Figure 40 - An alarm summary display ........................................................................ 114
Figure 41 - A typical point detail display ...................................................................... 115
Figure 42- A Typical Faceplate ................................................................................... 115
Figure 43 - A typical trend display ............................................................................... 116
Figure 44 - A typical group display .............................................................................. 116
Figure 45 - Safety Manager System Information Display ............................................ 117
Figure 46 - An event summary display ........................................................................ 118
Figure 47 - Supervisory Control Process ..................................................................... 123
Figure 48 - Process Control Example .......................................................................... 124
Figure 49 - Process Control Using Status Points ........................................................ 125
Figure 50 - Process Control Using Analog Points ....................................................... 126


Contents
Figures
xviii Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012


R410 Experion PKS Overview 19
March 2012 Honeywell
1. Introduction
1.1 Experion

Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers


a Single Solution
Introducing Experion PKS
Experion PKS is a cost-effective open control and safety system that expands the role
of distributed control. It addresses critical manufacturing objectives to facilitate sharing
knowledge and managing workflow. Experion provides a safe, robust, scalable, plant-
wide system with unprecedented connectivity through all levels of the plant as
illustrated in the following high-level view of the architecture. The Experion unified
architecture combines DCS functionality and a plant-wide infrastructure that unifies
business, process, and asset management to:
Facilitate knowledge capture
Promote knowledge sharing
Optimize work processes
Accelerate improvement and innovation.


1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
20 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012


Figure 1 - Experion Platform Architecture
Experion PKS basics
The Experion platform is well suited for both small and large systems. It provides the
power and flexibility required to handle the full spectrum of process control and safety
applications.
Experion offers state-of-the-art DCS capabilities that include Abnormal Situation
Management

(ASM

), Safety Management, and Information Management


technologies. Experion interfaces with FOUNDATION Fieldbus, Profibus, DeviceNet,
HART, LON, ControlNet and Interbus. Robustness, security, compliance, control,
safety, and reliability are plant-wide. Its distributed control features include a complete
continuous, logic, sequential, and drive object-oriented control environment hosted on
fully redundant controllers.
Experion features include:
Sophisticated human-machine interface.
Tightly integrated databases, engineering tools, and control and safety applications.
1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
R410 Experion PKS Overview 21
March 2012 Honeywell
Operational integration of control and safety applications.
Open, deterministic, high-speed control network communications system for
predictable and repeatable control linking servers, controllers, and remote I/O.
A configurable Control Execution Environment (CEE) provides deterministic,
consistent, and reliable control application execution.
A single builder tool, Configuration Studio, allows integrated application
configuration.
Four CEE-based controllers:
The C200 Process Controller is a compact and cost-effective solution located
close to the process with direct IO connections. It is ideal for integrated
regulatory, fast logic, sequential, and batch control applications.
The C200E Process Controller an enhanced C200 Controller with additional
user memory and an enhanced function block set.
The C300 Process Controller is the next generation controller that builds on
the reliability and robustness of the C200 controller to provide even more
versatile control integration through innovative mounting and connecting
techniques.
The Process, Machinery and Drives (PMD) Controller provides the
traditional control process functions and manages smart motor center controls,
hydraulic and pneumatic controls of machinery and coordinated line drive
control solutions. Fast functions, such as machine element controls and
coordinated line drives, can be executed at a 20 millisecond cycle. For more
information about PMD Controllers, refer to Experion PKS with PMD
Controller Field Controller User's Guide and Experion PKS with PMD
Controller Field Controller Express User's Guide.
The Application Control Environment (ACE) is ideally suited for
supervisory control solutions and integration with third party control systems. It
is hosted on a server grade computer platform.
Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS)
Safety Manager topology with scalable safety solution through Safety Manager
local I/O and SafeNet plant-wide network capabilities. Safety Manager will
meet the most stringent safety requirements with Safety Integrity Levels (SIL) 3
compliancy.
The Simulation Control Environment (SCE) supports system simulation on
computers without requiring dedicated controller hardware or process connections.
Redundancy support for servers, networks, and controllers.
Distributed System Architecture (DSA) that integrates multiple servers into a single
operational system.
1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
22 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
Support for internationalization/localization.
Interfaces for wide variety of third-party controllers and protocols.
A cost-effective architecture that -
Makes extensive use of open technologies and commonality of hardware, and
Is scaleable from just a few points, to thousands of points.
Basic Control System topology
In a basic Experion system topology, the server and C200/C200E and/or C300 Process
Controllers share a global database, so you only need to enter data once. This one-step
configuration eliminates errors and dramatically reduces configuration time. When you
define a control or safety strategy, point detail displays, trends, alarms, and group
displays are automatically created, so you instantly have access to the information you
need to operate your control or safety strategy. The following figure illustrates the
high-level view of a basic Experion system topology. Experion can be segmented into
basic sets of hardware component platforms:
Supervisory Platform, which includes non-proprietary computing platforms
running Windows operating systems and serving as both Experion servers and
Experion Stations. Experion Stations are able to serve as both engineering and
operating interfaces, depending on the software loaded on each node.
C200/C200E, C300, using a small hardware form-factor supporting a scaleable and
modular architecture. Commonality and flexibility of hardware components, and
their placement within the system, reduce initial cost-to-purchase, and minimize
cost-of-ownership while plant safety is guaranteed.
Safety Manager Controller is the SIL 3 safety controller that executes safety
strategies independently from the process control layer. It communicates with
dedicated Input/Output (I/O) modules that are directly connected to the Safety
Manager controller. Safety manager is a fully redundant controller that seamlessly
integrates in the Experion topology. Safety Manager Controllers can connect to
each other through a dedicated network or through the FTE network. The "SafeNet"
connection is a SIL 4 certified safety protocol.
Process, Machinery and Drives (PMD) Controller is a controller unit that
contains an integrated application execution environment, two independent fieldbus
interfaces, an Upline interface, an FTE system interface.
Integrated Controllers, the server integrates to a number of Honeywell loop
controllers and recorders. This integration effectively reduces engineering time by
integrating the device configuration tools and/or diagnostic features with the
Experion platform.
1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
R410 Experion PKS Overview 23
March 2012 Honeywell
Third -party Controllers, the server can interface to a number of third party
controllers including the Allen Bradley PLC5 and SLC range, Modicon, GE Fanuc
and Siemens plus many more.
Communications Platform, which utilizes open network standards, including:
Ethernet-or Honeywell's Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) based plant information
network (PIN) linking servers and clients together for the purpose of
supervisory level communications.
Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) network providing the communications link
between the C300 Controllers and the supervisory level as well as peer-to-peer
communication between Controllers and remote I/O.
SafeNet providing the safe communication link between the Safety Manager
Controllers on a separate network or by using Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE).
ControlNet, Ethernet, or Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) network providing the
communications link between the C200/C200E Controllers and the supervisory
level, as well as peer-to-peer communications between Controllers, with -
ControlNet network providing the communications link between the
C200/C200E Controllers and remote I/O.


ATTENTION
With R410, you can configure native peer-to-peer communication between
the CEE points and non-CEE points such as SCADA, TPS, PMD, and Safety
Manager points.


1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
24 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012


Figure 2 - Basic Experion System Topology with C200 Process
Controllers

Supervisory Fault Tolerant Ethernet, ControlNet, or Ethernet
Non-Redundant Controller Redundant Controller
Other connectivity
Honeywell S9000
Honeywell 620 LC
TDC 3000 Data Hiway
Honeywell UDC
Modicon PLC
Allen-Bradley
LAN (TCP/IP, Ethernet, Fault Tolerant Ethernet, etc.)
Server
Station Station
Controller
Controller Controller
I/O ControlNet
I/O ControlNet
1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
R410 Experion PKS Overview 25
March 2012 Honeywell


Figure 3 - Basic Experion System Topology with C300 Process
Controllers

1. Introduction
1.1. Experion Process Knowledge System (PKS) Offers a Single Solution
26 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012


Figure 4 - Example SafeNet Topology


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March 2012 Honeywell
2. Concepts and Functions
2.1 Global Data Ownership
Global ownership
The global ownership part of the Global Data Ownership concept means that there is
one-and-only-one owner of any particular object across the entire automation system.
This has advantages primarily in the area of engineering efficiency. Global data allows
the Experion system to provide a unified build environment.
Data ownership
In the Experion system, the controller owns some data while other data is owned by a
server-based database known as the System Repository. Each data element is owned by
one-and-only-one of these entities. This provides robustness because all users
throughout the Experion system are dealing with the same value for that data at any
given point in time. Since the data is owned by one-and-only-one entity yet is usable
throughout the entire system, each data entity needs to be built only once in Control
Builder.
Data is also acted upon in a unified fashion, best typified by unified event
management. For example, the C200/C200E or C300 Process Controller originates
alarms and events and notifies all relevant parties throughout the system of their
occurrence. This is known as the "event notification subsystem" and it is an important
part of the system's architecture. Data in the Experion environment is global in nature,
and as such, can be used by any relevant entity throughout the system.
2.2 Composite Data
Composite data (using a Control Module, point, parameter model) provides
engineering efficiency by establishing predefined data structures. It also permits
precise control by supporting consistent exception and failure mode handling.
2.3 Deterministic Control
Deterministic control simply means quality through repeatable control. Users are
informed when they approach the limits of the control processing cycle. If a user has
overloaded a controller processing cycle, control is still performed.
2.4 Redundancy
Redundancy provides critical system components with the software to transfer from a
primary to a secondary device should a problem develop in the primary device.
The Experion system has been designed to accommodate the most complete
redundancy protection ever developed for an industrial automation system, and fully
implement redundancy in terms of servers, networks, controllers, and selected I/O.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.5. SCADA Support
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For Experion Safety Manager, redundancy is applied by running the two single legs
simultaneously. This allows for uninterrupted process safety in case of any anomaly
detected in controller, I/O or field instrumentation. Even the single Safety Manager leg
is SIL 3 certified without restrictions.
2.5 SCADA Support
By definition, an Experion process system includes C200/C200E, C300, and/or ACE
controllers. It can also include SCADA devices that may consist of serial devices
(RS232 or RS485), ControlNet connections, and/or Ethernet Interfaces (for example,
MODBUS TCP) or combinations of these. In addition, SCADA points and connections
may coexist with C200/C200E s and TPS within given capacity constraints. The Quick
Builder application provides the tools for building a SCADA network interface. A
SCADA only system does not include C200/C200E, C300 or ACE controllers.
2.6 On-Process Migration
Experion on-process migration is a licensed option for upgrading software on
redundant servers, Stations, and Process Controllers to a new release. It does not
include the migration of SCADA connected controllers.
Redundant servers required
If you have a redundant system, you can use on -process migration to upgrade to the
next release of Experion while maintaining view and control of your processes.
On-process migration involves upgrading one of the servers, switching the upgraded
server to primary mode and then upgrading the other server.
Once you upgrade the redundant servers and their associated Stations, you can use the
Controller Migration Wizard to upgrade the redundant Controllers and their associated
I/O modules.
Experion controller migration
Redundant C200/C200E Controllers migration includes the firmware upgrade of
chassis-resident modules such as the Control Processor Module, Redundancy Module,
Fieldbus Interface Module and I/O Link Interface Module. The same is true for
Redundant Series C hardware such as the C300 Controller and Series C Fieldbus
Interface Module.
You must upgrade ACE and SCE nodes off process, but you can use the Controller
Migration Wizard to start the migration.


ATTENTION
You must perform freeze and switchover operation of redundant C200,
C200E, and C300 from server B only.

2. Concepts and Functions
2.7. Off-Process Migration
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Safety Manager migration
Safety Manager on-process migration is an option for upgrading software on redundant
Safety Manager Controllers to a new release.
If you have a redundant system, you can upgrade to the next release of Experion Safety
Manager while maintaining view and safety of your processes.
On-process migration involves upgrading one of the Safety Manager Control
Processors, switching the upgraded server to primary mode and then upgrading the
other Control Processor. This all is done by using the 4-step wizard that guides you
through the OPM process
The Safety Manager migration allows for upgrades of application, and firmware. The
migration is TUV approved and Safety Manager will continue safeguarding the
Process during all steps of the migration process. No external measures (such as
external overrides or secondary means of process stops) are needed.
The flexible migration of Safety Manager allows even adding and removing of
hardware modules, chassis or even complete Safety Manager Controllers while
continuously monitoring the plant safety.
2.7 Off-Process Migration
The off-process migration does not require a license and you can use it to upgrade
redundant as well as any non-redundant system components including servers.
2.8 Upgrade Tool
The Upgrade tool checks the upgrade readiness of the nodes and its subsystems in an
Experion system. The Upgrade tool is installed as a part of the Engineering tools
installation. If you have redundant servers, Upgrade tool is installed on Server B. In
case of non-redundant server, Upgrade tool is installed on the only server. The
Upgrade tool does not depend on any specific Experion topology. In case of a
redundant Experion configuration, the Upgrade tool is run only on the Server B. In
case of a non-redundant Experion server configuration, the Upgrade tool is run on the
single Experion server node. The Upgrade tool ensures that it does not overload the
Experion server. Before starting an Experion upgrade, you have to verify the upgrade
readiness of the Experion system and prepare it for the upgrade. The Upgrade tool
automates the manual process of preparing the Experion system for the upgrade. After
the upgrade is complete, you can run the Upgrade tool to perform a post-upgrade
analysis. Upgrade tool makes the upgrade readiness process effortless, easy, and error-
free. It reduces the manual information gathering time and minimizes the possibility of
errors.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.9. Custom installation path
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2.9 Custom installation path
Starting R410.1, Experion installation, and migration is supported on custom
installation paths. This feature allows control on the path where Experion is
installed/migrated and the location where the runtime files and SQL logs are stored.
You can select the custom installation path for the following components.
Experion software: This consists of deliverable that are part of Experion installer
and third party software.
Experion runtime data: This consists of the all the files and folders available at
C:\ProgramData\Honeywell\ path for the Experion release and the Experion SQL
databases. Following files comes under this category.
Runtime data
Experion created SQL data files
Experion SQL logs: This consists of SQL database log files generated during
installation/migration

2.10 Configuration Studio
Configuration Studio provides a central location from which you can configure your
Experion system. The individual tools required to configure parts of your system are
launched from Configuration Studio.

