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CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL

TEACHERS STRATEGY IN DEALING WITH


STUDENTS DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR
A Thesis
Presented to
The Faculty of the Graduate School
Cagayan State University
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan
In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirement for the Degree
Master of Arts In Educational Management
by
CLARENCE V. AGPULDO
MARCH 2010
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
APPROVAL SHEET
This thesis is title, TEACHERS STRATEGY IN DEALING WITH
STUDENTS DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR, prepared and submitted by
CLARENCE V. AGPULDO, in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree
Master of Arts In Educational Management, is hereby recommended for oral
examination.
SHELLA B. CACATIAN Ph.D.
Adviser
Approved by the Panel on Oral Examination with a grade of ________________
ROGER P. PEREZ, Ph.D.
Chairman
ELEUTERIO C. DE LEON, Ph.D LINA M. GARAN, DPA
Member Member
TOMASA C. IRINGAN, Ph.D EDITHA PAGULAYAN Ph.D.
Member Member
Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of
Arts in Educational Management.
NARCITAS B. OUANO, Ph.D
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Dean, Graduate School
DEDICATION
A dream is a wish your heart makes;
Have faith in your dreams that someday,
A rainbow will come shining through,
A dream that you wish will come true
To my parents,
Nestor J. Agpuldo and Precensia V.
Agpuldo
My Sister Cherry Pie V. Apuldo
My brother Wendy V. Agpuldo, and
The woman, whom will be my wife.
I sincerely offer you this humble piece of
work.
Cerlance
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
With grateful heart, the writer deeply acknowledges his indebtedness to the
following who shared their time and effort in making this study a success;
Dr. Roger P. Perez, the CSU president and the chairman of the panel, for
granting his permission to conduct this study in the campus.
Dr. Shella B. Cacatian, Adviser, for her substantial comments and
suggestions;
Mrs. Anita L. Aguidan, for the statistical treatment of the data;
Dr. Susan R. Matipo, for her deep concern and valuable suggestions;
The teachers of the first year college students of CSU-SM who willingly
served as his respondents;
Mr Freddie P. Masuli, Dean of the College of Information and Technology
and the faculty members for all the words and wisdom and encouragement;
His loving mother, Precensia V. Agpuldo, his ever supporting father Nestor J.
Agpuldo, his sister Cherry Pie V. Agpuldo, for their love and sacrifices;
Above all, the Almighty, for His blessings and guidance through all the days
in the realization of this piece of work.
C.V.A.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
TALE OF CONTENTS
Page
TITLE PAGE........................................................................
....... i
APPROVAL SHEET. ii
DEDICATION......................................................................
................... iii
ACKNOWLEGDEMENT.................................................................
..... iv
TABLE OF CONTENTS...............................................................
......... v
LIST OF TABLES..................................................................
................ vii
LIST OF FIGURES.................................................................
............... viii
CHAPTER
1 INTRODUCTION.. 1
Background of the Study..................................................... 1
Conceptual Framework...................................................... 4
Research Paradigm............................................................. 5

Statement of the Problem................................................... 6
Research Hypothesis........................................................... 6

Significance of the Study.................................................... 7
Scope and Delimitation....................................................... 8
Definition of Terms.............................................................
9
2
REVIEW OF RELATED
LITERATURE AND STUDIES 10
Classroom Management 10
Disruptive Behavior of the Students... 14
Causes of Disruptive Behaviors of the Students.... 16
Teachers Strategies...... 17
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
3 RESEARCH METHOLOGY. 30
Research Design.. 30
Locale of the Study..... 31
Respondents and Sampling Procedure..... 31
Research Instrument.. 32
Data Gathering Procedure. 33
Statistical Treatment.. 33
.
4 PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS
AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA.. 35
Profile of Teachers.. 35
Extent of Disruptive behaviors of the students.... 38
Teachers Strategies.... 39
Relationship between the profile of the teaches
And
the extent of disruptive behavior o the Students.. 49
5
SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS,
AND RECOMMENDATIONS... 50
Summary... 50
Conclusions... 53
Recommendations.... 54
Literature Cited.. 55
APENDICES... 58
Questionnaire for the Teachers. 58
Letter- Request to the CSU President 65
Letter- Request to the Campus Executive Office. 66
Letter - Request to the Campus Deans.. 67
Curriculum Vitae
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
LIST OF TABLES
Table Page
1. Distributions of respondents. 32
2. Profile of the
teachers.... 37
3. Teachers strategies in dealing with
students disruptive behavior. 46
4. Extent of disruptive behavior of the
students. 39
5. Significant relationship of teachers profile
and extend of disruptive behaviors of the students 49
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
LIST OF APPENDICES
Appendix Page
A. Questionnaire for Teachers.... 58
B. Letter Request to the CSU
President..... 65
C. Letter- Request to the Campus Executive Officer... 66
D. Letter - Request to the Campus Deans.. 67
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure Page
1.
Paradigm showing the relationship between
the independent and dependent variables 5
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
CHAPTER I
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND
Introduction
One really cannot teach effectively if the students do not behave is a common
expression of teachers. Teachers cannot begin to teach the content of a curricul
um if the
students are roaming around the room, shouting their answers during class discus
sions,
pestering neighbors during seatwork or engaging in a short disruptive behavior.
Disruptive behaviors of students in school are not a new problem. The difficulti
es,
which arise from anti-social behavior by students, are widely known. What maybe
less
appreciated is the extent to which teachers are trying to deal with the various
forms of
disciplinary behavior.
Disruptive behaviors of the students are the most serious problems confronting
educators today. Students misbehavior is one of the major obstacles in creating a
n
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
effective classroom learning environment. With it, smooth flow of the learning
process is affected, and if this is not corrected, this may lead to juvenile del
inquency.
There are certain kinds of misbehavior among students that make teachers task
more challenging. At times teachers cannot maintain order in the classroom effec
tively
because of the disturbance created by misbehaving students. Teachers must be abl
e to
manage the students under them. No matter how intelligent they are, if they are
unable
to control the students, little learning will take place. They should not only t
ake care of
routine factors; but also maintain good discipline in their classes.
Effective classroom management doesnt just happen. It is planned and purposeful.
It begins at the start of the school year with a focus on prevention and organiz
ation. It
continues with implementation of a plan for choosing rules and procedures in the

classroom and strategies to teach and to maintain appropriate behavior and to ma
nage
inappropriate behavior.
Teachers should not only be knowledgeable to their subject they teach but also i
n
handling students of different types. Effective teachers when confronting studen
ts with
disruptive behaviors apply varied practices and techniques to cope with the nume
rous
discipline dilemmas. Some observers argue that teachers should be more effective

disciplinarians. Others agree that preventive discipline should be employed. Whi
ch is
preferred is imperative that all teachers should possess a working knowledge of
how to
handle disruptive behavior inside the classroom.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
In the Cagayan State University, Sanchez Mira Campus, several disruptive
behaviors are noted from the students like yawning, giggling, cheating, shouting

answers, pestering other students, clicking their ballpen, tapping the floor, us
ing cell
phones, day dreaming, murmuring and others. These behaviors are said to be the
problems of teachers. Brophy (2005) pointed out that the causes of those problem
s
could not be determined by mere intuition alone.
The researcher too, has confirmed that teachers encounter such behavior because
students came from different family backgrounds with different culture and tradi
tions.
It is within this premise that the researcher wants to undertake this study to f
ind out
the strategies of CSU-SM teachers in dealing with the disruptive behaviors of th
e first
year college students and to come up with recommendations which could lessen, if
not,
totally eliminate these negative attitudes.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Conceptual Framework
The success of a teacher in implementing his lesson depends upon the management
he or she uses in the classroom. An organized and well managed student will achi
eve
success in learning. On the other hand a teacher can not teach well if the stude
nts are
undisciplined.
The study views that the extents to which teachers encounter disruptive behavior
s
of the students vary among types of teachers. This theory confirms the study
Pacheco(1999) that those teachers who are older and are married produce students
who
are more disciplined. Moreover teachers who are longer in the service and who
experienced less stress in their family relations are more competent and more ef
fective
in disciplining students.
Nacated (2006) also found out that the profile of the teachers such as; age, sex
, civil
status, educational attainment, years in service significantly affect the studen
ts
attitudes inside the classroom.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
To encapsulate the framework of the study, the variables are shown in figure 1.
The
independent variables are the profile of the respondents in terms of age, sex, c
ivil
status, status of appointment educational attainment, number of years in service
, and
academic rank. The dependent variables are the incidence of disruptive behavior
of the
students and the strategies employed by the respondents in dealing with the disr
uptive
behavior of the students
RESEARCH PARADIGM
Independent Variables Dependent Variable
The profile of the respondents
in terms of;
a.
Age
b.
Sex
c.
Civil status
d.
Educational attainment
e.
Number of years in
service
f.
Academic rank
g.
Status of appointment
Extent of incidence of
disruptive behaviors of the
first year college students.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Figure 1. A paradigm showing the relationship between the independent and depend
ent
variables.
Statement of the Problem
This study aimed to find out the teachers strategies in dealing with students
disruptive behaviors of the first year college students of CSU-SM.
Specifically, the researcher sought answers to the following questions;
1.
What is the profile of the respondents in terms of;
a. Age
b. Sex
c.Civil status
d. Educational attainment
e.Number of years in service
f. Academic rank
g. Status of appointment
2.
What is the extent of incidence of the disruptive behaviors of the first year co
llege
students?
3.
What are the strategies of CSU-SM teachers in dealing with the disruptive behavi
or
of the first college students?
4.
Is there a significant relationship between the teachers profile and the extent o
f
incidence of disruptive behavior of the first year college students?
Research Hypothesis
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
1. There no significant relationship between the teachers profile and the extent
of
incidence of disruptive behaviors of the first year college students.
Significance of the Study
The researcher believes that the result of this study is indispensable to the
following:
Teacher training institutions can integrate in one of its professional subjects,
Tips for the beginning teachers based on the analysis of the findings of this stu
dy. In
so doing, the pre-service education of prospective secondary teachers is enhance
d.
Teachers can also provide practice teacher with the classroom management tips on
how
to cope with the problem situations in the classroom.
The School Administrators can use the results of this research in planning
orientation programs for newly employed teachers as well as planning in-service
programs for those who may still encounter problems in the classroom which they
have
difficulty in coping with.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
The prospective teachers, on the other hand, will be prepared for his teaching
career. It can provide them with the in formations as to what strategies and met
hods to
employ in case confronted with problems in the classroom.
.
The researchers will be endowed with necessary information in case they will
venture similar studies in the future.
Scope and Delimitation of the Study
The study was delimited to the strategies of CSU-SM teachers in dealing with the

