Sunteți pe pagina 1din 27

American Kenpo and Ed Parker

American Kenpo began with Ed Parker. But it is not a single system as Ed went through five transitions before arriving at
what would become the Ed Parker Style of American Kenpo.
It might rightfully be said that Ed Parker's new system sprang full grown from the head of Ed Parker, much like Athena sprang
fully armored when Prometheus split the head of Zeus with a two man beetle at Lake Tritonis. At least Ed was pleased with this
analogy when it was presented to him in 1990.
Ed Parker's martial arts training under Professor Chow, his teaching of Kenpo and study of the Chinese systems, his education
and his life experience all, like the wisdom of a swallowed Metis, grew in Ed until the past became too confining for his new gift
to the world. Thus, in 1965, Ed Parker's new system (his fourth) began to emerge from his genius.
But Ed did not reveal this new system completely that early. He was still using the term Chinese Kenpo, which he would soon
change to Ed Parker Kenpo. He recognized that his students would not be able to assimilate all of his new knowledge and
theories immediately, so he gradually introduced his new concepts and movements over the next several years--"line upon line,
precept upon precept... here a little, there a little," that he could "prove" his students "herewith." Ed often spoke in parables and
reminded others that even Jesus had said that you cannot put new wine in old bottles.
American Kenpo
Dedication
True Kenpo Techniques
The Kenpo Patch
Written Manuals
Belt Requirements
The IKKA
IKKA Black Belts
Written Manuals
Learn American Kenpo
Kevin Lamkin

4 Demonstrations
That Changed Kenpo
BYU 1955
January 1957
Kenpo Karate
Sun Tzu & Politics

Ed knew that the future of American Kenpo would not be with the his existing students, because
they would resist breaking their ties to the past, and most had already gone beyond Kenpo to
study kung fu, first under James Wing Woo, and then under Bruce Lee. And as a prophet of the
new order, Ed Parker would rightfully foresee that most of his black belts and advanced
students would either reject the new system, or forsake it after a few years.
Ed felt no great bitterness toward this, because American Kenpo was not created to replace Ed
Parker Kenpo. It was created as a way to advance his standard for Kenpo. Ed knew his existing
students would not serve two masters. They would not learn a system that was designed to
take them where they already were, and most would go on to other systems where they could
continue to develop.
What Ed eventually created as "American Kenpo" was like, and yet very much unlike, the
Kenpo of his former styles. The differences were those of style and theory. His new system
would have its critics. And while much of their criticism was valid, no one could deny the genius
of the man who was its father.

Critics who do not understand Kenpo often ask why Ed Parker did not release videos or films of him personally demonstrating
his system. There were several reasons, not the least of which was the fact that Ed would have to slow down so people could
see his moves. Ed knew from experience that his students would mimic whatever they saw him do, and one thing Ed was not,
was slow.
But more importantly, Ed realized that no two people are alike and the new system was to be tailored to the individual. After all,
it was the individual who would advance through American Kenpo to where he met the standards Ed Parker wanted. There
were also many different ways of doing a movement. Many of his black belts would find that the way Ed taught them was
completely different from all the others. To put a technique on film or video would freeze the technique for all time. The move or
technique was a framework within which the individual worked. A video would freeze frame the move which would become the
way the Master did it; and the only way it should be done. The 5 foot, 98 pound woman would have to emulate the 6 foot, 220
pound Ed Parker. This would go against one of Ed's fundamental principle that he would teach correct principles and let the
individual govern himself. The way Ed moved was right for Ed. The way his students should move would not be the same. Thus,
he taught his new system differently to each person, and each way was right for the student. Just as Ed realized that there was
only one Bruce Lee, or one Mohammed Ali, there would only be one Ed Parker. He did not want his students to mimic him, or to
become puppets. He wanted them to become great in their own right.
To this end, Ed designed his new system as a method for teaching principles and not just as a way to teach techniques. Rather
than teaching 30 techniques and an equal number of variations for each belt as he had done with the Kenpo Karate Association
of American and early International Kenpo Karate Association, Ed reduced the number of techniques to 24, eliminated the
variations and created what he called "extensions". He also simplified each technique, teaching only the first part of the
technique to the beginning student who could now concentrate on the principle of the movement. No longer would a student
practice move after move, time after time, like a boxer using the same move time after time to perfect it. He was to learn the
"why" of the move and concentrate on, why, as he practiced the move. When the student was prepared for brown belt and black
belt he was to learn the extensions and the advanced applications and theories of the moves.
Not only was the student to learn the "why" of the move, but by simplifying the techniques, Ed believed his new system could be
tailored to the individual who would perfect it according to his own physical size and athletic ability. American Kenpo forms were
taught with hipen meaning so only the perspicacious would see what was intended. The system was designed to lead the
student through tangled and obscure paths, where the instructor was to point out the meaning of each twist or turn. Then, when
it all came together, the student--the Ed Parker black belt--was to emerge from the darkness into the light of new understanding.
The black belt would only need to know about 100 applications of his new system, as Ed believed his understanding of the
"why" of the movement would replace all of the "techniques" of other Kenpo systems.
This was in marked contrast to True Kenpo, where a student was taught hundreds of "techniques" and hundreds of variations--
over 400 for first degree black belt alone. This was the system Ed no longer taught. It was the old way, the past, and breaking
from this past was the very reason for the existence of the new system of American Kenpo. But it sapened Ed that few students
of this new style were able to compete successfully with the old system fighters in tournaments. It would have been even more
disappointing for Ed to see the dismal record of not one American Kenpo practitioner being able to stand up in the new ultimate
and extreme fighting forms. And where Ed Parker had taken all the Jujitsu moves out of True Kenpo, those in American Kenpo
now find they must train in Jujitsu because American Kenpo while great in theory, is greatly lacking in application.
Those who understand the "Parker principle" also understand why Ed chose no one to succeed him. Ed didn't intend on dying
when he did. After all he wasn't yet 60 years old, and he had not planned for his death. He had formed a living trust to protect
his assets while alive, without much concern for when he died. Ed told Will Tracy he was looking for someone to follow in his
footsteps, but like Diogenes walking through the streets carrying a lamp in the daytime looking for an honest man, Ed had yet to
find one.
In mid 1990, Ed Parker told Will Tracy he had five requirements for a disciple to take his place:
1. He (not a female) had to have at least a bachlors degree in sociology, psychology or history:
2. He had to be under 30 years of age:
3. He had to be extreme competent in all styles of Kenpo, and at least three other martial arts styles:
4. He had to be as good a writer as Ed Parker:
5. He had to be LDS (Mormon):
Ed Parker believed it would take 10-15 years to train a disciple and at the time of his death, there was no one even close to
being able to replace him; and so American Kenpo was his legacy to the world. He had taught what he believed to be correct
principles, and like Alexander the Great, he would leave succession to those who were best qualified to carry on their own style,
but not his. Ed no longer taught in the decade before his premature death. Rather he taught through his writings. He had seen
the failure of his new American Kenpo, but he did not believe it was a failure of the system. Rather it was a failure of the black
belts of his new system to apply the principles he had established. Some of these black belts left him to found their own
organizations where they would teach their versions of his new system, never realizing that they could never teach the
principles correctly. They took with them the techniques, but for the most part, they left his "correct principles" behind; and for
the most part they have abandoned Ed's system for their own style.
Since the death of Ed Parker December 15, 1990, his American Kenpo empire has fragmented and shattered. The IKKA has
floundered due to defections, internal politics and divisiveness. American Kenpo been interpreted and reinterpreted by Ed
Parker's new system black belts. Yet as Ed stated just three months before he died, none of his black belts knew the meaning
of the flower he showed them. (Referring to the Bupha.)
In death Ed Parker has become a legend, bigger than life. His black belts first scrambled to fill the void in the system he created
by making themselves his successor. But American Kenpo is not just a system. It is the visible expression of Ed Parker's
philosophy, a philosophy that holds that correct principles replace style; a philosophy that allows the same move to be taught a
myriad of ways with each way being the right way. Ed lamented, some three months before his death that he had awarded
black belts, but few Shodan ranks, and none had earned his philosopher's cloak. None had learned to think for himself. Few
were innovative.
When asked about some of his ideas which seemed absurd, Ed laughed and said he had purposefully taught and written
absurdities as a test. But none of his new system students had ever questioned him. He wanted each student to prove or
disprove every concept. He wanted them to think for themselves. And he most certainly did not want them to become the
puppets they had become. Had his American Kenpo students understood Ed's principles, they would have discovered that the
absurd concepts were little more than stumbling blocks put in the way to prove them, and catapults to launch them into thinking
for themselves.
Ed often lamented that his American Kenpo students knew what to think, but they didn't know how to think, and only a rare few
of his True Kenpo students had fully understood Ed Parker Kenpo. For this reason, Ed Parker did not create American Kenpo
as a system, but as an idea, an idea that encompassed all of his teachings and styles, from his first students to his last. Some
were a part and some were the whole of what he taught, but only those who continued to teach what he taught, the way he
taught it either in the beginning or the end are American Kenpo.

