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GiftsGiftsfts WINTER 2014 A supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard
GiftsGiftsfts
WINTER 2014
A supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard

IN

THIS

ISSUE

About OurChildren Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families Chanukah, Oh, Chanukah Food
About
OurChildren
Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families
Chanukah, Oh, Chanukah
Food • Fun • Fashion
Fighting the Flu
Supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard • December 2014
Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard • December 2014 SEE PAGES 15-19 NOVEMBER 28, 2014 VOL. LXXXIV

SEE PAGES 15-19

NOVEMBER 28, 2014

VOL. LXXXIV

NO. 10 $1.00

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15-19 NOVEMBER 28, 2014 VOL. LXXXIV NO. 10 $1.00 83 2014 NORTH JERSEY JSTANDARD.COM Assyria’s man
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Page 3

Going green

In the future, we were told, we would eat algae dispensed by computerized electronic machines. That future is arriving with an invented-in-Israel label. Khai-nam is a name for a fast-growing aquatic vegetable little known in the Western world. It has a nutritional profile that’s hard to beat — comparable to combining kale, broccoli and spinach. The world’s smallest flowering plant,

Khai-nam is better, if less appetizingly, known as duckweed. And thanks to research biologist Tsipi Shoham, this mild-tasting Asian superfood may be coming to your kitchen. Dr. Shoham founded a startup company, GreenOnyx, that plans to offer a unique home system — sort of

a 3D printer for food — to grow and

process Khai-nam for smoothies, soups, stews, and salads. Khai-nam has been likened to caviar, for its small size and round shape, if not its flavor or price. In effect, GreenOnyx does for vegetables what SodaStream does for soda: It moves the means of production onto your kitchen counter. GreenOnyx has won U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, and is forging collaborations in the United States and Europe. After another year of development, the patented countertop machine is expected to be available for sale. “This is a real high-tech system integrated with agriculture in a way nobody has done before,” says Dr. Shoham’s husband, CEO Benny Shoham, a Technion-trained electronic engineer who has been chief executive, vice president of business development, and product director for several Fortune 500 and startup companies. Mr. Shoham explains that his wife, who has a Ph.D. from the Weizmann Institute of Science and did postdoctoral research at Stanford University, began seeking exceptionally nutritious fresh produce for the family’s table about three years ago. “We have two girls and wanted to help protect them from chronic disease,” he said. “Based on her research into algae and cancer, she

understands that preventive steps like proper diet are most important, and

that’s why so many people are turning vegan and vegetarian. “After screening many types of bio- sources, we came across Khai-nam. In 1970, Nature had an article about it. So it’s not a secret vegetable — it existed for hundreds of years in Indochina — but it is complicated to grow and is consumed only in Thailand, Myanmar, and Laos these days. We wanted to find

a way to develop it.” Their at-home experiments with

find a way to develop it.” Their at-home experiments with the vegetable — also called wolffia

the vegetable — also called wolffia or watermeal — proved successful, and friends were eager to learn more. The Shohams knew that the average busy person could not eat Khai-nam regularly unless it was extremely convenient to buy and prepare. “At some point we reached out to Ron Guttmann, who used to be the CEO of Unilever Israel, and he invested immediately and joined us as our third partner in early 2013,” Mr. Shoham said. GreenOnyx, based in Tel Aviv, has a team of 10 employees with expertise in optics, algorithms, software, and physics. The scientific advisory team includes professors from Ben-Gurion and Rutgers universities, as well as international food safety and regulatory expert Catherine Adams Hutt. The Shohams have sourced several “champion strains” of Khai-nam, all compliant with FDA regulations. The antioxidant-rich vegetable, whose name means “water eggs” in Thai, is high in protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. “All the system needs is a connection to tap water and electricity,” Mr. Shoham said. “As long as you continue replacing the capsule pack we send you once a month, the system will run automatically and provide a daily source of fresh produce.” The user can choose the desired form of Khai-nam: fresh for salads; liquefied for juice; or a paste to use in soups, casseroles, pasta sauce and other cooked foods. “Think of it as vegetable base you can integrate into any dish,” Mr. Shoham said. “Depending on the strain, it has a very neutral, fresh taste like sweet cabbage, and no smell.” If that pitch sounds a bit like a description of the equally science fictional Soylent Green — well, at least Khai-nam is made from vegetables, not people. It is a better tomorrow after all.

LARRY YUDELSON & ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN/

ISRAEL21C.ORG

Breaded bird

After last year’s Thanksgivukkah festivities, this week’s Thanksgiving seems like a bit of a letdown. While Thanksgiving proper and the first day of Chanukah won’t coincide for some tens of thousands of years, the four- day weekend and the eight-day holi- day will overlap well before that.

Every year, however, the long Thanksgiving weekend overlaps with Shabbos. And to celebrate that fact, Evergreen Kosher Market in Monsey offered this only-in-America turkey challah. Only $14.95.

LARRY YUDELSON

For convenient home delivery, call 201-837-8818 or bit.ly/jsubscribe

Candlelighting: Friday, November 28, 4:12 p.m. Shabbat ends: Saturday, November 29, 5:14 p.m.

ON THE COVER Woman at the window; ivory and gold. Arslan Tash, Bâtiment aux Ivoires, room 14. late 9th–early 8th century B.C. Musée du Louvre, Paris, Département des Antiquités Orientales.

© RMN-GRAND PALAIS/ART RESOURCE, NY. PHOTOGRAPH BY RAPHAEL CHIPAULT

PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT: (USPS 275-700 ISN 0021-6747) is pub- lished weekly on Fridays with an additional edition every October, by the New Jersey Jewish Media Group, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666. Periodicals postage paid at Hackensack, NJ and additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Jersey Jewish Media Group, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666. Subscription price is $30.00 per year. Out-of-state subscriptions are $45.00, Foreign countries subscriptions are $75.00. The appearance of an advertisement in The Jewish Standard does not constitute a kashrut endorsement. The publishing of a paid political advertisement does not constitute an endorsement of any candidate political party or political position by the newspaper or any employees.

The Jewish Standard assumes no responsibility to return unsolic- ited editorial or graphic materials. All rights in letters and unsolic- ited editorial, and graphic material will be treated as uncondition- ally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and subject to JEWISH STANDARD’s unrestricted right to edit and to comment editorially. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without writ- ten permission from the publisher. © 2014

CONTENTS

NOSHES

4

GIVING TUESDAY

15

OPINION

20

COVER STORY

24

GALLERY

38

TORAH COMMENTARY

39

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

40

ARTS & CULTURE

41

CALENDAR

42

OBITUARIES

45

CLASSIFIEDS

46

REAL ESTATE

48

CALENDAR 42 OBITUARIES 45 CLASSIFIEDS 46 REAL ESTATE 48 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 28, 2014 3

Noshes

“Met him once at the Bayou. We played Jewish Geography. His cousin was my father’s cardiologist.”

– Rabbi Charles Arian, discussing the late rock singer songwriter Warren Zevon, composer of “Werewolves of London.”

Warren Zevon, composer of “Werewolves of London.” PROUD PAPA: Mike Nichols and his Jewish kids Director

PROUD PAPA:

Mike Nichols and his Jewish kids

Director MIKE NICH- OLS , the Berlin-born son of German Jew- ish refugees, died on November MIKE NICH- OLS, the Berlin-born son of German Jew- ish refugees, died on November 19 at 83. It is easy to find print and online biographies about him. What is harder to find is material about his relationship to his Jewish background after his ear- ly days as a child refugee in New York. In 2006, he was interviewed by ABIGAIL POGREBIN for her book “Stars of David,” in which famous Jews talked about being Jewish. Here is a little first-person information about his family life, as he related it to Pogrebin. It requires a brief pref- ace: Nichols was married four times, and none of his wives, including his widow, journalist Diane Sawyer, were Jewish. He had one child, DAISY, now about 44, with his first wife, and two children, JENNY, now around 36, and MAX, now about 39, with his third wife. Nichols told Pogrebin that his parents were not religiously observant at all. He said he was connected to his Jew- ish heritage, but did not practice Judaism or any other religion. His three children were not raised in any faith, he told her. But despite their secular upbringing, Nichols said, all three of his children ultimately came to iden- tify as Jewish. Nichols

told Pogrebin that his daughter Jenny once

said to him, “In the end you pick Jewish because

it is harder.”

When asked what he thought about his daughter’s statement, Nichols replied that he was “proud” of her. “Im- pressed. I think it was

also accurate. If you get

a choice, you do pick it

because it’s harder. You don’t like yourself if you pick the other one and always feel like you’re full of sh•t.” Max Nichols is a lead- ing music business exec- utive. In 2001, he married Jewish journalist RA- CHEL ALEXANDER, now 40, in a Jewish ceremony in Venice. Alexander was then a sportswriter for the Washington Post. She took her husband’s name and now is a prom- inent ESPN/CNN TV

sportscaster under the name Rachel Nichols. The hit sci-fi film, “Interstellar,” is still playing in theaters.

sportscaster under the name Rachel Nichols. The hit sci-fi film, “Interstellar,” is still playing in theaters.

Casey Affleck co-stars as Tom, the son of Cooper, the movie’s star charac- ter. TIMOTHEE CHAL- AMET, 18, plays Tom as

a 15-year-old. He also

played Finn Walden in the second season of “Homeland” and may co-star in an upcoming “X Men” movie. Raised in the States, his father is French and his mother is an American Jew. She’s

the sister of RODMAN

Mike Nichols Timothee Chalamet Rodman Flender Yael Grobglas FLENDER, 52, a big-time TV director. Last
Mike Nichols
Timothee Chalamet
Rodman Flender
Yael Grobglas
FLENDER, 52, a big-time
TV director. Last year,
Chalamet briefly dated
Madonna’s 17-year-old
daughter, Lourdes.
The series “Jane, the
Virgin” has an implau-
sible premise, but the
charming title character,
played by the charm-
ing Gina Rodriguez,
makes the show work.
It’s emerged as a critical
and popular hit since its
mid-October premiere.
The premise: Jane, a
“virg,” gets impregnated
at her doctor’s office
his baby only when she
realized that he might
leave her. Israeli actress
YAEL GROBGLAS, who
is
around 26, plays Petra.
Described often as a
“blonde bombshell,” she
starred in several Israeli
TV shows. She told the
New York Times:” It’s
been a blast playing such
a
mischievous character,
with sperm that Rafael,
her boss, had left there;
he had stored it before
cancer treatments made
him infertile. The sperm
was meant for Petra, Ra-
fael’s evil wife, who mar-
ried him for his money,
is serially unfaithful to
because she’s so un-
like me.” Rodriguez, by
the way, had a Jewish
grandfather, and her par-
ents, she told a reporter,
exposed her to many re-
ligions. She hasn’t really
picked one, but added
that “my oldest sister is
Jewish.”
If you get AT&T cable
TV, be advised that
there’s a free preview
of all premium channels,
including on-demand
him, and wanted to have
libraries of these chan-
on-demand him, and wanted to have libraries of these chan- Five Jewish talents and one ‘Peter
on-demand him, and wanted to have libraries of these chan- Five Jewish talents and one ‘Peter

Five Jewish talents and one ‘Peter Pan’

On Thursday, December. 4, at 8 p.m., NBC will present a live version of the classic musical “Peter Pan.” It stars Allison Williams as Peter, with Christopher Walken as Captain Hook. The musical was written by five Jewish theater legends, all deceased: Lyrics by BETTY COM-

DEN, ADOLPH GREENE, and CAROLYN LEIGH, with music by MARK CHARLAP and JULE STYNE.

– N.B.

nels, from November 27 to November 30. During this preview (or on Net- flix, etc.), you can binge- watch series like HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire.” The next-to-last season of “Boardwalk” (2013-14) featured the handsome BEN ROSENFIELD, 22,

as Willie Thompson, the smart but troubled nephew of star charac- ter Nucky Thompson. More recently, he filmed a large supporting role in a yet-untitled WOODY ALLEN movie that will be released in 2015.

– N.B.

California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at

Middleoftheroad1@aol.com

Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard

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4 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 28, 2014

WWW.ou.orG/convention Rosh yeshiva, yeshiva university; Senior posek, ou Kosher RabbI hERShEl SChaChtER

WWW.ou.orG/convention

Rosh yeshiva, yeshiva university; Senior posek, ou Kosher
Rosh yeshiva, yeshiva university;
Senior posek, ou Kosher

RabbI hERShEl SChaChtER

Senior posek, ou Kosher RabbI hERShEl SChaChtER ou orthodox union nationaL convention Friday, december 26
ou orthodox union nationaL convention Friday, december 26 - Sunday, december 28 y doubLetree tarrytoWn,
ou
orthodox union
nationaL convention
Friday, december 26 -
Sunday, december 28
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doubLetree tarrytoWn,
tarryto W n,
ny
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hear about:
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2014
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malColm I. hoEnlEIn
malColm I. hoEnlEIn

Executive vice Chairman, Conference of presidents of major american Jewish organizations

RabbanIt Chana hEnKIn Founder/dean, nishmat
RabbanIt Chana hEnKIn
Founder/dean, nishmat
organizations RabbanIt Chana hEnKIn Founder/dean, nishmat RabbI EphRaIm mIRvIS Chief Rabbi, united hebrew
RabbI EphRaIm mIRvIS
RabbI EphRaIm mIRvIS

Chief Rabbi, united hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth

Chief ashkenazic Rabbi of buenos aires
Chief ashkenazic Rabbi
of buenos aires

RabbI danIEl oppEnhEImER

Heightened Global Anti-Semitism

Bringing Women to the Communal Leadership Table Instilling Spirituality in our Children Day School Affordability Pre Nuptials and Post Nuptials

Shabbat ServiceS Led by cantor yanky Lemmer motZa’ei Shabbat ou inStaLLation dinner president of yeshiva
Shabbat ServiceS Led
by cantor
yanky Lemmer
motZa’ei Shabbat ou inStaLLation
dinner
president of yeshiva university
richard JoeL
keynote Speaker
SpeakerS incLude: RabbI dR. ElIE abadIE | RaChEl FRIEdman | RabbI mICah GREEnland dR. alan
SpeakerS incLude:
RabbI dR. ElIE abadIE | RaChEl FRIEdman | RabbI mICah GREEnland
dR. alan KadISh | RabbI lEonaRd matanKy | ChanI nEubERGER
RIChaRd StonE | RabbI ya’aKov tRump
RabbI dR. tzvI hERSh WEInREb | RabbI Shlomo WEISSman

reGiSter at WWW.ou.orG/convention For more information call 212.613.8110 $1,000 a couple* for the weekend | Sunday only $50/couple | $36/pp (includes lunch)

*Certain convention costs may be tax deductible for shul delegates as per IRS regulations. Consult your tax advisor.

tax deductible for shul delegates as per IRS regulations. Consult your tax advisor. JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER

Local

NCJW immigration panel decries “broken system”

Participants praise President Obama’s executive action

LOIS GOLDRICH

P resident Obama’s recent speech on immigration — and his decision not to deport some 5 million people — most likely was driven, at least in part, by the advocacy efforts of groups such as the National

Council of Jewish Women. The Bergen County section, which held a forum on immi- gration reform last Tuesday, was in the process of sending a letter to the president when his formal statement was issued. “It was a packed house,” Bea Podorefsky of Teaneck said of the forum, which drew 300 attendees. She and fellow NCJW member Joyce Kalman chaired the event. “We prepared a letter for attendees to sign urging the pres- ident to take some action,” she said, joking that one of the program’s panelists, Rabbi Greg Litcovsky, said she must have had a “connection” to a higher power, given the president’s subsequent action. Ms. Podorefsky said that the forum’s goals were “to educate ourselves, to educate the community at large, and to work together with our coalition partners.” The coalition, created around last year’s NCJW forum on human trafficking, consists of 24 organizations, ranging from Project Sarah to the Pali- sades Park Senior Center.

from Project Sarah to the Pali- sades Park Senior Center. Because this can only be addressed

Because this can only be addressed on the federal level, New Jersey has taken steps to help bring undocumented immigrants out of the shadows.