disruptive behaviors of the college freshmen.
The profile of the respondents in terms of age, sex, civil status, educational
attainment, number of years in service, academic rank and status of appointment
was
determined. The extent of incidence of disruptive behaviors of the students and
the
strategies of teachers in dealing with disruptive behaviors of the students was
determined. Further, the relationship between the teachers profile and the extent
of
incidence of the disruptive behaviors of the first year college was explained.
The respondents of the study were the teachers who are teaching college freshmen

at the Cagayan State University at Sanchez Mira. This study was conducted from
December 2009 to February 2010.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Definition of Terms
Behavior refers to the attitude response by the students towards teaching and
learning procedures.
Disruptive behavior refers to the problem that negatively affects the continuous

flow of the lesson; it is a negative problem that disturbs the teaching-learning
process.
Educational Attainment refers to the highest degree attained by the teachers whi
ch
could be doctoral, masteral or bachelors degree.
Sex refers to the gender of the respondents whether male or female.
Strategies refer to the process and techniques employed by the teachers in deali
ng
with the disruptive behaviors of the students.
Years in Service refers to the length of time the teacher has served as a teache
r.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES
This chapter discusses the related literature and studies relevant to the resear
ch
work.
Review of related Literature
The review of related literature includes (1.) Classroom management (2.) Disrupt
ive
behavior of the students (3.) Causes of disruptive behaviors of the
Classroom Management
Classroom management and discipline are the two important factors that have an
influence upon the efficiency of the teaching and learning situations. Classroom

management refers to the control of classroom activities. It is relatively confi
ned to the
more mechanical aspects of teaching activity. Classroom management assumes that
its
role is to save time and energy. Some of the things that a teacher should consid
er in
planning classroom management are regulations on seating and attendance, the
handling of instructional materials and equipment, and the control of activities
during
the class period. Further, the success of failure of teaching is determined ofte
n by the
way the class is organized and managed. Unless the details of the classroom proc
edure
are successfully worked out, much time will be wasted and little will be accompl
ished.
Therefore, the teacher should thoroughly routinize the details of daily practice
in
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
conducting class work. A well managed classroom will give the students rich
opportunities for mental growth and development.
Good (2003) claimed that classroom management doesnt just happen. Classes
where students are highly involved in learning activities and which are free fro
m
disruptive and chronic misbehavior are not accidental. These exist because effec
tive
teachers have a very clear idea of the types of classroom condition and students
behavior that are needed for a good learning environment, and because those teac
hers
work very hard to produce such behaviors and conditions.
Good(2003), defined classroom management as administration or direction of
activities with special refines to such problems as discipline, democratize tech
nique,
use and care of supplies and reference materials, and physical feature of studen
ts.
Classroom management includes operation and control activities. Unless classroom

procedures are spelled out carefully, much time and energy will be wasted. A wel
l
manage class is reliably conducive to mental growth development. Learning become
s
interesting and enjoyable under favorable working conditions. Unhygienic conditi
ons
on the other hand, affect the health as well as the learning of students. The te
acher is
likewise affected. She can teach effectively only when conditions around him are

favorable. Further, pleasant surroundings induce good thought and inspire both t
eacher
and students to do their best. Good classroom establishes an atmosphere, which p
ermits
activities to be carried on efficiently on time, with less efforts, and energies
.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
According to Brophy and Evertson (2005) there are five major factors on which
effective classroom management is faced upon: (1)developing a solid understandin
g of
students personal and psychological and learning needs;(2)establishing positive
teacher-students and peer relationships that help meet students basic psychologic
al
needs;(3) using organizational and group management methods that maximize studen
ts
behavior; (4) implementing instructional methods that facilitate optimal learnin
g by
responding to the academic needs of individual studies; (5) employing a wide ran
ge of
counseling and behavioral methods that involve students on examining and correct
ing
their inappropriate behavior.
Callahan (1999) pointed out that classroom management is the process of
organizing and conducting a class so that it is efficient and it results in maxi
mum
students learning. To manage a class successfully, one needs to be careful in cla
ss,
provide students with pleasant and supportive climate for learning, create inter
est and a
desire to learn and achieve, establish control, avoid disciplinary disturbance,
and in
general, promote effective students learning.
Evert (2003) recommended the following characteristics for the teacher to posses
s
in order to manage his class well. (1) Self-analysis the teacher must judge his
own
conduct. (2) Self-control he must be able to restrain his emotions and impulses.

(3)Self-criticism his good motto is grow or go (4) Self-confidence-he must believe

CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
in himself and his work. (5)Self-control-he must grow intellectually, morally, s
ocially,
and professionally. (6) Self-rating- he must constantly evaluate himself and his
work.
Sophier et al (2007), on the other hand, came up with six models of discipline
namely; (1) behavior modifies systematically; (2) clips (cuts off) reward on the

unproductive behavior; (3) identifies substitute and more productive behavior; (
4)
target this new behavior that starts out consistent and high in frequent, and gr
adually
becomes variables and lower in frequency; (5) self-awareness Training: teachers
read
their own signal so that they know why they are getting angry, afraid, frustrate
d, or
whatever else led to outburst or other unproductive behavior. Student can learn
a lot of
coping strategies they can plug in when these things are starting to happen. At
the
beginning, the teacher plays a very active, verbal and supportive role to the st
udent that
gradually diminishes as the students is helped toward greater autonomy with the
system; (6) personal influences are based on strong mutual relations between the

