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ANNUAL REPORT

2012-2013

ANNUAL REPORT 2012-2013 THE INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS ASSOCIATION 14, DR. BIRESH GUHA STREET, KOLKATA–700 017

THE INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS ASSOCIATION

14, DR. BIRESH GUHA STREET, KOLKATA–700 017

Published by :

The Indian Science Congress Association 14, Dr. Biresh Guha Street, Kolkata-700 017

Printed at :

East India Photo Composing Centre 69, Sisir Bhaduri Sarani, Kolkata-700 006

CONTENTS

Page

PREFACE

PROFILE OF THE INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS ASSOCIATION THE HUNDREDTH SESSION OF INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS 3

1

Inception Ceremony for Centenary Year

3

100 th Indian Science Congress : A Brief Report

6

Activities in Sections

16

ISCA Endowment Lectures

16

Children Science Congress

17

Women’s Science Congress

19

Sixth Rashtriya Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan

20

Science Exhibition: Pride of India Expo-100 th ISC

20

Scientific Programmes

22

Major Recommendations

40

OTHER ACTIVITIES

ISCA Chapters

45

Regional Science Congress

45

Programme on Official Language

46

Publications

46

Library Service

47

OTHER ITEMS

ISCA Meetings

48

ISCA Representation in other Organizations

48

Membership

49

 

Page

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

51

ANNEXURE -I Title of Addresses of Sectional Presidents of 100 th ISC Session

52

ANNEXURE -II Platinum Jubilee Lectures of 100 th ISC Session

53

ANNEXURE -III Titles of Symposia on specialized topics organised by the Sections of 100 th Indian Science Congress

54

ANNEXURE -IV List of Young Scientist Awardees for the year 2012-2013

55

ANNEXURE -V List of Best Poster Presentation Awards for 2012-2013

57

APPENDIX -I Members of the Council for 2012-2013

60

APPENDIX -II Members of the Council for 2013-2014

62

APPENDIX -III

Personnel

64

APPENDIX -IV General Presidents of ISCA

65

APPENDIX -V General Secretaries of ISCA

69

APPENDIX -VI Treasurers of ISCA

70

AUDIT REPORT & ACCOUNTS

71

PREFACE

March 31, 2013 marked the completion of the 100 th year of The Indian Science Congress Association. The 100 th Indian Science Congress was held at Kolkata under the auspices of the Calcutta University, from January 3-7, 2013. Sri Pranab Mukherjee, His Excellency, President of India, inaugurated the Congress on 3 rd January. Shri S. Jaipal Reddy, Hon’ble Union Minister of Science & Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India delivered his speech. Dr. Manmohan Singh, General President of ISCA and Hon’ble Prime Minister of India delivered his address on the Focal Theme “Science for Shaping the Future of India”. This was followed by presentation Awards to dignitaries. The inaugural function was attended by over 12,000 delegates including quite a few overseas scientists.

There were Plenary Sessions, Panel Discussions and Public Lectures devoted to different facets of the Focal Theme in which Nobel Laureates, many eminent scientists, technologists, policy-makers, industrial executives from industrial sector and social activists participated. Following the past tradition, Symposia on different interesting topics were organized in 14 sections besides the Platinum Jubilee Lectures which constituted a significant component of the entire programme. Invited Lectures and Paper Presentations (through Posters/Oral) organised in different sections were highly applauded. Special emphasis was given on ISCAYoung Scientists’Programme in sections and the awards were presented to Young Scientist Awardees on this occasion by Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam, former President of India. A large number of students from the neighbourhood schools and colleges visited and participated in the Children Science Congress. “Pride of India Expo –100 th ISC : Science Exhibition” was one of the major events of the 100 th Indian Science Congress. The development, achievement and contribution of Science and Technology vis-à-vis the Society was being show-cased by scientific institutions and the universities. The major organizations of Central and State Govts, R & D Institutions, Corporates, Academic Institutions, NGOs, Defence & Allied Organisations participated. Apart from this the 6 th RashtriyaVigyan Sancharak Sammelan (Science Communication) was organised with support from NCSTC, DST, New Delhi, where Science Communicators selected from different Chapters of ISCA participated. For the second time in the history of Science Congress, Women Science Congress was organised where women scientists from all over the country participated. The Valedictory Session was held on January 7, 2013. Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary DST gave the Welcome Address and Prof. M.S.Swaminathan and Sri. M.K.Narayanan, Governor of West Bengal presented awards and certificates to the participants judged for the Best Poster presentation in the respective sections. The 100 th Indian Science Congress concluded with handing over of Vigyan Joyt by Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary DST and representative of General President to Prof. R. C. Sobti, General President (Elect) 101 st ISC.

Twenty nine ISCA Chapters continued their activities during the year under report by organising seminars, symposia, lectures, quiz contests, etc. Among various activities, the Chapters observed National Science Day, World Environment Day, World Wetland Day, Earth Day, National Technology Day, World Health Day, World AIDS Day, National Children Day, Teachers Day, etc. The Chapters organised National Seminars on Focal Theme of 100 th ISC. In addition four Regional Science Congress was held at Baroda in West, Coimbatore in South, Delhi in North and Arunachal Pradesh in North East. The Association feels greatly honoured for receiving active financial support from Department of Science & Technology, Govt. of India, to carry out many of its intended activities and to execute improvements over its existing infrastructure. Attempts are being made to expand resource base and improve the fund position by effective finance management. The strength of Association lies in the strong support being received from its members. I am confident that with this support, the Association will be able to fulfill its objectives in a bigger way.

7 th September, 2013

its objectives in a bigger way. 7 t h September, 2013 (Er. Nilangshu Bhusan Basu) General

(Er. Nilangshu Bhusan Basu) General Secretary (Membership Affairs) The Indian Science Congress Association

PROFILE OF THE INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS ASSOCIATION

The Indian Science Congress Association (ISCA) is a premier scientific organization of the country established in 1914. ISCA has been promoting science and inculcating the spirit of science through its multifarious activities. ISCA meets in the first week of January in an Annual Congress of scientists, science administrators, policy makers and the general public to give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to the scientific inquiry, to promote the interaction of societies and individuals interested in science in different parts of the country and to obtain a more general attention to the objects of pure and applied sciences. ISCA brings together scientists both from India and abroad for mutual interaction in the cause of national development. Annual Congress of the Association has been held every year ever since 1914 with a very distinguished scientist as its General President.

The Association was formed with the following objectives :

1. To advance and promote the cause of Science in India;

2. To hold an annual Congress at a suitable place in India;

3. To publish such proceedings, journals, transactions and other publications as may be considered desirable;

4. To secure and manage funds and endowments for the promotion of Science including the rights of disposing of, or selling all or any portion of the properties of the Association;

5. To do and perform any or all other acts, matters and things as are conducive to, or incidental to, or necessary for, the above objects.

Since its foundation, the Association has steadfastly worked to uphold its lofty objectives. The scope of its activities has expectedly increased many fold since 1914. The first Session of the Congress was held during January 15-17, 1914 at the premises of The Asiatic Society, Kolkata, with the Honourable Justice Sir Asutosh Mookerjee, the then Vice-Chancellor of the Calcutta University, a General President. One hundred and five Scientists from different parts of India and abroad attended and papers numbering 35 were divided into six sections; Botany, Chemistry, Ethnography, Geology, Physics and Zoology under six Sectional Presidents. From these relatively modest beginnings ISCA has grown into a strong fraternity with nearly eighteen thousand members – who participate in fourteen different sections of the Congress. The number of papers communicated for presentation has risen to about one thousand. After independence ISCAhas been actively interacting with various foreign ScientificAcademies/Associations, namely, British Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science, French Academy of Sciences, Bangladesh Academy of Sciences, Sri Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science, Beijing Association for Science & Technology and others with a view to have a fruitful interactions on topics of mutual interest.

The year 1976 witnessed a significant departure in the trend of deliberations during the Congress. It was being felt for sometime that such a gathering of scientists, covering a wide spectrum and seized of national issues that have scientific and technological implications to adopt a cogent theme every year. In

1976, Dr. M.S.Swaminathan, the then General President of ISCA, introduced the concept of Focal Theme of national relevance which is now discussed at an Annual Session of the Indian Science Congress. Further, several plenary sessions are organised around various facets of the Focal Theme in which scientists and technologists as well as policy makers and administrators interact with one another. ISCA has thus become an important platform where members from different disciplines and from different walks of life contribute to discussions on the Focal Theme.

Another significant breakthrough was made in 1980, when the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India, set up a permanent Task Force involving representatives of ISCA and chiefs of different agencies and voluntary organizations. Chaired by the Secretary, DST, as being responsible for follow-up action on various recommendations on the Focal Theme. Every year followup actions on recommendations made in the previous Science Congress are discussed at a General Session organized by DST during the Science Congress. Through this process, the Indian Science Congress Association has been contributing to the development of Science in general and National

Science Policy, in particular.

ISCA introduced a programme for the benefit of young scientists from its 68 th Session in 1981. The Programme enables young scientists to present their proposed research work with opportunities to exchange ideas in the relevant scientific problems with their counterparts and specialists. For the best presentations, such young scientists are given the ISCA Young Scientist Award. The Young Scientist Award has been enhanced from 5,000/- to 25,000/- from 2006 to encourage talented young scientists.

A substantial number of the contributed papers, which are accepted on the basis of a careful screening to be done by the concerned Sectional Presidents with the help of some experts, are presented by way of posters. Further, to encourage scientists it was decided that at most two Prizes of 1,000/- in cash along with a certificate be awarded to the Best Poster presentation in each section from 1999 Session. The value of these prizes were enhanced to 5,000/- from 2007. Oral presentations of selected contributed papers are also included in the programme of each section.

The Indian Science Congress Association has instituted several Awards to honour and encourage scientists in India – mainly through special endowments received from individuals and groups and also from its own funds. The concept of instituting Awards started from 1965 onwards and presently there are about 33 Awards that are given by ISCA.

THE HUNDREDTH SESSION OF INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS

INCEPTION CEREMONY FOR CENTENARY YEAR

The Inception Ceremony for the celebration of Centenary Year was held on June 2 nd , 2012 at University of Calcutta, Kolkata. Dr. Manmohan Singh, Hon’ble Prime Minister of India and General President, formally declared open the Centenary Year of the Indian Science Congress Association. His Excellency Governor of West Bengal, Shri M. K. Narayanan, Chief Minister of West Bengal, Ms Mamata Banerjee, Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Shri Vilasrao Deshmukh, Minister of State for Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Shri Ashwani Kumar, Dr T. Ramasami, Secretary DST, Prof. Suranjan Das, Vice Chancellor, Calcutta University, were present on the occasion.

HON’BLE PRIME MINISTER’S ADDRESS AS THE GENERAL PRESIDENT

I am delighted to join you at this ceremony to formally declare open the Centenary Year of the Indian Science Congress Association.

When Council members of the Indian Science Congress Association elected me last year as the General President for the Centenary Year of this institution, I was deeply touched by their kind gesture.

But I was also aware that, as a layman, my ability to lead the Association in the complex realm of science would be limited. Eventually, what made me decide to foray into the affairs of this privileged association was a judgement, made with humility and sincerity, that by accepting the onerous responsibility I would signal the full support and commitment of the government to Indian science as it passes through a critical decade of innovation.

I wish to recall what Shri Ashutosh Mukherjee, the legendary Vice Chancellor of Calcutta University, once said :

the most enlightened Governments occasionally require to be reminded of the full extent of the paramount claims of Science upon the Public Funds.”

even

Ladies and Gentlemen,

It is entirely befitting that we are in the hallowed portals of the University of Calcutta to celebrate the Centenary. It was here that the Indian Science Congress Association took roots under the leadership of Shri Ashutosh Mukherjee. In many senses, modern science in India was nurtured in this city. I congratulate the city of Kolkata for nourishing an environment of learning and producing some of the country’s outstanding scientists, mathematicians and economists, including many of our Nobel laureates.

Earlier today I was privileged to lay the foundation stone of the unified campus of the Bose Institute, named after one of the greatest Indian scientists of the last century, Jagadish Chandra Bose.

These founders of modern Indian science did not let the burdens of colonial subjugation come in the way of their pursuit of scientific excellence. They complemented their brilliant scientific abilities with imagination, drive and patriotic fervour to write a glorious chapter in the annals of Indian science.

I propose that the technical programmes of the Indian Science Congress in Kolkata in January 2013

begin with a special lecture in honour of Shri Ashutosh Mukherjee, who personified the national science movement that took shape a hundred years ago.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

The theme for this year’s Congress is “Science for Shaping the Future of India”. It is a theme that might have resonated just as well a hundred years ago when the Association came into being.

Each generation, while grappling with the pressing problems of the present, has thought about the shape and character of the India they would bequeath to succeeding generations.

We can all agree that we aspire to a future for India in which each citizen is able to meet his or her basic needs of food, clean water and shelter and is educated and skilled not only to earn a living but to benefit and enrich himself or herself from global cross currents of cultural, scientific and social advances.

The journey of our development is marked by glittering scientific achievements whether in the field of atomic energy, space, agriculture or information technology. The burden on science in the future will only increase. Our problems are overwhelming and need scientific solutions. We have to use our abundant intellectual resources to find new pathways of development that use our scarce natural resources judiciously.

But science has a greater role to play. In recent times, I have been observing a growing intolerance among our people of dissent and opinions that contradict the prevailing orthodoxy. We seem to be losing the ability to engage in a rational discourse where different points of view are expressed. Public debate is often hostage to sensationalism. I sometimes fear that a growing culture of narrow mindedness might affect the creative, innovative and imaginative instincts of our youth.

Indian civilization has a rich tradition of preserving social harmony and promoting conciliation by accommodating different viewpoints, identities and cultural differences. We should strengthen these impulses through the propagation of a scientific temper and an enlightened understanding of the meaning of freedom of expression.

I would urge the doyens of the scientific community to speak out and make more effective contributions

to an informed and reasoned debate on the issues before the nation. The voice of our scientists is important and should be heard.

Ladies and Gentlemen :

I am happy that we have chosen this Centenary Year to declare the Year of Science in India. We should all work to make a success of it.

I submit to this august audience that our government has invested as never before in Indian science.

For many years the capacities in our higher scientific and technical infrastructure were stagnant. We built

world class institutions that created islands of excellence that created new knowledge. But we did not use science and technology in our development processes as much as we should have. We did not build local capacities that could meaningfully address problems of development in a decentralised manner.

I believe that the huge expansion in educational infrastructure that this government has overseen will

create the building blocks of a modern knowledge economy and, more importantly, society. Of course we have to overcome many challenges such as producing qualified teachers in adequate numbers, devising a modern curriculum and teaching methods and building proper physical infrastructure. But it is certainly true that we have taken a quantum leap in our ambitions for Indian science.

I

hope that all our educational institutions and scientific establishments will mark the occasion with

suitable events to raise the profile of science in India. One of the major outcomes of the centenary year celebration would be the formulation of a new Science and Technology Policy that will update the existing policy document of 2003 in the light of a rapidly changing scientific environment in the country and the world. We have to keep pace with what is happening elsewhere in the scientific world and the evolving aspirations of the Indian people. Turning to the calendar of events planned during the Centenary Year, I find that we have a busy year ahead. In addition to the annual session at Kolkata, there will be three regional science congresses in the North, West and South of the country. We will organize special sessions on the use of high technology, renewable energy and public health challenges like malnutrition. We will emphasise themes that relate science to integrated rural development in the country. We will bring out a well-researched publication on 100 high impact-making discoveries in Indian Science during the last 100 years. We will also launch a Hall of Fame in cyberspace to portray globally the contribution of Indian science. We are, rightly to my mind, also focusing our programmes on what we can do to attract our youth to science. There has been some discussion on the setting up of a Science Academy for the Young during the centenary year. We should follow up on this proposal.