VALERIE HUTTLE

The panel for this year’s program included Assembly- woman Valerie Vainieri Huttle, Michael Wildes, Rabbi Litcovsky, and Vidalia Acevedo. Each was chosen to represent a different aspect of what panelists called “the broken immi- gration system.” After the program, The Jewish Standard asked panelists to summarize their positions. These are their responses. Good for the state Assemblywoman Huttle of Englewood (D-37 Dist.) noted that while each legislator approaches immigration issues differently, “depending on their personal and family experi- ences, as well as who they represent in their districts, the gen- eral sentiment in New Jersey is supportive of immigrants who live, work, and go to school in our state.” She said that while some states have taken a “very anti- immigration position … New Jersey has instead focused on protecting and enhancing opportunities for immigrants in our state, recognizing that they are members of our communities, critical participants in our workforce, and talented students in

participants in our workforce, and talented students in Michael Wildes Valerie Vainieri Huttle our education

Michael Wildes

in our workforce, and talented students in Michael Wildes Valerie Vainieri Huttle our education system.” She

Valerie Vainieri Huttle

our education system.” She said that the most significant issue under discussion

is the status of undocumented immigrants who are living in

communities without the protection of legal recognition. “Because this can only be addressed on the federal level, New Jersey has taken steps to help bring undocumented immigrants out of the shadows,” she said. “This includes allowing undocumented students who graduated from New

Jersey high schools to attend college at an in-state rate” under

a law she co-sponsored, known as the Dream Act. In addition, legislative proposals are pending that would extend the Dream Act to cover tuition assistance for undocu- mented students and to create a type of driver’s license for undocumented residents. Ms. Huttle said that documented immigrants also confront challenges, including learning English and becoming mem- bers of their larger communities. For this group, “there is also

a lot we can do to make their transition easier and opportuni-

ties here more accessible,” she said. “The Korean Medical Pro- gram at Holy Name Medical Center is an example of a health care provider making sure immigrants are aware of screenings and information that is vital to cancer prevention and early detention.” Ms. Huttle is sponsoring a bill that would require forms and materials for people with developmental disabilities to be printed in other languages. “It is difficult enough for individuals with disabilities and their families to navigate the housing, health care, and educa- tional programs available to them,” she said. “Doing this with

a language barrier is nearly impossible. It is measures like this that go a long way to ease the immigrant experience in our state and make a real difference in the quality of life. “The most significant issue I see is emerging immigrant communities working to become part of our larger Bergen County and New Jersey community,” she continued. “I work with members of immigrant groups that are not well repre- sented in government and community organizations…. That representation is so critical to having a voice for their ethnic community, but also to bringing that group into our larger county and state framework.” Ms. Huttle said that in Bergen County, election ballots are printed in three languages — English, Spanish, and Korean. In light of recent findings that a large number of new immigrants are attracted to the state, she suggested that “it is because New Jersey is already a very diverse state, offering new immigrants communities of residents who speak their language, know their culture, and will help them become acclimated and com- fortable in their new country.”

become acclimated and com- fortable in their new country.” Rabbi Greg Litcovsky Vidalia Acevdo This, she

Rabbi Greg Litcovsky

com- fortable in their new country.” Rabbi Greg Litcovsky Vidalia Acevdo This, she said, is good

Vidalia Acevdo

This, she said, is good for New Jersey. “Being a state that attracts new immigrants is beneficial for New Jersey. It means that we are bringing in more talent and fresh ideas. This is all important for our society to grow and thrive, culturally and economically. New Jersey is such a great state because of how much we have to offer, and our diver- sity is partially responsible for that. BergenPAC, for instance, has showcased every kind of performance group from an acclaimed Korean singer to Matisyahu. Those shows come to our state, and North Jersey in particular, because we have the communities to attend and support the events.” She said that New Jersey’s economic well-being is enhanced by a strong immigrant presence. “We have seen, generation after generation, that immigrants bring energy and are will- ing to work hard to achieve their own American dream,” she said. “At the same time, I support making sure immigrants, just like all New Jersey residents, have access to education, health care, and employment opportunities that will allow them to have their American dream.” She said that “while we still need President Obama and Congress to work together to create a long-term plan to address immigration in the United States, I support the presi- dent’s recent executive action. His plan will allow families to stay together, require undocumented immigrants to pay their taxes without fear of deportation, and shift the focus of depor- tation officials from hard-working immigrants to individuals who have committed crimes while in our country. Millions of undocumented residents with U.S. citizen children and fami- lies will be able to come out of the shadows and begin to really live their American dream.”

Looking at the law

Immigration attorney Michael Wildes of the Manhattan law firm Wildes and Weinberg said that the immigration issue “is a personal journey for my firm and I. My father represented John Lennon in the 1970s” in the successful suit disputing his deportation. “The very authority the president is using to take [his executive] action emanates from the scholarship of that case.” Mr. Wildes, a former federal prosecutor as well as a for- mer mayor of Englewood, said that with millions of undocu- mented aliens in the country, “there are not enough detention centers, handcuffs, beds, or the inclination to remove them.” As a former mayor, he said, he would rather work to develop the trust of the immigrant community. Mr. Wildes pointed out that New Jersey has more than 550,000 undocumented aliens, the sixth highest number in the nation. He noted that the state receives some 50,000

6 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 28, 2014

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Local

immigrants annually. Yet despite this, New Jersey has not set up an office within the state government devoted to immigrant issues, as many other states have done. “State leadership on crucial issues such as drivers licenses and police/community rela- tions has been absent,” he said. “It’s impor- tant to get this right. It’s unsafe to have no intelligence as to who is here and not protect our nation properly.” He cited the old argument that we must “lock down” the border first, and then deal with the people who are here. “Our homeland is unsafe and our economy is in jeopardy,” he said. “We must confront both. Each has its own challenges.” Calling for a partnership between munici- pal and community leaders, charitable insti- tutions, local companies, and media, Mr. Wil- des said that as a result of globalization, many sectors of the American economy are suffer- ing major job losses. “It’s a broken system,” he said, decrying the large number of foreign students “who can’t integrate into our economic system.” Mr. Wildes, who teaches business immigra- tion law at Cardozo Law School, suggested that “we need a start-up visa for entrepre- neurs, with greater access for STEM students to get professional work visas.” Attracting such highly talented people, he said, would

“be a huge feather in our cap.” (STEM is an acronym referring to the aca- demic disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The acronym has been widely used in the immigration debate about access to United States work visas for immigrants who are skilled in these fields.) Mr. Wildes said that Congress has to “step up and create a meaningful platform for American businesses and families to profit from this extraordinary tool of immigration. The greatest risk-takers and entrepreneurs come from the immigrant community,” he said, adding that luminaries such as Bill Gates have publicly affirmed the talent of this group. Indeed, he said, “they are responsible for scores of patents and end up employing Americans, too.” “No doubt our safety and security were shattered 13 years ago but we can’t cripple ourselves in reconstituting [the country] without realizing that our nation was built on the backs of immigrants,” Mr. Wildes said. Remembering that legacy “and creating a system that’s smart, lawful, and safe is what everybody wants.” He suggested that we take actions such as creating visas for low-skilled workers, focus- ing more on dangerous criminals and ter- rorists than on minor violators, and helping

employers in the area of compliance with immigration laws. Mr. Wildes noted also that one implication of keeping people in the shadows is that they will tend to avoid law enforcement authori- ties. That means that witnesses to crimes will not speak up, and that victims themselves may fail to cooperate with law enforcement. He said that he is “sorely disappointed in the media, which is allowing the dialogue on immigration to deteriorate.” He stressed that we must not allow the media to feed into the myth that immigrants bring to our shores “only Ebola or ISIS.” Calling Jews “the biblical people of the passport,” Mr. Wildes said that we of all peo- ple should appreciate immigration, and that as Americans, we must prize our legacy of hospitality. He is glad that President Obama finally “stepped up and did the right thing,” he said. “Eleven presidents in the last half-century exercised the same discretion.”

Humanitarian concerns

Vidalia Acevedo, director of the multicul- tural outreach program for the Center for Hope and Safety (which until recently was called Save our Sisters), said that when she works with victims of domestic vio- lence, “many of the clients that I see are

immigrant women from various back- grounds. These women face a number of issues, challenges, and barriers that keep them from seeking help.” For example, she said, their abusers’ con- stant threat of deportation and their fear of being separated from their children keep immigrant women from leaving or report- ing abuse. In addition, “language barriers limit their ability to inquire about and obtain information and resources, and economics plays a major role in these women remaining in abusive relationships, since they are unable to work and have no support from family or friends in this country,” Ms. Acevedo said. “They are usually isolated and the husband is the only means of support.” However, notwithstanding these chal- lenges, “immigrant women who are victims of domestic violence and [are] married to a citizen or legal permanent resident can get help by self-petitioning for residency under the Violence Against Women Act. They can obtain permanent resident status without the knowledge, cooperation, or participa- tion of their abusive partner. Further, an undocumented immigrant victim of domes- tic violence can qualify for a U-visa when they can demonstrate that they suffered substan- tial physical or mental abuse as a result of

SEE IMMIGRATION PAGE 44

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Israeli from Tenafly makes storybooks with sign language

ABIGAIL KLEIN

LEICHMAN

E yal Rosenthal of Tel

Aviv doesn’t expect

to make a mint from

his new eMotion Sto-

ries digital books in English and American Sign Language. The world’s first interactive bilingual e-library for parents of children with hearing impairment was created as a labor of love, though the market is quite limited. Mr. Rosenthal, who moved to Israel from Tenafly in 2008, expects only to reap the satisfac- tion of bringing a new dimension into the lives of children who oth- erwise would miss out on read- ing classics with their parents such as “Goldilocks,” “Cinder- ella,” “The Ugly Duckling,” “Lit- tle Red Riding Hood,” and “Three Little Pigs.” Each of the interactive fairy tales features pictures by world- class Israeli illustrators and is narrated in American Sign Lan- guage, in synch with the text, by

deaf actress Alexandria Wailes. Soft-launched last May, eMo- tion Stories offers a free down- load of its iPad app along with the first book; consumers can buy more e-books at $3.99 apiece. “There have been 2,000 to 3,000 free downloads and sev- eral hundred downloads of paid books,” Mr. Rosenthal said last month. “Our total revenues are less than $1,000, but this wasn’t done for the money.” His idea was born in Septem- ber 2012, when he was having coffee with a friend who has a deaf niece. Mr. Rosenthal had just read his own nephew a bed- time story, and asked his friend if she could do that with her niece.

“The response was that there are no good solutions,” Mr. Rosenthal said. “Her sister signs her niece a bedtime story or might put on a YouTube video, but there was nothing available for them that comes close to the experience of a parent reading a story to a child. “And so I set out to change that.” Armed with his vision, Mr. Rosenthal — who does business development and product man- agement at Leumi Tech — got hooked up with the develop- ers at Tel Aviv’s Go UFO web and mobile creative application agency. “Without them it could not have occurred,” he said. Go UFO creative partner Eddie Goldenberg said that his team “had a lot of experience in pro bono work, and it’s close to our heart to do things more social and environmental.” Mr. Rosenthal’s concept struck a chord with him. “So-called ‘normal’ children can hear bed- time stories about princesses and dragons, but a hearing-impaired child misses out on that,” Mr. Goldenberg said. “I found it so inspiring that Eyal wanted to enrich the vocab- ulary and allow for a storytime experience. So we started think- ing together how to do it. We wanted to combine an interactive story, like those on tablets that are so popular, with the option to let the child or parent also read it using sign language.” They thought immediately about TV news shows that fea- ture a circle at the bottom of the screen. That circle holds a trans- lator simultaneously turning the words into sign language. “We were certain someone else may

into sign language. “We were certain someone else may have done it, but we saw nothing

have done it, but we saw nothing close, so we decided to do it,” he said. Believing that the most impor- tant aspect of a children’s book is the illustrations — and ham- pered by a shoestring budget — Mr. Goldenberg approached his father, illustrator Mirel Gold- enberg. His father drew the pic- tures for the Ugly Duckling. He also brought Israeli colleagues Noa Liberman and Shiraz Fuman to the project. Both are topflight illustrators, who agreed to work for little money. Mr. Rosenthal next got in touch with a friend from college who now works as a videographer for News 12 New Jersey. His friend agreed to film Ms. Wailes doing the American Sign Language translations. “From there it was a matter of producing the books and making the sign language fit the text,” Mr. Goldenberg said. “We had a lot of quality-assurance and feedback sessions with special educators and other people from the field.” Because every country has its

people from the field.” Because every country has its own sign language, the creators of eMotion

own sign language, the creators of eMotion are offering their “white-label” platform to other developers for free. “The biggest potential market is the United States, and that’s why we decided to launch there first, but other countries can take the platform we built and create their own stories and add the sign language,” Mr. Goldenberg said. “In our hopes and dreams, every country will have its own

app for children with hearing impairment.” Mr. Rosenthal hopes to find some time to launch an Indi- egogo crowdfunding campaign to finance an Israeli version of eMo- tion Stories and to produce addi- tional storybooks in response to enthusiastic feedback from par- ents using the app. “It was definitely a challenge, but it’s been an amazing experi- ence,” he said. ISRAEL 21C

Would like to take this opportunity to thank our donors and volunteers for all of

Would like to take this opportunity to thank our donors and volunteers for all of their support.

to thank our donors and volunteers for all of their support. JFS is here to guide

JFS is here to guide and support those in need and without the support of the community this would not be possible.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees and Staff of JFS we wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving!