2. Concepts and Functions
2.10. Configuration Studio
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Figure 5 - Configuration Studio
In Configuration Studio, you are provided with a customized list of tasks that you are
required to complete to configure your system. When you click a task, the appropriate
tool is launched so that you can complete the task.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.11. Building an Enterprise Model
32 Experion PKS Overview R410
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These tools include:
Enterprise Model Builder: a graphical tool for building your asset model. (See
Asset model.)
Quick Builder: a graphical tool for building hardware items such as Flex Stations,
printers, controllers, and standard (non-C200/C200E) points in your system. After
building hardware and points with Quick Builder, you download these items from
Configuration Studio to the server database.
System Displays: displays that are used to configure items such as reports, group
display, trends, Station settings, and Console Stations.
Control Builder: a graphical tool for building your control strategy for Process
Controllers.
HMIWeb Display Builder: a graphical tool for creating your own (custom)
displays using Web-based features. Displays are saved in HTML format. For more
information on custom displays and HMIWeb Display Builder, see the Safety
Builder section.
2.11 Building an Enterprise Model
About the Experion Enterprise Model
The Experion Enterprise Model is a framework that can be used by engineers,
operators, and applications to model and view their plant or process. The Enterprise
Model replaces the flat, area-based structure that was used prior to Release 210.
You use Configuration Studio (see Configuration Studio) to define the various
components of your Enterprise Model, which comprises:
A system model
An asset model
An alarm group model
Network tree
System model
The system model represents the boundaries of your system. You build your system
model by defining the servers that are part of your Experion system. You can also use
your system model, to define those servers that are connected to, but outside of, your
system.
Asset model
An asset model forms the core of the Experion Enterprise Model and is used to:
Define scope of responsibility for operators and other users
Navigate your Experion system
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
R410 Experion PKS Overview 33
March 2012 Honeywell
Resolve data references
Manage alarms
Organize points, displays and reports.
About assets in an asset model
An Experion asset is a database entity that represents a particular physical item in your
enterprise, for example, fixed plant equipment, facilities and buildings.
The benefits of a hierarchical asset-based structure in your Experion database include:
A simple and intuitive means of implementing scope of responsibility (SOR), that
is, of allowing or restricting access to parts of the plant, process, or equipment.
Instead of having to nominate each and every item for which a given Station or
operator has scope of responsibility, you can often assign the scope of
responsibility with a single click, depending on how you have defined your asset
structure. By assigning a given asset to a Station or operator, you assign that Station
or operator the ability to control all the points that belong to that asset (and any of
its subsidiary or "child" assets) and to view the alarms and custom displays for that
asset.
A structure that can be used to logically replicate your physical assets and to
engineer your Experion system around your key entities.
A user-friendly asset-naming system that helps operators and other users to more
easily navigate through displays and identify particular parts of the plant or specific
pieces of equipment without having to remember obscure tag names.
A ready-made form of alarm aggregation. Once you have defined your assets and
the points that belong to those assets, alarms for those points are automatically
aggregated under each asset.
Alarm group model
The alarm group model is used to:
Define alarm groups
View aggregated alarms for those alarm groups
Network tree
The Network tree is a graphical view of the nodes on your network, which can be
viewed on the System Status display. This provides you with a single display that can
be used to view the status of all the parts that comprise your control system.
The Network tree works in conjunction with the System Event Server and the System
Performance Server to display system errors, which can be used to troubleshoot faults
within the system.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
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2.12 Control Building
Control Builder
Control Builder is an engineering tool offering the latest in control strategy building
going well beyond looking "pretty" on screen. Its graphical, object-oriented design
dramatically reduces the effort required to design, implement and document control
applications.



Figure 6 - Typical Control Builder view with open Control Module.
Prior to R400, you could search or a tag by expanding the function block tree view in
Project or Monitoring mode.
With R400, you can search, sort, and filter the tags. The Control Builder search
window can be resized to view the complete tag name and other fields.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
R410 Experion PKS Overview 35
March 2012 Honeywell
Navigation improvements in the Control Builder
Navigating to the function block/parameter in the Control Builder is based on the
Closed Match concept.
For more information on navigation enhancements, see Control Building User's Guide.
Search enhancements in the Control Builder
Prior to R400, you could search for a tag by expanding the function block tree view in
Project or Monitoring mode.
With R400, you can search for tags in the following ways.
Using File > Open > Open Object
Using Find Options toolbar in the tree view
Typing the prefix of a tag in the tree view
Using New List View, which also provides sorting and filtering functionality
For more information on search enhancements, see Control Building User's Guide.
Resize Control Builder Search windows
Prior to R400, you could not resize the search window to view the complete tag name
and other fields.
With R400, following are the enhancements with Control Builder Search windows.
Resizing of the Control Builder Search window to view the complete tag name
A tooltip is available for the controls in the dialog box.
Column sorting and resizing based on the column values
The following are the search windows considered for the enhancements:
Point Selection popup window
Create / Read Bulk Build List
Create / Read Bulk Edit List
Substitute Name List
Execution Environment Assignment
For more information on resizing the Control Builder Search windows, see Control
Building User's Guide.

2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
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Control Builder enhancements in R410
The following are the Control Builder enhancements in Experion R410.
Configuring on-delay and off-delay for individual alarms
With R410, on the Alarms tab, you can configure on-delay time, off-delay time,
deadband value, and deadband units for the individual alarms. This is applicable only
for few function blocks for which alarms are supported.
For more information about the on-delay and off-delay functionality, refer to Control
Builder Components Theory.
Configuring alerts
With R410, the FLAG block is enhanced such that you can configure the FLAG block
to generate alerts. To accomplish this, a new parameter ALTENBOPT is introduced in
the Main tab of the FLAG block configuration form.
For more information about configuring the alerts, refer to Control Building User's
Guide.
Control Builder print feature
Prior to R410, you could not print multiple pages in a single sheet. This resulted in
wastage of paper. In addition, you could not view the complete chart configuration in a
single page. In addition, before printing, you could not predict the number of pages that
might be required to print the selected chart.
With R410, Control Builder print and zoom feature is enhanced such that you can print
multiple pages of a chart in a single sheet based on the scale factor. In addition, before
printing you can preview the charts and can predict the number of pages to be printed
using the Print Preview option. You can also zoom-in and zoom-out the charts to the
desired zoom values.
For more information about configuring the alerts, refer to Control Building User's
Guide.
Print Preview feature
With R410, Print Preview feature enables you to preview the charts before printing.
You can only preview the chart that is currently open before printing. The Print
Preview feature enables you to view each page of a chart individually. You can also
navigate to the next or the previous page of the chart.
For more information about configuring the alerts, refer to Control Building User's
Guide.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
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March 2012 Honeywell
Inserting comments into a strategy using Text Comment block
With R410, you can use the Text Comment block to add comments into a template or a
strategy. The Text Comment block contents can be added/modified from the Project
view. The strategy can then be loaded to the Monitoring view without inactivating the
strategy or setting the CEE to IDLE. If you add a Text Comment block into a strategy
that is already loaded, the Load while active delta flag appears against the strategy.
Similarly, if you modify the existing comments in the Text Comment block, the Load
while active delta flag appears against the specific Text Comment block. This indicates
that the strategy/block can be loaded while active.
For more information about Text Comment block, refer to Control Builder
Components Theory.
Exporting object with contents
With R410, you can export objects with contents. When you select a parent object to
be exported, all the childlevel objects are also selected for export, by default. The
parent objects can be Controllers, CEEs, IOLINKs, containers CM, or user-defined
templates. For example, you can export a controller along with its assigned strategies
in a single operation.
For more information about exporting objects, refer to Control Building User's Guide.
Regulatory control (REGCTL) function block detail displays
With R410, standard detail displays are supported for some of the REGCTL function
blocks. As a result, the operator need not create a custom display for these REGCTL
blocks for monitoring purposes.
For more information about exporting objects, refer to Control Building User's Guide.
Support for validation of blocks with OPC references
Prior to R410, if you entered an incorrect block name, there was no option to verify the
OPC references during configuration. If any of the block that contained OPC
references had executed successfully, and if that block was deleted later, there was no
indication of the missing block during the subsequent execution.
With R410, a new feature is introduced in the Control Builder/Recipe Builder to
validate blocks with OPC references after loading the OPC gateway. This feature can
also be used for validating OPC references, if the OPC gateway is configured through
the Redirection Manager (RDM).

2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
38 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012

Support to edit or load parameters while active
With R410, you can modify and load the SR-resident parameter values without
inactivating the control strategy/setting the CEE to IDLE. The parameters that can be
modified/loaded while active are referred to as active loadable parameters. In
addition, you can turn off editing of all parameter values except for active loadable
parameters. To accomplish this, Allow only active loadable parameter changes
option is introduced in the System Preferences > General tab.
To load parameters while active, a new load option called Load Values while
Active is provided. Note that when load while active is performed, the server point
build also happens simultaneously. Any errors that occur while loading the active
loadable parameter values do not affect the on-process control.
For more information about Load Values While Active functionality, refer to Control
Building User's Guide.
Automatically apply Daylight Savings Time (DST)
Prior to R410, at the start of DST, you had to manually set the DAYLIGHTTIME
parameter to ON in all Experion controllers. Similarly, at the end of DST, you had to
set this parameter to OFF in all Experion controllers.
With R410, a new feature Automatically apply DST is introduced, which enables you
to automatically apply DST settings to all Experion controllers in a cluster. This feature
is applicable to all Experion controllers. This feature is optional; however, if you do
not select this feature, you still have to manually set the DAYLIGHTTIME parameter.
For more information about Automatically apply DST functionality, refer to Control
Building User's Guide.
Identification of unused I/O channels
Prior to R410, identifying unused I/O channels was not easy since I/O channels
retained their last modified names even after unassignment or deletion.
With R410, I/O channel names return to their default names after unassignment or
deletion; thereby making the identification of unused I/O channels simpler.
In R410 and later, in case the channel name conflicts during any of the scenarios
mentioned, _1 is suffixed with the channel name. For example, if
AICHANNEL_01 already exists in the unassigned list, the channel name is changed
to AICHANNEL_01_1.
For more information about identification of unused I/O channels functionality, refer to
Control Building User's Guide.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
R410 Experion PKS Overview 39
March 2012 Honeywell
Support to rename objects while importing
Prior to R410, you could not rename the objects while importing. As a result, the
existing objects would be overwritten with the new objects.
With R410, you can rename objects while importing the objects. You can also rename
objects containing Foundation Fieldbus blocks.
For more information about renaming objects while importing functionality, refer to
Control Building User's Guide.
Support to search for dangling/missing connection
A connection is said to be dangling, if a block is missing at one end of the connection.
A connection is said to be missing, if the blocks are missing at both ends of the
connection.
With R410, you can search for dangling and missing connections in the system using
the Search utility in Configuration Studio. You can perform a search for a dangling
connection at the system, the server, the controller, and the tagged module level. You
can perform a search for a missing connection at the system and the server level.
For more information about searching for dangling/missing connection functionality,
refer to Control Building User's Guide.
Function blocks
Function blocks represent the basic unit of control functionality that includes
Regulatory Control blocks, Device Control blocks, Logic blocks, Sequential blocks
and Auxiliary blocks. With Control Builder, function blocks are selected from a
Honeywell-supplied "Function Block Library" and placed in a Control Module. These
function blocks are then soft wired together to perform the desired control strategy.
Control Modules
Experion provides two basic types of control modules: Control Modules - used for
continuous control functions, and Sequential Control Modules - used for sequential and
batch control functions. Both control module types contain their respective function
blocks.
Continuous control functions
The designed-in features of the continuous control functionality reduce your
engineering costs and enable intuitive operator interaction with the control strategy.
This has been done by designing in features and options that address a wide range of
control needs through simple configuration tasks. By offering configuration options to
address control needs, Experion provides predefined approaches for the operator
interface, and handling how failures are managed by the control strategy. This in turn
defines how your control strategies recover when failures are cleared. In Experion, the
continuous control automatically handles these functions, supporting control that
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
40 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
enforces maximum ramp rate of the temperature measurement-adjusting output ramp
as necessary. No additional engineering effort is required to implement this on your
part.
Logic control functions
The value of logic control functions is focused in the area of improving engineering
efficiency by providing a full suite of algorithm options in an approach that can be
consistently configured and operated. The built-in device level functions also address:
Common application needs for motors, valves, and pumps
Improve operational monitoring by offering
Intuitive interlock tracing, and
Direct access to device maintenance statistics, such as motor run-time.
Sequential control functions
Sequential control functions reduce the engineering costs for implementing sequential
and batch control applications. The implementation of batch and sequential control is
in the implementation of abnormal situation management such as:
"What control action should be taken when a motor trips?"
"What control action should be taken when an interlock shuts a valve?"
"What control action should be taken when an operator has intervened with manual
action to adjust a mode or setpoint?"
The Experion sequencing control facility is designed with built-in options to handle
abnormal situations. Devices can be configured to enter states, setpoint, outputs etc.
based on abnormal status, or you can program a series of steps to safely handle the
process. Devices can also be configured to take fail-safe action on abnormal sequence
operations. Implementation is simplified and intuitive operator information on
sequence/batch status is directly available. The system also uses smart device drivers to
enable the control strategy to easily and quickly return to its normal state when the
abnormal condition is cleared.
Batch control functions
Experion batch capabilities enable significantly reduced engineering costs and
improved operational security. The built-in coordination and batch, sequence, and
device controls eliminate the work required to handle normal housekeeping chores,
which in many projects can amount to 20% or more of the engineering effort.
Procedural operations
The Sequential Control Module (SCM) and Recipe Control Module (RCM) views and
operator interactive functions that collectively work to improve operator effectiveness
are referred to as Procedural Operations that are also known as ProcOps or Interactive
Instructions. When configured, these functions can deliver automated procedures for
2. Concepts and Functions
2.12. Control Building
R410 Experion PKS Overview 41
March 2012 Honeywell
startup, shutdown, grade change, and so on, in an interactive manner patterned after
those previously executed from paper documents. A Table View function in Station
facilitates operator interaction with SCMs and RCMs. Some of the features and
functions of Table View are the ability to:
View transition details associated with the step,
View Step associated Instructions when implemented,
Use filters allowing operators to focus on items relating to the steps and outputs
currently executing ,
Use filters allowing operators to display only executing steps/phases with key
trailing transitions ,
Enable the operator to 'stand' on a step to view leading and trailing transition details,
and
Record all operator changes made through the SCM/RCM Table View in the system
journal.
Layered recipe functions
Starting in Experion R310, Control Builder supports multiple layers of recipe
configuration. This means you can build and execute multiple level hierarchical recipes
as defined in ISA S88.01. In this hierarchy, a higher level recipe can control its
underlying recipe(s). Recipes at each layer are implemented as a modular function
block. Recipe Control Module (RCM) blocks can represent Procedures, Unit
Procedures, and Operations. Sequential Control Module (SCM) blocks can represent
Phases.
Unit Control Function (UCF)
The UCF provides the ability to map a PHASE block to an SCM or an RCM, which
allows a "function" defined by a PHASE block to initiate a single simple SCM in one
case and a more complex multi-layer RCM/SCM in another. This lets layered recipes
map directly to an SCM/RCM at any level rather than constraining initiation of a
Phase/SCM to the operation level. For example, a Procedure, Unit Procedure, or
Operation can directly initiate a Phase/SCM. The UCF does not constrain to a defined
parent/child relationship between the layers. It supports the standard layers while
giving users the flexibility to adjust to meet specific process needs.
Support for Class-based recipes
With R410, the Experion Batch Manager (EBM) is enhanced to support Class-based
recipes.
Class-based recipes are recipes that are designed for Unit classes and not for a specific
Unit. When you need to run an operation on every Unit in a Unit class, you can create
Class-based recipes to avoid creating the same operation for every Unit. That is, you
2. Concepts and Functions
2.13. Identical Build/Operate Environments
42 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012
can design a recipe for a Unit class and during runtime, the recipe can be assigned to
run on any selected Unit in the Unit class.
Class-based recipes enable reuse of recipes and reduce engineering effort; there by
improving the batch cycle time.
For more information about implementing and using Class-based recipes, refer
to the following documents
Batch Overview and Planning Guide
Batch Implementation Guide
Operators Guide
Template and hierarchical build functions
Control Builder offers optional template and hierarchical build functions so users can
create their own templates and arrange control strategy components to reflect their
process hierarchy.
Qualification and Version Control System
The optional Qualification and Version Control System (QVCS) lets users easily track
and compare changes that are made to control strategies and user templates through
Control Builder. It features a Version Control System Manager with a familiar
Windows like interface for intuitive interaction with the application.
Peer Control Data Interface functions
Beginning in Experion R310, Control Builder offers a licensed option for a Peer
Control Data Interface (PCDI) function to facilitate communications with Safety
Manager or third-party devices that support the MODBUS TCP protocol. The PCDI
function allows a C300 Controller to communicate directly with Safety Manager
without requiring the Experion Server in the communications path. It uses the existing
FTE network as the communications medium and has built in redundancy. Other
features include:
Bi-directional data transfer,
Operational integration without common cause failures, and
Fault reaction configuration per Safety Manager point.
2.13 Identical Build/Operate Environments
Build environment
With Control Builder, you build your control strategy by assembling a collection of
related control modules.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.14. Safety Builder
R410 Experion PKS Overview 43
March 2012 Honeywell
Independent build capability
Control Builder can be run on an engineering Station for independent development,
thereby allowing users to configure, load, and test control strategies without an
Experion server.
The engineering Station can be used as a development-only node for developing and
testing templates and control strategies independent of the target system.
Once developed, individual template strategies, or an entire database, can then be
exported and subsequently imported to the ERDB on the target system.
Multiple user access
Control Builder can run simultaneously on up to four Experion Station nodes and other
non-Experion server nodes in a ControlNet system or up to twelve in a Fault Tolerant
Ethernet system. Use of the Control Builder client allows simultaneous multi-user
configuration, monitoring and debugging capabilities thereby improving plant
productivity.
Up to four or twelve application engineers may configure control strategies in the
same ERDB from multiple computers.
Up to four or twelve operators and maintenance engineers (with appropriate
security levels) may access Control Building monitoring charts from separate
Experion Stations.
Between two and four users in separate locations, such as an operator at a plant site
and an engineer at a remote location, may be allowed simultaneous access of the
same control strategy from different computers thereby facilitating debugging and
troubleshooting.
Control Builder can run on any workstation connected to the server either by LAN, or
WAN connection. In addition to this, an engineer using Control Builder may choose
which server to use and switch servers at run time. It also features a secure logon
function that lets you integrate Windows user account with Station operator-based
account access.
Operate environment
When the process is running, the identical control module configuration forms used in
engineering your control strategy can be used by anyone with access to monitor or run
the process.
Of course, you may also build custom graphic displays to monitor the process but these
displays can be supplemented with the control modules themselves. This is particularly
useful for sequential operations where continuation conditions are frequently used by
your operators to move the process along.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.14. Safety Builder
44 Experion PKS Overview R410
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2.14 Safety Builder
Safety Builder is a powerful software package that runs on computers with a Microsoft
Windows operating system. It provides a user interface with Safety Manager and
supports the user in performing a number of design and maintenance tasks as
illustrated in the following figure.