At the Congress in Kolkata next year, we will invite outstanding Indian scientists under the age of 45 to deliver lectures to the youth. We will hold a special session in Kolkata for young scientists. To motivate young learners, the Association will bring out inspirational video documentaries highlighting the history of modern science. Starting from this year, a special scheme for 100 doctoral research fellowships every year will be launched under a Public Private Partnership between Ministry of Science & Technology and the Confederation of Indian Industries. Keeping in mind our obligation to promote science internationally and in our own region, we propose to introduce a scheme to invite 25 young scientists from our neighbouring countries to undertake doctoral research in India. The Department of Science and Technology will work out appropriate arrangements in this regard.

I am happy that efforts are being made to rejuvenate the Indian Science Congress Association

through additional building infrastructure and a resource mobilization drive to create a corpus of Rs. 150 crore on the occasion of its Centenary Year.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I hope that the occasions provided by the Centenary year events will be used by our scientific

community to reflect on how we can frame a science and technology policy that reflects our aspiration for

making science a spearhead of development in our country. I hope that by the time we meet for the Indian Science Congress seven months from now, we would be able to give concrete shape to ideas that can define our country’s future path.

I conclude with a quote from Pandit Nehru, who said at the meeting of the Indian Science Congress in 1938 :

Even “

Thank you.

more than the present, the future belongs to those who make friends with science.”

100

TH INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS : A BRIEF REPORT

The 100 th Indian Science Congress was held at Kolkata under the auspices of Calcutta University, from January 3 rd to 7 th , 2013. Hon’ble Sri Pranab Mukherjee, President of India inaugurated the Congress on 3 rd January at Yuva Bharati Stadium and Dr.Manmohan Singh, Hon’ble Prime Minister of India and General President presided over the function.

His Excellency Governor of West Bengal Shri M K Narayanan gave the welcome speech. Hon’ble Union Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India, Shri S Jaipal Reddy and Hon’ble Chief Minister of West Bengal Ms Mamata Banerjee addressed the august gathering. The Science,Technology and Innovation Policy 2013 was released. Dr.Manmohan Singh, Hon’ble Prime Minister of India, and General President released the proceedings of 100 th Indian Science Congress. A book entitled ‘Balancing Act‘ was released by Hon’ble Chief Minister of West Bengal Ms Mamata Banerjee. The report of nation wide celebration was released by Hon’ble Union Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India, Shri S Jaipal Reddy. On this occasion the postage stamp to

commomerate centenary session of Indian Science Congress Association was also released. Prof Geetha Bali, Immediate past President, Prof R C Sobti, General President Elect, Dr T Ramasami, Secretary DST, Dr. (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (ScientificActivities), and Dr. Manoj Kumar Chakraborti, General Secretary (Membership Affairs) were also present. Hon’ble Prime Minister of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh, delivered his Presidential address on the Focal Theme “Science for Shaping the Future of India” and Hon‘ble Sri Pranab Mukherjee, President of India delivered his Address and presented ISCAAwards

to a number of eminent scientists from the country and abroad for their outstanding scientific contributions.

Prof. Suranjan Das, Vice Chancellor, Calcutta University delivered the Vote of Thanks. Over 18,000 registered delegates, participated in the 100 th Indian Science Congress including a large number of scientists from different parts of the world.

Immediately after the inauguration a Theme panel was organized on the Focal theme “Science for Shaping the Future of India” where Dr.Manmohan Singh, Hon’ble Prime Minister of India and General

President Chaired the session. The speakers were Dr R Chidambaram, DAE Homi Bhabha Chair Professor

& Scientific Adviser, GoI, Prof M S Swaminathan, Emeritus Chairman, MS Swaminathan Research

Foundation and Dr John Beddington, Chief Scientific Adviser, Govt of UK.

On 4 th January, 2013, His Excellency, Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, Former President of India inaugurated the Children’s Science Congress at Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences in the presence of His Excellency Governor of West Bengal Shri M K Narayanan, Hon’ble Union Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India, Shri S Jaipal Reddy,

Secretary DST, Govt of India, Dr T Ramasami, Dr. (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (Scientific Activities). INFOSYS – ISCA Travel Awards to school students were presented on this occasion by Dr

A P J Abdul Kalam. The “Science for School Children” which was organized with support from NCSTC,

DST was a highly successful programme. Following the inauguration of the Children’s Science Congress, Dr. Kalam inaugurated the Children’s Science Exhibition where children from 125 selected institutions displayed their prize winning.

For the second time in the history of Indian Science Congress, a Women’s Science Congress was organized on 4 th January 2013 on the theme “Women Empowerment for the development of country”. This programme that motivated participation of a large number of women in science congress, was inaugurated

by Hon’ble Union Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India, Shri S Jaipal Reddy in Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences. Dr Gretchen Kalonji, Assistant Director General for Natural Science, UNESCO, Paris delivered her Address. Prof Suranjan Das, Vice Chancellor, Calcutta University and Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (Scientific Activities), ISCA also delivered address.

Following the inauguration of Science Congress on 3 rd January, Hon’ble Union Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India, Shri S Jaipal Reddy inaugurated the Science Exhibition in the presence of other dignitaries. Special Pavilions at PoI Expo were “Hall of Pride” (HoP), designed to raise a toast to the life and works of Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru - The first Prime Minister of India and also the General President of Indian Science Congress; Hon’ble Justice Sir Asutosh Mookerjee - A prolific Bengali educator and the first Indian Vice Chancellor of the University of Calcutta and also the first General President (GP) of Indian Science Congress Association (ISCA); “Edu Visionbrought various educational institutions under one roof & other stake holders in education sector; International Pavilion” hosted stalls of different countries showcasing their respective joint R&D/S&T ventures with India.

Besides, Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan was organised with support from NCSTC, DST, New Delhi, where science communicators selected from different chapters of ISCA participated.

There were plenary sessions on topics of importance especially in the context of India’s achieving inclusive development. There were symposia and panel discussions and public lectures and special lectures from eminent scientists, technocrats, policy makers from India and abroad as well as representatives from industries, addressing current issues and the main focal theme from different perspectives as well as latest developments in S & T. The 100 th ISC witnessed vibrant sectional activities in all the 14 sections. Keeping up the past tradition, symposia on different interesting topics complementary to the main focal theme were organised in the 14 sections besides the Platinum Jubilee Lectures in each section. Invited Lectures and Paper Presentations (through Posters/Oral) organised in different sections were highly applauded. Endowment lectures constituted a vital part of the programme. This apart, public lectures by Nobel Laureates and few award lectures were organized in respective sections.

The Valedictory Session was held on January 7 th , 2013. Dr. (Mrs.) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (Scientific Activities), ISCA, delivered the welcome address. Prof M S Swaminathan graced the occasion as Chief Guest. His Excellency Governor of West Bengal Shri M K Narayanan presided over the function.Among others, Prof Suranjan Das, Vice Chancellor, Calcutta University, Dr T Ramasami, Secretary DST, Prof R C Sobti, General President Elect, Dr. Manoj Kumar Chakraborti, General Secretary (Membership Affairs), were present on the occasion. Shri M K Narayanan, H.E. the Governor of West Bengal presented awards and certificates to the winners of the ISCAYoung Scientists’Awards and Best Poster awards from each of the 14 sections and also to representatives of institutions for outstanding participation in the exhibition.

INAUGURAL SPEECH BY HIS EXCELLENCY SHRI PRANAB MUKHERJEE THE PRESIDENT OF INDIA AT THE 100 TH INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS

Dr. Manmohan Singh, Honourable Prime Minister of India and the General President of Indian Science Congress Association, Shri Narayanan, Excellency the Governor of West Bengal, Miss Mamata Banerjee, Hon‘ble Chief Minister of West Bengal, Shri Jaipal Reddy, Hon‘ble Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India, Past General President and President elect and General Secretaries, Members of the Council and Executive Committee of Indian Science Congress Association, Science Icons of the World including Nobel and Abel Prize Awardees, distinguished friends and representatives of the press and media.

At the outset, I wish the participants to the Centenary session of Indian Science Congress and the people of the Nation, a purposeful and productive New Year. My warmest congratulations to the Indian Science Congress on the occasion of the celebration of their centenary. The Prime Minister of India generally inaugurates the annual sessions of Indian Science Congress. In the current year, the Association has elected the Prime Minister as its General President. I congratulate Dr. Manmohan Singh for being elected as the General President of Indian Science Congress in this historic year. It is a befitting honour. I can from personal experience vouchsafe the abiding faith of Dr. Manmohan Singh on education, science and technology. The good performance of science and technology sector in the recent years, I believe, owes greatly to the generous government support for S&T catalysed by the Prime Minister.

I am an alumnus of Calcutta University. Naturally, I am delighted to participate in a function co- organized by Calcutta University.As an alumnus, I fondly remember defining role of this university and Sir Asutosh Mukherjee in nurturing the Indian Science Congress in the early years. Kolkata has remained historically a city of culture, of knowledge. All Nobel Prizes awarded for work from India are somehow linked to the city of Kolkata. Sir Ronald Ross carried out his pioneering research on Malaria in this city for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1902. Sir CV Raman’s remarkable discovery, the Raman Effect, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1930, was made here in Kolkata. The legendry Rabindranath Tagore and Mother Teresa were also awarded Noble Prizes for their work carried out in Kolkata. The earliest organizations associated with science—The Asiatic Society, The Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science and the Indian Science Congress Association were established here. These organizations gave rise to celebrated luminaries in science who promoted a scientific culture. Sir JC Bose, Prof. Satyendra Nath Bose, PC Ray, Meghnad Saha and many others who built the edifice of modern science in the country. Sir JC Bose is hailed as the first of modern scientists of this country. His original contributions to the invention of radio are well known. The recent discovery of Higgs-boson particle highlights the epoch making contributions of Prof. Satyendra Nath Bose to particle physics. I do hope that the modern scientists of this city would emulate the examples of these leaders of science of the past.

ISCA presented me a compilation of all the addresses of General Presidents of the Association as well as the inaugural addresses delivered over the years. These make fascinating reading. In a sense, these capture the history of Indian science as it evolved over the past 100 years. In the year 1957, I was a student at Calcutta University. In that year, the Prime Minister of India Pandit Nehru was the Chief Guest.

The Chief Minister of Bengal, the visionary Prof BC Roy was the President of the Science Congress. The topic of BC Roy‘s address to the Congress was “On Science for Human Welfare and Development of Country”. The topic then was akin to the theme of the present session - ‘Science for Shaping Future of India ‘. I was greatly touched by BC Roy‘s concluding message and I quote: “The clouds of time may have hidden for us innumerable problems, trials and dangers, yet time may also reveal solutions of unknown difficulties or delightful surprises which man with his knowledge of Science should be prepared to turn to his advantage with faith, hope and good will.”

Let me congratulate the Indian Science Congress for selecting “Science for Shaping Future of India” as the focal theme for its 100th Session. Science has to be closely linked to a culture within the society which is built on scientific knowledge. It calls for a scientific temper that Pt. Nehru always used to talk about. Scientific culture demands that choices and decisions are made by individuals, society and the nation on the basis of scientific logic. Indian economy has been following a new paradigm of development; faster, sustainable and inclusive growth with equity. It is a new concept because it combines the faster growth with objectives of inclusiveness and sustainability. How to harness the forces of science, technology and innovation to achieve this end calls for deep deliberation. I am sure, you will discuss this in all its aspects and implications with the seriousness that it demands.

Science is one of the creative endeavours of human mind. Pursuit of Science as a personal passion can not be regulated or directed when the thrill of pursuit is in “Knowing the truth of Nature”. Prepared and creative minds are required to observe the revelations of Nature. Science seeks universal and fundamental truth. Culture of Excellence is the second nature of creative scientists. Eminent scientists of the world have always been concerned as to how their understanding of natural phenomena could be applied to solve social problems of the future. Sir JC Bose, more than a century ago, on 5th March 1885, wrote in his diary “I have been thinking whether the solar energy that is wasted in tropical regions in a new way could be utilized. Of course trees conserve the solar energy. But is there no other way of directly utilizing the radiant energy of the sun?” The seed for artificial photosynthesis was sown then. Even now it is an active area of research pursuit globally. His disciple Prof. Satyendra Nath Bose was a powerful communicator and an inspired teacher. He delivered lectures on ‘power’and ‘nuclear energy’in a language that lay people could understand. He motivated generation of people to move towards scientific endeavour. Public and political understanding of science is crucial. For that, I would like to urge upon you all to apply modern tools for communicating science in a manner that can be understood by the common man. This understanding would contribute to the creation of a science culture in the Indian society.

The prime concern of any government in a country is enhancing the well being of its people. Technology has the power of changing the lives of the people by creating physical well being. Countries have undergone transformational changes, all in one generation, from a relatively weak to an emerging economy. In this transformational change, technology-led economic growth has played a key role. While technology can be considered a logical extension of knowledge gained from science, it is much more than mere application of science. Technology is contextual. There is a economic value to technology. We all are a witness to the transformational changes being brought about by mobile telephony and internet. The number of mobile phone users in India was around 19 crore in October 2012 which is the second highest in the world after China. The mobile phone density of 74.21 per cent of India compares favourably with the other top ranking countries. Another marvel of technology—the internet—has become a vital source of information and communication. India ranks third after China and USA in terms of number of internet users. However,

the penetration of internet use as the percentage of the population is only 11.4 indicating the huge potential for future growth. Another transformational application of technology is Aadhaar project which focuses on electronic transfer of benefits directly to the beneficiaries of various social sector schemes. I understand the roll out of Aadhaar enabled service delivery has already started in twenty districts. In the Budget 2012-13, a target for covering fifty districts has been set which, I am sure, will be met. It is essential to innovate if we have to compete in a globalised economy. India has declared 2010- 20 as the decade of innovation. The announcement of Science, Technology and Innovation Policy today lays the roadmap for the development of an eco system for innovations and for encouraging, recognizing and rewarding the innovators in the society, especially the grass root innovators who through their genius are adding value to the processes which directly impact the local population. The new STI policy has also addressed the issue of right-sizing our research and development system. Balanced economic growth especially in emerging economies like India is of paramount importance. Productive engagement of our youth in agriculture, manufacturing and value based services holds the key for a balanced growth of the country. The new STI Policy, I am confident, will pave the technology-led path for change ensuring prosperity with peace and inclusiveness. We need an educational system which lays importance on development of a scientific culture within the society. Mere economic growth without the attendant knowledge capacity to manage the dimensions of change would neither suffice nor be appropriate. Our ancient universities, whether these be Nalanda or Taxila, focused on value based holistic education. Perhaps it is appropriate to quote from an address of Rabindranath Tagore delivered ninety years ago :

“You know the traditions of our country are never to accept any material fees from the students in return for teaching, because we consider in India that one who has knowledge has the responsibility to impart it to the students”. Swami Vivekananda always spoke of fusion of cultural values of the orient with practical methods of the occident. Innovation is a modern means of converting knowledge into social value and wealth. Indian philosophy, seeks to balance the pursuit of wealth and material success with the mastery of the self and the quest of inner happiness. The deeply introspective, yet practical, wisdom of Indian philosophy must find resonance in the metaphor of competition and conquest popularized in the modern world.