For more information on our services or how to support JFS please contact us at 201-837-9090 or visit our website at www.jfsbergen.org

8 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 28, 2014

upcoming at kaplen JCC on the Palisades Big Night Out december 6, 2014 the kaplen
upcoming at kaplen JCC on the Palisades Big Night Out december 6, 2014 the kaplen

upcoming at

kaplen JCC on the Palisades

Big Night Out december 6, 2014 the kaplen jcc on the palisades An evening of
Big Night Out
december 6, 2014
the kaplen jcc on the palisades
An evening of delectable food, drinks, and great music
to support the JCC.
presents
Please join us in honoring merle & fred fish,
amy & mark shirvan and danielle & doug
kaplan for their extraordinary contributions to the JCC.
Visit www.jccotp.org/bignightout to make your
reservation or gift online.
For more info, contact Sharon Potolsky at
201.408.1405 or spotolsky@jccotp.org
Shirah: Annual Chanukah Concert
Celebrating Israel, Chanukah and more! Join us as the
founding director and conductor, Matthew Lazar and
associate conductor Marsha Bryan Edelman lead the
Shirah Choir in celebratory songs from the Jewish choral
tradition. For more info or tickets call 201.408.1465 or
email thurnauer@jccotp.org.
Supported by founders Bernie and Ruth Weinflash z”l and
their Shirah Fund in tribute to Matthew Lazar, the Ethel
and Irving Plutzer Fund for the Shirah Choir, and the
Rhoda Toonkel Fund for the Shirah Choir.
Sun, Dec 14, 1:30 pm
saturday,
december 6, 2014
Art for All:
Special Talents Art Show
Join us for a special art exhibit of projects
created by school-aged children and teens,
community residents and JCC Special
Services participants. For more info,
contact Mindy Liebowitz at 201.408.1490.
Reception: Sun, Dec 7, 1-3 pm
On display throughout December,
Free and open to the community
families
families
film
film
families
families

Alice in Wonderland— The Musical

pushcart players

A dream…. a story…. an adventure! Filled with Lewis Carroll’s brilliant nonsense, madcap characters and Pushcart’s whimsical music and design, this production offers an inspired moment of theater that young viewers will long remember! Group rates available. No refunds/ exchanges. Space is limited. Visit jccotp.org/ theaterseries or call 201.408.1493 for tickets. Sun, Dec 7, 2 pm, $12 advance sale per person, $17 day-of, space permitting

Barbara

a film/discussion with harold chapler

This impeccably-crafted Cold War thriller stars Nina Hoss as a Berlin doctor banished to a rural East-German hospital as punishment for applying for an exit visa. While there, she falls in love with the hospital’s head physician, despite fearing he is a spy. Barbara won Best Director award at this year’s Berlin Film Festival. Mon, Dec 8, 7:30 pm, $5/$7

The Magic of David Caserta

Treat your family to a mind-blowing magic and comedy show that gets the whole audience involved. Families will be thrilled with a magical spectacular like no other. Watch the unbelievable happen! For more info, contact Michal at 201.408.1467 or mkleiman@jccotp.org. Thur, Dec 25, 10:30-11:30 am, Tickets: Adult, $10/$12, Children, $8/$10

to register or for more info, visit jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900. jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900.

or for more info, visit jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900. kaplen JCC on the Palisades taub campus

kaplen JCC on the Palisades taub campus | 411 e clinton ave, t enafly, nj 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org

Local

Surviving the Holocaust, living to 102

Family, friends remember the indomitable Helen Fellowes

JOANNE PALMER

N o one survived the Shoah with- out a story. No one survived the Shoah without some luck.

No one lives to be 102 years old without both luck and a story. Helen Fellowes of Ridgewood, who died on November 3 at 102, took advantage of some lucky breaks, and she had very many stories. Here’s one:

Ms. Fellowes’ husband, Donald, was reunited with their two children, Martha and George, after the war, but he could not find his wife. He had no idea if she had survived. “We waited in Budapest for my mother to return, but she did not, so we went back to Nagyvarad,” the small Hun- garian town where they had lived together long ago, before their part of the world went crazy, George Fellowes said. It was her sixth birthday, said Ms. Fel- lowes’ daughter, now Martha Tiktin. “My dad bought me a bouquet of red roses. And then he put me down for a nap, and he said, ‘The only thing I wish for your birth- day is that your mother would come back.’ “And then somebody woke me from my nap. I didn’t recognize her. It was my mother.” That’s the fairy tale part. Some reality — “The story is that my mother weighed 59 pounds then,” George Fellowes said. “That might be an exaggeration. She might have weighed as much as 80 pounds. Maybe. But no more than that.” And not only did Martha not recognize her mother, but at first she was frightened by her. This is from the middle of Helen Fel- lowes’ story. To start at the beginning, Helen Grosz was born in Budapest in 1912. Her father was a boot maker — and he also was a war veteran. He fought with the Hus- sars — the cavalry, who by definition rode horses to war — in World War I, on the side of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. She mar- ried Donald Freiberger, and they moved

to Nagyvarad. The town is in Transylva- nia, and it was exchanged between Hun- gary and Romania — where it is known as Oradea — many times. She was a milliner, he was a tailor; their family, which even- tually included Martha and George, lived there in peace until well after the start of World War II. Because Hungary was a collaboration- ist state, Germany did not go after its Jews until late in the war. When the Nazis began their roundups, they started at the edges of the country. They came to Nagyvarad, and sent Donald Freiberger to a forced labor camp on the Russian front. “My mother decided that instead of staying in

Above, Helen Fellowes and her chil- dren as she celebrated turning 100; inset, at 36.
Above, Helen Fellowes and her chil-
dren as she celebrated turning 100;
inset, at 36.

Nagyvarad, she would move us to Buda- pest, which is at the center of Hungary. Had she stayed, we all would have been taken.” Eventually the Nazis took Helen from her father’s house, but they did not take her father because he was an ex-Hussar, and they did not take her children either. Her father, Mikhael Grosz, took Martha and George to one of Raoul Wallenberg’s safe houses, where they lived out the rest of the war. Helen, meanwhile, “went through a series of concentration camps, and even- tually ended up on a forced march,” her son said. That was a death march; the Germans, who knew by that point that the war was ending and that they were losing, wanted all the women to die as soon as pos- sible, so that they could make their own escape. “The Germans had been making them carry huge boulders, to tire them

out,” Rabbi David Fine of Temple Israel in Ridgewood, Ms. Fellowes’ shul, said. But the women somehow were able to keep going. They talked about recipes, he said; in fact, “she still had a book of recipes, in very small handwriting,” he said. “They would sing songs as they walked, and it once made the female German guards cry. She saw them crying.”

Her son, her daughter, and Rabbi Fine all report that Ms. Fellowes said that when she had to keep going, “she imagined her children walking in front of her,” as Rabbi Fine said. “That’s what kept her going.” When the Russians finally caught up with the women, “they were worse than the Germans,” he continued. “They went to rape everyone, but she was down to 60 pounds, and she was older than everyone else, so they said ‘yuck’ and passed her by.” When Helen rejoined her family in Nagyvarad, she and Donald decided that they had to leave. Only three Jewish chil- dren from the town had survived the war,

three Jewish chil- dren from the town had survived the war, When we were kids, the

When we were kids, the subject of the Holocaust was never mentioned. It was an extraordinary void.

GEORGE FELLOWES

and the townspeople made it clear that Jews were not welcome there. “It was a terrible time,” George Fellowes said. His mother’s brother Dan, an engineer, had emigrated to New York before the war, and established himself there. “He tried to get us into the United States, but he was unable to get us a visa,” Mr. Fel- lowes said. “The Statue of Liberty says ‘Give us your tired, your poor,’ but it didn’t seem to apply to Jews in those days.” Still the family finally got a visa to the Domini- can Republic, which was accepting Jews in those immediate postwar years. On their way to the Dominican Repub- lic, the Freibergers stopped in New York to visit Dan Grosz. “I was ill — I had con- tracted tuberculosis of the spine in the Wallenberg camp — so I went immediately to St. Luke’s Hospital,” Mr. Fellowes said. That illness, which was serious, had the paradoxical effect of smoothing out their lives in the United States. The family got extension after extension to their tourist visas while George remained in the hos- pital. Eventually, they were served with a deportation notice. “About two weeks before we were to be deported,” Truman signed an order allowing aliens in the country right now to stay and to apply for green cards, so we ended up being able to stay in the States, he said. The family became American citizens

10 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 28, 2014

Local

Local Helen Grosz as a child; Helen and Donald Freiberger on their wedding day. in 1952,
Local Helen Grosz as a child; Helen and Donald Freiberger on their wedding day. in 1952,

Helen Grosz as a child; Helen and Donald Freiberger on their wedding day.

in 1952, and Donald and Helen Frei- berger decided that they’d like to fit in. They wanted an American name. “So my father literally went to a Manhattan phone book, and looked under F for a name that sounded American to him. The fact that Fellowes sounds more Brit- ish than American — that was lost on him, because of the intensity of their desire to assimilate.” Still, Helen and Donald Fellowes were deeply interested in Israel, and their con- nection with Judaism was strong enough for them to join a small Orthodox shul The family moved to the Bronx. “We came over with literally nothing,” George Fellowes said. But Donald, who had been apprenticed to a tailor when he was 10 years old, had no problem find- ing work. He “was all thumbs — except when it came to handling a needle,” his son said. “He was outstanding. When he picked up a needle and thread, he was extraordinary. “He produced clothing for Saks Fifth Avenue and other high-end places. He could literally look at a picture of cloth- ing in the Sunday Times magazine sec- tion and reproduce it.” Helen tried to run a clothing store, but she suffered from severe migraines and was unable to work steadily enough. Instead, she focused on her children. “When we were kids, the subject of the Holocaust was never mentioned,” George Fellowes said. “It was an extraor- dinary void. Based on my experience, the people who survived wanted so much to assimilate, to forget what they had gone through in Europe, that it was never mentioned.” George and Martha Fellowes grew up in the Bronx. Martha married and lived in Rio de Janeiro for 10 years, but George and his wife moved to Ridgewood, and

then to Saddle River. The neighbor- hood where the elder Fellowes lived was becoming increasingly unsafe. One night, George Fellowes said, a calm phone conversation with his father even- tually brought out the fact that the night before, an intruder had climbed into the apartment. “My father, all 5 foot 4 inches of him, starting yelling at him, and he went back out the window. “And then I sort of freaked, and said ‘O.K. Guess what? You’re moving to New Jersey.’” His parents weren’t sure — and they were on their way to Rio to see their new grandchild — so “I said, ‘I don’t care. You don’t have to move to New Jersey if you don’t want to, but your furniture is moving.’” That week, Helen and Donald Fellowes found an apartment in Ridgewood. They lived together in Ridgewood until Mr. Fellowes died in 1992. He was almost 85. Ms. Fellowes stayed there until she died. “My mother was an extraordinarily strong woman, and she was very direct,” Mr. Fellowes said. “I guess it comes with age as well. She had no filters. If she thought something, she said it. “She had gone through such incred- ible things, but she never complained about them afterward. The only thing she ever complained about is when we didn’t call often enough. It was a stan- dard Jewish mother joke, but it is liter- ally true. ‘What’s the matter,’ she’d say, in her Hungarian accent. ‘Is your finger broken?’” After Donald Fellowes died, Helen and her children were interviewed by the Shoah Foundation. “For many years, I couldn’t listen to my mother’s tape,” George said. “My wife finally prevailed on me to sit with her and listen to her tape, and she was able to provide us with

SEE FELLOWES PAGE 48

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Love and hate in Teaneck

Rabbi Pruzansky’s blog post stirs worldwide reaction

JOANNE PALMER

W riting a blog post in response to the bloody, brutal, and unprecedented murder of four Jews at

prayer in Jerusalem and the Druze police officer who tried to protect them on Novem- ber 18, Rabbi Steven Pruzansky of Congrega- tion Bnai Yeshurun in Teaneck has set off a firestorm. Rabbi Pruzansky is a lawyer and a vivid writer whose political views are out of the mainstream. In “Dealing With Savages,” the post he put up last Friday and had taken down by Sunday, he urged collective punishment. Rabbi Pruzansky’s blog is at rabbipru- zansky.com. Although this post has been removed it has been cached. The post was removed, he told the wire service JTA, in response to unspecified threats, not because he regretted anything he had written. “I don’t think I’m saying anything outlandish,” JTA reported Rabbi Pruzansky as saying. “How does a human being (or two) walk into a synagogue and begin hacking at wor- shippers who are immersed in prayer, leav- ing behind a trail of blood, victims, grief and horror?” he wrote. “The question is mis- placed because no ‘human being’ could do such a thing. It would have to be a beast in human form, a relic from primitive times before true humans became civilized. The Arab-Muslim animals that span the globe chopping, hacking and merrily decapitating — from Iraq to Jerusalem to New York to Okla- homa, and places in between and beyond — are a discredit even to the term ‘animal.’ Most animals are not that brutal.” Israel must act to change this dynamic, he continued. “At a certain point, the unrestrained behavior of unruly animals becomes the fault of the zookeeper, not the animals.” The way to deal with that, Rabbi Pruzan- sky said, must be based on the fact that “the Arabs who deal in the land of Israel are the enemy in that war and must be vanquished.” There can be no two-state solution, he says. “Israel should make clear that a Pales- tinian state will never be created between the river and the sea. There will be no non- Jewish national entity tolerated.” To that end, terrorists’ dead bodies “will not be returned to their families but will be cre- mated, and perhaps the ashes buried with deceased pigs.” The houses of all relatives

buried with deceased pigs.” The houses of all relatives Thousands of Muslim men pray at the