Figure 7 - Sample Safety Builder Function: Network Configurator


ATTENTION
Refer to the Experion specifications document for information about the
operating systems specification on which the Safety Manager executes.
Safety Builder's design and implementation features include:
Intelligent user interface, presenting menu items only when applicable,
2. Concepts and Functions
2.15. OneWireless integration
R410 Experion PKS Overview 45
March 2012 Honeywell
Network Configurator,
Hardware Configurator,
Point Configurator,
Application Editor,
Database import and export,
Automatic control program documentation,
FLD revision control, and
Easy loading of system software and control program into the Control Processors.
Safety Builder's maintenance support features include:
Live viewing of Application execution,
Detailed monitoring of process signal behavior,
Collection of diagnostics of Safety Manager, automatically or on user demand,
Diagnostic message storage, with user-definable browsing functions, and
Forcing of Safety Manager input and output interfaces.
2.15 OneWireless integration
Within Experion PKS, the wireless process I/O is considered identical to wired process
I/O in terms of data, event, and alarm information view, access, and configuration.
After integrating OneWireless with Experion, the OneWireless components such as
Wireless Device Manager (WDM), Field Device Access Point (FDAP), Multinode, and
the field devices become a part of the Experion system. The best approach for
deploying OneWireless Network infrastructure is to place it on the dedicated subnet
routed to the rest of the PCN.

2. Concepts and Functions
2.16. Functional Logic Diagrams (FLDs)
46 Experion PKS Overview R410
Honeywell March 2012

Figure 8 Experion OneWireless integration topology
For more information about integrating OneWireless with Experion, refer to the
Experion OneWireless Integration Users Guide available in the HPS Support website.
2. Concepts and Functions
2.16. Functional Logic Diagrams (FLDs)
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2.16 Functional Logic Diagrams (FLDs)
Safety Manager safety-critical control functions (contained in the control program) are
determined by the safety instrumented functions assigned to the system for the specific
application. Safety Builder supports the design of the control program by the user.
The control functions are defined through graphical Functional Logic Diagrams (IEC
61131-3: Continuous Function Charts). The following figure shows an example of a
Functional Logic Diagram (FLD).



Figure 9 - Sample Functional Logic Diagram (FLD)
An FLD is split into four main areas:
Information area (bottom) (on hardcopy only),
Input area (left),
Control function area (center), and
2. Concepts and Functions
2.16. Functional Logic Diagrams (FLDs)
48 Experion PKS Overview R410
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Output area (right).
The FLD information area, at the bottom of the FLD, is included on printouts, and
provides information to identify the Functional Logic Diagram, including revision data.
The FLD input area, on the left-hand side of the FLD, contains all the variables that
serve as the input to the control function. Input variables may originate from the field
equipment or from other computer equipment (Experion server, Safety Manager).
Special input functions are provided for:
Diagnostic status of the Safety Manager IO interfaces,
Status of field loops, and
System alarm summary, e.g. temperature pre-alarm or device communication
failure.
Data can be exchanged between FLDs through sheet transfer functions. This allows a
structured design of complex functions across multiple diagrams.
The table below lists the input functions that are available in Safety Manager
functional logic diagrams, together with their source.

Input Type Source
Analog Input Field Equipment
Boolean Input Field Equipment, Process Computer, Other Safety
Manager.
Numerical Input Field Equipment, Process Computer, Other Safety
Manager.
Diagnostic Input Diagnostic status of Safety Manager safe IO interfaces
Loop Status Input Field loop status of Safety Manager IO interfaces with
loop monitoring
System Alarm Input Safety Manager controller
Sheet Transfer Other FLDs

The FLD control function area, which is the central area of the FLD, contains the
actual implementation of the control function. The function is realized by
interconnecting predefined symbols, which provide a variety of functions including
logical, numerical and time-related functions.
Apart from these standard functions, user-definable blocks are supported:
Function Blocks standard FLDs for repetitive use within the control program, and
2. Concepts and Functions
2.16. Functional Logic Diagrams (FLDs)
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Equation Blocks for tabular definition of complex functions. For example, non-
linear equations.
The following table lists the control functions that are available in Safety Manager
functional logic diagrams.

Function Description
Data type conversion
functions
INT SINT
DINT INT, SINT
REAL DINT, INT, SINT
Boolean functions Boolean Constant, AND, OR, XOR, NOT, NAND, NOR,
XNOR, flip-flop set and reset dominant
Arithmetical functions Numerical Constant, AND filter, ADD, SUB, MUL, DIV,
SQR, SQRT, ln(x), e
x

Comparison functions EQ, NEQ, GT, GTE, LT, LTE
Timer functions (with
constant or variable time
value)
Pulse, Pulse-retriggerable, Delayed-ON, Delayed-OFF,
Delayed-ON memorize
Count and storage
functions
Counter, Register
User-definable blocks Equation Block
Function Block

The supported data types are: Boolean, ShortInt (-127 .. +128) Integer (-
32767...32768), LongInt and Real (-1038...1038).
The FLD output area, on the right-hand side of the FLD, contains the results of the
control function. These variables may be used to drive the field equipment or may be
transferred to other computer equipment. For example, a process computer or another
Safety Manager.
The following table lists the output functions that are available in Safety manager
functional logic diagrams, together with their destination.

Output Type Destination
Analog Output Field Equipment
Boolean Output Field Equipment, Process Computer, Other Safety
2. Concepts and Functions
2.17. Custom Display Building
50 Experion PKS Overview R410
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Output Type Destination
Manager.
Numerical Output Field Equipment, Process Computer, Other Safety
Manager.
Sheet Transfer Other FLDs
Timer functions (with
constant or variable time
value)
Pulse, Pulse-retriggerable, Delayed-ON, Delayed-OFF,
Delayed-ON memorize
Count and storage
functions
Counter, Register
User-definable blocks Equation Block
Function Block

2.17 Custom Display Building
HMIWeb Display Builder
You use HMIWeb Display Builder to create your own (custom) displays.
HMIWeb Display Builder is supplied with a set of shape libraries that cover a range of
industries.
You can also insert your own graphics, such as photographs and layout diagrams, using
any of the following formats.
GIF (*.gif)
Windows Bitmap (*.bmp)
JPEG (*.jpg)
Metafile (*.wmf)
Portable Network Graphic (*.png)
The following figure shows a typical custom display created using HMIWeb Display
Builder.

2. Concepts and Functions
2.18. Online Documentation
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Figure 10 - Typical custom display
Display scripts
Experion provides many native functions that minimize the need to write complex
scripts to accomplish appropriate visualization of process conditions in custom
displays. However, if the standard functionality does not provide the needed animation
or capability, then a powerful display scripting subsystem is available to supplement
the native functionality.
2.18 Online Documentation
Knowledge Builder
The online user documentation supplied with Experion is called the Knowledge
Builder. It is created using the familiar HTML language. This permits the support
information to be transmitted and searched over the Internet, Intranet, and yes, even
your facility's standard information network. A unique feature of the Knowledge
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52 Experion PKS Overview R410
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Builder is that, while it utilizes common World-Wide-Web based technologies, we
have removed the need for a web or Intranet server.
This permits your entire facility the option of accessing one central repository of
Experion support information, eliminating or minimizing the need to manage and
update multiple book sets.
KB mode
Knowledge Builder (KB) can be installed in the following modes.
Server mode - The KB server only contains booksets and installs the booksets locally.
The path where the KB booksets are installed is referenced in the following scenarios.
The path is referenced by the KB installed in client mode.
The path is the default KB server path in case you do not provide the KB server
path during KB client installation.
Client mode - The KB client contains tools (KB.exe and KB backup and restore utility)
and installed them on the local computer.
Full mode - The KB full mode contains both KB server and client components. The
selected booksets and KB tools are installed on the same local computer.
Internet-awareness
Honeywell will be providing documentation and training, including updates, over the
Internet to minimize your cost and maximize the expediency of their delivery. We
expect you will also find ways to leverage the power of the Internet to build
efficiencies into the way that you engineer and operate Experion systems.
2.19 Internationalization
Most major processing companies today operate on a global basis. Everyone involved
in the life cycle of a control application (engineers, operators, technicians, electricians,
managers, and so on) is more efficient if they are able to carry out their tasks in their
native language. Experion provides a built-in capability for Honeywell regional offices
to present the system in their local, native language.

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3. Servers and Stations
3.1 Supervisory Infrastructure
Components
Experion's supervisory infrastructure consists of one or more servers and a number of
workstation computers running the Experion's user-interface application called Station.
The workstation computers are usually referred to as "Stations". These components
provide the infrastructure for engineering and operations software applications.
Functions and features
Experion's server and workstation environments provide:
Supervisory level functions, including:
Monitoring and supervisory control of configured processes
Alarming of critical events
Logging and reporting of events either triggered by devices or by operators or
on demand
Recording of process history for pre-designated intervals and displaying by
sampling, mapping, graphing, totaling, and averaging to help you discern trends
Supervisory level features, including:
Time scheduled controls
Segregated database
Local or remote connection
Pre-built infrastructure that includes preformatted displays and reports for
immediate process information viewing
Custom display building
Composite point structure to reduce tag count and group related field data (PID
loop, for example)
Online configuration of channels, controllers and points and customization of
reports and trend displays
Redundant server system option for high availability actively linked for
constant data update
Distributed System Architecture (DSA) that integrates multiple servers into a
single operational system.

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3.2. Server
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3.2 Server
Capability


ATTENTION
Refer to the latest Experion Specification document for the Windows Server
operating system specifications.

Experion server software runs under Windows Server without Hyper-V. The server
contains supervisory control functions, the Experion Global Data infrastructure and
optional redundancy. The server supports object-oriented graphical tools such as
Control Builder and HMIWeb Display Builder and acts as the central repository for all
system data. It also runs all the core system functions, including:
Data acquisition and processing
Alarm and event management
History collection, archiving and trending
Reporting subsystem
Sign-on security
Specialist and user applications
Running on primary (and/or secondary) server nodes.
Alarm and event management
Experion provides comprehensive alarm and event detection, management, and
reporting facilities to speedily target the source of the problem, allowing the operator to
focus on the data of interest in times of urgency. Experion's alarm and event
management includes:
Controller-based alarming.
Multiple alarm priorities.
Standard notification displays of alarms, events, alerts, and messages.
Most recent alarm zone displayed on every screen.
Alarm shelving.
Advanced alarm management such as the ability to:
Launch associated graphic and point detail display on alarm for instant context
Log the "return to normal" status
Filter alarms (for example, by priority, asset, and acknowledgment status)
Log to track operator-initiated actions
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Configure and view aggregate alarm counts (see Alarm aggregation)
Alarm aggregation
Custom operating displays are often organized hierarchically to provide an overview of
the process being monitored and controlled. To enable operators to see alarms in
particular parts of the plant at a glance, aggregated alarm counts can be added to
custom displays.
One way in which you can generate aggregated alarm counts is to configure points into
alarm groups. Alarm groups provide an alternative way of viewing assets and alarms
associated with assets. By using alarm groups, you can create a group of assets and
points that are otherwise unrelated to one another in the asset model. For example, you
may be interested in all mechanically agitated tanks in the plant for the purposes of
monitoring agitator-related alarms across the entire plant.
Operators can also view aggregated alarms counts via your asset model (see Alarm
group model): the asset tree in the location pane on the Alarm Summary display
contains aggregated alarm counts for each asset that contains a point that is in alarm.
Historization
Experion provides history collection over a wide range of frequencies in both average
and snapshot/production formats. Large amounts of history are retained online, with
automatic archiving, allowing retention of and access to unlimited quantities of
historical data.
For more information regarding historization, refer to Process History Analysis and
Archiving.
Trending
Experion provides advanced trending facilities in a number of formats through simple
configuration. Trends are easily configured online through standard trend displays,
without the need to build special displays. See the following figure for a typical trend
display.


