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2 NOVEMBER 27, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
  EDITORIAL   EDITOR-IN-CHIEF   Randy Shulman   ART DIRECTOR NOVEMBER 27, 2014 Volume
 

EDITORIAL

 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

 

Randy Shulman

 

ART DIRECTOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2014 Volume 21 / Issue 30

 

Todd Franson

 

POLITICAL EDITOR

 
 

Justin Snow

 

NEWS & BUSINESS EDITOR John Riley

 

NEWS

10

RemembeRing maRion baRRy

 

by John Riley

ASSISTANT EDITOR

 
 

Rhuaridh Marr

12

Hagels Final act?

 

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

 

by Justin Snow

 

Doug Rule

 

BUSINESS

16

eveRy body Welcome

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS Ward Morrison, Julian Vankim

 

by John Riley

CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Scott G. Brooks

SCENE

18

nlgJa’s dateline:dc

 

HonoRing dinae ReHm

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Christian Gerard, Brandon Harrison, Will O’Bryan Troy Petenbrink, Kate Wingfield

 

photography by Ward Morrison

 

19

community calendaR

 

WEBMASTER

David Uy

SCENE

21

tRansgendeR day oF RemembRance

 

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Julian Vankim

 

photography by Ward Morrison

SALES & MARKETING

 

FEATURE

22

maRc solomon

 

PUBLISHER

by Justin Snow

 

Randy Shulman

 

BRAND STRATEGY & MARKETING Christopher Cunetto Cunetto Creative

OUT ON THE TOWN

28

tHe HungeR games:

 

mockingJay PaRt 1

NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Rivendell Media Co.

by Randy Shulman

 

212-242-6863

30

ligHts uP on 14tH stReet

 

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Dennis Havrilla

 

by Doug Rule

EDITOR EMERITUS

 

STAGE

34

tHougHt and dance

 

Sean Bugg

by Doug Rule

 

GAMES

37

assassins cReed: unity

 

PATRON SAINT

by Rhuaridh Marr

Marion Barry

 

TECH

39

moto 360

 

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY

 

by Rhuaridh Marr

 
 

Todd Franson

 

PETS

41

WinteR Pet caRe

 

by Doug Rule

 

METRO WEEKLY 1425 K St. NW, Suite 350 Washington, DC 20005

202-638-6830

 

NIGHTLIFE

45

FReddies beacH baR

 

photography by Ward Morrison

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All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject to editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or their agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or advertising in Metro Weekly is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of such person or organization.

 

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Now online at MetroWeekly.com Michigan Asks SCOTUS to Hear Marriage Case Fundraising for Trans Youth
Now online at MetroWeekly.com Michigan Asks SCOTUS to Hear Marriage Case Fundraising for Trans Youth

Now online at MetroWeekly.com

Michigan Asks SCOTUS to Hear Marriage Case Fundraising for Trans Youth Summer Camp

Remembering Marion Barry

Former “mayor for life” was one of the first D.C. politicians to embrace LGBT rights

by John Riley

P OLITICIANS, PUNDITS AND residents of the District of Columbia mourned the loss of former four-term mayor and

longtime Councilmember Marion Barry, J r. ( D-Ward 8 ), w ho di ed a t U nited Medical Center in Southeast D.C. early Sunday morning. He was 78. Barry, who had undergone a kidney transplant and surgery for prostate can- cer in recent years, had been released from Howard University Hospital hours earlier on Saturday after initially check- ing himself in on Thursday. A larger- than-life figure who got his start in the Civil Rights Movement, most notably as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Barry

entered the world of D.C. politics, serving

as an at-large member on the first elected

D.C. Council following the establishment

of Home Rule in 1974 and later challeng-

ing — and defeating — incumbent Walter E. Washington in the 1978 Democratic primary for mayor. Serving as mayor from 1979 to 1991, and then again from 1995 to 1999, Barry became inextrica- bly linked to the D.C. political scene and to the city’s dominant Democratic Party, with his mayoralty marked by an increase in the number of D.C. residents holding government jobs. As a result of his initiatives to tackle unemployment, including the start of Washington’s sum- mer jobs program, Barry was heralded as a fighter for low-income and middle- class residents of the city. As a result, he became a kingmaker of sorts, with future generations of candidates often seeking the blessing of D.C.’s “mayor for life” as they pursued political office. In 1990, following an FBI raid of

a hotel room where he had been vid- eotaped smoking crack cocaine, Barry was arrested and tried on 14 different

RANDY SHULMAN / METRO WEEKLY
RANDY SHULMAN / METRO WEEKLY

charges, including perjury, possession of crack cocaine and conspiracy to possess cocaine. The jury voted to convict him on one charge of possession, acquit on another and deadlocked on the remain- ing 12 charges. Barry was sentenced and served six months in prison, and later ran for and won the Ward 8 Council seat in 1992 by ousting incumbent Wilhelmina Rolark, using his Council position as a springboard to challenge and defeat incumbent Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly in the 1994 Democratic primary. Despite his personal shortcomings, Barry remained popular among a wide swath of the city’s residents, particularly among African- Americans — specifically the residents of Ward 8, who elected him to the Council twice more, in 2004 and 2008. While Barry made headlines as one

Marion Barry at Capital Pride circa 1996

of only two councilmembers to vote against the District’s marriage equality law in 2009, his actual record on LGBT rights was much more nuanced, and, at times, more supportive than many casual observers might believe. As mayor, and early on in his political career, Barry courted the LGBT vote, hiring the first openly gay person in a mayoral cabinet, and was a proponent of Gay Pride Day, which eventually evolved into Capital Pride. Mark Meinke, founder and chair of the Rainbow History Project, which tracks LGBT history in Washington, D.C., said Barry learned from the lesson of community activist Frank Kameny’s 1971 race for D.C.’s non-voting seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. Kameny came in fourth among six candidates, but

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demonstrated that the LGBT community constituted a significant voting bloc that could swing election results. As a result, Barry courted LGBT support to help him win his 1978 primary over Mayor Walter E. Washington and Council Chair Sterling Tucker. Afterwards, Barry and the LGBT community worked together as political allies for years, Meinke said. Craig Howell, the former president and a longstanding member of the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA), said Barry was first given a -15 on a scale of -10 to +10 because he had avoided the group’s ques- tions when he ran for the D.C. Board of Education in 1971. However, when Barry later became the president of the board, he helped pass a nondiscrimina- tion policy that protected employees of the school system based on sexual orien- tation. When he ran for and won an at- large seat on the Council, he was strongly supportive of GAA’s priorities, including eliminating the plainclothes police squad that was entrapping gay men in parks, increasing funding for the Gay Men’s VD Clinic and the Office of Human Rights. “He really carried the ball for us dur- ing that time,” Howell said. “Everything we wanted him to do, he did, and usually led the way.” When Barry later became mayor, he signed a law that prohibited subjecting anything under the Human Rights Act, such as protections for LGBT people, t o t he i nitiative p rocess. H e a lso f ol - lowed through on a campaign promise to appoint gay people to lots of boards and positions. Howell was responsible for coming up with a list of qualified appli- cants, which Barry then used to make appointments. “We used to brag we were way ahead of everyone else in the country,” Howeell said, “due in large part to the leadership shown by Marion Barry.” Those same sentiments were echoed by the Gertrude Stein Democratic Club, the city’s top LGBT political organiza- tion, which issued a statement saying its members were “deeply saddened” by Barry’s death. “He was a champion for the rights of the underserved and under-represented citizens of the District, which included LGBT residents,” the statement read. “He was one of the first politicians to campaign directly for the LGBT vote and pu shed for HIV/AIDS funding du ring the early stages of the AIDS pandemic. … He was a worthy ally and his presence will be missed.”

Despite criticism from many in the

LGBT community — even being reject- ed outright by Stein members when he sought their endorsement for the Ward 8 seat in his 2012 re-election bid — Barry defended his record on LGBT rights in

a Nov. 23 interview with Slate’s Dave

Wiegel, claiming “gay marriage is not the only litmus test.” Barry had made similar arguments in the past when the Council considered various LGBT initiatives or appointments, such as when Mayor Vincent Gray (D) named local activists Earline Budd and Alexandra Beninda as the first two transgender women to serve on the D.C. Commission on Human Rights. Barry’s pro-LGBT record extend- ed to other issues, as he supported anti- bullying policies for LGBT schoolchil- dren, the JaParker Deoni Jones Birth Certificate Equality Amendment Act of 2013, and the repeal of “prostitution- free zones,” which have been criticized for promoting profiling of transgender women. B udd, w hose n omination t o t he Commission on Human Rights was shep- herded through the Committee on Aging and Community Affairs by Barry, remem- bered the former mayor as a “friend and

positive role model for all people” as she extended her condolences to his family. “As a transgender activist and advo- cate for the transgender and LGBTQ commu nity, I have always looke d at Mayor for Life Marion Barry’s life as an inspiration to me in the daily work that I do,” Budd said. “While Marion Barry might not have been seen as an advocate for transgender and LGBTQ people, he was in his own way as one who wanted equality for all

I often believe that God puts ordinary

people like Marion Barry in our lives, and that comes with the good and the bad. Even his bad could not outshine the good, because he sincerely was one who loved his people, especially his Ward 8 family.” Richard J. Rosendall, president of the Gay and Lesbian Activists Alliance (GLAA), likened Marion Barry to for- mer President Bill Clinton for his charm, political savvy and a phenomenal memo- ry paired with an ability to connect per- sonally to people. “In his early years as mayor, before his addictions got the better of him, he appointed more gay officials than any mayor in the country,” Rosendall said. “I remember him announcing the birth of his son Christopher from the stage at Gay Pride. He was an ally of the LGBT com- munity throughout his mayoral years.” However, Rosendall also recalled the times he sparred with Barry, particularly after the latter touted his opposition to marriage equality. “I was greatly disappointed when he opposed marriage equality, and said ‘Shame on you’ to him after he led a call-and-response at an anti-gay rally in Freedom Plaza in the spring of 2009,” Rosendall said. “He replied, ‘I supported you on everything else.’ “That did not mollify me, but it was noteworthy that he and the only other ‘no’ vote on marriage, Ward 7 Councilmember Yvette Alexander, tout- ed t heir p ro-gay c redentials f rom t he dais rather than launching into anti-gay screeds,” Rosendall continued. “They were voting with their constituents; but they still, implausible as it seemed were eager not to be thought anti-gay. That was a tribute to how far the LGBT com- munity had come.” l

Hagel’s Final Act?

Outgoing defense secretary urged to act on military’s transgender ban

by Justin Snow

C HUCK HAGEL IS FACING renewed calls to order a review of the military’s longstanding ban on transgender service fol-

lowing the announcement he will step down as secretary of defense. On Monday, Pres ident Barack

Obama announced at the White House that Hagel would resign as defense secretary after nearly two years in the post. According to White House press secretary Josh Earnest, Obama and Hagel arrived together at the decision that Hagel should resign after concluding a different defense secretary might be bet- ter suited to meet current challenges. He will stay on as defense secretary until his

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Hagel DOD PHOTO BY PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS SEAN HURT/RELEASED
Hagel
DOD PHOTO BY PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS SEAN HURT/RELEASED

successor is nominated by Obama and confirmed by the Senate. A former senator from Nebraska criti- cal of the Iraq war, Hagel is the only Republican member of Obama’s national security team and, as a Vietnam veteran, is the first former enlisted combat soldier to serve as defense secretary. Although reports indicate Hagel was pressured to step down as Obama’s national security team has struggled to address threats such as ISIS, his depar- ture puts into question progress made in recent months to end the ban on trans- gender Americans serving openly in the military. Hagel told ABC News’ Martha Raddatz, in an interview that aired May 11, that the military’s transgender ban should be “continually reviewed” and stated he is open to such a review. “I go back to the bottom line — every qualified American who wants to serve our coun- try should have an opportunity if they fit the qualifications and can do it,” he said. “This is an area that we’ve not defined enough.” During a flight en route to Saudi Arabia a few days later, Hagel expand- ed upon his remarks, stating that the P entagon s hould c ontinue t o e valuate the ban. “I’ve not asked for a specific task force,” he said. “I’ve not asked for a specific study. I would want to hear more from individuals who are close to this issue, know this issue, who I would value their judgment and their direction on.”

On May 16, the White House signaled their support for such a review. “I would certainly point you t o w hat Secretary Hagel said and we certainly support his efforts in this area,” White House press secretary Jay Carney said in response to questions from Metro Weekly. Such statements illustrated a dramatic shift in tone by the Pentagon and Obama administration on transgender mili - tary service, but more than six months later, there has been no official action. Following news of Hagel’s resignation, Pentagon spokesperson Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen told Metro Weekly no review of the military’s transgender ban has yet been ordered. “Secretary Hagel’s leadership has been critical to the steady progress LGBT ser- vice members and their families have experienced during his tenure, and we commend him for living up to his belief that ‘Every qualified American who wants to serve our country should have the oppo rtunity to se rve,’” sta ted All yson Robinson, a former Army captain and director of policy for the LGBT military group SPARTA. “In his remaining days in office, we call upon him to uphold those values by initiating a review of the Department of Defense’s obsolete poli- cies that bar fully qualified transgender Americans from serving. Mr. Secretary, six months ago you promised 15,000 transgender service members and their families a review would happen. We expect you to keep your promise to them.”