I conclude with a quote from Swami Vivekananda, he said: “No nation can be said to have become

civilized, only because it has succeeded in increasing the comforts of material life by bringing into use lots

of machinery and things of that sort

so on the other, they have to acquire deep spiritual knowledge”.

I would like to call upon the scientific community to work for the promotion of a scientific culture for

shaping our future in which prosperity and peace, excellence and equity and oriental values and occidental methods of science converge and co-exist. India is expected to emerge as a major economic power by 2035. We should also emerge as a major knowledge power with high human and societal values. Let me mention in this regard that it has been 83 long years since CV Raman won the Nobel Prize for Physics. Another Nobel Prize in the sciences is long overdue for India. I call upon scientific fraternity gathered here to rise upto this challenge and work towards this goal in a time bound manner.

With these words, I formally inaugurate the 100th session of Indian Science Congress. Thank you.

Jai Hind!

In this age as on the one hand people have to be intensely practical,

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS BY DR. MANMOHAN SINGH HON’BLE PRIME MINISTER OF INDIA AT THE

100 TH INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS

“As General President of the Indian Science Congress Association, it is my great honour to welcome our Chief Guest, the Hon’ble President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee. Our President is a distinguished statesman. His wisdom, knowledge and vast experience of public life are great national assets. I also welcome the galaxy of luminaries, practitioners, policymakers and worshippers of science who have come together today to celebrate the centenary of the Indian Science Congress.

By selecting Kolkata as the venue of this historic occasion, the Congress is celebrating its 100th Anniversary at the original home of the Association. Modern Indian science was largely nurtured here in the soil of Bengal. Kolkata’s credentials in science are burnished not only by the impressive list of institutions it hosts today, but by the inquisitiveness, creativity and liberalism that have defined its residents for many generations. I thank the Government of West Bengal, particularly the Governor, Shri Narayanan, the Chief Minister, Kumari Mamata Banerjee, and the people of Kolkata for their unstinting support to the Science Congress.

I would also like to take this opportunity to felicitate the Executive Committee and Members of the Council of the Indian Science Congress Association for their work during the year and for achieving many of the initiatives I had outlined in my inception address in this very city seven months ago.

On the centenary of the Association, let us pause for a minute to recall the foresight and determination of its founding fathers – Sir Ashutosh Mukherjee, Professor J. L. Simonsen and Professor P.S. MacMahon. We also salute the genius and dedication of other stalwarts like Acharya Prafulla Chandra Ray, Sir RN Mookerjee, Sir Jagdish Chandra Bose, Sir M Visvesvaraya, Sir CV Raman, Sir SN Bose and Professor Meghnad Saha, who made this great institution a vehicle for the spread of knowledge and progress for the Indian nation. Let their commitment and social consciousness be the guiding spirit of today’s scientists.

The theme of this Congress, ‘Science for Shaping the Future of India‘, reflects the dream of every generation of Indian scientists. Faster growth over the next few decades, more sustainable development based on food and energy security, and socio-economic inclusion made possible by rapid growth of basic social services, such as education and health, are all crucial for defining India’s future. Science, technology and innovation all have an important role to play in achieving these objectives.

Science and technology development have been central to the phenomenal material advancement and efficiency in the use of resources seen in the last hundred years. The pace of change has only accelerated in the last few decades, as globalization and new technology have enhanced people’s access to knowledge and their ability to leverage it through collaboration. India has benefited from this epochal transformation by embracing these trends.

Since technological changes typically emanate from established structures, they may at times re- inforce them and inhibit the advancement of equity and equality. As India seeks a sustained growth of its national income, we must endeavour to harness the tools of science to cater to the needs of the underprivileged and to bridge the gap between the haves and the have-nots.

Nearly 65 percent of our people live in rural areas. The increase in their living standards depends greatly on the growth of agricultural production and productivity. The Twelfth Five Year Plan assumes that a sustained growth of our agriculture at the rate of 4 percent per annum is essential for the achievement of food security for our country. This growth is constrained by shortages of water and also of land. We need new breakthroughs in water-saving technologies of cultivation, enhancement of land productivity and development of climate-resilient varieties. This transformation of agriculture must be the top priority concern of our public policies, including science and technology policies. In keeping with the theme of this Congress, the question naturally arises as to what we should do to build our future through science? I would like to share a few ideas. First, we must, as a society, enhance the spread of what Jawaharlal Nehru used to describe as the scientific temper. Our younger generations must adopt a science-based value-system in order to benefit from what science can offer and to make up for lost time. Complex issues, be they genetically modified food or nuclear energy or exploration of outer space, cannot be settled by faith, emotion and fear but by structured debate, analysis and enlightenment. A scientific approach and understanding of these issues are therefore as vital as our core scientific capabilities. For this, we must invest in popularizing science, not only in our schools and colleges – as we are doing through the INSPIRE programme – but also in our homes, workplaces and communities through all available communication methods, like the high-speed optical fibre National Knowledge Network. Eventually, science must help in establishing an inclusive society that seeks to solve major social problems through the application of science. Second, our scholarship and research must be informed by a keen awareness of our basic social and economic realities. Given the limited resources that we, as a nation, are able to devote to scientific research, it is imperative that we give priority to meeting those challenges which are fundamental to the transformation of our economy. I have already referred to the need to transform India’s agriculture. But there are other equally valid concerns as well which require priority attention. The quest for energy security, sanitation, provision of safe drinking water, labour intensive manufactures and universal healthcare at affordable cost are other areas of high priority concern. Our effort should be to carve out a niche for India’s leadership in some of these areas. Indian industry must play an active part in this process through in-house research centres and, more importantly, through enhanced academia-industry interaction. Third, a holistic organizational approach is essential. There was a time when science took a lonely road, driven by individual enterprise rather than collective effort. This is sub-optimal in the innovation and knowledge-intensive world that is empowering the growth process today. We need cross-fertilization of disciplines and synergy among stakeholders. Government-sponsored research must be supplemented by research in private labs. Academic and research systems must foster innovation and entrepreneurship and therefore link up with those interested in commercial development. In the last few years, we have taken some policy measures in this direction. We have encouraged sharing of and access to Government-owned data for research. We have also created new mechanisms like Innovation Complexes, Technology Business Incubator and Innovation Universities in an effort to bring about convergence of interests among the various players in science. Fourth, international collaboration is vital for increasingly resource-intensive modern science to progress. Economic liberalization and economic growth over the last several years have made it possible

for our scientists to collaborate meaningfully and confidently in the international arena. Let me cite only two outstanding examples. There was significant Indian collaboration with the European Centre for Nuclear Research on the Large Hadron Collider, which led to the discovery of what is believed to be the elusive Higgs boson. The other example is our work with a select group of countries on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

We must partner not only with established leaders in science and technology, but also with emerging innovation powerhouses, many of them in our region. We must also offer our expertise to our neighbours for collective prosperity and progress.

Finally, the quality of our scientific institutions will depend upon the quality of the students we can attract into science, the freedom we give them in pursuing scientific research and the human resource policies we follow in selecting leaders. We must select only the best and we must expand our search to the many Indian scientists abroad who may wish to return to India at least for some years.

The solution of even the simplest of problems related to humanity’s pressing needs often requires first-rate fundamental research. During the last eight years, we have tried to fill this gap by expanding the infrastructure of our scientific research and innovation. We have established five new Indian Institutes of Science Education and Research, eight new Indian Institutes of Technology, sixteen new Central Universities, ten new National Institutes of Technology, six new R&D institutions in the field of biotechnology and five institutions in other branches. It is my hope that all this will significantly raise the quality of scientific research in our country.

Given that science-led innovation is the key to development, the National Innovation Council has also brought the domain of innovation to the foreground, helping translation of knowledge into usable solutions.

The Science, Technology and Innovation Policy 2013 released here today aspires to position India among the top five global scientific powers by the year 2020. It is an ambitious goal. It aims to produce and nurture talent in science, to stimulate research in our universities, to develop young leaders in the field of science, to reward performance, to create a policy environment for greater private sector participation in research and innovation and to forge international alliances and collaborations to meet the national agenda. The Twelfth Five Year Plan, which was approved by the NDC a few days ago, outlines a number of initiatives which will make this possible.

An important step in this direction in the Eleventh Plan was the establishment of the National Science and Engineering Research Board as an autonomous funding body.As pointed out in the Twelfth Plan, this institution proposes to invest in researches of proven track record and establish about 200 to 250 centres based on a grant model with performance reward linkages.

I would like to conclude by recalling Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s immortal lines in which he prayed for a future India where, among other things, a “clear stream of reason” would prevail. I am confident that, in the next five days, this confluence of leading lights of science from home and abroad will throw up useful ideas on how science will shape the future of India. As the Indian Science Congress crosses another milestone, let us pledge to keep alive the passion of its architects for truth that is eternal and beautiful and their dream to lead India to greater heights of knowledge.

Let me also take this occasion to wish all those gathered here a very Happy New Year.”

HON’BLE PRIME MINISTER UNVEILS NEW SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGYAND INNOVATION POLICY

The Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh, unveiled the Science, Technology and Innovation Policy (STI) 2013 by presenting its first copy to the President of India Shri Pranab Mukerjee at the inaugural session of the Centenary session of the Indian Science Congress.

The STI Policy seeks to send a signal to the Indian scientific community, both in the private and public domain, that science, technology and innovation should focus on faster, sustainable and inclusive development of the people. The policy seeks to focus on both STI for people and people for STI. It aims to bring all the benefits of Science, Technology & Innovation to the national development and sustainable and more inclusive growth. It seeks the right sizing of the gross expenditure on research and development by encouraging and incentivizing private sector participation in R & D, technology and innovation activities.

The policy also seeks to trigger an ecosystem for innovative abilities to flourish by leveraging partnerships among diverse stakeholders and by encouraging and facilitating enterprises to invest in innovations. It also seeks to bring in mechanisms for achieving gender parity in STI activities and gaining global competitiveness in select technological areas through international cooperation and alliances. The policy goal is to accelerate the pace of discovery, diffusion and delivery of science led solutions for serving theaspirational goals of India for faster, sustainable and inclusive growth. AStrong and viable Science, Research and Innovation system for High Technology led path for India (SRISHTI) are the goal for the STI policy.

The Key features of the STI policy 2013 are

Promoting the spread of scientific temper amongst all sections of society.

Enhancing skills for applications of science among the young from all social sectors.

Making careers in science, research and innovation attractive enough for talented and bright minds.

Establishing world class infrastructure for R&D for gaining global leadership in some select frontier areas of science.

Positioning India among the top five global scientific powers by 2020(by increasing the share of global scientific publications from 3.5% to over 7% and quadrupling the number of papers in top 1% journals from the current levels).

Linking contributions of Science Research and innovation system with the inclusive economic growth

agenda and combining priorities

of excellence and relevance.

Creating an environment for enhanced private sector participation in R &D.

Enabling conversion of R & D output with societal and commercial applications by replicating hitherto successful models, as well as establishing of new PPP structures.

Seeking S&T based high risk innovation through new mechanisms.

Fostering resource optimized cost-effective innovation across size and technology domains.

Triggering

in the mindset & value systems to recognize respect and reward performances which

create wealth from S&T derived knowledge.

Creating a robust national innovation system.

Aspirations of the Policy

The main aspirational elements of the STI policy are:

Raising Gross Expenditure in Research and Development (GERD) to 2% from the present 1% of the GDP in this decade by encouraging enhanced private sector contribution.

Increasing the number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of R&D personnel in India by at least 66% of the present strength in 5 years.

Increasing accessibility, availability and affordability of innovations, especially for women, differently- abled and disadvantaged sections of society.

Mechanisms

Wide ranging mechanisms are envisaged to be deployed to realize the policy aspirations, a few of these are:

Promoting the spread of scientific temper amongst all sections of society.

Enhancing skill for applications of science among the young from all social strata.

Making careers in science, research and innovation attractive enough for talented and bright minds.

Empowering women through appropriate STI inputs and investments

Facilitating private sector investment in R&D centres in India and overseas.

Promoting establishment of large R&D facilities in PPP mode with provisions for benefits sharing.

Permitting multi stakeholders participation in the Indian R&D system.

Treating R&D in the private sector at par with public institutions for availing public funds.

Bench marking of R&D funding mechanisms and patterns globally.

Aligning Venture Capital and Inclusion Innovation Fund systems.

Sharing of IPRs between inventors and investors.

Modifying IPR policy to provide for marching rights for social good when supported by public funds and for co-sharing IPRs generated under PPP.

Providing incentives for commercialization of innovations with focus on green manufacturing.

Closing gaps in the translation of new findings at the grassroots and the commercial space.

Forging strategic partnerships and alliances with other nations through both bilateral and multilateral cooperation in science, technology and innovation.

Triggering ecosystem changes in attitudes, mindset, values and governance systems of publicly funded institutions engaged in STI activities to recognize, respect and reward performances which create wealth from S&T derived knowledge.

ACTIVITIES IN SECTIONS

Deliberations in the 14 sections commenced with the addresses of Sectional Presidents (Annexure-I) followed by Platinum Jubilee Lectures (Annexure-II) in each section. Symposia on special topics (Annexure- III) and a large number of Invited/Special Lectures were organised by the Sectional Presidents which formed an integral part of the technical programme of the Science Congress.

ISCAYoung Scientists’Programme

Presentation of papers under ISCAYoung Scientists’Programme in the sections were arranged on 4 th January, 2013. This year fourteen young scientists received awards under this programme in recognition of their contributions in respective areas of research. ISCA Young Scientist Awards (Certificate and Cash Award of Rs. 25,000/-) were presented by Prof. M.S.Swaminathan, Former General President, ISCA and Sri. M.K.Narayanan, Hon’ble Governor of West Bengal, on January 7, 2013 at the valedictory programme. Names of those young scientists and titles of their papers are given in Annexure-IV.

Presentation of Contributed Papers (Poster/Oral)

Most of the contributed papers accepted on the basis of screening done by the Sectional Presidents, Local Sectional Secretaries and Experts were presented by way of Posters during January 5-6, 2013. The names judged for Best Poster presenter during the 100 th Indian Science Congress in different sections are given in Annexure-V. Oral presentations of some selected contributed papers were also made in the sections.

ISCA ENDOWMENT LECTURES

The following ISCA Endowment Lectures were delivered during the 100 th Indian Science Congress in different Sections:

Name of the Award

Speaker

Title

Prof. Hira Lal Chakravarty Award Lecture

Sudesh Kumar Yadav IHBT, Palampur (HP)

Exploring Tea Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway Genes for Plants Improvement.

Pran Vora Award

Gyan Prakash Mishra DRDO, Leh, Ladakh

Conventional and Biotechnological In- terventions for Conservation and Sus- tainable Utilization of Local Germplasm to Trans-Himalayan Region of Ladakh.

Prof. Umakant Memorial

Durai Sundar

Molecular tools for Targeted Genome

Award Lecture

IIT Delhi

Engineering.

Dr. B. C. Deb Memorial Award for Popularisation of Science

Dr. (Mrs.) Gouri Ganguly Memorial Award Lecture

Debashis Mandal CSWCRTI, Dehradun

Rajnish Kumar Chaturvedi I.I.T.R., Lucknow

in

Science:Reaping Benefits of Resource

Conservation for Healthier Land Hus- bandry.