3. Servers and Stations
3.2. Server
56 Experion PKS Overview R410
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Figure 11 - Typical trend display
Real-time and historical data are presented together on the same trend. Archived
history may be accessed automatically by simply scrolling to, or directly entering, the
appropriate time and date. Because Experion supports copying/pasting, users can copy
trend data to other applications such as Microsoft Excel.
For more information regarding trending, refer to Analyzing process history.
Reporting
For analyzing key system data, Experion provides a range of standard reports,
including:
Alarm/Event reports all alarms and events in a specified time period. By using
filters, this report provides an operator and/or point trace facility.
Alarm Duration reports the time of occurrence and elapsed time before return-to-
normal for specific alarms in a specified time period.
Point Attribute reports on points displaying specific attributes, such as off-scan,
bad data, and alarm inhibit.
Cross Reference determines database references for specified points to enable
easier system maintenance when points are decommissioned or renamed.
Integrated Microsoft Excel Report allows Excel-based reports to be scheduled
like other pre-formatted reports.
3. Servers and Stations
3.2. Server
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Safety Manager System information and diagnostics report the status of the
diagnostic based Safety Manager. It will give an overview of the important Safety
Manager properties such as temperature behavior, execution time and the overrides
currently applied in the Safety Manager Controller.
If you have special reporting needs, you can use:
Integrated Microsoft Excel Reports to design your own reports in Microsoft
Excel and run them from a Station like a standard report.
Free Format Report Writer option to modify standard reports, and to create your
own reports and then add them to the list of standard reports
Reports may be generated periodically, or on an event-driven or demand basis, and
may be configured on line. Outputs may be directed to screen, printer, file, or directly
to another computer for analysis or electronic viewing.
For more information regarding reporting, refer to Understanding Reports.
Redundancy
The server supports redundant server configurations providing a warm fail over
architecture with online database replication. This differs dramatically from the more
typical PC-based systems, which run two independent servers that are not
synchronized at the database level.
The server redundancy scheme supports temporary removal of a server for
maintenance. When the server is brought back online, the databases can be re-
synchronized at the touch of a button.
Distributed System Architecture
The Distributed System Architecture (DSA) option enables multiple systems to share
point data, alarms, messages, and history without the need for duplicate configuration
on any server. It also provides global access to Experion data on all servers in the
system. Each server provides automatic dynamic caching of remote data for all of its
clients, so that clients access their local server for all data. This mechanism ensures
maximum efficiency both on the servers and over the network.

3. Servers and Stations
3.2. Server
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WAN
Site A
Site B
Site C
Master Control Center


Figure 12 - A geographically distributed system

Plant-Wide Network
Plant A
Plant B
Plant C


Figure 13 - A plant-wide distributed system
3. Servers and Stations
3.3. Stations
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Server scripts
You can add extra functionality to your system by writing server scripts. A server
script runs when the associated event occurs, for example, when:
A point changes state
An operator acknowledges an alarm
The server starts
A report is generated
Server scripts can also include:
Periodic scripts, which run at periodic intervals while the server is running
Library scripts, which perform specialized functions when called by other server
scripts
Specialized server software options
Experion provides a range of specialized options that you can license, including:
Controller interface options (each interface enables the server to communicate with
a particular type of controller)
Point Control Scheduler option can be used to schedule supervisory control for
specified points. This option means an operator does not have to be present to
exercise control.
Recipe Manager option is used to load sets of points with pre-configured values. A
recipe is a set of point values that serve as the "ingredients" for a process.
Redundancy option provides a high availability architecture where a backup system
is actively linked for constant data updating.
Application Programming Library option consists of set of routines that can be used
to develop user-written applications that run on the server.
3.3 Stations
Flexibility
Station is Experion's main human interface. (Station uses a series of Web-style displays
to present process information in a user-friendly manner. These are described in the
Process Monitoring and Data Display section of this document.
The following topics describe the various Station configurations and options, each of
which has been optimized to meet specific requirements.
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Flex Stations
A Flex Station is the most common Station configuration. It typically runs on a
standard PC and communicates with the server using either of the following two
connection types:
Static. A permanent, dedicated connection. This is the recommended connection
type for Flex Stations used by operators.
Rotary. An "as required" connection. This is the recommended connection type for
users who do not need full-time access to the server, or who need remote access
(typically through a modem). Rotary connections are advantageous from a
licensing viewpoint because the license specifies the maximum number of
simultaneous Station connections.
Console Stations, Console Extension Stations, and Consoles
A Console Station is a Station that connects directly to a Process Controller, FIM,
IOLIM, or ACE node as well as to an Experion server
Console Stations are advisable in an environment where continuity of view is
paramount and where it is important to minimize the impact of a server being
unavailable. Because Console Stations can directly access process data, alarms and
messages from C200/C200E, C300, ACE, and so on, there is no loss of view of critical
data and alarms when the server fails and therefore an operator can still control and
monitor the process.
For each Console Station, you can connect up to three Console Extension Stations.
Console Extension Stations connect to a Console Station in the same way that a Flex
Station connects to an Experion server.
A Console is a logical grouping of Console Stations and Console Extension Stations
constituting a single workspace for an operator. In general, Console Stations and their
Console Extension Stations are grouped together physically.
A Console can include the following combinations:
A Console Station with a Console Extension Station
Multiple Console Stations
Multiple Console Stations with Console Extension Stations
Multiple-window Station configurations
There are two Station configurations that provide a multiple-window setup:
Multi-window Station. A Flex or Console Station that uses SafeView to manage
several windows (typically two or four), each of which can contain a separate
display. Multi-window Station enables you to control the placement of displays in
the various windows. For example, you may want the Alarm Summary display in
3. Servers and Stations
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the top-left window, a trend display in the top-right window and a point detail
display in the bottom-right window.
Multiple static Station. A computer that has up to four instances of Flex Station
running simultaneously. Note that each instance requires its own static connection
to the server. This option is only available for Flex Stations to meet legacy needs. It
is not available for ES-C and ES-CE.
In practice, both setups require specialized hardware, such as an Icon Console.
Mobile Station
Mobile Station enables users with handheld devices to access displays through a local
wireless network.
Mobile Station provides the following levels of access and control:
Mobile Access for eServer Standard. Provides "snapshots" of displays, in which
the data is valid at the time of the snapshot. This option does not provide any
process control functions.
Mobile Access for eServer Premium. Provides "live" displays, in which the data
is regularly updated. This option does not provide any process control functions.
Mobile Access for Station. Provides users with the same level of access and
control as a normal Station.
eServer and casual Web access
An eServer gives casual users read-only access to displays and reports using a browser
such as Microsoft Windows Internet Explorer. An eServer also simplifies
administration because it consolidates the management, security and licensing of
casual user accounts.
An eServer provides two levels of access:
Premium. Provides access to displays that are updated in the normal manner.
Standard. Provides snapshots of displays that are not updated. (To check for
changes to data, the user must request a new snapshot by using the browser's
refresh function.)
Specialized Station hardware
In general, Station runs on a standard computer, with a standard keyboard, monitor and
mouse. However, Station supports most Windows-compliant peripherals such as
trackballs and touch-screens, as well as two specialized keyboards:
Operator Entry Panel (OEP). This is a membrane-style keyboard with dedicated
function keys. It is suited for use by operators in harsh environments.
Integrated Operator Keyboard (IKB). This consists of a standard keyboard
combined with dedicated function keys and built-in trackball. It is suited for use by
3. Servers and Stations
3.3. Stations
62 Experion PKS Overview R410
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operators who need a large number of function keys in addition to a standard
keyboard.
For demanding tasks, you can use Honeywell's Icon Console, which includes up to four
flat-panel monitors and an OEP.



Figure 14 - Honeywell's Icon Console
Either of Station's multiple-window configurations is suitable for use with an Icon
Console.
3. Servers and Stations
3.3. Stations
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Station security
There are two types of Station security:
Operator-based. Each user is assigned an ID, and signs on to a Station with a
password. Operator-based security is appropriate if you need to specify each user's
access and control rights, or where an operator remains at the Station throughout a
shift.
Station-based. A Station provides operator-level access to any user. However,
users can move to a higher level if they know the password for that level on that
Station.
You can also restrict a Station's ability to display Web pages and ActiveX documents
by either restricting access entirely or specifying the pages/documents that can be
accessed.
Integrated Security
With Integrated Security, each user has an integrated account, which is a combination
of a Windows user account and a Station operator account. The security settings stored
in the Windows user account are used to authenticate the user, whereas the security
settings in the Station operator account are used to control the user's authority within
Experion.
Note that you must use Station's operator-based security, if you want to use Integrated
Security.
Single signon
If you are using integrated accounts you can set up single signon. With single signon,
operators only need to log on to Windows when they start their computer and do not
need to enter their logon details again when they start Station. This is particularly
useful where operators need to start up multiple instances of Station.
Windows group accounts
If you are using integrated accounts, you can use Windows group accounts to add
multiple users to Experion by simply adding the Windows group. Users within the
Windows group can then log on to Station in the same manner as traditional operator
accounts or integrated accounts.
Signon Manager
If you use Windows-based security, and want to keep Station running during user
changeovers-for example, when operators change shift-you need to use Signon
Manager. (Without Signon Manager, the outgoing user must close Station and log off
Windows; and the incoming must log on and restart Station.)
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Signon Manager is also recommended if you have a multiple static Station (see
Multiple-window setups) because it enables users to simultaneously log on/off each
instance of Station.
If you have installed a supported smart card reader, Signon Manager can be configured
so that operators not only have to use a smart card for authentication but may also be
required to enter a PIN as well as a password.
Note that Signon Manager requires Integrated Security.
Electronic signatures
An electronic signature is the legally binding equivalent of an operator's handwritten
signature.
You can configure an action to require one or two electronic signatures before the
action is performed. (You can also require a reason to be specified before the action is
performed.)
Each time such an action is performed, an event records the name of the operator(s)
who initiated the action, the specified reason and the date/time.
High Security Policy
The High Security Policy provides an appropriate security configuration for each user
type: operator, supervisor, engineer and so on.
The High Security Policy is based on the Windows Security Model, but has been is
optimized for use with Experion and related products with the addition of specialized
security templates, accounts and groups.
Note that you need a domain controller if you want to use the High Security Policy.

3. Servers and Stations
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3.4 Data Exchange
TPS Integration
You can completely integrate your TPS system with Experion by upgrading to
Experion Stations and controllers. You get the benefits of an upgraded system while
protecting your investment in existing equipment and the associated configuration and
graphics.
Experion Stations TPS (ES-T) are fully functional Experion Console Stations which have a
direct connection to the LCN. ES-Ts are the primary interface to TPS data on an upgraded
system.
The optionally redundant Experion Server TPS (ESVT) has direct connections to the LCN, as
shown in the following figure. A server is required on every LCN to support Experion Stations
and controllers. One redundant ESVT per LCN is supported. It is a fully functional Experion
Server in addition to having an LCN connection



Figure 15 - Sample Upgraded System with Experion Controller Expansion

3. Servers and Stations
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66 Experion PKS Overview R410
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ATTENTION
With R400, the TPS GUS and TPS APP nodes are merged with the Experion
PKS system. The TPS GUS is referred as GUS node and the TPS APP node
is referred as APP node in Experion.

Consistent alarms behavior
The view and control of alarms on an upgraded system is fully consistent. For assigned
LCN units, the alarm summaries on all Experion Station TPS, GUS and Universal
Stations are identical. Alarms can be silenced and acknowledged from any of these
stations and all other users see and respond to this.
Graphics support
Experion HMIWeb graphics fully support points from LCN controllers. Solution pack
shapes, conforming to the Abnormal Situation Management Consortium guidelines, are
available for both LCN and Experion points and controllers. Points and controllers
from both LCN and Experion can be mixed freely in any HMIWeb graphics.
Expand with Experion controllers
You can expand or upgrade by adding Experion C200/C200E and C300 controllers.
These controllers connect through Fault Tolerant Ethernet. The required infrastructure
to support Experion controller is included on all ESVT and ES-Ts.
Application Control Environment TPS (ACE-T) Node
The ACE-T supports control strategies built in the same Control Execution
Environment (CEE) as the C200/C200E and C300 controllers. These are built and
monitored with the same tool. ACE supports Control Application Block (CAB) visual
basic applications. UCNOUT and HIWAYOUT connection blocks are supported for
creating cascade connections to UCN and Hiway-based controllers, including
initialization and anti-windup. A single control strategy can include controllers from
Experion, UCN and Data Hiway.
Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) Driver
The ODBC driver allows ODBC-compliant client applications, such as Crystal
Reports, or Microsoft Access, to retrieve Experion data.
Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) Data Exchange
ODBC Data Exchange enables data to be transferred between the server database and
an ODBC-compliant database. The data can be transferred on event or periodically.
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Microsoft Excel Data Exchange (MEDE)
MEDE incorporates a wizard that provides an efficient means of reading real-time and
historical data from Experion servers into an Excel spreadsheet. You can also enable
the writing back of data to the Experion database.
OLE for Process Control (OPC)
Experion provides the following OPC interfaces, each of which has been optimized for
a particular purpose:
Experion OPC Client Interface is primarily designed for integrating low-
complexity subsystems, such as controllers. Configuration involves individually
mapping OPC items to standard Experion points (analog, status and so on). If you
require alarming for an item, you must configure the associated point's alarm
properties.
Experion OPC Advanced Client includes a data client, and an alarm and event
client for connection to third-party OPC servers:
Experion OPC Advanced Data Client is primarily designed for integrating
complex subsystems, and is compliant with the OPC 2.0 Data Access
specification. Such systems typically have OPC items with multiple parameters,
and are capable of generating their own, often broad range of, alarms. It also
performs dynamic communications optimization. Only those parameters (items)
that are currently being accessed-in displays, reports and so on-are subscribed
from the OPC server. The points are dynamically subscribed and unsubscribed
as required to minimize load on the source system.
Experion OPC Advanced Alarm and Event Client enables Experion to
receive alarms and events from third-party OPC alarm and event servers. OPC
alarms are displayed and acknowledged in the same way as Experion alarms,
giving operators a uniform user interface. For example, when an OPC alarm is
received, it appears in the Alarm Summary; and when an operator
acknowledges the alarm, confirmation of the acknowledgement is sent to the
OPC alarm and event server. The Experion OPC Advanced Alarm and Event
Client is based on the OPC Foundation Alarm and Events Specification
(Version 1.0).
Experion Display Data Client is designed to be used when you want to add OPC
items to custom displays, but have no requirement for advanced features such as
alarms, history or reporting. (You can directly add OPC items to custom displays,
without having to first define them as points in Quick Builder.)
Experion OPC Data Access Server gives an OPC client read/write access to
Experion point parameters. It is compliant with the OPC 2.0 Data Access
specification, and can accept connections from either OPC 1.0 or 2.0 clients. The
Experion OPC Data Access Server supports all mandatory OPC interfaces,
3. Servers and Stations
3.4. Data Exchange
68 Experion PKS Overview R410
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including an automation interface for application development in Visual Basic, as
well as the IOPCBrowseServerAddressSpace interface.
Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server allows an OPC alarm and event client to
receive alarm and event information from Experion. It is compliant with the OPC
1.02 Foundation Alarm and Event Specification.
Experion OPC History Data Access Server allows an OPC history data access
client to receive history information from Experion. It is compliant with the OPC
1.2 Foundation History Data Access Specification.
Experion OPC Integrator is designed to allow data to be transferred bi-
directionally between two or more OPC servers. The Experion OPC Integrator
supports redundant servers, and is therefore itself redundant; it also supports
redundant third-party OPC servers. The following scenarios illustrate typical uses
of the Experion OPC Integrator:
You have a system that provides an OPC data access server, but not an OPC
client. However, the system needs to retrieve data from Experion.
Experion data needs to be transferred to a third-party OPC server whenever it
changes, irrespective of the reason for the change (including when the data is
changed by an operator).
You have C200/C200E Process Controllers and need to transfer data efficiently
between the controllers at the supervisory control layer.
Experion Application Programming Interface (API)
The Experion API allows programmers to create applications that run on the server.
These applications can be written in C/C++. The API Library includes libraries of
functions, header files, and sample source programs to help programmers create
applications.
Network API
Network API allows programmers to create network applications in Visual C/C++, and
Visual Basic languages. Network API has libraries of functions, header files,
documentation, and sample source programs to help programmers create network
applications.

