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This article is about the Intel processor brand name.

For the Intel microarchitecture that is the


basis for the Core 2 processor family, see Intel Core (microarchitecture).
Intel Core is a brand name that Intel uses for various mid-range to high-end consumer and
business microprocessors. In general, processors sold as Core are more powerful variants of
the same processors marketed as entry-level Celeron and Pentium. Similarly, identical or more
capable versions of Core processors are also sold as Xeon processors for the server and
workstation market.
As of 2013 the current lineup of Core processors includes the latest Intel Core i7, Intel Core i5,
and Intel Core i3, and the older Intel Core 2 Solo, Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core 2 Quad, and
Intel Core 2 Extreme lines.[1]
Contents
[hide]

1 Overview
2 Enhanced Pentium M based
o 2.1 Core Duo
o 2.2 Core Solo
3 64-bit Core microarchitecture based
o 3.1 Core 2 Solo
o 3.2 Core 2 Duo
o 3.3 Core 2 Quad
o 3.4 Core 2 Extreme
4 Nehalem microarchitecture based
o 4.1 Core i3
o 4.2 Core i5
o 4.3 Core i7
5 Sandy Bridge microarchitecture based
o 5.1 Core i3
o 5.2 Core i5
o 5.3 Core i7
6 Ivy Bridge microarchitecture based
o 6.1 Core i3
o 6.2 Core i5
o 6.3 Core i7
7 Haswell microarchitecture based
o 7.1 Core i3
o 7.2 Core i5
o 7.3 Core i7
8 Broadwell microarchitecture based
9 See also
10 References
11 External links

Overview[edit]

Desktop

Mobile

Brand
Code-

Cores Fab

named

Date

Code-

released

named

Cores Fab

Date
released

January

Core Solo

Desktop version not available

Yonah

1 65 nm

Core Duo

Desktop version not available

Yonah

2 65 nm

Merom-L

1 65 nm

Penryn-L

1 45 nm

Merom

2 65 nm

Penryn

2 45 nm

Penryn

4 45 nm August 2008

Core 2
Solo

Desktop version not available

2006

January
2006

September
2007
May 2008

August 2006
Core 2
Duo

Conroe

2 65 nm

January

Allendale

2 65 nm

2007

Wolfdale

2 45 nm

January

July 2006
January
2008

2008

Core 2

Kentsfield

4 65 nm

Quad

Yorkfield

4 45 nm

Conroe XE
Core 2
Extreme

January
2007
March 2008

July 2006

Kentsfield

2 65 nm

November Merom XE

2 65 nm

XE

4 65 nm

2006 Penryn XE

2 45 nm

Yorkfield

4 45 nm

November Penryn XE

4 45 nm

XE

2007

July 2007
January
2008
August 2008

January
Clarkdale
Sandy
Core i3

Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

2010
2 32 nm

February

2 32 nm

2011

2 22 nm

September

2 22 nm

2012
September

Arrandale
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

January
2 32 nm

2010

2 32 nm

February

2 22 nm

2011

2 22 nm

June 2012
June 2013

2013

September
Lynnfield

Core i5

2009

Clarkdale

4 45 nm

January

Sandy

2 32 nm

2010

Bridge

4 32 nm

January

Sandy

2 32 nm

2011

Bridge

4 22 nm

February

Ivy Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Ivy Bridge

4 22 nm

April 2012

Haswell

2 22 nm

April 2012

Haswell

Arrandale
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

January
2 32 nm

2010

2 32 nm

February

2 22 nm

2011

2 22 nm

May 2012
June 2013

June 2013
June 2013

November

Bloomfield
Lynnfield
Gulftown
Sandy
Bridge
Sandy
Core i7

Bridge-E
Sandy
Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge
Haswell
Ivy Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge-E

4 45 nm

2008

4 45 nm

September

6 32 nm

2009

4 32 nm

July 2010

6 32 nm

January

4 32 nm

2011

4 22 nm

November

4 22 nm

2011

4 22 nm

February

6 22 nm

2012

6 22 nm

April 2012
June 2013
September

September
Clarksfield

2009

Arrandale

4 45 nm

January

Sandy

2 32 nm

2010

Bridge

4 32 nm

January

Sandy

2 32 nm

2011

Bridge

4 22 nm

February

Ivy Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Ivy Bridge

4 22 nm

May 2012

Haswell

2 22 nm

May 2012

Haswell

June 2013
June 2013

Haswell-E

2013
September
2013
August 2014

November
Bloomfield
Core i7
Extreme
Edition

Gulftown
Sandy
Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge-E
Haswell-E

4 45 nm
6 32 nm
6 32 nm
6 22 nm
8 22 nm

2008
March 2010
November
2011
September
2013

Clarksfield
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

September
4 45 nm

2009

4 32 nm

January

4 22 nm

2011

4 22 nm

May 2012
June 2013

August 2014

List of Intel Core microprocessors


List of Intel Core 2 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i3 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i5 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i7 microprocessors

Clock speed slowest 1.2 GHz to the fastest 4.0 GHz (Intel Core i7-4790K) (or 4.4 GHz via Intel
Turbo Boost Technology)[2]

Enhanced Pentium M based[edit]


Main article: Enhanced Pentium M (microarchitecture)
For details about the processor core, see Yonah (microprocessor).
The original Core brand refers to Intel's 32-bit mobile dual-core x86 CPUs, which derived from
the Pentium M branded processors. The processor family used a more enhanced version of
the Intel P6 microarchitecture. It emerged in parallel with the NetBurst microarchitecture (Intel
P68) of the Pentium 4 brand, and was a precursor of the 64-bit Core microarchitecture of Core
2 branded CPUs. The Core brand comprised two branches: the Duo (dual-core) and Solo (Duo
with one disabled core, which replaced the Pentium M brand of single-core mobile processor).
Intel launched the Core brand on January 6, 2006 with the release of the 32-bit Yonah CPU
Intel's first dual-core mobile (low-power) processor. Its dual-core layout closely resembled two
interconnected Pentium M branded CPUs packaged as a single die (piece) silicon chip (IC).
Hence, the 32-bit microarchitecture of Core branded CPUs contrary to its name had more

in common with Pentium M branded CPUs than with the subsequent 64-bit Core
microarchitecture of Core 2 branded CPUs. Despite a major rebrandingeffort by Intel starting
January 2006, some companies continued to market computers with the Yonah core marked
as Pentium M.
The Core series is also the first Intel processor used as the main CPU in an Apple
Macintosh computer. The Core Duo was the CPU for the first generation MacBook Pro, while
the Core Solo appeared in Apple's Mac mini line. Core Duo signified the beginning of Apple's
shift to Intel processors across their entire line.
In 2007, Intel began branding the Yonah core CPUs intended for
mainstream mobile computers as Pentium Dual-Core, not to be confused with the desktop 64bit Core microarchitecture CPUs also branded as Pentium Dual-Core.
September 2007 and January 4, 2008 marked the discontinuation of a number
of Core branded CPUs including several Core Solo, Core Duo, Celeron and one Core 2 Quad
chip.[3][4]

Core Duo[edit]
Intel Core Duo[5] (product code 80539) consists of two cores on one die, a 2 MB L2 cache
shared by both cores, and an arbiter bus that controls both L2 cache and FSB (front-side bus)
access.

Codename
(main article)

Yonah

Brand name (list) L2 Cache Socket

TDP

Core Duo T2xxx

31 W

Core Duo L2xxx

Core Duo U2xxx

2 MB

Socket M 15 W

9W

Core Solo[edit]
Intel Core Solo[6] (product code 80538) uses the same two-core die as the Core Duo, but
features only one active core.[citation needed] Depending on demand, Intel may also simply disable
one of the cores to sell the chip at the Core Solo pricethis requires less effort than launching
and maintaining a separate line of CPUs that physically only have one core. Intel used the

same strategy previously with the 486 CPU in which early 486SX CPUs were in fact
manufactured as 486DX CPUs but with the FPU disabled.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list) L2 Cache Socket

Core Solo T1xxx


Yonah

TDP

2731 W
2 MB

Core Solo U1xxx

Socket M
5.56 W

64-bit Core microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Core (microarchitecture)
The successor to Core is the mobile version of the Intel Core 2 line of processors using cores
based upon the Intel Core microarchitecture,[7] released on July 27, 2006. The release of the
mobile version of Intel Core 2 marks the reunification of Intel's desktop and mobile product
lines as Core 2 processors were released for desktops and notebooks, unlike the first Intel
Core CPUs that were targeted only for notebooks (although some small form factor and all-inone desktops, like the iMac and the Mac Mini, also used Core processors).
Unlike the Intel Core, Intel Core 2 is a 64-bit processor, supporting Intel 64. Another difference
between the original Core Duo and the new Core 2 Duo is an increase in the amount of Level 2
cache. The new Core 2 Duo has tripled the amount of on-board cache to 6 MB. Core 2 also
introduced a quad-core performance variant to the single- and dual-core chips, branded Core 2
Quad, as well as an enthusiast variant, Core 2 Extreme. All three chips are manufactured at a
65 nm lithography, and in 2008, a 45 nm lithography and support Front Side Bus speeds
ranging from 533 MHz to 1600 MHz. In addition, the 45 nm die shrink of the Core
microarchitecture adds SSE4.1 support to all Core 2 microprocessors manufactured at a 45 nm
lithography, therefore increasing the calculation rate of the processors.

Core 2 Solo[edit]
The Core 2 Solo,[8] introduced in September 2007, is the successor to the Core Solo and is
available only as an ultra-low-power mobile processor with 5.5 Watt thermal design power. The
original U2xxx series "Merom-L" used a special version of the Merom chip with CPUID number
10661 (model 22, stepping A1) that only had a single core and was also used in some Celeron
processors. The later SU3xxx are part of Intel's CULV range of processors in a smaller FC-

BGA 956 package but contain the same Penryn chip as the dual-core variants, with one of the
cores disabled during manufacturing.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache Socket

TDP

Merom-L

Mobile Core 2 Solo U2xxx

1 MB

FCBGA 5.5 W

Penryn-L

Mobile Core 2 Solo SU3xxx 3 MB

BGA956 5.5 W

Core 2 Duo[edit]
The majority of the desktop and mobile Core 2 processor variants are Core 2 Duo[9][10] with two
processor cores on a single Merom, Conroe, Allendale, Penryn, or Wolfdale chip. These come
in a wide range of performance and power consumption, starting with the relatively slow ultralow-power Uxxxx (10 W) and low-power Lxxxx (17 W) versions, to the more performance
oriented Pxxxx (25 W) and Txxxx (35 W) mobile versions and the Exxxx (65 W) desktop
models. The mobile Core 2 Duo processors with an 'S' prefix in the name are produced in a
smaller FC-BGA 956 package, which allows building more compact laptops.
Within each line, a higher number usually refers to a better performance, which depends
largely on core and front-side bus clock frequency and amount of second level cache, which
are model-specific. Core 2 Duo processors typically use the full L2 cache of 2, 3, 4, or 6 MB
available in the specific stepping of the chip, while versions with the amount of cache reduced
during manufacturing are sold for the low-end consumer market as Celeron or Pentium DualCore processors. Like those processors, some low-end Core 2 Duo models disable features
such as Intel Virtualization Technology.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

Mobile Core 2 Duo U7xxx

L2 Cache Socket

2 MB

Merom

TDP

10 W
BGA479

Mobile Core 2 Duo L7xxx

4 MB

17 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo T5xxx

2 MB

Socket M
Socket P 35 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo T7xxx

24 MB

Core 2 Duo E4xxx

2 MB

Conroe and

BGA479

LGA 775 65 W

Allendale
Core 2 Duo E6xxx

24 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo SU7xxx


3 MB

10W

Mobile Core 2 Duo SU9xxx


BGA956
Mobile Core 2 Duo SL9xxx

17 W
6 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo SP9xxx

25 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo P7xxx


Penryn

3 MB
Mobile Core 2 Duo P8xxx

Mobile Core 2 Duo P9xxx

25 W

6 MB
Socket P
FCBGA6

Mobile Core 2 Duo T6xxx

2 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T8xxx

3 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T9xxx

6 MB

35 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo E8xxx

6 MB

Core 2 Duo E7xxx

3 MB

Wolfdale

Socket P 35-55 W

LGA 775 65 W
Core 2 Duo E8xxx

6 MB

Core 2 Quad[edit]
Core 2 Quad[11][12] processors are multi-chip modules consisting of two dies similar to those
used in Core 2 Duo, forming a quad-core processor. This allows twice the performance of a
dual-core processors at the same clock frequency in ideal conditions.
Initially, all Core 2 Quad models were versions of Core 2 Duo desktop
processors, Kentsfield derived from Conroe and Yorkfield from Wolfdale, but later PenrynQC was added as a high-end version of the mobile dual-core Penryn.
The Xeon 32xx and 33xx processors are mostly identical versions of the desktop Core 2 Quad
processors and can be used interchangeably.