Molecular Therapeutic Target Identification and Neural Stem Cell Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders: Prospects of Regenerative Medicine.

The

Farmer-First

Paradigm

Name of the Award

Speaker

Title

Prof S S Katiyar Endowment Lecture

Jitendra P. Khurana University of Delhi, New Delhi

Functional Genomics of Reproductive Development and Abiotic Stress Response in Rice.

Professor R. C. Shah

J. Mathiyarasu

New Polymer-Supported Composite

Memorial Lecture

CERI,Tamilnadu

Systems for Electrochemical Bio- Sensing Applications.

Prof. Archana Sharma MemorialAward Lecture

Prof. (Mrs.) Anima Sen Memorial Lecture

Dr. V. Puri Memorial Award Lecture

A. K. Koul

Baba Ghulam Shah Badshah

Univ., (J&K)

G. P. Thakur

MMHC&CS, New Delhi

Dr R. Raghavendra Rao INSA, Hony. Scientist, Bangalore

Climate

Reproduction and Food Security.

Change,

Crop

Plant

Managing Stress-free life in India Aged.

Guiding Principles and Trends in The Evolution of Angiosperm Flowers.

CHILDREN SCIENCE CONGRESS

The Children Science Congress was inaugurated by former President of India Dr. A.P.J.Abdul Kalam in Kolkata at S.N.Bose National Center for Basic Sciences today. Speaking on the occasion Dr. Kalam said the this Indian science congress standing is on the shoulders of great scientific minds SN Bose, JC Bose, Meghnath Saha, Sir CV Raman, Srinivasa Ramanujan, Homi Bhabha and Vikram Sarabhai and many great scientists. He said would like to share few thoughts on the topic “Excellence in thinking and actions”.

Dr. Kalam asked the young buds present on the occasion to take science as a life mission with excellence in thinking and action by striving to work with their utmost potential. I would like to focus on importance of two great needs: Value to science and scientific magnanimity. He also spoke about energy conservation and building scientific temperament.

Dr. Kalam said “History has proven that those who dare to imagine the impossible are the ones who break all human limitations. In every field of human endeavor, whether science, medicine, sports, the arts, or technology, the names of the people who imagined the impossible and achieved are engraved in our history. By breaking the limits of their imagination, they changed the world.”

The former president also shared his interaction with students in State Children Science Congress (2012) Uttar Pradesh State Science Congress at Barabanki, Southern Regional Science Congress at Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, Mega Science Fair at Darbhanga (Bihar) and National Children Science Congress at Varanasi.

He also referred to the recent development by two teams at the CERN Laboratory towards the discovery of the “God Particle”, a popular name for an elementary particle called Higgs Boson, named

after a great scientist Peter Higgs and Already some progress is being made in this direction in 2011, and it may be possible that within the next few year, we would be able to understand better about the God’s Particle and unravel the mystery of why matter exists and how universe came into being. Dr. Kalam said, I am sure, some of you, as scientists of tomorrow would be finding such sub-atomic, fundamental physics as a research area for your scientific pursuits and would play a vital role in discovering more about this unique area of particle physics.

Presiding over the session, Union Minister Science & Technology and Earth Sciences, Dr. S. Jaipal Reddy said the future of India will be shaped by the emerging force, the youth of the Nation and in the words of Pandit Jawahar Lal Nehru, as he quoted in the “Discovery of India” -.”Old as we are, with memories stretching back to the early dawns of human history and endeavour, we have to grow once again, in tune with our present time, with the irrepressible spirit and joy of youth in the present and its faith in the future.

Shri Reddy said Dr. Kalam, apart from making signal contributions in the field of technology and public life, has made abstruse subjects like science and technology inspiring for children and youth in their impressionable years. Nobody has proved to be a greater source of positive energy and soaring inspiration than him in recent years.

The Minister impressed upon the need to invest in today’s youth, both in terms of resources and mentoring support, as our first Prime Minister Pt. Nehru did in setting up such temples of learning as Atomic Energy Commission and IITs. Our Government realizes the inestimable value of such investments. He urged senior scientists of today to extend all the mentoring support to budding researchers. He said “Let us together build an India which is a leader in science and technology in the world”.

The Minster said we have a dynamic, developed and diversified industrial and service sectors, established on the strength of our own techno-entrepreneurial talents. Our technological achievements are substantial and in certain areas, these are world class. The country today has over 700 R&D, technical and development centres of the top global companies, employing over 150,000 scientists and engineers. This confidence of global majors in our youth has given fillip to some of India’s best and talented young technocrats to become first generation technopreneurs. And, most importantly, all of this has been achieved in a framework of a vibrant pluralistic democracy.

Shri Reddy referred to the scheme “Innovation in Scientific Pursuit for Inspired Research” INSPIRE launched by the Department of Science and Technology and said that Under this scheme around nine lakh awards for youth in the age group of 10-32 years has been provided. Besides this INSPIRE supports science camps for top 1% performers at class level across all school boards. It also provides high value scholarship for study of science courses at undergraduate levels, offers research fellowships for doctoral research and creates assured opportunity for careers with research by providing faculty awards for 5-year contractual assignments and research grants

Referring to the newly announced Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, Shri Reddy said it conveys India’s aspiration to emerge as one of the top global knowledge powers. The new policy also stresses the importance of research that culminates in innovation. It seeks to highlight the need to integrate science, research and innovation to develop valuable technologies. He said we have also initiated a PM Doctoral Research Fellowship in partnership with industry. Already 30 fellowships have been awarded

to doctoral students. To me this is a landmark initiative and I hope that in coming years the young recipients of the Fellowship will be instrumental in shaping a glorious future of science in India, the minister added.

On this occasion some young students from different parts of country were also presented with the ISCA - Infosys Travel Awards by Dr. Kalam.

WOMEN’S SCIENCE CONGRESS

The inauguration of the 2 nd Women’s Science Congress took place on January 4, 2013 as a part of the 100 th Indian Science Congress at the Satyendranath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences in Kolkata. The following dignitaries delivered their addresses in the inaugural session. Shri S.Jaipal Reddy, Hon’ble Union Minister, Science & Technology & Earth Sciences, GoI, Dr. G. Kalonji,ADG, UNESCO, Paris, Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary, DST, GoI, Prof. Suranjan Das, Vice-Chancellor, University of Calcutta, Dr. (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (ScientificActivities), ISCA, Vote of thanks was proposed by Prof. Mamata Ray, Pro-VC (BA&F), University of Calcutta and Convener, WSC-2013.

A panel discussion was held on January 5, 2013 at 10:00 am entitled: Gender Empowerment- Policy Issues. It was chaired by Dr. G. Kalonji, ADG, UNESCO and the eminent panelists were Dr. Sudha Nair, Vice Chairman, Golden Jubilee Biotech Park for Women, Chennai, Dr.Archana Bhattacharya, Ex Director, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Mumbai, Dr. Sanghamitra Banerjee, Professor, ISI, Kolkata, Justice Ruma Pal,Retd. Judge, Supreme Court of India, Dr. Vibha Gupta, Chairperson, Magan Sangrahalaya Samiti (NGO), Wardha.

The second session entitled Women from Academic Sector was chaired by Dr. Archana Bhattacharya Ex Director, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Mumbai at 11:45am on January 5, 2013. The speakers were: Dr. Hemlata J Wankhede, Director, Government Institute of Science, Aurangabad, Prof. Jyoti Das, Retd. Prof. of Mathematics, University of Calcutta, Prof. Chitrani Medhi, Professor of Chemistry, Guwahati University, Guwahati, Prof. Nilanjana Sanyal, Dept. of Psychology, University of Calcutta, Prof. Neerja Agarwal, Professor, Department of Entomology, CSA University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur, Prof. Navrati Saxena,Associate Professor, Sungkyunkwan University, (South Korea).

The third lecture session entitled: Women health and Science took place. It was chaired by Prof. Gourie Devi, Emeritus Professor of Neurology, IHBAS, New Delhi and the speakers were Prof. M.V. Padma,AIIMS, Delhi, Dr. Neeru Singh, Director, Regional Medical Research Centre for Tribals, Jabalpur, Dr. Indira Chakraborty, Former Director, All India Institute of Hygiene &Public Health, Kolkata; Dr. Asha Chandola-Saklani, Consulting Professor Eminence,Apeejay Education Society, Gurgaon, Dr. Sikha Sharma, National Co-Chair (Health), India

On January 6, 2013 at 10:00am, the lecture session entitled: Showcasing Contribution of Women was chaired by Prof. Rohini M. Godbole, IISc, Banglore. The illustrious speakers were Dr. Tessy Thomas, Project Director, Agni V, (C), DRDO, Advanced Systems Laboratory, Hyderabad, Dr. Amudeswari, Director, CICS, Chennai, Dr. Rita Kumar, IGIB, Delhi, Ms. Mirai Chatterjee, Director, SEWA, Managing Trustee, Lok Swasthya Sewa Trust,Ahmedabad

Dr. Y. T. Lee, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry (1986) accompanied by Dr. T. Ramasami, had an interactive session in which he shared his valuable views in an inimitable fashion, on women’s participation in the field of Science & Technology.

The concluding session of Women’s Science Congress – 2013 on January 6, 2013 at 1:30 pm had the following dignitaries Prof. Geetha Bali, General President, 99 th Indian Science Congress- 2012 and Former Vice Chancellor, Karnataka State Women’s University, Dr. ShashiAhuja, Scientist G/Director, DST, Govt. of India, Dr. (Mrs.) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (Scientific Activities), ISCA, Prof. Mamata Ray, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (BA&F), University of Calcutta. Prof. Sumita Jha, Professor of Botany, University of Calcutta proposed the formal vote of thanks.

Among 35 posters 5 were awarded for their distinguished presentation and the certificates of merit were distributed.

SIXTH RASHTRIYA VIGYAN SANCHARAK SAMMELAN

The inauguration of the 6 th Science Communicators’ Meet took place on January 4, 2013 as a part of the 100 th Indian Science Congress at the auditorium of Techno India University at Sector V, Salt Lake, Kolkata. Dr. (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (Scientific Activities), ISCA, gave welcome address. The SCM was formally inaugurated and the book of abstract was formally released by Dr. K. Kasturirangan, Hon’ble Member, Planning Commission, Govt. of India. Dr. Manoj Kumar Chakrabarti, General Secretary, (Membership Affairs), ISCA was also present. Prof. Sekhar Bhattacharjee narrated the objective of the programme. The session was presided by Dr. B. P. Singh, Head, NCSTC, DST, Govt. of India.

The programme consisted of 5 technical sessions where 34 speakers selected from 29 ISCA Chapters from across the country delivered lectures and presented posters. The awardee of B.C.Deb memorial award for popularization of Science, Dr. Debashis Mandal from Central Soil & Water Conservation Research & Training Institute delivered a lecture entitled: “The farmer-first paradigm in science: Reaping benefits of resource conservation for healthier land husbandry.”

Valedictory session of the SCM was held on January 5, 2013. Following were the dignitaries on the dais who delivered their lectures at the valedictory session - Dr.(Mrs.) Vijay Laxmi Saxena - General Secretary (Scientific Activities), ISCA, Prof. Sekhar Bhattacharjee - Chairman, SCM-ISC-2013 summarized the programme, Dr. Manoj Pattariya, DST, GoI, Prof. U.C. Goswami - Gauhati University, and Prof. Suranjan Das - Vice-Chancellor, University of Calcutta. Dr. Amit K De, Executive Secretary, ISCA offered the formal vote of thanks.

SCIENCE EXHIBITION : PRIDE OF INDIA EXPO-100 TH ISC

One of the major attractions of 100 th ISC – the Pride of India (PoI) Expo was held at the Salt Lake Stadium Complex from 3 – 7 January 2013. It was inaugurated by Shri Jaipal Reddy, Hon’ble Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences in presence of Dr. T. Ramasami, Hon’ble Secretary, DST, Prof. Sameer Brahmachari, DG, CSIR and Secretary, DSIR, Dr. Shailesh Nayak, Secretary, Ministry of Earth Sciences and such other dignitaries.

Complimenting the 100 th edition of ISC, the PoI Expo, spread over an area of approx. 12,000 sqm with participation of over 200 organisations was a confluence of new ideas, innovations and products covering the entire canvas of scientific world. Special Pavilions at PoI Expo were “Hall of Pride” (HoP), designed to raise a toast to the life and works of Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru - The first Prime Minister of India and also the General President of Indian Science Congress; Hon’ble Justice Sir Asutosh Mookerjee - A prolific Bengali educator and the first Indian Vice Chancellor of the University of Calcutta and also the first General President (GP) of Indian Science Congress Association (ISCA); “Edu Visionbrought various educational institutions under one roof & other stake holders in education sector; International Pavilion” hosted stalls of different countries showcasing their respective joint R&D/S&T ventures with India.

Vigyan Jyot (VJ) Flame of Knowledge, (conducted since 97 th ISC) organized by MM Activ Sci – Tech Communications is a novel initiative to popularize science and encourage pure science as career amongst the youth thus preparing scientists and innovators for future. VJ was flagged off ceremoniously, mounted on a float on 17 th December 2012 from Delhi to reach University of Calcutta on 2 nd January 2013 by road. It was enthusiastically supported by Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan & National Service Scheme (NSS) of Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports throughout its journey which ensured participation of large number of youth in the VJ programmes held in various educational institutions en- route. The VJ was relit at the site of PoI Expo by Dr. T. Ramasami, and Prof. Samir Brahmachari on 3 rd January 2013 after inauguration of the Expo. This torch remained lit throughout the 100 th ISC inspiring all the visitors at the expo to lead life with scientific temperament.