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4. Process Control Hardware
4.1 Control Hardware Infrastructure
Basic Components


ATTENTION
The C300 20mS CEE has been introduced to support Turbine control
solutions. It has a faster base period of 20 ms and supports two new Series C
IO modules - Speed Protection Module (SPD) and Servo Valve Positioner
(SVP) Module along with Series C IO modules.

The Experion platform offers a traditional chassis-based hardware infrastructure and a
Series C form factor infrastructure featuring a unique vertical design for enhanced
component mounting and wiring. Each infrastructure provides a common approach to
Controller and I/O configurations, which can be integrated to support an economical
evolution path. Common chassis, cabinets, power supplies and communication media
are employed across the basic system. Typical control hardware components include:
C200 Control Processor Module (CPM) is the Control module within the C200
Process Controller in which Experion control strategies execute. It communicates
with Input/Output (I/O) Modules and peer devices via the Integrated Control
Protocol (ICP) backplane and the connected ControlNet network. Together with an
ICP backplane and I/O devices, the CPM constitutes a controller. It may also be
referred to as the C200 controller, since C200 identifies the current version of the
CPM.
C200E Controller (C200E) is an enhanced C200 Controller with additional user
memory and an enhanced function block set. The C200E Controller provides
increased user memory from 4 MB to 16 MB. The C200E Controller supports the
following supervisory networks.
FTE through the Fault Tolerant Ethernet Bridge
ControlNet through the ControlNet Interface
C300 Process Controller (C300) is the Series C form factor controller that
executes Experion control strategies. It communicates with Input/Output (I/O)
Modules and peer devices through the FTE network and the connected C300 I/O
link on its I/O termination assembly (IOTA). You can communicate with Chassis-
Series A I/O, C200/C200E controller, and programmable logic controller (PLC)
through the Fault Tolerant Ethernet Bridge module mounted in the respective
chassis.
Safety Manager Controller is the SIL 3 safety controller that executes safety
strategies independently from the process control layer. It communicates with
dedicated Input/Output (I/O) modules that are directly connected to the Safety
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Manager controller. Safety manager is a fully redundant controller that seamlessly
integrates in the Experion topology. Safety Manager Controllers can connect to
each other through a dedicated network or through the FTE network. The "SafeNet"
connection is a SIL 4 certified safety protocol.
Process, Machinery and Drives (PMD) Controller is a controller unit that
contains an integrated application execution environment, two independent fieldbus
interfaces, an Upline interface, an FTE system interface.
I/O Modules (either local to a processor or as remote I/O), which provide the
terminals and processing power to accept input signals from transmitters,
thermocouples, etc. and send output signals to valves, motors, etc. A variety of I/O
modules are available for analog inputs/outputs and digital inputs/outputs. Experion
also offers Serial Interface and Pulse Input Modules. The Series C I/O or Process
Manager I/O can connect directly to the I/O links on the C300 controller.
Series C I/O is the family of Series C form factor I/O modules designed to operate
with the C300 controller. The Series C I/O is optionally available as redundant.
With R410, the following Series C I/O modules are introduced.
Series C Pulse Input Module (SCPIM)
Universal Input/Output (UIO) module
For more information about the new Series C I/O modules, refer to Series C I/O
User's Guide.
ControlNet Interface Module(s) (CNI) links the C200/C200E controller with
remote I/O module chassis (up to 8) via the I/O Network and/or other system
controllers and plant networks via ControlNet.
Control Firewall 9-Port Switch controls Ethernet communications and provides
FTE connections to the C300 controller domain. It rejects Ethernet messages that
are not needed for control. If control communication starts to slow, it controls the
flow of messages of lower importance.
Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) Supervisory Network Support is the default
communications medium for the Series C form factor components. It can be
optionally configured using a Fault Tolerant Ethernet Bridge module for the FTE
Supervisory Network connection between the server and the C200/C200E Process
Controller.
ETHERNET Supervisory Network Support can be optionally configured using
10baseT Ethernet for the Supervisory Network connection between the server and
the C200/C200E Process Controller. An ICP chassis based Ethernet Module is used
instead of the Uplink CNI Module.
Redundancy Module (RM) with a C200/C200E controller chassis provides
automatic backup for the primary C200/C200E controller. It can also be used in
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chassis containing Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Modules (CIOM-A
FIM) to support redundant fieldbus operation.
PCIC - ControlNet Module is a PCI Bus Card that increases the available
ControlNet bandwidth usage from the Experion server. This module is installed in a
slot in the server.
Profibus Gateway Module (PGM) is an interface module that can be used with
C300 Controller to connect and communicate with the Profibus devices. The PGM
is developed in the Series C form factor for use with the C300 Controller. The
PGM module is an FTE resident module.
With R410, the following enhancements are supported.
Processing HART data using Turck Excom DSB
Gateway redundancy
User-defined Template (UDT) support for Device Support Blocks (DSB)
Remote IO (RIO) diagnostics support
Generic Device Support Blocks (GENIODSB) support
For more information about the enhancements, refer to PROFIBUS Gateway
Module User's Guide.
Turbine Control Solution is a solution to improve plant performance and
reliability. This solution is suitable for applications like steam turbine control in
power plants, steam turbine driven auxiliaries control, centrifugal compressor
control, and other fast process control applications.
With R410, the following enhancements are supported.
Flow measurement
Angular measurement
Two servo output current drives
For more information about the enhancements, refer to Turbine Control
User's Guide.
Extension Component


ATTENTION
Refer to the latest Experion Specification document for the Windows
operating system specifications.

The Experion system offers a variety of additional components that let you adapt the
system to ever expanding data gathering and control interfacing requirements. These
extension components include:
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Application Control Environment (ACE) turns a computer using a Windows Server
operating system into a supervisory controller that mirrors the basic operations of a
Control Processor Module (CPM). It provides the additional capability of
communicating with OPC servers through a Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) or
redundant or non-redundant Ethernet network. You can also connect an ACE
supervisory controller directly to a supervisory ControlNet network to support peer-to-
peer communications with a C200/C200E Process Controller.
Simulation Control Environment (SCE) turns a computer using a Windows
operating system into an advanced simulation environment to support Honeywell's
Shadow Plant simulator. The SCE is designed to emulate the same Control Execution
Environment (CEE) functions found in the Control Processor Module (CPM) of the
C200/C200E Process Controller or the Application Control Environment (ACE)
supervisory controller to provide high fidelity simulation of control strategies. It
requires the same system server and operator Station support as the other system
controllers. The components are connected through the Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE)
or Ethernet network.
Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Module (CIOM-A FIM) serves as the
communication gateway between the Supervisory ControlNet and/or I/O ControlNet
network and the Foundation Fieldbus H1 communications medium. It includes a
Remote Termination Panel (RTP) for connecting and powering up to two fieldbus H1
links. It lets you seamlessly integrate fieldbus devices with your Control Builder
configured control strategies.
Series C Fieldbus Interface Module (FIM4) is the Series C form factor version of the
CIOM-A FIM and serves as the communication gateway between the Supervisory
Fault Tolerant Ethernet network and the Foundation Fieldbus H1 communications
medium. Its input/output termination assembly provides up to four fieldbus H1 links.
An optional power conditioner supplies redundant power to all four H1 links on the
associated Series C Fieldbus Interface Module as well as alarm contacts to monitor
circuit status.
I/O Link Interface Module (IOLIM) serves as the communication gateway between
the Supervisory ControlNet and the Process Manager Input/Output components. It lets
you seamlessly integrate Input/Output Processors (IOPs) with your Control Builder
Configured control strategies.
Rail Input/Output Module - Series A (RIOM-A) complements the existing system
chassis I/O Modules by providing a seamless integration with the ControlNet
communications network through a Gateway.
Rail Input/Output Module - Series H (RIOM-H) complements the existing system
chassis I/O Modules by providing a seamless integration with the ControlNet
communications network through a Galvanically Isolated/Intrinsically Safe (GI/IS)
Gateway and a fiber optic-coupling scheme. They are designed for use in locations
with potentially explosive atmospheres.
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4.2. Process Controller
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PROFIBUS Interface Module Block (PBIM) - serves as control strategy interface to
the chassis mounted SST-PB3-CLX-HWL module that interfaces to devices on a
PROFIBUS DP network.


ATTENTION
The PROFIBUS interface Module SST-PB3-CLX-HWL (SAP item
1120160021), manufactured by Molex Inc. (formerly Woodhead / SST),
supersedes models SST-PBF-CLX and SST-PBF-CLX-RLL.

HART Input/Output Integration - complements the existing system chassis I/O
Modules or Process Manager IOPs by providing seamless integration with the
ControlNet communications network through HART (Highway Addressable Remote
Transducer) communication capable analog input and analog output modules installed
in the chassis. A HART software multiplexer application resides in the server to further
enhance the communication interface.
DeviceNet Interface Module - serves as the communication bridge between the I/O
ControlNet network and the DeviceNet network. Requires interface to personal
computer running the RSNetWorx application to handle DeviceNet configuration
requirements. It lets you seamlessly integrate DeviceNet devices with your Control
Builder configured control strategies.
Non-CEE points are PMD, SCADA, TPS, and Safety Manager points. With R410,
these points can be peer-to-peer communicated to the CEE points such as
C300/C200E/ACE points.
4.2 Process Controller
About the controller
The C200/C200E or C300 Process Controller handles all possible control
requirements, whether for continuous processes, batch processes, discrete operations,
or machine control needs.


ATTENTION
A C300 20mS CEE controller has been introduced for Honeywell Turbine
Control Solutions.
For detailed information refer to the C300 Controller Users Guide.

The C200/C200E Process Controller architecture supports one common set of multiple
size chassis for both Control Processor and remote chassis I/O configurations. The
power supplies are attached, but separate from the chassis and support both 115/230
Vac and 24 Vdc sources. A single ControlNet communications module, available in
4. Process Control Hardware
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both non-redundant and redundant media configuration, supports all controller-to-
server and controller-to-I/O networking. The Control Processor (CPM) provides the
plant-level control execution environment (CEE) for your control applications. The I/O
system supports discrete, analog, and special function modules.
The C300 Process Controller architecture features an innovative vertical design for
more efficient mounting and wiring. It includes integral connections for redundant FTE
media and Series C I/O or Process Manager I/O modules. It supports redundant
configuration through a dedicated connection and provides the control execution
environment (CEE) for your control applications like the C200/C200E controller. The
Control Firewall ensures data integrity and an integrated power subsystem distributes
power efficiently within a cabinet. The discreet and analog Series C I/O are optionally
redundant.
The PMD Controller architecture supports a single automation system to control a
production plants continuous and batch processes, machines and drives. The PMD
Controller can be utilized on all plants control levels for implementing advanced
controls, fast machine controls and process controls. For more information about
Experion PKS with PMD Integration, refer to Experion PKS with PMD Controller
Overview Guide.
Chassis
Experion supports a common chassis backplane technology that may be used for either
C200/C200E controller or remote chassis I/O. This minimizes the cost while
maximizing the flexibility of the system.
Five different size chassis assemblies provide you with scalability and flexibility in
your control system layout. Each chassis, with cards installed, is 14 cm (5.5 in.) high
and 17 cm (6.7 in.) deep. Length is dependent upon the number of slots the chassis
provides. Chassis sizes, by number of slots, include:
4-Slot, 26 cm (10.4 in.) in length
7-Slot, 37 cm (14.5 in.) in length
10-Slot, 49 cm (19 in.) in length
13-Slot, 59 cm (23.5 in.) in length
17-Slot, 69 cm (27.7 in.) in length
Control Processor
The C200/C200E or C300 Control Processor is designed for integrated continuous
loop, Boolean logic, motor, sequence and batch control functions.
The specific functions of I/O Processing (via IOMs), Modulating/Logic Control (via
CMs), and Sequential Control (via SCMs) are selected and defined by configuration
prior to process operation. I/O Processing, Modulating/Logic Control, and Sequence
Control have access to a common database that includes current parameter values for
4. Process Control Hardware
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all IOMs, CMs, and SCMs controlled by all controllers on the supervisory network.
The operator also has access to these parameters through Station displays.



Figure 16 - C200 Control Processor

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4.2. Process Controller
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Figure 17 - C300 Control Processor
Controller redundancy
Process control applications require that the controller recognize when its integrity has
been compromised and it should fail over to a back up processor in a bumpless fashion.
Honeywell's previous fail over schemes from the Process Manager family of process
controllers have been built into Experion's controller redundancy scheme. This
patented technology deals with:
Fault detection
Guaranteed database synchronization
Bumpless failure. The C200/C200E Controller achieves redundancy through
matching chassis configurations that include a Redundancy Module with a
dedicated link. The Series C form factor components include redundant capability
as an integral part of their design. The input/output termination assembly (IOTA)
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for the C300 Controller includes a connector for a dedicated redundancy link to
another C300 Controller. This makes installing and configuring a redundancy
scheme in a C300 Controller domain more efficient.




Figure 18 - Redundancy Module For C200 Controller Redundancy


4 character display
Primary LED
Comm LED
OK LED
Front View
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Figure 19 - Module redundancy for C200 Controller in redundant
supervisory ControlNet networks

Controller
LAN (TCP/IP, Ethernet, etc.)
Redundant Supervisory
ControlNet networks
A
B
A
B
Redundant I/O ControlNet networks
Server
Station
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Figure 20 - C300 Controller redundancy in supervisory Fault Tolerant
Ethernet network
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Bumpless failure
The redundancy aspects implemented in the Experion system are far superior to those
available today by PC/PLC systems. The most critical failure task, switching the
controller in a bumpless fashion, has been fully implemented in the Experion system.
Chassis I/O
The Experion chassis I/O -Series A modules are an expanding family of traditional and
special function input/output signal interface devices. The traditional models are
available in a wide variety of densities, including 6, 8, 16 and 32 points, and they can
interface to AC, DC or TTL voltage levels as well as common thermocouple and RTD
sensors. The output modules are available with analog solid state AC, solid state DC
or relay contact type output. The special function models include a Pulse Input Module
(PIM) for counting dc pulses and a Serial Interface Module (SIM) for accepting
asynchronous serial communications based on an EIA-232 (RS-232) or EIA-422/485
(RS-422/485) standard. The PIM provides up to eight input channels and two output
channels and also provides channel-to-channel and terminal-to-backplane isolation.
All I/O modules, except the SIM, have a small form factor (5 inches by 5 inches) and
feature deterministic I/O update rates and diagnostic capabilities. They can support
local, front of module or remote terminations and software configuration. These I/O
modules, except the SIM, share the same basic layout as illustrated in the following
figure.



Figure 21 - Chassis I/O Module Basic Layout
DIGITAL INPUT
24 vdc 16 PT lsol
O
K
ST
ST
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Chassis I/O terminal connectors
The chassis I/O has a uniquely designed termination connector that supports Removal
and Insertion Under Power (RIUP) for field termination and backplane connectors.
Field wiring connectors allow RIUP to be accomplished without any detrimental effect
on the I/O module operation. RIUP is accomplished on the field wiring connector by
the length of the connecting pins. When removing the connector, the signal is broken
first and when inserting the connector, the commons are connected first.


REFERENCE - INTERNAL
Review the Removal and Insertion Under Power (RIUP) Function Guidelines
in the Control Hardware Installation Guide before you RIUP any module.