teacher and the students. The teacher works hard to build this relationship in c
ertain
specific ways. Teachers bring in enough of their outside-school life and
accomplishments so as to earn some respect as a figure in the world, persons of
some
interest and significance beyond the immediate classroom environment. Teachers a
re
firm with students when disruption occurs.
Wilson (2007) asserted that the effective classroom manager uses three types of
control.(1) Preventive control is aimed at minimizing the onset of discipline pr
oblems,
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
which the teacher tries to anticipate through planning. Making predictions about
what is
likely to happen, given certain classroom activities, is an important element in
the
design and selection of preventive, measures.(2)Supportive control is aimed at h
elping
the students before their behavior becomes a full Pledged problem. Teachers ofte
n
stand in the vicinity of students who need to be aware of the students presence t
o
behave properly. Similarly, a teacher might use verbal or nonverbal cue to remin
d
students to raise their hands before speaking or to remain in their seats. The c
ue is
delivered just before such students behave contrary to the rules.(3)Corrective c
ontrol
seeks to discipline students who have not been faithful to the standard of good
conduct.
Teachers use corrective controls after the students have chosen to resist their
influences
or defy the rules. Because the students behavior is inappropriate and objectiona
ble, the
teachers apply punitive measure or, at a minimum, a warning to redirect the beha
vior.
In this instance the teachers have to help the students regain control by making
life
momentarily unpleasant. When the students behavior falls within the acceptable ra
nge,
the teachers may revert to support supportive control measures.
Disruptive behavior of the students
Generally, disruptive behavior interferes with the instructors ability to conduct
the
class, or the ability of other students to profit from the instruction.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Disruptive behavior is a problem that negatively affects faculty, students, and
university/college administration. Disruptive behavior plays a critical role in
the success
or failure of faculty teaching careers (Robert, 1998). Faculty well-being, comfo
rt, and
satisfaction can be directly affected by the disruptive behavior of students. Fa
culty may
become disillusioned and even dread teaching (Meyers, 2003). Classroom disruptio
n
contributes to additional faculty stress, discontent, and eventual burnout (Maru
ssette,
2001). Instructor concentration is negatively affected, so time and energy may b
e devoted
to planning coping (survival) strategies rather than focusing on lecture materia
l. As a
result, a hostile learning environment is created (Gim, 2006).
The most recent report on violence statistics in the workplace from 1993-1999 is
sued
by the Bureau of Justice Statistics of the U.S. Department of Justice, records 4
1,600
reported incidents of violence directed against college/university instructors (
Sopier,
2007). However, the statistics did not allow one to distinguish the number of as
saults
against faculty perpetrated by students from those perpetrated by co-workers or
others.
Furthermore, it is estimated that approximately 20 percent of students display a
ctive
resistance to learning (Meyers, 2003).
Gibson (2004) suggested some typical behavior problems that a teacher should be
able to recognize and deal with. These are: (1) The unsociable, withdrawal child
. The
child tends to be shy, secretive, unhappy and suffering of feeling of insecurity
and
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
adequacy. He may daydream excessively and refuse to mix with other children.
Although he may cause no trouble or inconvenience, he may need as much assistanc
e
as the aggressive, anti-social students. This type of child can become schizophr
enic if
nothing is done to check his behavior, although not all shy children of course b
ecome
psychotic. But they usually develop socially ineffective and unhappy adults. (2)
The
aggressive. The child who is aggressive is generally hostile, disobedient, volat
ile, and
disruptive. Because of his violent temper, he may threaten to attack others incl
uding his
teachers, verbally or physically. He may engage or participate in anti-social an
d
criminal behavior like stealing, fighting, using deadly weapons, sometimes vanda
lism,
and arson. Such behaviors may occur in the content of group activity, especially
among
adolescents. These children usually have parents who are unaffectionate and reje
cting,
often socially deviant themselves. The parents frequently have low expectations
of their
children, lack supervision of their children, threaten them and are inconsistent
in their
discipline. The resulting conflict and dissatisfaction with parents may lead to
an
aggressive behavior. (3) The lazy child. The child tends to lie if he has no int
erest in the
school activities, which are directed towards the environment of certain goals.
Causes of Disruptive Behavior
Robertson et. Al (2003), in his study, identified five main causes of disruptive

behavior. These are: (1) Immediate pat off. Here the motive is simple and
uncomplicated. If a student talks, it is because he or she has something to say
that will
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
wait. If he or she runs in the corridor, it is because there is hurry. The act i
tself is quite
acceptable, but it is done at the wrong time, in the wrong context, so far as th
e teacher
is concerned. (2)Attention seeking device. The purpose of the disruptive behavio
r can
put the students in the limelight and keep them as the center of attraction-by t
he
teachers and the students.(3)Excitement in an effort to alleviate the frustratio
n and
boredom of life in the classroom, the students can search for excitement by inte
rfering
with the progress of the lesson, causing episodes that break the tedium of class
routine.
(4)Malicious teasing. By purposely provoking a confrontation with the teacher or
by
subjecting the teacher to subtle forms of ridicule, students can gain excitement
in the
eyes of their peers. This can elevate the status of the students by challenging
the
authority of the teacher.(5)Avoiding work. Students can avoid the hardship of do
ing
work by passive resistance, but they can also engage in disruptive behavior that
creates
incidents and subsequently affects the ends needs of the class.
Teachers strategies in dealing with disruptive behavior of students
The following are strategies for dealing with problem students, sometimes called
difficult students based on the experiences of the teachers. Although generally
developed for high school students, the strategies apply to most school setting
and year
levels: (1) accentuate their positive qualities; (2) be confident; take charge o
f the
situation, and dont give up in front of the students; (3) be yourself since these
students
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
can recognize and take offense at such decent; (4) provide structure since many
of these
students lack inner control and are restless and impulsive; (5) explain your rul
es and
routines so students understand them. Be sure your explanations are brief; other
wise,
you lose your effectiveness and you appear to be defensive and preaching; (6)
communicate positive expectations that you expect the students to learn in your
required academic work; (7) rely on motivation, and not on your powers to mainta
in
order; an interesting lesson can keep students on task; (8) keep calm and keep s
tudents
calm, especially when conditions become tense or upsetting. It may be necessary
to
delay action until after classes, when emotion has been reduces; (9) seize up th
e
situation, and be aware of undercurrent of behaviors, since these students are s
eizing
you up and are now manipulator of their environment; (10) anticipate behavior; b
eing
able to judge what will happen if you or a student decides on a course of action
that
may allow you to curtail many problems; (11) expect, but dont accept misbehavior.

Learn to cope with misbehavior, but dont get upset or feel inadequate about it.
According to Mueller (2004), discipline means preparing boys and girls for life
in
democratic society. He further state that the purpose of discipline is to help t
he
individual to acquire knowledge, habits, interest, and ideal, which are designed
for the
well being of himself and his fellows, and that discipline is a matter of educat
ion.
Classroom discipline seeks to bring about desirable behavior on the part of all
students.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Gim and Michalis (2006) said that good discipline implies obedience on the part
of
every student to classroom rules and regulations with the aim of achieving succe
ss in
learning. Ability to secure good discipline is one of the qualities of a good te
acher. In
fact, psychological studies have revealed that a poor discipline is one of the c
auses of
failure in teaching. The teacher should not only take care of the routine factor
s; he has
also to maintain good discipline in his class to achieve good classroom manageme
nt.
To reiterate this, Good (2003) defined discipline as the process of redirecting
immediate wishes., impulses, desires or interest for the sake of an ideal, or fo
r the
purpose of gaining more effective, dependable action. Discipline becomes an impo
rtant
factor in the development of education. It implies systematic training of the ph
ysical,
moral and social capabilities of the students. In common parlance, discipline is

understood in terms of punishment, control through obedience, and orderly behavi
or
and self-direction.
Gregorio (2000) offered some suggestions that can minimize if not totally elimin
ate
cheating in schools. These are as follows. (1)Publicize as widely as possible sc
hool
policies on cheating, including penalties ranging from suspension to dismissal.(
2)Give
essay question in an examination or contrast of two variables, or comment or rea
ction
to an event.(3)Proctors must be present during the entire period of an examinati
on.
They should position themselves in strategic places to see everybody in the room
and to
be seen by every examinee.(4)During an examination, all books, and other materia
ls
xxviii
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
which might contain coded information should be kept away from the examinee.(5)I
f
an examiner leave for any reason he should be accompanied and prevented from tal
king
to anyone about the examination.(6)Suppliers of blue books or other pamphlets on

which answers are written should be requested to print on the covers of their pr
oduct,
an abstract of the policy cheating.
Melvin Keens (2000) gave some pointers to teachers when they locate a
troublemaker who is deliberately provoking a situation :(1)At the end of the per
iod talk
to him privately. Let him know by the tone of your voice and your manner that yo
u
have no intention of tolerating his nonsense.(2)Change his seat to anyone direct
ly in
front of you. If he shows the slightest indication of getting out of line, speak
to him in a
low voice, as if you were his confidential friend warning of the trouble ahead.
This
technique often works magic, especially with younger teenagers. (3)Make out a sp
ecial
disciplinary card that you keep in your files for future references. Let the cla
ss as well
as the trouble maker know that you are keeping a record. A formal, careful writt
en
complaints is frequently a strong deterrent to future outburst.(4)Immediately se
nd the
troublemaker to your department office. Take the precaution to write a special p
ass in
ink. Put the line when the pass is issued and request that the time be noted whe
n the
students arrive in the office. The youngster is to wait there until the end of t
he period
when you can go thresh the matter out with him. The procedure has an advantage o
f
getting out the troublemaker of your classroom so that you may proceed with your

CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
lesson.(5)If school regulations do not permit you to send him to the department
office,
keep him in your room, but let him stand rear away from supporting walls or desk
s.
Give gesture that he is not considered a part of your class until disciplinary m
easures
have been taken. A variation of this technique is to let him stand in the hall o
utside your
room. Often however, supervisors who feel that a students especially if misbehav
ing,
should be under a teachers observation.(6) Inform the guidance counselor. Be care
ful
to give him an exact account. If possible arrange a meeting with him, the troubl
emaker,
and yourself. (7)Go to your subject supervisor. Usually he has the experience to
be of
definite help. Of course be explicit in your charges. (8)Telephone to parent; if
there is
no phone, and your supervisor doesnt object, write a letter with a full account a
sking
the parents to see you in school to discuss the matter stating the time when you
have a
free period. Cooperation of the home is important in disciplinary matters. (10)C
ontact
the supervisor who is in charge of discipline. Be specific; give the exact detai
ls of your
complaint. The completeness of your report is important because when the parents

come to school, the discipline supervisor will have your version at hand. You ca
nnot
expect him to support if your file has inaccurate reports.
Robert (1999) also gave some ideas for motivating students such as : (1) Explain
.
Some recent research shows that many students do poorly on assignments or in
participation because they do not understand what to do or why they should do it
.
Teacher should spend more time explaining why we teach what we do, and why the
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
topic or approach or activity is important and interesting and worthwhile. In th
e
process, some of the teachers enthusiasm will be transmitted to the students, who
will
have more time explaining exactly what is expected on assignment or activities.
Students who are uncertain about what to do will seldom perform well. (2) Reward
.
Extrinsic motivators in the form of rewards can help students who do not yet hav
e
powerful intrinsic motivation learn. Rather than criticizing unwanted behavior o
r
answers, reward correct behavior and answers. Remember that adults and children
alike
continue or repeat behavior that is rewarded. The rewards can be small and confi
gured
to the level of the students. Small children can be given a balloon, a piece of
gum, or a
set of crayons/ even at the college level. Many professors at various colleges g
ive
books, lunches, certificates, exemptions from final exams, verbal praises and so
on for
good performance. Even something as apparently childish as a good job stamp or
sticker can encourage students to perform at a higher level. And the important p
oint is
that extrinsic motivators can, over a brief period of time, produce intrinsic mo
tivation.
Everyone likes the feeling of accomplishment and recognition; rewards for good w
ork
produce those good feelings. (3) Care. Students respond with interest and motiva
tion to
teachers who appear to be human and caring. Teachers can help produce these feel
ings
by sharing parts of themselves with students, especially little stories of probl
em and
mistakes they made. Such personalizing of the student and teacher relationship h
elps
students see teachers as approachable human beings and not a as aloof authority
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
figures. Young people are also quite insecure, and they secretly welcome the adm
ission
by adults that insecurity and error are common to everyone. Students will attend
to an
adult who appears to be a real person who had problems as a youth and survive them
.
(4) Have students participate. One of the major keys to motivate is the active
involvement of students in their own learning. Standing in front of them and lec
turing
to them is thus a relatively poor method of teaching. it is better to get studen
ts involved
in activities, group problem solving exercises, helping to decide what to do and
the best
way to do it, helping the teacher, working with each other, or in some other way
getting
physically involved in the lesson. A lesson about nature, for example, would be
more
effective walking outdoors than looking at pictures.(5) Teach inductively. It ha
s been
said that presenting conclusions first and then providing examples robs students
of the
joy of discovery by beginning with examples, evidence, stories, and so forth and

arriving at conclusions later. You can maintain interest and increase motivation
, as well
as teach the skills of analysis and synthesis. Remember that the parable method
of
making a point has some significant historical precedent.(6)Satisfy students need
s.
Attending to need satisfaction is a primarily method of keeping students interes
t and
happiness. Students basic needs have been identified as survival, love, power, fu
n, and
freedom. Attempting to the need for power could be as simple as following studen
ts to
choose from among two or three things to do two or three paper topics, two or th
ree
activities, choosing between writing an extra paper and taking final exam etc. M
any
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
students have a need to have fun in active ways in other words; they need to be
noisy
and excited. Rather than always avoiding or suppressing these needs, design an
education activity that fulfills them. Students will be much more committed to a

learning activity that has value for them. They will, in fact, put up with subst
antial
immediate unpleasantness and do amazing amounts of hard work if they are convinc
ed
with that what they are learning ultimately meets their needs.(7)Make learning v
isual.
Even before young people were reared in a video environment, it was recognized t
hat
memory is often connected with visual images. In the middle ages people who
memorized the bible or Homer sometime walk around inside a cathedral and mentall
y
attach certain passage to objects inside, so that remembering the image of a col
umn or
statue would provide the needed stimulus to remember the next hundred lines of t
ext.
Similarly, we can provide better learning by attaching images to the ideas we wa
nt to
convey. Use drawing, diagram, pictures, charts, graphs, bulleted list. Even thre
e
dimensional objects can brought to class to help students anchor the idea to an
image. It
is very helpful to begin a class session or a series of classes with a conceptua
l diagram
of the relationship of all the components in the class so that at a glance stude
nts can
apprehend contexts for all the learning they will be doing. These will enable th
em to
develop a mental framework or feeling system that will help them to learn better
and
remember more. (8)Use positive emotions to enhance learning and motivation. Stro
ng
and lasting memory is connected with the emotional state and experience of the l
earner.
xxxiii
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
That is, people remember better when the learning is accompanied by strong emoti
on.
If you can make something fun, exciting, happy, loving, or perhaps a bit frighte
ning,
students will learn more readily and the learning will last much longer. Emotion
s can be
created by classroom attitude, by doing something an unexpected or outrageous, b
y
praise, and by many other means. (9)Remember that energy sells. Think about this

problem for a minute: why would many students rather see Rambo, Robocop, Friday
the 13th, or another movie like that done one on the life of Christ? Why is rock
music
more popular than classical music or music elevator music? Why is evil often see
n as
more interesting than good? The answer is connected with the way good and evil a
re
portrayed. Unfortunately, evil usually has high energy on each side while good i
s seen
as passive and boring. Weve been trap by the idea that bad people do; good people
dont; good is passive, resistant, and reactionary, while evil is proactive, energ
etic, and
creative.
Evert et. Al. (1999) suggested 12 ways that could help the teacher prevent
occurrence of problem situations. These are (1) be organized. (2)be Definite. (3
)be
natural. (4)act your age. (5)be consistent and fair. (6)avoid argument. . (7)avo
id temper
fits. (8) develop set values. (9)do not threaten. (10)avoid humiliating pupils i
f possible.
(11)give students responsibility if they can handle it. (12)do not rush to give
absolution.
xxxiv
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Review of Related Studies
Causes of Disruptive Behavior of the Students
Bugay (2001) concluded, as results of examining hundreds of juvenile delinquents

for the juvenile Court of Cook Country, Illinois, that the major cause of teenag
ers
aggression and violence is family disorganization, especially, broken homes and
absent
fathers. Those teenagers, who had engaged in burglaries and mugging were not poo
r,
nor were they merely looking for thrills. They were primarily interested in mone
y to
support their expensive consumers habit like their appetite for junk foods, movie
s,
attractive clothes, among others. The school can help these young people but pee
r-
group resistance often thwarts attempt.
In the Philippines, according to Dunuan (2000), et.al, students with problem
behavior normally experience much feeling of anxiety, insecurity, inferiority, h
ostility,
guilt, and alienation. Among the more common causes of problem behavior and are
sources of such feeling are: (1) conflicts moral standards as values are in the
home and
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
community; (2) over protection from failure and frustration; (3) unstable home
conditions or broken homes; (4) rejection by parents; (5) unfair treatment and e
xcessive
punishment; (6) autocratic controls and inconsistent discipline; (7) very high a
nd
unrealistic expectation; (8) unfavorable comparison with others; (9) lack of sym
pathy
and understanding in times of trial, stress or crisis; (10) poverty, unemploymen
t of
parents and socio-economic status.
Pacheco (1999) found out the causes of the behavioral problems. These are: (1)
social and environmental factors; (2) stemming from the home; (3) psychological
and
physical factors; (4) the school teacher factors
Her findings also showed that majority of the teachers used desirable positive o
r
relevant disciplinary measures.
According to Dunuan (2000) disruptive behaviors are (1) Students related, i.e.,
Students do not think of the future, and contented only with passing mark. (2) S
chool
and teacher-related i.e.,, bad influences of classmates, and school authorities
and not
understanding for the welfare of students. (3) Home related i.e., Parents are bu
sy
earning for a living that they cannot attend to their children and their school
activities
(4) Community related i.e., Many liquor stores near the school and there are cha
nces of
earning pocket money.
Similarly, behavioral problem of students of Tadian Schools of Arts and Trades
were studied by Nacated (2006). The top behavioral problems as noted by him were
:
xxxvi
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
inattentiveness, absenteeism, and truancy while the top three behavioral problem
s as
perceived by the students were: disobedience, gambling, and inattentiveness. Fur
ther in
the same study the causes of misbehavior as perceived by the teachers were: infl
uence
of peers, environmental factor and inadequate school facilities, heavy home choi
rs and
poverty.
Disruptive Behavior of the Students
Bgugay (2001),identified that the common characteristics of Filipino children wi
th
behavioral problems are the following: (1) dishonesty as shown in lying and chea
ting in
examination; (2) timidity or shyness even among peers and family; (3) sensitiven
ess
followed by crying; (4) quarrelsomeness shown in teaser and bullying classmates;
(5)
restlessness or inattentiveness; (6) disobedience and disrespect for authority;
(7.)
tardiness and absenteeism with no valid reason; (8) unnecessary giggling, talkin
g,
swearing, and using vulgar word often. (10) Low voice in the classroom but loud
in the
halls and corridors; (11) isolating him from the rest of the class.
Similarly, Pachecos study on the behavior of high school students in Baguio
Central University presented the following behavioral problems: (1) feeling of
inferiority; (2) aggressive behavior; (3) withdrawing behavior; (4) non-complian
ce
behavior; (5) delinquent related behavior
xxxvii
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Dunuan (2000) said that there are behaviors of students, which teachers would li
ke
to change and modify. Some of these are food-dragging, tardiness, absenteeism,
fighting with the other students, teasing others, leaving the room without permi
ssion,
daydreaming, bullying, and ruddiness. The problems mentioned were the same
problems, which were included in the study.
Specific examples of disciplinary problems reflected in Lepanto National High
School are absenteeism, cutting classes, and use of abusive language, gambling,
drinking liquor, and abuse of prohibited drugs that make them prone to violence.