Fred Sainz, vice preside nt of the Human Rights Campaign, said Hagel’s departure should have no impact on the awaited review. “It should proceed with all due haste and nothing should slow it down,” Sainz said. While gay, lesbian and bisexual Americans have been able to serve open- ly since the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) in September 2011, with no negative consequence, a medical regula-

tory ban still prohibits transgender mili- tary service. Unlike DADT, the ban is not

a federal statute and the ability to lift it

lies not with lawmakers on Capitol Hill, but leaders at the Pentagon. An estimated 15,500 transgender personnel currently serve in the armed forces. A n i ndependent r eport r eleased i n August, authored by a nine-member commission consisting of three retired U.S. military generals and convened by the Palm Center, found the Pentagon could immediately open the armed ser- vices to transgender Americans in a way that is consistent with military readiness and core values. Robinson also noted that more than three years after the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” military nondiscrimination protections have not been updated to include sexual orientation. “It’s past time for the Pentagon to bring itself in line with nearly every other federal agency and protect its lesbian, gay, and bisex- ual troops from discrimination,” said Robinson. Although Hagel faced skepticism from the LGBT community during his confirmation process in 2013 for his record as a senator, he soon earned their trust. He became the first secretary of defense to attend a Pentagon Pride event in June 2013, implemented the Supreme Court’s decision striking down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act and sought to ensure states blocking requests for benefits by members of the National Guard with a same-sex spouse followed federal policy. Hagel has been an “important ally and transformational leader on issues of equality with the Department of Defense,” stated Ashley Broadway, presi- dent of the American Military Partner

Association. ”While there is certainly still

a tremendous amount of work to be done

for full LGBT equality in the military, Secretary Hagel’s leadership has made

a profound impact on the lives of the

families of our nation’s LGBT service members.” l

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Business

LGBT
LGBT

JULIAN VANKIM

Every Body Welcome

Capitol Hill’s Freed Bodyworks specializes in “radical inclusion,” client-centered care

by John Riley

F RANCES REED AND JESSICA VonDyke, co-owners of Freed Bodyworks, a wellness center on Capitol Hill, have rolled

out the welcome mat for potential cli- ents. It starts with their business cards, emblazoned with the words “Radical Inclusion” and “All Bodies” in black- and-white lettering on red background on the backside. On the front, alongside their contact information, they’ve placed five logos — a Pride flag, a BDSM flag, a trans flag, a “fat-positive” seal and a “no shame” seal, making it clear that these specialists in healing and holistic body treatments are intent on opening their doors to as wide an audience as possible. “That is the first things we put out t here, a t a ll t imes, t hat y ou a re w el -

come no matter what,” VonDyke says of the company’s branding and advertis - ing strategy, which she calls “overt and unapologetic.” “All of our marketing materials and graphic design is geared towards folks who aren’t looking for the massage or acupuncture or holistic treatments that have the lotus flowers on them,” she says. “Not anything against those places — there’s nothing wrong with those places — but that’s not us. We’re intentionally talking to people who are like, ‘Oh, I see, this is bold colors, this is big graphics, this has got my attention. And also, now I’m noticing that it has this message that says I’m welcome there.’” That inclusion is apparent within the first few minutes of a client’s arrival. In what would normally be a mundane ritu- al — filling out intake paperwork — Freed Bodyworks spices it up, asking clients not only personal questions about their body, such as whether a person binds their chest, wears hair extensions, or even car- ries a messenger bag on their shoulder,

or even car- ries a messenger bag on their shoulder, but their legal name and the

but their legal name and the name they prefer to be called. And the therapists will then use whatever preferred name the person writes down. “I will call you Cupcake if you write it as your preferred name,” says Reed, who identifies as genderqueer, meaning neither male nor female. “I won’t even remember your legal name.” Reed, who first founded Freed Bodyworks as a solo practice in 2011 before launching a joint venture with VonDyke in 2013, wanted to ensure cli- ents did not have to explain or defend their identity to the therapists that work on them. “I wanted to do away with that, and have a place where we would do the work to know a broad swath of identity infor- mation, so that when people walk in the

VonDyke (L) and Reed

door and say, ‘I identify as fat-positive,’ we knew what that meant,” Reed says. “And not only did they not get judged for it, but they got a feeling of belonging and being met in their identity.” To perform specific therapies, Freed Bodyworks hires out qualified inde - pendent contractors. Clients pay Freed Bodyworks, which acts as an umbrella organization, and takes a cut to pay for supplies, cleaning and laundry services, and maintenance of the physical space, which currently includes a waiting area and three treatment rooms inside a con- verted row house near 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue SE. Every thera- pist — eight in all, including Reed — is responsible for maintaining their own client relationships, though it is common to cross-promote or refer clients to their

fellow colleagues within the company. “We have a lot of clients who see more than one of us, and as we expand to offer more wellness services, that’s our vision,”

apy, are recognized by insurance com- panies, offering clients the chance to be reimbursed for those expenses. VonDyke and Reed, who are both busi-

room space as a meeting place for special outside groups, such as community LGBT organizations or meditation groups. The space will also be wheelchair accessible.

Freed Bodyworks is located at 1426

says Reed. “That piece of sharing and building up clients goes to a core ethic of client-centeredness. The wellness of the client is our guiding principle. We believe if you just move the client towards well- ness in the greatest possible fashion you can, you’ve made your best customer.” Among the therapies and services offered at Freed Bodyworks are psycho- therapy, a cupuncture, r eiki, r eflexol - ogy, neuromuscular, deep tissue massage, sports massage performed by a certified personal trainer, and various relaxation therapies such as Swedish or Esalen mas- sage. Rates for each therapy range from

ness partners and life partners, hope to further expand the company’s offerings. T hey w ant t o s tart o ffering h ot s tone therapy and art therapy, as well as bring on an herbalist and a nutritionist. They also have long-term plans to hire a recep- tionist, although Reed notes that there is not currently a need for one. The busi- ness does not accept walk-ins, requiring potential clients to book an appointment through their website or via phone, pref- erably a few days in advance. “Until I can have enough therapists free for large chunks of the day, we just can’t accept walk-ins,” Reed says.

Currently, the business offers outcall ser- vices to clients with mobility issues to compensate for the lack of accessibility in its current space. Above all, Reed and VonDyke are dedi- cated to hiring therapists who are not only well-qualified, often in several dif- ferent types of therapies, but who also have good people skills, in order to ensure their clients have an enjoyable experience and will return, hopefully recommending the business to their family, friends and colleagues. “The quality of work that our thera- pists do is astonishing,” VonDyke says.

a

one-hour standard massage, priced

Part of the company’s expansion also

“Not everyone can work here,” adds

at

$80, to a combined acupuncture and

includes moving into a bigger space,

Reed. “Particularly now that we really

massage session, which costs $125. Freed Bodyworks also offers short 30-minute massage sessions for $42 for clients who wish to stretch their dollars a little more. Most therapies are not cov - ered by insurance, although the State Department’s insurance is the only com- pany in the area that covers massage or other bodywork therapies. Other thera- pies, such as acupuncture or psychother-

which will be located just a few blocks from the current headquarters. The new space will offer five treatment rooms, a movement studio for yoga and tai chi classes, and a a classroom space that can be used to host various workshops, from massage for those who bind their chests to adult-geared body-based sensual edu- cation focusing on finding pleasure in the body. Reed foresees offering that class-

have 15 months of reputation under our belt. We pick really carefully. We owe it to the other therapists, and our 1500-plus clients, to only be bringing in people wor- thy of our brand.”

Pennsylvania Ave. SE. To make an appoint- ment, or for more information, visit freedbodyworks.com. l

To make an appoint- ment, or for more information, visit freedbodyworks.com. l METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014
To make an appoint- ment, or for more information, visit freedbodyworks.com. l METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014

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scene NLGJA’s Dateline: DC Benefit honoring Diane Rehm at Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Thursday, November

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LGBTCommunityCalendar

Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at 202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.

Weekly office at 202-638-6830 or the calendar email address. THURSDAY , NOVEMBER 27 BURGUNDY CRESCENT ,
Weekly office at 202-638-6830 or the calendar email address. THURSDAY , NOVEMBER 27 BURGUNDY CRESCENT ,

THURSDAY , NOVEMBER 27

BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer organiza- tion, is supporting the 13th Annual “Clear Out Your Closets” Thanksgiving Clothing Drive for the Needy and the Ruth Long Annual Thanksgiving Dinner for the Needy food drive. To participate and/or donate, visit burgundycrescent.org.

The DC Center’s Center Global and Center Aging

groups host THE DC CENTER THANKSGIVING

DINNER for those who do not have plans or are not with their families for the holiday. Doors open at 1 p.m., Dinner is 2-7 p.m. Bring a dish to share, plus music, board games, or other holiday traditions. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS

Regularly-scheduled events will resume next week. Happy Thanksgiving!

FRIDAY , NOVEMBER 28

GAY AND MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION

(GAMMA) is a twice-monthly support group for men who are gay, bisexual, questioning or don’t identify as any of the above, but who are attracted to men; and are or were married or otherwise involved with a woman. 7:30-9:30 p.m. at St. Thomas’ Parish Episcopal Church, 1772 Church St. NW. For more information, visit GAMMAinDC.org or meetup.com/GAMMAinDC.

WOMEN IN THEIR 20S, a social and activity group for queer women, meets the second and fourth Fridays of each month at The DC Center. Dancing at Phase One after meeting. 8-9:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS

Regularly-scheduled events will resume next week. Happy Black Friday!

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29

ADVENTURING outdoors group hosts strenu- ous 10-mile hike with 2400 feet of elevation gain to Signal Knob, at northern end of Massanutten Mountain near Strasburg, Va. Bring beverages, lunch, sturdy boots, and about $20 for fees. Carpool

at 9 a.m. from East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride lot. Craig, 202-462-0535. adventuring.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS

BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by Kiddush luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.

BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others inter- ested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.

DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social

club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and supportive environment, socializing afterward. Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or 10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.

DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey

Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.

teamdcbasketball.org.

DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass

for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome. For more info, visit dignitywashington.org.

GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical languag- es and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s, 900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@gmail.com.

IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For appointments other hours, call 301-422-2398.

SUNDAY , NOVEMBER 30

CHRYSALIS arts & culture group visits National Gallery of Art to view exhibits on El Greco, Degas et al. Free, all welcome. Lunch in Cascades Cafeteria. Meet at 11:30 a.m. inside the 6th & Constitution Avenue NW lobby. Craig, 202-462-0535. craighow-

ell1@verizon.net.

MONDAY , DECEMBER 1

The DC Center hosts its monthly VOLUNTEER NIGHT. Activities include sorting through book donations, cleaning up, taking inventory for safe-

sex packets. Pizza provided. 6:30-8:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS

Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a pro-

gram of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green Lantern,

1335 Green Court NW. No cost, newcomers wel-

come. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.

DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session

at Hains Point, 927 Ohio Dr. SW. 7-8:30 p.m. Visit swimdcac.org.

DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-8:30

p.m. Garrison Elementary, 1200 S St. NW. dcscan- dals.wordpress.com.

GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,

2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.

NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 5-7 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington. Appointments:

703-789-4467.

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger. Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or test- ing@smyal.org.

The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000

14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.

US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening

affinity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-

1100.

WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team

practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim- ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.

Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsup- port@whitman-walker.org.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:

Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appoint- ment call 202-745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2

WEEKLY EVENTS

ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH offers

free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by appointment). 202-291-4707, andromedatranscul- turalhealth.org.

ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/ Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com, afwashington.net.

DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social club

serving greater D.C.’s LGBT community and allies hosts an evening run/walk. dcfrontrunners.org.

LGBTCommunityCalendar

THE GAY MEN’S HEALTH COLLABORATIVE

SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21

offers free HIV/STI screening every 2nd and 4th Tuesday. 5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday LGBT Clinic, Alexandria Health Department, 4480 King St. 703-321-2511, james.leslie@inova.org.

THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER

meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

US HELPING US hosts a support group for black gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.

hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.

Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MENS HEALTH

AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,

SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger. Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155, test- ing@smyal.org.

1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis. No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available for fee. whitman-walker.org.

and herpes testing available for fee. whitman-walker.org. 20 NOVEMBER 27, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM WEDNESDAY , DECEMBER
and herpes testing available for fee. whitman-walker.org. 20 NOVEMBER 27, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM WEDNESDAY , DECEMBER

20 NOVEMBER 27, 2014

METROWEEKLY.COM

WEDNESDAY , DECEMBER 3

BOOKMEN DC, an informal men’s gay-literature group, discusses Denton Welch’s 1945 coming- of-age novel, “In Youth Is Pleasure.” 7:30 p.m. Tenleytown Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave NW. All welcome. bookmendc.blogspot.com.

