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The Study of Sociology in Institutions of Learning in the United States.

III
Author(s): Frank L. Tolman
Source: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Sep., 1902), pp. 251-272
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
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THE

STUDY OF SOCIOLOGY IN INSTITUTIONS


LEARNING IN THE UNITED STATES. III.
CATALOGUE

ILLINOIS

OF COURSES

OF

IN SOCIOLOGY-continued.

(conizinued)- UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS.


DEPARTMENT

OF PHILOSOPHY.

6. Practical ethics. In thiscourse those questions which bear the closest relations to life and conductare raised and discussed. The dutiesof the individual,the
family,the state,are among the subjectsdiscussed. Special subjects in social ethics
may be takenup. (InadvertentlyomittedfromJulylist.)
9. Political ethics, historicaland applied. A study of the various phases of
thoughtconcerningthe ethics of social organization,theories of the nature of the
state,includingviews of the state of nature,of natural law, and of naturalright. A
discussionof rightsand duties in relationto social institutions;internationalrights
and duties; the ethicsof diplomacy. (InadvertentlyomittedfromJulylist.)
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO.

Sociology 3Ia. Originand psychologyof occupations-research course. (InadvertentlyomittedfromJulylist.) Associate ProfessorThomas.


BIBLICAL

AND PATRISTIC

GREEK.

I2. Social and religioushistoryof Palestine in New Testamenttimes. Introduc-

tion to Course 64. ProfessorMathews.


64. The social teachingsof Jesus. The teachingofJesusconcerningsociety,the
state,the family,wealth,and othersocial institutions. ProfessorMathews.
65. The social teachingsof the apostles. ProfessorMathews.
EUREKA COLLEGE.
POLITICAL

SCIENCE.

II. Sociology. Method: The same as in politicaleconomy,with the addition


of reviews of books on social science. Bascom's Social Theory. B. J. Radford.
NORTHWESTERN
MORAL

AND SOCIAL

UNIVERSITY.
PHILOSOPHY.

A. Ethics. Social philosophy. Second semester: Social philosophy. The


problemof social philosophyand the principlesof sociology,the nature of the social
problem and of social science; the conclusions of anthropologyand of the other
sciences on whichsociologyrests; the theoryof sociologyby referenceto the workof
the leading social philosophers. Practical applicationof sociologicalprinciplesto the
chiefsocial problems. This courseattemptsto outlinethatapplicationof science and
philosophyto societyand social problemswhich is such a characteristictendencyof
today,and also to point out the main lines along whichsocial advance maybest be
made. Lectures,use of some serviceable manual,readings,reports,practical investigations. There will be scope fordiscussionas in the firstsemester. Open to students
who have completedthirtyhours. ProfessorCaldwell.
25I

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252

THE

A=MEZRICA4N JOURNAL

OF SOCIOLOGY

B. Social philosophy. Practical problems. Brief class-roomstudy of some


introductory,
practical book. Investigationby students(under direction)of social
conditions,problems,agencies,institutions. Intendedto startstudentsin the workof
hours.
social observationand reflection. Open to studentswho have completedthirty
Second semester: Continuationof the work of the firstsemester,or similarwork.
ProfessorCaldwell. Creditwill be given fortimespentin investigation.
C. Practicalethics. First semester: Ethics of the social questions; the problems of the family,education,wealth, poverty,temperance,social discontent,social
reform,in the light of ethical theory. Lectures, special researches,discussions.
Second semester: Moral pathologyand the science of character; class-roomstudy
and discussion of such books as Giles's Moral Pathology,or Sidgwick'sPractical
of studentsupon
Ethics,MacCunn'sMaking of Character. Reportsand investigations
topics. ProfessorCaldwell.
D. Social psychology. Considerationof the attemptsof recentAmerican and
European philosophersand psychologiststo approachthe studyof societyfromthe
psychological(as distinctfromthe hithertoprevailinglybiological) point of view,
The logic and mindof society; the psychologyof social action; the psychical factors
in civilization; the relationof the social mind to the mind of the individual; the
applicationof social psychologyto education and reform. Studyof ProfessorBaldand of Tarde's Social
ofMental Develop5ment,
win's Social and Ethical Interpretations
Laws, withreferenceto the writingsof others,such as Le Bon, Sidis, Ward, Bosanquet,etc. Second semester: Continuationof theworkof the firstsemester. Open to
studentswho have had or are takingCourse A, or who have had or who are taking
Course A in psychology. ProfessorCaldwell.
E. Advanced course. First semester: Ethics. Reading and analysis of
advanced works upon ethics,such as the writingsof Plato, Aristotle,Kant, Hegel,
Wundt,Gizycki,Paulsen, Sidgwick,Green,Spencer,Stephen, Martineau and others.
Lecture and studynotes upon special topicssuch as the metaphysicof ethics,the logic
(methods)or psychologyof ethics,the artof conduct,the moral ideal, social or political or religious ethics, etc. Or, study of special periods in the historyof ethical
growth,or of ethical speculation,such as the ethics of the Greeks, or of German
philosophers,etc. Paulsen's Ethics may be used as a guide. Second semester:
Social philosophy. Social theoriesof leading thinkers,ancient and modern. Tensocial philosophy("English " and foreign). The philosophy
dencies in contemporary
of social advance and of social reform. Mackenzie's IntroductiontoSocial Philosophy
may be used as a guide. Open to studentswho have completedCourseA. Professor
Caldwell.
F. Seminary. Research study of topics connected with any of the above
courses. Subjects can be announcedonlyafterconsultationwith those fittedfor the
workof investigators. ProfessorCaldwell.
POLITICAL