Thousands of Muslim men pray at the Al-Aksa Mosque on the Temple Mount at the end of the holy month of Ramadan, which fell this year on July 28. Rabbi Steven Pruzansky’s deleted blog post suggested relocating the mosque.

up to and including first cousins should be destroyed, and the people should be deported. If more than one terrorist comes from any one village, the village itself should be destroyed. Rioters should be shot, and the “media barred from scenes of violence, cell service canceled and cameras confiscated, like in most war zones.” Muslims should not be allowed on the Temple Mount, he wrote, and if possible, the “mosque and the dome can be uplifted intact and reset in Saudi Arabia, Syria or wherever it is wanted.” Israeli Arabs on the whole would have to go — “If Israeli Arabs persist in their sup- port of terror — now at a low level, but who can predict the future? — they should forfeit their citizenship and be returned to military rule as it was before 1966.” But, he contin- ues, “Of course those who wish to stay and be peaceful, acknowledging the sovereignty of the Jewish people in the land of Israel, are welcome to stay. But an enemy is an enemy…” These actions indeed would be draco- nian, Rabbi Pruzansky acknowledges, and the world, quick to judge Jews and slow to protect them, would react with disgust and rage. And, in fact, the short-term repercus- sions would be necessary. Still, Israelis must realize that their enemies — and all the mur- derous attacks come from the same larger enemy — “rides our buses, shops in our malls, drives on our roads and lives just two miles from us. The same enemy.” (Rabbi Pruzansky lives in Teaneck, many

commentators have pointed out, so his pro- noun use here is perhaps less than entirely accurate.) “Change the dynamic,” he concludes. “Change the terms of the debate. Change the rules of war. And change the outcome that the enemy now anticipates. Such will save Jewish lives, and even bring redemption.” Reaction to the blog post was swift and strong; much of it was negative although some responses cheered Rabbi Pruzansky on. On Monday night, in a new post he called “Clarification!” Rabbi Pruzansky tried to clear up what he called distortions. “Let me be absolutely clear,” he began. “The ‘savages’ referred to in ‘Dealing with Sav- ages’ were terrorists such as those who per- petrated the horrific massacre in Har Nof last week.” But, he continued, “to extrapo- late from that sentiment and apply it to all Arabs or all Muslims is repugnant to me, and a complete distortion of what I wrote and intended to write. To the extent that my words could be misinterpreted, I take full responsibility and regret the lack of clarity.” Rabbi Pruzansky has been in the news fre- quently during these last few weeks. Three of his blog posts have attacked Gary Rosen- blatt, the publisher of the Jewish Week, as resembling Julius Streicher, the publisher of the notorious Nazi propaganda rag “Die Sturmer.” Debate between his defenders and his detractors has been vocal and had barely died down when this one erupted. Strikingly, Rabbi Pruzansky’s proposed solution to the situation goes far beyond

SLIMAN KHADER/FLASH90

what Israelis are proposing. As Uriel Heil- man wrote in JTA, “Meanwhile, in Israel, officials across the political spectrum — from Justice Minister Tzipi Livni of the centrist Hatnua party to Economy Minister Naftali Bennett of the far-right Jewish Home party — have spoken out forcefully in recent days against the kind of collective punishment that Pruzansky seems to advocate. And Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last week weighed in with a statement saying, “There can be no discrimination against Israeli-Arabs. We must not generalize about an entire public due to a small and violent minority. The vast majority of Israel’s Arab citizens are law abiding and whoever breaks the law, we will take determined and vigor- ous action against him.” Shmuel Goldin is the rabbi of Congrega- tion Ahavath Torah in Englewood. Although he is a former president of the Rabbinical Council of America, he spoke not as its rep- resentative but simply for himself when he said, “While I understand and share the deep frustration with the events in the Middle East that moved Rabbi Pruzansky to write his words, his conclusion and recom- mendations do not represent my position. Nor, I believe, do they represent the posi- tion of most Orthodox rabbis, or of most people within the Orthodox community.” Rabbi Pruzansky had been set to be one of the speakers at the Orthodox Union’s convention, set for December 26 through December 28 in Tarrytown, N.Y. In fact, his picture appeared on the ad that ran in last

SEE PRUZANSKY PAGE 44

12 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 28, 2014

Local

Local Dan Shlufman and Jon Mangot on the court of Nahariya’s professional basketball team. Men with

Dan Shlufman and Jon Mangot on the court of Nahariya’s professional basketball team.

Men with a mission

Federation gathers guys for April Israel trip

Larry yudeLson

D an Shlufman of Tenafly and Jon Mangot of Haworth are looking for a few good men. Actually, more than a few.

They want at least enough of them to fill

a bus. The two are organizing a trip to Israel for the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey — a mission for men only, to take place in April. “We gear the trip a little bit more toward physical activities,” Mr. Shlufman explained. “It’s an incredible opportunity to do and see things that you would never experience other than on a Federation mission, and other than with fellow men,” Mr. Shlufman said. The two traveled together to Israel in 2008 — the last time the federation had a mission just for men. They had met and became friends a couple years earlier on another such mission that Mr. Shlufman, 50, “just went on on a whim.” (Mr. Man- got is 52.) “I knew nobody. I did not know a per- son on the trip. From that time, Jon has become one of my closest friends,” he said. “It was a life-changing experience,” he said. On Monday night, the pair hosted the first informational meeting to promote the mission. The speaker was Shlomi Avni, a former officer with the Israeli SEALs and the founder of a social service agency in the federation’s Israeli sister city of Nahariya. The Men’s Mission will take advantage of both of Mr. Avni’s roles, soldier and social worker.

As a federation trip, it will see some of the social service projects the federation funds in Nahariya and elsewhere around the country. But it will also have a gung-ho element. Trip members will take part in the SEAL training alongside the high school stu- dents with whom Mr. Avni works. Then they’ll travel up to — but not across — the Lebanese border in torpedo boats. They’ll tour an underground bullet factory, where before the State of Israel was created Jewish militias manufactured ammunition to fight the British. On Yom Ha’atzmaut, they’ll visit an air force base to see planes take off from the tarmac for their Independence Day air shows. “We’ll mix in touristy things with chari- table things and fun things,” Mr. Shlufman said. “We’ll be meeting with the CEO of Google Israel, the CEOs of other startups. We want to emotionally connect men in our community both to Israel and to Federation. “We’re targeting any man between 35 and 75. The average age is between 40 and 55. We have one guy who is coming with his son, who is in his 20s. We have people who have never been to Israel and one guy who has been a number of times.” And that’s just from the first dozen peo- ple to sign up. Mr. Shlufman emphasizes that the trip is designed to fit into a busy schedule. “You’re only missing one weekend with your family and one week from work,” he said. The recommended flight is Sunday

night out of JFK; we’ll start the mission at

4 p.m. Monday at the Knesset. It will end

the following Saturday night.

“Basically you’ll be back by Sunday at

4 or 5 a.m.”

House Calls Top $ Paid for Judaica Collectibles 346 Palisade Avenue, Bogota, NJ
House
Calls
Top $ Paid
for Judaica
Collectibles
346 Palisade Avenue, Bogota, NJ
House Calls Top $ Paid for Judaica Collectibles 346 Palisade Avenue, Bogota, NJ Jewish standard nOVeMBer

Giving Tuesday

Putting the give into Thanksgiving

Area agencies prep for Giving Tuesday

Larry yudeLson

I n the beginning was Robert Browne, an Anglican priest who in 1581 was the first to secede from the 47-year-old Church of England. (This at the time when those who skipped weekly services were fined

by the state.) And Brownism begot the Mayflower colo- nists, and the colonists begot Plymouth Colony, and the Colony begot, two or three centuries later, Thanksgiving and America’s sole four-day yontiff. And in the late 20th century, Thanksgiving begot Black Friday, when the Christmas shopping season was her- alded with amazing discounts that were in-store only, leading some pilgrims to camp out overnight and others to trample their fellow pilgrims to death. And lo, in 2005 Scott Silverman of Shop.org said: “Let there be Cyber Monday,” and Mr. Silverman sent out a press release, and the New York Times duly reported that “millions of otherwise productive working Americans, fresh off a Thanksgiving weekend of window shopping, were returning to high-speed Internet connections at work Monday and buying what they liked.” And the shoppers saw Cyber Monday, and it was good. And in 2006 online spending on Cyber Monday jumped 25 percent to $608 million, and by 2011, notwithstanding the spread of high speed Internet at home, and the fact 7 per- cent of human resource managers had reported firing an employee for holiday shopping, that figure had doubled. So it was that in 2012 the 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation decided to combine Thanksgiving spirit of gratitude with Cyber Monday’s spirit of online credit card use to draw attention to philanthropy. Thus was born Giving Tuesday, a day in which Ameri- cans are encouraged to give back to their community and to highlight their philanthropic sides in their online inter- actions, and of course to give generously. And in 2013, online gifts on Giving Tuesday rose 90 per- cent over 2012, and according to one credit card proces- sor, the average gift rose from $101 to $142, and the Chron- icle of Philanthropies saw that it was good. So it was that in 2014 the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey came aboard and promoted the idea of Giving Tuesday to the organizations of Northern New Jersey, both as a Jewish coalition and as part of a broader, nonsectarian Northern New Jersey Giving Tuesday program. In keeping with the principles of Reverend Browne, who was the founder of decentralized Congregationalism, different organizations have been participating in Giving Tuesday in different ways. At the federation itself, Giving Tuesday is an oppor- tunity for a classic display of the organization’s mixture of hands-on community involvement and leadership philanthropy. Starting early, on Monday Federation staff packed frozen turkeys and large chickens for a food pantry in Paterson. “Hunger is still a huge factor in northern New Jersey,” said Miriam Allenson of the federation. On noon on Giving Tuesday, volunteers from Flames of Giving will gather at the federation’s Paramus offices to prepare gifts for residents of the Federation Apartments in

Paterson, a senior independent living facility. Volunteers are invited to bring two mugs, candy to pack in the mugs, and holiday cards. The federation will supply cellophane and wrapping paper. That evening, the organization is hosting Laura Silver, author of “Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food” as part of its “Leadership Leads” program. Leaders of the federation and its affiliated agencies are invited to learn about the knish — a food that to Ms. Allenson “represents the past, present, and future of the Jewish community” — and to make their pledges for the federation’s annual campaign. The Jewish Home Family is involving its residents, cli- ents, and outside volunteers — that could be you — in sort- ing medical supplies. No longer needed but still usable medical supplies have been collected; now people have to sort them so they can be shipped overseas where they are needed. Please call Charlene Vannucci at 201-784-1414, ext. 4237, if you are interested. The Bergen County YJCC in Washington Township has jumped into the social media nature of the Giving Tues- day event. (Giving Tuesday organizers boast that last year,

there were 320,000 posts to Twitter with the tag “#Giv- ingTuesday.) From early in November, Rhonda Roth of the YJCC has been posting to the center’s Facebook page, highlighting spreading awareness of both Giving Tuesday and the work the YJCC does for the community. Modeled on the popular “Humans of New York” Facebook posts, these posts feature a member of the YJCC community and comments. The center also has set up a special dedicated online giving site. And on Tuesday, the word will go forth via an email to members that Giving Tuesday is here, and a donation would be appropriate. Across Bergen County in Tenafly, the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades is preparing for its own Giving Tuesday appeal. It will highlight the work it does for children with special needs, for children with cancer, and in feeding seniors. “When you make donations and support your com- munity, you’re also helping yourself,” said Jeff Nadler, the JCC’s chief development officer. “You’re helping your fam- ily, helping your neighbors, and you’re helping the place where you live. You strengthen us as a whole.”

14 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

A global day dedicated to giving back.
A global day
dedicated to
giving back.

On December 2nd, we invite you to participate in #GivingTuesday by making a gift to the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades.

The JCC is a welcoming home away from home for all who pass through its doors. Deeply rooted in shared Jewish values and tradition, the JCC offers cultural, recreational and educational programming for people at every age and stage of life.

the Jcc is proud to provide extensive social services to our community, and with the generous help of people liKe you, the Jcc:

• Assists 600 children with special needs reach their potential

• Offers more than 70 programs a month for people with special challenges

• Supports preschoolers with developmental difficulties at its award-winning Therapeutic Nursery, which draws people from around the country and around the world

• Gives children with cancer and other blood disorders, together with their siblings, a week of summer fun at Camp Dream Street

• Teaches developmentally challenged teens and young adults valuable life skills and vocational training that improve their daily lives

• Serves more than 13,000 meals to seniors yearly

• Provides a safe, caring environment and programming for frail elders, including those suffering from Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia

• Donates hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships to families facing financial difficulties, and more.

Give where you live and support your JCC! www.jccotp.org/givingtuesday

To make a donation, find out how to start an endowment or to learn more about how you can make a difference, contact Jeff Nadler at 201.408.1412 or jnadler@jccotp.org.