Like the whispering of Leuce from the leaves of the white poplar which grows near Leath, few will hear the warning that to drink
of that water will bring forgetfulness of what once was. Pindar
Kenpo Style Generations of Transition to Ed Parkers American Kenpo
Fist Generation 1954-1961 (Original Kenpo - True Kenpo)
Second Generation 1961-1963 (Traditional Kenpo - Removal of Juijitsu, Forms aped)
Third Generation 1963-1969 (Chinese Kenpo)
Fourth Generation 1970-1981 (Ed Parker's Kenpo)
Fifth Generation 1982-1990 (American Kenpo)
Copyright












Ed Parker's True Kenpo Techniques
by
Will Tracy
I began training with Ed Parker in October 1957 and my brothers, Al and Jim Tracy began shortly after that. In February 1958 I was
promoted to Yonkyu and Ed Parker started a beginning day class with me as his assistant instructor. The studio was located at
1840 E. Walnut Street, one block north of Colorado Blvd, and three block from Pasadena City College. My brothers and I signed up
most of Ed Parker's students between 1958 and 1961, and we were the only students ever given keys to the studio as well as a key
to the drawer where Ed Parker kept the student records, the cash box and a card file that contained all of his Kenpo techniques.
The techniques were organized according to the attack, i.e. different hand grabs from the front side, and read, chokes, punches,
kicks, club, knife, gun etc. Ed Parker wrote a monthly article for Iron Man Magazine, and in early 1958 Ed Parker asked me to
organize the techniques according to difficulty and prepare a list for the book he was preparing, Kenpo Karate. I also organized the
techniques for the beginning, intermediate and advance classes. During the time the
By February 1959 I had reorganized the entire technique file, and Ed Parker had taught my brothers and all of the techniques in the
file. The techniques were written in narrative, as in "countering a left hand lapel grab from the front." I also kept a card file of all the
techniques my brothers and I were taught, but used a short version, such as "left lapel grab front." I also selected 120 techniques
for Ed Parker's upcoming book. That number was reduced to 62, which were the basic techniques taught beginning students.
American Kenpo
Dedication
True Kenpo Techniques
The Kenpo Patch
Written Manuals
Belt Requirements
The IKKA
IKKA Black Belts
Written Manuals
Learn American Kenpo
Kevin Lamkin

4 Demonstrations
That Changed Kenpo
BYU 1955
January 1957
Kenpo Karate
Sun Tzu & Politics

There were no belt requirements, and no belt tests at that time, and two brown tips were
introduced by Al Tracy in late 1958, when brown "Iron On Patches" became available. I was
promoted to Ikkyu in February 1959 and Ed Parker wanted to create forms because he had
taught all the techniques he had. Al Tracy had found James Mitose's book What is Self
Defense in a used book store, and Ed Parker told us that Mitose was living in Los Angeles. When
I asked if I should train with Mitose, Ed Parker suggested I train with Professor Chow in Hawaii
instead.
I took my technique card file with me to Hawaii, and when Ed Parker received an advance on his
book and went to Hawaii for Statehood and to meet with me and Professor Chow. Ed was out of
the studio from April 1959 until two or three months after his son was born in December 1959.
During that time Al and Jim Tracy ran the studio, and for the first time, the studio brought in over
$1,000 a month. My brothers had complete access to the technique card file and used the card
file to pick the techniques for James Ibrao or Rich Montgomery to teach the advanced class. Al
Tracy also began copying the techniques to compare them with what I would learn from
Professor Chow.
I returned to Pasadena several times over the next two years, but only stayed 2-3 days and would go over what I was learning
from Professor Chow, not only with my brothers, but with Ed Parker. Professor Chow taught me all the same techniques, and he
too used a simple name for the techniques, i.e. "Right Lapel Grab" with variations, 1 through as many as 15, while Ed Parker
used "A" though "E" for variations and broke the other variations into apitional techniques - which were the same as Professor
Chow's single technique with its variations. Professor Chow had three techniques that did not describe the attack, "Dance of
Death," "Leap of Death" and "Mass Attack." Professor Chow had about 20 apitional techniques to what Ed Parker had, but
considering there were hundreds of techniques, these were for the most part inconsequential. Ed Parker, however, had about
60 Judo and Jujitsu techniques that Professor Chow did not have as Professor Chow did not teach Judo or Jujitsu.
Ralph Castro was a brown belt under Professor Chow when he went to San Francisco, and his early Kenpo techniques were
the same as Professor Chows, and Ed Parkers.
Shortly before I left for Hawaii, my brother Al and I went to San Francisco, where our relatives lived, and introduced Ed to some
of the Kung Fu and Tai Chi masters we knew. It was at that time that Ed Parker created "Form One" which was performed on a
straight line. Ed changed the form at least twice by early 1959, and by the time Jimmy Wing Woo joined Ed Parker in June
1960, Ed had also created "Form Two," and Master Woo showed Ed how to do the forms in a "Chinese Ten" pattern IE "+" or
four directions, and then in eight directions.

Recently a typical American Kenpo liar using the handle of Damitol posted a defamatory statement about me on one of
the Kenpo forums. claiming it is from a reliable source. The post was made with complete and utter disregard for the
truth and purports to have taken place when I and my brothers were with Ed Parker in 1958-1959.
Demitol states: "Once, in the early days, Grandmaster Parker was alone in the dojo using the forms to practice moving
meditation. About 2/3rds of the way through form 4 Grandmaster Parker's ecstatic eye was drawn to his file cabinet. He noticed
one of the drawers was slightly ajar.
He intuited that someone was rifling through his private materials."
First: There was no form 4 until after my brothers and I left Ed Parker and went to San Francisco in 1962. But this liar
goes a step further and attributes form 4 with some mystical power of perspicuity.
Second:
If the drawer was "ajar" it was because either he, or my brothers or I had failed to lock it, since we were the only ones
with a key to the drawer.
Demitol states: "Without knowing who he could Trust, he began a one-man investigation to identify the culprits. Whenever he
left the dojo, he would wedge a hair into the cabinet drawer.
It took less than a week to realize that the drawers were only opened when one of the Tracy brothers was left alone in the dojo."
In other words: Demitol claims that Ed Parker was so stupid that he could not know that the Tracy brothers were the
only ones with keys to the cabinet.
Demitol states: "Rather than directly confront them, he decided on an Ingenious Test.
He filled the cabinet with notes on hundreds of plausible but Ultimately Flawed techniques. The movement would look like
Kenpo, but had the Vital Essence removed and replaced by still more empty arm-waving. In apition, he removed all of the
physical conditioning elements.
Day after day the bogus notes were secretly copied.
Day after day Grandmaster Parker waited to see if plagiarizers would notice his little joke.
As time went on it became apparent they would not. He was on the verge of revealing the truth to them when they broke away
to teach on their own. Stung by their defection, Parker felt they deserved their plight."
In other words: Professor Chow taught Ed Parker the same "arm waving" techniques as Ed Parker taught as Ture
Kenpo which were the techniques in card file; and according to Demitol Kenopo itself is a "joke" even though I
personally chose the techniques for Ed Parker's Iron Man Magazine monthly article, and his book, Kenpo Karate; and
further, the techniques Rich Montgomery and James Ibrao would ask Al and Jim to select for the advance class while
Ed Parker was gone for over six monts were all a "joke", evnthough they are the same techniques taught in American
Kenpo.
CONCLUSION - According to Demitol : Ed Parker was a fraud and never taught true Kenpo, because everything on the
cards was a "joke" - a joke which Professor Chow also played on Ed Parker, because the Chow and Parker techniques
were the same.
Obviously Demitol and many in American Kenpo do not know that plagiarism is, "use or close imitation of the language and
thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work," or in this case techniques. My brothers
have always attributed the Kenpo they teach as coming from Ed Parker, while I have always given credit to both Ed Parker and
Professor Chow. However, Ed Parker learned the techniques from Professor Chow and even took the term, Kenpo Karate,
which Professor Chow coined. It is therefore be Ed Parker who plagiarized the techniques, except for the fact that Professor
Chow learned the techniques from James Mitose. There is no plagiarism where credit is given, and those in American Kenpo
have created another silly arguments suited for their small minds which are incompetent to understand what Ed Parker taught
as either True Kenpo or American Kenpo. They seek wisdom in fiction and their imaginations, without devoting themselves to
the training Ed Parker sought in vain to insil among his later followers.
The only thing worse than the lies of Demitor and his "reliable source" in regard to this, is those who believe it but don't have the
intelligence to learn the history of Kenpo. They believe what they want, regardless of the truth, "they think, therefore it is", and
they represent the deplorable state American Kenpo has become.






