ECONOMY.

G. The labor question in Europe and the UnitedStates. The purpose of this
courseis to acquaintthe studentwiththeeconomicconditionof the workingclasses in
Europe and the UnitedStates duringthe past century,and to discuss the relationof
labor organizationsto capital in the productionand distributionof wealth. Among
otherphases of the subject are discussed the rise and growthof labor organizations,
the developmentof the labor contract,methodsof industrialremuneration,
the shorter

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN

UNIYED

STATES

253

working day, workingmen'sinsurance,and employers'liability. Lectures, discussions,and a systematiccourseof prescribedreading; one writtenreporton a selected
topic each semester. Dr. George.
LOMBARD COLLEGE.
SOCIOLOGY.
SERIES

A.

THE DEVELOPMENT

OF SOCIOLOGICAL

THEORY.

An introduction
to the studyof sociology. An outlinestudyof the characteristicconcepts of recent sociological thought. ProfessorKimble.
2. Pre-Comteansociology. A careful studyof the earlier theoriesconcerning
social relations. ProfessorKimble.
3. Pre-Comteansociology. (Continuationof Course 2.) ProfessorKimble.
modern
4. Modern sociologicaltheory. The chiefworksof the moreprominent
positionsof each author and
sociologistsare studiedwitha view to the characteristic
the relationborneby each to sociological theoryas a whole. ProfessorKimble.
5. Modernsociologicaltheory. (Continuationof Course 4.) ProfessorKimble.
6. Types of sociologicaltheory. The utopians,the organicists,the psychologists.
ProfessorKimble.
i.

SERIES

B.

THE DEVELOPMENT

OF ASSOCIATION

AND OF SOCIETY.

7. An introduction
to the comparativestudyof association. The method,scope,
and aim of comparativesociology. ProfessorKimble.
8. Biography. A general sketch of the influenceof "natural conditions"upon
upon the associativeactivitiesof livingorganisms. ProfessorKimble.
9. The developmentof association. A studyof the lower stages of the associative process,with especial referenceto the earlier formsof food,sex, and conflict
association. ProfessorKimble.
Io. The developmentof association. (Continuationof Course 9.) The investigationbegun in Course 9 is continuedamong organismsof a highertypethan those
therestudied. ProfessorKimble.
ii. The developmentof association. (Continuationof Courses 9 and Io.)
The
associationalprocessas manifestedamong the naturalraces. ProfessorKimble.
I2. The developmentof association. (Continuationof Courses 9, IO, and II.)
The associationallifeof a moderncommunity.Studyof the local environment.ProfessorKimble.
I3. Abnormaland pathologic variationsof the associative process. An introductoryand outlinestudyof the sociologyof crime,pauperism,etc. ProfessorKimble.
I4. Abnormaland pathologicvariationsof the associative process. (Continuation of Course I3.) A studyof the preventive,curative,and ameliorativefactorsof
associate life. ProfessorKimble.
I5. Reproductiveassociation. The familyis taken as the mosthighlydeveloped
and best knownexample of thistype of associational life; attentionis given to its
origin,development,and significance. ProfessorKimble.
I6. The chieftypesof association. Food, sex, and conflict. The characteristic
associationalactivitiescenteringabout each. Origin,development,and significance.
ProfessorKimble. For the mostadvanced studentsonly.
fromthestandpointof sociology,
I7. The sociologyofreligion. A consideration,
of theWphenomena
of religion. ProfessorKimble.