Kaplen JCC on the Palisades taub campus | 411 e clinton ave, tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org

BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School

BLACK FRIDAY. C

BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut

DECEM

A global movement to inspire

BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut
BLACK FRIDAY. C DECEM A global movement to inspire Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut

Academies at Gerrard Berman Day School Areyvut Ben Porat Yosef Boys Town of Jerusalem Congregation Beth Sholom Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation B’nai Israel Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey

B’nai Israel Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey Jewi sh OF NO Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High Project

Jewi sh

OF NO

Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey Jewi sh OF NO Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High Project Ezr Rosenbaum
Jewish Historical Society of North Jersey Jewi sh OF NO Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High Project Ezr Rosenbaum

Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High Project Ezr Rosenbaum Yeshiva of Nor Sharshere Solomon Schechter Day Scho Temple Beth El of Nor The Moriah Sc

On Giving Tuesday, join the movement to give time, energy and donations to your favorite chari Just contact them to find out how you can get involved and be part of a global day of true than

16 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

CYBER MONDAY.

CYBER MONDAY. MBER 2 pire and celebrate generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
CYBER MONDAY. MBER 2 pire and celebrate generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
CYBER MONDAY. MBER 2 pire and celebrate generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
CYBER MONDAY. MBER 2 pire and celebrate generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
CYBER MONDAY. MBER 2 pire and celebrate generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
CYBER MONDAY. MBER 2 pire and celebrate generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

MBER 2

pire and celebrate generosity.

i sh Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY iva High School for Girls roject Ezra
generosity. i s h Federation OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY iva High School for Girls roject Ezra

iva High School for Girls roject Ezra iva of North Jersey (RYNJ) Sharsheret Day School of Bergen County El of Northern Valley Moriah School

rite charities. true thanksgiving.

Valley Moriah School rite charities. true thanksgiving. Tomchei Shabbos Torah Academy of Bergen County Yavneh
Valley Moriah School rite charities. true thanksgiving. Tomchei Shabbos Torah Academy of Bergen County Yavneh

Tomchei Shabbos Torah Academy of Bergen County Yavneh Academy Yeshivat Noam

Thank you to our media sponsor

Academy of Bergen County Yavneh Academy Yeshivat Noam Thank you to our media sponsor Jewish standard
Jewish Association for Developmental Disabilities (J-ADD) is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that has served individuals
Jewish Association for Developmental Disabilities
(J-ADD) is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that has
served individuals with intellectual and developmental
disabilities and their families in the Northern New Jersey
Jewish Community for over 25 years. J-ADD provides
Residential, Vocational and Respite Services. J-ADD has
been on the front lines of improving the lives of those
with intellectual and developmental disabilities. J-ADD
is funded by the Division of Developmental Disabilities
and through the support of community donors, the
JFNNJ and through Flowers by J-ADD.
www.j-add.org
190 Moore Street, Suite 272
Hackensack, NJ 07601-7418
201-457-0058
Street, Suite 272 Hackensack, NJ 07601-7418 201-457-0058 During the holidays we make the time to visit
During the holidays we make the time to visit with loved ones and spend time
During the holidays we make the time to visit
with loved ones and spend time with our families.
We create warm memories of happy times.
At Daughters of Miriam Center/The Gallen Institute,
through our skilled nursing facility, subacute care,
dementia care pavilion, and senior apartments,
we provide care for seniors who may not
have their own families or whose families
cannot give them the level of care they need.
On December 2 join us for Giving Tuesday
and participate in a national day of generosity.
You can help us provide those warm memories
to the seniors who are part of the Daughters of
Miriam Center/The Gallen Institute family.
Visit our website to explore opportunities for
giving or to learn how you can become a volunteer.
www.daughtersofmiriamcenter.org
Daughters of Miriam Center/The Gallen Institute
155 Hazel Street, Clifton, NJ 07011 · (973) 772-3700 · www.daughtersofmiriamcenter.org

18 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

100 years and counting! As we start our next 100, can we count on you?
100 years and counting! As we start our next 100, can we count on you?

100 years and counting!

As we start our next 100, can we count on you?

The Jewish Home Family is celebrating our 100th anniversary. But as soon as we cut the cake, we’re setting course for our next hundred years.

Be a part of shaping the future of our community’s elder care.

Give your time, your energy, and your support.

www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate

or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237

Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
Give your time, your energy, and your support. www. jewishhomefamily.org/donate or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237
or volunteer, by calling 201-750-4237 the Jewish standard asks that you support the organizations

the Jewish standard asks that you support the organizations listed in this section. Let’s all make Giving tuesday a great success.

Editorial

Editorial Thanksgiving “O ver the river, and through the wood, trot fast, my dapple-gray! Spring over

Thanksgiving

“O ver the river,

and through the

wood,

trot fast, my

dapple-gray! Spring over the ground like a hunting-hound! For ’tis Thanksgiving Day.” These are hard times that we are living through now. Monsters use pre- historic technology to behead their victims, and then use high tech to show off their sick handiwork all over the Internet. (Sort of like deranged, bizarro-world kindergarteners com- ing home with finger paintings — only, you know, different.) Monsters invade sanctuaries to kill men deep in prayer. Monsters drive cars into small children. Monsters shoot missiles at innocents. Mon- sters invade elementary schools with guns and shoot children. Monsters in human form seem to be all around us. But we cannot give in to monsters. Sometimes it seems as if the only way to maintain hope is through a willed naiveté, a resolute refusal to believe that only bad things are pos- sible. And if occasional willed naiveté were the only way to let in any light, then we should go right ahead, and do as Alice’s White Queen did — believe at least six impossible things before breakfast.

This week, we can look to the example of Helen Fellowes, who died two weeks ago — her story is on page 10. She was 102 years old, and she sur- vived the Holocaust; in fact she was one of its oldest remaining survivors. She already had been well into adult- hood when her life was interrupted, made into hell, and almost ended. But she did not give in to despair. We do not know what allowed her to live such a long and full life — certainly some of it is the luck of the genetic draw, despite the malevolence of his- tory — but we can assume that some of it was the sheer stubborn refusal to give up. Ever. So now Thanksgiving is coming. Summer is long gone, the leaves are almost all down and the few that are left are brown and clinging to their trees in what we know is a futile effort to stay above ground. But. But Thanksgiving is a festival that celebrates the romance of the American adventure, of the Ameri- can dream if only we could still use those words without the heavy- handed irony that attaches to them now. Yes, we can get all cynical about it, go on about the oppres- sion of the natives, and we proba- bly would be right. But we also can give in to the beauty of the Currier

and Ives-ness of it, to the vision of neat fields and pastures and white glistening snow. We Jews, just like all other Ameri- cans, are extraordinarily lucky to be living in this country. It is imperfect, yes — it is after all a human institu- tion — but it is very good. It offers us democracy, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and the oppor- tunity to pursue happiness, both col- lectively and individually. This Thanksgiving, let us all take a day or two off from fear and anger to glory in what we have. Let’s allow our imaginary dapple-gray (what- ever that might be — yes, a horse, but beyond that who knows?) to trot freely. Let’s allow our spir- its to spring over the ground like hunting-hounds. And while we’re at it, let’s remem- ber Giving Tuesday, a project, spear- headed locally for the Jewish com- munity by the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey and joined enthusiastically by many other agen- cies. It asks us to give thanks for what we have on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving painlessly, on line. (Or you can show up with fellow volun- teers to give back in person.) Let’s give thanks for life and light and love, and for the country that allows us to pursue them. —JP

TruTh regardless of consequences

Ignorance of Israel is bliss on campus

R ecently my organization, This World: The Values Network, and I have dramatically revved up our efforts on campus to defend Israel. The Jewish state is being slaughtered on campus. Most major Ameri-

can universities today have a very active Students for Justice For

Palestine, an Israel Apartheid Week, a strong BDS movement, and phenomenal protests against any substantial pro-Israel speaker. The Jewish campus response, as I noted in my last column, is

milquetoast-like and inadequate, leading to Israel’s name being mightily and perhaps irreversibly impugned. Let’s look at the most important charge. Israel is an apartheid state committed to disenfranchising the Palestinians as evidenced by their expansion of settlements. Israel is pre-Mandela South Africa. You can believe this only by omit- ting the fact that all the land ceded by Israel to the Palestinians in peace deals has been transformed every time into terrorist enclaves; by omitting that Hamas is a geno- cidal organization committed in

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach

Rabbi

Shmuley

Boteach

its charter to Israel’s destruction and the murder of Jews worldwide; by omitting that the Palestinian

Authority is now a dictatorship run by Mahmoud Abbas, who has not gone to elections in more than a decade; by omitting that Abbas runs a kleptocracy enriching his sons Tarik and Yasser, who ille- gally control the construction and cigarette trade, among other lucrative industries; by omitting that Nelson Mandela was a true apostle of peace, who languished in jail for 27 years, while Yas- ser Arafat is the father of international terrorism, who made his name by blowing up children; by omitting that Arab citizens of Israel enjoy more rights than Arabs anywhere in the Middle East; by omitting that Arabs serve at the highest levels of Israeli officialdom, including the Supreme Court, something unthink- able in an apartheid regime; by omitting that Israeli hospitals treated Abbas’ wife and the daughter of the current Hamas leader; by omitting that the single greatest threat to world civi- lization today is not the Jews and the puny state of Israel but radical Islamic terrorism that is producing monsters like ISIS, Hamas, and Boko Haram; and by distorting the record of the

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach of Englewood is the author of 30 books, winner of the London Times Preacher of the Year Competition, and recipient of the American Jewish Press Association’s highest award for excellence in Commentary. He has just published “Kosher Lust: Love is Not the Answer.” Follow him on Twitter @RabbiShmuley.

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20 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

   

Opinion

 

brave black population of South Africa, who are models of reconcili- ation and forgiveness. The Jews are the indigenous people of Israel. It is not I who says it but the Christian Bible. Read the New Testament and try to find men- tion of a single Arab resident of ancient Israel. The Jews were the land’s inhabitants, and they were displaced by a European colonial occu- pier named Rome. They were forcibly removed from their land and displaced for 2,000 years, while a small remnant always remained. The Jews prayed thrice daily to return to their land. And when finally granted the political opportunity, they came and drained the swamps, irrigated the sands, and made the land so much more inhabitable for Arab brethren that had migrated in the interim.

Shopping for a shop class

A lmost two months ago, as the sun sank toward the horizon, and the Jewish world prepared for Sukkot, my sons tested out their new wiffleball cannon.

For weeks, my fourth-grader and my husband planned their father-son project. On Sundays through- out the summer, they shopped at Sears and Home

 

didn’t exist: shop class. Some teens in my grade were academically gifted. They would go on to become doctors and lawyers

and rabbis and physicists and politicians. There were teens with talent, who went on to become artists and musicians and writers and photographers. But there were also kids who excelled at working with their hands. So, along with their Gemara and Jewish phi-

 

Depot for PVC pipes of various shapes and diameters

a

until they had collected all the right pieces and connectors, consulting the Do-It-Yourself instructions in Popular Mechanics. The eleventh-grader sawed everything down to the right length. The high school freshman determined the optimal distance that the batter should stand from the barrel. It was left to the fourth-grader to duct-tape the contrap- tion to the leaf blower, wrestle it onto

Helen

Helen

losophy and Ivrit classes, they learned how to create things out of wood and metal and wiring and circuits. Maybe they weren’t at the top of their class in calculus or chemistry, but in shop, they were kings. I can say with feeling and honesty that I am madly in love with my chil- dren’s high school. Walking through the halls, I am overwhelmed by the sensa- tion of Jewish belonging that it kindles, and energized by the atmosphere of

learning and scholarship and kinship and enthusiasm that surge through

blood fest by launching a never-ending terror war against Israel’s buses, schools, and cafes. Rather than Western universities demanding that the Palestinians stop the never-ending incitement against the Jews and the promises to push them into the sea, rather than calling out Mahmoud Abbas for his monstrous lies about an Israeli genocide in Gaza, rather than object-

the picnic table on the lawn, plug it in, and switch it on. The cannon works. As long as some- one stands at the feeder pipe and drops

Maryles

Shankman

to the Palestinian authority in the Oslo peace accords. Should it create

wiffleballs into the top, it fires fastballs. As I stood in the kitchen mixing honey cake and skim- ming chicken soup, the boys took turns at bat, enjoy- ing the machine they had built with their own hands. Which got me to thinking. I was blessed to attend a remarkable Jewish high school, Ida Crown Jewish Academy, in Chicago. What made it remarkable? Small classes. Teachers who cared. A pretty, airy new build- ing with a great layout. A real gym, with basketball nets, rings, a pommel horse, bleachers. A crazy mix of teens from all walks of Jewish life. I made friends with kids from public schools whose families didn’t keep kosher, kids who had been frum from birth, the chil-

 

the air. The kids, as they did at my high school, come from all walks of Jewish life. The teach- ers are dynamic, experts in their fields. We have a tol- erant and fair-minded principal. The building is enor- mous and spectacular. The many sports teams win championships. They offer a terrific new arts track. They offer a thrilling new engineering track. They offer every activity and club under the sun. Except for shop. They’re not alone in this omission. None of the other Jewish high schools offer it, either. Someone solve this mystery for me. Is it an insurance issue? A safety issue? All those computers that are outdated within five years and have to be replaced, did they take over the space that used to be allotted to lathes, clamps, sanders, and jigsaws? I cannot think of a better and more useful addition to our high schools. In our society, plumbers, elec- tricians, carpenters, and people who repair cars are just as necessary as doctors and hedge fund man- agers. There are great numbers of Orthodox Jewish kids who would shine in these fields, who could hap- pily shape a successful and satisfying career out of them — if they only had access to the tools and an experienced and knowledgeable teacher. So, if anyone reading my column today has influ- ence in this matter, please consider this; perhaps we already have enough awesome options for high school kids striving to get into Ivy League col- leges. Perhaps what our community really needs

are more classes where Orthodox boys and girls can learn the joy and satisfaction of building some- thing with their own hands, out of wood and wir- ing, sheet metal and pipes.

 

that lead to tens of thousands of rockets being fired at Israeli hospi-

Along with their Gemara and Jewish philosophy and Ivrit classes, they learned how to create things out of wood and metal and wiring and circuits.

dren of Holocaust survivors and children who grew up under Communism, privileged kids, poor kids. There were kids from Russia and Israel and Egypt and Iran, as well as Omaha, Minneapolis, and Peoria. We had sports teams and cheerleaders. A drama club, an art

tals and schools.

club. There were classes for the average student and classes for the academically advanced. We were for- tunate to have a tolerant and fair-minded principal. Also this, which I never realized was special and unique until I grew up and moved to a place where it

 

Helen Maryles Shankman’s short fiction has appeared in many publications, including The Kenyon Review and JewishFiction.net. Her debut novel, “The Color of Light,” is available on Amazon. She lives in Teaneck.