THE DC LGBT CENTER PROGRAM COMMITTEE

meets to provide input on program content and management and examine relationships with orga- nizations for whom The DC Center serves as fiscal sponsor. 6-7 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.

THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB

meets for Social Bridge. No reservation and partner needed. All welcome. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. 301-345-1571 for more information.

THE TREVOR PROJECT, along with Still Point Pictures, host a free screening of Broken Heart Land, a documentary about gay teen suicide, HIV/ AIDS awareness and LGBT rights in the American heartland. Panel discussion to follow. Tickets avail- able via Eventbrite. For more information and link to tickets, visit brokenheartland.com.

WEEKLY EVENTS

AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647 20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.

ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH offers

free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by appointment). 202-291-4707, andromedatranscul- turalhealth.org.

HISTORIC CHRIST CHURCH offers Wednesday

worship 7:15 a.m. and 12:05 p.m. All welcome. 118 N. Washington St., Alexandria. 703-549-1450, historic- christchurch.org.

JOB CLUB, a weekly support program for job entrants and seekers, meets at The DC Center. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. More info, www.centercareers.org.

NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington. Appointments: 703-789-4467.

PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m., Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637 17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316. l

FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS PLEASE VISIT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM

Italian Kitchen, 1637 17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316. l FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS PLEASE VISIT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM

scene

scene Transgender Day of Remembrance at Metropolitan Community Church of D.C. Thursday, November 20 scan this

Transgender Day of Remembrance at Metropolitan Community Church of D.C.

Thursday, November 20

Metropolitan Community Church of D.C. Thursday, November 20 scan this tag with your smartphone for bonus

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21

Wedding

THE

PLANNER

In his new book, Marc Solomon reflects on how the marriage-equality movement found itself on the brink of victory

Interview by Justin Snow

F OR THE PAST 13 YEARS, MARC SOLOMON HAS FOUND himself at the center of some of the marriage-equality movement’s most contentious battles. “While I was in graduate school, the marriage decision happened in Massachusetts,” he says. “I was already vol- unteering 40-plus hours a week on the cause and after we won, I went to work full time in early 2004 and have been at it ever since, nonstop.” A former Republican staffer on Capitol Hill, it would not have been easy to predict that Solomon would spent the majority of his working life fighting for same-sex cou- ples’ right to marry. But after the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court issued a ruling in November 2003 legalizing

same-sex marriage in the state, Solomon turned his focus to other states, including Vermont, Connecticut and California. In 2010, he joined Freedom to Marry, where he currently serves as national campaign director, and immersed himself in the leg- islative fight over same-sex marriage in New York. As other state legislatures have considered same-sex marriage legislation, Solomon has often been there, lending advice to activists on the ground on how to drive the issue over the finish line. In his new book, Winning Marriage: The Inside Story of How Same-Sex Couples Took on the Politicians and Pundits — and Won (ForeEdge, $27.95), Solomon charts how the marriage-equality movement found itself on the brink of victory and pro- vides a blueprint to other movements on how to win.

With same-sex marriage legal in a majority of states and the Supreme Court hav- ing been asked to hear five cases challenging same-sex marriage bans in five states,

a national resolution legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide now seems closer

than ever. Public support in on the rise, and with Democrats solidly behind marriage equality, a growing number of Republicans appear to be as well. But Solomon warns that despite those gains, marriage-equality supporters must not grow complacent or comfortable until the job is done.

“The idea that this is inevitable is really scary to me,” he says. “None of this stuff

is inevitable. The Windsor decision was a 5-4 decision, so it’s one justice who gets

sick or who resigns. We know we need to drive it over the finish line and be done. It concerns me when I hear people say, ‘Well that one is done already.’ Actually a third

of the country doesn’t have the freedom to marry and it’s not done yet. This has been

such a great success in the context of the last decade. Let’s finish it and then we can

party and say it was inevitable.”

Photography by Todd Franson

Photography by Todd Franson

“There is this idea in our culture now that there needs to be a superhero,
“There is this idea in our culture now that there needs to be a superhero,
“There is this idea in our culture now that there needs to be a superhero,

“There is this idea in our culture now that there needs to be a superhero, and that’s how things happen. I WANTED TO TELL THE STORY OF HOW A SUCCESSFUL MOVEMENT REALLY WORKS. THE MOVEMENT IS NOT ABOUT ONE PERSON.”

happen. I WANTED TO TELL THE STORY OF HOW A SUCCESSFUL MOVEMENT REALLY WORKS. THE MOVEMENT
happen. I WANTED TO TELL THE STORY OF HOW A SUCCESSFUL MOVEMENT REALLY WORKS. THE MOVEMENT

METRO WEEKLY: Who is Marc Solomon? MARC SOLOMON: I grew up in Kansas City, Missouri. Was born a raised there from zero through 18. I went to Yale for college and I was Mr. Republican when I was a kid, and also when I was coming out of college and in my early 20s. I was a Republican staffer on Capitol Hill for a senator from Missouri — Jack

in district court it was clear to me we weren’t going to go back to the ballot, and if we had a chance to win it in court we should let it play out. I started talking with Evan Wolfson around that point and joined Freedom to Marry at the end of 2010. What Evan had seen was that from campaign to campaign, each of them was reinventing itself. There was not much trans- fer of knowledge and information from one state to the next. It was sort of happenstance.

And Evan saw that if we could set up a centralized campaign operation that could make sure that every state is using the best practices, that centralizes mes- saging because the right mes - saging is pretty consistent state to state, if we could set that up we could really accelerate our progress. He asked me to run the campaign elements of the work. Evan is really the big picture strategist — the persuader — and I’m the one who is really the political strategist: How do we win in Illinois? How do we win in New York? What are we going to need in this campaign and that campaign? What are the smart ways to push the president? How do we build power in strategic ways to get us where we need to go? MW: Tell me more about the young Republican aspect. SOLOMON: I decided I was a Republican when I was probably 13 or 14 years old, which was ironic because my parents were super liberal, so it was around the time I was recognizing that I was gay. In retrospect I really think it was a reaction. It was certainly a rebelling against my parents but it was also the idea of being with the tough guys, the Republicans, the badasses — it was sort of “If I’m one of them then I’m not gay.” I didn’t map it out that way, but in retro - spect I think there was plenty of that going on. I was never a gay Republican. I was a Republican

and I was gay. I also talk about in the book one of the most transformational things I’ve ever done is that was chosen to be part of this fellowship to the Rockefeller Foundation called Next Generation Leadership. They took 24 of us from around the country to focus on different elements of democracy and had all sorts of really inspiring advocates for dif- ferent causes. That was during the time I was coming out. I was around all these incredible leaders like Dan Gross, who heads the Brady Campaign, and Eric Garcetti, who is now mayor of Los Angeles, and it just became clear to me that ultimately at its root the fight for LGBT equality is a fight against oppression and

Danforth — who actually I’m still very close with. He’s still sort of a mentor, father-figure kind of guy.

But I was always super involved in poli- tics from early on. When Danforth retired from the Senate, I moved to St. Louis and helped him set up an not-for-profit project. I was on both this ideological journey as well as in the process of coming out and moved to Boston in 2001 and went to [Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government]. I also started volunteer- ing with this grassroots groups called the Massachusetts Freedom to Marry Coalition and really got hooked on the issue. It just seemed to make so much intuitive sense to me that gay people should be able to marry. I remember looking at an array of issues and causes that the groups were fighting for in Massachusetts and that one just appealed to me so strongly. And after I came out I really decided I wanted to use the politi- cal skills that I had developed and the background I had to advance the cause. In Massachusetts, I ended up running the campaign and we defeated two con- stitutional amendments that would have taken the right to marry away. When I started we were at 50 votes out of 200 in the legislature to stop a constitutional amendment when we needed to get 150. We needed 75 percent of the legisla- ture in order to defeat the constitutional amendment in Massachusetts and keep it off the ballot. We finally did that in 2007. We reelected every lawmaker who voted our way in 2004 and 2006. It was 195 out of 195. And we were the only state in that whole period of time. We lost four court cases in Maryland, Washington, New Jersey, New York, and then after we won in 2007, I started working closely with GLAD and doing essentially consulting work in other states.

I spent some time in Vermont and Connecticut helping guide them on elec- toral and legislative strategy. I went out to California for the last two weeks of Prop. 8 just to lend a hand and after it passed it was so clear to me that we had to overturn it. I felt really emotional

about it so I went back to Massachusetts and said I was leaving, and moved back and joined Equality California as their marriage director. People always asked me if I was planning weddings and stuff. It was really to build a ballot campaign to win back the freedom to marry in California. That was overtaken with events by the Prop. 8 lawsuit. It was a few months after I moved out there that Chad Griffin and team filed the lawsuit. Once we won

“I was in a lot of weddings as a groomsman, seeing my friends get married
“I was in a lot of weddings as a groomsman, seeing my friends get married
“I was in a lot of weddings as a groomsman, seeing my friends get married

“I was in a lot of weddings as a groomsman, seeing my friends get married and feeling like I wasn’t allowed to do this. I WAS BARRED FROM DOING THIS BY THE LAW. I DID FEEL LIKE A SECOND CLASS CITIZEN.”

like I wasn’t allowed to do this. I WAS BARRED FROM DOING THIS BY THE LAW.
like I wasn’t allowed to do this. I WAS BARRED FROM DOING THIS BY THE LAW.

when it came down to it what side did I want to be on. I wanted to fight against all oppression and that meant that I was on the left, and not on the right anymore. I’ve been a pretty active lib- eral for a good amount of time since. MW: Do you think that experience has informed how you approach Republicans in this fight? SOLOMON: No question. I joke that I’m not a Republican but I can play one on TV. If you want to make real advances on a cause in America with divided government it’s crucial that it becomes a bipartisan cause. And on most causes I care about now it means working extra hard to enlist Republicans to be in support and then highlighting and touting that support. It can’t be lip service — it’s got to be real. I think that’s why we’ve been successful with this Young Conservatives for the Freedom to Marry — people know me and they know that I’m about one cause. It’s about winning the free- dom to marry and it’s not in my day job my work that’s all I’m about. I know we need Republicans in order to win, in order to make our strongest case and in order to make it a truly American issue. I’ve been able to develop a lot of trust with Republicans who know how serious I am about the cause and I’m not winking and nodding and just giving them lip service. MW: What made you write this book? Why now?

Massachusetts, being at my first marriage. I remember it was one of the plaintiff couples. I remember always being wistful going to weddings and I was in a lot of weddings as a groomsman and seeing my friends get married and feeling like I wasn’t allowed to do this. I was barred from doing this by the law. I did feel like a second class citizen, and I felt like it was really wrong. And going to this wedding and seeing two guys getting married, everything felt so perfect. Hearing the officiant say, “By the power vested in me by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,” — it was excep- tionally moving. The other point was on the political side when we beat back the final constitutional amendment in Massachusetts. So many people thought we’d never get a majority of the legislature, but we actually got three-quarters of the legislature to vote our way. That was such a huge emotionally powerful day. I remember Ted Kennedy called me and left this great message on my phone. None of the states have had anywhere close to the intensity we had in Massachusetts. A lot people don’t realize how intense it was. There were religious nuts from all over the country who came. There was this one guy who carried this huge cross back and forth in front of the state house. I remember people were walking behind Mary Bonauto chanting “Evil!” MW: Police had set up sharpshooters, too. SOLOMON: That sort of epitomizes it. Prop. 8 was very intense but even some of

t he m ore i ntense moments during Prop. 8 were nothing like the vitriol and inten- sity in Massachusetts because it was the first place. As far as lows — losing Prop. 8. We were at this hotel in San Francisco and outside people were celebrating like crazy because Obama had won, and here we were. It felt like even in San Francisco, on this joyous night for so many people, our community was being left behind. The next

day, the giant rainbow flag in the Castro was flying at half-mast and people were protesting. It was really devastating. MW: What do you think the state of the opposition is currently? SOLOMON: We’re seeing them moving into these so called reli- gious protection — or as we call them, “license to discriminate efforts.” But ultimately, I don’t think those are going to have too much resonance because what they’re about is telling people that you can keep gay folks out of your store, out of your restau- rant, not provide services to gay people. And when you remind people we’ve been through that period in U.S. history before when blacks weren’t allowed to sit at lunch counters, people really recoil because some of those images are so instilled in people’s memories. I think ultimately it’s not going to catch on. I don’t know where they go next. We’ve seen them go to fight equality for transgender people, which is really terrible. But also

SOLOMON: Well, it took a long time to write. I started writing this book five years ago, after Massachusetts,

because nobody had really told the story of Massachusetts. A fter I j oined Freedom to Marry in 2010 I immediately immersed myself in the New York mar- riage fight. That was such a power- ful, momentum- shifting battle — the disgusting intrigue in Albany, which is one of the grimmest state capitols politi- cally, working super closely with Gov. Cuomo and dealing with some of these

horrible shenani - gans by legislators. It was really a compelling story. But then we had the ballot fights and we did all this work with the Obama administration, pushing them and working with them. And then we had the DOMA case and the Prop. 8 case. I just kept writing and writing and writing. There is this idea in our culture now that there needs to be a superhero, and that’s how things happen. I wanted to tell the story of how a successful movement really works. The move- ment is not about one person. There are certainly leaders like

Evan Wolfson and Mary Bonauto and Tim Gill and a few others who really point the way with a long term vision and a plan, but the creation of this movement and the hard work of the move- ment — that’s the thing I wanted to show. The hard work of the movement, the unglamorous work. MW: What’s been the highest point and lowest point for you? SOLOMON: The highest points were the first couples marrying in

other issues. Many of the people who fight against us are also the people fighting against immigration reform. There is this strain of cultural conservatism. We’re also really seeing a shift in evangeli- cal churches away from this Pat Robertson style of fire and brim- stone. Given where millennials are, if they want to keep appealing

the states fighting these suits doesn’t make much sense. Now that there’s a split in the circuits, we’ve answered what Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said was really needed for them to take up a case. What we’re doing now is working to highlight

to

younger people, they’re going to have to do something.

two things — that America is ready for national resolution and that every day of denial is a day of real harm for real people, and highlighting that harm so the justices realize that punting or not taking up a case and letting it go for another year or two has a real serious impact on lives. MW: Is there a politician you think has ever led on this issue? It

MW: After so many losses, what was the turning point for the

marriage-equality movement? SOLOMON: There have been several. Number one was gay peo-

ple finally marrying. People have been working on this for

years and years, and finally, in Massachusetts gay people were

   

seems like a lot of them are always playing catch up.