The History and organs of all Kenpo Katas (Sets/Forms)

My advise: Print out this information - its the only place you will find it.
As I surf the WEB I cannot believer all the miss-information about Kenpo Katas. The most miss
leading I have seen are about the origin and history of the "Book Set".
NOTE: This is a "Rough" draft - but I want to get this information on the WEB.
Historical Background. I am the only person alive who was there when all Katas were introduced
into Kenpo. (With the exception of Nihanchi 1-2)
Historical background
Kata is a Japanese term. The Chinese terms are Sets and Forms. Original Kenpo did not have Katas but
there were over 30 different Sets. Most of the sets were very short and were used as "Drills" . . . be
used for a specific purpose. A classical example is the "Three Star Blocking Set" which was used to
toughen the arms. The most important of all the sets is the "Speed Set". When you are looking down
the barrel of a gun and it a matter of life and death . . . this set may save your life. The 3-5 count
blocking set is used to practice the 5 major blocks of kenpo. Every class at Ed Parkers would used
many of these set.
Below I have listed the of the Katas:
1. In the order they were introduced into Kenpo
2. The order they are now taught
3. The Katas taught by American Kenpo will be in Red.
4. Tracys teaches all of the Katas listed
History of Kenpo KATAS (SETS/FORMS)
Order Introduced and taught in Kenpo
Katas in Red are those now taught by American Kenpo
Historical Note: All original Katas were developed using tradition Kenpo Self Defense
Techniques. American Kenpo would not exist until almost 10 years later
Nihanchi 1-2 James Mitose 1937
Finger Set (First Kata/ Set created by Ed
Parker 1959
(Moving Finger Set- More about this set
later)
Two Person Set - James Lee 1959-60
Black Belt Set - 2 person set
Got the name Black Belt set because it was the
highest Kata required when Katas were required
for promotion to Black belt. 1060-61
Book Set - Panther Set/Bunji James Woo
5 Section Punching Set - James Woo
18 Section Punching Set - James Woo
Tam Tui - James Woo
2 Man Tam Tui - James Woo









Tai Chi - Yang Style - James Woo
Tiger and Crane - James Woo
After these Katas were introduced into Kenpo
the Katas to the Right were created . . . using
many theories and movements from these classic
Chinese (Forms/Sets).
I have been giving Seminars around the US . . .
Explaining and demonstrating the origin off
all Kenpo Katas. I the future this information
will be released on DVD>


Order Katas were Created and
Originally Taught
Short #1 (4 Shields) 10 Pattern Kata -
Woo-Parker
Short #2 (Cat Set) Star Pattern
Short #3 (Single Escape set)
Black Belt Set -
Note: The above 4 Katas were the
original Kata requirements for
"Black Belt"
Long #1 (Shield and Mace)
Long #2 Continuous Set
Long #3 (Double Escape Set)
Long #4 (Definitive Set)
Historical note of the above Katas
(With the exception of the Black Belt
Set) All of the Katas were jointly
created by Ed Parker and James Woo
Staff Set - Created by Chuck
Sullivan

Long #5 - Takedown or Transition
Set
Long #6 - Weapons Kate (There are
several version of #6)
Historical Note: Ed Parker would
created Long #5 and Long #6 in the
Mid 1960's - after Ed Parker* and
James Woo when their own Ways
Ed Parker would not created any more
Katas for almost 20 years until he
created #7 and #8
* Ed - Ed Parker - When I started
studying with Ed Parker I was 22 Years
old and Ed Parker was 27 - at his peak as
an athlete and martial artist.
STORY TIME: When my brothers
and I started studying with Ed Parker
we asked him what title he want us
to use: His replay "ED"!
Historical Note: Many of the top
kenpo people refer to Ed Parkers as
the "Old Man"!
I never studied with the "OLD
MAN".
The Ed Parker I studied with was a
195 pound - 6 foot tall -slim - trim
fighting machine.
Since Kenpo lacked any weapon Forms I spend
over 30 years studying with many different
Chinese Masters to enable me to add . . .
practical Weapon Sets.
Historical Note: When we first started Kenpo
(!957) there was a complete lack of any real
history of the origin of Kenpo. As it turned out
our Heritage came from the Japanese Yoshida
Clan and the Kenpo art was based upon the
"RENZI" sect of "ZEN BUDDHISM": which
was a self defense system that DID NOT
ALLOW THE USE OF ANY WEAPONS.

Japanese Sword Set 1964-65
Chinese Sword Set 1964-65
Wong Family Hand Set (Wai Wong)
Dark Room Staff (Doi Wai)
Skylight Staff - Doi Wai
Skylight Spear - Doi Wai
Chinese Set - Master Houng
Little Tiger (Doi Wai)
Butter Fly Knives - Doi Wai
More history and information to be added
later