Codename
(main article)

Kentsfield

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache

Socket

TDP

Core 2 Quad Q6xxx

24 MB

95105 W

Core 2 Quad Q7xxx

21 MB

95 W
LGA 775

Yorkfield

Core 2 Quad Q8xxx

22 MB
6595 W

Core 2 Quad Q9xxx

2326 MB

Penryn-QC Mobile Core 2 Quad Q9xxx 2326 MB Socket P 45 W

Core 2 Extreme[edit]

Core 2 Extreme processors[13][14] are enthusiast versions of Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
processors, usually with a higher clock frequency and an unlocked clock multiplier, which
makes them especially attractive for overclocking. This is similar to earlier Pentium processors
labeled as Extreme Edition. Core 2 Extreme processors were released at a much higher price
than their regular version, often $999 or more.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache

Socket

TDP

Merom

Mobile Core 2 Extreme X7xxx

4 MB

Socket P

44 W

Conroe

Core 2 Extreme X6xxx

4 MB

LGA 775

75 W

Core 2 Extreme QX6xxx

24 MB

LGA 775

130 W

Mobile Core 2 Extreme X9xxx

6 MB

Socket P

44 W

Socket P

45 W

Kentsfield

Penryn

Penryn-QC Mobile Core 2 Extreme QX9xxx 26 MB

Yorkfield

Core 2 Extreme QX9xxx

26 MB

LGA 775 / LGA 771 130150 W

Nehalem microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Nehalem (microarchitecture)
With the release of the Nehalem microarchitecture in November 2008,[15] Intel introduced a
new naming scheme for its Core processors. There are three variants, Core i3, Core i5 and
Core i7, but the names no longer correspond to specific technical features like the number of
cores. Instead, the brand is now divided from low-level (i3), through mid-range (i5) to high-end
performance (i7),[16] which correspond to three, four and five stars in Intel's Intel Processor
Rating[17] following on from the entry-level Celeron (one star) and Pentium (two stars)
processors.[18] Common features of all Nehalem based processors include an integrated DDR3
memory controller as well as QuickPath Interconnect or PCI Express and Direct Media
Interface on the processor replacing the aging quad-pumped Front Side Bus used in all earlier

Core processors. All these processors have 256 KB L2 cache per core, plus up to 12 MB
shared L3 cache. Because of the new I/O interconnect, chipsets and mainboards from previous
generations can no longer be used with Nehalem based processors.

Core i3[edit]
Intel intended the Core i3 as the new low end of the performance processor line from Intel,
following the retirement of the Core 2 brand.[19][20]
The first Core i3 processors were launched on January 7, 2010.[21]
The first Nehalem based Core i3 was Clarkdale-based, with an integrated GPU and two
cores.[22] The same processor is also available as Core i5 and Pentium, with slightly different
configurations.
The Core i3-3xxM processors are based on Arrandale, the mobile version of the Clarkdale
desktop processor. They are similar to the Core i5-4xx series but running at lower clock speeds
and without Turbo Boost.[23] According to an Intel FAQ they do not support Error Correction
Code (ECC) memory.[24] According to motherboard manufacturer Supermicro, if a Core i3
processor is used with a server chipset platform such as Intel 3400/3420/3450, the CPU
supports ECC with UDIMM.[25] When asked, Intel confirmed that, although the Intel 5 series
chipset supports non-ECC memory only with the Core i5 or i3 processors, using those
processors on a motherboard with 3400 series chipsets it supports the ECC function of ECC
memory.[26] A limited number of motherboards by other companies also support ECC with Intel
Core ix processors; the Asus P8B WS is an example, but it does not support ECC memory
under Windows non-server operating systems.[27]

Codename
(main article)

Clarkdale

Brand name (list) Cores L3 Cache

Core i3-5xx

4 MB

Socket

LGA 1156

TDP

I/O Bus

73 W
Direct Media Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i3-3xxM

3 MB

rPGA-988A 35 W

3 MB

BGA-1288 18 W

Arrandale
Core i3-3xxUM

Core i5[edit]

The first Core i5 using the Nehalem microarchitecture was introduced on September 8, 2009,
as a mainstream variant of the earlier Core i7, the Lynnfield core.[28][29] Lynnfield Core i5
processors have an 8 MB L3 cache, a DMI bus running at 2.5 GT/s and support for dualchannel DDR3-800/1066/1333 memory and have Hyper-threading disabled. The same
processors with different sets of features (Hyper-Threading and other clock frequencies)
enabled are sold as Core i7-8xx and Xeon 3400-series processors, which should not be
confused with high-end Core i7-9xx and Xeon 3500-series processors based on Bloomfield. A
new feature called Turbo Boost Technology was introduced which maximizes speed for
demanding applications, dynamically accelerating performance to match the workload.
The Core i5-5xx mobile processors are named Arrandale and based on the 32 nm
Westmere shrink of the Nehalem microarchitecture. Arrandale processors have integrated
graphics capability but only two processor cores. They were released in January 2010,
together with Core i7-6xx and Core i3-3xx processors based on the same chip. The L3 cache
in Core i5-5xx processors is reduced to 3 MB, while the Core i5-6xx uses the full cache and the
Core i3-3xx does not support for Turbo Boost.[30] Clarkdale, the desktop version of Arrandale,
is sold as Core i5-6xx, along with related Core i3 and Pentium brands. It has Hyper-Threading
enabled and the full 4 MB L3 cache.[31]
According to Intel "Core i5 desktop processors and desktop boards typically do not support
ECC memory",[32] but information on limited ECC support in the Core i3 section also applies to
Core i5 and i7.[citation needed]

Codename
(main
article)

Brand name
(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

Core i5-7xx
Lynnfield

I/O Bus

95 W
4

Direct Media

8 MB

Core i5-7xxS

Clarkdale

TDP

Interface
LGA 1156

Core i5-6xx

82 W

7387

4 MB

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

Arrandale

Core i5-5xxM

3 MB

rPGA-

35 W

988A
Core i5-4xxM

Core i5-5xxUM
BGA-1288 18 W
Core i5-4xxUM[33]

Core i7[edit]
Intel Core i7 as an Intel brand name applies to several families of desktop and laptop 64bit x86-64 processors using the Nehalem, Westmere, Sandy Bridge, Ivy
Bridge andHaswell microarchitectures. The Core i7 brand targets the business and high-end
consumer markets for both desktop and laptop computers,[34] and is distinguished from theCore
i3 (entry-level consumer), Core i5 (mainstream consumer), and Xeon (server and workstation)
brands.
Intel introduced the Core i7 name with the Nehalem-based Bloomfield Quad-core processor in
late 2008.[35][36][37][38] In 2009 new Core i7 models based on the Lynnfield(Nehalem-based)
desktop quad-core processor and the Clarksfield (Nehalem-based) quad-core mobile were
added,[39] and models based on the Arrandale dual-core mobile processor (also Nehalembased) were added in January 2010. The first six-core processor in the Core lineup is the
Nehalem-based Gulftown, which was launched on March 16, 2010. Both the regular Core i7
and the Extreme Edition are advertised as five stars in the Intel Processor Rating.
In each of the first three microarchitecture generations of the brand, Core i7 has family
members using two distinct system-level architectures, and therefore two distinct sockets (for
example, LGA 1156 and LGA 1366 with Nehalem). In each generation, the highest-performing
Core i7 processors use the same socket and QPI-based architecture as the low-end Xeon
processors of that generation, while lower-performing Core i7 processors use the same socket
and PCIe/DMI/FDI architecture as the Core i5.
"Core i7" is a successor to the Intel Core 2 brand.[40][41][42][43] Intel representatives stated that they
intend the moniker Core i7 to help consumers decide which processor to purchase as Intel
releases newer Nehalem-based products in the future.[44]

Code
name

Brand name

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process Busses

Release
Date

Core i7-9xxX

Mar

Extreme Edition

2010

Gulftown

12 MB

32 nm

Core i7-970

Jul 2010

Core i7-9xx

LGA

130

1366

QPI,
3
DDR3

Extreme Edition
Nov

Bloomfield

2008
Core i7-9xx (except
Core i7-970/980)

Core i7-8xx

Sep

95 W
8 MB

Lynnfield

1156

2009

LGA

Core i7-8xxS

45 nm

Jan

82 W

2010
DMI,
PCI-e,

Core i7-9xxXM
Extreme Edition

Clarksfield

55 W

DDR3
Sep

Core i7-8xxQM

988A
Core i7-7xxQM

35 W
2

Core i7-6xxLM

45 W

6 MB

Core i7-6xxM
Arrandale

2009

rPGA-

4 MB

DMI,
32 nm

BGA-

25 W

PCI-e,
FDI,
2

Jan
2010

1288

DDR3

Core i7-6xxUM

18 W

Sandy Bridge microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Sandy Bridge
In early 2011, Intel introduced a new microarchitecture named Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture. It kept all the existing brands from Nehalem, including Core i3/i5/i7, and
introduced new model numbers. The initial set of Sandy Bridge processors includes dual- and
quad-core variants, all of which use a single 32 nm die for both the CPU and integrated GPU
cores, unlike the earlier microarchitectures. All Core i3/i5/i7 processors with the Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture have a four-digit model number. With the mobile version, the thermal design
power can no longer be determined from a one- or two-letter suffix but is encoded into the CPU
number. Starting with Sandy Bridge, Intel no longer distinguishes the code names of the
processor based on number of cores, socket or intended usage; they all use the same code
name as the microarchitecture itself.
Ivy Bridge is the codename for Intel's 22 nm die shrink of the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture
based on tri-gate ("3D") transistors, introduced in April 2012.

Core i3[edit]
Released on January 20, 2011, the Core i3-2xxx line of desktop and mobile processors is a
direct replacement of the 2010 "Clarkdale" Core i3-5xx and "Arrandale" Core i3-3xxM models,
based on the new microarchitecture. While they require new sockets and chipsets, the uservisible features of the Core i3 are largely unchanged, including the lack of support for Turbo
Boost and AES-NI. Unlike the Sandy Bridge based Celeron and Pentium processors, the Core
i3 line does support the new Advanced Vector Extensions. This particular processor is the
entry-level processor of this new series of Intel processors.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

W
2

(Desktop)

I/O Bus

65

Core i3-21xx
Sandy Bridge

TDP

3 MB

LGA 1155

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i3-21xxT

35

W
rPGA988B

Core i3-2xx0M

BGA-

Sandy Bridge

1023

(Mobile)

Core i3-2xx7M

BGA-

17

1023

Core i5[edit]
In January 2011, Intel released new quad-core Core i5 processors based on the "Sandy
Bridge" microarchitecture at CES 2011. New dual-core mobile processors and desktop
processors arrived in February 2011.
The Core i5-2xxx line of desktop processors are mostly quad-core chips, with the exception of
the dual-core Core i5-2390T, and include integrated graphics, combining the key features of
the earlier Core i5-6xx and Core i5-7xx lines. The suffix after the four-digit model number
designates unlocked multiplier (K), low-power (S) and ultra-low-power (T).
The desktop CPUs now all have four non-SMT cores (like the i5-750), with the exception of the
i5-2390T. The DMI bus is running at 5 GT/s.
The mobile Core i5-2xxxM processors are all dual-core chips like the previous Core i5-5xxM
series and share most the features with that product line.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Sandy Bridge
(Desktop)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

Core i5-2xxx

95

Core i5-2xxxK

Core i5-2xxxS 4

Core i5-25xxT

6 MB

LGA 1155

65
W

45
W

I/O Bus

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i5-23xxT

rPGACore i5-2xxxM

988B
2

3 MB

Sandy Bridge

35
W

BGA1023

(Mobile)

Core i5-2xx7M

BGA-

17

1023

Core i7[edit]
The Core i7 brand remains the high-end for Intel's desktop and mobile processors, featuring
the Sandy Bridge models with the largest amount of L3 cache and the highest clock frequency.
Most of these models are very similar to their smaller Core i5 siblings. The quad-core mobile
Core i7-2xxxQM/XM processors follow the previous "Clarksfield" Core i7-xxxQM/XM
processors, but now also include integrated graphics.