“The most important thing for the vast majority of elected officials is to continue to be an elected official. THERE

able to marry. People around the country were able to see it was good and it was fine, and expe- riencing the real couples and why they wanted to get married really was transformational. And that’s why our opponents put so much effort into trying to stop it because they knew once people saw what we were really talking about, people would be

SOLOMON: The most important thing for the vast majority of elected offi- cials is to continue to be an elected official. So there aren’t many who will take these über-courageous votes. There are a few who really led on this issue when it wasn’t in their political best interests. One is a woman named Barbara L’Italien — a Democratic then-state rep in Massachusetts. There are

a

few others. Richard Ross from

fine with it. Winning in New York was

huge turning point because we hadn’t won in awhile and New York was such a big pow- erful state. That provided real fuel. And I think losing Prop. 8 provided real intensity to every- body. It was a big wake-up call

a

AREN’T MANY POLITICIANS WHO WILL TAKE THESE

Massachusetts, who replaced Scott Brown in the state Senate, and Brown called him right after he switched his vote and voted our way and said, “What the fuck are you doing?” He thought he was going to

lose his seat, but he recognized that he couldn’t live with himself if he voted the other way. A couple of the leaders of the Republicans in New York who voted our way took truly courageous votes — they knew that

to

the gay community that if we

ÜBER COURAGEOUS VOTES.”

really wanted this freedom and right then we really needed to

work hard for it. It wasn’t going

 

it

could cost them their seats and a

to happen on its own and we couldn’t just expect people to vote our way. The final one was the Windsor decision and just how power- fully it was written. Justice Anthony Kennedy was so clearly

couple of them have lost their seats. I think Republican Sen. Rob Portman took a very principled stand on marriage. He got some flack from people in our com- munity because they said he only did it because his son is gay. Let me tell you how many politicians I know who have gay kids who are opposed to us because they are worried about the political consequence. To me, it was really moving because he was essen- tially saying his kid was more important to him than a potential political future if it ever came to that. I thought that was very powerful. On the national front, that was the most courageous stand I’ve seen. MW: Freedom to Marry has said once same-sex couples secure a national right to marry that you all are done and the organization will shut down. So what’s next for you? SOLOMON: There’s no question that I’m passionate about issue campaigns. There are some issues I care a lot about, such as how can we reframe the issue of income inequality in this country so that we can create serious momentum to deal with it and give everybody an equal opportunity to succeed. There’s certainly the immediate need in the LGBT movement to drive forward non- discrimination and get that passed for gay and trans folks. I love thinking about the different pressure points that a movement or a cause has that it can strategically leverage to gain power and start putting wins on the board and create this snowball effect. MW: What lessons can other movements take from this one? SOLOMON: Have a very clear goal of what you’re fighting for and

onboard, and when you read Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent and how clearly he saw what it meant. But that gets back to what I was talking about before. I wrote the book because I wanted to show what a movement is — how

a

movement works and how our movement gained power and

won. The Windsor decision didn’t happen on its own. The

Windsor decision happened because it rests on not only the other DOMA cases but the wins we’d had in the states and the growth

in

public support. It’s the cumulative effect that gets us to the

point where its downhill skiing.

MW: When do you think the movement for marriage equality will come to a conclusion? SOLOMON: I think it could happen by June 2015. There are [five] cases now pending before the Supreme Court. I saw this USA Today piece where the reporter had my quote right next to [National Organization for Marriage President] Brian Brown’s quote and they were like the exact same quote: we want the Supreme Court to take up a case and rule immediately.

I

think from the states, whether you’re for or against, people

want national resolution. They realize that there’s a need for national resolution and that having this patchwork doesn’t make

lot of sense. Having the unclarity doesn’t make a lot of sense. Spending all of this time and money fighting our opponents in

a

being able to enunciate it clearly. What’s the endgame? And then to have a big-picture strategy of how to get there. Those are things that Evan really developed — they’re what we’ve always called the roadmap to victory. The freedom to marry nationwide was the end and the strategy to get there was to win a critical mass of states and achieve a critical mass of public support so we could get the Supreme Court to ultimately do the right thing. It’s very important to have an aspirational goal. Winning the freedom to marry is something that inspires lots of folks. You need something that is inspiring enough to get people to go knock on doors in rural Virginia or Maryland or to sit down with your lawmakers. Having strong campaigns in the states is also important. Being very strategic about where we play knowing there’s not unlimited resources or unlimited talent and when we decide on them just being exceptionally professional about the kinds of campaigns we put together. Always having those campaigns be very field focused, very strategically grassroots focused. On issues as big as ours and some of the other issues that have been tough to move along like gun violence or immigration, you need lawmakers hearing from people in their districts so they hear much more from your side than your opponents’ side. And the framing of the issue is really important. You need to know who your audience is. Audience is sort of middle America, so you really need to figure out a way to talk about your cause in a way that resonates with regular people and the people who represent them. Always being very focused on values-laden messaging. That’s something we got wrong a lot before we got it right, and it’s something professionals in the business get wrong all the time. The messages that poll the best aren’t necessarily the ones that work the best. People need to feel ultimately that

if they don’t support your position they are not living up to their best selves. And that takes figuring out how to really tell the story in a way that people can connect with. It’s also important to be very positive and not demonizing of people who aren’t with you. When I first started on this our support was in the 30-some odd percent. If we demonized the people who weren’t with us back then we’d still be there. It’s respecting the fact that people come from all sorts of back - grounds and most people learn that marriage is not two guys or two gals. They learned that marriage is a father and a mother. That’s what you learn from your first story book as a kid and that’s what plenty of religions teach as well. People aren’t bad people because they believe that or because they were taught that. It’s how do you walk people through a journey to get to the place where you want them to get and how do you help them see that that’s where they want to get. And then welcom - ing them and embracing them. Not saying, “What the hell took you so long?” I wanted this book to show how we constructed this move- ment and how the movement works so people get a deeper perspective of what it takes to have a social movement that really builds power for itself and wins in our American politi- cal system. It’s a very positive and optimistic story in the end because what I’m showing is that you can win in America. Even in dysfunctional Washington and divided government, you can still accomplish great things.

Marc Solomon’s Winning Marriage: The Inside Story of How Same-Sex Couples Took on the Politicians and Pundits — and Won is published by ForeEdge and available in bookstores and at online booksellers. l

published by ForeEdge and available in bookstores and at online booksellers. l METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014
published by ForeEdge and available in bookstores and at online booksellers. l METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014
published by ForeEdge and available in bookstores and at online booksellers. l METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1
Compiled by Doug Rule NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014 Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1

Compiled by Doug Rule

NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 4, 2014

Unfinished Business Mockingjay Part 1 is all build up with no emotional or dramatic payoff

Unfinished Business

Mockingjay Part 1 is all build up with no emotional or dramatic payoff

by Randy Shulman Illustration by Christopher Cunetto

E VERYONE’S EITHER GOING TO WANT TO KISS YOU, KILL YOU OR

be you,” says Capitol couture maven Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks) to her

young charge Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), the valiant heroine of

“The Hunger Games” trilogy-turned-quadrilogy. When we last saw Katniss, at the end of the magnificent The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, she was being whisked away to District 13, home of an underground revolutionary base. Her maybe-beloved Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) had been rushed off in the other direction, to the tyrannical Capitol, where life is a giant cesspool of excess to which the various impoverished districts pay tribute. And so commences The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1, as Katniss is groomed for gamesmanship of a propagandizing kind. Recruited by Plutarch Heavensbee (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and District 13’s brittle president, Alma Coin (Julianne Moore) to be the face of the revolution, Katniss finds herself pushed, pulled and twisted as though she were the kneaded dough in Peeta’s family bakery. As the reluctant star of rebel propaganda, or “propos” as they are called in the film, Katniss is once again paraded around in a way not altogether dissimilar from what the antagonistic Capitol forced her to do in the previous films. She spends most of

the movie in a morose fog, battling PTSD and heartsick over her sepa- ration from Peeta. President Snow (Donald Sutherland, whose delicious, glint-of-evil performance is only out- matched in polish by his alarmingly well trimmed, white locks) continues to torture Katniss from afar. Every so often there’s a sign of the old Katniss — a trace of ferocity, a hint of anger, a moment of resolve — but mostly she spends the movie with a very bad case of the blahs. And so it goes for two long, nearly action-free hours, as Katniss grows mopier and mopier over her separa- tion from Peeta, despite the fact that there’s a perfectly good stud nearby who adores her — Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth), ready to fi ght alongside her and even kiss her chastely, lips closed vise-tight. Directed by Francis Lawrence, who also helmed Catching Fire and will do similar honors a year from now with Mockingjay, Part 2, the cur- rent Hunger Games installment suf- fers from Hollywood’s recent, greed- fueled need to split the final install- ment of trilogies into an unmatched pair. Mockingjay Part 1 is a static, grim setup for what is sure to be a ter- rific payoff, particularly if President Coin makes good on her promise of a “special weapon.” Claustrophobic and bleak, virtu- ally devoid of color, Mockingjay Part 1 is essentially the first half of any traditional action film — all buildup, with no emotional or dramatic payoff. Even the few assorted incidents that kick the movie to sudden life sputter into nothing. Fans of the books will no doubt love Mockingjay Part 1. The rest of us are left to fidget in our seats, wondering why we’re not at home watching an encore of Catching Fire.

Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 (HHHHH) is now playing at area theaters.

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TODD FRANSON

TODD FRANSON Deck the Shops Lights Up on 14th Street kicks off the holidays in Logan

Deck the Shops

Lights Up on 14th Street kicks off the holidays in Logan Circle

T HESE DAYS THE MID-CITY AREA OF 14TH STREET IS ALREADY bustling. But the folks at Miss Pixie’s Furnishings and Whatnot are determined to make the city’s trendiest strip glow even brighter this

holiday season. The store has spearheaded “Lights Up on 14th Street,” which launches Friday night, Dec. 5. Businesses up and down the street in Logan Circle will hang outdoor lights and decorate window displays, with many offering promotions that evening, from specials to free food and samples. “We told everyone do anything that you want to do that suits your busi- ness,” says Joani Maher of Miss Pixie’s. “It’s just a way to get people excited about the holidays, start shopping and cruise the street.” Participating businesses include Home Rule, Logan Hardware, Flowers on 14th, Pearl Dive Oyster Palace, Cork & Fork Fine Wine Merchants, Ted’s Bulletin, BakeHouse, Bodysmith Gym, City Paws, Redeem, and even the new- est kid on the block, West Elm. The idea springs from the “customer appreciation shopping bazaar” that Miss Pixie’s first hosted last year and has decided to expand. “We invite local artists and vendors to sell in the store,” Maher says about the annual bazaar, where customers can find art, cards, vintage clothes, jewelry and candies, going well beyond the eclectic goods the store sells year round. This year’s event will feature live music from the gypsy jazz band Bitter Dose Combo, and there will also be prizes and contests. To encourage more businesses to go all out in decorating, there’s also a contest for best storefront displays organized by the Washington City Paper. “People who take the time to vote on their favorite will be entered to win gift certificates,” Maher says. And the Logan Circle Community Association is also working to encourage residents in the area to decorate their houses and apartments for the evening. Says Maher, “We’re hoping over the years it will get bigger and bigger.” — Doug Rule

Lights Up on 14th Street starts at 5:30 p.m., with the Customer Appreciation Bazaar running until 8 p.m. at Miss Pixie’s, 1626 14th St. NW. Call 202-232-8171 or visit lightsupon14thstreet.com for more information.