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THE

254

OF SOCIOLOGY

JOURNAL

AMERICAN

COLLEGE.

ILLINOIS

OF SOCIOLOGY.

DEPARTMENT

BARNES.

PRESIDENT

Sociology. Second semester: A studyof the formsof humanassociationand


the principlesunderlyingthem, togetherwith a briefconsiderationof the various
means
problemsresultingfroma dependent and defectiveclass, and the different
employed for remedyand relief. Text: Giddings,Principles of Sociology; Wright,
ElementsofPractical Sociology.
2.

NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE.
DEPARTMENT

AND

OF POLITICAL

SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

Sociology. The aim is to give a trueconceptionof society,to trace the princiconcerning


ples underlyingthe social conditionsof life,and to promotethoughtfulness
relationsof man to man. It embraces the studyof the genesis and
the diversified
of society,and the forcesthathave determinedits development. The ecostructure
nomicphenomenaof societyare carefullyexamined,and currentproblemsof social
reformreceive special attention. Small and Vincent; Henderson; Giddings,Principles; and Mackenzie.
SHURTLEFF
POLITICAL

COLLEGE.
SCIENCE.

VII. Elementarysociology. Small and Vincent is used as a text. Elective


forjuniorsand seniors.
DEPARTMENT

WHEATON

COLLEGE.

AND

POLITICAL

OF HISTORY

PROFESSOR

AND SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

WHIPPLE.

4. Sociology. The conclusions reached in economics duringthe two previous


termsapplied to currenttheoriesof socialismand to the presenttrendtowarda larger
controlof businessby the state,witha view of ascertainingwhat dangersare ahead,
and what changes are likelyto proveadvantageousto mankind. Comparisonof textbooks; collateralreading; reportsby studentsappointedto investigatespecial topics
of interest.
VDIAIVA

INDIANA
DEPARTMENT

UNIVERSITY.

OF ECONOMICS

AND SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

Socialism and communism. A studyof ideal commonwealthsand of the


theoriesof the chiefsocialisticwriterssince the FrenchRevolution. Particularattention is given to the present position of the various socialisticgroupsin Germany,
England, and America. Lecturesand reading. ProfessorWeatherly.
7. General sociology. A studyof the workof leading sociologists,witha comparison of views and a critical discussion of theoriesand conclusions. Professor
Weatherly.
4. Social pathology. (i) Fall term: pauperism and charities. (2) Winter
the
term: crimeand penology. (3) Spring term: social questions. In I900-I90I
special subjectinvestigatedin the springtermwas the economicaspect of the liquor
problem. Inasmuchas thesubjectvariesin successiveyears,thisdivisionof thecourse
may be taken more than once. Lectures,reading,and special reports. Professor
Weatherly. Throughoutthe year.
IO.

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SYUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN

UNITED

STA,TES

255

8. Seminaryin economicsand sociology. Designed foradvanced studentswho


have shown abilitysuccessfullyto undertakeindividual research. The subjectsfor
investigationmay be taken from the fieldof either economicsor sociology,but it is
intendedthattheyshall have some degree of unity. Considerable attentionis given
to training in statisticalmethods. Professor Weatherly and Assistant Professor
Rawles.
DEPARTMENT

OF PHILOSOPHY.

8. Social psychology. Includes a studyof the moreimportantrecentbooks on


social psychology. Lectures. Introductionto research methods and problems.
Tarde, Social.Laws; Baldwin, Mental Development. ProfessorBryan.
DEPAUW UNIVERSITY-ASBURY

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS.

POLITICAL SCIENCE.
PROFESSOR WEAVER.