Codename
(main
article)

Brand
name (list)

Cores

Core i7-

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process

I/O Bus

Release
Date

15 MB

39xxX
6
Sandy
Bridge-E
(Desktop)

Core i7-

12 MB

39xxK

LGA

130

Direct Media

November

2011

Interface

2011

32 nm
Core i7-

10 MB

38xx
4
Sandy

Core i7-

Bridge

2xxxK, i7-

8 MB

LGA

95

Direct Media
Interface,

January

(Desktop)

2xxx

1155

Core i7-

65

2xxxS

Core i7-

55

2xxxXM

Integrated GPU 2011

Core i728xxQM
rPGACore i72xxxQE, i7Sandy
Bridge

6 MB

26xxQM,

988B

45

BGA-

1023

i7-27xxQM

(Mobile)
Core i7-

35

2xx0M

Core i72xx9M

4 MB

25

February

2011

BGA1023
Core i7-

17

2xx7M

Ivy Bridge microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Ivy Bridge (microarchitecture)
This section
requires expansion.(April 2014)

Core i3[edit]

This section
requires expansion.(April 2014)

The Ivy Bridge based Core-i3-3xxx line is a minor upgrade to 22 nm process technology and
better graphics.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

I/O Bus

55

Core i3-32xx

Ivy Bridge

LGA 1155

(Desktop)
Core i3-32xxT

35
rPGACore i3-3xx0M

Ivy Bridge (Mobile)

3 MB

988B

Direct Media
Interface,

BGA-1023

Integrated GPU

17

Core i3-3xx7U

W
BGA-1023
13

Core i3-3xx9Y

Core i5[edit]
Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Ivy Bridge

Core i5-3xxx

(Desktop)

Core i5-3xxxK

Cores

L3
Cache

6 MB

Socket

LGA 1155

TDP

77
W

I/O Bus

Direct Media
Interface,

Integrated GPU
65

Core i5-3xxxS

45

Core i5-35xxT

Core i5-34xxT
35
rPGACore i5-3xx0M

988B
BGA-1023
2

Ivy Bridge (Mobile)

3 MB
17

Core i5-3xx7U

W
BGA-1023
13

Core i5-3xx9Y

Core i7[edit]
Codename

Brand

(main

name

article)

(list)

Cores

Core i7Ivy Bridge(Desktop)

Cache

6
Core i74930K

Socket TDP Process

I/O Bus

Release
Date

15MB

4960X

L3

LGA2011
12MB

130
W

22 nm

Direct Media

September

Interface

2013

Core i7-

10MB

4820K

Core i7-

77

37xx, i7-

37xxK

Ivy Bridge
(Desktop)

Core i7-

65

37xxS

Core i7-

8 MB

45

37xxT

Core i7-

55

3xxxXM

W
4
Direct Media

LGA
Core i7-

Interface,

1155

Integrated GPU

38xxQM

Core i736x0QM,
Ivy Bridge i7(Mobile) 3xx0QE,

45
W

i736x5QM,
i7-

6 MB

3xx5QE,
i737xxQM

Core i73xx2QM,

35

April 2012

i7-3xx2QE

Core i73xxxM

Core i7-

25

3xxxLE

W
2

4 MB

Core i7-

17

3xx7U, i7-

3xx7UE

Core i7-

13

January

3xx9Y

2013

Haswell microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Haswell (microarchitecture)

Core i3[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core
s

(list)

L3

GPU

Cach Mode
e

Socke TD
t

Core

54

i3-43xx

Proces

I/O Bus

Release
Date

Direct Media

HaswellDT

Core
(Desktop) i343xxT,
Core
i3-

4 MB

HD

LGA

4600

1150

22 nm
35
W

Interface,

Septembe

Integrated GP

r 2013

4xxxT
E

Core

54

i3-41xx

W
HD
4400

Core

35

i3-

41xxT

Core

25

i3-

4xx2E
BGA
1364
Core

HD

i3-

4600

4xx0E

37

3 MB

W
Core
HaswellMB

Socket

i3-

G3

4xxxM

(Mobile)
Core
i34xx8U

Iris

28

5100

BGA

Core

June 2013

1168

i34xx0U,

HD

15

Core

4400

i34xx5U

Core
i34xxxY

HD

11.5

4200

Core i5[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core
s

(list)

L3

GPU

Cach Mode Socket


e

TD Proces
P

I/O Bus

Release
Date

Core
i5-

84

4xxx,

i546xxK

Core

6 MB

65

i5-

4xxxS

Direct Media

HaswellDT
(Desktop)

Core
i5-

HD

LGA

4600

1150

22 nm
45
W

46xxT

Core
i545xxT,
Core
i545xxT
E

4 MB

35
W

Interface,
Integrated GP
U

June 2013

Core
i5-

Iris
4

65

Pro

4xxxR

5200

Core

47

i5-

4xxxH
BGA
1364
Core

25

i5-

4xx2E
HD

Septembe

4600

r 2013

Core
i54xx0E
37
W
Haswell- Core
MB

i5-

Socket

3 MB

G3

(Mobile) 4xxxM

Core
i54xx8U

Core
i54x50U

Iris

28

5100

HD

BGA116

5000

June 2013
15
W

Core
i54x00U

HD
4400

Core
i54xxxY

HD

11.

4200

5W

Core i7[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core

(list)

L3

GPU

Cach Mode
e

Socke TD Proces
t

Core i7-

Release
Date

84

47xx, i7-

47xxK

Core i7-

65

47xxS
8 MB
HaswellDT

I/O Bus

HD

LGA

4600

1150

Core i7-

45

(Desktop) 47x0T

W
Direct Media

Core i7- 4

35

47x5T

Core i7-

65

47xxR

W
Iris

Core i7Haswell- 4x50HQ


, Core
MB
(Mobile)

i74x60HQ
Core i7-

6 MB

Pro
5200

BGA
1364
47
W

22 nm

Interface,
Integrated GP
U

June 2013

4x50EQ,
Core i74x60EQ

Core i747x2HQ
, Core
i7-

37

47x2EQ

Core i7-

47

470xHQ

, Core
i7470xEQ

Core i7-

37

HD

47x2MQ

4600

Core i7-

47

470xMQ

Core i7-

Socket

49xxMQ
, Core

G3

8 MB

57
W

i74xxxXM

Core i7-

35

Septembe

4xxxM

r 2013

Core i74xx8U

4 MB

Iris
5100

28
BGA

1168
Core i7-

HD

15

June 2013

4x50U

5000

Core i7-

HD

4x00U

4400

Core i7-

HD

11.5

4xxxY

4200

Broadwell microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Broadwell (microarchitecture)
The Broadwell microarchitecture was released by Intel on September 6, 2014, and will be
shipping in late 2014. It is the first to use a 14 nm chip.[45]

Mod
el

sSpec

Co Frequ Tur

num number res ency

bo

ber

Core
M-

SR217 (
2
5Y1 E0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0[46]

Core
M-

SR218 (
2
5Y1 E0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0a
Core
SR23C (
2
F0)
M-

L2
cac
he

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

L3
ca
ch
e

GPU GPU T
mod frequ D
el

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics

800

2G 2 4

MHz

Hz

ency P

Soc
ket

O Relea
b

se

date

ase
Part

pric

number(s)

HD
4

Rele

I/

5300
HD

100 4.
800

MHz

100 4.
800

MHz

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

A-

D)

D
M Septe
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2.

FH80658018 $28
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2014

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2014

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256 MB Grap 800

(US

Q4
FH80658020
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5Y1

KB

hics MHz

0c

W 123 I

5300

2.
0

Core
M-

SR23G (
2
5Y3 F0)

900

2.4

MHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR23L (
2
5Y5 F0)

1.1

2.6

GHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR216 (
2
5Y7 E0)

1.1

2.6

GHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR23Q (
2
5Y7 F0)

1.2

2.9

GHz

GHz

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

300 4.
850

MHz

300 4.
900

MHz

100 4.
850

MHz

300 4.
900

MHz

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

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1

This article is about the Intel processor brand name. For the Intel microarchitecture that is the
basis for the Core 2 processor family, see Intel Core (microarchitecture).
Intel Core is a brand name that Intel uses for various mid-range to high-end consumer and
business microprocessors. In general, processors sold as Core are more powerful variants of
the same processors marketed as entry-level Celeron and Pentium. Similarly, identical or more
capable versions of Core processors are also sold as Xeon processors for the server and
workstation market.
As of 2013 the current lineup of Core processors includes the latest Intel Core i7, Intel Core i5,
and Intel Core i3, and the older Intel Core 2 Solo, Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core 2 Quad, and
Intel Core 2 Extreme lines.[1]
Contents
[hide]

1 Overview
2 Enhanced Pentium M based
o 2.1 Core Duo
o 2.2 Core Solo
3 64-bit Core microarchitecture based
o 3.1 Core 2 Solo
o 3.2 Core 2 Duo
o 3.3 Core 2 Quad
o 3.4 Core 2 Extreme
4 Nehalem microarchitecture based
o 4.1 Core i3
o 4.2 Core i5
o 4.3 Core i7
5 Sandy Bridge microarchitecture based
o 5.1 Core i3
o 5.2 Core i5
o 5.3 Core i7
6 Ivy Bridge microarchitecture based
o 6.1 Core i3
o 6.2 Core i5
o 6.3 Core i7
7 Haswell microarchitecture based
o 7.1 Core i3
o 7.2 Core i5
o 7.3 Core i7
8 Broadwell microarchitecture based
9 See also
10 References
11 External links

Overview[edit]
Desktop

Mobile

Brand
Codenamed

Cores Fab

Date

Code-

released

named

Cores Fab

Core Solo

Desktop version not available

Yonah

1 65 nm

Core Duo

Desktop version not available

Yonah

2 65 nm

Date
released

January
2006

January
2006

Core 2
Solo

Desktop version not available

September

Merom-L

1 65 nm

Penryn-L

1 45 nm

Merom

2 65 nm

Penryn

2 45 nm

Penryn

4 45 nm August 2008

2007
May 2008

August 2006
Core 2
Duo

Conroe

2 65 nm

January

Allendale

2 65 nm

2007

Wolfdale

2 45 nm

January

July 2006
January
2008

2008

Core 2

Kentsfield

4 65 nm

Quad

Yorkfield

4 45 nm

Conroe XE
Core 2
Extreme

January
2007
March 2008

July 2006

Kentsfield

2 65 nm

November Merom XE

2 65 nm

XE

4 65 nm

2006 Penryn XE

2 45 nm

Yorkfield

4 45 nm

November Penryn XE

4 45 nm

XE

2007

July 2007
January
2008
August 2008

January
Clarkdale
Sandy
Core i3

Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

2010
2 32 nm

February

2 32 nm

2011

2 22 nm

September

2 22 nm

2012
September

Arrandale
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

January
2 32 nm

2010

2 32 nm

February

2 22 nm

2011

2 22 nm

June 2012
June 2013

2013

Lynnfield
Core i5

Clarkdale
Sandy
Bridge

4 45 nm
2 32 nm
4 32 nm
2 32 nm

September
2009
January
2010

Arrandale
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge

2 32 nm
2 32 nm
2 22 nm
2 22 nm

January
2010
February
2011

Sandy

4 22 nm

January

Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Ivy Bridge

4 22 nm

February

Ivy Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Haswell

April 2012

Haswell

April 2012

Haswell

May 2012
June 2013

June 2013
June 2013

November
2008
Bloomfield
Lynnfield
Gulftown
Sandy
Bridge
Sandy
Core i7

Bridge-E
Sandy
Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge
Haswell
Ivy Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge-E

September
4 45 nm
4 45 nm
6 32 nm
4 32 nm
6 32 nm
4 32 nm
4 22 nm
4 22 nm
4 22 nm
6 22 nm
6 22 nm