A jumper bar is shipped with each I/O module so that commons can be tied together
very quickly, without the need for wiring. The front door of the housing opens and
provides a handle for the removal of the connector from the I/O module. Labels are
provided to attach to the inside of the connector door for identification of the field
wire.
Series C I/O
The Series C I/O is an expanding family of Series C form factor I/O modules for
handling a variety of analog and discreet I/O signals as wells as HART protocol
interfaces. The Series C I/O module mounts directly on its mating I/O termination
assembly (IOTA) for efficient mounting and wiring. All Series C I/O is optionally
redundant by simply adding a second matching Series C I/O module to its I/O
termination assembly. The following illustration shows a typical non-redundant Series
C I/O hardware configuration.

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Figure 22 - Typical non-redundant Series C I/O configuration

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4.3 Safety Controller
Safety Manager System Configurations
Safety Manager is available in several configurations to suit virtually every process
control requirement. The following table lists the Safety Manager system
configurations that are available, together with their main characteristics.
Table 1 Safety Manager System Configurations
Type Safety Manager
Controller
Safety
Manager IO
Interface
Typical
Application
Architecture
Non-redundant
(single)
Non-redundant Non-redundant Critical process
control with
redundancy in field
equipment
DMR
Redundant Redundant Non-redundant Critical process
control with
redundancy in field
equipment
DMR
Redundant Redundant Critical process
control
QMR
Combined Redundant Redundant &
Non-redundant
Burner/Boiler
Management
System with
Safety Manager -
controlled alarm
panel
Fire and Gas
QMR
DMR = Dual Modular Redundant
QMR = Quadruple Modular Redundant

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Safety Manager basic architectures
Safety Manager can be configured for a number of architectures, each with its own
characteristics and typical applications. The following table provides an overview of
the available architectures.
Table 2 System Manager Architectures

Controller configuration IO configuration Remarks
Non-redundant (DMR) Non-redundant DMR architecture;
Applications up to and
including SIL3
Redundant (QMR) Non-redundant
Redundant
Redundant and non-
redundant
QMR architecture;
Applications up to and
including SIL3
DMR = Dual Modular Redundant
QMR = Quadruple Modular Redundant

All Safety Manager architectures can be used for safety applications up to and
including SIL 3. The preferred architecture depends on the availability requirements
The Safety Manager Controller consists of:
Controller chassis
Control Processor (one or two)
Battery & Key switch Module
Controller chassis
The SM controller is placed in the CP chassis (CPCHAS). The CP backplane (CPB),
which is integrated into the CP chassis, has the following functions:
A 32 bit Redundant System Bus between the Control Processors
5 Vdc and WD distribution to the IO chassis,
I/O bus connections,
Communication connections,
Incoming 24Vdc power for both Control Processors,
ESD input, and
Three common system inputs.

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The following figure shows also that the CP chassis is covered at the back.



Figure 23 - Front and Rear View of the CP chassis
Control Processor
The Control Processor (CP) is the heart of the SM controller. It is a modular
microprocessor system specifically designed for safety-critical applications and can be
tailored to the requirements of many applications. The main Control Processor modules
are:
Quad Processor Pack (QPP)
Universal Safety Interface (USI)
Power Supply Unit (PSU)
The Control Processor modules are constructed on a European standard size instrument
card. The height of the front panel of the modules is 4 HE (4U), their width is 8 TE (8
HP) (USI, SMM, PSU and BKM module), and the QPP module is 16 TE wide. The
Control Processor modules are placed in the CP Chassis (19-inch chassis), which are
generally located in the top section of the cabinet.

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Figure 24 - Safety manager Control Processor Modules
Quad Processor Pack (QPP)
The QPP reads the process inputs and executes the application program created with
the Application Editor. The results of the control program are transmitted to the output
interfaces. In Safety Manager configurations with a redundant Controller, both QPPs
synchronize their operation through a dedicated redundant communication channel,
integrated in the Controller backplane. Through continuous testing of Safety Manager
hardware and software integrity, the QPP ensures safe operation as well as extensive
diagnostics.
The QPP contains a watchdog circuit. It automatically monitors the correct functioning
and the operating conditions of the QPP safety processors. The watchdog circuits
include the following functions:
A unique feature of the Safety Manager watchdog is that it verifies if the processor
executes its tasks within the defined cycle time.
The monitored operating conditions include the data integrity check of the
processor memory and the voltage range check of the supply power (under voltage
and over voltage).
Deactivate the safety-critical outputs of Safety Manager, regardless of the QPP
status, whenever required.


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The QPP is also equipped with the following items:
4 bus drivers to drive the IO chassis
A status LED
Display to show time, date, system information, system status and diagnostics
Key switch
Universal Safety Interface (USI)
USI is a communication module with universal safety interfaces. Safety Manager uses
the USI to exchange information with other equipment.
The USI is equipped with 2 Ethernet interfaces and 2 serial interfaces, for either RS232
or RS485 (configurable). A Control Processor can accommodate two USI modules
with a maximum of eight external communication links.
IO bus
The Control Processor controls I/O (located in the IO chassis) through an I/O bus. An
I/O extender (located in the I/O chassis) communicates with the individual I/O modules
through a horizontal I/O bus.
The Control Processor interfaces with the I/O system through an I/O bus, which is a
flat cable that runs vertically in the cabinet. The I/O-bus is controlled by the I/O Bus
Driver function, which is part of the QPP module.

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Figure 25 - Back View of Typical Safety Manager with Redundant
Controller and I/O Chassis
Each of the I/O chassis contains an I/O extender IO-0001 module, which connects to
the I/O-bus. The I/O extender module drives the Horizontal I/O Bus, which relays the
signals from the I/O-bus to the I/O modules through a flat cable. The Horizontal I/O
bus back plane is located on top of each I/O chassis. The Horizontal I/O bus and the
flat cables of the I/O modules are covered with a sheet steel cover which provides
optimum EMC/RFI immunity. The cover plate contains a paper strip which holds the
relevant process tagging for signal identification.
I/O modules
The I/O modules are constructed on a European standard-size instrument card. The
height of the front panel of the modules is 3 HE (3U), their width is 4 TE (4 HP). A
total of 18 I/O modules can be placed per I/O chassis. All I/O modules are equipped
with standard 32-pin DIN 41612F connectors. All I/O chassis are provided with an I/O
backplane, which contains matching 32-pin connectors with key coding to prevent
miss-insertion of the I/O modules.

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Figure 26 - Example of the High Density SAi 1620m Module
Safety Manager provides an extensive selection of digital and analog input and output
interfaces, with different characteristics, to meet the demands of a wide range of field
equipment. The following table lists the input and output interfaces available with
Safety Manager.

Interface Properties
Digital Input 24 Vdc, 48 Vdc and 110 Vdc
24 Vdc (loop-monitored)
120-230 Vac
Class I, Division 2, Groups ABCD; Class II, Division 2,
Groups FG
Class [Eex ia] IIC intrinsically safe (Through external
devices)
Digital Output 24 Vdc, 48 Vdc, 60 Vdc and 110 Vdc
24 Vdc, 48 Vdc (loop-monitored)
120-230 Vac
Dry contact outputs
Class [Eex ia] IIC intrinsically safe (Through external
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devices)
Analog Input 0-20 mA, 4-20 mA, 0-25mA
0-20 mA and 4-20 mA with HART support (Through
external devices)
0-5 V, 1-5 V, 0-10 V and 2-10 V
Class I, Division 2, Groups ABCD; Class II, Division 2,
Groups FG
Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) (Through
external devices)
Thermocouple, types E, J, K and T (Through external
devices)
Analog Output 0-20 mA and 4-20 mA
Class I, Division 2, Groups ABCD; Class II, Division 2,
Groups FG

All Safety Manager I/O modules are galvanically or optically isolated between external
and internal power supply. Safe I/O modules can be used for safety loops up to and
including SIL3.
Safe modules can also be used for control applications, offering the benefits of Safety
Manager diagnostic and fault-reporting functions with or without automatically
isolating faults. (Automatic isolation of faults is configurable.)
IO FTA
An FTA module for I/O converts input field signals to values appropriate for the Safety
Manager input module that is used, or Safety Manager output module signals to values
that can be used in the field. To enable this conversion, FTAs can be used in
combination with input converter modules or output converter modules.
FTA modules are 70 mm (2.76 in) or 109 mm (4.29 in) wide, and their length varies
between 90 mm and 300 mm (3.54 and 11.81 in), depending on the FTA type, as
shown in the following figure. The modules are mounted on standard DIN EN rails
(TS32 or TS35 x 7.5).

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Figure 27 - Some Terminal Type FTA's
An FTA may contain electronic circuitry to convert standard Safety Manager signals to
specific signals with characteristics required by field equipment. For the connection to
the Safety Manager IO modules a standard system interconnection cable FS-SIC-0001
is used for all FTAs. The field cables are connected to terminals.

4. Process Control Hardware
4.4. Wireless Device Manager
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4.4 Wireless Device Manager
WDM is the central management unit of the OneWireless Network. The WDM is
responsible for network security, network resource allocation, data caching, and
external interface functionality (including CDA protocol).
OneWireless Network supports integration of wireless data with existing control
systems using industry standard protocols such as HART, Modbus TCP, Modbus RTU,
and OPC. The WDM hosts the interfaces required to connect the field device data to
the control application using the proprietary protocols.
The WDM can establish peer-to-peer communication with ACE/C200/C200E/C300
controllers. WDM and wireless devices can be configured and loaded in Experion
Control Builder. You can monitor the devices and WDM parameters using Control
Builder and Detail Displays in Experion Station. In addition, the notifications related to
diagnostic information of OneWireless devices can be monitored using Station.

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5. Supported Experion Hardware
5.1 Supported Platforms
Supported server platforms
Experion R410.1 supports the following Dell server platforms.
Dell PowerEdge 2850 server
Dell PowerEdge 2900 and 2900 III servers
Dell PowerEdge 2950 and 2950 III servers
Dell PowerEdge SC1430 server
Dell PowerEdge T610 server
Dell PowerEdge R710 server
Dell PowerEdge T310 server
Dell PowerEdge T105 server
Supported workstation platforms
Experion R410.1 supports the following Dell workstation platforms.
Dell Precision WS490 workstation
Dell Precision T3400 workstation
Dell Precision T3500 workstation
Dell Precision T5400 workstation
Dell Precision T5500 workstation
Dell Precision R5500 workstation

5. Supported Experion Hardware
5.2. Support for new Matrox Extio2 Remote Peripheral Solution (RPS)
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5.2 Support for new Matrox Extio2 Remote Peripheral
Solution (RPS)
Experion R410.1 supports Matrox Extio2 RPS. The Matrox Extio2 RPS installation kit
extends the following components from an Icon Series Console or a Desktop Station to
a system, through a fiber-optic cable without any loss of signal integrity or system
performance.
Audio (stereo output and mono input)
Video (up to four monitors)
USB (including keyboard, mouse, MIMs, Pop-Up disk drives, touch screens, OEP,
and IKB)
The system can be at a maximum distance of up to 400meters (1312 feet) from the
console station. This can substantially reduce noise and heat in the control room, while
providing additional security for the computer.
Matrox Extio2 RPS can be installed on an existing Experion system or along with a
fresh Experion installation using the latest EXPPlus media (Experion R3xx) or the
Experion PKS System Initialization media (Experion R4xx).

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6. Process Communications
6.1 Communications Topology
Plantwide communications
You can scale an Experion PKS system architecture to accommodate small personal
workgroups, large plantwide domains, or a mix of workgroups and domains including
the integration of an existing TPS system and information from your business network.
The following figure combines many of the features previously discussed in the
Servers and Stations and Process Control Hardware sections into a single view as an
example of system scalability.



Figure 28 - Scalable Architecture for Plantwide Communications.
6. Process Communications
6.1. Communications Topology
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Scalable security inhibits unauthorized data access
The Experion system offers integrated Windows and Station-based security as well as
electronic signature and asset assignment functions. This lets you easily scale your
security functions to provide progressive data access on a "need to know" basis to
complement plantwide communications.
Control level communications
Controller domain
The most significant networks within the Experion controller architecture are the, open
networks called ControlNet for C200/C200E Controllers only and Fault Tolerant
Ethernet (FTE) serving as the network technology for:
Controller-to-Server communications,
Controller-to-Controller (peer-to-peer) communications,
Controller-to-I/O communications through ControlNet for C200/C200E
Controller only.
Both ControlNet and Fault Tolerant Ethernet support redundant media.



Figure 29 - Control Level Communications Network for C200 Controllers
using ControlNet media
Controller
to Server
Controller to Controller
Controller to
I/O Module
Server
6. Process Communications
6.1. Communications Topology
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The C200/C200E architecture also supports an Ethernet media for Controller-to-Server
and Controller-to-Controller communications that are also referred to as the
supervisory level communications.
Application and user interface communications for the Experion server
Experion takes advantage of industry standard Ethernet for communication above the
Experion server. Ethernet is employed for communication between the server and
Stations involved in the Experion application. Ethernet is also the media for
communication with PIN-resident applications. Honeywell also offers its own version
of a robust Ethernet known as Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE).



Figure 30 - Supervisory Level Communications Network
Foundation Fieldbus communications
FOUNDATION Fieldbus (FF) is an open, digital multi-drop communications technology
for intelligent field devices and automation systems through an integral chassis
mounted Series A Fieldbus Interface Module (CIOM-A FIM) or a Series C Fieldbus
Interface Module (FIM4) and integral Control Builder configuration. Some interface
features include:
A rail-mountable device for linking two H1 networks into the I/O ControlNet or
into the Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Module.
A non-redundant or redundant I/O termination assembly for linking four H1
networks into the Series C Fieldbus Interface Module mounted in a cabinet.
Provides support for multiple interface modules per controller.
Server to Station
ControlNet
Server
Station Station
Controller
6. Process Communications
6.1. Communications Topology
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Supports Experion regulatory, sequential and logic control operation with Fieldbus
measurement and actuation devices.
Supports operational access to field device data via server points.
As a field communication network(s) interconnecting field devices, fieldbus devices
also broadcast alarms and collect and broadcast trend data providing standard
definitions of base field device functions.




Figure 31 - Foundation Fieldbus Level Communications Network using a
Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Module

Ethernet (TCP/IP)
Remote
I/O Chassis
Remote
I/O Chassis
Redundant
Servers
PT
PT
Supervisory ControlNet/Ethernet
I/O ControlNet
I/O ControlNet
Redundant
Controllers
Non-Redundant
Controller
Station
PT
PT
PT
PT
PT
PT
24Vdc
(Optional)
24Vdc
(Optional)
Remote
Termination
Panel
Remote
Termination
Panel
FIM
FIM
H1 Link 1
H1 Link 1
H1 Link 2
H1 Link 2
F Fieldbus OUNDATION Compliant Devices
F Fieldbus OUNDATION
Compliant Devices
24Vdc
Conditioned
24Vdc
Conditioned
24Vdc
Conditioned
24Vdc
Conditioned
Notes:
FIM = Fieldbus Interface Module
Only ControlNet is available as redundant media.
6. Process Communications
6.1. Communications Topology
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Figure 32 - Foundation Fieldbus Level Communications Network using a
Series C Fieldbus Interface Module
Redundant Fieldbus integrated architecture
The following figures show sample redundant fieldbus architectures. The first figure
shows a pair of Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Modules (CIOM-A FIMs)
and Redundancy Modules (RMs) in a redundant C200/C200E Process Controller and a
redundant remote I/O chassis configuration. The FIM serves as the communication
gateway between the Supervisory ControlNet and/or I/O ControlNet network and the
Foundation Fieldbus H1 communications medium. It includes a redundant Remote
Termination Panel (RTP) for connecting and powering up to two fieldbus H1 links.
6. Process Communications
6.1. Communications Topology
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The second figure shows a redundant Series C Fieldbus Interface Module (FIM4)
configuration in a C300 Process Controller domain. The FIM4 serves as the
communication gateway between the Supervisory Fault Tolerant Ethernet network and
the Foundation Fieldbus H1 communications medium. It does not require a C300
Controller for operation.
The illustrations in the following figures are for example purposes only to show the
possible architectural variations for a redundant fieldbus application.