During the valedictory function, the VJ torch was handed over to Prof. R. C. Sobti, General President (Elect) 101 st ISC by Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary DST and representative of General President, 100 th ISC.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMES

January 3, 2013, Theme Panel Science for Shaping the Future of India

Chairman

Panellists

Convener

Dr. Manmohan Singh Hon’ble Prime Minister of India Dr R Chidambaram DAE Homi Bhabha Chair Professor & Scientific Adviser, GoI Dr M S Swaminathan Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai Dr John Beddington Chief Scientific Adviser, Government of UK Dr T Ramasami

Endowment Lectures/Public Lectures G P Chatterjee Memorial Award 2012-2013 -13

Speaker

Coordinator

Speaker

Coordinator

Chairman

Speaker

Coordinator

Prof Amalendu Bandhopadhyay Kolkata Dr Manoj Kumar Chakrabarty / Dr Amit Krishna De

Children Science Congress Popular Lecture

Dr B N Das Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Public Lecture Sir Asuthosh Mookherjee Session

Dr A K Sharma Dr M S Swaminathan Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai “From ship to mouth to right to food with home grown food” Dr T Ramasami Secretary, Department of Science and Technology, GoI

January 4, 2013 Plenary Lectures M N Saha Session: Exploration & Energy

Chairman

Speakers

Dr R Chidambaram DAE Homi Bhabha Chair Professor & Scientific Adviser, GoI Dr K Kasturirangan Member, Planning Commission, GoI Dr J N Goswami Director, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad

Coordinator

Welcome Address Introduction of Hon’ble Minister Presidential Address Introduction of Chief Guest Key note Address Vote of Thanks

Coordinator

Dr Srikumar Banerjee DAE Homi Bhabha Chair Professor, BARC, Mumbai Maj Gen (Dr) R Sivakumar Head, NRDMS, Department of Science & Technology, GoI

Inauguration Children Science Congress

Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena General Secretary, (Scientific activities), ISCA Prof Suranjan Das Vice Chancellor, University of Calcutta, Kolkata Shri S Jaipal Reddy Hon’ble Minister of Science and Technology and Earth Sciences Dr Arup Raychaudhuri Director, S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Kolkata His Excellency Dr A P J Abdul Kalam

Dr B P Singh Head, NCSTC, Department of Science and Technology, GoI Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Symposia S N Bose Session: Frontiers of Physics

Chairman

Speakers

Coordinator

Prof S K Joshi JNCASR Vikram Sarabhai Professor, NPL, New Delhi Dr Ajay K Sood Department of Physics, IISc, Bangalore “Driven Soft and Granular Matter” Dr Barry Sanders Director, Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Canada Prof Girish. S. Agarwal Noble Foundation Chair and Regents Professor, Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, USA “Perspectives in Quantum Optics” Dr Rohini M Godbole Professor, CHEP, IISc, Bangalore Dr Arup Kumar Raychaudhuri Director, SN Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Kolkata

Symposia P C Ray Session: Frontiers of Chemistry

Chairman

Dr R A Mashelkar CSIR Bhatnagar Fellow, NCL, Pune

Speakers

Dr Animesh Chakravorty Emeritus Professor & Ramanna Fellow, IACS, Kolkata Dr Bimal Banik President’s Endowed Professor, The University of Texas-Pan American, USA “Ringing the Changes for Cancer with Novel â-Lactams:

Coordinator

Chemical Manipulation and Preclinical Evaluation” Dr Ei-ichi Negishi Herbert C. Brown Distinguished Professor & Teijin Limited Director of the Negishi-Brown Institute, Purdue University, USA “Magical Power of Transition Metals – past, present and future” Dr Sourav Pal Director, NCL, Pune Dr Avijit Banerjee Professor, University of Calcutta, Kolkata

Symposia D N Wadia Session: Earth System Sciences

Chairman

Prof Harsh K Gupta

Public Outreach Session: DRDO

Speakers

Member, NDMA, GoI Dr V K Dadhwal

Coordinator

Director, NRS Centre, Department of Space, Hyderabad Prof Jagadish Shukla University Professor, George Mason University President, USA “Predictability and Prediction of Monsoons in the Present and Future Climate.” Dr Ronald Prinn Director, Center for Global Change Science, MIT, USA “Development and application of integrated earth system models” Dr Shailesh Nayak Secretary, Ministry of Earth Sciences, GoI Dr Swati Basu

Director, NCMRWF, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Uttar Pradesh

Coordinator

Dr Radhakrishnan

Public Outreach Session: ICAR

Public Outreach Session: MoES

Inauguration 6 th Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan

Welcome Address Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena General Secretary (Scientific activities), ISCA Objective of the Prof Sekhar Bhattacharjee Programme Chairman, SCM, ISC

Introductory Address Dr B P Singh Head, NCSTC, Department of Science and Technology, GoI Inaugural address and Dr K Kasturirangan

release of the booklet of abstract Address by the Guest

of- Honour Vice-Chancellor, KIIT University

Member, Planning Commission, GoI

Prof P P Mathur

Vote of Thanks

Dr Manoj Kr. Chakraborti

Children Science Congress

Coordinator

General Secretary, Membership Affairs, ISCA Prof Sekhar Bhattacharjee

Chairman, SCM, ISC

Presentation of Projects / Exhibits

Coordinator

Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan: Session I

Chairman

Prof Biswapati Mukherjee

Speakers

Ex. Professor, University of Calcutta, Kolkata Dinesh Mani “The need of science communication” Manojkumar N Shinde “Use of natural antioxidants: A remedy to develop healthy India”

Coordinator

Ramesh Chandra Parida “Science for shaping the future of India- The role of nuclearenergy” R K Rawley “Science for shaping the future of India” Sudesh Bhaskar Ghoderao “To inculcate scientific temper for shaping the future of India” Prof Sekhar Bhattacharjee Chairman, SCM, ISC

Inauguration Women Science Congress

Welcome Address Prof Suranjan Das

Vice Chancellor, University of Calcutta, Kolkata Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena General Secretary, (Scientific activities), ISCA Shri S Jaipal Reddy Hon’ble Minister for Science, Technology and Earth Sciences Dr Gretchen Kalonji

Introductory Remarks

Address by Chief Guest

Address by Guest of

Honour Hon’ble Assistant Director General for Natural Sciences, UNESCO, Paris

Presidential Address

Dr T Ramasami

Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan: Session II

Vote of Thanks

Secretary, Department of Science and Technology, GoI Prof Mamata Ray

Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Calcutta, Kolkata

Chairman

Shri Pathik Guha

Speakers

Neha Grover

“Science in 21st century- The Indian scenario” Puneeta Malhotra “Science renaissance: The need of the hour”

K

Saratchandra Singh

“Dynamics of ethnic groups in Manipur”

A

Srinivas Reddy

“Nurturing creativity: The key to birth future”

L

Veerakumari

Coordinator

“Phototherapeutic antihelminthic drug” Prof Sekhar Bhattacharjee Chairman, SCM, ISC

Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan: Session III (Poster)

PP-01

Asmita Vishwanathrao Dhokrat, H. R. Gite and C. Namrata

Mahender

PP-02

Information and communication science and technology add-on group system for filtered social networking by edge Prafulla Kumar Mohanty

PP-03

Science for shaping the future of India Shariq Ali, Ayesha S. Ali and Santosh Kumar Wastewater recycling using biotechnological principles:Water conservation

strategies for shaping the future of India

PP-04

Archita Bhatta

Children Science Congress- Popular Lecture

PP-05

Communicating natural resource information- historical and current trends Asha Gupta

PP-06

A grass for climate change mitigation and sustainable development Abhimanyu Sharma

PP-07

Green friends for shaping the future of India Sudhir Srivastava

PP-08

Treatment of multiple drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in India Benzir Parvin

PP-09

Science for shaping the future of India Rupali Deshpande

PP-10

Sustainable use of natural resources for making natural dyes B Ravichandrane

PP-11

Mulching- The future prospect of Indian farmers Bharat Neekhra

PP-12

Insects’ biodiversity of India: An approach through Molecular Markers Awnindra K Singh

PP-13

Crop genetic resources: An adaptive potential for food security, climate change and crop diversification R Sivakumar

PP-14

Science for shaping the future of India G Mustafa Shah

PP-15

Population growth a threat to biodiversity T Rajya Lakshmi

PP-16

Sensitization of biodiversity to local women community- Role of women organization P N Narasegowda

Coordinator

Prof Sekhar Bhattacharjee

Chairman, SCM, ISC

Speaker

Prof S K Chakrabarti

Co ordinator

“Story of the Universe: From the smaller Scale to the Largest scale” Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Chairman

January 5, 2013 Plenary Session Homi Bhabha Session : Mega Science and India Dr Anil Kakodkar

Women Science Congress

Children Science Congress

Speakers

DAE Homi Bhabha Chair Professor, BARC, Mumbai Dr Bikash Sinha

Coordinators

Homi Bhabha Chair Professorship to Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, DAE, Kolkata Dr S S Hasan Former Director, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore Dr Horst Stoecker Scientific Director, GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research Germany Dr G Rajasekaran The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai Dr Rolf-Dieter Heuer Director-General, CERN, Geneva Dr Praveer Asthana

Chairperson

Head, Autonomous S&T Institution and Nano Mission, Department of Science & Technology, GoI Dr B. Purniah Head, International Studies Division, DAE, Mumbai

Panel Discussion: Gender Empowerment- Policy Issues Dr G Kalonji

Panelists

Hon’ble, Assistant Director General, UNESCO, Paris Dr Archana Bhattacharya

Former Director, Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Mumbai Prof Sanghamitra Banerjee Professor, ISI, Kolkata Justice Ruma Pal Former Justice, Supreme Court of India Dr Sudha Nair Former Senior Director, MS Swaminathan Research Foundation Chennai Dr Vibha Gupta Magan Sangralaya, Wardha

Presentation of Projects / Exhibits

Coordinator

Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Chairman

Symposia U N Brahmachari Session: Fourth Paradigm Dr R Ramamurthi Former VC, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati

Speakers

Coordinator

Chairman

Speakers

Coordinator

Chairman

Speakers

Dr Alex Szalay Alumni Centennial Professor, The Johns Hopkins University, USA Dr Kenneth H Buetow Director, Computational Sciences & Informatics Core Program, USA

Dr Stephen Wolff InterimVice President & ChiefTechnology Officer, internet2,Washington,

DC

Dr Vijay Chandru Chairman & CEO, Strand Life Sciences, Bangalore Dr Ashok Kolaskar Former Vice Chancellor KIIT Univ. Bhubaneswar

Symposia DS Kothari Session: Universities in Shaping the Future of India Dr S S Katiyar Former Vice Chancellor (Kanpur University) Prof Deepak Pental, Former Vice Chancellor (Delhi University) Prof S C Lakhotia Emeritus Professor & DAE-Raja Ramanna Fellow Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, BHU, Varanasi Prof Lalji Singh Vice Chancellor, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi Prof Seyed Hasnain Former Vice Chancellor (University of Hyderabad) “Need to Re-Prioritize Higher Education Funding to Ensure Greater Inclusivity and Promote Excellence” Dr Ashok Kumar Saxena Emeritus Fellow, UGC, DAV College, Kanpur

Symposia H Khurana Session: Biology of Future Dr Manju Sharma Former Secretary, Department of Bio-Technology, GoI Dr Amitabha Chattopadhyay, Outstanding Scientist (Director Level), CCMB, Hyderabad

DrAnanda Mohan Chakrabarty, Distinguished University Professor, University of Illinois, USA “Cancer therapy and prevention: Current status and future

prospects”

Dr Dronamraju Krishna Rao President, Foundation for Genetic Research, Houston, USA “Hybrid technologies: Synthetic Biology, Nano-Biotechnology, and

Human Gene Therapy”

Coordinator

Dr Vijaylakshmi Ravindranath Professor & Chair, Centre for Neuroscience, IISc, Bangalore Prof Arun Lahiri Majumdar Plant Molecular and Cellular Genetics, Bose Institute, Kolkata

Chairperson

Women Science Congress: Session I Women from Academic Sector Prof Malabika Sarkar

Public Outreach Session: DOS

Speakers

Vice Chancellor, Presidency University, Kolkata Prof Chitrani Medhi

Professor of Chemistry, Guwahati University, Guwahati Dr Hemlata J Wankhede Director, Government Institute of Science, Aurangabad Prof Jyoti Das Retd. Professor of Mathematics, University of Calcutta Dr Navrati Saxena Associate Professor, Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea Prof Neerja Agarwal Professor, Department of Entomology, CSA University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur Prof Nilanjana Sanyal Professor of Psychology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata

Public Outreach Session: ICMR

Public Outreach Session: DBT

Coordinator

Dr. Madan Mohan and Dr. Bindu Dey

Coordinator

Children Science Congress Presentation of Projects / Exhibits Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Chairperson

Women Science Congress: Session II Women Health and Science Prof Gourie Devi

Speakers

Emeritus Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology, IHBAS, New Delhi Dr Indra Chakraborty Former Director, All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata Dr. Neeru Singh Director, Regional Medical Research Centre for Tribals, Jabalpur Prof M.V. Padma Department of Neurology, AIIMS, New Delhi Dr Vijaylakshmi Ravindranath Professor & Chair, Centre for Neurosciences, IISc, Bangalore

Chairman

Speaker

Chairman

Speakers

Chairman

Speakers

Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan – Invited Lecture Prof A R Thakur Vice Chancellor, TIU Dr Debashis Mandal Central Soil and Water Consurvation Research and Training Institute

Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan – Session IV Prof Santosh Kumar Former Vice Chancellor, Barkatullah Univeristy, Bhopal Anil Dixit “Science for shaping the future of India: The role of science communication amongst common people and policy makers” Arnab Bhattacharya “Chai and why?”- Going beyond a science-cafe to get public excited about science” Kuldeep K Sharma “Science in shaping the future of India: Aquaculture and fisheries perspective” Monalisha Banerjee “Science for shaping the future of India” Rohit Mohan “Societal aspect of iron deficiency in India and its future management”

Mohan “Societal aspect of iron deficiency in India and its future management” Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan –
Mohan “Societal aspect of iron deficiency in India and its future management” Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan –
Mohan “Societal aspect of iron deficiency in India and its future management” Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan –

Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan – Session V

Prof Pattanaik Rector, KIIT University B P Bhaskar “Soil science for shaping future of India” Dinakar R Ampasala “Future Research perspective in Indian biopesticides” Ela Tiwary “Studies on traditional medicinal plants and futuristic approach towards developing India” Madala Suguna “Treatment of water for the removal of Arsenic(III) from aqueous solution by glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan beads” S Ramakrishna “Silk industry in India- An overview” M Sankaran, V Damodaran, D R Singh and S Dam Roy “Biodiversity of coconut for livelihood opportunity of Bay Island farmers”

January 5, 2013 Women Science Congress: Poster Session

1. Antara Kundu

ATwo Warehouse Inventory Model with Stochastic Demand, controllable Lead Time and Fuzzy Present Value with Budget constraint and surprise function

2. Anindita Biswas

Isolation and functional characterization of compounds from Alstonia scholaris

3. Anindita Seal

BjYSL6- A long distance transporter of Cadmium?

4. Chhandasi GuhaRoy Sarkar

Interaction of 2-(Arylazo)phenols With Rhodium Cyclometalation, Alcohol Condensation and C-N Bond Formation

5. Geetanjali Sundaram

Atf1: a cell cycle accelerator and novel regulator of Cdc2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

6. G Dhanavathy

Antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract of Memecylon edule RoxB (MELASTOMATACEAE) on FPG

of

STZ–induced Swiss albino rats and Morphology study of islet cells

7.

K Indira Petchiammal

Molecular characterization of cultivated and wild species of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.)Millspaugh.)

using Simple Sequence Repeat markers

8.

Meenu Verma

A

brief Review about Allium sativum (Garlic)

9.

Nirupama Panda

Innovative approaches for entrepreneurship of ornamental fish by rural women in North Eastern Region of India

10. Padmavathi Godavarthy

Hyperglycemia and HypoInsulinemia as a Stress Induced Response to Starvation in Climbing Perch,

Anabas testudineus(Bloch)

11. Rituparna Acharya

Developing prospective anti-cancer drug delivery systems

12. Madhura Bose

Pongamia pinnata Seed Oil has preventive role in rat adjuvant induced

arthritis

13. Samita Kundu

Thyroid Hormone Homeostasis in adult mammalian brain: An interplay of genomic and non-genomic processes

14. Sanghamitra Sengupta

Genetic Diversity of Apical Membrane Antigen-1 of Plasmodium falciparum in Isolates of Kolkata

15. Soumita Kundu

An EOQ Model For Deteriorating Items With Fuzzy Demand And Fuzzy Partial Backlogging Parameter

16. Sujaya Das

Genetic diversity and combining ability in mungbean(Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) for yield and quality

17.