SPOTLIGHT

A BROADWAY CHRISTMAS CAROL

Kathy Feininger’s A Broadway Christmas Carol tells Dickens’ classic by altering the lyrics to familiar Broadway tunes, 30 or so in all, from The Music Man to Sweeney Todd to Annie. The result is a pretty gay show, especially with gay Helen Hayes Award- winning actor Michael Sharp at the helm as direc- tor and choreographer. This year, Peter Boyer will take on the bah-humbugging duties, while Sharp plays The Man Who Isn’t Scrooge, Tracey Stephens plays The Woman Who Isn’t Scrooge and Howard Breitbart is the music director — aka The Man Behind The Piano. “I always think of it like the Carol Burnett Show,” Sharp told Metro Weekly a couple seasons ago. “[Three] people playing a million differ- ent characters.” Runs to Dec. 28. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria. Tickets are $50. Call 800-494-8497 or visit metrostage.org.

A DRAG SALUTE TO MOTOWN REVUE

Indefatigable local drag sensation Shi-Queeta Lee and her troupe of illusionists offer another edition of her show “A Drag Salute To The Divas,” this time singing, lip-synching and dancing to the songs from the Motown Era. You know, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas, the Four Tops and the Temptations — yes, that’s right, there will be drag kings and female-to-male performers this time around. Sunday, Dec. 7, at 8 p.m. The Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. Tickets are $20 in advance or $45. Call 202-588-5595 or visit adragsalutetothe- divas.com.

FRANK WARREN

Sixth & I offers a multimedia presentation by the founder and curator of the PostSecret Project, a collection of over one million highly personal and artistic postcards mailed anonymously from around the world to share secrets. The website is report- edly the most visited ad-free blog in the world. Frank Warren shares some of these secrets in his newest book from the project, The World of PostSecret. He’ll also sign books after the presentation. Wednesday, Dec. 3, at 7 p.m. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets, including one book, are $30; $45 for two tickets. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC:

FARM-TO-TABLE MEAL IN HUBBARD HALL

National Geographic head chef Matthew Crudder offers a local, sustainable dinner — paired with local wine, beer and cider — in the first headquarters of the National Geographic Society, an evening inspired by the exhibition Food: Our Global Kitchen. Archivist Renee Braden joins to share the history of the society and its relationship with food. Thursday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M St. NW. Tickets are $175 per person. Call 202-857-7700 or visit events.nationalgeographic.com.

NATIONAL ZOO’S ZOOLIGHTS

Every year, the Smithsonian’s National Zoo presents ZooLights, in which 500,000 colorful Christmas lights illuminate life-sized animal silhouettes, danc- ing trees, buildings and walkways. All that, plus select animal houses will be open, displaying noctur- nal creatures, including the Small Mammal House, the Great Ape House and Reptile Discover Center. Opens Friday, Nov. 28, at 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. To Jan. 26. National Zoo, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free, courtesy of Pepco. Call 202-633-4800 or visit nationalzoo.si.edu.

ONCE THERE WERE BILLIONS

Once There Were Billions: Vanished Birds of North America documents those species of birds we’ve lost on this continent over the past two centuries, from

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the puffin-like great auck to the Carolina parakeet to the heath hen to the passenger pigeon, not to be confused with the commonplace carrier pigeon. Through October 2015. National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Call 202-633-1000 or visit mnh.si.edu.

House Theatre, 4545 East-West Highway, Bethesda. Tickets are $25 to $50. Call 240-644-1100 or visit roundhousetheatre.org.

STAGE

SUTTON FOSTER WITH THE NSO POPS

“I would torture my family with made-up arias and stuff, and sing around the house,” Sutton Foster told Metro Weekly last year, about her childhood days in Georgia and Michigan. Of course, her fam- ily’s torture has become the world’s pleasure. The 38-year-old Foster has been nominated five times in the last decade as Leading Actress in a Musical at the Tony Awards — and won twice. Foster stops by the Kennedy Center to perform selections from her Broadway career with the National Symphony Orchestra Pops as conducted by Steven Reineke and also featuring guest vocalists Joshua Henry and Megan McGinnis. Friday, Nov. 28, and Saturday, Nov. 29, at 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $20 to $88. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

STEVEN LUTVAK

The gay composer behind this year’s Tony Award winner for Best Musical, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, stops by the Kennedy Center as part of the free Millennium Stage nightly programming in a cabaret presented as part of ASCAP’s “Broadway:

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow” series. Tuesday, Dec. 2, at 6 p.m. Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. Tickets are free. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy- center.org.

THE SUZANNE FARRELL BALLET

The Kennedy Center’s resident dance compa- ny returns to the Kenn Opera House with three Balanchine works, including the 1951 one-act version of Swan Lake. Scott Speck conducts the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra during the perfor- mance. Friday, Nov. 28, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 29, at 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 30, at 1:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $2O to $95. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy- center.org.

THE NUTCRACKER

There will be no pirouettes at Bethesda’s Round House Theatre this season, as the company premieres its production of a Chicago-born new musical based on the famous story by E.T.A. Hoffman — which also inspired the far more famous ballet by Tchaikovsky. Joe Calarco directs Round House’s production of this musical, set in a contemporary American home, written by composer Kevin O’Donnell and writers Jake Minton and Phillip Klapperich. Will Gartshore, Sherri L. Edelen, Mitchell Hébert, Erin Weaver and Lauren Williams star. Now to Dec. 28. Round

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

Molly Smith directs an Arena Stage production of Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick’s beloved musical, celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year. Jonathan Hadary, a Bethesda native who has been nominated for a Tony Award and won a Helen Hayes, plays Tevye, leading a 28-member cast. Arena favorite Parker Esse (Oklahoma, The Music Man) adapts Jerome Robbins’s original choreography for the in- the-round Fichlander Stage. To Jan. 5. Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Tickets are $50 to $99. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.

FIVE GUYS NAMED MOE

Arena Stage presents Clarke Peters’s celebration of the feel-good music of Louis Jordan, whose hits included “Let the Good Times Roll” and “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby.” Robert O’Hara directs a cast featuring Travis Porchia, Jobari Parker-Namdar, Paris Nix, Sheldon Henry and Clinton Roane. To Dec. 28. Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Tickets are $51 to $109. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.

HANDBAG

In Handbag, provocative British playwright Mark Ravenhill (Shopping and F***king) explores the pur- suit of parenthood by gay couples in present-day London by juxtaposing it with a Victorian-era tale, styled as a prequel to Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest. Scena Theatre kicks off its 28th sea- son with a production of this black comedy, whose two storylines run in parallel until colliding in a sat- ire of society’s progress. Scena’s Robert McNamara directs a cast that includes Anne Nottage, Amanda Forstrom, Gray West, Edward C. Nagel, Robert Sheire and Haely Jardas. Closes this Sunday, Nov. 30. Anacostia Playhouse, 2020 Shannon Place S.E. Tickets are $20 to $35. Call 202-399-7993 or visit scenatheatre.org.

JULIUS CAESAR

Call 202-399-7993 or visit scenatheatre.org. JULIUS CAESAR Specters haunt the stage at Folger Theatre, and these

Specters haunt the stage at Folger Theatre, and these cloaked souls — ghosts of those lost to war — lurk in the shadows and stalk the set, like a group of grim reapers, in Robert Richmond’s stunning, mystical production of Julius Caesar. They faintly chant what must be warnings of further bloodshed to come, if we could only make them out. But just as Caesar ignores his Soothsayer’s fervent plea “Beware the Ides of March,” so the lost souls’ incantations fall

the Ides of March,” so the lost souls’ incantations fall 32 NOVEMBER 27, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM on

32 NOVEMBER 27, 2014

METROWEEKLY.COM

on deaf ears. It’s impressive how Richmond, work- ing with fight director Casey Dean Kaleba, has his attractive actors move — from the lurching lost souls to the multiple slow-motion battle scenes to the marches and synchronized hand gestures showing group solidarity. Everything here is stylized in an

evocative, even elegant manner, with every detail carefully thought out, right down to the poppy petals that are regularly tossed out after each death. After all, since the First World War red poppies have been

a symbol of remembering the war dead. To Dec. 7.

Folger Shakespeare Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE.

Tickets are $40 to $75. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu. (Doug Rule)

PEN

Kasi Campbell directs a Washington Stage Guild production of this sharply funny, poignant play, a recent Off Broadway hit. Written by contemporary American playwright David Marshall Grant, Pen focuses on the perplexing future faced by a divorced, mixed-religion couple and their college-bound son. Closes Sunday, Nov. 30. Undercroft Theatre of Mount Vernon United Methodist Church, 900 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Tickets are $40 to $50. Call 240-582-0050 or visit stageguild.org.

MUSIC

MOYA BRENNAN

“An Irish Christmas” has become something of a tradition at the National Geographic Society, featur- ing the woman who came to fame as the voice of the Irish group Clannad. Moya Brennan performs a selection of Irish musical gems for the season, and the Culking School of Traditional Irish Dance offers

a special performance. Saturday, Dec. 6, at 3 p.m.

and 7 p.m. Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M St. NW. Tickets are $30. Call 202-857-7700 or visit

events.nationalgeographic.com.

THE SELDOM SCENE

Formed over 40 years ago in Bethesda, the progres- sive bluegrass band Seldom Scene remains especially popular in its hometown region. The group returns to Alexandria’s seated show palace the Birchmere for two nights over Thanksgiving Weekend, this time with special guests Dry Branch Fire Squad. Friday, Nov. 27, and Saturday, Nov. 28, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $35. Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com or seldomscene.com.

ZELLNIK BROTHERS

Writer David Zellnik and composer Joseph Zellnik wrote the gay-affirming Off-Broadway military musi- cal Yank! a decade ago. The duo perform from that work and other collaborations, including The Wright Brothers: First in Flight as part of the “Broadway:

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow” presented as a free Kennedy Center Millennium Stage concert by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, better known as ASCAP. Saturday, Nov. 29, at 6 p.m. Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. Tickets are free. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy- center.org. l

FOR MORE OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS PLEASE VISIT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM

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C. STANLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

stage

Josh Adams (L) and Lou Liberatore

Thought and Dance

stage Josh Adams (L) and Lou Liberatore Thought and Dance Theater J stages an extraordinary, intelligent

Theater J stages an extraordinary, intelligent epic, while KenCen turns up the dance

by DOUG RULE

I ’M THINKING,” ONE CHARACTER SAYS AT THE END

of the long play with the long title now in production at

Theater J. You’ll be thinking at the end of this play, too —

and all throughout its more than three-hour running time.

The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and Socialism with a Key to the Scriptures is a Tony Kushner play, after all. The gay playwright has all but cornered the market on long plays that reward thinking, even over-thinking, ever since his break- through masterpiece 20 years ago, Angels in America: A Gay

Fantasia on National Themes — which, before it was a six-hour

miniseries on HBO, was two plays, each three hours long. However daunting The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide might sound, you’ll ultimately find it worth the effort. Director John Vreeke has assembled a fine cast of 11 actors who portray members of an Italian-American family and its assorted friends and lovers. Tom Wiggin portrays family patriarch, Gus, who in 2007 has summoned his three children to the family’s Brooklyn brownstone to announce his plans to “liquidate and vacate” — that is, sell the house and commit suicide. A retired longshore- man and labor organizer, Gus feels like he’s spinning his senes- cent wheels. He’s also not particularly proud of the marks he’s left on the world. Most of the action takes place in the family’s parlor room and plays out like an Arthur Miller classic, exploring all manner of topics — philosophical, political, personal. But the opposing con- cepts of freedom and oppression predominate, and even Gus’s desire is portrayed in this light — he sees suicide as the only way to gain a sense of freedom, while his children naturally see it as an oppressive act that will cause great distress. Wiggin commands the stage as Gus, getting to the heart of a contradictory kind of character — the learned everyman. Susan

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53

Rome puts up a good fight as his earnest bisexual daughter, Empty, who endeavors to “defeat death” by talking him out of his plans. Lisa Hodsoll plays Empty’s partner, Maeve, as less of a monster and more personable than the character otherwise might be in a different actor’s hands — while the opposite is true of Lou Liberatore. He plays Gus’s gay son Pill as a weaselly character who struggles to connect with anyone and seemingly disappoints everyone, including gay hustler Eli (Josh Adams), who falls for him. Speaking of struggling to connect, Michael Anthony Williams is tyrannical as Pill’s lover Paul, making it hard to see any redeeming virtue. It might take a theatergoer a while to connect overall to The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide, which is split into three acts by two 10-minute intermissions — and into scenes by Jared Mezzocchi’s intriguing projected black-and-white cityscape images. The play’s first act is convoluted and slow-to-rise. But by the second act, a war of words and wills has broken out all over — at one point, there are four overlapping conversations — and you’ll be on the edge of your seat, enraptured by every well-timed volley.