LOGICA, FACTOR DE LA EFICACIA.
En el arte del KENPO-KARATE desarrollado por el legendario Maestro Ed Parker, la lgica
constituye la base en la cual se sustenta todo el sistema, todo posee un porque, una accin y una
reaccin.
En lo terico la lgica se define como: ciencia que se ocupa de las leyes, los modos, y las formas del
conocimiento humano y cientfico. Normal o natural, por ser conforme a la razn o al sentido comn.
Relativo al razonamiento.
El arte marcial o cualquier prctica relacionada con la defensa personal, no puede escapar a este
tipo de leyes, pues, somos una parte del universo y nos rigen los mismos principios fsicos que a
todas las cosas.
Haciendo historia.
Antes de comenzar de lleno con el tema que nos ocupa, pondr al alcance de ustedes una breve
resea de la vida del Maestro Parker, para que de esta manera comprendan que el Kenpo-Karate o
American Kenpo, es el resultado de un tedioso pero fructfero trabajo de investigacin.
Ed Parker es uno de los ms grandes pioneros en la introduccin del arte marcial en los Estados
Unidos de Amrica. l es conocido como: EL PADRE DEL KARATE AMERICANO, abriendo su
primer dojo en 1954.
Nativo de Honolulu, Hawaii y graduado de Kamehameha high School. Luego estudi en Brigham Young
University en Provo, Utah, donde obtuvo su grado en sociologa y psicologa.
Ed Parker aprendi Karate en Hawaii, l realiz, a partir de all, innovaciones dentro de arte para el
combate de los das en que vivimos. Vio la necesidad de cambiar aspectos que no resultaban
prcticos, que no posean lgica, desarrollando revolucionarios principios y teoras para aplicar a la
prctica, no clsicas, pero efectivas. Como resultado de sus innovadoras ideas y conceptos, el
sistema del American Kenpo Karate es el arte que ms desarrollo posee en U.S.A., Chile, Venezuela,
Europa, Australia, Espaa, etc.
En 1956, abre su primera escuela de Kenpo-Karate, con sus principios y teoras, en Passadena,
California, la cual hoy da funciona. Muchos artculos se han escrito sobre su persona, por citar:
1961,Time Magazine, se refiri a Ed Parker como el gran maestro de las figuras de Hollywood, ya
que instruy a notables como: Elvis Presley, Robert Wagner, Blake Eduars, Robert Clup, Robert
Conrad, george Hamilton, Dick Martin, y muchos otros.
La Black Belt Magazine se refiri al Maestro como: el gran precursor del Kenpo en U.S.A. y en
el mundo(febrero de 1975).
Inside Kung-Fu: conmemorando los 20 aos del Karate en Amrica, no existe otro padre del
karate Americano... el conocimiento que este hombre ha introducido durante los ltimos 20 aos lo
convierten en el ms innovador y exitoso introductor de cambios en el desarrollo de las artes de
defensa personal. Adems escribi una serie de libros destinados al desarrollo del arte como son:
Kenpo-Karate, Secretos del Karate Chino, Gua de la defensa personal femenina, Ed Parker's gua
del Nunchaku. Estos fueron publicados en sus comienzos, luego, una vez desarrollado por completo
su sistema public: Infinite insigthts into Kenpo del I al V, The Zen of Kenpo, Enciclopedia del
Kenpo, en otro aspecto, y como amigo personal del legendario Elvis Presley, publico luego del
fallecimiento de la estrella, un libro llamado Inside Elvis. Ed Parker fallece en 1991, luego de su
muerte Leilani Parker, su esposa, escribe en su honor el libro llamado Memories of Ed Parker, en el
cual relata todas sus ancdotas de la vida junto al maestro, sus relaciones, sus pensamientos, etc. ,
como as tambin hace una extensa referencia al desarrollo del los famosos torneos de Long Beach,
de los cuales se impuls a muchas figuras a la fama, como: Bruce Lee, Chuck Norris, Joe Lewis, Mike
Stone, entre otros.
LOGICA, UNA HERRAMIENTA FUNDAMENTAL EN LA DEFENSA PERSONAL.
Cuantas veces en las prcticas nos hemos preguntado Y esto para que sirve?, Por qu debo
moverme de esta manera y no de otra?...esto resulta muy comn en un dojo, todos alguna vez
cuestionamos, pensamos, pero no siempre la respuesta que recibimos, si recibimos respuesta, nos
resulta satisfactoria. Inconscientemente lo que buscamos es lgica, que el movimiento que estemos
realizando posea una reaccin esperada, un cambio en la agresin.
Durante muchos aos dentro de lo que hoy se conoce como China, se desarrollaron sistemas de
combate acordes con los movimientos de los animales, se los imitaban, puesto que para ellos
resultaban seres admirables. Ahora bien, el mtodo de lucha de un animal se basa en su naturaleza,
ellos instintivamente conocen sus partes dbiles y sus puntos vulnerables, no desarrollan grandes
movimientos para el combate, sino movimientos lgicos precisos y cotidianos, puesto que una grulla
realiza el mismo movimiento de cuello para comer que para atacar lo que vara es su potencia. Cmo
podemos trasladar este ejemplo a nosotros?, Por ejemplo: una persona cualquiera realiza una serie
de movimientos cotidianamente que se pueden convertir en una gran defensa como lo es caminar,
cuando uno camina realiza un movimiento de traslacin que involucra el desarrollo en conjunto de
brazos y piernas, lo que a su vez traslada toda nuestra masa hacia delante, Qu pasara s, a ese
mismo movimiento le colocamos mayor potencia y lo dirigimos a un punto vulnerable como a la zona de
los testculos de una persona situada delante nuestro?, El resultado sera un hermoso y efectivo
rodillazo o bien si nos dirigimos al punto con nuestro brazo golpearamos con nuestro canto de la
mano entre sus piernas. Esto es parte de la lgica, estos son conceptos muy bsicos, los cuales
simulan ser letras de un extenso abecedario en el Kenpo, lo cual lleva a la posterior formacin de
palabras, frases y prrafos completos.
REACCION COMO CONSECUENCIA DE UNA ACCION.
Cuantas veces hemos practicado tcnicas de defensa personal con un compaero de prctica,
cuantas veces ha proyectado su ataque hacia nosotros para que podamos ejecutar su tcnica, pero,
Dnde termina su trabajo?. La persona que hace las veces de agresor no debe limitarse slo a la
ejecucin del ataque, sino que tambin debe asimilar los golpes que le son propinados. Qu
decimos con esto?. Si yo bloqueo un golpe de puo y luego proyecto una patada frontal en sus
genitales, la reaccin real de una persona al recibir tal golpe sera como mnimo la de inclinarse hacia
delante ocupando sus manos en la toma de dicho sector, lo que involucra que si mi prximo golpe va
ha ser dirigido a su cuello debo bajar mi altura para poder golpearlo, ya que se encuentra en otro
posicin distinta a la inicial, mediante mi accin provoque esa reaccin de su cuerpo, ahora bien si
cuando realizamos la misma tcnica con un compaero de prctica y l se limita slo a propinar la
agresin nuestro ltimo blanco se halla en un lugar distinto que si la tcnica se hubiese aplicado a
una situacin real, en consecuencia, si pensamos que practicamos hasta el cansancio las tcnicas sin
asimilacin por parte del compaero, esto har que el da de un enfrentamiento real no podamos
desarrollar correctamente la tcnica y luego digamos: La tcnica no es efectiva, siendo que lo que
fall en s slo fue una pequea falta de asimilacin.
Recuerden toda accin produce una reaccin, todo golpe una asimilacin, cada golpe proyectado
en una defensa personal, prepara al cuerpo del agresor para el prximo golpe.
LOS CUESTIONAMIENTOS DENTRO DE LA PRACTICA MARCIAL.
Cuestionar, indagar, buscar, es parte de nuestra naturaleza, de nuestra evolucin, muchas veces
dentro de los lugares de prctica no se les permite a los alumnos preguntar sobre el porqu de las
cosas, lo consideran una falta de disciplina, dentro del arte del Kenpo-Karate los cuestionamientos
son necesarios, puesto que de esta forma se le sumerge al alumno en la lgica de los movimientos, en
la accin y la reaccin, en la correcta utilizacin de los principios de potencia, etc.
PRICIPIOS DE POTENCIA
Existen tres principios bsicos de potencia que deben conocer los alumnos que comienzan dentro de
la prctica del Kenpo a saber: Matrimonio con la gravedad, torqueo, masa de refuerzo.
Matrimonio con la gravedad: utilizacin del peso del cuerpo en apoyo de un golpe que se
desplaza de arriba hacia abajo.
Torqueo: se utiliza este principio cuando giras de un lado al otro tu cintura, es decir,
golpeando con la potencia de la cadera.
Masa de refuerzo: es el peso de cuerpo movindose en lnea recta con el golpe.