Haswell-E

2009

September

July 2010 Clarksfield

2009

January

Arrandale

4 45 nm

January

2011

Sandy

2 32 nm

2010

November

Bridge

4 32 nm

January

2011

Sandy

2 32 nm

2011

February

Bridge

4 22 nm

February

2012

Ivy Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

April 2012

Ivy Bridge

4 22 nm

May 2012

June 2013

Haswell

2 22 nm

May 2012

September

Haswell

June 2013

2013

June 2013

September
2013
August 2014

November
Bloomfield
Core i7
Extreme
Edition

Gulftown
Sandy
Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge-E
Haswell-E

4 45 nm
6 32 nm
6 32 nm
6 22 nm
8 22 nm

2008
March 2010
November
2011
September
2013
August 2014

Clarksfield
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

September
4 45 nm

2009

4 32 nm

January

4 22 nm

2011

4 22 nm

May 2012
June 2013

List of Intel Core microprocessors


List of Intel Core 2 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i3 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i5 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i7 microprocessors

Clock speed slowest 1.2 GHz to the fastest 4.0 GHz (Intel Core i7-4790K) (or 4.4 GHz via Intel
Turbo Boost Technology)[2]

Enhanced Pentium M based[edit]


Main article: Enhanced Pentium M (microarchitecture)
For details about the processor core, see Yonah (microprocessor).
The original Core brand refers to Intel's 32-bit mobile dual-core x86 CPUs, which derived from
the Pentium M branded processors. The processor family used a more enhanced version of
the Intel P6 microarchitecture. It emerged in parallel with the NetBurst microarchitecture (Intel
P68) of the Pentium 4 brand, and was a precursor of the 64-bit Core microarchitecture of Core
2 branded CPUs. The Core brand comprised two branches: the Duo (dual-core) and Solo (Duo
with one disabled core, which replaced the Pentium M brand of single-core mobile processor).
Intel launched the Core brand on January 6, 2006 with the release of the 32-bit Yonah CPU
Intel's first dual-core mobile (low-power) processor. Its dual-core layout closely resembled two
interconnected Pentium M branded CPUs packaged as a single die (piece) silicon chip (IC).
Hence, the 32-bit microarchitecture of Core branded CPUs contrary to its name had more
in common with Pentium M branded CPUs than with the subsequent 64-bit Core
microarchitecture of Core 2 branded CPUs. Despite a major rebrandingeffort by Intel starting
January 2006, some companies continued to market computers with the Yonah core marked
as Pentium M.
The Core series is also the first Intel processor used as the main CPU in an Apple
Macintosh computer. The Core Duo was the CPU for the first generation MacBook Pro, while
the Core Solo appeared in Apple's Mac mini line. Core Duo signified the beginning of Apple's
shift to Intel processors across their entire line.
In 2007, Intel began branding the Yonah core CPUs intended for
mainstream mobile computers as Pentium Dual-Core, not to be confused with the desktop 64bit Core microarchitecture CPUs also branded as Pentium Dual-Core.

September 2007 and January 4, 2008 marked the discontinuation of a number


of Core branded CPUs including several Core Solo, Core Duo, Celeron and one Core 2 Quad
chip.[3][4]

Core Duo[edit]
Intel Core Duo[5] (product code 80539) consists of two cores on one die, a 2 MB L2 cache
shared by both cores, and an arbiter bus that controls both L2 cache and FSB (front-side bus)
access.

Codename
(main article)

Yonah

Brand name (list) L2 Cache Socket

TDP

Core Duo T2xxx

31 W

Core Duo L2xxx

2 MB

Socket M 15 W

Core Duo U2xxx

9W

Core Solo[edit]
Intel Core Solo[6] (product code 80538) uses the same two-core die as the Core Duo, but
features only one active core.[citation needed] Depending on demand, Intel may also simply disable
one of the cores to sell the chip at the Core Solo pricethis requires less effort than launching
and maintaining a separate line of CPUs that physically only have one core. Intel used the
same strategy previously with the 486 CPU in which early 486SX CPUs were in fact
manufactured as 486DX CPUs but with the FPU disabled.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list) L2 Cache Socket

Core Solo T1xxx


Yonah

2731 W
2 MB

Core Solo U1xxx

TDP

Socket M
5.56 W

64-bit Core microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Core (microarchitecture)
The successor to Core is the mobile version of the Intel Core 2 line of processors using cores
based upon the Intel Core microarchitecture,[7] released on July 27, 2006. The release of the
mobile version of Intel Core 2 marks the reunification of Intel's desktop and mobile product
lines as Core 2 processors were released for desktops and notebooks, unlike the first Intel
Core CPUs that were targeted only for notebooks (although some small form factor and all-inone desktops, like the iMac and the Mac Mini, also used Core processors).
Unlike the Intel Core, Intel Core 2 is a 64-bit processor, supporting Intel 64. Another difference
between the original Core Duo and the new Core 2 Duo is an increase in the amount of Level 2
cache. The new Core 2 Duo has tripled the amount of on-board cache to 6 MB. Core 2 also
introduced a quad-core performance variant to the single- and dual-core chips, branded Core 2
Quad, as well as an enthusiast variant, Core 2 Extreme. All three chips are manufactured at a
65 nm lithography, and in 2008, a 45 nm lithography and support Front Side Bus speeds
ranging from 533 MHz to 1600 MHz. In addition, the 45 nm die shrink of the Core
microarchitecture adds SSE4.1 support to all Core 2 microprocessors manufactured at a 45 nm
lithography, therefore increasing the calculation rate of the processors.

Core 2 Solo[edit]
The Core 2 Solo,[8] introduced in September 2007, is the successor to the Core Solo and is
available only as an ultra-low-power mobile processor with 5.5 Watt thermal design power. The
original U2xxx series "Merom-L" used a special version of the Merom chip with CPUID number
10661 (model 22, stepping A1) that only had a single core and was also used in some Celeron
processors. The later SU3xxx are part of Intel's CULV range of processors in a smaller FCBGA 956 package but contain the same Penryn chip as the dual-core variants, with one of the
cores disabled during manufacturing.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache Socket

TDP

Merom-L

Mobile Core 2 Solo U2xxx

1 MB

FCBGA 5.5 W

Penryn-L

Mobile Core 2 Solo SU3xxx 3 MB

BGA956 5.5 W

Core 2 Duo[edit]

The majority of the desktop and mobile Core 2 processor variants are Core 2 Duo[9][10] with two
processor cores on a single Merom, Conroe, Allendale, Penryn, or Wolfdale chip. These come
in a wide range of performance and power consumption, starting with the relatively slow ultralow-power Uxxxx (10 W) and low-power Lxxxx (17 W) versions, to the more performance
oriented Pxxxx (25 W) and Txxxx (35 W) mobile versions and the Exxxx (65 W) desktop
models. The mobile Core 2 Duo processors with an 'S' prefix in the name are produced in a
smaller FC-BGA 956 package, which allows building more compact laptops.
Within each line, a higher number usually refers to a better performance, which depends
largely on core and front-side bus clock frequency and amount of second level cache, which
are model-specific. Core 2 Duo processors typically use the full L2 cache of 2, 3, 4, or 6 MB
available in the specific stepping of the chip, while versions with the amount of cache reduced
during manufacturing are sold for the low-end consumer market as Celeron or Pentium DualCore processors. Like those processors, some low-end Core 2 Duo models disable features
such as Intel Virtualization Technology.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

Mobile Core 2 Duo U7xxx

L2 Cache Socket

2 MB

TDP

10 W
BGA479

Mobile Core 2 Duo L7xxx

4 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T5xxx

2 MB

17 W

Merom
Socket M
Socket P 35 W
Mobile Core 2 Duo T7xxx

24 MB

Core 2 Duo E4xxx

2 MB

Conroe and

LGA 775 65 W

Allendale
Core 2 Duo E6xxx

Penryn

BGA479

24 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo SU7xxx 3 MB

BGA956 10W

Mobile Core 2 Duo SU9xxx

Mobile Core 2 Duo SL9xxx

17 W
6 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo SP9xxx

25 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo P7xxx


3 MB
Mobile Core 2 Duo P8xxx

Mobile Core 2 Duo P9xxx

25 W

6 MB
Socket P
FCBGA6

Mobile Core 2 Duo T6xxx

2 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T8xxx

3 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T9xxx

6 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo E8xxx

6 MB

Core 2 Duo E7xxx

3 MB

Wolfdale

35 W

Socket P 35-55 W

LGA 775 65 W
Core 2 Duo E8xxx

6 MB

Core 2 Quad[edit]
Core 2 Quad[11][12] processors are multi-chip modules consisting of two dies similar to those
used in Core 2 Duo, forming a quad-core processor. This allows twice the performance of a
dual-core processors at the same clock frequency in ideal conditions.

Initially, all Core 2 Quad models were versions of Core 2 Duo desktop
processors, Kentsfield derived from Conroe and Yorkfield from Wolfdale, but later PenrynQC was added as a high-end version of the mobile dual-core Penryn.
The Xeon 32xx and 33xx processors are mostly identical versions of the desktop Core 2 Quad
processors and can be used interchangeably.

Codename
(main article)

Kentsfield

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache

Socket

TDP

Core 2 Quad Q6xxx

24 MB

95105 W

Core 2 Quad Q7xxx

21 MB

95 W
LGA 775

Yorkfield

Core 2 Quad Q8xxx

22 MB
6595 W

Core 2 Quad Q9xxx

2326 MB

Penryn-QC Mobile Core 2 Quad Q9xxx 2326 MB Socket P 45 W

Core 2 Extreme[edit]
Core 2 Extreme processors[13][14] are enthusiast versions of Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
processors, usually with a higher clock frequency and an unlocked clock multiplier, which
makes them especially attractive for overclocking. This is similar to earlier Pentium processors
labeled as Extreme Edition. Core 2 Extreme processors were released at a much higher price
than their regular version, often $999 or more.

Codename
(main article)

Merom

Brand name (list)

Mobile Core 2 Extreme X7xxx

L2 Cache

4 MB

Socket

Socket P

TDP

44 W

Conroe

Kentsfield

Penryn

Core 2 Extreme X6xxx

4 MB

LGA 775

75 W

Core 2 Extreme QX6xxx

24 MB

LGA 775

130 W

Mobile Core 2 Extreme X9xxx

6 MB

Socket P

44 W

Socket P

45 W

Penryn-QC Mobile Core 2 Extreme QX9xxx 26 MB

Yorkfield

Core 2 Extreme QX9xxx

26 MB

LGA 775 / LGA 771 130150 W

Nehalem microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Nehalem (microarchitecture)
With the release of the Nehalem microarchitecture in November 2008,[15] Intel introduced a
new naming scheme for its Core processors. There are three variants, Core i3, Core i5 and
Core i7, but the names no longer correspond to specific technical features like the number of
cores. Instead, the brand is now divided from low-level (i3), through mid-range (i5) to high-end
performance (i7),[16] which correspond to three, four and five stars in Intel's Intel Processor
Rating[17] following on from the entry-level Celeron (one star) and Pentium (two stars)
processors.[18] Common features of all Nehalem based processors include an integrated DDR3
memory controller as well as QuickPath Interconnect or PCI Express and Direct Media
Interface on the processor replacing the aging quad-pumped Front Side Bus used in all earlier
Core processors. All these processors have 256 KB L2 cache per core, plus up to 12 MB
shared L3 cache. Because of the new I/O interconnect, chipsets and mainboards from previous
generations can no longer be used with Nehalem based processors.

Core i3[edit]
Intel intended the Core i3 as the new low end of the performance processor line from Intel,
following the retirement of the Core 2 brand.[19][20]
The first Core i3 processors were launched on January 7, 2010.[21]
The first Nehalem based Core i3 was Clarkdale-based, with an integrated GPU and two
cores.[22] The same processor is also available as Core i5 and Pentium, with slightly different
configurations.