Sumana Bera

An Inventory Model for Deteriorating Items under Conditionally Permissible Delay in Payments depending

on the order quantity

18. Sumana Saha

A buyer-vendor EOQ model with time varying holding cost involving lead time as a decision variable on a

Stackelberg game in supply chain

19. Sunila Banerjee Mitra

Impact of Music therapy on Diseases

20. Rishna Dalui

Evaluation of Changes in Cardiorespiratory Responses and Endurance Capacity in Healthy Female University Studentsof Kolkata during Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle

21. Sangita Paul

VO2max and PFI in 14–16 Years of Male Sprinters and Soccer Players : a Comparative Study

22. Sudeshna Mukherjee

Gold coated EGCG nanoparticle: synthesis, characterization and evaluation of in vitro anti-oxidant properties

23. Angira Das

Sesame Honey: A source of Nutraceutical

24. Vijayalakshmi Venkatesan

Mesenchymal Stem Cells As Feasible In Vitro Tool To Study Basis Of Disease

25. T Rajya Lakshmi,

The rule of Science & Technology in empowering women for the development of the country

26. Mansha Kotwani

A Model to Study the Impact of Buffers on Calcium Diffusion in Fibroblasts Cell

27. A Rajalakshmi

A study of efficacy and potency of veterinary vaccines

28. Jayati Das

Development of GIS based information system on health mapping of respiratory disorders among bidi workers in C.D. blocks Bankura I & II of district Bankura, West Bengal

29. Tanmoyita Nayak

The study of DNA Damage by the anti-obesity drugs (Sibutramin and Orlistat) along with the influence of

Caffeine

30. Ishita Bhattacharjee

Validity of Queen’s College Step Test to Predict VO2max in Bengalee School Girls

31. Prapti D. Deshmukh-Patil

Computer aided technique to detect breast cancer at earlier stage : Step To Decline Mortality Rate Amongst

Women

32. Himani Bhattachcharya

Eating attitudes among Higher Secondary School students

33. Sudipta Ghosh

Chronic Energy Deficiency and Morbidity among Santhals of West Bengal, India

34. S Karpagam

A study of internet usage among faculty members and students of Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, India

35.

Seema Singh

Empowerment of women through food & nutrition security in Dumka district of Jharkhand

36. Manju Tembhre

Women Empowerment through Organizing the Unorganized – imperatives and Initiatives

37. Soma Das

Isolation of tannin from de-oiled seeds of sal (Shorea robusta) and determination of its in vitro anti- oxidative properties

38. Sanjukta Kar

Development of Nutritionally Enriched Health Beneficial Peanut Butter like Spread Products

39. Mayurakshi Nag

Dynamics of network of threshold coupled bistable maps

40. Barnali Pal

Dynamics of low dimensional model for weakly relativistic Zakharov equations for plasmas

41. Kaushiki Mukherjee

Correlations In Trilocality Scenario

Welcome Address

Summarization of SCM 2013 Special Address

Address by the Guest of Honour Valedictory address and Distribution of prizes Vote of thanks

Valedictory Session Vigyan Sancharak Sammelan Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena General Secretary (Scientific Activities), ISCA Prof Sekhar Bhattacharjee Chairman, SCM-ISC2013 Dr Manoj Pattairiya Department of Science and Technology, GoI Prof U C Goswami Gwahati University Prof Suranjan Das Vice chancellor, University of Calcutta Dr Amit K De, Executive Secretary, ISCA

Chairman

Speaker

Coordinator

Speaker

Co-ordinator

Public Lecture Prof Asis Datta Professor of Eminence, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, New Delhi Prof Samuel Ting Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Physics, MIT, USA Prof Sibaji Raha Senior Professor of Physics & Director Bose Institute, Kolkata

Professor of Physics & Director Bose Institute, Kolkata Children Science Congress Popular Lecture Prof P B
Professor of Physics & Director Bose Institute, Kolkata Children Science Congress Popular Lecture Prof P B
Professor of Physics & Director Bose Institute, Kolkata Children Science Congress Popular Lecture Prof P B

Children Science Congress Popular Lecture Prof P B Pal “The history and Mystery of Calendars” Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Congress Popular Lecture Prof P B Pal “The history and Mystery of Calendars” Dr Basab Choudhury

Chairman

Speakers

Coordinator

Chairman

Speakers

Coordinator

Chairman

January 06, 2013 Plenary Lectures N Borlaug Session: Sustainability Science & Climate Change Dr R K Pachauri Director-General, TERI, New Delhi Dr Pradipto Ghosh Distinguished Fellow, TERI, New Delhi Dr J Srinivasan Chairman, Divecha Centre for Climate Change and Professor, Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, IISc, Bangalore Dr Yuan Tseh Lee Distinguished Research Fellow,Academia Sinica, Taiwan “Sustainable transformation and future earth” Coordinator Dr Sudha Nair Former Senior Director, MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai Dr Aurobindo Mitra Scientist G, Department of Science and Technology, GoI

MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai Dr Aurobindo Mitra Scientist G, Department of Science and Technology, GoI

Children Science Congress Presentation of Projects / Exhibits Dr Basab Choudhury / Dr Rajib Mitra

Symposia C V Raman Session: Materials Science Dr P Rama Rao Chairman, ARCI, Hyderabad Prof Bhupendra N Dev Senior Professor, IACS, Kolkata Dr Peter Littlewood Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences and Engineering, ANL, USA Dr Purushottam Jena Distinguished Professor, Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA Prof DD Sharma Professor & Chairman SSCU, IISc, Bangalore Prof Gour P Das Senior Professor, IACS, Kolkata

USA Prof DD Sharma Professor & Chairman SSCU, IISc, Bangalore Prof Gour P Das Senior Professor,
USA Prof DD Sharma Professor & Chairman SSCU, IISc, Bangalore Prof Gour P Das Senior Professor,

Symposia S Ramanujan Session (Frontiers in Mathematics) Prof R P Bambah, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics, Panjab University, Chandigarh

Speakers

Prof Sir James Mirrlees

Symposia

Science Congress: Session III

Coordinator

Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, UK Prof M S Narasimhan TIFR, Centre for Applicable Mathematics, Bangalore Prof M S Raghunathan Distinguished Professor, IITB, Mumbai Prof Srinivasa S R Varadhan Courant institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, USA Dr Bimal Roy

Chairman

Director, ISI, Kolkata

Ronald Ross Session: Drugs & Pharma Dr N K Ganguly

Speakers

National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi Prof RC Deka

Coordinator

Director, AIIMS, New Delhi Dr Kalpana Chakraburtty Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA Dr Tushar K Chakravorty, Director, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow Dr Manoj Kumar Chakraborty

Chairperson

Scientist F, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Kolkata

Showcasing Contributions of Women Ms Meena Gupta

Speakers

Former Secretary, MoEF, GoI Dr A Amudeswari Director, Centre for International Co-operation in Science, Chennai Dr TK Anuradha Head, G SAT 12, ISRO, Bangalore Ms Mirai Chatterjee Managing Trustee, Lok Swasthya Sewa Trust,Ahmedabad Dr Rita Kumar Chief Scientist, IGIB, New Delhi Dr Tessy Thomas Project Director, Agni V, Advanced Systems Laboratory, Hyderabad

Welcome Address

Report of the meeting

Address by Guest-of- Honour

Women Science Congress: Concluding Session Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena General Secretary, (Scientific activities), ISCA Prof Mamata Ray Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Calcutta, Kolkata Prof Geeta Bali Former President, ISCA

Overview

Ms Shashi Ahuja

Vote of Thanks

Scientist G, DST, GoI Prof. Sumita Jha

Chairperson

University of Calcutta, Kolkata Children Scientist Meet Dr S C Pakrashi

Speakers

Former President, ISCA Dr Bhaskar Saha Scientist F, NCCS, Pune Dr Govindasamy Mugesh Associate Professor, IISc, Bangalore Dr T Ramasami Secretary, Department of Science and Technology, GoI Dr Shanker Doraiswamy Scientist E II, NIO, Goa Prof V K Singh Director, IISER, Bhopal Dr Tarun Kant Scientist E, Arid Forest Research Institute, Jodhpur, Rajasthan

Coordinator

Public Outreach Session: DAE Dr S K Malhotra Head, PublicAwareness Division, DAE

Coordinator

Public Outreach Session: CSIR Dr B K Mishra Director, IMMT Dr Siddharth Ray Director, IICB, Kolkata

Public Outreach Session: DST

Chairman

January 7, 2013 Plenary Session C Subramanian Session: Biodiversity Conservation and Food Security Dr M S Swaminathan Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai

Speakers

Dr Ashok Khosla

Symposia

Coordinator

President of IUCN and Chairman, Development Alternatives, New Delhi “Secure Access to Food needs Secure and Healthy Ecosystem” Dr Balakrishna Pisupati Chairman, National BiodiversityAuthority, Chennai Dr A Damodaran Chair Professor IPR Chair on IP Management (MHRD), IIM, Bangalore Dr Indrani Chandrasekharan Adviser, Planning Commission “Need for Coordinated approaches to Conservation in India” Dr Sachin Chaturvedi Senior Fellow Research and Information System for Developing Countries, New Delhi Dr R Ramamurthi

Chairman

Formerly VC, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati

Vikram Sarabhai Session: Probing the Universe Prof Yash Pal

Speakers

National Research Professor & National Mahatma Gandhi Fellow, New Delhi Dr Amitabha Ghosh, IITK

Coordinator

Dr Amitabha Ghosh Chair, Science Operations Working Group, Mission Operations NASA Mars Exploration Rover Mission “Destination Mars: The Search for Life and Water on the Red Planet” Dr Sandip Kumar Chakrabarti Senior Professor & Head, Department of Astrophysics & Cosmology S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Kolkata “Probing the Universe with the darkest torch: the Astrophysical Black Holes” Dr R Wielebinski Professor, Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Germany “Radio Astronomy: A window to study the Universe” Dr Sanjay K Ghosh Department of Physics & Centre for Astroparticle Physics & Space Science, Bose Institute, Kolkata

Chairman

Speakers

Coordinator

Chairman

Speakers

Coordinator

Chairman Speakers Coordinator Chairman Speakers Coordinator Chairman Chief Guest Symposia M Vishveshwaraya Session:

Chairman

Chief Guest

Symposia M Vishveshwaraya Session: Manufacturing/Infrastructure Dr T Ramasami Secretary, Department of Science & Technology, GoI Prof Ashok Jhunjhunwala, Professor, Dept of Electrical Engineering, IIT, Chennai Dr Jaanaki Gooneratne Head, Food Technology Section, Industrial Technology Institute Sri Lanka “Innovation to Food Manufacture” Dr M M Sharma Former Director, University Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai Dr V Sumantran Executive Vice Chairman, Ashok Leyland Ltd Dr Anjan Das Executive Director-Technology, Confederation of Indian Industry, New Delhi

Confederation of Indian Industry, New Delhi Symposia G N Ramachandran Session: Frontiers of Biology Dr
Confederation of Indian Industry, New Delhi Symposia G N Ramachandran Session: Frontiers of Biology Dr
Confederation of Indian Industry, New Delhi Symposia G N Ramachandran Session: Frontiers of Biology Dr

Symposia G N Ramachandran Session: Frontiers of Biology Dr R C Sobti Former Vice-Chancellor, Panjab University, Chandigarh Prof Michael J Waring Cambridge University Professor of Chemotherapy, Department of Pharmacology, UK Dr Raghavendra Gadagkar INSA SN Bose Research Professor & JC Bose National Fellow, Centre for Ecological Sciences, IISc, Bangalore Dr Virandar S Chauhan Director, New Delhi Component, ICGEB, New Delhi Dr (Mrs) Vijay Laxmi Saxena General Secretary (Scientific activities), ISCA

Saxena General Secretary (Scientific activities), ISCA Special Session Satish Dhawan Session: Networking &
Saxena General Secretary (Scientific activities), ISCA Special Session Satish Dhawan Session: Networking &

Special Session Satish Dhawan Session: Networking & Governance

Valedictory Function Shri M K Narayanan Chairman Host Committee, 100 th ISC Dr M S Swaminathan Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai

100 t h ISC Dr M S Swaminathan Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor MS Swaminathan Research

100 TH INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS 3-7 JANUARY, 2013, KOLKATA

RECOMMENDATIONS OF SECTIONAL COMMITTEES (AS RECEIVED FROM SECTIONAL PRESIDENTS)

Agricultural and Forestry Sciences

1. Integrated farming system model involving livestock and dairy sector is essential for ushering evergreen revolution in the country.

2. Group farming consisting of a collective approach of a farming community to work together with appropriate work distribution is needed for livelihood security of resource poor farmers.

3. Custom hiring, market intelligence, family-farming agribusiness, use of cooperative system model for procurement of farm produce of government needs to be promoted to ensure best economic return to farming community.

4. There is a need to develop new watershed models involving principles of convergence, collective action, capacity building and consortium for technical backstopping for improving productivity in rainfed areas. Watersheds should be developed in a business model through knowledge based entry points and the benefits must be shared among the farmers.

5. ICAR models like promoting village climate risk management committees, capacity building among farmers, building social capital, encouraging farmer innovations, farming and rural employment for social harmony (FRESH),linking farmers to markets, FARMERS FIRST and STUDENT READY, women empowerment through mechanization, National Initiative for Climate Resilient Agriculture ( NICRA) need to be popularized in participatory research mode.

6. Major challenges for second green revolution are less availability of arable lands, water scarcity, low productivity, declining soil health, small holdings of farmers, declining biodiversity, climate change, low purchasing power of farmers, poor marketing etc. Therefore, opportunities lie with developing genetically modified crops which can alleviate abiotic stress (RAPB gene), stress resilient crop varieties, C4 rice and potato cultivars and biofortification of cereals with Fe and other essential nutrients

7. Eastern India is a sleeping giant with immense resources and potentiality. The second green revolution must start from this region through use of improved cultivars, enhancing input use efficiency, soil health improvement, decreasing post harvest loss and value addition, increasing income of farmers and developing climate resilient agricultural technologies.

8. There is a need for farm innovations and significant breakthrough in the technologies through high density vertical farming, roof top gardening, protected agriculture and precision farming, water saving techniques, public-private-partnership(PPP) etc .

9. Frontier scientific tools and long term strategy and policy research are required to mitigate the impact of climate change on agriculture.

10. Imparting training and education to youth for adoption of agriculture science as career and knowledge sharing with farming community is essential

11.

Small and marginal farmers produce 80% of farmland and support 2.5 billion people. Therefore “National Year for family farming” needs to be celebrated with enhanced investment in agriculture for improving livelihood of agri-based people

12. Like in China, proportion of high yielding hybrids should increase in our country to cover half of the area so that it can produce additional 5000 tons of food from same area. Similarly efforts should be undertaken for developing hybrids in pigeon pea crop

13. Protection of valuable agricultural land, prevention of its fragmentation and consolidation together with effective Government interventions and policy support should be accorded top priority

Animal, Veterinary and Fisheries Sciences

1. Special emphasis needs to be given for development of mariculture with focus on open sea cage fish farming and enclosure farming technology in floodplain wetland and reservoirs for enhancing shellfish and finfish production in the country

2. Technologies need to be upgraded for utilization of inland saline areas in the country for shrimp production

3. Environment flow requirements in major river basins of the country need to be worked out to develop strategies for restoration of degraded habitats and fisheries

4. India needs to take lead in tropical ecological research initiatives with focus on riverine fisheries resources for sustainable rural livelihood development. A tropical Chapter is proposed to undertake the leadership across the temperature gradient along the equator.

5. Bringing major river systems under the concurrent list and establishing single authority to ensure holistic management of riverine health and fisheries integrating ecosystem based approaches.