From the above mentioned researches and reviews, the researcher witness vibrant
attention on national issues on the state of education in our country. If colleg
es and
universities are to fulfill their roles as preparers of scientifically oriented
citizens, some
major changes will be necessary and the roles played by professors, instructors,
and
university administrators will have to be re-defined. The people involved in thi
s
undertaking should face own limitations and take up initiatives with respect to
professional development. Similarly existing programs will have to be revived
precedent vigor, university level pedagogical practices will have to be critique
d and
updated, and their roles and practices to be re-examined and re-defined.
Thus, the literature cited will help the researcher a lot to gain more depth and

insight into this study, furthermore, this study can later on help validate the
findings can
serve as a guide in coming out with the theoretical framework and the questionna
ires to
xxxvii
i
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
be used in this study. Moreover, the researcher will be helped in the formulatio
n of the
specific research problems, in the selection of the research methodology and in
the
construction of the data gathering tool.
CHAPTER III
METHODS AND PROCEDURES
This chapter presents the methods of investigations used by the researcher. It
includes the research design, locale of the study, the respondents and sampling
procedures, the research instrument, data gathering procedure and analysis of da
ta.
Research Design
The research study made used of the descriptive comparative correlated method
since it simply described the profile of the respondents in terms of age, sex, c
ivil status,
academic rank, status of appointment, and years of service. The extent of incide
nce of
disruptive behaviors of the students and the strategies of teachers in dealing w
ith
disruptive behaviors of the students was determined. Further, the relationship b
etween
the teachers profile and the extent of incidence of the disruptive behaviors of t
he
college freshmen was explained.
xxxix
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Locale of the Study
This study was conducted at the Cagayan State University at Sanchez Mira. The
school is situated in a 6.9 hectare lot along Maharlika Highway, Centro 02, Sanc
hez
Mira Cagayan. It offers courses that include Doctor of Philosophy in Educational

Management, Master of Arts in Educational management, Master in Public
Administration, Bachelor in Secondary Education majors in Biological Science,
English, and Mathematics, Bachelor of Elementary Education, Bs in Information
Technology, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture majors in Animal Science and Crop

Science, BS in Hospitality Industry Management, BS in Criminology, BS in Police
Administration, BS in Business Administration major in Management Accounting and

a Science High School.
Respondents and Sampling Procedure
The respondents of this study were the CSU-SM teachers who are teaching the
first year college students this school year 2009-2010. Total or complete enumer
ation
was used in this study considering their small number.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
The distribution of respondents is shown in table 1.0
Table 1. Distribution of respondents by department.
College/Department Number of Teachers in the first year
College of Education 6
College of Agriculture 8
College of Information Technology 9
College of Arts and Sciences 17
Department of Technology 3
Total 43
Research Instrument
The main instrument which was used in the study is the questionnaire. The
questionnaire is composed of three parts. The first part concerns the profile of
the
respondents in terms of age, sex, civil status, academic rank, status of appoint
ment,
number years in service and educational attainment. The second part describes th
e
extent of incidence of the disruptive behavior that is being experienced by the
CSU-SM
teachers in the classroom. The third part is the strategies employed by the CSU-
SM
teachers in dealing with the disruptive behavior of the students.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Data Gathering Procedure
The researcher sought the approval of the University President to conduct the
study at the Cagayan State University at Sanchez Mira. Then a similar letter req
uest
was sought from the Campus Executive Officer, the campus deans, and the
respondents. Upon approval the researcher personally distributed and retrieved t
he
questionnaire. This gave the researcher a chance to guide the respondents in
accomplishing the test.
Statistical Treatment
The formula used by the researcher varies according to the different problems in

the study.
Frequency counts and percentage distribution were used to describe the profile o
f
the respondents. Ranking was used to describe the strategies employed by the tea
chers
in dealing with the disruptive behaviors of the first year college students. Wei
ghted
mean was used to explain the extent of the incidence of disruptive behavior of t
he first
year college students.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
The chi-square was used to determine the significant relationship between the
teachers profile and the extent of incidence of disruptive behavior of the first
year
college students.
The five points scale was used in describing the result of this study and it is
interpreted as follows;
Scale Range of Mean Descriptive Value
5 4.21-5.0 Always
4 3.41-4.20 Often
3 2.61-3.40 Sometimes
2 1.81-2.60 Seldom
1 1.0-1.80 Never
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Chapter IV
PRESENTATION, INTERPRETATION, AND ANALYSIS OF DATA
This chapter covers the presentation, interpretation and analysis of data
gathered.
Profile of Teachers
Table 2 presents the profile of the teaches of the Cagayan State University,
Sanchez Mira, who are teaching the college freshmen in terms of age, sex, civil
status, status of appointment, academic rank, highest educational attainment, an
d
number of years in the service.
Of the 43 respondents, 22 or 51.2 percent belong to the age bracket of 29 and
below, 9 or 20.9 percent are aged 40-49, 8 or 18.6 percent are 50 years old and
above,
and 4 or 9.3 percent belong to 30-39 age bracket. This means that the respondent
s are
relatively young.
As regards sex, 23 or 53.5 percent are females and 20 or 46.5 percent are
males. This shows that most of the respondents are females. It implies that teac
hing is
more attractive to females than males.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
In terms of civil status, 22 or 51.2 percent are married and 21 or 48.8 are
single. This shows that instructors teaching in the first year are dominated by
married
ones.
As to status of appointment, there are 19 or 44.2 percent of the respondents
who are permanent in their work and 24 or 55.8 percent are part timers or lectur
ers.
Consideration is due to the fact that there were new courses offered in the camp
us
which resulted to tremendous increase in enrollment; hence, the school hired mor
e
part time instructors to teach the students.
As regards to the academic rank, 24 or 55.8 percent are part timers / lecturers,

7 or 16.3 percent of the teachers are in the instructor level, 8 or 18.6 percent
are
assistant professors, 3 0r 7.0 percent are associate professors and 1 or 2.3 is
a
professor. The data shows that there are more part timers/ lecturers who are tea
ching
the first year college students than the permanent teachers.
The data on educational attainment shows that majority or 21 or 48.8 percent
of the respondents are BS graduates. Twelve or 27.9 are MA graduates. And 10 or
23.3 are PhD graduates. The number of BS graduates which outnumbered the MA
and PhD is due to the fact that most of the instructors are new in the service a
nd have
not finished their post graduate studies.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
The length of service reveals that 26 or 60.5 percent have been in the service
for less than 9 years, 9 or 20.9 percent have served for 20-29 years, 5 or 11 pe
rcent
have stayed in the service from 10-19 years, and 3 or 7. O percent have spent 30
years
and above in the service. This manifested that the respondents do not have enoug
h
experiences yet to the context of classroom activities.
Table 2. Profile of the teachers
: Frequency ( N= 43 ) : Percentage
Age
29 below 22 51.2
30 39 4 9. 3
40 49 9 20.9
50 above 8 18.6
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------Sex
Male 23 53.5
Female 20 46.5
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------Civil
Status
Single 21 48.8
Married 22 51.2
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------Status
of Appointment
Permanent 19 44.2
Part Timer or Lecturer 24 55.8
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------Academic
Rank
Part Time/ Lecturer 24 55.8
Instructor 7 16.3
Assistant Professor 8 18.6
Associate Professor 3 7.0
Professor 1 2.3
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------Highest
Educational Attainment
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
BS Graduate 21 48.8
MA Graduate 12 27.9
PhD Graduate 10 23.3
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------Number
of Years in the Service
Less than 10 26 60.5
10-19 5 11.6
20-29 9 20.9
30-above 3 7.0
Extent of Incidence of Disruptive Behaviors
Table 3 reveals the extent of incidence of the disruptive behaviors of the while

having classes
The behaviors which are rated as Sometimes are the following; tardiness,
cheating, talking during class discussion, giggling, inattentiveness, refusing t
o recite,
frequent absences with mean ranging from 2.78 to 3.35. The behaviors which are
rated as Seldom; are cheating during class discussions , drawing caricature during