 

and full human rights of post-apartheid South Africa for both its Jew- ish and its Arab citizens.

Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of the Jewish Standard. The Jewish Standard reserves the right to edit letters. Be sure to include your town. Email jstandardletters@gmail.com. Handwritten letters will not be printed.

- The Jews were happy to share the land, but it was a sentiment that was rejected by the Arabs. They rejected the 1936 Peel Commission

, Partition. They rejected the 1947 U.N. partition plan. They rejected Israel’s offers to return all conquered 1967 lands with their famous three “No’s” in Khartoum: No peace, No recognition, No negotiation. And they turned the Oslo peace accords — which granted Arafat polit- ical autonomy over 95 percent of the Palestinian population — into

- ing to the rampant assassination of Palestinian gay men by Hamas and the honor killings of innocent women, today’s academics would defend this barbarity by pointing the finger at the Middle East’s only democracy. Apartheid state? Watch the proceedings of the Israeli Knesset,

- where you will be shocked and amazed at how some Arab MKs deliver speeches that assail Israel in the most horrible way. No one stops them. Arabs serve in the civil service and every other area of Israeli life. Indeed, the judge who sentenced Israeli President Moshe Katsav to prison was an Arab, something utterly unthinkable in an apartheid state. Could campuses hate Israel because it has not settled the status of the West Bank?

- But surely they know that Israel has seen thousands of its citizens slaughtered in gruesome terror attacks ever since it granted autonomy

- another Hamas rocket launching pad in the West Bank? Academics are highly educated. They know that after Israel withdrew fully from Gaza — dismantling its communities and forcibly removing its settlers

- Perhaps Western academics ought to think to themselves that it’s not Western university support that is critical to the Palestinians but rather that the Palestinians create universities of their own to promote

- and foster Palestinian opportunity. Hamas, as the world’s largest per- capita recipient of international foreign aid, could easily channel that

, funding into building universities rather than buying bombs, or edu- cating women rather than tacitly allowing the honor killings of young Palestinian women whose only crime is to have a boyfriend. Instead, we see modern campuses choosing instead to condemn the country whose scholars have won ten Nobel prizes, from a pop- ulation of six million, while the entire Arab world, numbering in the hundreds of millions, have won two, outside the peace prize (another four). The Middle East is in a downward death spiral. The withdrawal of American troops from Iraq has led to thousands of civilians mur- dered by ISIS. Pakistan’s second largest airport, in Karachi, recently was overrun by terrorists. In Libya, civilians are also being blown sky-high, and an American ambassador already has been murdered. Afghanistan is a viper’s nest of Taliban butchery, and in Syria we’ve seen 150,000 killed in the civil war. Gaza, from which Israel withdrew in 2005, is home to the Hamas death-cult. University academics have little to say about all this. Nearly blissful silence is the order of the day. No, universities instead are punishing the one country in the Middle East that demonstrates the harmony

Opinion

Media and the Jews

Bias will lead to even more tragedy, local lawyer warns

O n Tuesday, November 18, I arrived in Israel at 9:30 a.m. When I landed, I didn’t know that one hour before, two Pales-

tinian terrorists had hacked and shot to death four rabbis and a policeman and had injured more than a dozen worshippers at the morn- ing services inside their synagogue. Later in the day I started to receive some emails from colleagues back in the States who had woken to the news on TV and told me that I should “be careful.” Of course, they were warning me about my personal safety. While I appreciated their concern, I knew that my personal safety in Israel was not the issue. The issue to me was and is the safety of the Jewish people in the climate of growing anti-Semitism, disguised as criticism of Israel’s conduct of negotia- tions with the Palestinians or criticism of its conduct of the military operation in Gaza. The murder of four people at prayer in their house of worship and a policeman who came to their rescue is a horrific event. It is a viola- tion of the rules of decent human conduct, even among those who disagree about the

vexing issues that face Israelis and Palestin- ians. However, the thought that the Jewish people could return to circumstances of pre- Holocaust Germany in my lifetime is startling, frightening, and wholly unacceptable — but it

is not impossible. The reporting of the mur-

ders in Jerusalem by two of the world’s most

important news outlets provides insight into how the trend toward blatant anti-Semitism

is facilitated by their coverage.

We live in an age of instant, uncensored, raw information, courtesy of breaking news on TV, the internet, and social media. Although it is true that the print media do not strive for enough accuracy in reporting on the Middle East, journalistic professionalism and editorial review would sift out the bad from accurate reporting. Despite the differ- ent delivery methods, when it comes to the treatment of Israel and by extension the Jew- ish people, news reporting often is quick to characterize Jewish conduct, civilian and mil- itary, in ways that facilitate anti-Semitism and make lethal action against Jews more likely. Much was made of the “asymmetry” of the conflict during the Israeli military operations

in Gaza. Israel, with its highly regarded military, caused civil- ian losses that were not “pro- portional” to the losses suf- fered by Israelis, we were told. Coverage of the conflict was filled with sad images of Pales- tinian children lying dead after explosions attributed to Israeli strikes. That Israel’s actions were in response to thousands

of rockets fired at its civilian population, that its actions included previ- ously unheard of efforts to warn the civilian

population of Gaza to get out of harm’s way, and that Israel has offered the world proof that Hamas used its civilian population as pawns are truths that cannot be challenged reasonably. But day after day the world was fed a steady stream of sad images of dead Gazan children. Those images provided anti-

Semites reason to attack the Jewish state and the Jewish people with hateful words, and in some countries to attack them physically.

Robert S. Peckar

Robert S.

Peckar

Palestinian spokesman who claimed that Jews were mur- dering Palestinians in Jeru- salem. Mr. Bennett held up a photograph of a murdered Jew, wearing a tallit, lying on the floor of the synagogue. The BBC interviewer directed him to lower the photograph. “We don’t actually want to see that picture,” he said.

As everyone knows, CNN betrayed its tendency to show Palestinians as victims by reporting “4 Israelis, 2 Palestinians dead in Jerusalem” on its news tickers. It did not mention that the “2 Palestinians” were the murderers. In a small text, the words “ter- ror attack” were in quotation marks. Then it attributed the Israeli deaths to Israeli police action! In another incident, CNN superim- posed a ticker reading “Deadly attack on

Jerusalem mosque,” over an interview with Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat. When global news services cannot report the truth accurately and fairly, why is it sur- prising that anti-Semites who “report” gross lies and distortions on social media are able to do so with impunity? How did this happen? Bad judgment? Bad reporting? I think not. I think that the per- vasive anti-Israeli feeling in the media that

I travel the world for business regularly;

I have visited more than 20 countries so far

this year. There are two news channels that provide 24-hour reporting to the English- speaking world; CNN and BBC. On the day of the murders in Jerusalem, Israel’s Naftali Bennett was interviewed on BBC, after a

Reacting to the murders in Jerusalem last week

T uesday, November 18, 2014

8:38 AM

I rarely write about events

occurring in the Middle East.

This morning is different. This isn’t political. When I was little, my mother bought me a two-book series by Lillian S. Freehof (who, incidentally, was the wife of the emi- nent Reform scholar, Dr. Rabbi Solomon B. Freehof of Pittsburgh). In that series, Freehof took biblical passages, talmudic tales, and rabbinic exegetical texts, and wove them together to create fascinating children’s books telling the stories of Kings David and Solomon. According to a talmudic legend that she described in her book, King David knew in advance that he was to die when he was 70 years old, and that his life would end on Shabbat. Rabbinic thought teaches that the Angel of Death has no power over someone who is studying Torah, and so, after he turned 70, David would spend the entirety of the Sabbath learning Torah, starting well before Shabbat began and finishing after its conclusion. (Of course, he could not stall death for- ever, and the Angel of Death had to get rather crafty to distract him. How that hap- pened is for another space.) This morning, four people were

pened is for another space.) This morning, four people were a man walks next to a

a man walks next to a bullet hole inside Kehilat Yaakov synagogue in the orthodox neighborhood of har nof, Jerusalem.

Noam RevkiN FeNtoN/Flash90

murdered during morning services at

a synagogue in Jerusalem. Many others

were injured. Two men came into the syn- agogue, and armed with a pistol, knives, and an ax, desecrated the universe. I’ve seen the pictures. I’ve looked at the

blood splattered on the syn- agogue walls and splashed on prayer books. I’ve read quotes from medics detailing how these worshippers were murdered, wearing phylac- teries and prayer shawls.

I wear phylacteries and a prayer shawl.

Gabriel Slamovits

Gabriel

Slamovits

conversation with God, we are safe. We trust Him, speak to Him, argue with Him, con- fide in Him, fear Him, love Him. Perhaps the message of the story is not that man physi- cally can’t die when learning or praying. It is a message that we would hope goes without saying:

Man shouldn’t die during learning, during prayer. What I believe the Talmud is telling us is that even the Angel of Death has respect for the opportunity that man has to con- verse with God. It is an opportunity in which, maybe, just maybe, man can find some peace with God. This, then, is a key aspect of the trag- edy. Today, people died in conversation with God. Since this piece was written, a fifth per- son, Druze Israeli police officer Sergeant- Major Zidan Saif, died of injuries sustained in his heroic efforts to stop the attackers. EDITOR’S NOTE: This column began as a Facebook entry.

I go to synagogue.

And as I think of this trag-

edy, as I mourn for the dead, as I lament the state of the world, as I become frustrated by some of the initial reactions — and make no mis- take here, whatever your politics, mur- dering civilians during prayer services simply cannot be justified, only unequivo-

cally condemned — as I pray that such acts never happen again yet fear that they will,

I suddenly realize that I have the privilege

to pray today. These people didn’t. Now people will be scared to pray. Today peo- ple are scared to go to synagogue. They’re terrified. It’s called “terror” for a reason. And I keep coming back to that child- hood story that I read, teaching me that

man cannot die when he is studying or reciting verses of Torah. And there is a link, an important link between learning Torah and prayer. In prayer, we speak to God. In learning, God speaks to us. In

Gabriel Slamovits of Englewood is a medical student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

22 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

Opinion/Letters

caused writers and reporters to assume that the Jews were the perpetrators and the Palestinians the victims. It is a narrative that the media finds appealing. However, in finding every opportunity to cast Jews as the victimizers of Palestinians, the media ignores the facts and instead dehumanizes Jews. To those BBC and CNN reporters, of course if people were killed in a house of worship in Jerusalem it had to be in a mosque, not a synagogue. To those reporters, of course if people were killed in Jerusalem it had to be at the hands of the Israeli police, not Palestinian terrorists. And of course if there was a tragedy that demanded sym- pathy, it only would be appropriate if the sympathy went to Palestinians. To report this terrible crime accurately would require that the reporter, readers, and viewers see the Jews as human victims of a vicious crime, not its perpetrators. Such accurate and fair reporting would not fit into the story line that the media want to tell. The results of such reporting do far more harm to the Jewish world than a media correction and apology can possibly repair. It is time for the media to recognize the impact of its words and images upon the growth of anti-Semitism, and to change this course before it is too late.

Robert S. Peckar, an attorney, lives in Alpine and is active in Jewish life in northern New Jersey. Among other things, he is a vice chair of the Jewish Home Family and just finished a term as the national chair of Project Interchange, the educational institute of the American Jewish Committee.

letteRs

Bernie Weinflash and the cantorial concert

In addition to all of the ways that Bernie Weinflash sup- ported Jewish music and the Jewish community listed in “Remembering Bernie Weinflash” (November 14), he was also instrumental in funding the JCC’s annual cantorial concert through the Weinflash Family Cantorial Concert Endowment Fund. Each year, this concert brings together cantors of different denominations from all over Bergen County to sing solo and ensemble music in a rich vari- ety of styles with a unifying theme. This year’s concert, featuring the music of Shabbat, took place on November 23. It was dedicated to Bernie’s memory, yehi zichrono livracha.

The cantorial concert committee cantors estelle epstein, Ilan Mamber, and faith steinsnyder

Thank you, Rabbi Chernick

Bravo to Rabbi Dr. Michael Chernick’s recommendations and observations regarding rabbinic students and gradu- ates (“Scandals in the rabbinate,” November 14). I would like to add another recommendation: careful screening of candidates for the rabbinate and monitoring their social and ethical behavior while students. I have been told that Orthodox rabbinic seminaries do not charge tuition. Given the cache and no charge for obtaining the title, I fear we may be flooded with “rabbis” who know how to pass the academic tests. However, do they pass the “mensch” test?

rachel lawrence, Teaneck

Berman had them first

Sorry but your story is wrong (“Here comes the sun,” November 14). The Gerrard Berman Day School in Oak- land has had solar panels on their roof for at least 8 years! We entered into a power purchase agreement when most people did not even know about solar.