THE NEW MUSICAL Little Dancer, now having its world pre- miere at the Kennedy Center, tells the partly imagined story of the girl who posed for Edgar Degas’s famous statue. It’s chiefly set in and around the demimonde of the Paris Opera Ballet in the 19th century. As such, the musical is at its strongest and most original when director and choreographer Susan Stroman incorporates elements of ballet, most notably during an extended sequence near its end. Here, Tiler Peck, a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet, gets to display her dancing skills, as her char-

acter, the Young Marie, concisely conveys through movement everything that we just saw and heard happen in the musical’s preceding two hours. It’s a rather unprecedented merger of two parallel performance genres, and a dazzling display that almost makes Little Dancer worth seeing all its own. There are other aspects that make this production a worth- while trip to the theater — principally Beowulf Boritt’s grand, art-inspired sets, William Ivey Long’s equally imaginative cos- tumes and Stroman’s starry, strong-voiced cast. Boyd Gaines and especially Rebecca Luker are knockouts as Degas and Adult Marie, respectively. Other standouts include the charismatic Janet Dickinson, who brings artist Marie Cassatt vividly to life, and Jenny Powers, who as Antoinette is a dream of a bawdy, well-heeled older sister. The show itself is on less solid footing. Stephen Flaherty has composed several great tunes (“Laundry,” “Little Opportunities”), but the score isn’t as distinguishable as the overall conceit. Lynn Ahrens’s book and lyrics, even less so. There’s also the unavoid- able creep factor, as a 14-year-old girl spends hours alone with a significantly older man and is pursued by a couple others with far more prurient interests. Still, if you can overlook that, Little Dancer will surely pirouette its way to favor.

Little Dancer (HHHHH) runs to Sunday, Nov. 30 at the Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are $45 to $155. Call 202-467- 4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and Socialism with a Key to the Scriptures (HHHHH) runs to Dec. 21 at Washington, D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $35 to $65. Call 202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org. l

NW. Tickets are $35 to $65. Call 202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org. l 36 NOVEMBER 27, 2014
NW. Tickets are $35 to $65. Call 202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org. l 36 NOVEMBER 27, 2014

UBI SOFT

games
games

Paris is Burning

UBI SOFT games Paris is Burning Assassin’s Creed: Unity may not be perfect, but its depiction

Assassin’s Creed: Unity may not be perfect, but its depiction of Paris is incredibly fun nonetheless

by RHUARIDH MARR

I HAVE A LOVE/HATE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE Assassin’s Creed series. I invariably fall in love with the wonderfully realized historical settings, the rich cast of characters and the narratives the games attempt to weave.

I then, more often than not, get bored and stop playing after several hours with the series’ janky controls and repetitive mis- sions. There’s only so many times I can tail someone and stab them before I want to play something else. Last year’s Black Flag was different in that, instead of focusing so much on the assas- sinating, Ubisoft instead gave us an incredible pirate game — complete with gorgeous water physics and ship-to-ship combat — and added the assassination stuff on as fun distraction from the main, water-based action. It was a blast. Literally, when can- nons came into play. So, what then would I make of Unity, the latest entry to the series that strips back the fun and frivolity of Black Flag’s Caribbean setting and instead aims for the close, city-based action of the series’ first two entries? As it transpires, I kind of loved it. Unity is far from a perfect experience, and indeed can be downright frustrating at times, but it represents an astounding technical achievement and sets the Assassin’s series up well for

its next foray on the new generation of consoles. Unity is set in revolutionary France, a bloody and violent place that saw as much beheading and murder as it did sunrises and sunsets. Paris, specifically, is the main focus here, and developers Ubisoft Montreal have created an utterly gorgeous depiction of the city in the eighteenth century. To call it photorealistic seems the most fitting praise, as textures, lighting, graphics and details add up to make Unity’s world one of the most realistic I’ve ever encountered in a game. Climbing to the top of the Notre Dame, Paris sprawls out beneath you, with several districts each with their own distinct populations and intents. Noblemen inhabit the wealthy areas, with their sprawling mansions, palaces, and wide, clean streets gleaming in the Parisian sunshine. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the slums of la Cour des Miracles are horrif- ic cesspools of pestilence and poverty, with prostitutes, beggars and murderous revolutionaries lining the cramped, dirty streets. It helps that the streets themselves are filled with people. Ubisoft touted the engine powering Unity for its ability to draw hundreds of characters on-screen at once, and indeed it makes for an impressive sight. I can’t remember ever seeing so many people wandering around in a game before, and, particularly in one of the later story missions, that number can seemingly stretch into the thousands. It helps that the streets sound as you’d expect, too, filled with the chattering and hustle and bustle of daily life, the screams and shouts of protesters and revolu- tionaries, the roars of gathered crowds, the sound of music from buildings or the calls of pedestrians who require your help. As a means of reflecting the feeling of being in a tight, cramped city, the deluge of people only adds to the feeling of a living, breathing recreation of 18th century Parisian life. To navigate this world, players are given control of Arno Dorian,

a French nobleman we first meet as a child, navigating the corri- dors of the King’s palace. Here, his father is murdered, and Arno is adopted by Monsieur De La Serre, who, it transpires, is the Grand Master of the Templars. De La Serre adopts Arno, despite knowing that his father was an Assassin, with the Brotherhood of Assassins being enemies to the Templars. Still with me? Good, because the series’ lore is a little confusing after so many games. Flash forward to Arno’s adult years. De La Serre is murdered and Arno is accused. In jail, he meets a member of the Brotherhood and so begins his rise through the ranks of the Assassins. In the early stages of the game in particular, Arno is a delight- ful character to play. He has some of the bravado and swagger that made Edward Kenway such fun to play in Black Flag, but without quite as much of the “my family is dead” misery of Connor from Assassin’s Creed III. This is all toned down once he enters the Brotherhood, but in cutscenes and dialogue snippets during the game, Arno represents an amusing and interesting character, even if his story can be boiled down to “seeks revenge, wants girl” — the girl in question being De La Serre’s daughter Elise, now a member of the Templars. Ubisoft have worked hard to fix one of the series’ biggest bug- bears: the controls. Arno has a fluidity to his movement, aided by fancy new animations and a newly added downward traversal ability that makes descending from a height easier than jumping from the building and praying you won’t die. Clambering across Parisian rooftops, scampering up churches and diving through open windows — the city is littered with explorable interiors that can be used to effect an escape or wandered through to mar- vel at the interior design — is all made easier by improve collision detection and numerous grab points for Arno to cling to. Still, they’re not perfect. Too often, Arno will simply refuse to jump the way you’re directing him to, or he’ll grab the wrong object and ruin the momentum you’ve built. Similarly, moving down buildings remains a little janky, and Arno’s inability to effectively move into a window — instead preferring to jump around it — quickly becomes an irritance more than a humorous quirk. The controls impact other areas of the game, as well. Stealth, in particular, is needlessly frustrating at times. Why can’t Arno move around corners when in cover? It’s such a simple thing that would make life so much easier, but instead you have to leave cover and move around the corner and then re-enter cover. He can already switch between covers — such as across door- ways — so is this really such a tough thing to implement? Object detection, too, is still less than perfect. All too often I’d run at two guards, intending to kill them both, but the game would only highlight one or the other. As the (admittedly lovely) animation played, showing Arno slicing his blade into one guard’s side, the other would invariably start hacking at Arno with his sword. Combat is the usual parry and attack brand that series fans have come to love or loathe. Attacks are mounted with X (on Xbox One, which I reviewed the game on) and blocked with B. Pistol fire is attributed to LB (and RT, if you prefer to manually aim) while bombs and distractions are dropped with RB. Once again, it’s possible to stand in the middle of a group of guards and parry each incoming attack until you’ve killed everyone, though this hardly seems like the most rewarding way to do so. Instead, drop a smoke bomb and leg it out of there and then pick them off one-by-one. This is when Unity is at its best, silently killing people from the shadows or leaping onto their heads from above. Guns work well here, too, such as sniping with a rifle, as do phantom blades, which can be silently fired to kill, or berserk blades which can drive enemies insane and force them to kill their comrades so you don’t have to. When not trapped in

38 NOVEMBER 27, 2014

METROWEEKLY.COM

a group of enemies trying to slice and shoot you, Unity’s combat is a lot of fun. It’s aided by new, open-plan mission structures that actively rewards exploration and experimentation. The story frequently places Arno into a giant set-piece and then tasks him with find- ing his way to the target. Do you burst through the front door, slicing and shooting, killing guards until you reach your assas- sination target, or do you work your way to a window or balcony and silently slide past threats? Is there a distraction you can use, such as blocking chimneys to fill passageways with smoke, or rescuing citizens from guards who will then help you fight? There’s a relative freedom to certain missions that task you with thinking through your objectives, and it makes for a welcome break from the rigid structure of the normal “tail this guy, then kill him” or “go here, work your way through guards and kill that guy” structure of other missions. Your experimentation will get you Creed points, given to reward stylish kills or actions, such as vanishing from search- ing guards or successfully killing any enemies after you. These points, as well as Sync points earned while playing through missions and money collected from missions and side quests, can be spent on upgrading Arno and his abilities. Guns, swords, skills, costumes and gear can all be customized and adapted to your playstyle — if you prefer pistols and wearing disguises, you can upgrade Arno to match. If stealth kills and dropping from heights is more your style, that’s an option, too. Even simple things, like sitting between people on a bench to disappear from guards, is now an upgradeable option. Of course, there’s a pay- to-win option, in the form of “Hack upgrades” available for every item, the points for which can be bought in-game for worryingly high sums of real world money. They’re not necessary, though, so ignore them and your bank balance will be safe. You can, of course, explore Unity’s numerous side missions to collect money and points to spend. There are dozens of activi- ties, from rift missions that throw you into Paris in the late 1800s (complete with Eiffel Tower), to riddles that require you to solve increasingly difficult puzzles and send you hunting around Paris for clues, to crowd events such as stopping criminals and thieves, to unlocking dozens of chests scattered around the city. You’ll meet a vast array of interesting characters — a personal favorite was the delightfully sadistic Marquis de Sade — and you’ll see every inch of the big, beautiful map. If you prefer to play with friends, there are co-op missions available, which are fun, diffi- cult challenges that require proper teamwork to prevail. If one of you dies, the entire team fails, so communications and resource sharing is key to ensure you successfully complete your objec- tives. Of course, if you’d rather just scamper around the city with friends, that’s also supported — and jolly good fun. Sadly, Unity is far from a perfect experience. It’s clear that Ubisoft is pushing each system to its max, but it’s also apparent that the company gave up on some bug-testing and fine-tuning in the interest of getting Unity out in time for the holidays. For starters, while the game is gorgeous, it can slow down to a chugging crawl at times. One interior, in a church atop the Assassin’s base, was impossible to navigate as the framerate inexplicably slowed to an almost complete standstill. Similarly, it can plummet during cutscenes, in places with lots of people, and is particularly apparent when syncing viewpoints in each of the districts — there’s nothing pretty about the camera panning around Paris when it does so at such a low framerate. Character animations are usually wonderful, with excellent detail, but you’ll frequently see glitches, such as hair bouncing around dur- ing camera changes or body parts clipping through others. AI

continues on page 40

MOTOROLA

tech

All in the Wrist

MOTOROLA tech All in the Wrist The Motorola Moto 360 pairs Android Wear with a premium