Figure 33 - Sample system architecture for redundant Fieldbus
integration using a Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface Module

Ethernet (TCP/IP)
Remote
I/O Chassis
Redundant
Remote
I/O Chassis
Redundant
Servers
PT
PT
Supervisory ControlNet
I/O ControlNet
I/O ControlNet
Redundant
Controllers
Non-Redundant
Controller
Station
PT
PT
PT
PT
PT
PT
24Vdc
(Optional)
24Vdc
(Optional)
Redundant
Remote
Termination
Panel
Redundant
Remote
Termination
Panel
CPM
H1 Link 1
H1 Link 1
H1 Link 2
H1 Link 2
FIM RM FIM RM
F Fieldbus OUNDATION Compliant Devices
F Fieldbus OUNDATION
Compliant Devices
24Vdc
Conditioned
24Vdc
Conditioned
24Vdc
Conditioned
24Vdc
Conditioned
Notes:
CPM = Control Processor Module
FIM = Fieldbus Interface Module
RM = Redundancy Module
Only ControlNet is available as redundant media.
FIM RM FIM RM
6. Process Communications
6.1. Communications Topology
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Figure 34 - Sample system architecture for redundant Fieldbus
integration using a Series C Fieldbus Interface Module

6. Process Communications
6.2. Network Platforms
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6.2 Network Platforms
Ethernet
Ethernet has been globally accepted as the de facto standard for office environments
and has recently been accepted to perform many tasks on the plant floor. Because of
the wealth of third party Ethernet equipment, including switches, routers, hubs, and so
on. coupled with its ever increasing performance, along with a steady decline in the
price-performance curve, Ethernet has become the ideal network for many plant floor
applications, including data monitoring and program maintenance.
Many are now using today's Ethernet for critical control. The support of TCP/IP
Ethernet as the Supervisory network in Experion does not preclude the customer to
design and configure a mission critical control strategy based upon Ethernet. The user
is cautioned, however, that Ethernet is not a deterministic network and there are many
factors that should be considered before employing a mission critical control strategy
that relies on Ethernet. The system can also communicate with modem-connected
system components by using:
Local Area Networks (LANs) to connect system components for plants that have
all their installations located at one site, for example, waste water treatment
facilities and food manufacturing plants
Wide Area Networks (WANs) that connect modem-connected installations that are
separated by hundreds (sometimes thousands) of miles, such as offshore oil and gas
installations and pipelines. WANs may use satellite uplinks, ISDN, microwave or
radio communications systems.
Fault Tolerant Ethernet
Honeywell's Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) represents a way to achieve Ethernet
redundancy through the use of Honeywell's FTE driver and redundant commercially
available equipment. Fault Tolerant Ethernet enabled components allow network
communication to occur over a functioning route. If that route should fail and another
route exists, then communication occurs over that route. In this approach, FTE can
recover from single faults and may recover from several faults.


REFERENCE EXTERNAL
Refer to the Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE) Specification and Technical Data
Sheet EP03-500-110 or latest version for more information.
The Specification and Technical information is subject to change without
notice and is superseded by information in applicable Experion product
Specification and Technical data documents. Hence, for each Experion
release, you are recommended to refer the applicable Specification and
Technical data documents.
6. Process Communications
6.3. ControlNet
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Supervisory Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE), ControlNet or Ethernet
The Supervisory FTE, ControlNet or Ethernet is used by the Experion server to access
data from the Controller to populate Experion displays, receive Alarms, and gather
Historical Data. The Controllers for Peer-to-Peer communications also use the
Supervisory FTE, ControlNet, or Ethernet. Only the FTE and ControlNet are available
as redundant media. The Control Builder also uses the Supervisory Network for
strategy loading and monitoring. However, not all Controller related functions are
Ethernet compatible. For example, the Chassis I/O - Series A Fieldbus Interface
Module requires an FTE or ControlNet network. All the Series C form factor
components require Supervisory FTE.
Time Synchronization
To ensure accurately time-stamped process event data, the real-time clocks of Safety
Managers in a network need to be synchronized by a time master.
Safety Manager can use the following external sources to synchronize their real-time
clock:
Experion system (connected via Ethernet)
GPS receiver via IEEE 1588 protocol
Safety Station
Time master
Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP)
6.3 ControlNet
Open technology
The ControlNet technology was designed by Allen-Bradley, with significant design
input from Honeywell to ensure its suitability for process control applications, and
turned over to the public sector as an open system. ControlNet is an open standard that
will support third-party devices in the future, but you cannot currently connect third-
party devices on the I/O ControlNet or the Supervisory ControlNet.
Devices
What kind of devices would likely sit on ControlNet? Basically, any of the devices
certified under our existing TPS Multi-vendor Interface Program. For example, these
devices might include:
Analyzers
Weigh scales
Motor drives
6. Process Communications
6.4. ControlNet Interoperability
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Operator interface panels
Bar code readers
Control network redundancy
Experion incorporates the open technology of ControlNet, which can be implemented
in a redundant fashion. This provides redundant communication between the server
and controllers, from controller to controller and from controller to remote I/O. The
LAN can also be redundant.



Figure 35 - Control Network Redundancy
6.4 ControlNet Interoperability
ControlNet Interoperability gives the Experion system the ability to exchange Process
data with A-B PLCs and other third-party devices. In order for the devices to
communicate with each other, a protocol that is understood by both must be used.
Remote I/O Chassis Remote I/O Chassis
Controller
Redundant Supervisory
ControlNet networks
A
B
A
B
Redundant I/O ControlNet networks
LAN (TCP/IP, Ethernet, etc.)
Server
Station
6. Process Communications
6.4. ControlNet Interoperability
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An example of a suitable protocol is the PCCC (Programmable Controller
Communications Commands) protocol. This protocol is a simple Command-Reply
protocol. The PCCC protocol is supported by devices on ControlNet and by devices on
other networks such as the DH+ network. Using a bridge module such as the DHRIO
module, you will be able to establish communication between a device on the
ControlNet and a device on the DH+ network.
Each message is limited to a maximum length of 256 bytes. Currently the CPM can
only be used as the Requester. The following commands are supported:
PLC-5 Typed Read
PLC-5 Typed Write
The following devices have been qualified:
PLC-5 on ControlNet
CL5550 controller
PLC-5 on DH+
Communication between the CPM and the CL5550 controller can also be achieved
through the more advanced CIP protocol. The CIP protocol allows both Command-
Reply and Producer-Consumer modes. Currently the CPM only supports the
Messaging mode as a Requester. The following CIP commands are supported:
CIP Data Table Read
CIP Data Table Write


ATTENTION
You will not be able to implement ControlNet Interoperability unless
communication has been established between the third-party device and its
software.

6. Process Communications
6.5. Connectivity
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6.5 Connectivity
Background
Experion supports many types of controller, such as Modicon PLCs, Honeywell Series
9000 and Allen-Bradley.
You can connect a controller to the server in a number of ways. If a controller has a
network interface, you can connect it directly to the network. If it has a serial interface,
you can connect it through a "terminal server". (A terminal server allows you to
connect several controllers to the network even though they only have serial or parallel
ports. Most terminal servers also provide a range of serial connection options, such as
RS-232, RS-422 and RS-485.)
The communications link used to connect controllers to the server is called a channel.
Logical representations of channels are stored in the server. Usually each type of
controller uses a different communications protocol, so each has its own channel.
Third-party networks
The following figure illustrates how systems are connected to the Experion system.
For example, drivers are used to connect Allen Bradley's PLCs via the data highway to
an Experion system.

Figure 36 - Connectivity System

ControlNet
LAN (TCP/IP,Ethernet,etc.)
Honeywell S9000
Honeywell 620 LC
TDC 3000 Data Hiway
Honeywell UDC
Modicon PLC
Allen-Bradley PLC
other
Other connectivity
Server
Station
6. Process Communications
6.6. Communications Model for the Control Processor
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6.6 Communications Model for the Control Processor
Reference model
Experion employs a publish/subscribe communications scheme. The following figure
illustrates the communications models employed within Experion and relates them to
the standard ISO - OSI model as a reference.



Figure 37 - Experion versus ISO-OSI Communications Model
Publish/subscribe transport layer
The Experion OSI stack employs a Producer/Consumer model for managing
communications. This means that any node on the network can demand to be registered
as a "consumer" of a particular piece of information. Then, when an object from
another node "produces" that piece of information, it is done in a way that makes it
available to every registered consumer. This allows the same piece of data to be
distributed to multiple consumers of that data.

CEE
ASA Transport Class 5
Frag/Reassembly, Mult Msg
CDA
(Pub/Sub,Req/Resp, Notif. Pub)
ASA Network
Data Types
ICP, SMAC
Null
Serial Bus, ControlNet
Server Cache:
Run-time Monitor, Builder Load
ASA Class 5
Null
CDA
Server DA
DDE
ASA Network IP
Endian
Conversion
KTC-SMAC 802.3
TCP
ControlNet
Ethernet Media,
Serial Comm.
User Layer
Transport
Application Layer
Network
Presentation Layer
Link
Session
Physical
Experion PKS
Control Processor Server Reference Model
ISO-OSI
6. Process Communications
6.7. Safety Manager SafeNet
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Publish/subscribe application layer
The transport layer is capable of producing information onto the network for
consumers to "pick-up" but how is the subscription list managed and how are
subscribers identified? This is done through CDA's connection-oriented
communication scheme. Information is sent between nodes by establishing
connections. Each published message contains a Connection ID (CID). Each potential
consumer can then subscribe to receive that particular CID.
Request/response application layer
Publish/subscribe works well for cyclic (repeated) transactions. But, for one-time reads
and writes between two end-points, Experion has implemented request/response.
Report-by-exception
In addition to the high performance of the publish/subscribe model, Experion supports
report-by-exception technology, also known as 'on data change'. This way, only
changes to data are published. In other words, publishing doesn't happen simply
because a clock cycle requests it.
6.7 Safety Manager SafeNet
Safety Manager supports Distributed Safety Solutions (DSS) through its extensive
networking capabilities. Safety Manager networks provide the means to decentralize
process safeguarding with central process monitoring and control capabilities.
In a DSS network, multiple Safety Managers are interconnected via dedicated Ethernet
(or serial) communication links. Both point-to-point and multidrop networks are
supported.
For optimum availability of the communication, the redundant Safety Manager
configurations require the use of redundant communication links.
The communication is based on the Honeywell proprietary, TV-approved SafeNet
communication protocol. This protocol includes a high level of error detection and
recovery, which makes it suitable for exchanging safety-related information while
maintaining optimum availability. The network is also used to route diagnostic data to
central operator stations and maintenance workstations.
Communication within Safety Manager networks is based on the master-slave concept.
In this concept, the master system is responsible for all communication activities. It
initiates requests for data from the slave systems, and sends data to the slaves.
Safety Manager networks also support communication server systems. These are
Safety Managers that are interconnected between the communicating master and slave
system(s). Their task is to route the data that is exchanged between master and slave(s).
6. Process Communications
6.7. Safety Manager SafeNet
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The DSS concept supports safety solutions in line with the plant design, with every
independent process unit being safeguarded by a separate Safety Manager. This
minimizes the risk of nuisance plant trips during unit maintenance.
Safety Manager supports SafeNet communication through Ethernet, RS232, RS485
and Fiber optic. This allows easy integration of fail-safe networking through third-
party equipment (black channel), enabling the use of existing media, equipment, and
cabling to exchange safety-critical Safety Manager data. For example, using public
telephone lines, satellites, or radio links. This TV-approved function provides
flexible solutions for FPSOs, pipelines, and other remote system applications. It is
completely embedded into the Safety Manager design, and no additional effort is
needed to configure this type of communication.



Figure 38 - Example Safety Manager Topology

6. Process Communications
6.7. Safety Manager SafeNet
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7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.1 Understanding Points
Process points
From the point of view of operators, Stations and servers, Function blocks (created in
Control Builder) are points. These points are called Process points to distinguish them
from other types of point.
Flexible points
Experion includes a number of system interfaces (high-level interfaces), such as TPS
and OPC that allow it to exchange data with other applications or subsystems without
the need for separately defining points in Experion. Such points are called flexible
points.
The database structure of a flexible point is determined by the application/subsystem,
rather than by Experion. An example of flexible points would be TPS points.
Standard (Inbuilt) point types
Experion provides the following types of standard (inbuilt) point to exchange data with
controllers other than C200/C200E or C300 Process Controllers. These points are also
known as SCADA points. Note that points deriving their inputs from OPC are licensed
as SCADA points.
Analog, used for continuous values, such as temperature or pressure
Status, used for digital values (on and off)
Accumulator, used for totalizer values
Container, a "user-defined" point type that allows you to treat a group of related
points as if they were one point.
Standard points have a composite data structure that can represent several field values.
For example, you only need one analog point for a control loop that maintains the
temperature of an oven, because the point's data structure includes the following
parameters (data items):
Process variable (PV) to record the current oven temperature
Output variable (OP) to change the temperature of the oven
Set point (SP) to specify the correct oven temperature
Mode (MD) to change the loop from manual to automatic control

7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.2. Process Monitoring and Data Display
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Scanning
In the case of standard points, Experion uses a scanning process to read from/write to
memory locations in controllers.
Controllers can be scanned using the following strategies, each of which is optimized
for a specific need:
Periodic (at regular intervals)
Exception (the server only requests change-of-state data)
Some controllers support unsolicited messaging, where the controller, rather than the
server, initiates a communications session. Unsolicited messaging can substantially
reduce communications traffic, especially if the values change infrequently.
Point algorithms
Experion includes a set of algorithms that can be attached to standard points to perform
specialized tasks on point data. (If you want to attach an algorithm to a process or
flexible point, you must map it to a standard point and then attach the algorithm to the
standard point.)
There are two types of point algorithm:
Action Algorithm, which initiates an action-such as requesting a report-when the
point's PV changes value
PV Algorithm, which gathers/manipulates data, the result of which is usually
stored in the point's PV
The following two examples illustrate an algorithm's capabilities:
Status Point Notification, which sends a message to a custom application when
the status of the point changes to a specified state
Maximum/Minimum, which records the maximum and minimum values of the
PV of an analog point and the times at which they occurred
Scripts
You can extend a point's functionality by writing a script that, for example, performs a:
Calculation on the value of its PV parameter each time its value changes
Task when it goes into alarm
User-defined parameters
You can increase the functionality of a standard point by defining your own parameters
so that you can store custom data. For example, you may want to store a value
generated by a script, or record the serial number of the device associated with the
point.
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.2. Process Monitoring and Data Display
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7.2 Process Monitoring and Data Display
Station uses a series of Web-style displays to present process information in a user-
friendly manner. (In addition to displays, Station can also show Web pages and
ActiveX documents such as Microsoft Word documents and Microsoft Excel
spreadsheets.)
Experion is supplied with over 400 system displays that present information in a
standardized manner. You can also create your own (custom) displays, which can
include graphics and animations.
The following topics describe Experion's system displays and the benefits of creating
your own custom displays.
System displays for configuring your system
Experion includes a comprehensive set of system displays that make it easy to
configure and fine-tune your system.