Paul c. Beck, Fairfield

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From Assyria to Iberia

Even in prophetic period, Israelites were part of the larger world, local Assyriologist says

Joanne Palmer

W e Jews are used to think- ing of the ancient land of Israel as set in the middle of vast stretches of desert,

and of the Israelites as living more or less alone there, relatively unaffected by their neighbors. Yes, there were skirmishes with neigh- bors, occasional raids down from the hill country, some fights over borders, but on the whole Israel was separate, the undis- puted center of its world. Well, that’s not really true, according to Dr. Ira Spar of Suffern, N.Y. Dr. Spar, who is a professor of ancient studies at Ramapo College of New Jersey in Mahwah, is also the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s research Assyriologist. (Isn’t that the most wonder- ful job title?) In that capacity, he is part of a team that put together “Assyria to Iberia at the Dawn of the Classical Age,” an exhibit

on display at the Met until January 4. Dr. Spar is also an active member of Temple Israel and Jewish Community Cen- ter in Ridgewood, where he will talk about the exhibit on December 3. (See box, page 28.) Although he is a student of the entire Middle East and all its peoples, his most intense focus is on the Israelites and their land; his section of the exhibit catalogue is “Bible and Babylon.” A striking man — six and a half feet tall and thin, white-haired and white-bearded — Dr. Spar describes many of the objects in the display cases to a visitor, casually read- ing the cuneiform inscriptions on some of the tablets as if they had been written in English. The exhibit shows ancient Israel as part of an intricate cat’s cradle of relationships; trading, borrowing ideas, lending ideas, a nation among many others. Idiosyncratic, yes, but not isolated. “The show basically tries to use art to

but not isolated. “The show basically tries to use art to Dr. Ira Spar illustrate the

Dr. Ira Spar

illustrate the effects that major powers have when they trade and export to areas they’ve conquered, or where they travel,”

Dr. Spar said. In this case, the major power was Assyria, which expanded from its small core around the Tigris River to reach from the Persian Gulf to the Mediter- ranean around the seventh century BCE. Assyria was threatened by the Phoeni- cians, a seafaring nation that blocked the Mediterranean. “They were the big gorilla in the neighborhood,” Dr. Spar said. “With their ships, they established an empire, from Lebanon all the way across the Medi- terranean to Spain.” Around the end of the second millen- nium BCE, there was a sudden catas- trophe, Dr. Spar said. “It overwhelmed the whole Fertile Crescent area and the Aegean with the collapse of civilization — a political, social, and cultural collapse. “It was so overwhelming that the Greeks” — the Greeks! The civilization that refined poetry and art, and that wrote everything down — “actually lost the abil- ity to write. Ninety-five percent of their

24 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

knowledge was wiped out.” It was sudden climate change that did it, he said. “There was a long period of dry- ness — about 20 years — and then wetness.” There was famine during the dry period, and fungus-ridden disease during the sec- ond one. “That was the period of the Isra- elites’ exodus from Egypt,” Dr. Spar said. “They were able to leave because there was no one there to stop them.” When the climate change stopped and normal life resumed “after the tremen- dous destruction, people still kept the symbols of second-millennium cultural identity,” Dr. Spar said. “Depictions of animals, scenes that represent power and sovereignty, and the icons of kingship, even though kingship itself had totally changed. People understood the meaning of the symbols. They kept them as heir- looms. They copied them. “And we find them in Israel.” We have similar impulses today, he added. “Look at our dollar bill. Why do we have Roman symbols? Why do we have Latin on it? It’s because our found- ing fathers knew the Roman symbols by heart.” Those words and symbols repre- sented the “greatness of empire” to the

symbols repre- sented the “greatness of empire” to the When you come into contact with another
symbols repre- sented the “greatness of empire” to the When you come into contact with another

When you come into contact with another culture, that has a significant effect on you.

Dr. Ira Spar

founders of our republic, and to us as well. “If you are a nascent society,” as the 13 colonies were, “you look back to great- ness,” Dr. Spar continued. “You don’t look back to failure. The past inspires you, and you want to emulate the past. “The difference between modern and ancient societies is that ancient societies always looked back. There was no con- cept of progress until the scientific revolu- tion.” That’s why ancient founding figures are believed to have lived such long lives, and essentially to be something other than human. “The stories accrue and the legends grow, so you don’t view them as

accrue and the legends grow, so you don’t view them as Tiered stand; ceramic. Ta’anach; Iron
accrue and the legends grow, so you don’t view them as Tiered stand; ceramic. Ta’anach; Iron

Tiered stand; ceramic. Ta’anach; Iron age IIa, 10th century B.C. Israel antiquities authority, the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

© t he i srael m useum, Jerusalem/ i srael a ntiquities authorit Y. Photogra P h BY aV raham h aY.

people, with the same sorts of needs that you have,” he said. Another theme of the exhibit, “the one that I emphasize, the one that is subtly behind everything else, is that when you come into contact with another culture, that has a significant effect on you,” he continued.

“The example I like to use is the Philistines. “The Philistines arrived from the Aegean Islands during this period of catastrophe. They are not Semites — they are also not Greeks, but they are part of that culture — so when they come and settle along the coast, they transfer their main god, who is

settle along the coast, they transfer their main god, who is Far left, relief of a
settle along the coast, they transfer their main god, who is Far left, relief of a

Far left, relief of a striding lion; glazed and molded brick. Babylon, processional Way. Neo-Babylonian, 604–562 B.C. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Vorderasiatisches

Museum. Berlin/Vorderasiatisches museum, staatliche museen zu Berlin/ art resource, nY. PhotograPh BY olaf m. tessmer. above, from left, Statuette of a griffin; bronze with traces of

gold foil. Toprakkale, Urartian, 8th–7th century B.C. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin/Vorderasiatisches museum, staatliche museen zu Berlin/ art resource, nY. PhotograPh BY Jürgen liePe. Male protome; ceramic. Cádiz, punta del Nao, beach of La Caleta phoenician, 6th–5th century B.C. Museo de Cádiz Bruce White Helmet; bronze. Karmir Blur; Urartian, 8th century B.C. History Museum of armenia, Yerevan historY museum of armenia, YereVan. PhotograPh BY armen ghazarYan Statue of a seated couple; basalt. Tell Halaf, Lower City, “cult area.” Syro-Hittite, early 9th century B.C. Max Freiherr von Oppenheim-Stiftung, Cologne Berlin/Vorderasiatisches mu-

seum, staatliche museen zu Berlin/ art resource, nY. PhotograPh BY olaf m. tessmer.

Cover Story

Cover Story Clockwise from top left, Openwork plaque with a striding sphinx; ivory. Excavated at Nimrud
Cover Story Clockwise from top left, Openwork plaque with a striding sphinx; ivory. Excavated at Nimrud
Cover Story Clockwise from top left, Openwork plaque with a striding sphinx; ivory. Excavated at Nimrud

Clockwise from top left, Openwork plaque with a striding sphinx; ivory. Excavated at Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), Fort Shalmaneser, room NW 21 Neo-assyrian period, South Syrian style, 9th–8th century B.C. The Metro- politan Museum of art, rogers Fund, 1964 (64.37.1) © the metroPolitan museum of art, neW York plaque with lioness attacking a youth; ivory, gold, semiprecious stones, and vitreous material. Nimrud, Northwest palace, well in room NN. Neo-assyrian period, phoenician style, 9th–8th century B.C. The Trustees of the British Museum, London. © the trustees of the British museum plaque with incised hunter-warrior between a griffin and a lion; bone. Bencarrón necropolis (Seville). Orientalizing, 7th century B.C. hisPanic societY of america, neW York

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a sea god, to a land-based god. “So they adopt a new chief god, Dagon, who is the father of Ba’al, the chief god of the Canaanite pan- theon. To the ancient mind, you can never have too many gods. Gods are capricious, unstable, and they don’t travel with you,” so when you move, you adopt the gods who are there already. “They wanted to be like the Canaanites. It’s just like people who move to America and want to be like Americans. “It is the same thing in Israel. “When Israel comes into the land, they settle into the hill country. There were very few settlements. It was sparsely inhabited at the time of the catastrophe, but then suddenly the hill country became the refuge. People were fleeing there. “So who were the early Israelites? They were the ref- ugees from Canaanite cities, as well as the people who worshipped Yahweh. It is a pluralistic society, because you” — the Israelites — “are the small guy, and the new people have moved in, to escape the civil war in the Canaanite cities, the catastrophe there, the invasions that followed. You are a center for refugees. That has a huge impact on biblical thought, because you are con- cerned with poor people who are escaping disaster. “The ethics of Israel probably emerged from this period.” This period, Dr. Spar said, was the time of the bibli- cal books of Joshua and Judges. “So when you build the Temple” — during Solomon’s

Just as ira spar is the consummate assyriol- ogist when he is at the Metropolitan Museum of art and at ramapo College of new Jersey, he is also and always a curious and deeply connected Jew. he and his wife, rebecca, have collected hats — including many kippot — from Central asia, and they are on display at ramapo from now until december 12. in their shapes and bright or subtle colors, the kippot are different from the more so- ber headcoverings that mark the ashkenazi world, although their function — to cover men’s heads and at times women’s hair — are the same. some of these kippot are in styles that look vaguely familiar to many of us — they have come into vogue in the Jewish world in the last few decades. But the elaborate work that has gone into the kippot in the spars’ collection, along with the variations in shape and color, are new to us. the exhibit, “woven treasures — selec- tions from the Collections of ira and re- becca spar,”include other textiles that have caught the spars’ eyes as they traveled in europe and Central asia. the show features costumes from Provence, in France; some of them have been put on dolls created for that purpose by an artist skilled in that highly specific craft. the show also includes a large number of hats. the kippot, in riots of color and texture, are predominant among them. “woven treasures” is on exhibit in ramapo College’s Pascal Gallery at the Berrie Center for Performing and Visual arts. it is open on tuesdays, thursdays, and Fridays from 1 to 5 p.m., and on wednesdays from 1 to 7 p.m. the college is at 505 ramapo Valley road in Mahwah. For more information, call the gallery’s director, sydney Jenkins, at (201) 684-7147, email him at sjenkins@ramapo.edu, or go to www.ramapo.edu/berriecenter/art-galleries.

26 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

Cover Story

Cover Story Cult stand; ceramic. Yavneh; Iron age IIa, 9th century B.C. Israel antiquities authority, courtesy

Cult stand; ceramic. Yavneh; Iron age IIa, 9th century B.C. Israel antiquities authority, courtesy of Eretz

Israel

Museum, Tel aviv.

eretz i srael museum, t el aV iV/i srael a ntiquities authoritY

reign, as told in the Book of Kings, written not much later — “what images are you going to use? “You are going to use the Canaanite images, the ones that say power and kingship. Images of bulls and lions, and of cheru- bim. These are images that have come down from the Canaanites — and you see them throughout the show. “The underlying theme here for Jews is that it offers a much more realistic understanding of the ancient Israelites, acting with all the forces around them. Instead of looking only at the acts of God, we also are looking at the acts of people, as they create their com- munity using symbols of the past. “I call this the fluidity of culture. We view the Bible from the per- spective that Israel exists alone.” That view, he said, is encouraged by the way we read the Proph- ets, the biblical books written at the time. We read the haftarah — those prophetic writings — piece- meal, to accompany the Torah reading on Shabbat and holidays. We read bits chosen to point out something in the Torah text, and so we rarely get a feeling for the Prophets as a flowing narrative in itself. Because of that, Dr. Spar said, “We don’t understand that Israel is a small nation, caught in a web of larger powers, and we don’t understand the effect that those powers had on Israel.” Really, it is all about economics, Dr. Spar said. Eco- nomics and power. The Temple in Jerusalem, for exam- ple, is not about religion but about power, in this read- ing. “It is the private chapel of the king. “The chapel is tiny, the size of a three-car garage. It’s not as big as your house. And the king uses the Temple as a storage house. When Israel is attacked, the king goes to the Temple. The priests don’t control it. The king does. It’s right there in the text. The king has the

king does. It’s right there in the text. The king has the Handle; ivory. praeneste, Colombella

Handle; ivory. praeneste, Colombella ne- cropolis, Barberini Tomb. Orientalizing, early 7th century B.C. Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia, rome

Bruce White

right to hire and fire priests. He is coronated in front of the Temple, where you have those big pillars. “It is about domination and strength. It is all about power.” Dr. Spar came by his worldview logically. He was born in New Rochelle, N.Y., but after earning his undergraduate degree — it’s in international relations — at American Univer- sity in Washington, D.C., he went to Michi- gan State University to work toward a Ph.D. in economics. That field once had leaned more heavily toward the social sciences, but by the time he got there, in the late 1960s, it relied heavily on statistical models. “I was terrible at it,” he said. “I couldn’t do the mathematics.” He had three choices, he said. “One was to get a job. No way! I’d have to work! Forget about it.” (Yes, he was joking. Earning a doc- torate is hard work. It’s just largely unpaid.) “The second was to join the Peace Corps. My cousin had; I got an application and it was sit- ting on my desk. I was considering it. “The last one was to stay in school forever.” That, more or less, is the option he took. Dr. Spar, who always had been a reader, realized that the books he most loved to read were about “the ancient world, archeology, and biblical-related stuff.” His depth of knowledge impressed the heads of the department in Michigan, and he not only was offered admission, but a fellowship to fund it. Because the best scholar in his field was at the University of Minnesota, after two years he transferred there. Dr. Spar was very lucky — although men of his genera- tion were being drafted and sent off to Vietnam, he was not. He had deferred his meeting with his draft board

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JCC Fort Lee/Congregation Gesher Shalom CSI Scholar Fund Presents:ts: Joshua Nelsonn The Prince of Kosher
JCC Fort Lee/Congregation Gesher Shalom CSI Scholar Fund Presents:ts:
Joshua Nelsonn
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Saturday December 6th, 7:30pmm
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By combining Jewish liturgical lyrics with an invigorating gospel sound, Joshua
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1449 Anderson Ave Fort Lee, NJ 07024  geshershalom.org 28 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014 Jewish

28 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 28, 2014

Jewish World

Jewish World Necklace, gold. Carthage; phoenician, ca. mid- 7th–6th century B.C. National Bardo Museum, Tunis.

Necklace, gold. Carthage; phoenician, ca. mid- 7th–6th century B.C. National Bardo Museum, Tunis.

l’institut national du Patrimoine, tunis

— he was in the upper Midwest and it was in New York

— until “finally I got an induction notice to show up in

Detroit,” he said. “There was no way out of this one. I was really getting nervous. “And then, just two or three days before I was supposed to go, I got another notice, saying that the draft quota had been filled. So that was that. I wasn’t drafted.” Dr. Spar worked on an excavation in Tel Hadar in Israel for 10 years, as this paper chronicled years ago. He has excavated in other parts of the ancient near east as well. After he graduated, Dr. Spar had a few job offers; he chose to go to Ramapo College of New Jersey. “It was new, and it seemed like it would have a future,” he said. “I could help the college. I could be one of its founding members.” He has been there ever since, as a professor of ancient studies. A few years later, Dr. Spar began his work at the Met, where the department of ancient near eastern art held an unpublished collection of Assyrian cuneiform. Dr. Spar since has published the text in four volumes. Dr. Spar juggles his work as an Assyriologist and his life as an active Conservative Jew with apparent ease; instead of those two different worlds colliding, knock- ing the balls out of his hands, they fly around each other with grace.

who: dr. ira spar what: will give a talk and slide show to explain how the biblical period comes alive in “assyria to iberia at the dawn of the Classical age” at the Metropolitan Museum of art in Manhattan where: temple israel, 475 Grove street, ridge- wood when: wednesday, december 3, at 7:30 p.m. sponsored by: temple israel and the Glen rock Jewish Center More information: office@synagogue.org

Opinion

Overlooked Palestinian terror group returns with a vengeance

T he older I get, the more my child- hood memories fade, but I still vividly remember the morning of Sunday, July 4, 1976.