The Core i3-3xxM processors are based on Arrandale, the mobile version of the Clarkdale
desktop processor. They are similar to the Core i5-4xx series but running at lower clock speeds
and without Turbo Boost.[23] According to an Intel FAQ they do not support Error Correction
Code (ECC) memory.[24] According to motherboard manufacturer Supermicro, if a Core i3
processor is used with a server chipset platform such as Intel 3400/3420/3450, the CPU
supports ECC with UDIMM.[25] When asked, Intel confirmed that, although the Intel 5 series
chipset supports non-ECC memory only with the Core i5 or i3 processors, using those
processors on a motherboard with 3400 series chipsets it supports the ECC function of ECC
memory.[26] A limited number of motherboards by other companies also support ECC with Intel
Core ix processors; the Asus P8B WS is an example, but it does not support ECC memory
under Windows non-server operating systems.[27]

Codename
(main article)

Clarkdale

Brand name (list) Cores L3 Cache

Core i3-5xx

4 MB

Socket

LGA 1156

TDP

I/O Bus

73 W
Direct Media Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i3-3xxM

3 MB

rPGA-988A 35 W

3 MB

BGA-1288 18 W

Arrandale
Core i3-3xxUM

Core i5[edit]
The first Core i5 using the Nehalem microarchitecture was introduced on September 8, 2009,
as a mainstream variant of the earlier Core i7, the Lynnfield core.[28][29] Lynnfield Core i5
processors have an 8 MB L3 cache, a DMI bus running at 2.5 GT/s and support for dualchannel DDR3-800/1066/1333 memory and have Hyper-threading disabled. The same
processors with different sets of features (Hyper-Threading and other clock frequencies)
enabled are sold as Core i7-8xx and Xeon 3400-series processors, which should not be
confused with high-end Core i7-9xx and Xeon 3500-series processors based on Bloomfield. A
new feature called Turbo Boost Technology was introduced which maximizes speed for
demanding applications, dynamically accelerating performance to match the workload.
The Core i5-5xx mobile processors are named Arrandale and based on the 32 nm
Westmere shrink of the Nehalem microarchitecture. Arrandale processors have integrated
graphics capability but only two processor cores. They were released in January 2010,
together with Core i7-6xx and Core i3-3xx processors based on the same chip. The L3 cache

in Core i5-5xx processors is reduced to 3 MB, while the Core i5-6xx uses the full cache and the
Core i3-3xx does not support for Turbo Boost.[30] Clarkdale, the desktop version of Arrandale,
is sold as Core i5-6xx, along with related Core i3 and Pentium brands. It has Hyper-Threading
enabled and the full 4 MB L3 cache.[31]
According to Intel "Core i5 desktop processors and desktop boards typically do not support
ECC memory",[32] but information on limited ECC support in the Core i3 section also applies to
Core i5 and i7.[citation needed]

Codename

Brand name

(main

(list)

article)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

Core i5-7xx
Lynnfield

I/O Bus

95 W
4

Direct Media

8 MB

Core i5-7xxS

Clarkdale

TDP

Interface
LGA 1156

Core i5-6xx

82 W

7387

4 MB

Core i5-5xxM
rPGACore i5-4xxM
Arrandale

988A

35 W

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

3 MB
Core i5-5xxUM
BGA-1288 18 W
Core i5-4xxUM[33]

Core i7[edit]
Intel Core i7 as an Intel brand name applies to several families of desktop and laptop 64bit x86-64 processors using the Nehalem, Westmere, Sandy Bridge, Ivy
Bridge andHaswell microarchitectures. The Core i7 brand targets the business and high-end
consumer markets for both desktop and laptop computers,[34] and is distinguished from theCore

i3 (entry-level consumer), Core i5 (mainstream consumer), and Xeon (server and workstation)
brands.
Intel introduced the Core i7 name with the Nehalem-based Bloomfield Quad-core processor in
late 2008.[35][36][37][38] In 2009 new Core i7 models based on the Lynnfield(Nehalem-based)
desktop quad-core processor and the Clarksfield (Nehalem-based) quad-core mobile were
added,[39] and models based on the Arrandale dual-core mobile processor (also Nehalembased) were added in January 2010. The first six-core processor in the Core lineup is the
Nehalem-based Gulftown, which was launched on March 16, 2010. Both the regular Core i7
and the Extreme Edition are advertised as five stars in the Intel Processor Rating.
In each of the first three microarchitecture generations of the brand, Core i7 has family
members using two distinct system-level architectures, and therefore two distinct sockets (for
example, LGA 1156 and LGA 1366 with Nehalem). In each generation, the highest-performing
Core i7 processors use the same socket and QPI-based architecture as the low-end Xeon
processors of that generation, while lower-performing Core i7 processors use the same socket
and PCIe/DMI/FDI architecture as the Core i5.
"Core i7" is a successor to the Intel Core 2 brand.[40][41][42][43] Intel representatives stated that they
intend the moniker Core i7 to help consumers decide which processor to purchase as Intel
releases newer Nehalem-based products in the future.[44]

Code
name

Brand name

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process Busses

Release
Date

Core i7-9xxX

Mar

Extreme Edition

2010

Gulftown

12 MB

32 nm

Core i7-970

Jul 2010

Core i7-9xx

LGA

130

1366

QPI,
3
DDR3

Extreme Edition
Bloomfield

4
Core i7-9xx (except
Core i7-970/980)

8 MB

45 nm

Nov
2008

Core i7-8xx

Sep

95 W

2009

LGA

Lynnfield

1156
Core i7-8xxS

Jan

82 W

2010
DMI,
PCI-e,

Core i7-9xxXM

55 W

Extreme Edition

Clarksfield

2
DDR3
Sep

Core i7-8xxQM

2009

rPGA988A

Core i7-7xxQM

45 W

6 MB

Core i7-6xxM

35 W
DMI,
PCI-e,

Arrandale

Core i7-6xxLM

4 MB

25 W 32 nm
BGA-

1288
Core i7-6xxUM

FDI,

Jan
2010

DDR3
18 W

Sandy Bridge microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Sandy Bridge
In early 2011, Intel introduced a new microarchitecture named Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture. It kept all the existing brands from Nehalem, including Core i3/i5/i7, and
introduced new model numbers. The initial set of Sandy Bridge processors includes dual- and
quad-core variants, all of which use a single 32 nm die for both the CPU and integrated GPU
cores, unlike the earlier microarchitectures. All Core i3/i5/i7 processors with the Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture have a four-digit model number. With the mobile version, the thermal design
power can no longer be determined from a one- or two-letter suffix but is encoded into the CPU
number. Starting with Sandy Bridge, Intel no longer distinguishes the code names of the
processor based on number of cores, socket or intended usage; they all use the same code
name as the microarchitecture itself.

Ivy Bridge is the codename for Intel's 22 nm die shrink of the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture
based on tri-gate ("3D") transistors, introduced in April 2012.

Core i3[edit]
Released on January 20, 2011, the Core i3-2xxx line of desktop and mobile processors is a
direct replacement of the 2010 "Clarkdale" Core i3-5xx and "Arrandale" Core i3-3xxM models,
based on the new microarchitecture. While they require new sockets and chipsets, the uservisible features of the Core i3 are largely unchanged, including the lack of support for Turbo
Boost and AES-NI. Unlike the Sandy Bridge based Celeron and Pentium processors, the Core
i3 line does support the new Advanced Vector Extensions. This particular processor is the
entry-level processor of this new series of Intel processors.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

I/O Bus

65

Core i3-21xx

Sandy Bridge

LGA 1155

(Desktop)
Core i3-21xxT

2
Core i3-2xx0M
Sandy Bridge

3 MB

rPGA988B

35
W

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

BGA1023

(Mobile)

Core i3-2xx7M

BGA-

17

1023

Core i5[edit]
In January 2011, Intel released new quad-core Core i5 processors based on the "Sandy
Bridge" microarchitecture at CES 2011. New dual-core mobile processors and desktop
processors arrived in February 2011.
The Core i5-2xxx line of desktop processors are mostly quad-core chips, with the exception of
the dual-core Core i5-2390T, and include integrated graphics, combining the key features of

the earlier Core i5-6xx and Core i5-7xx lines. The suffix after the four-digit model number
designates unlocked multiplier (K), low-power (S) and ultra-low-power (T).
The desktop CPUs now all have four non-SMT cores (like the i5-750), with the exception of the
i5-2390T. The DMI bus is running at 5 GT/s.
The mobile Core i5-2xxxM processors are all dual-core chips like the previous Core i5-5xxM
series and share most the features with that product line.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

Core i5-2xxx

95

Core i5-2xxxK

Core i5-2xxxS 4

65

6 MB

Sandy Bridge

I/O Bus

W
LGA 1155

(Desktop)

45

Core i5-25xxT

W
Direct Media
Interface,

Core i5-23xxT

Integrated GPU

rPGACore i5-2xxxM
Sandy Bridge

988B
2

3 MB

35
W

BGA1023

(Mobile)

Core i5-2xx7M

BGA-

17

1023

Core i7[edit]
The Core i7 brand remains the high-end for Intel's desktop and mobile processors, featuring
the Sandy Bridge models with the largest amount of L3 cache and the highest clock frequency.

Most of these models are very similar to their smaller Core i5 siblings. The quad-core mobile
Core i7-2xxxQM/XM processors follow the previous "Clarksfield" Core i7-xxxQM/XM
processors, but now also include integrated graphics.

Codename
(main
article)

Brand
name (list)

Cores

Core i7-

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process

I/O Bus

Release
Date

15 MB

39xxX
6
Sandy
Bridge-E
(Desktop)

Core i7-

12 MB

39xxK

Core i7-

LGA

130

Direct Media

November

2011

Interface

2011

10 MB

38xx

Core i7-

95

2xxxK, i7Sandy

2xxx

LGA

Bridge

32 nm

1155

(Desktop)
Core i72xxxS

65
4

W
8 MB

Direct Media

Core i7-

55

2xxxXM

W
rPGA-

Sandy
Bridge

Core i7-

(Mobile)

28xxQM

988B
BGA1023

45
W

Core i72xxxQE, i7-

6 MB

Interface,
Integrated GPU

January
2011

26xxQM,
i7-27xxQM

Core i7-

35

2xx0M

Core i72xx9M

4 MB

25

February

2011

BGA1023
Core i7-

17

2xx7M

Ivy Bridge microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Ivy Bridge (microarchitecture)
This section
requires expansion.(April 2014)

Core i3[edit]
This section
requires expansion.(April 2014)

The Ivy Bridge based Core-i3-3xxx line is a minor upgrade to 22 nm process technology and
better graphics.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

W
2

(Desktop)

I/O Bus

55

Core i3-32xx
Ivy Bridge

TDP

3 MB

LGA 1155

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i3-32xxT

35

W
rPGACore i3-3xx0M

988B
BGA-1023

Ivy Bridge (Mobile)

17

Core i3-3xx7U

W
BGA-1023
13

Core i3-3xx9Y

Core i5[edit]
Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

Core i5-3xxx

77

Core i5-3xxxK

Core i5-3xxxS

65

6 MB

Ivy Bridge

I/O Bus

W
LGA 1155

(Desktop)

45

Core i5-35xxT

Core i5-34xxT

2
Ivy Bridge (Mobile) Core i5-3xx0M

3 MB

35
rPGA988B
BGA-1023

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

17

Core i5-3xx7U

W
BGA-1023
13

Core i5-3xx9Y

Core i7[edit]
Codename

Brand

(main

name

article)

(list)

Cores

Core i7-

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process

I/O Bus

Release
Date

15MB

4960X
6
Ivy BridgeE
(Desktop)

Core i7-

12MB LGA2011

4930K

Core i7-

130

Direct Media

September

Interface

2013

10MB

4820K

22 nm
Core i7-

77

37xx, i7-

37xxK
4
Ivy Bridge
(Desktop)

Core i737xxS

8 MB

LGA
1155

Direct Media
65

Interface,

Integrated GPU

Core i7-

45

37xxT

April 2012

Core i7-

55

3xxxXM

Core i738xxQM

Core i736x0QM,
i7-

45

3xx0QE,

i736x5QM,
i76 MB

3xx5QE,
i737xxQM
Ivy Bridge
(Mobile)
Core i73xx2QM,
i7-3xx2QE

35
W

Core i73xxxM

Core i7-

25

3xxxLE

W
2

Core i73xx7U, i73xx7UE

Core i7-

4 MB

17
W

13

January

3xx9Y

2013

Haswell microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Haswell (microarchitecture)

Core i3[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core
s

(list)

L3

GPU

Cach Mode
e

Socke TD
t

Core

54

i3-43xx

Proces

I/O Bus

Release
Date

Core
i3-

4 MB

43xxT,

HD
4600
35

Core
HaswellDT
(Desktop)

i34xxxT

LGA

1150

Direct Media

22 nm

Core

54

i3-41xx

W
HD
4400

Core
i341xxT

Haswell- Core
MB
(Mobile)

i34xx2E

35
3 MB

HD

BGA

25

4600

1364

Interface,

Septembe

Integrated GP

r 2013

Core
i34xx0E
37
W
Core

Socket

i3-

G3

4xxxM

Core
i34xx8U

Iris

28

5100

Core
i34xx0U,

HD

BGA

15

Core

4400

1168

June 2013

i34xx5U

Core
i34xxxY

HD

11.5

4200

Core i5[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

HaswellDT

Brand
name

Core
s

(list)

L3

Cach Mode Socket


e

Core
i54xxx,

GPU

6 MB

TD Proces
P

HD

LGA

84

4600

1150

I/O Bus

Release
Date

Direct Media
22 nm

Interface,
Integrated GP

June 2013

(Desktop) i5-

46xxK

Core

65

i5-

4xxxS

Core

45

i5-

46xxT

Core
i545xxT,
Core

35

i545xxT

4 MB

Core
i5-

Iris
4

65

Pro

4xxxR

5200

Core

47

i54xxxH

BGA

1364
HaswellMB

Core

(Mobile) i54xx2E

Core
i5-

3 MB

HD
4600

Septembe
25
W

37

r 2013

4xx0E

Core

Socket

i5-

G3

4xxxM

Core
i54xx8U

Core

Iris

28

5100

HD

i5-

5000

4x50U

BGA116 15
8
Core

June 2013

HD

i5-

4400

4x00U

Core
i54xxxY

HD

11.