classes, leaving without permission, rudeness, drowsiness, and daydreaming with
these corresponding means 2.05, 1.88, 2.14, 2.23, 2.19, and 2.0. The behaviors t
hat
are rated as Never are the following; reading comics, passing letter to another,
stealing, destroying school properties with means of 1.25, 1.79, 1.35, and 1.72,

respectively. The overall weighted mean of the incidence of the disruptive behav
ior
of the students of 2.35 means that the listed disruptive behaviors of the studen
ts are
seldom done in the school during class discussions. This is because the students
are
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
given orientation about the school policies and students conduct before the class

starts. Whereby, sanctions and punishments are emphasized to them which make
them afraid to do such in the classroom
.
Table 3. Extend of incidence of disruptive behavior.
Disruptive Behavior : Weighted Mean : Descriptive
Value
Tardiness 3.35
Cheating 2.93
Eating during discussions 2.05
Talking during class discussion 3.28
Giggling 2.78
Drawing caricature during classes 1.88
Reading comics 1.35
Passing letter to another 1.79
Leaving the room without permission 2.14
Stealing 1.35
Rudeness or impoliteness 2.23
Drowsiness 2.19
Destroying school properties 1.72
Inattentiveness 2.88
Refusing to Recite 3.27
Frequent absences 2.79
Day Dreaming 2.00
Sometimes
Sometimes
Seldom
Sometimes
Sometimes
Seldom
Never
Never
Seldom
Never
Seldom
Seldom
Never
Sometimes
Sometimes
Sometimes
Seldom
Weighted Mean 2.35 Seldom
Teachers Strategies in Dealing with Students Disruptive Behaviors
xlviii
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Table 4 presents the strategies used by the teachers in dealing with the
disruptive behaviors of the students.
In addressing students who are coming in late in the classroom, the teachers
mostly punished late comers with a weighted mean of 2.09. Ranked second is to
ask for an explanation then give warning with a weighted mean of 2.72 and ranked
third is to send the student to the deans office with a weighed mean of 3.07. This
findings implies that the teachers are following the right protocol in solving p
roblems
inside the classroom whereby, teachers must have to solve whatever problems they

may encounter in their classroom first, before bringing it to the deans office an
d to
the guidance office if the problem cannot be solved inside the classroom.
As regards students who are cheating during examinations, the most
commonly used strategy by the teachers is to confiscate the paper with a weighted
mean of 1.58 because confiscating immediately upon finding out the student is
cheating, the action is immediately controlled. Ranked second is to mark name in
the record with cheating with a weighted mean of 2.53. Ranked third is to mark the

paper with cheating with a weighted mean of 2.72, and ranked fourth is to give
failure grades with a weighted mean of 3.16. This is to cut the negative behavior

done by the student and for the students not to imitate it. According to Evert (
2003)
pointed out that if you cheat in school now, youll find it easier to cheat in oth
er
situations later in life even perhaps in your closest personal relationship.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
As to students who are eating during class discussion, the number one ranked
strategy is to remind the students of the no eating rule with a weighted mean of
1.58. This is because in every classroom there are rules and regulations that ar
e well
emphasized before the school year started. As pointed out by Ebreo (1992) in a w
ell
defined, safe and structured classroom, many conflicts and inappropriate behavio
rs
are prevented because the students know what the boundaries are. The strategy is

followed by tell the student to keep the food, with a mean of 2.53, then scold the

student with a mean of 2.72.
For the students who are talking while the discussion is going on, the strategy
used by the teachers which is ranked number one is to call the attention of the
students to recite with a weighted mean of 1.72. This is stop what they are talki
ng
about and directed them to listen in the discussion. Ranked number two is to
rearrange the seating arrangement with a mean of 1.98. And ranked number three is
to stop the lecture and scold with a mean of 2.65.
In dealing with students who are giggling during class discussion, the best
strategy used by the teachers is to stop the lesson with a weighted mean of 2.09.
This is followed by the strategy, ask for an explanation of the lesson with a mean
of
2.19. Next is to scold the student and last is to ask the student to stand in front.

CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
This is proven by Wilson (2007) that a long dramatic pause in your lecture when
students are chatting to each other is effective.
For the students who are drawing caricature during class discussion, the most
effective strategy used is to confiscate the caricature with a weighted mean of 1.
91.
Ranked second is to ask the student to draw on the board with a weighted mean of
2.44. Ranked third is to scold the student with a weighted mean of 2.58. And
ranked fourth is to punish the student with a weighted mean of 3.19. This is to st
op
what they are doing and get back their attention because according to Marusette
(2001 )it is better to stop the negative attitude right away for it is hard to u
ndo when it
is already a habit.
To prevent students who are reading comics and other reading materials
during class discussions, the best strategy used by the teachers is to confiscat
e what
they are reading with a weighted mean of 2.16 . Ranked second is scold with a
mean of 2.26. Ranked third is tear the material in front with a weighted mean of
3.28. Ranked fourth is make student to seat in front of the class with a mean of
2.37. This will stop him from what he is doing and in that way the other student
s will
not be disturbed. Though being strict is not much liked by the students but the
result
is overwhelming for the reason that it will not interrupt the flow of the discus
sion and
for the student to be directed to listen.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Likewise in passing letter to another during class discussion, the teachers best
strategy to stop the negative behavior of the students is to confiscate the lette
r with
a weighted mean of 2.16. Ranked second is teacher reads the notes aloud with a
weighted mean of 2.3. Ranked third is to scold the student with a weighted mean of

2.44. Ranked fourth is to make the student to read the notes in front with a
weighted mean of 3.14. This will stop him from what he is doing and in that way
the
other students will not be disturbed.
As regards student who leaves the room without permission, the strategy that
is ranked number one is to threaten the student not to permit him to go out again
with a weighted mean of 1.84. Ranked second is to send the students to the office
with a weighted mean of 2.33. And ranked third is to write the parents with a
weighted mean of 2.4. This is to reprimand students not to do the action again.
With regards to students who are stealing, send the students to the deans
office with a weighted mean of 2.05 is ranked number one because if the student
students are not sent to the office, they might do it again and it may become a
habit.
Moreover, the students are afraid to the Deans and higher persons like the guida
nce
counselor because they are one of the authorities of the school.
In terms of avoiding rudeness and impoliteness of the students in the
classroom, the best strategy used by teachers is to give lecture on courtesy with a

weighted mean of 1.35. This is followed by shouting at students with a mean of 2.7
.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Then tell the student to ask for apology. This is because as an educator, one shou
ld
be patient, and understanding in using procedures and strategies in eliminating
or
reducing negative behaviors and that is to teach an alternative behaviors that
communicates the same message, but it is in a positive form of communication.
In handling students who are sleepy, the best strategy used by the teachers is
to give jokes, with a weighted mean of 1.88. Ranked second is raise voice with a
weighted mean of 2.42; ranked third is to give a set of exercises with a weighted
mean of 2.79 and ranked fourth is to ignore the matter, with a mean of 2.95.
Boredom is one of the major causes of disciplinary problems in the classroom and
so
teachers must have to do something in order to curtail the unlikely behavior of
the
students .They must employ motivation techniques for the students to be directed
and
to get their attention.
In dealing with students who destroys school properties, ranked first is to ask
the student to repair the damaged one with a weighted mean of 1.86. Ranked second

ignore the matter having a mean of 2.86. Next is give lecture on respect to others
property with a weighted mean of 2.79 and ranked fourth is to scold the student
with a weighted mean of 2.86. This is because it is stated in the student manual
that
there is a corresponding punishment or sanctions for every students misbehavior.
And that case students are afraid to do so.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
To deal with students who are in attentive in the classroom, ranked first is to
call the students attention with a weighted mean of 1.93. Ranked second is to let
the student repeat the lesson with a weighted mean of 2.07. Ranked third is ignore

the matter with a mean of 2.93 and ranked fourth is get irritated with a mean of
3.12. Since the college students are already old enough, they are ashamed of the
ir
peers when their attention is called for misbehavior.. Doing such is the best st
rategy
because as per observation if a teacher will humiliate student in front of the c
lass, the
action is becomes worse.
As to handle students who refuse to recite during class discussion, ranked one
is to give them a quiz with a weighted mean of 2.26. Ranked two is to scold the
class with a weighted mean of 2.28. Ranked third is to lecture the students on the

importance of cooperation with a mean of 2.63. Ranked fourth is to give a study
period with a mean of 2.88. This is attributed to individual differences. General
ly,
there are students who are hesitant to talk in front of their classmates. Giving
a quiz is
very effective strategy to let the students participate in class discussion beca
use
quizzes have more percentage in grading system than in recitation and that case,