I was eight years old at the time, spend-

Ben Cohen

Ben Cohen

the two assailants, cousins Ghassan and Odai Abu Jamal, as “PFLP comrades.” A statement released in the name of Khalil Maqdesi, a member of the PFLP’s Cen- tral Committee, was in essence a call to genocide. “Occupiers and racists do not belong to the land of Palestine; there are, and must be, consequences and reper- cussions for the theft of our land and our rights,” Maqdesi said. If his meaning here

is unclear, look at the bloodstained images from the Har Nof synagogue for clarifica- tion. Similarly, anyone tempted to believe that the PFLP is the secular organization that Maqdisi presents it to be should ask why the terrorists screamed “Allahu Akhbar” as they embarked on their murder spree. What was most striking about this statement, however, was Maqdesi’s praise of Jewish anti-Zionists: “Thousands of Jews around the world are true and genuine voices for the struggle, leading boycott movements and joining the Palestinian struggle for liberation on a daily basis. We salute each and every one of them.” I think he knew what he was doing here, and it’s smart. Maqdesi understands that by heaping compliments on the tiny minority of Jews

see OVERLOOKED page 31

ing Shabbat with my grandparents at their house in London. Early on that Sunday, I woke to the sound of my grandpa, the emi- nent Sephardic Rabbi Dr. Solomon Gaon, whooping and yelling and generally mak-

ing a racket in the kitchen. It was behavior that was most definitely out of character. Thinking something was wrong, I bolted downstairs to discover my elated grandfather listening to the BBC radio news. Locked in his embrace, and in between his joyous shouts of “They are free! The hostages are free!” I could make out certain words uttered by the announcer — “Israeli forces,” “rescue operation,” “hijacking,” and so on. The news that made my grandfather’s heart burst with pride was, as those who recognize the date will have figured out, the rescue operation mounted by Israel to free around 100 hostages from an Air France plane that had been hijacked seven days earlier by Palestinian terrorists and diverted to Uganda, then under the boot of the brutal dictator Idi Amin. After a week of sheer hell, during which the German leftist hijackers separated the Jewish from the non-Jewish passengers with the uncompromising determination of concentration camp guards, Israel launched a dar-

ing and successful raid to bring them home. Among those killed in the gun battle was the operation’s com- mander, Yonatan Netanyahu, the brother of the cur- rent Israeli prime minister. President Ronald Reagan later described the operation as a gift from Israel to mark the United States bicentennial, which fell on the same day.

I relate that anecdote because that morning was the

first time that I encountered the name of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, the Marxist fac- tion of the Palestine Liberation Organization led by the late Dr. George Habash, which planned and exe- cuted the Air France hijacking in conjunction with a group of left-wing German terrorists. From the late 1960s onwards, the PFLP established itself as the most spectacularly violent of the Palestin- ian factions, carrying out hijackings and bombings, and working with a range of far left terrorists like the notorious Carlos the Jackal. The PFLP spoke in the barbed, aggressive language of both Marxism and Arab nationalism, but left little doubt as to its real tar- get. If the Entebbe episode failed to convince outside observers of the PFLP’s hard-wired anti-Semitism, then its bombing of the Rue Copernic synagogue in Paris in October 1980 should have set aside any lin- gering doubts. Over the last 20 years, the PFLP has been eclipsed by both Fatah, the faction now led by the forked- tongued Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, and Hamas, the Islamist terrorists who still reign in Gaza. But this week, the PFLP returned to the scene with a vengeance, again by targeting a syna- gogue, this time in Jerusalem rather than in a Western capital. While the PFLP didn’t explicitly claim responsibil- ity for the atrocity at the synagogue in the Har Nof neighborhood, it did laud the attack while describing

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About

OurChildren

Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families Chanukah, Oh, Chanukah Food • Fun
Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families
Chanukah, Oh, Chanukah
Food • Fun • Fashion
Fighting the Flu
Supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard • December 2014
Supplement to The Jewish Standard and Rockland Jewish Standard • December 2014
First breath. First smile. First steps. Treasured moments begin here. The MotherBaby Center at Chilton

First breath. First smile. First steps.

Treasured moments begin here.

The MotherBaby Center at Chilton Medical Center.

Whether you are planning to start a family or adding to one, Chilton Medical Center invites you to begin this exciting journey with us. Our MotherBaby Center encourages moms-to-be to personalize their birthing experience in a way that makes it memorable for the entire family. We offer private rooms with personalized visiting hours, hydrotherapy for labor, a celebratory gourmet dinner and a Mom’s spa. For special care, there’s a Level II Nursery with board certified neonatologists and pediatricians available 24/7. And with caring nurses, expert medical staff, and our seamless connection to Morristown Medical Center, it’s no wonder why so many women choose to have their babies here with us, close to home.

For more information about parent education classes, please call 973-831-5475.

about parent education classes, please call 973-831-5475. For a referral to a Chilton Obstetrician or Certified

For a referral to a Chilton Obstetrician

or Certified Nurse Midwife,

call 1-888-4AH-DOCS

or visit atlantichealth.org/chilton

a referral to a Chilton Obstetrician or Certified Nurse Midwife, call 1-888-4AH-DOCS or visit atlantic health.org/chilton
About OurChildren
About
OurChildren

Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families

December 2014

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The family Chanukah party

   

FashionwhenIt’s

   

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Hot looks for the coldest of days

   

Eight Days of Fun

 

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Activities for the holiday

   

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Fanciful holiday candleholders

 
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The exercise has myriad benefits

   

Protectionagainst

 

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How to guard against the virus this season

 

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Encouraging children with learning disabilities

 
 

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Community snapshots

 
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Kosherfest ’14 inspires Chanukah recipes

   
 

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Our children’s milestones

   
 

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Great picks in December

 

Calendar

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Fun things to do this month

About

OurChildren

James L. Janoff

Publisher

Robert Chananie

Business Manager

Heidi Mae Bratt

Editor

Deborah Herman

Art Director

Natalie Jay

Advertising Director

Peggy Elias

George Kroll

Karen Nathanson

Janice Rosen

Brenda Sutcliffe

Account Executives

Rachel Harkham

Ed Silberfarb

Adina Soclof

Contributing Writers

About Our Children is published 11 times a year by the New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666; telephone: 201-837-8818; fax: 201-833-4959.; e-mail: AboutOC@aol.com.

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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN

DECEMBER 2014

3
3

I f a picture worth is a thousand words, then our Chanukahs ll volumes.

Little did I ever imagine that I would be sending picture holiday cards, but for nearly a decade, our December ritual was to pose the family before the menorah and craft these images into Chanukah cards. Our photographer, my long- time BFF Tina, would come for the “session” in which we’d dress and pose and get the menorah dusted off and lled with colorful candles. The sessions would last as long as our patience — it was a race to see whether the kids would hold up or the candles would — and then we would have our choice of wonderful images to use. I remember our rst picture. Yehuda was a few months old and I was holding him. It was Jeff and I. We smiled, the three of us, the menorah in the background. The next year, Yehuda, nearly a year and half, sat on our laps looking at a Chanu- kah book. Shaina was in my belly. The following year, Shaina and Yehuda, me and Jeff in another

following year, Shaina and Yehuda, me and Jeff in another pose in our apartment with the

pose in our apartment with the il- lumination of the candles. There were images of us play- ing with dreidels, standing near the menorah, interacting with each other. Laughing, smiling, looking at each other. We used other Chanukah props, crafts and drawings that the children made. And each year, after we chose the right image, it was my chal- lenge to gure out a new and in- teresting way to make the card. Sepia, black and white, color, postcards, pre-writ- ten, hand-written. I, too, wanted to make them dif- ferent each year with a message that played on the theme of love and light. These photographs were a yearly marker and a document of our family’s growth. Not only were the images beautiful, but to watch the passing of time was beautiful as well. Tina’s pictures were so lovely, many friends remarked how they put the cards on their refrigerators and looked forward to the following year’s. Then came a December that was the coldest ever.

About

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My father, of blessed memory, was very sick, and my days and nights were spent at the hos- pital. I was so consumed with his deteriorating health, and so saddened by what was coming, to have a happy, fun- lled photo shoot to create the Chanukah picture card felt incredibly wrong. That year there was no picture. There was no card. It’s been a few years since, and in that time, photographs have changed. Sel es have become part of the lexicon and suddenly, everyone is a photographer. In fact, over the nearly decade that we took pictures, Tina’s mode changed from lm to digital. I’m not sure whether we will pick up the thread and again take the Chanukah picture. But what I do know is that everyday I can now see the bounty and blessings in my life and that the light of Chanukah shines bright. Wishing all a happy and healthy holiday. Cheers,

bright. Wishing all a happy and healthy holiday. Cheers, About Our Children, January issue, published on

About Our Children, January issue, published on December 19, 2014.

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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN

DECEMBER 2014

FEATURING THE INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED DONETSK BALLET FROM UKRAINE AND BALLET STUDENTS OF MISS PATTI’S SCHOOL
FEATURING THE INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED DONETSK BALLET FROM UKRAINE
AND BALLET STUDENTS OF MISS PATTI’S SCHOOL OF DANCE
WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA (ADELPHI ORCHESTRA)
Net proceeds to benefit… Pediatric Cancer Research Care & Treatment
IN 16 YEARS JULIE DANCE HAS RAISED $430,000 FOR THIS IMPORTANT CAUSE
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GENERATION G

The Family Chanukah Party as Traditional as Latkes

ED SILBERFARB

I t began innocently enough, 40 years ago, lighting

the Chanukah candles with Jake, 5, and Joe, 3, trying

to grab the ame. That’s a sign, I thought. After all,

didn’t baby Moses start his career by seizing a red-hot coal? Sharon decided this magic moment had to be shared, and her mind raced ahead. “Sunday is the eighth night. We’ll invite …” and she recited half a dozen of the kids friends and their parents. “We need latkes, donuts, cookies, some salads, tuna sh, maybe deviled eggs, a loaf of rye or pumpernickel…” “Whoa there, Dobbin. You’re talking party.” “Of course. We need a supply of dreidels, a batch of those chocolate coins, and let’s nd some song sheets.” And so the annual Silberfarb Chanukah party was inaugurated with a guest list that later grew to more than 50. We put together sheets with the Chanukah blessings and songs that ranged from the traditional “Rock of Ages” to the insipid “I Had a Little Dreidel” (the kids favorite) to the Hebraic version of Handel’s majes- tic “Hail the Conquering Hero” (“Judah Maccabee”). The song sheets, now thoroughly food-stained, are still in use, and each year our old friend, Chaim, a com- poser and music professor, brings the songs to life at the piano. We made our own latkes with one guest or another standing hours over the frying pan while the apart- ment smelled of cooking oil. A newcomer thought we had hired a professional latke chef. Three years later we gave up and bought frozen latkes. The children liked them better than the homemade. In some Judaica store’s closeout, we found a set of Chanukah cookie cutters in the shape of a dreidel, a Star of David, a menorah and a lion. So began the labor- intensive task of rolling out dough and baking butter cookies in four different shapes. Donuts were another challenge. We rejected the mushy, pillow-like jelly donuts, and searched for the genuine, fried “sufganyot.” One year we found them on the Lower East Side. Then that store went out of busi- ness, so did the little bake shop on the Upper West Side. Another year we imported them from Teaneck, and re- cently again from the Upper West Side. Chocolate coins are the currency of Chanukah, and the dreidel game is the holiday’s roulette. In the early years each kid’s stake was a dozen or so choco- late coins, but they grasped them so desperately dur- ing the game that the chocolate melted in their hands, so we switched to pennies. The chocolate coins went into each kid’s gift bag along with a dreidel, a chocolate Maccabee, and some bit of ephemera from Job Lot or Amazing Savings. Ah, the menorahs! We began with the basic nine- candle Chanukiah, with a traditional elaborate design in brass or silver plate, but then we added the ones made by the children in Hebrew school, and a generation lat- er added the creations of the grandchildren. One was clay with nine “ancient” oil cups. Another was balsam wood decorated with bits of raw spaghetti and bottle

The Family continued on 8

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Jewish Teens with Big Ideas Invited to Video Contest

Leading up to BBYO Internation- al Convention (IC) 2015, Jewish teens around the world are invited to share their innovative ideas for how to engage more Jewish teens in Jewish life by submitting a vid- eo application. Teens whose videos receive the most votes will be able to pres- ent their big idea to 150 of the Jew- ish community’s top philanthro- pists at the 24-hour Summit on Jewish Teens immediately preced-

ing the conference. This friendly competition will be to win seed funding up to $5,000 and mentor- ing to implement their idea. Complete video contest in- structions can be found here. The Summit on Jewish Teens participants will explore topics such as leadership, community- building, Jewish learning, Israel and service, all in the context of what teens are thinking to- day, what their interests are, and

what the possibilities are for their deeper involvement in Jewish life. Discussions will be facilitated by experts including former Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Con- gregations of the Commonwealth Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. When: Now through December 16, 2014 Where: Online at bbyo.org/trending Participants: Open to all Jewish teens.

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, December 6 11:00 a.m. Engaged Learning. For Life. Register Today. The Elisabeth
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, December 6
11:00 a.m.
Engaged Learning. For Life.
Register Today.
The Elisabeth Morrow
School
Call 201.568.5566 x7212 or
admissions@elisabethmorrow.org.
435 Lydecker Street • Englewood, NJ 07631
www.elisabethmorrow.org