Juan Jos Negreira
5
th
Degree Black Belt en Kenpo
WKKA director para Sudamrica




http://kenpo-systems.cl/wordpress/?cat=6
Archivo de la categora "apuntes de clases"
Entradas anteriores
Tiempo de Reaccin (Reaction Time)
Wednesday, 13 de April de 2011
Hace unos das por razones laborales tuve que asistir a un seminario de Base de Datos y entre los temas expuestos
estaba el concepto de Tiempo Real y cmo este ha cambiado en el paradigma de la informtica.
Esta presentacin activ inmediatamente un Trigger a mi base de datos en Kenpo, trayendo como resultado el
concepto de Tiempo de Reaccin (Reaction Time), que consiste en la cantidad de tiempo desde que percibes el
estmulo y ejecutas la respuesta correcta.
Nuestros sentidos son los encargados de detectar (percibir) el inminente peligro (estmulo), llevando la informacin a
nuestro cerebro para que tome la decisin de respuesta (accin).
Las personas que caminan distradas sin prestar atencin a su entorno o escuchando msica en su Mp3 reducen
dramticamente su capacidad de percibir cuando est comenzando a gestarse una agresin callejera.
La presin del tiempo y la intensin del ataque podra provocar que no necesariamente elaboremos la respuesta
correcta en el momento adecuado.
Cuando ocurri el terremoto en Japn y se declar alerta de Tsunami en nuestras costas con 24 horas de
anticipacin, recuerdo que en uno de los despachos de prensa desde La Serena, mostraba gente disfrutando del da de
playa como si nada, total la ola llegara a la noche.
En cambio los habitantes de Japn con toda su preparacin para enfrentar desastres naturales, no corrieron la misma
suerte. El tiempo y la intensidad del fenmeno supero todo lo previsto.
Si slo nos quedamos con un aprendizaje de las tcnicas en la Fase Ideal, sin comprender y experimentar escenarios
reales, lo ms probable es que sufriremos las consecuencias.
Kenpo como dice la cancin de Alberto Cortez es callejero por derecho propio y esa identidad se ha ido perdiendo por
diferentes motivos.
En mi opinin necesitamos volver hoy a su sentido y objetivo primario y no a partir de maana.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
4 Count Drill
Friday, 14 de August de 2009
El entender el tiempo, posiciny movimiento necesario para entrar o contra atacar los diferentes conteos del 4 count
abre todas las puertas dentro de la pelea ya que los demas ngulos de ataque son variaciones de estos 4 puntos
cardinales.
Carlos Pipo Lopez
(FCS Kali)
Es una serie bsica para aprender los movimientos rudimentarios en el uso de los Sticks, pues esos cuatros ataques son
los ms utilizados en la pelea con bastones, ya sea con uno (single stick) o dos bastones (double sticks).
El estudiante aprende a usar ambas manos con igual habilidad y precisin en la ejecucin de estos golpes bsicos (high-
low).
Mucha concentracin y dominio es requerido para realizar los cambios de mano (1-2) (3-4) cuando estamos trabajando
slo con un bston.
Para facilitar el aprendizaje, inicialmente nuestro partner trabajar el 4 count slo con su mano dercha, marcando el
ritmo y los puntos sobre la X.
En una segunda fase, ambos paracticantes intercambian el bastn libremente, variando el ritmo, velocidad y distancia
(larga,media y corta), procurando dominar y tener el control del centro del crculo de combate.
Este ejercicio acta como un taladro, creando aperturas para futuros movimientos.
En paralelo podemos reforzar las mltiples opciones a mano vaca que nos da el signo de la multiplicacin dentro de los
patrones de movimientos del Kenpo.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
Counter Balance
Friday, 27 de March de 2009
1.Fuerzas opuestas que mejoran la efectividad de un golpe particular, maniobra o movimiento.
2.La continua relocacion de partes del cuerpo en orden a ecualizar tu peso corporal en movimiento, como tambin para
dar una mejor proteccin.
Enciclopedia del Kenpo. Ed Parker
En la clase de Cinturones Negros coment brevemente un detalle presente al final de la extensin de Squeezing the
Peach, me refiero al concepto de Contra Balance (Counter Balance).
Lo trabajamos primero desde el front twist desplazando nuestro peso desde la pierna derecha hacia la izquierda para
poder realizar un back kick derecho y sin bajar nos impulsamos y giramos en sentido de las manecillas del reloj hacia
nuestra pierna derecha y ejecutar un spinning inward crescent kick izquierdo.
Una simulitud interesante la podemos encontrar con la tcnica Snaking Talon (Blue Belt) donde desde una patada (front
kick), nuestra mano derecha controla la mueca del oponente aplicando un desequilibrio diagonalmente hacia abajo de
modo de controlar la zona de altura del oponente (height zone).
En la extensin de Squeezing The Peach vamos al front twist desde una patada (side kick) y golpeando hacia arriba con
un Stiff arm derecho, levantando al oponente y controlando su zona de altura (Height Zone).
En ambas tcnicas viene despus el Contra Balanceo (Counter Balance), ajustando distancia y consolidando el
alineamiento para descargar el Back Kick con la pierna derecha.
Sin duda el posicionamiento de nuestras manos ayuda a potenciar nuestro Counter Balance de igual manera que un
equilibrista caminando en una cuerda floja. La Forma Larga V (Long Form 5) es un buen ejemplo de estudio.
En los estudiantes avanzados de Kenpo, estas acciones permiten efectuar cambios direccionales o el enfrentamiento con
ms de un oponente.
Piensa sobre esto y como puede beneficiarte en tus acciones.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
El Patrn Universal
Friday, 12 de December de 2008
Estn all. Los vemos ahora, a nuestro alrededor, gigantescos, inmviles, levantados en el mar. Son tan blancos que
todo lo otro deviene oscuro, y uno se detiene frente a ellos, sin palabra ni aliento. Es hacia ellos que nos conduce la voz.
Desde ellos que habla, sin cesar, con sus palabras claras y duras. La voz nace entre ellos, sale del cielo y del mar y va
hasta las riberas y hasta las ciudades. Cuntos aos de viaje para llegar hasta ellos, que no esperan?. Los Dioses no
piden que se les venere ni que se les tema. Estn all, al centro de su imperio, y no miran a nadie.
Hacia los Icebergs. Jean Marie Le
Clzio.
Hace algunos aos, en la Feria Internacional de Sevilla, la muestra chilena acapar las miradas de cientos de curiosos al
exhibir un trozo de un iceberg antrtico de 60 toneladas, demandando un tremendo desafo logstico, tcnico y
humano.
Yo, modestamente traer a este sitio, un pequeo trozo de hielo perenne que flota silencioso en mar del Kenpo, y del
cual poco se habla, me refiero al Patrn Universal.
A principios de los 60s, Ed Parker trabajaba en su segundo libro, Secretos del Karate Chino, el cual fue finalmente
publicado en 1963.
All es introducido al pblico en general por primera vez, un misterioso diagrama llamado Patrn Universal y que
contiene movimientos secretos, motivacin especial para que los lectores usaran su imaginacin para comprender las
llaves maestras de los principios de movimiento.
Probablemente el principal escollo para un principiante en Kenpo es Cmo estudiarlo para convertirlo en una
herramienta eficiente?
Lo ms recomendable es partir de lo simple a lo complejo.Contemple el smbolo en un solo un plano (Unidimensional) y
podrs reconocer los elementos geomtricos involucrados:
Lneas rectas, lneas curvas, crculos completos, cuartos de crculos, semicrculos, crculos que se tocan, crculos
sobrepuestos, cuadrados, rectngulos, diamantes, tringulos, cruces, entrelazamientos, corazones, figuras de ocho,
figura de ochos sobrepuestas que representan espirales, figuras de ocho alargadas, octgonos, etc.
En una segunda mirada (estudio), intente internalizar los elementos que constituyen el armazn del smbolo y que
generalmente se pierden de vista.
Son cinco y representan el patrn bsico que estaba incluido en la antigua insignia del tigre y el dragn.
El punto central (eje)
Crculo Mayor (exterior) (contiene-limita)
Lnea Mayor Vertical (divide)
Lnea Mayor Horizontal (separa)
2 Lneas Mayores diagonales
En geometra, un punto define una posicin en el espacio y si adems ste es el punto central, constituye el eje, la
interseccin de puntos en esa regin.
Bajo todas las perspectivas, cuando fijamos un centro estamos diciendo que ah hay algo importante. Por ejemplo,
cuando nos concentrarnos convergemos nuestra atencin en aquel punto o tema. Comprendemos que si perdemos el
centro estamos en problemas.
No es el nico punto que utilizaremos, tambin contaremos con la asistencia del Punto de Origen, el cual tiene la
funcionalidad de estar en cualquier parte dentro del espacio y que es el principio, raz o fuente de todo movimiento. Por
vicios tcnicos es poco apreciada su importancia, algo as como moneda de un peso, pero a la hora de gestionar la
economa de movimientos, produce ganancia segura.
Definido un punto (central) en el plano, el siguiente paso es definir el espacio que ocuparemos, es decir la extensin
ilimitada que contiene a todos los objetos habidos, y lo hacemos mediante la figura del crculo.
Con la ayuda de un noble instrumento, apoyamos en el punto central una de las piernas de un comps imaginario,
trazando el Crculo Mayor.
Muchas ideas fuerza representa el crculo, slo mencionare que en lo respecto al movimiento, esta la continuidad de
los movimientos.
Hay varias cosas que podemos hacer en el crculo:
1. Mantenernos en el crculo
2. Reversar el crculo
3. Cortar el crculo
Movimientos circulares son de dos tipos: en el sentido de las manecillas del reloj y en sentido opuesto a las manecillas
del reloj (Ed Parker)
El tercer elemento en aparecer es una lnea recta denominada Lnea Vertical Mayor, dividiendo nuestro en crculo
en dos, izquierdo-derecho, inside-outside. Signo de la divisin.
Filosficamente es unir El Cielo y la Tierra, el Norte y el Sur y si usamos el principio del Reloj las 12:0006:00.
Finalmente una segunda recta, la Lnea Horizontal Mayor vuelve a subdividir nuestro crculo, formando 4
cuadrantes. Signo de la resta. Uppercase-Lowercase.
Ambas lneas forman el signo de la suma, de la Cruz. Grafica lo anteriormente sealado de cortar el crculo.
Cuando el movimiento circular termina, movimiento lineal comienza; cuando el movimiento lineal termina, el
movimiento circular ocurre nuevamente (Ed Parker)
El crculo es la contribucin de los sistemas chinos y las lneas rectas de los sistemas japoneses.