students are required to comply with because they are afraid to fail in their cl
asses.
In dealing with students with frequent absences, first ranked is to talk to the
students after class with a weighted mean of 1.53. Ranked second is warn on the
possibility of failure with a mean of 1.95. Ranked third is require an admission
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
slip with a mean of 2.51. Talking to a student in a nice way can change the negat
ive
behavior into a positive attitude. This confirms the finding of Robertson (2003)
that
misbehavior should be handled with appropriate consequences that is by having a
one-on-one talk. This way the students find it more acceptable than scolding him
in
public.
And to handle students who are day dreaming during discussion, ranked first
is to call the student to repeat the last word of the teacher with a weighted mean
of
1.37. This is to get the attention of the student and to let the student not to
do the
same again. Ranked second is to ignore the matter with a mean of 2.28. Ranked
third is scold the student with a mean of 2.35.
Table 4 presents the strategies used by the teachers in dealing with disruptive
behaviors of the students.
Table 4.0 Strategies of teacher in dealing with students disruptive behavior.
Strategies
Weighted Mean
Rank
1. Tardiness
Send the student to the principals
3
office
3.07
Ask for an explanation then give
2
warning.
2.72
Punished latecomers.
2.09
1
2. Cheating
lvi
CA AYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOLG
GGive failing grades.
3.16
4
Mark paper with cheating.
2.72
3
Confiscate the paper.
1.58
1
Mark name in the record.
2.53
2
3. Eating during
class discussion
Send student out.
3.16
4
Scold.
2.72
3
Remind the student of the no eating
1
rule
1.58
Tell the student to keep the food.
2.53
2
4. Talking during class discussion
Stop the lecture and scold.
2.65
3
Rearrange seating arrangement
1.98
2
Call to recite
1.72
1
5. Giggling
Ask the student to stand in front
3.37
4
Scold.
2.35
3
Stop the lesson.
2.09
1
Ask for an explanation of the lesson.
2.19
2
6. Drawing caricature during classes
Ask the student to draw on the board.
2.44
2
Confiscate caricature
1.91
1
Punish
3.19
4
Scold.
2.58
3
7. Reading: comics and other
materials
Tear the material in front of the class
3.28
3
Confiscate
2.16
1
Make the student to seat in front.
2.37
4
Scold.
2.26
2
8. Passing letter to another
Make student to read the notes in
4
front.
3.14
Scold
2.44
3
Confiscate
2.16
1
Teacher read the notes aloud.
2.3
2
9. Leaving the room without
permission
Threaten not to permit student to go
1
out again.
1.84
Send the student to the office.
2.33
2
Write the parents.
2.4
3
10.Stealing
Reprimand.
2.95
4
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Sign
Significant relationship between the teachers profile and the extent of incidence

of the disruptive behavior of the first year college students
Table 6 reveals that the extent of the incidence of the disruptive behavior of
the first year college students is not affected by the profile of the respondent
s. Hence,
the hypothesis, there is no significant relationship between the teachers profile
and
the extent of incidence of disruptive behavior of the first year college student
s is
accepted. This is proven by the r-values which are less than the probability val
ues of
each of the profile variables.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Profile ::r-value : Probability : Remarks
Age -.153 .326 NS
Sex -.113 .470 NS
Civil Status -.106 .497 NS
Status of Appointment -.033 .832 NS
Academic Rank -.097 .534 NS
Educational Attainment -.087 .579 NS
Years in the Service -.185 .234 NS
Chapter 5
SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Summary
The study generally assessed the teachers strategies in dealing with students
disruptive behaviors of the first year college of CSU-SM. It looked into the pro
file of
the teachers in terms of age, sex, civil status, status of appointment, academic
rank,
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
educational attainment, and number of years in the service. Also the disruptive
behaviors of the first year college students of CSU-SM, Likewise, the extent of
their
disruptive behavior and the relationship between the teachers profile and the ex
tent of
the incidence of disruptive behavior of the college freshmen were determined.
The data were elicited from 43 teachers through the use of questionnaires.
Analysis of the data included frequency counts, means, percentages, and ranking.

The study came out of the following findings.
Most likely equal in numbers of female and male are the respondents of the
study. Most of the teachers are age of 21-29, also nearly equal in the numbers o
f
married and single who are teaching the first year college students, but majorit
y of the
teachers are part timer or lecturer in the status of their appointment and acade
mic rank
having a less than ten years teaching in the service . On the other hand, most o
f the
teachers are MA or PhD graduates.
The following behaviors of the students have been considered by the teachers
to be disruptive in their classes; these problems are arranged according to the
extent
of incidence in the classroom. Tardiness, cheating, talking during class discuss
ion,
giggling, inattentiveness, refusing to recite and frequent absences are sometimes
encountered. Eating during classes, drawing caricatures, leaving the room withou
t
permission, rudeness, drowsiness, and day dreaming are considered Seldom done
by the students inside the classroom. Reading comics, passing letter to another,

CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
stealing, destroying school properties are Never done by the students in the schoo
l.
Nevertheless, the listed disruptive behaviors of the students of CSU-SM, is Seldo
m
done.
For the strategies used by the teachers in dealing with disruptive behaviors of
the students. The following strategies were ranked as one, send the student to th
e
office. For tardiness and stealing, confiscate the paper. For cheating, remind the
students of no eating rule for eating during class discussion, Call to recite for
students who talks during class discussion. stop the lesson for student who are
giggling while discussion, confiscate caricature for students who are drawing
caricature during class discussion, like reading other materials, also to those
who are
passing letter to another, threaten the student not to permit to go out for those
who
leaves the room without permission, give a lecture on courtesy for students who ar
e
impolite, give jokes if the students get drowsy, ask the student to repair the
damage done, if someone destroys school properties, call student attention if the
students are not listening, give a quiz if the students refuse to recite, talk to
the
student after class if one is getting frequent absences, and call the student to r
epeat
his last word, if someone is day dreaming while discussion.
The extent of the incidence of disruptive behaviors of the first college student
s
has no significant relationship to the teachers profile in terms of age, sex, civ
il status,
status of appointment, academic rank, and numbers of years in the service.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
CONCLUSION
Based on the above findings the following conclusions are drawn.
The respondents profile in terms of age, sex, civil status, status of
appointment, academic rank, and numbers of years in the service is not significa
ntly
related to the extent of the incidence of disruptive behaviors of the first coll
ege
students.
Disciplinary actions are instituted for conduct by the students in the class.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
The teachers of the first year college students are using diverse strategies in
handling disruptive behaviors of the students inside the classroom.
Recommendations
Based on the findings and conclusions of the study, the researcher offers
recommendations addressed to the school administrators and to the new entrants
tertiary educators.
1.
A seminar or a workshop on how to handle problem situation in the classroom, and

who among the personnel maybe consulted for some problem situations should be
conducted as part of the orientation of the newly employed teachers.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
2.
Guidance counselors should be invited to give a talk to beginning teachers on
manifestations of behavioral problem among adolescent; and discuss possible
strategies to employ in order not to aggravate the behavioral problem and what t
ype
of behavioral problems need to be referred to the guidance office. The guidance
counselor should be consulted in the event that they cannot understand why their

students are behaving unsociably acceptable manner in the classroom.
3.
Parents-teachers meeting should be regulatory conducted to discuss problem
situations encountered by the teachers in their classes so that preventive strat
egies are
discussed together both by the parents and teachers. As such, even parents are
involved in reinforcing the schools preventive strategies at home.
4.
Teachers should discuss with their students their expectations on themselves and
also
to their teacher in their classes, hence, encouraging open lines of communicatio
ns.
LITERATURE CITED
Books
Brophy and Evertson. 2005. Classroom teaching skills. Boston. D.C. Heat and
Company.
Callahan, Joseph F. 1999. Teaching in the Middle and Secondary school. New
York. McMillan Publishing Comapany.
Evert, Joseph E. 2003. The excellent teacher. Tennessee. Joseph Evert Publishing

Company.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Gregorio, Herman C. 2000. Principles and Methods of teaching. Quezon City. R.P.
Garcia Publishing Company.
Gim and Michalis 2006. Teachers guide to classroom management. New York.
The Concentrary Company.
Good, Carter V. 2003. Dictionbary of education. . New York: McGraw-Hill Book
Company
Gibson, Janice. 2004. Psychology for classroom. New Jersey: Prentice hall
Bustos, Alicia. 2009. Educational pschology. Quezon City: JMC Press Inc
Glasser, William W. 2004. A new approach to psychology. N.Y. Harper and Row
Publishing Inc
Hallahan, Daniel P et. al. 2000. Managing classroom behaviour. Massachusetts:
Allyn and Bacon.
Keens, Melvin. 2000. Beginning Secondary School Teachers guide. N.Y. Harper
and Row Publishing Inc.
Marusette, Walter et al. 2001. Teachers guide to classroom management. New
York: Random house.
Meyers, Anthony. 2003. Discipline concepts in education. Boston: Daughters of
Saint Paul Press.
Mueller D. A. 2004. Teaching in secondary School. New York. The Concentrary
Company.
Robert, Louis D. 1999. Classroom discipline Management. Massachusetts: Allyn
and Bacon.
Robertson, et al. 2003. Classroom management for Elementary teacher. New
Jersey: Prentice hall
Sophier, John et al.2007. The skilful teacher. Massachusettes. Search for Better