Unityand scope of the department: This departmentembraces specificallythe


science and philosophyof the state or societypoliticallyorganized. But as this
depends so essentiallyon organizedsocietyin general,the science and philosophyof
society fall naturallywithinits scope. Although the state springs logicallyfrom
organizedsociety,yetforthe sake of clearness the theoryof state is studied before
sociology; the latter,being more complexand indefinite,
demands more intellectual
maturity. Then followthe special phases of political science,viz., thoseof law and
economics. It is believed,furthermore,
thatnonieof thesesubjectsshould be divorced
fromethics,particularlythe practicalpart,which may be denominatedits art; and,
althoughhistoryformsa distinctdepartment,thisdoes not implythatits vital importance is overlookedin this department. On the contrary,
it is emphasizedat every
step,since all social theoryand philosophymust be testedby historicaldata properly
interpreted. The historical-philosophic
methodis theonlysafeguardagainst ideology
on the one hand and empiricismon the other.
Explanation and suggestionas to method: No special text-booksare required.
Particularlyin sociological subjectsthe laboratorymethodhas proven its superiority.
Studentsare co-laborerswiththe instructor
in the investigationof specificsubjects.
Too muchhelp stuntsthe intellect; it must ratherbe quickened to self-dependence.
Syllabuses,whenpracticable,are utilizedto supplybibliographyand unifyclass work.
A departmentallibrary,containingthe best literatureof the subjectstaught,is placed
at the fullestdispositionof the student. Individual problemsare assigned forspecial
research, and co-operationin acquisition is utilized in class reports and theses.
Instead of purchasingadditionaltext-books,the studentspay fifty
cents per termto
the departmentlibraryfund,fromwhich over one hundredvolumesare purchased
annually,so thatverysoon one of the best special librariesin the countrywill have
been collected.
2. Sociology,principlesand theory: (i) Scope, method,organization,evolution,
problems,goal, etc. (2) Defective,dependent,and delinquentclasses.
3. Practical sociology,or its applications: Institutions,family,school, church,
market,and state.
4. Socialism,historyand philosophy: (I) Communisticutopias. (2) Socialistic
schemes. (3) Social reform.
Io. Seminariumin political science. This embraces only advanced work,viz.:
the investigationof original and unsettledproblems,togetherwith such additional

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256

THE AMERICAN

JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY

subjectsas may be assigned. All graduatesand such undergraduatesas can present


sufficient
attainmentsare eligible,at the optionof the professorin charge. One year's
satisfactorywork in the seminariumentitlesundergraduatesto threecourses'credit
on graduation.
HANOVER COLLEGE.

I. Sociology. Three months.

2. Questionsof the day. One year,fourhours.


BUTLER COLLEGE.

The departmentenjoys the advantage of having access to the large collectionof


public documentsin the state library,and the very complete collectionsof works
pertainingto the social sciences in the libraries of the state,the city,and Butler
College.
The courses in sociology,economics,and political science are so arranged that
the studentmay elect workin thesebranchesaggregatingfiveyearsof study. Work
be begunbeforethe junioryear; but students
in thisdepartmentshould not ordinarily
havingmaturemindsand desiringto elect junior and seniorwork largelyfromthis
classes in the sophomoreyear.
departmentmay enterthe introductory
COURSES IN ECONOMICS.
PROFESSOR

FORREST.

4. Problemsof capital and labor: A studyof the growthof large industries,and


the place and natureof public serviceand industrialcorporations,"trusts,"and labor
organizations. Considerationwill be given to the causes of conflictsbetweencapital
and labor,the relations of bothto the consumingpublic,questionsof taxation,and
methodsof public control.
COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY.

3. Philanthropy: A study of the causes of povertyand methodsof amelioration. The departmentenjoys the heartyco-operationof the excellentCharityOrganization Societyof Indianapolis,and is therebyenabled to make a thoroughstudyof
the charitiesof the city. Such agencies as the social settlement,the institutional
church,the labor colony,etc.,will also receive consideration. The studentwill be
expectedto make a personalinvestigationof actual conditionsfoundin the city.
in the narrowersense,
5. Anthropology: A studyembracingboth anthropology,
intendedto give a general understandingof the beginningsand
and culture-history,
earlier stages of social evolution. Such an examinationof the method of social
developmentserves as a basis for advanced historical,sociological, and ethical
investigation,and forthe studyof comparativereligion.
6. Social history: A studyof the developmentof the main elementsof modern
of the industrialand ethical
civilization. The emphasisis laid on the interrelation
lines of development. An investigationis made of the beginningsof civilizationin
antiquity,the transitionfromthe Graeco-Romanempireto the medieval period,and
the leading movementsof the modernperiod. This course employsin the studyof
civilizedpeoples the same methodthatis used in the precedingcoursein the studyof
peoples of lower culture.
7. Socialism: A briefhistorical sketchof modernsocialistictheories,followed
socialisticpositions. The economicbearings
by a criticalexaminationof present-day
of socialismreceivefirstconsideration,but itsinfluenceon the family,the state,and
religiousand ethicalideals is the main subjectof thecourse.