Solamente hay dos mtodos de aplicar movimiento: lineal o circular. (Ed Parker)
Cuando aadimos las dos rectas diagonales formando una X, tenemos el signo de la multiplicacin. Como
consecuencia tenemos 9 puntos contenidos en nuestro crculo que multiplicado por 2 (lado derecho e izquierdo)
obtenemos 18.
El Crculo, las lneas rectas formando los signos de Divisin, Suma, Resta y multiplicacin, los 9 puntos, son el patrn
bsico y que estaba representado en la insignia del Tigre y el Dragn.
Comprendida la estructura base, aada un nuevo elemento, estudiando sus propiedades y as sucesivamente hasta
formar la figura completa.
En forma paralela y acorde a tu nivel de conocimiento o con la ayuda de tu instructor analiza los movimientos que vas
aprendiendo e identifcalos dentro del Patrn, por ejemplo en el Blocking Set o Finger Set.
Todos los movimientos del Kenpo estn en Patrn Universal. As obtendrs un conocimiento prctico y efectivo.
Algunas preguntas como para continuar la conversacin:
Se puede afirmar que contiene todos los movimientos?
Es realmente Universal?
Es un diseo original de Ed Parker o tiene sus fuentes en otros diagramas o smbolos?
Es susceptible de mejoras o cambios de diseo?
Los alumnos intermedios avanzarn en su estudio en dos dimensiones (bidimensional).
Para los cinturones negros que se precien de tal deben estudiarlo bajo una perspectiva tridimensional, momento en que el
patrn asemeja una madeja. Si no lo hacen podra pasarles lo mismo que al Titanic.
Para los cinturones negros de grados superiores al 4th degree, el desafo es ms complejo an debiendo trabajar en ..
opss lo siento, aquellos que al menos tengan un ladrillo en su belt podran preguntarme, pero les aseguro que se
requieren toneladas de tapsin.
Los Smbolos son inagotables como fuente de conocimiento e interpretacin y requieren mucho estudio y dedicacin.
Espero que esta breve resean introductoria les ayude a ver mejor, porque hacia all nos conduce la voz.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
Upward Elbow
Friday, 28 de November de 2008
El Maestro Ed Parker incorpor muchos elementos como herramientas para desarrollar y refinar el arte del
Kenpo, desde la geometra, fsica hasta el sentido comn.
En su libro Infinite Insights Vol 1, hay un interesante captulo (V) que describe como el Arte se relaciona con
la vida diaria en muchos aspectos, situacin que pasa inadvertida. Para facilitar el camino, Parker utiliz
analogas como la del lenguaje, la msica o movimientos de la vida cotidiana, todo esto para
proporcionarnos una mejor comprensin de las Bsicas.
El anlisis de acciones diarias, Parker las consideraba potenciales para convertirlas en Armas Naturales y
del aprendizaje de observar otras actividades y cmo aplicarlas con los conceptos y principios de las artes
marciales estars usando la Lgica como una herramienta fundamental mientras desarrollas un arte prctico
y no terico.
A modo de ejemplo, el simple movimiento que realizamos al peinarnos, fcilmente puede convertirse en un
golpe de Upward Elbow, arma devastadora si la necesitas en distancias cortas, siendo los blancos preferidos
para ste golpe la barbilla y el plexo solar.
Otra mirada al mismo movimiento es observar a una persona correr, sus brazos oscilan cerrados al cuerpo.
Bajo la mirada del Kenpo, esto es un movimiento embrinico (embryonic move).
Esto no es una idea nueva, y ha estado presente en muchos sistemas y estilos, he incluso lleg al cine en la
pelcula Karate Kid 1, cuando el Sr. Miyagui cita al estudiante a su primera clase y lo tienen cepillando el
piso, puliendo el auto y pintando la cerca.
El Upward Elbow lo encontrars en varias tcnicas utilizado en diferentes formas, ngulos y blancos, por
ejemplo: Thrusting Wedge, Circling Wings, Bow of Compulsion, Bowing to Buddha, Obstructing the Storm,
Heavenly Ascent, Conquering Shield, Brushing the Storm, trmino Long Form 2 (hand Isolation).
Otras alternativas son destruccin de extremidades (Limb Destruction), desbloqueo de muecas, etc.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
Destruccin de Extremidades
Friday, 2 de May de 2008
En nuestras ltimas clases hemos explorado uno de lo tpicos presentados en el seminario de Guro Rick Faye,
denominado Limb Destruction, o Destruccin de Extremidades.
Corresponde a un trabajo a mano vaca de los sistemas de boxeo filipinos, que esta basado en el uso del cuchillo.
Los filipinos tienen una analoga que sostienen que si le sacas los colmillos a una serpiente, sta no podr
inyectarnos su veneno. Al cortar o herir una extremidad, disminuye la capacidad del oponente para hacerte dao.
Nuestros ataques son realizados a centros nerviosos y articulaciones, produciendo gran dolor y parlisis
momentnea, lo cual es un mensaje directo al oponente para afectar su fortaleza psicolgica, esto lo sintetiza el
refrn popular ir por lana y volver trasquilado.
Requiere una gran habilidad en el momento de la entrada y chequeos para beneficiarnos de los espacios
conquistados, siendo necesario desarrollar un buen timing.
Cuando se utiliza un movimiento tipo tijera (ya sea horizontal o verticalmente y en cualquier direccin (arriba-
abajo) se denomina Gunting.
El concepto de Limb Destruction no es exclusivo de las FMA y est presente en muchos estilos, por ejemplo el
poderoso Low Kick, patada caracterstica del Boxeo Muay Thai.
Desde nuestra perspectiva, hay varias tcnicas de Kenpo en las cuales podemos graficar Limb Destruction.
Si en Leaping Crane o Gathering Cloudes realizamos el raking middle knuckle fist al interior del brazo del oponente, tendramos un Gunting.
En Bow of Compulsion, Dance of Death y Evading the Storm trabajamos sobre las extremidades inferiores, ya sea
usando nuestras manos o piernas.
Pero si queremos ser ms precisos, desde Delayed Sword podemos ver Limb Destruction si somos capaces de
materializar el dicho del Kenpo Cada bloqueo es un golpe y cada golpe es un bloqueo, as nuestra primera
accin (bloqueo-golpe) ser suficiente para terminar el combate.
En las primeras etapas del aprendizaje, los alumnos por naturaleza son ms estructurados y cuando aprenden una
bsica, por ejemplo, un Inward Block es slo un bloqueo. En cambio el alumno ms experimentado lograr
ver ms funcionalidades, transformando el concepto del Inward block en Hammerfist aplicado a centros nerviosos
del antebrazo.
Cuando realizamos un bloqueo en cualquier tcnica, no hay que limitarse a la accin de sacar el golpe del
oponente de la lnea de fuego, hay que aplicar la misma potencia de un golpe al cuerpo y vers como el brazo o
pierna del oponente reacciona.
Los desvos (parries) al complementarlos con un atrape (trapping) obtendremos naturalmente un Gunting.
Clasificado bajo: Uncategorized, apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios




Long Form 2 notas Seminario
Thursday, 24 de January de 2008
En el reciente seminario en San Fernando, me tom la libertad de analizar brevemente y proponer algunas aplicaciones a
un set especfico de la Long Form # 2, y que posteriormente fue enlazado con un grupo de tcnicas de defensa personal.
Como nuestra piel, las formas estn cubiertas por varias capas, de las cuales podemos aprender muchas cosas.
A continuacin un breve anlisis de los 3 primeros movimientos correspondientes al Set # 11
Path of Action = 7:30 1:30

Step 1.
1. Left front thrusting sweep kick
2. Left Overhead punch
Desde la posicin anterior, left neutral bow con un left vertical punch, proyectaremos nuestra lnea menor (7:30-1:30).
Esto demanda un cambio direccional en 180 grados.
Previo a movernos, un golpe de vista nos permite ubicar a nuestro oponente. Nuestros sentidos como sensores nos
advierten la presencia del adversario. Este gesto estimula el desarrollo de un estado de vigilancia intuitiva (Intuitive
Awareness). Es un error comn, constatar miradas displicentes, desenfocadas o vacas que revelan una escasa atencin
al entorno (environment).
En las formas previas, cuando el ataque provena de la Obscure zone, nuestra accin era salir de la lnea de ataque
(aunque en la Long 1 hicimos una excepcin), optamos por enfrentarlo directamente, reforzando uno de los temas de la
Forma que es Avanzar y bloquear.
Anteriormente nuestras transiciones se realizaban por medio de Cat Stance, Cover, etc., ahora introducimos el concepto
de Twist Through foot maneuver, que nos ensea a descomponer nuestro avance en rotacin y distancia.
Simultneo al foot maneuver ejecutamos un Overhead Punch al rostro del adversario. Sobre este golpe hay varias
interpretaciones, por ejemplo golpear con la palma hacia el exterior y la mano vertical o usando los nudillos anteriores
(Chopping Knuckle Punch) similar a la accin de llamar en una puerta o el cariito de Don Ramn al Chavo del 8 cuando
pierde la paciencia.
Si proyectamos una lnea vertical imaginaria desde la posicin de la mano, esta debe estar alineada con el pie izquierdo
(front twist).
El Overhead punch acta como bloqueo, la idea que todo bloqueo es un golpe y que todo bloqueo es un golpe.
Step 2
1. Right step through forward
2. Right neutral bow
3. Extended outward block (forearm strike)
Nuestra primera accin contuvo el avance del oponente, es el momento de tomar iniciativas, para ello realizamos el Step
Through Forward y establecemos un neutral bow de modo de tener Body Alignment y Direccional Harmony (un Forward
bow debilitara el soporte del peso del oponente) ejecutando un Extended Outward block modificado, por estar en un
punto intermedio de un Upward y Extended.
En la Short 2, mostramos el bloqueo Ideal con Double Factor. Es una muestra de Sofisticacin de una bsica,
comenzando desde la posicin de amartillamiento en la cadera, Uppercut , torque del antebrazo aplicado bajo la garganta
del oponente, operando como un pressing check y constituyendo el Bracing Angle (algo similar tambin fue mostrado en
la Long 1).