6. Taxonomical aspects have been grossly neglected during recent past. However, this branch of science is of critical importance for conducting ecological and biodiversity related research and assessment of the ecological integrity of the rivers for implementation of amelioration / conservation measures.

7. Development of modern animal health management system with serological, molecular and sensor based diagnostic tools for various diseases diagnosis and new vaccines for disease control should be given priority.

8. Bioprospecting of flora and fauna, both terrestrial and aquatic, for value addition and their utilization for human benefits

9. There is need for management and research input for increasing milk, meat and egg yield per animal/ bird and explore possibilities of transgenic and high yielding animal/ bird and feed and fodder production.

10. Integrated farming needs to be promoted on a wider scale with newer components for production of diversified edible biomass; sustainable increase in productivity and re-cycling of materials for overall economic viability.

11. Icthyofaunal diversity in India is under threat due to various factors like climate change, pollution, disease outbreak, overfishing, etc. There is need for holistic assessment of biodiversity and the drivers that affect it and plan and implement mitigation action plans.

12.

Proper documentation of ITKs to formulate future research programs to manage animal and fishery resources in the country.

13. A Dynamic National Informatics System with database on resources, production and productivity, socio-economics, etc. both in animal sciences and fisheries should be developed and established for informed decision support and planning.

14. Biodiversity rich Island ecosystems need to be conserved and sustainably exploited.

15. Programme should be developed and implemented for the development of specialized human resource for fish health management with basic background in fishery science.

Anthropological and Behavioural Sciences (including Archaeology and Psychology & Educational Sciences and Military Sciences)

1. Application of human sciences should be given greater prominence in policy making for shaping the future of society, especially with regards to socially marginalized groups for an inclusive society.

2. Promoting action research to further and understanding the phenomenon of social and political violence and to mitigate its impact by making the individuals and communities more productive resources for shaping the future of India.

Chemical Sciences

1. It is recommended that the quality of chemistry teachers of schools and colleges be upgraded for building solid base and for creating more excitement amongst children to opt for careers in chemical sciences.

2. It is proposed to device effective ways and means to improve quality of Ph.D. work in chemical sciences.

3. Recommendations are made to strengthen teaching of Nuclear and Radio-chemistry at graduate and post-graduate levels in all colleges and universities to cater to the impending demand of highly trained manpower in the wake of expanding nuclear energy needs of our country.

4. It is recommended that citation impact of publications in chemical sciences shall be enhanced by improving the quality of research.

5. Less than 3% Bhatnagar awardees and less than 1% INSA fellows are women. Hence, a balancing act is needed while top awards in chemical sciences are decided.

Earth System Sciences

1. Focused research should be taken up to develop system early warning of Earthquake.

2. Efforts to be strengthened to ensure safe potable water to everyone, specially in the rural areas

3. Research towards developing action plan for mitigating the impact of climate change.

Engineering Sciences

Technologies for sustainable energy are to be developed and implemented through application of material and environment friendly process and R & D are needed further in the area of renewable energy.

Environmental Sciences

1. Use of Bio-pesticides and Bio- fertilizers should be promoted for Environmental friendly agriculture.

2.

Microbial remediation, phytoremediation and other related technologies are essentially needed for solving environmental pollution related problems, such research and development activities should immediately be initiated, concerning all the stake holders.

3. Development of green technologies are need of the hour, energy options such as solar and nuclear as well as bio-mass energy are to be explored in its best possible way. All possible safe guards are recommended to be taken for nuclear energy so that the efficiency and advantage can be optimized fully.

4. Climate change impacts, mitigation and adaptations strategies should be addressed. Special emphasis should be given to ecologically sensitive areas in India.

5. Safe access to pure drinking water must be ensured. Studies are recommended or maintaining the quality of both surface and ground drinking water.

6. Exploration, inventrization, documentation and conservation of biodiversity are recommended to be completed at the earliest.

7. Habitat conservation with special emphasis on wetlands, Mountains, Forest, Coast and riverines are recommended.

Information and Communication Science & Technology (including Computer Sciences)

1. To formulate policies, programmes and ICT applications to reach the rural communities, Urban poors, school children, Agriculture based people and other deprived classes to minimize poverty, ignorance, illiteracy, Malnutrition and basic miseries to improve the livelihood and life styles of the citizens.

2. To government, civil societies, Scientific & Technical bodies to promote ICT applications with availability of minimum ICT tools, band width for Network applications to schools & Colleges, Gram Panchayats, NGOs & Women organization to minimise the digital divide.

3. To promote computing and IT power in the areas of Health Care, Agrobased activities and Scientific Research to help develop non-expensive and people friendly hardware & software for proper development the related beneficiary groups.

4. To central & State Governments for allocating sufficient funds to promote the ICT applications in all developmental areas & fields for the inclusive growth with ICT applications.

Materials Science

1. High-energy materials

2. Development of science and technology of biomaterials

Medical Sciences (including Physiology)

1. Topromote research works on cognitive and neuro degenerative diseases (particularly Alzheimers’s and Parkinsons). More funds are needed to pursue research in these area.

2. Musculosketetal disorders are on the rise in India. Policy to be framed in such a way that researches in this area get stimulated with more projects and funds. Disorders due to occupation be given priority.

3. To promote research works on the ameliorative role of natural products against neuro-degenerative disorders, cancers, diabetes, different types of cardio myopathies and nutritional deficiency diseases.

New Biology (including Biochemistry, Biophysics & Melecular Biology and Biotechnology)

1. The need for early diagnosis of various diseases (like cancer, hepatitis) and understanding their biology is required to be explored in a large scale with imaging, nanoparticles and other methods for early intervention

2. Focus should be to improve and develop methodologies for assessing tumor response as well as to initiate newer methods of treatment like stem cell therapy targeted delivery etc.

Plant Sciences

1. A special effort be made to develop a post-graduate course which will impart knowledge about the principles of explorations, documentation, collection, domestication, cultivation and reproduction of RET species from the wild and conserve them and reintroduce to their natural habitats.

2. Personnel trained in taxonomy in the AICOPTAX programme or after offering advance courses in taxonomy should be employed at the entry point in Botanical Survey of India and Zoological Survey of India (after due assessment) so that they will fill in the positions that will fall vacant after retirement of the present scientists.

3. Establish international collaboration for planning research on biosystematics, phylogeny and evolutionary biology.

4. India had a lead in chromosome botany. Unfortunately most of the schools that were pursuing this work switched over to more fashionable branches like cell and molecular biology. The result is that three fourths of flowering plants in India have not even been censored for chromosome number. There is need to resurrect chromosome botany.

5. In view of the imminent adverse effects of climate change on the reproductive phase of plants, there is need to study reproductive biology to expose the intricacies of plant reproduction.

OTHER ACTIVITIES

ISCA CHAPTERS

The Association started organizing popular science lectures in different centers in India from 1962- 63. This scheme envisaged constructive work for the popularization and advancement of science throughout the year. Till 1985-86 these lectures were delivered at seventeen centers spread over the country. These activities were restructured with the formation of Regional Chapters of the Association. One of the major objectives of the Association is to inculcate scientific temper among people and to encourage young scientists to develop steadily by involving them in the programme relevant to fundamental, experimental and operational activities. To further these objectives ISCA Chapters had been stated from 1986-87. In 2012-2013 there were Twenty nine ISCA Chapters, situated at different places of the Country. Those are at Allahabad, Amravati, Aurangabad, Banasthali, Bangalore, Baroda, Bhopal, Bhubaneswar, Chandigarh, Chennai,Coimbatore, Delhi, Gwahati, Hyderabad, Imphal, Jaipur, Jammu, Kanpur, Karnal, Kolkata, Mumbai, Nagpur, Patiala, Pondicherry, Port-Blair, Sagar, Shillong, Tirupati, Visakhapatnam.

The Association celebrated its centenary year in this year. Like wise centenary year had been celebrated in ISCA Chapters. ISCA Chapters had organized Two Day Programme on the Focal Theme of 100 th Science Congress -“Science for Shaping the Future of India”. In addition three chapters selected for holding Regional Science Congress. The schedule as celebrated by different chapters is given below :

The Schedule:

July, 2012

:

Kolkata 27-28, Mumbai 14

August, 2012

:

Amravati 11-12,Aurangabad 22-23, Banasthali 24-25, Bangalore 30-31, Imphal

 

27-28

September, 2012 :

Shillong 27-28, Sagar 30 Sept-Oct 1 Baroda-Western Regional Science Congress 15-16 September

October, 2012

:

Jaipur 6-7, Bhubaneswar 17-18, Chandigarh 22-23, Tirupati 27- 28, Bhopal

 

30-31

November, 2012

:

Nagpur 9-10, Allahabad 9-10, Jammu 19-21, Hyderabad 28-29, Delhi-Northern Regional Science Congress 26-27 November

December, 2012

:

Kanpur 3-4, Chennai 17-18, Port Blair 20-21 Coimbatore-Southern Regional Science Congress 15-16 December

January, 2013

:

Patiala 24-25

March, 2013

:

Pondicherry 15-16

Besides above North Eastern Science Congress was organized in Itanagar,Arunachal Pradesh from 11-13 March, 2013.

Chapter Conveners were requested to give a brief presentation of the activities of their Chapter during the Centenary year (maximum 3 slides) on January 6, 2013. A book delineating the Nationwide Celebration of the Centenary session of the Indian Science Congress in all ISCA Chapters was released during the inaugration of the Science Congress.

PROGRAMME ON OFFICIAL LANGUAGE

Hindi Week was inaugurated in The Indian Science Congress Association on 13.09.12 by organising Hindi Workshop. In this Workshop Chief Guest was Shri Mohammad Shamim Ansari, Hindi Officer, Marine House. This programme was presided by Dr. Amit Krishna De, Executive Secretary. In this programme Dr.Arun Kumar Pandey,Asstt. Executive Secretary was also present.In Hindi Week (13.09.12 - 19.09.12) various competitions were kept and the staff members enjoyed to participate in it.On 18.09.12 National Seminar was celebrated.The Focal Theme of this Seminar was “Bharat Ke Bhavishya Ko Aakar Dene Ke Liye Vigyan”.In this programme Dr. Manoj Kumar Chakrabarti,General Secretary (Membership Affairs), Er. Nilangshu Bhushan Basu, Treasurer and Dr.Ashok Kumar Saxena, Former General Secretary were present.Shri Nirmal Kumar Dubey, Research Officer,Regional Implementation Office,Kolkata, Shri Kailash Nath Yadav,Member Secretary,TOLIC, Dr.Monoj K.Patariya,Director, NCSTC,DST,New Delhi were Chief Guests.On this occasion many speakers came from outside Kolkata.This programme was presided by Dr. Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary(Scientific Activities).This programme was co- ordinated by Shrimati Debasree Dutta (Saha),Junior Hindi Translator,ISCA.

On 19.09.12 Quarterly Meeting of Official Language was arranged and along with this the Valedictory Session of Hindi Week was organised.

NATIONAL SEMINAR ON OFFICIAL LANGUAGE

On 18th September,2012 a National Seminar on Official Language was organized by ISCA on the focal theme of centenary year “Bharat ke bhavishya ko aakar dene ke liye Vigyan”. Dr. Amit Krishna De, Executive Secretary, ISCAdelivered welcome address. Dr. Manoj Kumar Chakrabarti, General Secretary (Membership Affairs), ISCA & Er. Nilangshu Bhusan Basu, Treasurer, ISCA were present on this auspicious occasion. Mr. Nirmal Kumar Dubey, Research Officer, Regional Implementation Office, Kolkata, Mr. Kailash Nath Yadav, Member Secretary, TOLIC, Dr. Monoj K. Patariya, Director, NCSTC, DST, New Delhi were present as Special guests. Dr. Ashok Kumar Saxena, Executive Committee Member and Former General Secretary, ISCA was the Chief guest and the programme was presided by Dr. (Mrs.) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary (ScientificActivities), ISCA. Dr.Arun Kumar Pandey,Assistant Executive Secretary, ISCA gave vote of thanks. Dr. Ramesh Verma, Professor, Hindi Deptt, DAV College, Kanpur and Dr. Poonam Arora, Professor, Zoology Deptt, S.N.Sen Degree College, Kanpur were the speakers respectively. Speakers from different institutes, Kolkata also participated and the whole programme was conducted by Mrs. Debasree Dutta (Saha), Junior Hindi Translator, ISCA.

PUBLICATIONS

Proceedings of the Ninety-nineth Annual Session of the Indian Science Congress Association were published. The bi-monthly journal Everyman’s Science (Vol.XLVII Nos.1-6) was brought out.

Other publications brought out were : ISCA Directory : 2012-2013, Annual Report : 2011-2012, List of Office-Bearers & Sectional Committees for 2012-2013, CD of Honorary Member, Donor & Life Members for 2012-2013, Members (With Voting Right) for 2012-2013, Synopsis of the Presentations of ISCAYoung Scientist for 100 th ISC, proceedings (containing Presidential Address, abstracts of Platinum Jubilee Lecture, Awards Lecture, papers presented and invited lectures of different sections).

LIBRARY SERVICE

During the year under report, the Library of the Indian Science Congress Association received the following journals/newsletters in exchange of theAssociation’s journal “Everyman’s Science” :

Indian Science Cruiser

CSIR News

Indian Spices

DRDO News

JIMA

EnvironmentalAwareness

Natural History (Bombay)

Environmental Health Perspectives

S & T Post

Gana Darpan

Science & Culture

Gyan Bigyan

Spices India

IASSI News

University News

INSA News

UNESCO News

ICSSR Newsletter

WMO Bulletin

Indian Journal of Physics

WISTA

The Library is open to all category of members of the Association as well as school, college and university teachers on all weekdays (except Saturday, Sunday and Public holidays) from 10.00 a.m. to 5.30 p.m.

OTHER ITEMS

ISCA MEETINGS

Following meetings of different bodies were held during the year 2012-2013.

Name of the Body Meetings held on

Executive Committee

May 26, 2012, August 13, 2012, October 13, 2012, January 2 & 7, 2013.

Finance & Establishment May 25, October 12, 2012.

Standing Committee on Science and Society

Endowment Committee

Council May 26, 2012 , October 13, 2012; January 2&7, 2013.

Centenary Coordination Committee

Besides above, two meetings of the General President with Sectional Presidents of 100 th Indian Science Congress were held on May 25, 2012 and October 13, 2012. Also, meeting of Conveners of ISCA Chapters were held on January 06, 2013.

May 25, 2012.

May 25, 2012, October 12, 2012.

April 23, 2012, May 25, 2012, October 12, 2012.

ISCA REPRESENTATION IN OTHER ORGANIZATIONS DURING 2012-2013

Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi :

Dr. Ganesh Pandey, Head, Division of Organic Chemistry, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, B-4, Bungalow, NCL Colony, Pashan Road, Pune. Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh :

Prof. B. P. Chatterjee, former General Secretary, ISCA, Emeritus Professor, West Bengal University of Technology, Sector – I, BF - 142, Salt Lake, Kolkata. JIPMER, Puducherry :

Prof. Avijit Banerji, former General Secretary, ISCA, Professor (Retired) and Former Programme Co-ordinator, CAS Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, Kolkata; 83, Sarat Bose Road, Kolkata. All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal :

Dr. (Mrs.) Vijay Laxmi Saxena, General Secretary, ISCA, Coordinator-Bioinformatics Infrastructure Facility Centre of DBT (Govt. of India); Head of the Department of Zoology, Dayanand Girls P.G. College, Kanpur; 7/182, Swarup Nagar, Kanpur. All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar :

Dr. Ashok Kumar Saxena, former General Secretary, ISCA, Former Dean, Faculty of Science, C.S.J.M.University, Kanpur; 7/182, Swarup Nagar, Kanpur-208 002, U.P. All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur :

Prof. Dr. Ranbir Chander Sobti, General President-Elect, ISCA, Vice-Chancellor, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University (A Central University), Vidya Vihar, Rai Bareilly Road, Lucknow.