Teaching, Inc.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Wilson, John C. 2007x. Strategies for effective teaching students. Boston: Harpe
r
Collins Publishers, Inc.
Journals
Brown .Jim et.at. 1999. School Dscipline. The Educational Digest, December 2001
Bustos, Norman. 2006. Maintaining discipline through conduct management.
Phoenix Education, January 1999
Cagnaan, Emilla M. Discpline as end and as means. The Modern Teacher, January
1991.
Ebreo, Ben M. Four students face Arson Raps. Philippine Daily Inquirer,
December 1998
Mc Kenney. Daisy E. Behavior in the classroom. The Modern Teacher, July 1992
Tumlak, Ricardo C. Minimizing Cheating in school. Phoenix Educators Journal,
March 2008
Unpublished thesis
Bugay, Efrosenia. 2001. Study of juvenile delinquency in Bario Obrero, Tondo
Manila. Unpublished Masters Thesis. University of Manila, Manila.
Dunuan, Nelin W.2000. Behavioral problem of students in Bugias-Loo-Industrial
School. Unpublished Masters Thesis. Baguio Central University, Baguio
City.
Nacated, Gregorio. 2006. Behavioral Problem of Student of Tadian School Arts
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
and Trade. Unpublished Masters Thesis. Baguio Central University,
Baguio City.
Pacheco, Florence. 1999. The behaviour problems of High School students in
Baguio Central University. Unpublished Masters Thesis. Baguio Central
University, Baguio City.
Internet
http://www/pacificnet.net/`mandel/classroom management.html
http://www.bsu.edu /web/mboram/portfolio/classroomplan.html
http:/www.calstatela.edu./faculty/jshindl/cm/caroldunnCMP.html
http:/www.virtual.sal.com
Appendix
Questionnaires
Part I: Personal Profile
Direction: Please answer all the items below by simply checking the appropriate
box
that corresponds to your honest answer or supply the needed information called f
or.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
1.
Age as of last birthday: _______________
2.
Sex
( ) Male
( ) Female
3.
Civil Status
( ) single
( ) married
4.
Status of Appointment
( ) Regular
( ) Lecturer/Part Time
5.
Academic Rank
( ) Lecturer/ part time
( ) Instructor
( ) Assistant Professor
( ) Associate Professor
( ) Professor
6.
Educational Attainment
( ) Doctoral Degree
( ) Masteral Degree
( ) Bachelors Degree
7.
Years in Service:__________________
( ) 1-9 years ( ) 10 19 years ( ) 20-29 years ( ) 30 - above
Part III: The extent of the disruptive behavior
Below are some of the disruptive behaviors of the students. Please answer the
following as sincerely as you can. Your answer shall not be in any way taken aga
inst
you. Please indicate the extent of the problem by putting a check mark on the
appropriate column.
5- Always
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
4- Often
3- Sometimes
2- Seldom
1- Never
5 4 3 2 1
Tardiness
Cheating
Eating during class discussions
Talking during class discussion
Giggling
Drawing caricature during classes
Reading comics
Passing letter to another
Leaving the room without
permission
Stealing
Rudeness or impoliteness
Drowsiness
Destroying school properties
Inattentiveness
Refusing to recite
Frequent absences
Day dreaming
Part IV: Strategies used by the Teachers
Below are the strategies which you may have employed when you encountered
problem on the disruptive behaviors of the first year college students in your c
lasses.
Please rank them from the best strategy to the least strategy that is being expe
rienced by
you inside the classroom. Make sure that the strategy you numbered as one will b
e the
best strategy. Please answer the following as sincere as you are.
Problems
Rank
Strategies
Tardiness . Send the student to the deans office.
. Ask for an explanation then give warning.
lxviii
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
. Punished latecomers.
. Others, please specify
Cheating . Give failing grades.
. Mark paper with cheating.
. Confiscate the paper.
. Mark name in the record.
. Others, please specify
Eating during class
discussion
. Send student out.
. Scold.
. Remind the student of the no eating rule
. Tell the student to keep the food.
. Others, please specify
Talking during class
discussion
. Stop the lecture and scold.
. Rearrange seating arrangement
. Call to recite
. Others, please specify
Giggling . Ask the student to stand in front.
. Scold.
. Stop the lesson.
. Ask for an explanation of the lesson.
. Others, please specify
Drawing caricature during
classes
. Ask the student to draw on the board.
. Confiscate caricature.
. Punish.
. Scold.
. Others, please specify
Reading: comics and other
materials
. Tear the material in front of the class.
. Confiscate.
. Make the student to seat in front.
. Scold.
. Others please specify.
Passing letter to another
. Make student to read the notes in front.
. Scold.
. Confiscate.
. Teacher reads the notes aloud.
. Others, please specify.
Leaving the room without . Threaten not to permit student to go out
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
permission again.
. Send the student to the office.
. Write the parents.
. Ignore the matter.
. Others, please specify.
Stealing . Reprimand.
. Send the student to the office.
. Advise the student to return.
. Ignore the matter.
. Others, please specify
Rudeness/ impoliteness . Shout at student.
. Give a lecture on courtesy.
. Tell student to ask for apology.
. Ignore the matter.
. Others, please specify
Drowsiness . Give a set of exercise.
. Give jokes.
. Raise voice.
. Ignore the matter.
. Others, please specify
Destroying school properties . Give a lecture on respect to others
property.
. Ask the student to repair the damage
done.
. Scold.
. Ignore the matter.
. Others, please specify
Inattentiveness . Call students attention.
. Make the student to repeat the lesson.
. Get irritated.
. Ignore the matter.
. Others, please specify
Refusing to recite . Give a quiz.
. Scold.
. Give a study period.
. Lecture the student on the importance of
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
cooperation.
. Others, please specify
Frequent absences . Require an admission slip.
. Talk to the student after class
. Warn on the possibility of failure.
. Others, please specify
Day dreaming . Scold the student.
. Call the student to repeat his last word.
. Ignore the matter.
Letter Request to the Campus Executive Officer
Republic of the Philippines
Cagayan State University
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan
December 8, 2010
Dr. Lina M. Garan
Campus Executive Officer
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan
Madam:
I, Clarence V. Agpuldo, am conducting a research study titled, Teachers
Strategies in Dealing with Students Disruptive Behaviors. in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree Master of Arts in Educational Management.
In this regard, may I be granted permission from your good office to
administer the prepared questionnaire and gather data from the teachers who are
teaching the first year level? I know that you share with me the enthusiasm and
interest in helping promote the cause of my research and knowledge.
Any assistance given to me shall be highly appreciated.
Very truly yours,
CLARENCE V. AGPULDO
Researcher
Noted:
SHELLA B. CACATIAN, Ph.D.
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Adviser
NARCITA B. OUANO, Ph.D
Dean, College of Teacher Education
Approved:
LINA M. GARAN, DPA
Campus execurive Officer
Letter-Request to the College Deans
Republic of the Philippines
Cagayan State University
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan
December 8, 2010
Dr. NARCITAS B. OUANO
Campus Dean, College of Education
Cagayan State University
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan
Madam:
I, Clarence V. Agpuldo, am conducting a research study entitled, Teachers
Strategies in Dealing with Students Disruptive Behaviors. in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree Master of Arts in Educational Management.
In this regard, may I be granted permission from your good office to
administer the prepared set of questionnaire and gather data from the teachers w
ho
are teaching the first year level? I know that you share with me the enthusiasm
and
interest in helping promote the cause of my research and knowledge.
Any assistance given to me shall be highly appreciated.
Very truly yours,
CLARENCE V. AGPULDO
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Researcher
Noted:
SHELLA B. CACATIAN, Ph.D.
Adviser
Approved:
NARCITA B. OUANO, Ph.D
Dean, College of Teacher Education
Letter- Request to the Respondents
Republic of the Philippines
Cagayan State University
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan
December 8, 2010
Dear respondents:
I, Clarence V. Agpuldo, am conducting a research study entitled, Teachers
Strategies in Dealing with Students Disruptive Behaviors. in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree Master of Arts in Educational Management.
I am earnestly soliciting your cooperation in filling up the questionnaires.
Rest assured that all your answers will be treated confidentially.
Thank you very much.
CALRENCE V. AGPULDO
lxxiii
lxxiv
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Researcher
CURRICULUM VITAE
Name: CLARENCE V. AGPULDO
Civil Status: Single
Sex: Male
Birth Date: July 5, 1985
Birth Place: Dona Loreta, Pudtol, Apayao
Schools Attended:
Elementary:
Capannikian Elementary School
Pudtol, Apayo
Secondary: Santo Rosario High School
Pudtol, Apayo
Tertiary:
Saint Luis University
Baguio City
CAGAYAN STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Graduate:
Cagayan State University
Sanchez, Mira
Teaching Experiences:
Santo Rosario High School, Pudtol, Apayao
June 2007- May 2008
Cagayan State University, Sanchez mira
June 2008-present