Step 3.
1. Right Forward bow
2. Right check
3. Left vertical finger thrust
Cambiamos a un Forward bow, manteniendo el chequeo. En el Set # 1 el chequeo es realizado por la mano atrasada,
ahora es el turno de la mano adelantada.
El Finger thrust a los ojos, mejora su precisin por la gua natural de nuestra mueca, con lo que utilizamos el concepto
de Tracking.
El tracking y la X como Open Triangle tambin se dan en el Claw y Back knuckle. De alguna manera la posicin de las
manos X, se replica en el patrn de los pies.
Podramos aventurar un estado embrionario de las tcnicas Destructive Twins, Rainning Claw, Lone Kimono, Parting
Wings.
Muchas otras cosas podramos seguir hablando de la Forma y este set en particular, pero ser motivo de otro artculo.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
Long Form 2
Thursday, 24 de January de 2008
El Arte del Kenpo est conformado por 3 grandes divisiones: Basics, Self Defense y Freestyle. La divisin de las Basics
(stances, punches, strikes, etc.) sita a las Formas y Sets en la cumbre de su pirmide.
Una forma es un nmero de movimientos bsicos ofensivos y defensivos incorporados como en una rutina de una danza.
Tiene muchas funciones, siendo una de ellas conformar un sistema para indexar movimientos bsicos.
Ed Parker indicaba en su libro Infinite Insights into kenpo(vol.1), que aprender una forma sin conocer su significado o
intentarlo es como deletrear o pronunciar una palabra sin saber su definicin.
En mi modesta opinin, las Formas del Kenpo contienen el ADN de sus principios y reglas de movimiento, refleja el
pensamiento de Parker en el diseo de un Sistema Progresivo, y convirtindose en un repositorio de la historia del
desarrollo y evolucin del Kenpo.
Slo la atenta mirada de quien conozca su diseo y propsito puede permitir que un alumno acceda a la comprensin de
sus profundas enseanzas.
Es por eso comn ver estudiantes ejecutando estereotipados movimientos aprendidos de memoria, algunas veces formas
avanzadas que no corresponden a su grado, incapaces de articular una respuesta cuando se les formula una sencilla
pregunta sobre el sentido de los movimientos ejecutados. Cmo se puede explicar lo que no se comprende.? Son
exponentes de la formas sin forma, y no me estoy refiriendo a la frase acuada por Bruce Lee sobre el JKD, sino a que
una de las razones de estos ejercicios formales es dar Forma, moldear la tcnica del artista marcial. Estamos hablando en
Kenpo de adquirir las mecnicas corporales adecuadas (Proper Body Mechanics).
La Long Form 2 completa el grupo denominado Formas Diccionario, que su objetivo es la definicin de movimientos.

El Maestro Parker entren a sus estudiantes primero en las bsicas, entonces en las Self Defense. Las Formas reflejan
ste pensamiento. Es por esto, que las Formas 1 y 2 son llamadas bsicas o Formas Diccionario Lee Wedlake
Segn las fuentes que he podido consultar, habra sido creada entre 1961-62, y desde el 1963 incorporada al programa
de los 4 kyu de la poca (brown belts).
Este dato pasa a ser significativo porque sus movimientos reflejan de alguna manera las primeras influencias chinas en
el sistema que recibi Ed Parker en sus entrenamientos en el Chinatown de San Francisco.
Algunos de sus sets probablemente fueron antiguas tcnicas que posteriormente fueron modificadas, o eliminadas
cuando se estableci el Sistema de 32 tcnicas. No hay tcnicas pre-estabelecidas, aunque por ejemplo el primer set
podramos reconocer Five Swords.
Dennis Connaster, afirma que no hay un set de tcnicas para sta serie de bsica o en ninguna de las otras series de las
Shorts y Longs 1-2, ya que ellas son definiciones de posibilidades y acciones. Cualquiera puede desarrollar aplicaciones de
defensa personal, pero Ed Parker no quera ningn escenario especfico debido a que l no quera limitar
encapsulando la definicin.
El tema de la Forma es ensearle al estudiante intermedio cmo defenderse mientras avanza. T puedes
inmediatamente golpear despus de bloquear, o simultneamente bloquear y golpear.
El diagrama de los movimientos est referenciado por los signos matemticos de la suma y la multiplicacin, lo cual
constituye el Padrn Bsico de Movimientos.
La realidad de los rangos de armas cortas y largas son simultneamente usadas mientras empleas el concepto del
kenpo Two-handed. Esta forma es ms larga que la primera y con ms conceptos y principios que son explorados.
Tiene muchas tcnicas ocultas dentro de la forma. (Larry Tatum)

Una idea interesante que aade el Maestro Tatum es que las formas incrementan la memoria (muscular) y la habilidad de
tomar una eleccin.
Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
Conceptos Matemticos y Smbolos Geomtricos
Wednesday, 9 de January de 2008
Tres Conceptos Matemticos y Tres Smbolos Geomtricos

Son ayudas visuales que pueden ser usadas tangible o intangiblemente.
Conceptos Matemticos
a) Resta ( - )
b) Suma ( + )
c) Multiplicacin ( X )

Smbolos Geomtricos
a) Cuadrado
b) Tringulo
c) Crculo

Los conceptos matemticos y los smbolos geomtricos pueden estar en paralelo con el Principio del Reloj, y por esto, ambos
mtodos pueden ser usados en combinacin.Un valor agregado en estas ayudas es darte una proporcionalidad adaptando el Arte a las
medidas especficas de un individuo. El estudiante puede obtener una mejor relacin de su tamao corporal (width, depth, height) de
una guardia especfica o l puede ser capaz de controlar las zonas dimensionales del oponente.



Clasificado bajo: apuntes de clases | Sin comentarios
La Clave del xito
Monday, 5 de November de 2007
Para transformarse en un experto en las artes marciales, deca Bruce Lee, uno debe vislumbrar
delante de s una vida de dedicacin. Y para llegar a ser bueno en cualquier cosa que uno intente se
debe tener el cuerpo y la mente adaptados para ello.

La persona que practica artes marciales debe aprender no tan slo secuencias de movimientos, sino
que debe incorporar a travs de una disciplina marcial, conductas, valores y sobre todo un
fortalecimiento interno-externo que le permitan desarrollarse integralmente. Para que el arte se
manifieste dentro de ti, se requiere primero que nada tu compromiso y continuidad, la cual debe ser
afianzada con la dedicacin, la cual no es comparable a la de los antiguos monjes, puesto que los
ritmos de vida actuales no nos permiten dedicarle todo el tiempo a las artes marciales, pero s debe
existir un momento que le dediques a practicar y repasar los conocimientos que se entregan clase a
clase para que pueda existir un avance serio.

Slo los grandes de espritu y voluntad, lograron abrir los caminos ms importantes en la historia
de cualquier disciplina humana. Y a esa grandeza debemos aspirar todos los hombres.
El mismo empeo que ponemos en perfeccionar un golpe de puo o una patada lateral, o en
lograr potencia en nuestros golpes, o flexibilizar nuestro cuerpo, debemos colocarlo a la disposicin de
nuestra cultura, de nuestro mundo interior.
Bruce Lee

Long Form 2 notas Seminario

En el reciente seminario en San Fernando, me tom la libertad de analizar brevemente y proponer algunas aplicaciones a
un set especfico de la Long Form # 2, y que posteriormente fue enlazado con un grupo de tcnicas de defensa personal.
Como nuestra piel, las formas estn cubiertas por varias capas, de las cuales podemos aprender muchas cosas.
A continuacin un breve anlisis de los 3 primeros movimientos correspondientes al Set # 11
Path of Action = 7:30 1:30

Step 1.
1. Left front thrusting sweep kick
2. Left Overhead punch
Desde la posicin anterior, left neutral bow con un left vertical punch, proyectaremos nuestra lnea menor (7:30-1:30).
Esto demanda un cambio direccional en 180 grados.
Previo a movernos, un golpe de vista nos permite ubicar a nuestro oponente. Nuestros sentidos como sensores nos
advierten la presencia del adversario. Este gesto estimula el desarrollo de un estado de vigilancia intuitiva (Intuitive
Awareness). Es un error comn, constatar miradas displicentes, desenfocadas o vacas que revelan una escasa atencin
al entorno (environment).
En las formas previas, cuando el ataque provena de la Obscure zone, nuestra accin era salir de la lnea de ataque
(aunque en la Long 1 hicimos una excepcin), optamos por enfrentarlo directamente, reforzando uno de los temas de la
Forma que es Avanzar y bloquear.
Anteriormente nuestras transiciones se realizaban por medio de Cat Stance, Cover, etc., ahora introducimos el concepto
de Twist Through foot maneuver, que nos ensea a descomponer nuestro avance en rotacin y distancia.
Simultneo al foot maneuver ejecutamos un Overhead Punch al rostro del adversario. Sobre este golpe hay varias
interpretaciones, por ejemplo golpear con la palma hacia el exterior y la mano vertical o usando los nudillos anteriores
(Chopping Knuckle Punch) similar a la accin de llamar en una puerta o el cariito de Don Ramn al Chavo del 8 cuando
pierde la paciencia.
Si proyectamos una lnea vertical imaginaria desde la posicin de la mano, esta debe estar alineada con el pie izquierdo
(front twist).
El Overhead punch acta como bloqueo, la idea que todo bloqueo es un golpe y que todo bloqueo es un golpe.
Step 2
1. Right step through forward
2. Right neutral bow
3. Extended outward block (forearm strike)
Nuestra primera accin contuvo el avance del oponente, es el momento de tomar iniciativas, para ello realizamos el Step
Through Forward y establecemos un neutral bow de modo de tener Body Alignment y Direccional Harmony (un Forward
bow debilitara el soporte del peso del oponente) ejecutando un Extended Outward block modificado, por estar en un
punto intermedio de un Upward y Extended.
En la Short 2, mostramos el bloqueo Ideal con Double Factor. Es una muestra de Sofisticacin de una bsica,
comenzando desde la posicin de amartillamiento en la cadera, Uppercut , torque del antebrazo aplicado bajo la garganta
del oponente, operando como un pressing check y constituyendo el Bracing Angle (algo similar tambin fue mostrado en
la Long 1).