The Motorola Moto 360 pairs Android Wear with a premium exterior to make the best smartwatch you can buy

by RHUARIDH MARR

I N T HE W ORLD O F W ATCHES, S TYLE I S K ING. Whether it’s rugged, sleek, waterproof or gold-plated, we want whatever adorns our wrist to be a piece of jewellery, a fashion item others can glance at and learn a little more

about our personality. Whether it’s Breitling, Jaeger-Le Coultre, Casio, or that Mickey Mouse timepiece you’ve had for years, a watch — really, above all else — should look good on one’s wrist. Oh, and tell the time accurately. That’s also pretty important. With smartwatches, however, form too often gives way to function. Samsung’s Gear devices are crammed with technology but styled as an afterthought. Pebble’s watches are useful, but they’re hardly sexy. The first raft of Android Wear devices were intended to showcase the software, but neglected the hardware (in my review of LG’s G Watch I described it as being “simply dull”). Even Apple’s Watch, which won’t launch until next year, isn’t the most attractive of devices. Despite what the hordes of Apple faithful will tell you when asked, on the (watch) face of it, it’s an uninspired design. Of course, there is one smartwatch that does place a big emphasis on style. It was one of three announced when Android Wear launched, it was the one that drew the most intrigue, and the one everyone interested in the platform was eager to get their hands on: Motorola’s Moto 360. Designed and built from

the ground up to look like a premium, elegant watch — complete with a traditional, round face — it radiated style and quality from every machined pore, at a price of just $249. It’s no wonder attendees of Google’s I/O conference gave it a standing ovation when they were told they’d be getting one for free. However, can the 360 stand up to its own hype, and deliver a great smartwatch experience where so many others have delivered merely an okay one? Well, the answer to that is a somewhat mixed bag of hard- ware and software limitations. Let’s start with the hardware — and boy, is it a great piece of hardware. Motorola currently offers the 360 in three color choices: light finish, dark finish and champagne, though in layman’s terms, its stainless steel casing is either silver, black or a very subtle gold. Straps are available in leather or metal — though the gold band is restricted to the slimmer, 18 mm style. I opted for a light finish 360 with the grey leather band. When first taking it out of the box, it’s clear that the 360 is different to its Android Wear brethren, and not just because it was the first round watch sporting the software — though it’s now joined by LG’s G Watch R in that category. It looks and feels like something that should cost much more than $249. The silver finish of the casing is cool to the touch and captures the light, the soft-touch Horween leather band creaks like leather should as it wraps around your wrist, the chamfered edges of the Gorilla Glass screen feel exquisite as your finger slides over them. The Moto 360 is a gorgeous piece of technology. Indeed, in the sprint to build the best-looking smartwatch, Motorola has easily out- maneuvered Apple in a race the Cupertino company would have been expected to win. What about that 1.56-inch LCD display? It too is a sight to behold. Its 320x290 resolution isn’t anything to write home about, but at this size, that still equates to a pixel-per-inch rating of 205. If you’re wondering why the resolution isn’t a perfect

320x320, given the screen is circular, that’s because the 360 has

a small strip at the bottom of the display that holds the display

drivers and the ambient light sensor. Motorola claims it was nec- essary to avoid giving the 360 an unsightly bezel, but the tradeoff

is a “flat tire” effect when viewing the screen. In day-to-day use,

however, you forget it’s there. As for the screen itself, it’s big, bright and colors are nicely balanced. The ambient light sensor allows for auto brightness to be used and — while occasionally slow to detect when moving from bright to dark situations — makes the hassle of manually changing brightness on earlier Wear devices a forgotten annoyance. Underneath its polished exterior lies a mixed bag of hard- ware. There’s 4GB of storage and 512MB of RAM, much like every other Wear device, as well as sensors to detect movement and activity, including a pedometer and heart-rate monitor. The 360 is water resistant for up to 30 minutes in three feet of water, and there’s wireless charging so you won’t have to fiddle with any cables to replenish your watch’s power at night. And, indeed, you’ll have to charge it every night as the 360 has a tiny 320 mAh battery. It’s not helped by the bizarre use of a TI OMAP 3 proces- sor — which is ancient in technology terms, hailing from 2010. Presumably it’s to help the 360’s cost, but it’s hardly the most efficient processor. Indeed, swiping through Android Wear is noticeably less fluid than on the G Watch. Not enough to impact your useage, but it’s apparent in comparison. What’s more, it means that charging every night is a requirement — though you will at least get a full day’s use out of it. I took my 360 off the charger at 8 a.m. and, after a day of notifications, voice dictation and frequently checking the time, returned it to its charging dock at midnight with 27 percent left. Your mileage will vary, but the 360 can at least make it through an entire day — and unless you sleep with your watch on, taking it off and dropping it onto its wireless dock is a simple solution, particularly as the watch can be used as an alarm clock when in its dock. As for Android Wear, well, there are still limitations. Head online for my full review of the software (http://bit.ly/mwan- droidwear), but suffice to say that it’s still in its early stages — though, even compared with launch this summer, it’s now infi- nitely more useful. It still relies heavily on your smartphone for most tasks, but now users can download music to the watch and listen to it with bluetooth headphones — useful if you’re going for a run or bike ride and don’t want your phone in your pocket. As Wear matures, more apps are being updated to use it. Indeed, most of the apps I use every day have some kind of functionality, whether it’s swiping to a second screen or offering interaction with notifications. Emails can be read and responded to, as can messages from texts, Facebook and Whatsapp, among others. Workouts can be started, runs can be logged, maps can be opened up and directions given, music playback can be controlled, cars can be ordered through Lyft, flight details and boarding passes can be displayed and so much more. Android Wear will only continue to improve, and the amount of times I pull my phone out of my pocket each day has been significantly reduced as more apps start to work with it. Google’s excellent voice dictation is obvi- ously key to this, as it’s your only means of responding to items or asking questions on the 360 — and the watch’s dual micro- phones means that it rarely fails to understand what I’m saying. In day-to-day terms, the 360 is a joy to use. It helps that it simply looks so damn good on the wrist. It’s sleek and modern, but still recognizable as a watch. Motorola continues to push software updates to the watch, which have helped with con- cerns over battery life and its aging processor. The real question,

though, is should you buy it? I’ll admit, I rarely wore a watch before I got the 360 — my phone was my preferred means of tell- ing the time. Now? I wear it every day. The sheer convenience

of seeing and responding to notifications from your wrist can’t

be ignored, and when it’s operating through something which looks as good as the Moto 360, it makes it even more pleasur- able. Thanks to some of its internals, the 360’s beauty may only be skin-deep — but it’s gorgeous enough that you simply won’t care. For $249, it’s the best smartwatch you can buy right now.

The Motorola Moto 360 starts at $249 and is available from the Google Play Store (play.google.com) and via motorola.com. l

continued from page 38

characters will frequently have moments where their program- ming seems to fail entirely — in one cutscene, a random Parisian was having a heated argument with the wall right behind the man Arno was talking to. There are other technical issues, such as unresponsive controls at times, or the world failing to load properly when coming out of a cutscene or changing locations, but none is more egregious than the loading times. Oh, god, the loading times. To call them obscene would be an understate- ment. When Grand Theft Auto V can stream the entirety of Los

Santos without a loading screen, why on earth must I sit through

a 20-40 second loading screen every time I move between

exploring Paris and whatever it is that I’m loading into, be it the Brotherhood’s base, or a training mission, or a rift mission. Loading times can often be longer than that, and are on numer- ous occasions entirely inexplicable. One training mission saw me fighting enemies in the Cafe Theatre. Once it had ended, I sat for over half a minute while the game loaded — into the same damn location. Yes, you can run from one end of Paris to the other without a loading screen, but it’s ruined every time you have to sit through the dark, unresponsive screen which greets you far too frequently during missions and cutscenes. It’s infuriating, and on consoles this powerful, inexcusable. There are there bugbears, too, such as everyone having regional English accents while the random characters on the streets chatter away in French. Even Napoleon, who you meet during the game, speaks with an English accent. It’s infuriat- ingly distracting. If everyone in the game spoke with an English accent, or everyone spoke English with French inflection, it’d be fine, but this weird hybrid distracts more often than not. Similarly, the map is hideously cluttered with all of the available icons and missions, though it thankfully can be sorted into cat- egories, and there are random difficulty spikes during missions which can seriously punish you if you’re caught off-guard. That said, Unity does succeed where I thought it might fail.

Its Parisian setting, while slow to load, is so gorgeously detailed and filled with activities, I’ve still yet to see and do everything

it has to offer. Its story, while far from original, is fun to romp

through. Side missions are interesting, co-op play is an excellent distraction and Revolutionary France is an interesting setting

for the game. My time in Unity was not one without frustrations, but unlike previous entries in the series, they weren’t sufficient

to actually drive me from the game. Yes, it could have used a few

more months of testing and optimizing, and yes, you’ll have to

endure several large patches as Ubisoft tries to fix problems to justify the $60 you’ll spend buying the game, but at the end of

it all, Unity remains a big, beautiful, bountiful world to play in.

Assassin’s Creed: Unity (HHHHH) retails for $59.99 and is avail- able on PS4, Xbox One and PC. l

VVVITA

pets

Warm Pets

VVVITA pets Warm Pets From avoiding toxic puddles to giving shorter walks, 9 tips for optimal

From avoiding toxic puddles to giving shorter walks, 9 tips for optimal winter pet care

by DOUG RULE

D OGS PARTICULARLY ARE NOT VERY GOOD about setting their own limits, especially if they’re having fun outside,” says Janine Calabro, chief of emergency and critical care at D.C.’s Friendship

Hospital for Animals. “If it’s too cold for you to be outdoors without your hands getting really cold, then maybe your dog shouldn’t be running around for too, too long outside either.”

9 TIPS FOR OPTIMAL WINTER PET CARE:

1. ANTIFREEZE IS DELICIOUSLY DEADLY

Antifreeze may taste sweet to animals, but its effects are decid- edly not. Antifreeze contains ethylene glycol, which is very toxic to both dogs and cats, and can cause neurological abnormalities,

including seizures, and gastrointestinal complications, includ- ing acute kidney failure. “It is fatal without prompt treatment,” Friendship Hospital’s Calabro says. “Even one little lick for a small pet can be quite dangerous. Any exposure and they should be promptly brought to a veterinarian.”

2. NO HELTER-SKELTER SHELTER

Wintertime doghouses, says Nick Lipincott, a humane law enforcement officer with the Washington Humane Society, need to be “raised off the ground to keep from flooding as snow melts [and feature] a windbreak so the insulation from [a dog’s] body heat is not pushed out from the cold.” Also, a dog’s water needs to be constantly changed, put in a heated water bowl or placed under a heat lamp to keep it from freezing.

3. TO COAT OR NOT TO COAT

Both Calabro and Lipincott advise putting at least a light coat on top of thin-coated dog breeds, such as greyhounds and Jack Russell terriers. A coat will help keep their skin both warm and dry, shielding from snow or freezing rain, and suiting them in the same way that natural fur does on their thick-coated brethren.

4. IT’S A SPRINT, NOT A MARATHON

Of course, not every little dog will stand for wearing a coat. In

pets

pets PetPet PixPix Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Gazpacho, Mojito and Lumpia Reggie & Travis Reyes’s
PetPet PixPix Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Gazpacho, Mojito and Lumpia Reggie & Travis Reyes’s
PetPet PixPix
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets
Gazpacho, Mojito and Lumpia
Reggie & Travis Reyes’s 15-year-old Chihuahuas
“Our pets are like people. Gazpacho, the cream one, is 15, so he’s the
old grumpy one, yet still runs around like he’s a puppy. Mojito, the tan
one, is the coy one who plays dumb to get things. Then there’s Lumpia,
the only girl, who is just one year old, but is already showing the other
two that she’s queen bee.”

which case, especially with short-haired, skinny dogs, or those older ones suffering from arthritis, Calabro recommends more frequent but shorter trips outside — enough to “still get a decent amount of daily activity and daily walking in.”

5. ALL ABOUT THAT PAW

If you don’t clean your pet’s paws after a walk, they’ll likely do the deed with their tongue — and licking too much Ice Melt can cause upset stomachs and digestive problems. The chemicals used in snow and ice removal and the overall dry air outside can also cause paw irritation. For more sensitive dogs, Calabro recommends “putting booties on them, as silly as they look.” If you or your dog won’t allow the wearing of silly booties, then you should wipe their paws clean after walks with at least a damp, clean rag. Rubbing baby oil or Vaseline either pre- or post-walk on a dog’s paws can also help keep them free of slushy buildup, Lipincott recommends. It can also help keep pads from drying out and cracking.

6. SEASONAL GROOMING

In addition to Vaseline, consider trimming the hair on a dog’s toes every winter to keep the area clean and clear, says Calabro. She also recommends bathing your pet less often in the dry, win- ter months, using a moisturizing shampoo, and brushing them regularly between baths.

7. ALWAYS USE A (TICK) CONDOM

“I do recommend continuing flea and tick prophylactics throughout the year,” Calabro says. In part because some ticks survive into the winter, but also because it’s harder to forget when you squirt your pet with medicine routinely the same

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day and time every month.

8. SKULL AND CROSSBONES

There’s a whole list of things your pet shouldn’t eat because they’re toxic — and yet might, given the indulgent nature of the holidays. Friendship Hospital sees an uptick in pets brought in over the holidays after they’ve consumed chocolate, fatty turkey skin or grapes, among other human food no-nos. This time of year it’s also important to keep your pet away from rat poison — or take them to the hospital right away if they ingest some. Just as with antifreeze, exposure to rat poison can be fatal if not treated promptly.

9. HELP IS STANDING BY

“We are the only 24-hour [animal] hospital inside the Beltway,” Calabro says. In fact, Friendship Hospital is currently expanding its large Tenleytown complex and will soon have even more staff working in more specialties. Meanwhile, WHS works with the city government to enforce the city’s animal cruelty laws and to provide shelter to all animals in need. It’s the place to call 24/7, according to Lippincott, “if an animal is…in some form of distress [or] if you have any concern about an animal you see that may not be getting the proper requirements in the cold months, or anytime.”

Friendship Hospital for Animals is at 4105 Brandywine St. NW. Call 202-363-7300 or visit friendshiphospital.com.