All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna :

Prof. S. S. Katiyar, former General President, former Vice-Chancellor, Chhatrapati Shahu Ji Maharaj University, Kanpur & Vice Chancellor, C.A.University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur & Former Chairman, U.P. State Council for Higher Education, Lucknow & Founder Director, Dr.Ram Manohar Lohia National Law Institute, Lucknow & President, Association of Indian Universities, New Delhi; 7/ 111-E, Swaroop Nagar, Kanpur. All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, Raipur :

Prof. H. P. Tiwari, former General Secretary, ISCA, 389, Mumfordganj, Allahabad. All Indian Institute of Medical Sciences, Rishikesh :

Dr. Manoj Kumar Chakrabarti, former General Secretary, ISCA, Deputy Director (Senior Grade) & Head, Division of Pathophysiology, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (ICMR), P-33, C.I.T. Road, Scheme XM, Beliaghata, Kolkata. American Association for Advancement of Science :

Prof. Dr. Ranbir Chander Sobti, General President-Elect, ISCA, attended the Annual Meeting of AAAS in Boston, USA from February 18, 2013.

MEMBERSHIP

The trend in Membership of different categories during the last three years can be observed from the following table :

98 th Session

99 th Session

100 th Session

(2010-2011)

(2011-2012)

(2012-2013)

Life Member Annual Member Sessional Member Student Member Individual Donor Institutional Donor Institutional Member

17,216

19,527

22,023

5,891

6,573

6,840

2,012

1,872

3,792

785

1,076

1,305

13

15

16

29

29

30

12

15

11

Total

25,958

29,107

34,017

ORGANIZATIONAL SET-UP*

The composition of GB/GC/FC :

The composition of General Body of ISCA consists of all the Members (with voting right) andHonorary Members of the Association.

The Council consists of (i) Members of Executive Committee, (ii) all such Members or HonoraryMembers of the Association who have held office as General President, General Secretary or Treasurer,(iii) Sectional Presidents, (iv) seven members of the Association elected by the General Body,

* In accordance with the suggestion given by DST in its letter No.AI/AR/004/2007 dated 31-03-2007 the above materials on organizational set-up are also furnished.

(v) one member to be nominated by The Kolkata Municipal Corporation, (vi) Co-opted members of the Finance and Establishment Committee, (vii) Editor-in-Chief of Everyman’s Science, and (viii) a nominee of Indian National Science Academy (INSA) Council who is a member of ISCA.

The Executive Committee consists of the General President, the Immediate Past General President, the General President-Elect, the two General Secretaries, the Treasurer, ten members electedby the General Body, and Secretary or his nominee, Department of Science and Technology, Government of India and two local Secretaries of the ensuing session.

ISCA has six Statutory Committees viz : (i) Advisory Committee (ii) Finance Committee (iii)Establishment Committee (iv) Publication Committee (v) Endowment Committee and (vi) Standing Committee on Science and Society.

Staff Welfare measures :

No staff welfare matters was taken during the year under report.

Implementation of reservation policy :

The Association is following the policy of the Government of India in the matter of recruitment of its staff members.

Implementation of the Official Languages Policy :

Steps to implement the provisions of Official Languages Policy as adopted by the Government of India from time to time, have been taken by the Association by way of printing of letterheads, title headings in different registers, name plates of different sections, membership forms, annual report, etc.in bi-lingual forms. A Junior Hindi Translator is looking after the above work.

Right to Information Act :

As per Right to Information Act a Public Information Officer has been identified from the existing Officers and her name has been displayed in the ISCAWebsite. Any enquiry received regarding R.T.I.is taken care of by the concerned Officer.

Public Grievances Redress Mechanism :

Executive Secretary has been nominated as Public Grievance Officer to take necessary action on complaints received from the members of the Association. There is also a Vigilance Officer whose name has been displayed in the ISCA Website.

Citizen’s Charter :

Reservation Policy under the Corporate Social Responsibility :

The Association is following the Reservation Policy of the Government of India in respectof SC/ST/ OBC in the matter of recruitment of its staff members and a roster is maintained in this regard.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Executive Committee of the Indian Science Congress Association is grateful to the Department of Science & Technology, Government of India, for the generous grant-in-aid to the Association. The Committee would also like to record its deep appreciation of the continued help and cooperation received from officers and staff of DST.

The Executive Committee records its great appreciation of the personal interest for hosting and organizing the 100 th Indian Science Congress by University of Calcutta and Bose Institute at Kolkata. Sincere thanks are also due to the Prof. Dhrubajyoti Chattopadhyay and Prof. Sibaji Raha, Local Secre- taries and their associates, for their untiring efforts to make the 100 th Indian Science Congress a grand success.

The Executive Committee also expresses its indebtedness to the Council and the members of the General Body as also Members of different Committees and Sub-Committees, Sectional Presidents, Sec- tional Recorders, Local Sectional Secretaries, Chapter Conveners and members of the Sectional Com- mittees for their guidance and advice. In referring to the success achieved at the 100 th Session, it is a pleasure for the Committee to record its gratefulness to the General President, Dr. Manmohan Singh, Hon’ble Prime Minister of India for all his efforts to make the 100 th Indian Science Congress a great success and memorable one.

Last but not least, no record of acknowledgement could be complete without expressing the deep appreciation of the work done by the staff of the Association throughout the year.

ANNEXURE - I

TITLE OF ADDRESSES OF SECTIONAL PRESIDENTS OF 100 TH ISC SESSION

Section

President

Title

1. Agriculture and Forestry Sciences

2. Animal, Veterinary and

Dr. Probir Kumar Ghosh IGFRI, Jhansi

Prof. Anil Prakash Sharma

Fishery Sciences CIFRI, Kolkata

3. Anthropological and Prof.ArupRatanBandyopadhyay Behavioural Sciences CU, Kolkata (including Archaeology and Psychology & Educational Sciences and Military Sciences)

A Paradigm Shift in Managing Natu-

ral Resources and Food Security :

Strategy to Action. Environment and Health Management for Sustainable Animal and Fish Pro- duction. Repositioning Application of Anthro- pology for the Future Shape of The Society.

4. Chemical Sciences Prof. Kamal Kant Dwivedi Haryana

A

Century of Development of Chem-

5. Earth System Sciences

Dr. Ajai ISRO, Ahmedabad

istry in India. Space Technology in Tandem with Earth Sciences towards Empowering

mass to utilize as alternative fuel for

6. Engineering Sciences

Prof. Debabrata Paul JIS, Kolkata

the Society. Bioresources : Potential source of bio-

renewable energy.

7. Environmental Sciences

Dr. S.B.Mahato

“Environmental Conundrums and pos-

IICB, Kolkata

sible remediation.”

8. Information and Prof. (Dr.) UttamKumarSingh

Communication Science

IIBM, Patna

Emerging trends in ICT for inclusive growth in India.

& Technology (including

Computer Sciences)

9. Materials Science

Prof. Shanker Ram IIT, Kharagpur

10. Mathematical Sciences Prof. Dinesh Singh (including Statistics) University of Delhi, New Delhi

11. Medical Sciences Prof. Tusharkanti Ghosh (including Physiology) CU, Kolkata

12. New Biology (including

Prof. N.R. Jagannathan AIIMS, New Delhi

Biochemistry, Biophysics

& Molecular Biology

and Biotechnology)

13. Physical Sciences Prof. Awadhesh Kumar Rai University of Allahabad, Allahabad

14. Plant Sciences Dr. Umesh Chandra Lavania CIMAP, Lucknow

Green Synthesis of Nanofluids and Films with Fast Energy-transfer Properities : Cosmetics, Medicals and Biological sensors. Mathematics in India : Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow. Neurophysiology in Modern Perspec- tive. Role of Magnetic Resonance Imag- ing (MRI) and in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) in Breast Cancer. Laser Based Spectroscopic Tech- nique with Special Reference to LIBS for Multidisciplinary Researches. Polyploidy, Body Size, and Opportu- nities for Genetic Enhancement and Fixation of Heterozygosity in Plants.

ANNEXURE - II

PLATINUM JUBILEE LECTURES OF 100 TH ISC SESSION

Section

Speaker

Title

1. Agriculture and Forestry Sciences

2. Animal, Veterinary and Dr. Renu Tripathi

Dr. S. Ayyappan ICAR, New Delhi

Fishery Sciences

3. Anthropological and

CDRI, Lucknow

Prof. Dipak Kumar Behera

Behavioural Sciences Sambalpur University, Odhisa (including Archaeology and Psychology & Educational Sciences and Military Sciences)

4. Chemical Sciences

5. Earth System Sciences

Dr. Arvind Kumar Saxena DMSRDE, Kanpur

Prof. Arun Kumar Manipur University, Imphal

6. Engineering Sciences

7. Environmental Sciences

8. Information and

Communication Science

& Technology (including

Computer Sciences)

Prof. Souvik Bhattacharyya IIT Kharagpur

Dr. Prasanta Kumar Das IACS, Kolkata

Sri Satish Babu ICFOSS, Trivandrum

9. Materials Science

Prof. Sirshendu De IIT, Kharagpur

10. Mathematical Sciences Prof. Govindan Rangarajan (including Statistics) IISc, Bangalore

11. Medical Sciences (including Physiology)

12. New Biology (including Dr. Rajan Sankaranarayanan

Dr. Bhaskar Saha NCCS, Pune

Biochemistry, Biophysics

& Molecular Biology

and Biotechnology)

CCMB, Hyderabad

13. Physical Sciences

Mrs. (Dr.) D. Alamelu BARC, Mumbai

14. Plant Sciences

Dr. (Mrs.) Sangeeta Srivastava IISR, Lucknow

ABC of Climate-Smart Agriculture

Malaria Chemotherapy: Present Scenario And Future Perspectives

Understanding Changing Childhood from a Human Science Perspective

Multifunctional Inorganic Polymers:

Synthesis and Applications

Neotectonic Measurements Along An Active Fault Using Multidisciplinary Evidences Along Indo Burma Ranges, Manipur

Transcritical CO 2 Systems for Heating and Cooling

Self Assembled Soft Materials: A Step towards Greener Environment

Innovation and Open Source: Future Directions for India

Functional Polymeric Membranes and Applications

Are You Connected? Detecting Connectivity Patterns in Networks

Receptor-regulated Responsiveness and Therapeutic Intervention

Mechanistic Insights into Proofreading during Translation of the Genetic Code

Isotopic and Elemental Composition data for Food Authentication and Nuclear Technology

Disease Free Sugarcane Production - A Molecular Approach

ANNEXURE – III TITLES OF SYMPOSIA ON SPECIALIZED TOPICS ORGANISED BY THE SECTIONS OF 100 TH ISC SESSION

Section

Topic(s)

1. Agriculture and

1.

Innovating Agriculture for shaping future of India

Forestry Sciences

2.

Towards Ever green revolution

2. Animal, Veterinary and Fishery Sciences

Panel Discussion- Ending Era of farmers suicide

1. Environment and health management for sustainable animal and fish production. Panel Discussion- Recent approaches for enhanced animal protein production to feed billions.

3. Anthropological and

1.

Future of India relevance of human science

Behavioural Sciences (including Archaeology and Psychology & Educational Sciences and Military Sciences)

2.

Development and welfare: perspectives of human science

4. Chemical Sciences

1.

Innovations in Chemical Sciences from Molecules to

5. Earth System Sciences

Systems Panel discussion-Chemistry for Nuclear Energy and Safety

1. Earth Science empowering the society

 

2.

Planetary geoscience: Achievements and future trends

6. Engineering Sciences

1.

Technologies for Sustainable Energy and Development

in India in the climate change regime Panel Discussion - Energy Security in India for sustain- able development in climate change regime

7. Environmental Sciences

1.

Mission Green Environment, Problems and Remediations.

2.

New Innovations and Technologies for Cleaner and Greener India.

8. Information and Communication 1. ICT for Inclusive Growth

Science & Technology (including Computer Sciences)

2.

Green Computing

9. Materials Science

1.

Energy materials and applications

2.

Green synthesis of surface multifunctional

10. Mathematical Sciences

1.

nanomaterials Mathematics as a trans disciplinary vehicle.

(including Statistics)

2.

Mathematics today and tomorrow.

11. Medical Sciences

1.

Translational health research in shaping future of India.

(including Physiology)

2.

Modern perspective of research in molecules to system Physiology.

12. New Biology (including Biochemistry, 1. Disease Biology Biophysics & Molecular Biology 2. Nano-engineering and Stem Cell Technology and Biotechnology)

13. Physical Sciences

1.

Physics research in multidisciplinary area.

2.

LASERS in the Service of Human being.

14. Plant Sciences

1.

Chromosome Botany: From Microscope to Molecules.

2.

Management of our Phytodiversity: A pre-requisite for India’s future.

ANNEXURE – IV LIST OF YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARDEES FOR THE YEAR 2012-2013

Sections

Name of the Awardee(s)

Title of Paper(s)

1. Agriculture and

K. Chakraborty

Forestry Sciences

IARI, Junagadh

2. Animal, Veterinary and

A. K. Verma

Fishery Sciences NEHU, Shillong

3. Anthropological and Madhumati Chatterjee Behavioural Sciences CU, Kolkata (including Archaeology and Psychology & Educational Sciences and Military Sciences)

4. Chemical Sciences

5. Earth System Sciences

6. Engineering Sciences

7. Environmental Sciences

8. Information and Communication Science and Technology (including Computer Sciences)

Rubel Chakravarty BARC, Mumbai

Parijat Roy NGRI, Hyderabad

Abhilash NML, Jameshedpur

Divya Sharma IARI, New Delhi

Mallamma V. Reddy Bangalore Univ.

Differential Expression of Genes In- volved in Osmolyte Biosynthesis Play a Major Role in Salinity Tolerance in Brassica spp

Changes in Glutathione and Glu- tathione-related Enzymes Induces Mitichondrial Stress and Apoptosis in the Anticancer Activities of Canthari- din Isolated from Red-headed Blister Beetles, Epicauta Hirticornis and its Mechanism of Action.

On The Variation of Primate Hair : Ap- proach to Evolutionary Biology

Combination of Nano-ceria-Ceria-Poly- acrylonitrile Based 68Ge/68Ga Genera- tor and NOTA as Bifunctional Chela- tor Makes 68Ga-Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry more Practical

PGE Geochemistry of Kimberlites from Anantapur Area, Southern India : Im- plications for Nature of Mantle below Dharwar and Diamond Potentiality

Bioreactor Processing of Low Grade Indian Uranium Ores : Improvisation in Leaching Kinetics Vis-à-vis Resource Utilisation

Microbial Degradation of Bifenthrin by Consortium in Broth and Soil

Indic Language Machine Translation Tool for NLP

Sections

Name of the Awardee(s)

Title of Paper(s)

9. Materials Science

Arvinder Singh

Graphite Oxide based Composites :