Step 3.
1. Right Forward bow
2. Right check
3. Left vertical finger thrust
Cambiamos a un Forward bow, manteniendo el chequeo. En el Set # 1 el chequeo es realizado por la mano atrasada,
ahora es el turno de la mano adelantada.
El Finger thrust a los ojos, mejora su precisin por la gua natural de nuestra mueca, con lo que utilizamos el concepto
de Tracking.
El tracking y la X como Open Triangle tambin se dan en el Claw y Back knuckle. De alguna manera la posicin de las
manos X, se replica en el patrn de los pies.
Podramos aventurar un estado embrionario de las tcnicas Destructive Twins, Rainning Claw, Lone Kimono, Parting
Wings.
Muchas otras cosas podramos seguir hablando de la Forma y este set en particular, pero ser motivo de otro artculo.
Edmund Kealoha "Ed" Parker fue un artista estadounidense de guerra, promotor, maestro y autor.
Vida
Parker naci en Hawai, y creci un miembro de La Iglesia de Jesucristo de los Santos de los ltimos Das. Comenz su
formacin en las artes marciales a una edad temprana en el judo y ms tarde de boxeo. En algn momento de la
dcada de 1940, Ed Parker fue introducido primero en Kenpo de Frank Chow. Frank Chow introdujo Ed Parker a
William Chow, un estudiante de James Mitose que entren a Parker mientras serva en la Guardia Costera y asistir a la
Universidad Brigham Young. En 1953 fue ascendido al rango de cinturn negro. Parker, al ver que los tiempos
modernos plantean nuevas situaciones que no se abordaron en Kenpo, adapt la tcnica para que sea ms fcil de
aplicar a las calles de Estados Unidos y llam a su estilo, American Kenpo Karate.
Parker abri el primer "americanizado" escuela de karate en el oeste de los Estados Unidos en Provo, Utah en 1954. En
1956, Parker abri un Dojo en Pasadena, California. Su primer alumno cinturn marrn era Charles Beeder. Existe
controversia sobre si Beeder recibi el primer cinturn negro otorgado por Parker. El hijo de Beeder ha declarado que
conste que el cinturn negro de su padre se produjo despus de Ed Parker se haba mudado a California. Los otros
cinturones negros en orden cronolgico hasta 1962 fueron: Rich Montgomery, James Ibrao, Mills Crenshaw, autorizada
por Ed Parker para abrir una escuela en Salt Lake City, UT a finales de 1958, Rick Flores, Al y Jim Tracy de Tracy
Kenpo, Chuck Sullivan, John McSweeney, y Dave Hebler. En 1962, John McSweeney abri una escuela en Irlanda, lo
que provoc Parker para dar el control de la Asociacin de Kenpo Karate de Amrica a los hermanos Tracy y formar
una nueva organizacin, la Asociacin Internacional de Kenpo Karate.
Parker era bien conocido por su creatividad en los negocios y ayud a muchos artistas marciales abren sus propios
dojos. Era muy conocido en Hollywood donde se form un gran nmero de hombres y celebridades truco; ms notable
fue Elvis Presley, a quien finalmente recibi un grado de cinturn negro octavo en Kenpo. Dej tras de s algunos
grandes maestros que son conocidos en todo el mundo a este da como Al Tracy, jefe del mayor sistema mundial de
kenpo, Frank Trejo que dirige una escuela en California. l ayud a Bruce Lee ganar la atencin nacional por su
introduccin en el Campeonato Internacional de Karate. Fue uno de guardaespaldas de Elvis Presley durante los
ltimos aos de la cantante, hizo cine stunt-trabajo y actuacin, y fue uno de los instructores de Kenpo de accin de
artes marciales actor de cine Jeff Speakman. l es mejor conocido por Kenpoists como el fundador del American Kenpo
y se conoce cariosamente como el "Padre de American Kenpo". Lo refieren formalmente en Senior Gran Maestro de
American Kenpo. Parker se puede ver con Elvis Presley en la secuencia de apertura de la 1977 especial de televisin
"Elvis in Concert". Parker escribi un libro sobre su tiempo con Elvis en el camino.
Parker tuvo una carrera menor como un actor de Hollywood y el hombre de truco. Su pelcula ms notable fue matar a
la gallina de oro. En esta pelcula, que l co-estrellas con Hapkido maestro Bong Soo Han. Su trabajo actoral incluido el
papel del Sr. Chong en La venganza de la pantera rosa alumno de Blake Edwards.
Edmund K. Parker muri en Honolulu de un ataque al corazn el 15 de diciembre de 1990. Su viuda Leilani Parker
muri el 12 de junio de 2006 - De sus cuatro hijos supervivientes, slo su hijo, Ed Parker Jr., se mantiene activo en el
sistema de su padre cre.
Formacin de Parker
El padre de Ed Parker inscrito a su hijo en las clases de Judo a la edad de doce aos. Parker recibi su Shodan en
Judo en 1949 a la edad de dieciocho aos. Despus de recibir su cinturn marrn de Kenpo, se traslad al continente
para asistir a la Universidad Brigham Young y comenz a ensear las artes marciales. Kenposhodan diploma del Sr.
Parker es de fecha 1953.
Fue durante este perodo que Parker fue influenciada significativamente por los japoneses y okinawenses
interpretaciones predominantes en Hawaii. De Parker Kenpo Karate libro, publicado en 1961, muestra los muchos
movimientos lineales duras, aunque con modificaciones, que establecen sus interpretaciones aparte.
Todas las influencias que hasta ese momento se reflejaron en el mtodo rgido y lineal de Parker de "Kenpo Karate",
como se le llamaba. Entre la escritura y publicacin, sin embargo, comenz a ser influenciado por las artes chinas, y se
incluye esta informacin en su sistema. Se instal en el sur de California despus de salir de la Guardia Costera y
terminar su educacin en la Universidad de Brigham Young. Aqu se encontr rodeado por otros artistas marciales de
una amplia variedad de sistemas, muchos de los cuales estaban dispuestos a discutir y compartir su arte con l. Parker
se puso en contacto con gente como Ark Wong, Haumea Lefiti, James W. Woo, y Lau Bun. Estos artistas marciales
eran conocidos por sus habilidades en artes como la Salpicar-Manos, San Soo, T'ai Chi y Hung Gar, y esta influencia
sigue siendo visible tanto en el material histrico y los principios actuales.
Expuestos a los nuevos conceptos de entrenamiento chinos y la historia, escribi un segundo libro, Secretos de Karate
chino publicado en 1963 - Parker estableci comparaciones en este y otros libros entre el karate y los mtodos chinos
que adopt y ense.
En la pelcula de artes marciales 1991 The Perfect Weapon, protagonizada por su alumno Jeff Speakman, Ed Parker
ayud con la coreografa de la lucha.
Bibliografa
1960, Kenpo Karate: Ley del puo y la mano vaca. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-47-3
1963, Secretos del Karate Chino. Prentice-Hall ISBN 0-13-797845-6
1975, Gua de Ed Parker en el Nunchaku ISBN 0-86568-104-X
1975, Kenpo Karate Diario acumulativo de Ed Parker. Asociacin Internacional de Kenpo Karate.
1978, Inside Elvis. Rampart Casa ISBN 0-89773-000-3
1982, Infinite Insights de Ed Parker en Kenpo, vol. 1: Estimulacin Mental. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-00-7
1983, Infinite Insights de Ed Parker en Kenpo, vol. 2: Fsica Analyzation I. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-02-3
1985, Infinite Insights de Ed Parker en Kenpo, vol. 3: Analyzation Fsica II. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-04-X
1986, Infinite Insights de Ed Parker Kenpo Into, vol. 4: Componentes fsicos y mentales. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-06-6
1987, Infinite Insights de Ed Parker Kenpo Into: vol. 5: Aplicaciones mental y fsica. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-08-2
1988, gua de la mujer a la autodefensa
1988, El Zen del Kenpo. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-10-4
1992, Enciclopedia de Kenpo de Ed Parker. Delsby Publications ISBN 0-910293-12-0