Figure 39 - Typical configuration display
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.2. Process Monitoring and Data Display
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System displays for managing alarms and events
Experion's alarm and event displays enable operators to manage and respond to alarms
and events in an efficient manner. Inbuilt features of these displays include the ability
to sort and filter alarms and events according to criteria such as priority, asset, and so
on.
The Experion Alarm Summary, for example, provides live information about current
process alarms in your system. Depending on how your system has been configured,
the Alarm Line (at the bottom of the display) shows the most recent (or oldest), highest
(or lowest) priority alarm that has not been acknowledged.



Figure 40 - An alarm summary display
System displays for monitoring your processes
Experion includes a range of system displays and faceplates that form the basis for
monitoring your processes. These include the:
Point detail displays, which show the current parameter values, and configuration
details, for a selected point.
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.2. Process Monitoring and Data Display
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Faceplates, specialized popup displays that are the identical to the left-hand section
of the corresponding point detail displays. They provide a convenient means of
monitoring and controlling points from custom displays.
Trend displays, which plot changes in process values over time.
Group displays, which show the main parameter values of up to eight related
points.



Figure 41 - A typical point detail display



Figure 42- A Typical Faceplate
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.2. Process Monitoring and Data Display
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Figure 43 - A typical trend display


Figure 44 - A typical group display
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.3. Operator Notification of Alarms and Events
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Figure 45 - Safety Manager System Information Display
Custom displays
Custom displays enable you to represent a complete process on one display, and to
include graphics and animations to make processes easier to understand. Custom
displays are created using HMIWeb Display Builder.

7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.3. Operator Notification of Alarms and Events
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7.3 Operator Notification of Alarms and Events
Alarm and event generation
Experion generates events and alarms when it detects certain changes in the plant or
process as reported by controllers.
With Experion operators can:
View events and alarms in Station displays
Print a summary of alarms and events to an alarm/event printer
All changes in the system caused by, for example, alarms, operator actions, and
changes in security level, are logged as events. The following figure shows the
Experion Event Summary.



Figure 46 - An event summary display
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.3. Operator Notification of Alarms and Events
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Alarms
Alarms indicate unusual conditions in processes (excess pressure in a valve, low
temperature of an oven, and so on) or in the system (such as the failure of a channel)
that require operator action.
Unless an alarm has been suppressed or shelved, it remains in the default view of the
Alarm Summary until the condition that triggered the alarm returns to normal and
someone acknowledges the alarm.
All alarms are recorded in the event log, including when it was generated, when it
returned to normal, and when it was acknowledged. The event log also shows when
alarms have been suppressed or unsuppressed, and shelved or unshelved.
Filters and views
Filters and views on Station summary displays enable operators to temporarily exclude
less important (or currently irrelevant) alarms and events from the display - for
example, operators might want to filter out high and low alarms to focus on urgent
alarms only.
In addition to a range of filtering options for the columns in an alarm (or event)
summary, Experion provides several predefined views for summary displays,
including:
unacknowledged alarms (to show only unacknowledged alarms)
Urgent alarms (to show only urgent alarms)
Urgent and high alarms (to show only urgent and high alarms)
Suppressed alarms (to show only alarms that are currently suppressed)
Shelved alarms (to show only alarms that are currently shelved)
You can also create your own filters, based on various criteria such as asset, priority
and date/time.
Alarm suppression
Dynamic Alarm Suppression (DAS) is an Experion licensed option that provides an
automated way of temporarily removing alarms from the default (unfiltered) view of
the Alarm Summary. DAS removes alarms in accordance with a set of rules that you
configure. By temporarily removing specific alarms from the Alarm Summary when
pre-configured conditions are met, DAS helps operators to focus on the issue at hand
or on other more critical conditions in the plant.
For more information, see the Server and Client Planning Guide and the Server and
Client Configuration Guide.
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.3. Operator Notification of Alarms and Events
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Alarm shelving
Alarm shelving allows operators to temporarily remove distracting/nuisance alarms
from the Alarm Summary display. Shelved alarms are only visible in the (shelved
alarms) view or when you choose the Alarm State column filter for showing shelved
alarms.
To prevent operators from forgetting about a shelved alarm, a shelved alarm is
automatically unshelved when the shelving period expires or the alarm returns to
normal (depending on how the shelving settings have been configured).
Operator response
Operators can:
View events and alarms in Stations. The Status Line (below the display), always
shows the most recent (or oldest) and highest priority alarm that has not been
acknowledged.
Print a summary of alarms and events to an alarm/event printer.
Note that you can make it easier for operators to manage alarms by creating
appropriate views for operators. (A view shows a particular subset of alarms, and
presents the details in a particular way.)
By default, the Alarm Summary shows all alarms (except shelved alarms and
suppressed alarms) in a table format with the newest alarm at the top. Operators can
change this view by applying filters and sorting the summary to help them to monitor
and respond to alarms of particular interest.
The following graphic shows other features of the Alarm Summary that help operators
monitor and respond to alarms more efficiently and effectively:
The Location pane (in the lower left of the display), which filters the Alarm
Summary to show alarms for a particular asset, alarm group or piece of equipment.
The Alarm Tracker pane, which provides a graphical view of alarm clusters on
assets within an operators scope of responsibility.
Based on Abnormal Situation Management (ASM) Consortium research, Experion
Alarm Tracker supports operator effectiveness by providing an asset-based view of
alarms over time that enables operators to identify and respond more easily to
abnormal situations such as alarm floods.
7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.3. Operator Notification of Alarms and Events
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Figure 45 An Alarm Summary with the Alarm Tracker pane showing

7. Monitoring Plant Processes
7.4. Safety Manager Sequence of Events (SOE) support
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7.4 Safety Manager Sequence of Events (SOE) support
SOE generation
Safety Manager integrates the sequence-of-event (SOE) features as supported by
Safety Manager into the Experion server. Safety Manager supports SOE for digital
inputs and outputs, analog inputs and outputs, and marker points. Each tag name that
has been "SOE-enabled" is time-stamped by the Safety Manager controller and
reported to the Experion Server,
SOE reporting
SOE from Safety Manager as well as from DI SOE are incorporated into the standard
Experion Server SOE list which allows for improved search, filter and automated
archive functionality. Standard SOE displays are available to view the events as they
are reported.

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8. Controlling the Process
8.1 Understanding Supervisory Control
Supervisory control
The term "supervisory control" means control that originates from a location outside
and above the controller, whether by an operator or a program.
Supervisory control works by changing the values in controllers that are associated
with processes. Process control is usually performed by the internal logic of
controllers.
The following figure and procedure show how supervisory control works.
A new value is entered by an operator (manual mode) or a program (automatic mode).
The server relays the new value to the controller.
The controller outputs the control value to the field device.



Figure 47 - Supervisory Control Process

8. Controlling the Process
8.2. Examples of Process Control
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8.2 Examples of Process Control
Background
The following examples are based on a pipeline carrying a fluid. The pipe, for the
purposes of the examples, contains a pump, a valve, and a device that measures the rate
of flow of the fluid.
If you are using a C200/C200E and/or C300 Process Controller, field devices are
represented by named parameters related to associated control function blocks. If you
are using another type of controller, the field devices are represented by standard
points, such as accumulator, analog or status.
The following figure shows a representation of this pump, control valve, and flow-
measuring device.



Figure 48 - Process Control Example
Process control using status points
Because a pump can be in only one of two possible states at a time (either on or off),
Experion stores data about pumps in a status point. Status points have three main
process variables:
Input (PV), which is read-only digital value.
Output (OP), which an operator can change. In this case, this represents the "on" or
"off" instruction you send to the pump.
Controller
Pump
Valve
Flow Sensor
Flow
8. Controlling the Process
8.2. Examples of Process Control
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Mode (MODE), which the operator can change to switch the control from manual
mode to automatic mode, or the other way around.
The current state of the pump is read by the controller using a digital input. The state of
the pump can be changed by the controller by using a digital output. In automatic
mode, the controller logic changes the digital output automatically to switch the pump
either on or off. In manual mode, the pump is switched on or off by the operator.
Manual mode effectively disables or bypasses the internal logic of the controller.
Because the control command is issued from Experion, this is supervisory control.
The following figure illustrates how this works.



Figure 49 - Process Control Using Status Points
Process Control Using Analog Points
For valves that can be open to any extent (such as control valves), Experion uses
analog points. Analog points store continuous values, which can range from 0 to 100
percent of full scale.
Analog points can have several process-related variables:
Input (PV), which is a read-only analog value
Setpoint (SP), which is the desired value for the input variable.
PV
OP
MD
Digital Input
Digital Output
Server (Station Display) Controller Plant Equipment
Ladder
Logic
OP PV
Pump
MD
8. Controlling the Process
8.2. Examples of Process Control
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Output (OP) which is an analog value; in this case, the variable controls how much
the valve should be open or closed.
Mode (MODE), which governs whether or not operators will be able to control the
SP and OP process variables.
Auxiliaries (A1 to A4), which can be assigned to any values for any purpose (loop
tuning constants, for example)
In this example, the valve controls the flow rate, and the controller reads the flow rate
and the current valve position into registers.
If the flow changes in:
Automatic mode, the controller compares the PV to the setpoint specified for the
flow. If the flow is too low or too high, the output variable adjusts the valve
automatically.
Manual mode, the valve is adjusted by the operator by entering the OP.
The following figure illustrates how this works.


Figure 50 - Process Control Using Analog Points
SP
PV
OP
MD
PID
SP PV OP MD
Pump
Valve
Flow Sensor
Server (Station Display) Controller Plant Equipment

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9. Analyzing Process Data
9.1 Understanding Reports
Background
Reports extract information from the server database. Reports may be requested and
printed on demand, or scheduled to be automatically generated reports at pre-defined
times. Reports can be sent to printers or to operator Station displays. Experion can
produce both:
Standard Reports, which are preformatted reports provided with Experion and
contain information about alarms, events, points, and so on.
Custom Reports, which can contain almost any kind of information stored in the
server database.
You can either request reports when you need them or schedule Experion to
automatically produce reports at pre-defined times.
9.2 Process History Analysis and Archiving
History
Experion provides two different ways of collecting and storing historical data for point
parameters:
Periodic history
Exception history
The historical data collected by Experion can be used for:
Third-party applications via the Experion OPC HDA Server and ODBC driver.
Operational purposes like trend monitoring (in the case of periodic history).
Collection and analysis by enterprise historians like PHD servers.
Because the data from both periodic history and exception history is readily accessible
to specialized historians, the transmission of Experion history data places no additional
load on your control network.
Periodic history
Periodic history collects and stores numerical data at predefined regular intervals.
Periodic history data is generally used for operational purposes such as trend
monitoring but is also collected for historical analysis.
Experion collection rates for periodic history provide a high degree of flexibility in
moderating the load on your control network.
9. Analyzing Process Data
9.2. Process History Analysis and Archiving
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Fast history Stores snapshots of a point parameter at short regular intervals (less
than 1 minute). You can choose from 8 different collection rates. By default, the
fastest rate is 5 seconds but this can be changed to 1 second if necessary.
Standard history Stores snapshots at intervals ranging from 1 minute to 30
minutes. The fastest standard history collection rate of 1 minute can be changed to
30 seconds if necessary. Standard history also calculates and stores average values,
based on the standard history snapshot rates. The default averages are: 6-minutes,
1-hour, 8-hours, and 24-hours.
Extended history Stores 1, 8, and 24-hour snapshots.
Exception history
While periodic history is used for numerical data and primarily for operational
purposes, exception history collects string data for analysis by enterprise historians
such as PHD servers.
And unlike periodic history, exception history is based on sampling rather than regular
collection: it only stores the scanned values when they are different to the last stored
value. This not only helps to minimize the database size but also the load on the control
network.
The default collection rates for exception history are:
5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 seconds
5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes
2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours
PHD integration
Experion can be integrated with a Uniformance Process History Database (PHD). The
integration allows synchronized history collection of Experion data on PHD. PHD tags
that map to point parameters assigned to history on Experion are created and
maintained automatically. PHD provides long term history collection. PHD data can
be displayed on Experion trends.
Analyzing process history
Process history can be analyzed for trends using trend set displays, which present
process history in a graphical manner. Experion allows you to present trend set data in
a range of useful ways, such as:
Simple Trend, which displays plotted data for the specified point parameters.
Trend with Events, which displays plotted data for the specified point parameters
as well as an Event Summary.
Trend with numeric history, which displays plotted data for the specified point
parameters as well as tabular numeric history for the specified point parameter.
9. Analyzing Process Data
9.2. Process History Analysis and Archiving
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Archiving process history
Archiving stores process data in the server. The period of time that this historical data
is stored is determined by the default retention periods for the history interval being
used. You can archive this process history to off-line media such a removable disk or a
tape so that the history can be restored later if needed.
Event archiving and storage
Experion stores every event, such as a point status change or an operator action, in an
event journal.
Events are collected in an Experion system database, and are periodically copied to an
SQL Server online event database for queries and reporting. Events are kept in the
SQL database for a specified period, after which they are deleted.
If you want to keep events for more than a few weeks, use Event Archiving.
Event Archiving allows you set up automatic archiving, or to configure an alarm,
which alerts the operator to archive events at appropriate intervals. Event Archiving
enables you to archive events to a network fileserver or to tape. Archiving to tape uses
the Windows Backup program. Events archived to a network fileserver can be copied
to other media such as CD, or included in a system backup.

9. Analyzing Process Data
9.2. Process History Analysis and Archiving
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10. Standard Compliance
10.1 Safety Manager compliance
A major requirement for compliance to IEC 61508 is the availability of a change
history of applications. With the new Safety Builder this is no longer an issue as the
Safety Audit Tracker provides an automatically enabled audit trail. It will keep track of
all the changes performed on an application automatically. Difficult procedures or
extensive loggings are not required. The Safety Audit Tracker, together with the
Application Verification Tool, is all that is necessary.
Safety Manager complies with the following international standards:
For BMS: NFPA 85, 86, VDE 0116
For ESD: IEC 61508, ISA S84.01, DIN V 19250, UL, FM, ATEX
For F&G: EN54-2, NFPA 72, Lloyd's Register.
In summary, with all SIL3 safety compliance tools, hardware and software,
Honeywell's Safety Manager provides excellent protection for safety applications
across multiple industries throughout the lifetime of an installation. Together with
Experion or any other process control systems, Safety Manager provides the basis for
critical control and safety unification, reducing risks and installed costs, and improving
plant safety.
10.2 Experion compliance
The various components of the Experion system are declared to be in conformity with
the following standards.
EN 50082-2-1995 Electromagnetic Compatibility - Generic Immunity Standard,
Part 2: Industrial Environment.
EN 55011-1991 Limits and Methods of Measurement of Radio Disturbance
Characteristics of Industrial, Scientific and Medial (ISM) Radio-Frequency
Equipment
EN 61131-2-1994 Programmable Controllers - Part 2: Equipment Requirements
and Tests (LVD), Year of first CE marking per 73/23/EEC (LVD): 1997
EN 61326-1998 Electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory use -
EMC requirements.
EN 61010-1-1993 Safety Requirements for Electrical Equipment for Measurement,
Control and Laboratory Use. Part 1: General Requirements


10. Standard Compliance
10.2. Experion compliance
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