4200

5W

Core i7[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core

(list)

L3

Cach Mode
e

Haswell- Core i7DT

47xx, i7- 4

(Desktop) 47xxK

GPU

8 MB

Socke TD Proces
t

HD

LGA

84

4600

1150

I/O Bus

Release
Date

Direct Media
22 nm

Interface,
Integrated GP

June 2013

U
Core i7-

65

47xxS

Core i7-

45

47x0T

Core i7-

35

47x5T

Core i7-

65

47xxR

Core i74x50HQ

Iris

, Core

Pro

i7-

5200

47

4x60HQ

Core i74x50EQ,
Core i74x60EQ

BGA

6 MB

1364

HaswellMB
(Mobile)

Core i747x2HQ
, Core
i7-

37

47x2EQ

HD

Core i7-

4600

47

470xHQ
, Core
i7470xEQ

Core i7-

37

47x2MQ

Core i7-

47

470xMQ

Core i7-

Socket

49xxMQ
, Core

G3

8 MB

57
W

i74xxxXM

Core i7-

35

Septembe

4xxxM

r 2013

Core i7-

Iris

28

4xx8U

5100

Core i74x50U

4 MB

HD
5000
BGA

15

1168

Core i7-

HD

4x00U

4400

Core i7-

HD

11.5

4xxxY

4200

June 2013

Broadwell microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Broadwell (microarchitecture)
The Broadwell microarchitecture was released by Intel on September 6, 2014, and will be
shipping in late 2014. It is the first to use a 14 nm chip.[45]

Mod
el

sSpec

Co Frequ Tur

num number res ency

bo

ber

Core
M-

SR217 (
2
5Y1 E0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0[46]

Core
M-

SR218 (
2
5Y1 E0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0a

Core
M-

SR23C (
2
5Y1 F0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0c

Core
M-

SR23G (
2
5Y3 F0)

900

2.4

MHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR23L (
2
5Y5 F0)

1.1

2.6

GHz

GHz

1
Core

M-

5Y7

SR216 (
2
E0)

1.1

2.6

GHz

GHz

L2
cac
he

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

L3
ca
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GPU GPU T
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Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
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Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

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HD
4

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date

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Part

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100 4.
800

MHz

300 4.
800

MHz

300 4.
850

MHz

300 4.
900

MHz

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1

This article is about the Intel processor brand name. For the Intel microarchitecture that is the
basis for the Core 2 processor family, see Intel Core (microarchitecture).
Intel Core is a brand name that Intel uses for various mid-range to high-end consumer and
business microprocessors. In general, processors sold as Core are more powerful variants of
the same processors marketed as entry-level Celeron and Pentium. Similarly, identical or more
capable versions of Core processors are also sold as Xeon processors for the server and
workstation market.
As of 2013 the current lineup of Core processors includes the latest Intel Core i7, Intel Core i5,
and Intel Core i3, and the older Intel Core 2 Solo, Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core 2 Quad, and
Intel Core 2 Extreme lines.[1]
Contents
[hide]

1 Overview
2 Enhanced Pentium M based
o 2.1 Core Duo
o 2.2 Core Solo
3 64-bit Core microarchitecture based
o 3.1 Core 2 Solo
o 3.2 Core 2 Duo
o 3.3 Core 2 Quad
o 3.4 Core 2 Extreme
4 Nehalem microarchitecture based
o 4.1 Core i3
o 4.2 Core i5
o 4.3 Core i7
5 Sandy Bridge microarchitecture based
o 5.1 Core i3
o 5.2 Core i5
o 5.3 Core i7
6 Ivy Bridge microarchitecture based
o 6.1 Core i3
o 6.2 Core i5
o 6.3 Core i7
7 Haswell microarchitecture based

o 7.1 Core i3
o 7.2 Core i5
o 7.3 Core i7
8 Broadwell microarchitecture based
9 See also
10 References
11 External links

Overview[edit]
Desktop

Mobile

Brand
Code-

Cores Fab

named

Date

Code-

released

named

Cores Fab

Date
released

January

Core Solo

Desktop version not available

Yonah

1 65 nm

Core Duo

Desktop version not available

Yonah

2 65 nm

Merom-L

1 65 nm

Penryn-L

1 45 nm

Merom

2 65 nm

Penryn

2 45 nm

Penryn

4 45 nm August 2008

Core 2
Solo

Desktop version not available

2006

January
2006

September
2007
May 2008

August 2006
Core 2
Duo

Conroe

2 65 nm

January

Allendale

2 65 nm

2007

Wolfdale

2 45 nm

January

July 2006
January
2008

2008

Core 2

Kentsfield

4 65 nm

Quad

Yorkfield

4 45 nm

January
2007
March 2008

Conroe XE
Core 2
Extreme

July 2006

Kentsfield

2 65 nm

November Merom XE

2 65 nm

XE

4 65 nm

2006 Penryn XE

2 45 nm

Yorkfield

4 45 nm

November Penryn XE

4 45 nm

XE

2007

July 2007
January
2008
August 2008

January
Clarkdale
Sandy
Core i3

Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

2010
2 32 nm

February

2 32 nm

2011

2 22 nm

September

2 22 nm

2012
September

Arrandale
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

January
2 32 nm

2010

2 32 nm

February

2 22 nm

2011

2 22 nm

June 2012
June 2013

2013

September
Lynnfield

Core i5

2009

Clarkdale

4 45 nm

January

Sandy

2 32 nm

2010

Bridge

4 32 nm

January

Sandy

2 32 nm

2011

Bridge

4 22 nm

February

Ivy Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Ivy Bridge

4 22 nm

April 2012

Haswell

2 22 nm

April 2012

Haswell

Arrandale
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

January
2 32 nm

2010

2 32 nm

February

2 22 nm

2011

2 22 nm

May 2012
June 2013

June 2013
June 2013

Core i7

Bloomfield

4 45 nm

November Clarksfield

4 45 nm

September

Lynnfield

4 45 nm

2008

Arrandale

2 32 nm

2009

Gulftown

6 32 nm

September

Sandy

4 32 nm

January

Sandy

4 32 nm

2009

Bridge

2 32 nm

2010

Bridge

6 32 nm

July 2010

Sandy

4 22 nm

January

Sandy

4 32 nm

January

Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Bridge-E

4 22 nm

2011

Ivy Bridge

4 22 nm

February

Sandy

4 22 nm

November

Ivy Bridge

2 22 nm

2011

Bridge-E

4 22 nm

2011

Haswell

May 2012

Ivy Bridge

6 22 nm

February

Haswell

May 2012

Haswell

6 22 nm

2012

June 2013

Ivy Bridge-E

April 2012

June 2013

Ivy Bridge-E

June 2013

Haswell-E

September
2013
September
2013
August 2014

November
Bloomfield
Core i7
Extreme
Edition

Gulftown
Sandy
Bridge-E
Ivy Bridge-E
Haswell-E

4 45 nm
6 32 nm
6 32 nm
6 22 nm
8 22 nm

2008
March 2010
November
2011
September
2013

Clarksfield
Sandy
Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell

September
4 45 nm

2009

4 32 nm

January

4 22 nm

2011

4 22 nm

May 2012
June 2013

August 2014

List of Intel Core microprocessors


List of Intel Core 2 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i3 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i5 microprocessors
List of Intel Core i7 microprocessors

Clock speed slowest 1.2 GHz to the fastest 4.0 GHz (Intel Core i7-4790K) (or 4.4 GHz via Intel
Turbo Boost Technology)[2]

Enhanced Pentium M based[edit]


Main article: Enhanced Pentium M (microarchitecture)
For details about the processor core, see Yonah (microprocessor).
The original Core brand refers to Intel's 32-bit mobile dual-core x86 CPUs, which derived from
the Pentium M branded processors. The processor family used a more enhanced version of
the Intel P6 microarchitecture. It emerged in parallel with the NetBurst microarchitecture (Intel

P68) of the Pentium 4 brand, and was a precursor of the 64-bit Core microarchitecture of Core
2 branded CPUs. The Core brand comprised two branches: the Duo (dual-core) and Solo (Duo
with one disabled core, which replaced the Pentium M brand of single-core mobile processor).
Intel launched the Core brand on January 6, 2006 with the release of the 32-bit Yonah CPU
Intel's first dual-core mobile (low-power) processor. Its dual-core layout closely resembled two
interconnected Pentium M branded CPUs packaged as a single die (piece) silicon chip (IC).
Hence, the 32-bit microarchitecture of Core branded CPUs contrary to its name had more
in common with Pentium M branded CPUs than with the subsequent 64-bit Core
microarchitecture of Core 2 branded CPUs. Despite a major rebrandingeffort by Intel starting
January 2006, some companies continued to market computers with the Yonah core marked
as Pentium M.
The Core series is also the first Intel processor used as the main CPU in an Apple
Macintosh computer. The Core Duo was the CPU for the first generation MacBook Pro, while
the Core Solo appeared in Apple's Mac mini line. Core Duo signified the beginning of Apple's
shift to Intel processors across their entire line.
In 2007, Intel began branding the Yonah core CPUs intended for
mainstream mobile computers as Pentium Dual-Core, not to be confused with the desktop 64bit Core microarchitecture CPUs also branded as Pentium Dual-Core.
September 2007 and January 4, 2008 marked the discontinuation of a number
of Core branded CPUs including several Core Solo, Core Duo, Celeron and one Core 2 Quad
chip.[3][4]

Core Duo[edit]
Intel Core Duo[5] (product code 80539) consists of two cores on one die, a 2 MB L2 cache
shared by both cores, and an arbiter bus that controls both L2 cache and FSB (front-side bus)
access.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list) L2 Cache Socket

TDP

Core Duo T2xxx

31 W

Yonah

2 MB
Core Duo L2xxx

Socket M
15 W

Core Duo U2xxx

9W

Core Solo[edit]
Intel Core Solo[6] (product code 80538) uses the same two-core die as the Core Duo, but
features only one active core.[citation needed] Depending on demand, Intel may also simply disable
one of the cores to sell the chip at the Core Solo pricethis requires less effort than launching
and maintaining a separate line of CPUs that physically only have one core. Intel used the
same strategy previously with the 486 CPU in which early 486SX CPUs were in fact
manufactured as 486DX CPUs but with the FPU disabled.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list) L2 Cache Socket

Core Solo T1xxx


Yonah

TDP

2731 W
2 MB

Core Solo U1xxx

Socket M
5.56 W

64-bit Core microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Core (microarchitecture)
The successor to Core is the mobile version of the Intel Core 2 line of processors using cores
based upon the Intel Core microarchitecture,[7] released on July 27, 2006. The release of the
mobile version of Intel Core 2 marks the reunification of Intel's desktop and mobile product
lines as Core 2 processors were released for desktops and notebooks, unlike the first Intel
Core CPUs that were targeted only for notebooks (although some small form factor and all-inone desktops, like the iMac and the Mac Mini, also used Core processors).
Unlike the Intel Core, Intel Core 2 is a 64-bit processor, supporting Intel 64. Another difference
between the original Core Duo and the new Core 2 Duo is an increase in the amount of Level 2
cache. The new Core 2 Duo has tripled the amount of on-board cache to 6 MB. Core 2 also
introduced a quad-core performance variant to the single- and dual-core chips, branded Core 2
Quad, as well as an enthusiast variant, Core 2 Extreme. All three chips are manufactured at a
65 nm lithography, and in 2008, a 45 nm lithography and support Front Side Bus speeds
ranging from 533 MHz to 1600 MHz. In addition, the 45 nm die shrink of the Core

microarchitecture adds SSE4.1 support to all Core 2 microprocessors manufactured at a 45 nm


lithography, therefore increasing the calculation rate of the processors.