The Washington Humane Society’s main shelter is at 1201 New York Ave. NE. Call 202-723-5730 to report cruelty, or visit washhumane.org. l

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t

NIGHT

LIFE

LISTINGS

THURS., 11.27.14
THURS., 11.27.14

9 1/2 Doors open 7pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 7-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selection • No Cover

ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S UPSTAIRS 4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm • $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

COBALT/30 DEGREES Happy Hour: $6 Call Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call, 7-9pm • $3 Rail Drinks, 10pm-midnight,

$5 Red Bull, Gatorade and Frozen Virgin Drinks • Locker Room Thursday Nights • DJs Sean Morris and MadScience • Ripped Hot Body Contest at mid- night, hosted by Sasha J. Adams and Ba’Naka • $200 Cash Prize • Doors open 10pm, 18+ • $5 Cover under 21 and free with college ID

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Thanksgiving Buffet, 11am • Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm

JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close • Halloween-themed Throwback Thursday featur- ing rock/pop retro hits

NUMBER NINE Doors open 7pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 7-9pm • No Cover

GREEN LANTERN Doors Open 9pm • 2 Full Hours of Shirtless Men Drink Free, 9-11pm • Music by DJs BacK2bACk

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR Doors open 4pm • Featuring DJ Lemz •Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15 • Drag Bingo

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS All male, nude dancers • New Meat Thursday • DJ Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm • Cover 21+

JR.’S Doors open 7pm • $3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2

FRI., 11.28.14 t 9 1/2 Open at 5pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
FRI., 11.28.14 t
FRI., 11.28.14
t

9 1/2 Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

• Friday Night Videos with

resident DJ Shea Van Horn

• VJ • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

ANNIE’S 4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis • Upstairs open

5-11pm

COBALT/30 DEGREES All You Can Drink Happy Hour • $15 Rail & Domestic, $21 Call & Imports, 6-9pm • Guys Night Out • Free Rail Vodka, 11pm-Midnight, $6 Belvedere Vodka Drinks all night • DJ Keenan Orr and guest DJs • $10 cover 10pm-1am, $5 after 1am

DC BEAR CRUE @Town • Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles • Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted

by Charger Stone • No cover before 9:30pm • 21+

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm

GREEN LANTERN BOOM Go-Go Bears, 10pm- close • Hot Jock Contest hosted by Danny “Boom” • Featuring DJ Chord Bezerra • $5 Smirnoff, All Flavors,

10pm-close

JR.’S Buy 1, Get 1, 11pm-mid- night • Happy Hour: 2-for- 1, 4-9pm • $5 Coronas, $8 Vodka Red Bulls, 9pm-close

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR DJ Matt Bailer • Videos, Dancing • Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15 • DJ Jeff Pryor

NUMBER NINE Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
TOWN PATIO
Open 6pm • 21+
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers,
hosted by LaTroya Nicole •
Ladies of Illusion with host
Kristina Kelly, 9pm • DJ
Steve Henderson in Secrets
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
DJ Joey O in Ziegfeld’s •
Cover 21+
301-498-4840
SAT., 11.29.14
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and fries,
4-8pm
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by Lena
Lett and featuring Miss
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Epiphany B. Lee
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
upstairs, BacK2bACk
downstairs • Doors open
at 10pm • For those 21 and
over, $5 from 10-11pm and
$10 after 11pm • For those
18-20, $12 all night • 18+
$5 Absolut & Tito’s, $3
Miller Lite after 9pm •
Expanded craft beer selec-
tion • No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Drag Yourself to Brunch at
Level One, 11am-2pm and
2-4pm • Featuring Kristina
Kelly and the Ladies of
Illusion • Bottomless
Mimosas and Bloody Marys
Happy Hour: $3 Miller
Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm

scene

Freddie’s Beach Bar

Sunday, November 23

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Sizzling Saturdays with Music by DJ MadScience,

NUMBER NINE Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • No Cover

PHASE 1

10-close • $5 Rail, $4 Fireball, $8 Vodka and Red Bull • $5 Cover after 10pm

21+

Dancing, 9pm-close

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Diner-style Breakfast

PW’S SPORTS BAR Karaoke in the lounge • Charity Bingo with Cash Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every Month • Half-price chees- esteaks and fries, 4-8pm

TOWN

Buffet, 10am-3pm • Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Freddie’s Follies Drag Show 8pm-10pm, hosted by Ms. Destiny B. Childs • Karaoke, 10pm-1am

DC

Rawhides host Town

GREEN LANTERN

& Country: Two-Step, Line Dancing, Waltz and West Coast Swing, $5 Cover to

stay all night • Doors open 6:45pm, Lessons 7-8pm, Open dance 8-10:30pm

Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $5

Bacardi, All Flavors, 9pm- close

JR.’S $4 Coors, $5 Vodka high- balls, $7 Vodka Red Bulls

CTRL Pop Dance Party,

11-close upstairs • Doors open 10pm • Drag Show

NELLIE’S Guest DJs • Zing Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer, House Rail Drinks and

Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •

starts at 10:30pm • Hosted

by

Lena Lett and featuring

Miss Tatianna, Shi-Queeta- Lee, Epiphany B. Lee and Ba’Naka • Music and vid-

Buckets of Beer, $15

eos

by DJ Wess downstairs

Cover $8 from 10-11pm,

$12

after 11pm • 21+

DJ Wess downstairs • Cover $8 from 10-11pm, $12 after 11pm • 21+ METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27,
TOWN PATIO Open 10pm • 21+ ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS Men of Secrets, 9pm • Guest dancers •
TOWN PATIO Open 10pm • 21+ ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS Men of Secrets, 9pm • Guest dancers •

TOWN PATIO Open 10pm • 21+

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS Men of Secrets, 9pm • Guest dancers • Ladies of Illusion with host Ella Fitzgerald, 9pm • DJ Steve Henderson in Secrets • DJ Joey O in Ziegfeld’s • Doors 8pm • Cover 21+

GREEN LANTERN Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Bears Can Party featuring DJ Jeff Eletto upstairs, 6-10pm • Mama’s Trailer Park Karaoke downstairs,

9:30pm-close

JR.’S Sunday Funday • Liquid Brunch • Doors open at 1pm • $2 Coors Lights & $3 Skyy (all flavors), all day and night

NELLIE’S Drag Brunch, hosted by Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm • $20 Brunch Buffet • House Rail Drinks, Zing Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer and Mimosas, $4, 11am-close • Buckets of Beer, $15

NUMBER NINE Pop Goes the World with Wes Della Volla at 9:30 pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • No Cover

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS All male, nude dancers • Decades of Dance • DJ Tim-e in Secrets • Doors 8pm • Cover 21+

MON., 12.01.14
MON., 12.01.14

9 1/2 Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selec- tion • No Cover

ANNIE’S 4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

SUN., 11.30.14
SUN., 11.30.14

9 1/2 Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selection • No Cover

COBALT/30 DEGREES $4 Stoli and Miller Lite all day • Homowood Karaoke,

10pm-close

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Champagne Brunch Buffet, 10am-3pm • Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke 8pm-1am

Champagne Brunch Buffet, 10am-3pm • Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke 8pm-1am 4 8 NOVEMBER 27, 2014
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm GREEN LANTERN Happy Hour, 4pm-close JR.’S
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm GREEN LANTERN Happy Hour, 4pm-close JR.’S

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm

GREEN LANTERN Happy Hour, 4pm-close

JR.’S Underground (Indie Pop/Alt/ Brit Rock), 9pm-close • DJ Wes Della Volla • 2-for-1,

all day and night

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15 • Karaoke

NUMBER NINE Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • No Cover • Safe Word: A Gay Spelling Bee, 8-11pm • Prizes to top three

spellers • After 9pm, $3

Absolut, Bulleit & Stella

spellers • After 9pm, $3 Absolut, Bulleit & Stella GREEN LANTERN Happy Hour, 4-9pm • The

GREEN LANTERN Happy Hour, 4-9pm • The Boys of Hump upstairs, 9pm

JR.’S

Trivia with MC Jay Ray, 8pm • The Queen, 10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts & $4 Vodka ($2 with College I.D./ JR’s Team Shirt)

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Half-Price Burger Night • Buckets of Beer $15 • SmartAss Trivia, 8pm

NUMBER NINE

Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2

for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • No Cover

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS All male, nude dancers • Shirtless Night, 10-11pm, 12-12:30am • Military Night, no cover with military ID • DJ Don T. in Secrets • 9pm • Cover 21+

COBALT/30 DEGREES Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3 Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm NUMBER NINE Open
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
Monday Night’s A Drag,
No Cover
10pm-close • $3 Skyy
Cocktails, $8 Skyy and Red
Bull • No Cover, 18+
TUES., 12.02.14
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
Multiple TVs showing
GREEN LANTERN
movies, shows, sports •
Expanded craft beer selec-
Happy Hour, 4pm-close
tion • No Cover
Michael’s Open Mic
Karaoke, 9:30pm-close
JR.’S
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Poker Texas
Hold’em, 8pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
SIN Industry Night •
Half-price Cocktails, 10pm-
close
WED., 12.03.14
WED., 12.03.14

9 1/2 Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

• Multiple TVs showing

movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selec- tion • No Cover

ANNIE’S Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

COBALT/30 DEGREES Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3

Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm

• Karaoke, 10pm-close

• $4 Stoli & Flavors and Miller Lite

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,

10pm

THURS., 12.04.14
THURS., 12.04.14

9 1/2 Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selection • No Cover

ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S UPSTAIRS 4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm • $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

$4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014 4
$4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014 4
COBALT/30 DEGREES Happy Hour: $6 Call Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES Happy Hour: $6 Call Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES Happy Hour: $6 Call Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller Lite, $4
Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm • $3
Rail Drinks, 10pm-midnight,
$5 Red Bull, Gatorade
and Frozen Virgin Drinks
• Locker Room Thursday
Nights • DJs Sean Morris
and MadScience • Ripped
Hot Body Contest at mid-
night, hosted by Sasha
J. Adams and Ba’Naka •
$200 Cash Prize • Doors
open 10pm, 18+ • $5 Cover
under 21 and free with
college ID
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close •
Throwback Thursday featur-
ing rock/pop retro hits
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Free
Pizza Thursday, 9-10pm •
Shirtless Scandals Rugby
Team sells Jell-O Shots •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • Music by DJs
BacK2bACk
Shots • Shirtless Men Drink Free, 10-11pm • Music by DJs BacK2bACk 5 0 NOVEMBER 27,
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014 5 1

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Freddie’s Beach Bar

Sunday, November 23

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WaRd moRRison

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52 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE

METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014 53
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014 53
METROWEEKLY.COM NOVEMBER 27, 2014 53
“ We never really went out of our way to decide on the sex of

We never really went out of our way to decide on the sex of [Toad and Toadette],

even though they have somewhat gendered appearances.”

KOICHI HAYASHIDA, producer of Nintendo’s Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker and director of Super Mario Galaxy 2 , somewhat altering all of our childhood memories in an interview with Gamespot. Hayashida confirmed that the characters of Toad and Toadette from the Mario series of games, typically presented as male and female, are in fact genderless.

If I had it my way,

I never would have done it the way I did.”

MICHAEL SAM, the NFL’s first openly gay player, speaking with GQ . Sam expressed regret over his coming out being publicly announced, stating that, while he has no regrets, he’d have preferred his sexuality to have been known to his teammates but not to the entire world. “But the recruiters knew, and reporters knew, and they talked to each other, and it got out,” he told the magazine. Several critics have argued that Sam, who was recently cut from the Dallas Cowboys, would still have a team had he not come out.

We look forward to the opportunity to

clear his name.”

KRISTEN WINEMILLER, a lawyer for Terrence “Terry” Bean, who helped establish the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the Gay

& Lesbian Victory Fund and the National Gay Games, speaking in the wake of accusations that Bean had sex with a 15-year-old

minor, The Oregonian reports. Bean and his former boyfriend are accused of using Grindr to set up an encounter with the minor in Eugene, Ore., in September last year.

Initially I came to this community searching for love, intimacy and brotherhood. In return,

I got shade, infidelity, loneliness and disunity.”

LUIS PABON, writing for Thought Catalog in a piece titled “Why I No Longer Want To Be Gay.” Pabon maintains he has “experienced all aspects of the life and can safely say that it no longer speaks to the person that I am,” before listing the various problems he has with the gay community, including its adherence to stereotypes, the decline of chivalry, and the rise in apps over in-person conversations. Pabon ends by saying: “The gay life is like the love of a bad boy whose attention and love you initially covet but eventually outgrow.”

“I am disgusted.”

STACY DEE HUDSON, friend of Jennifer Gable — a 32-year-old trans woman from Idaho who died suddenly of an aneurysm in

October — writing on her Facebook. The Miami Herald reported that Hudson was upset Gable’s family chose to bury her as “Geoff,” despite Gable having changed her name and lived as Jennifer for several years. “They cut her hair, suit on. How can they bury her as geoff [sic] when she legally changed her name.” Meghan Stabler, a board member of HRC, stated, “No mention of the

woman she knew she was

Just

erosion of her identity.”