Core 2 Solo[edit]
The Core 2 Solo,[8] introduced in September 2007, is the successor to the Core Solo and is
available only as an ultra-low-power mobile processor with 5.5 Watt thermal design power. The
original U2xxx series "Merom-L" used a special version of the Merom chip with CPUID number
10661 (model 22, stepping A1) that only had a single core and was also used in some Celeron
processors. The later SU3xxx are part of Intel's CULV range of processors in a smaller FCBGA 956 package but contain the same Penryn chip as the dual-core variants, with one of the
cores disabled during manufacturing.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache Socket

TDP

Merom-L

Mobile Core 2 Solo U2xxx

1 MB

FCBGA 5.5 W

Penryn-L

Mobile Core 2 Solo SU3xxx 3 MB

BGA956 5.5 W

Core 2 Duo[edit]
The majority of the desktop and mobile Core 2 processor variants are Core 2 Duo[9][10] with two
processor cores on a single Merom, Conroe, Allendale, Penryn, or Wolfdale chip. These come
in a wide range of performance and power consumption, starting with the relatively slow ultralow-power Uxxxx (10 W) and low-power Lxxxx (17 W) versions, to the more performance
oriented Pxxxx (25 W) and Txxxx (35 W) mobile versions and the Exxxx (65 W) desktop
models. The mobile Core 2 Duo processors with an 'S' prefix in the name are produced in a
smaller FC-BGA 956 package, which allows building more compact laptops.
Within each line, a higher number usually refers to a better performance, which depends
largely on core and front-side bus clock frequency and amount of second level cache, which
are model-specific. Core 2 Duo processors typically use the full L2 cache of 2, 3, 4, or 6 MB
available in the specific stepping of the chip, while versions with the amount of cache reduced
during manufacturing are sold for the low-end consumer market as Celeron or Pentium DualCore processors. Like those processors, some low-end Core 2 Duo models disable features
such as Intel Virtualization Technology.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

Mobile Core 2 Duo U7xxx

L2 Cache Socket

2 MB

TDP

10 W
BGA479

Mobile Core 2 Duo L7xxx

4 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T5xxx

2 MB

17 W

Merom
Socket M
Socket P 35 W
Mobile Core 2 Duo T7xxx

24 MB

Core 2 Duo E4xxx

2 MB

Conroe and

BGA479

LGA 775 65 W

Allendale
Core 2 Duo E6xxx

24 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo SU7xxx


3 MB

10W

Mobile Core 2 Duo SU9xxx


BGA956
Mobile Core 2 Duo SL9xxx
Penryn

17 W
6 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo SP9xxx

25 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo P7xxx


3 MB
Mobile Core 2 Duo P8xxx

Socket P
FCBGA6

25 W

Mobile Core 2 Duo P9xxx

6 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T6xxx

2 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T8xxx

3 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo T9xxx

6 MB

Mobile Core 2 Duo E8xxx

6 MB

Core 2 Duo E7xxx

3 MB

Wolfdale

35 W

Socket P 35-55 W

LGA 775 65 W
Core 2 Duo E8xxx

6 MB

Core 2 Quad[edit]
Core 2 Quad[11][12] processors are multi-chip modules consisting of two dies similar to those
used in Core 2 Duo, forming a quad-core processor. This allows twice the performance of a
dual-core processors at the same clock frequency in ideal conditions.
Initially, all Core 2 Quad models were versions of Core 2 Duo desktop
processors, Kentsfield derived from Conroe and Yorkfield from Wolfdale, but later PenrynQC was added as a high-end version of the mobile dual-core Penryn.
The Xeon 32xx and 33xx processors are mostly identical versions of the desktop Core 2 Quad
processors and can be used interchangeably.

Codename
(main article)

Kentsfield

Brand name (list)

Core 2 Quad Q6xxx

L2 Cache

24 MB

Socket

TDP

LGA 775 95105 W

Yorkfield

Core 2 Quad Q7xxx

21 MB

Core 2 Quad Q8xxx

22 MB

95 W

6595 W
Core 2 Quad Q9xxx

2326 MB

Penryn-QC Mobile Core 2 Quad Q9xxx 2326 MB Socket P 45 W

Core 2 Extreme[edit]
Core 2 Extreme processors[13][14] are enthusiast versions of Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
processors, usually with a higher clock frequency and an unlocked clock multiplier, which
makes them especially attractive for overclocking. This is similar to earlier Pentium processors
labeled as Extreme Edition. Core 2 Extreme processors were released at a much higher price
than their regular version, often $999 or more.

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list)

L2 Cache

Socket

TDP

Merom

Mobile Core 2 Extreme X7xxx

4 MB

Socket P

44 W

Conroe

Core 2 Extreme X6xxx

4 MB

LGA 775

75 W

Core 2 Extreme QX6xxx

24 MB

LGA 775

130 W

Mobile Core 2 Extreme X9xxx

6 MB

Socket P

44 W

Socket P

45 W

Kentsfield

Penryn

Penryn-QC Mobile Core 2 Extreme QX9xxx 26 MB

Yorkfield

Core 2 Extreme QX9xxx

26 MB

LGA 775 / LGA 771 130150 W

Nehalem microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Nehalem (microarchitecture)
With the release of the Nehalem microarchitecture in November 2008,[15] Intel introduced a
new naming scheme for its Core processors. There are three variants, Core i3, Core i5 and
Core i7, but the names no longer correspond to specific technical features like the number of
cores. Instead, the brand is now divided from low-level (i3), through mid-range (i5) to high-end
performance (i7),[16] which correspond to three, four and five stars in Intel's Intel Processor
Rating[17] following on from the entry-level Celeron (one star) and Pentium (two stars)
processors.[18] Common features of all Nehalem based processors include an integrated DDR3
memory controller as well as QuickPath Interconnect or PCI Express and Direct Media
Interface on the processor replacing the aging quad-pumped Front Side Bus used in all earlier
Core processors. All these processors have 256 KB L2 cache per core, plus up to 12 MB
shared L3 cache. Because of the new I/O interconnect, chipsets and mainboards from previous
generations can no longer be used with Nehalem based processors.

Core i3[edit]
Intel intended the Core i3 as the new low end of the performance processor line from Intel,
following the retirement of the Core 2 brand.[19][20]
The first Core i3 processors were launched on January 7, 2010.[21]
The first Nehalem based Core i3 was Clarkdale-based, with an integrated GPU and two
cores.[22] The same processor is also available as Core i5 and Pentium, with slightly different
configurations.
The Core i3-3xxM processors are based on Arrandale, the mobile version of the Clarkdale
desktop processor. They are similar to the Core i5-4xx series but running at lower clock speeds
and without Turbo Boost.[23] According to an Intel FAQ they do not support Error Correction
Code (ECC) memory.[24] According to motherboard manufacturer Supermicro, if a Core i3
processor is used with a server chipset platform such as Intel 3400/3420/3450, the CPU
supports ECC with UDIMM.[25] When asked, Intel confirmed that, although the Intel 5 series
chipset supports non-ECC memory only with the Core i5 or i3 processors, using those
processors on a motherboard with 3400 series chipsets it supports the ECC function of ECC
memory.[26] A limited number of motherboards by other companies also support ECC with Intel
Core ix processors; the Asus P8B WS is an example, but it does not support ECC memory
under Windows non-server operating systems.[27]

Codename
(main article)

Brand name (list) Cores L3 Cache

Socket

TDP

I/O Bus

Clarkdale

Core i3-5xx

4 MB

LGA 1156

73 W
Direct Media Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i3-3xxM

3 MB

rPGA-988A 35 W

3 MB

BGA-1288 18 W

Arrandale
Core i3-3xxUM

Core i5[edit]
The first Core i5 using the Nehalem microarchitecture was introduced on September 8, 2009,
as a mainstream variant of the earlier Core i7, the Lynnfield core.[28][29] Lynnfield Core i5
processors have an 8 MB L3 cache, a DMI bus running at 2.5 GT/s and support for dualchannel DDR3-800/1066/1333 memory and have Hyper-threading disabled. The same
processors with different sets of features (Hyper-Threading and other clock frequencies)
enabled are sold as Core i7-8xx and Xeon 3400-series processors, which should not be
confused with high-end Core i7-9xx and Xeon 3500-series processors based on Bloomfield. A
new feature called Turbo Boost Technology was introduced which maximizes speed for
demanding applications, dynamically accelerating performance to match the workload.
The Core i5-5xx mobile processors are named Arrandale and based on the 32 nm
Westmere shrink of the Nehalem microarchitecture. Arrandale processors have integrated
graphics capability but only two processor cores. They were released in January 2010,
together with Core i7-6xx and Core i3-3xx processors based on the same chip. The L3 cache
in Core i5-5xx processors is reduced to 3 MB, while the Core i5-6xx uses the full cache and the
Core i3-3xx does not support for Turbo Boost.[30] Clarkdale, the desktop version of Arrandale,
is sold as Core i5-6xx, along with related Core i3 and Pentium brands. It has Hyper-Threading
enabled and the full 4 MB L3 cache.[31]
According to Intel "Core i5 desktop processors and desktop boards typically do not support
ECC memory",[32] but information on limited ECC support in the Core i3 section also applies to
Core i5 and i7.[citation needed]

Codename
(main
article)

Lynnfield

Brand name
(list)

Core i5-7xx

Cores

L3
Cache

8 MB

Socket

TDP

LGA 1156 95 W

I/O Bus

Direct Media

Interface
Core i5-7xxS

Clarkdale

82 W

Core i5-6xx

7387

4 MB

Core i5-5xxM
rPGACore i5-4xxM
Arrandale

988A

35 W

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

3 MB
Core i5-5xxUM
BGA-1288 18 W
Core i5-4xxUM[33]

Core i7[edit]
Intel Core i7 as an Intel brand name applies to several families of desktop and laptop 64bit x86-64 processors using the Nehalem, Westmere, Sandy Bridge, Ivy
Bridge andHaswell microarchitectures. The Core i7 brand targets the business and high-end
consumer markets for both desktop and laptop computers,[34] and is distinguished from theCore
i3 (entry-level consumer), Core i5 (mainstream consumer), and Xeon (server and workstation)
brands.
Intel introduced the Core i7 name with the Nehalem-based Bloomfield Quad-core processor in
late 2008.[35][36][37][38] In 2009 new Core i7 models based on the Lynnfield(Nehalem-based)
desktop quad-core processor and the Clarksfield (Nehalem-based) quad-core mobile were
added,[39] and models based on the Arrandale dual-core mobile processor (also Nehalembased) were added in January 2010. The first six-core processor in the Core lineup is the
Nehalem-based Gulftown, which was launched on March 16, 2010. Both the regular Core i7
and the Extreme Edition are advertised as five stars in the Intel Processor Rating.
In each of the first three microarchitecture generations of the brand, Core i7 has family
members using two distinct system-level architectures, and therefore two distinct sockets (for
example, LGA 1156 and LGA 1366 with Nehalem). In each generation, the highest-performing
Core i7 processors use the same socket and QPI-based architecture as the low-end Xeon

processors of that generation, while lower-performing Core i7 processors use the same socket
and PCIe/DMI/FDI architecture as the Core i5.
"Core i7" is a successor to the Intel Core 2 brand.[40][41][42][43] Intel representatives stated that they
intend the moniker Core i7 to help consumers decide which processor to purchase as Intel
releases newer Nehalem-based products in the future.[44]

Code
name

Brand name

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process Busses

Core i7-9xxX

Date

Mar

Extreme Edition
Gulftown

Release

2010
6

12 MB

32 nm

Core i7-970

Jul 2010

Core i7-9xx

LGA

130

1366

QPI,
3
DDR3

Extreme Edition
Nov

Bloomfield

2008
Core i7-9xx (except
Core i7-970/980)

Core i7-8xx
4

Lynnfield

Sep

95 W
8 MB

LGA

2009
45 nm

1156
Core i7-8xxS

82 W

DMI,
PCI-e,

Jan
2010

2
DDR3

Core i7-9xxXM
Extreme Edition
Clarksfield
Core i7-8xxQM

55 W
rPGA-

Sep

988A

2009
45 W

Core i7-7xxQM

6 MB

Core i7-6xxM

35 W
DMI,
PCI-e,

Arrandale

Core i7-6xxLM

4 MB

25 W 32 nm
BGA-

1288
Core i7-6xxUM

FDI,

Jan
2010

DDR3
18 W

Sandy Bridge microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Sandy Bridge
In early 2011, Intel introduced a new microarchitecture named Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture. It kept all the existing brands from Nehalem, including Core i3/i5/i7, and
introduced new model numbers. The initial set of Sandy Bridge processors includes dual- and
quad-core variants, all of which use a single 32 nm die for both the CPU and integrated GPU
cores, unlike the earlier microarchitectures. All Core i3/i5/i7 processors with the Sandy Bridge
microarchitecture have a four-digit model number. With the mobile version, the thermal design
power can no longer be determined from a one- or two-letter suffix but is encoded into the CPU
number. Starting with Sandy Bridge, Intel no longer distinguishes the code names of the
processor based on number of cores, socket or intended usage; they all use the same code
name as the microarchitecture itself.
Ivy Bridge is the codename for Intel's 22 nm die shrink of the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture
based on tri-gate ("3D") transistors, introduced in April 2012.

Core i3[edit]
Released on January 20, 2011, the Core i3-2xxx line of desktop and mobile processors is a
direct replacement of the 2010 "Clarkdale" Core i3-5xx and "Arrandale" Core i3-3xxM models,
based on the new microarchitecture. While they require new sockets and chipsets, the uservisible features of the Core i3 are largely unchanged, including the lack of support for Turbo
Boost and AES-NI. Unlike the Sandy Bridge based Celeron and Pentium processors, the Core
i3 line does support the new Advanced Vector Extensions. This particular processor is the
entry-level processor of this new series of Intel processors.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3

Socket

Cache

TDP

I/O Bus

65

Core i3-21xx

Sandy Bridge

LGA 1155

(Desktop)
Core i3-21xxT

3 MB

rPGA988B

Core i3-2xx0M

35
W

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

BGA-

Sandy Bridge

1023

(Mobile)

Core i3-2xx7M

BGA-

17

1023

Core i5[edit]
In January 2011, Intel released new quad-core Core i5 processors based on the "Sandy
Bridge" microarchitecture at CES 2011. New dual-core mobile processors and desktop
processors arrived in February 2011.
The Core i5-2xxx line of desktop processors are mostly quad-core chips, with the exception of
the dual-core Core i5-2390T, and include integrated graphics, combining the key features of
the earlier Core i5-6xx and Core i5-7xx lines. The suffix after the four-digit model number
designates unlocked multiplier (K), low-power (S) and ultra-low-power (T).
The desktop CPUs now all have four non-SMT cores (like the i5-750), with the exception of the
i5-2390T. The DMI bus is running at 5 GT/s.
The mobile Core i5-2xxxM processors are all dual-core chips like the previous Core i5-5xxM
series and share most the features with that product line.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

I/O Bus

Core i5-2xxx

95

Core i5-2xxxK

Core i5-2xxxS 4

65

6 MB

Sandy Bridge

W
LGA 1155

(Desktop)

45

Core i5-25xxT

W
Direct Media
Interface,

Core i5-23xxT

Integrated GPU

rPGACore i5-2xxxM

988B
2

3 MB

Sandy Bridge

35
W

BGA1023

(Mobile)

Core i5-2xx7M

BGA-

17

1023

Core i7[edit]
The Core i7 brand remains the high-end for Intel's desktop and mobile processors, featuring
the Sandy Bridge models with the largest amount of L3 cache and the highest clock frequency.
Most of these models are very similar to their smaller Core i5 siblings. The quad-core mobile
Core i7-2xxxQM/XM processors follow the previous "Clarksfield" Core i7-xxxQM/XM
processors, but now also include integrated graphics.

Codename
(main
article)

Sandy

Brand
name (list)

Core i7-

Cores

L3
Cache

15 MB

Socket TDP Process

LGA

130

32 nm

I/O Bus

Direct Media

Release
Date

November

Bridge-E

39xxX

2011

Interface

2011

(Desktop)
Core i7-

12 MB

39xxK

Core i7-

10 MB

38xx

Core i7-

95

2xxxK, i7Sandy

2xxx

LGA

Bridge

1155

(Desktop)
Core i7-

65

2xxxS

W
8 MB
4

Core i7-

55

2xxxXM

January
2011
Direct Media

Core i7-

Interface,

28xxQM

Integrated GPU
rPGA-

Sandy
Bridge
(Mobile)

Core i72xxxQE, i7-

6 MB

26xxQM,

988B

45

BGA-

1023

i7-27xxQM

Core i72xx0M

Core i7-

35
2

4 MB

February
2011

BGA-

25

2xx9M

1023

Core i7-

17

2xx7M

Ivy Bridge microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Ivy Bridge (microarchitecture)
This section
requires expansion.(April 2014)

Core i3[edit]
This section
requires expansion.(April 2014)

The Ivy Bridge based Core-i3-3xxx line is a minor upgrade to 22 nm process technology and
better graphics.

Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

I/O Bus

55

Core i3-32xx

Ivy Bridge

LGA 1155

(Desktop)
Core i3-32xxT

2
Core i3-3xx0M

3 MB

35
rPGA-

988B
BGA-1023

Ivy Bridge (Mobile)

Core i3-3xx7U

BGA-1023

17
W

Direct Media
Interface,
Integrated GPU

13

Core i3-3xx9Y

Core i5[edit]
Codename

Brand name

(main article)

(list)

Cores

L3
Cache

Socket

TDP

Core i5-3xxx

77

Core i5-3xxxK

Core i5-3xxxS

65

6 MB

Ivy Bridge

W
LGA 1155

(Desktop)

45

Core i5-35xxT

Direct Media

Core i5-34xxT

Interface,
35
rPGA-

Core i5-3xx0M

988B
BGA-1023
2

Ivy Bridge (Mobile)

3 MB
17

Core i5-3xx7U

W
BGA-1023

Core i5-3xx9Y

Core i7[edit]

I/O Bus

13
W

Integrated GPU

Codename

Brand

(main

name

article)

(list)

Cores

Core i7-

L3
Cache

Socket TDP Process

I/O Bus

Release
Date

15MB

4960X
6
Ivy BridgeE
(Desktop)

Core i7-

12MB LGA2011

4930K

Core i7-

Core i7-

September

Interface

2013

77

37xx, i7-

37xxK

(Desktop)

Direct Media

10MB

4820K

Ivy Bridge

130

22 nm
Core i7-

65

37xxS

W
4

Core i7-

8 MB

37xxT

LGA
1155

45

Direct Media

Interface,
Integrated GPU

Core i7-

55

3xxxXM

Ivy Bridge
(Mobile)

Core i738xxQM

45
W

Core i7-

6 MB

April 2012

36x0QM,
i73xx0QE,
i736x5QM,
i73xx5QE,
i737xxQM

Core i73xx2QM,
i7-3xx2QE

35
W

Core i73xxxM

Core i7-

25

3xxxLE

W
2

4 MB

Core i7-

17

3xx7U, i7-

3xx7UE

Core i7-

13

January

3xx9Y

2013

Haswell microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Haswell (microarchitecture)

Core i3[edit]
Codenam Brand
e

name

Core

L3

GPU

Cach Mode

Socke TD

Proces

I/O Bus

Release

(main

(list)

Date

article)

Core

54

i3-43xx

Core
i3-

4 MB

43xxT,

HD
4600
35

Core
HaswellDT
(Desktop)

i34xxxT

LGA

1150

Core

54

i3-41xx

W
Direct Media

HD
Core

4400

35

i3-

41xxT

Core
i34xx2E

25
3 MB

W
BGA
1364

Haswell- Core
MB
(Mobile)

i34xx0E

HD
4600
37
W

Core
i34xxxM

Socket
G3

22 nm

Interface,

Septembe

Integrated GP

r 2013

Core
i34xx8U

Iris

28

5100

Core
i34xx0U,

HD

BGA

15

Core

4400

1168

June 2013

i34xx5U

Core
i34xxxY

HD

11.5

4200

Core i5[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core
s

(list)

L3

GPU

Cach Mode Socket


e

TD Proces
P

I/O Bus

Release
Date

Core
i5-

84

4xxx,

i5HaswellDT
(Desktop)

Direct Media

46xxK
4
Core
i54xxxS

Core

6 MB

HD

LGA

4600

1150

22 nm
65
W

45

Interface,
Integrated GP
U

June 2013

i5-

46xxT

Core
i545xxT,
Core

35

i545xxT

4 MB

Core
i5-

Iris
4

65

Pro

4xxxR

5200

Core

47

i5-

4xxxH
BGA
1364
Core

25

i5-

4xx2E
HaswellMB

Core

HD

Septembe

4600

r 2013

3 MB

(Mobile) i54xx0E
37
W
Core

Socket

i5-

G3

4xxxM

Core
i5-

Iris

BGA116 28

June 2013

4xx8U

5100

Core

HD

i5-

5000

4x50U

15
W
Core

HD

i5-

4400

4x00U

Core
i54xxxY

HD

11.

4200

5W

Core i7[edit]
Codenam
e
(main
article)

Brand
name

Core
s

(list)

L3

GPU

Cach Mode
e

Socke TD Proces
t

Core i7-

Haswell- Core i7(Desktop)

Date

47xxK

47xxS

Release

84

47xx, i7-

DT

I/O Bus

8 MB

HD

LGA

4600

1150

Direct Media

65
W

22 nm

Interface,
Integrated GP
U

Core i7-

45

47x0T

Core i7-

35

June 2013

47x5T

Core i7-

65

47xxR

Core i74x50HQ

Iris

, Core

Pro

i7-

5200

47

4x60HQ

Core i74x50EQ,
Core i7-

BGA

4x60EQ

Core i7-

1364

6 MB

47x2HQ
, Core
Haswell- i7-

37

MB

47x2EQ

(Mobile)

Core i7-

47

470xHQ

, Core
i7HD

470xEQ

4600
Core i7-

37

47x2MQ

Core i7-

47

470xMQ

Socket W
G3

Core i749xxMQ
, Core

8 MB

57
W

i74xxxXM

Core i7-

35

Septembe

4xxxM

r 2013

Core i7-

Iris

28

4xx8U

5100

Core i74x50U

4 MB

HD
5000
BGA

15

1168

Core i7-

HD

4x00U

4400

Core i7-

HD

11.5

4xxxY

4200

June 2013

Broadwell microarchitecture based[edit]


Main article: Broadwell (microarchitecture)
The Broadwell microarchitecture was released by Intel on September 6, 2014, and will be
shipping in late 2014. It is the first to use a 14 nm chip.[45]

Mod
el

sSpec

Co Frequ Tur

num number res ency


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bo

L2
cac
he

L3
ca
ch
e

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GPU GPU T
mod frequ D
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Soc
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se

date

ase
Part

pric

number(s)

e
(US
D)

Core
M-

SR217 (
2
5Y1 E0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0[46]

Core
M-

SR218 (
2
5Y1 E0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0a

Core
M-

SR23C (
2
5Y1 F0)

800

2G

MHz

Hz

0c

Core
M-

SR23G (
2
5Y3 F0)

900

2.4

MHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR23L (
2
5Y5 F0)

1.1

2.6

GHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR216 (
2
5Y7 E0)

1.1

2.6

GHz

GHz

Core
M-

SR23Q (
2
5Y7 F0)
1

1.2

2.9

GHz

GHz

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

2
256
KB

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

HD
4

Grap

MB hics
5300

100 4.
800

MHz

100 4.
800

MHz

300 4.
800

MHz

300 4.
850

MHz

300 4.
900

MHz

100 4.
850

MHz

300 4.
900

MHz

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

BG
A123
4

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