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN

UNITED

STATES

257

8. General sociology: This course attemptsto reach a general view of social


phenomena. It is based on the resultsobtainedby the coursein anthropologyand
thoseof some of the recentwriterson social psychology.
9. Developmentof social philosophy: An examinationof the principalattempts
to interpret
social phenomena,fromPlato to Comte. Lectures,readings,reports.
IO. Contemporary
social philosophy: An examination of the principal sociological contributionssince AugusteComte,with special emphasis upon the workof
to generalsociology,
livingwriters. This course is intended to be an introduction
since it takes up mostof the importantattemptsto interpretsociety.
20. Social forcesin English Romanticism: This course deals with the English
Romanticmovementfroma social and literarypoint of view. The formerphase of
the workis consideredin lectureson the different
social, and political forces in the
literatureat thattime; the latterside of the workconsistschieflyof a studymore or
less minuteof the prominentauthorsof the Romantic movement. In collaboration
withProfessorW. D. Howe.
UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME.
COURSES

IN PHILOSOPHY.

(b) Social duties. The domestic societyand marriage; monogamy;polygamy


and divorce; relationsbetween parentsand children. Education: the part of the
parents,the church,and the state. On slaveryin ancientand moderntimes; duties
of mastersand servants. On capital and labor.
(c) Sociology. Necessityof a public society; the city. Originof the civil and
in
politicalorganization; theoriesof Hobbes and J. J. Rousseau; sourceof authority
human society. On the divinerightofkings; the absolutesovereignty
of the people;
the reasonable system. The different
formsof government;the primitivepolity;the
best formof government;opinionsof 0. A. Brownson. On moderndemocracy;the
positionof the church;the usurpationand transferof thesupremepower; on thegovernmentde facto. On despotism; is it lawful to resist a tyrant? Theory of St.
Thomas and Machiavelli on government.The distinctionof the threesocial powers;
parliamentary
and representativegovernment. Qualities of a good ruler; the question of the poor. Public liberties; freedomof the press and of conscience; the right
of the sword; on warand treaties. The internationallaw. Civilization. Churchand
state.
VIII. The elements of sociology. Lectures, readings, and examinations on
requiredtexts. Two hoursa week forfivemonths.
SOWA-

COE COLLEGE.
PHILOSOPHY.

(Mental science 9.) Charities and correction. This is a course in sociology


applied to the pauper and criminalclasses. (Not given afterI902-3.)
HISTORY

AND POLITICAL

SCIENCE.

I. Political and social sciences.


III. Sociology,threehours. Senior year.
(Social economicstreatedin politicaleconomy.)

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258

THE

JOURNAL

AMERICAN
DES

MOINES

OF SOCIOLOGY

COLLEGE.

ELECTIVES.
I. Social science. An introductory
coursereviewingthe general factsof society.
A discussionof social forcesand remedies. Text, Giddings'sElementsof Sociology,
withreferencesto the worksof Spencer,Ward, and Small.
DRAKE

UNIVERSITY.

AND

SOCIOLOGY

POLITICAL

PROFESSOR

ECONOMY.

SHEPPERD.

I. Sociology. During the fall termthe general subject of sociologyis sketched


in broad outlines. The methodof studyis illustratedby directinvestigationof interesting problems,each studentbeing assigned a special topic and asked to present
beforethe class a writtenreport,embodyingmethodsand resultsobtained. Afterthe
firstmonth the class will have one meetingper week additional in order to hear
reports.
PARSONS

POLITICAL

COLLEGE.

AND SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

coursein whichsignificantsocial phenomenaand


23. Sociology. An elementary

the problemsinvolvedare recognizedand appreciated. An attemptis made to seek


the principlesupon whichsocial well-beingand progressdepend,and the best means
of applyingthemin orderto securethe healthiestconditionof the social organism.
Special studyis made of labororganizations,monopolies,pauperism,ignorance,crime,
disease, theliquortraffic,
and temperancereform. Lectures,discussions,and readings.
IOWA COLLEGE.
APPLIED

CHRISTIANITY.

PROFESSOR

WYCKOFF.

The coursesat presentgiven in this departmentare sociological in character.


Special attentionis given,however,to those institutionsand processes withwhich
is to be chieflycredited. The ultimateaim of the workis practical in
Christianity
character,namely,educationforgood citizenship. No attemptis made to develop a
science of societyfromthe teachingsof Christ,but it is hoped thatgood resultsmay
come fromthe effortto appreciate the spiritof Christ on the one hand, and on the
other,modernsocietyand its needs.
to the study
I. Americansocial life. This course is intendedas an introduction
of society. It is believed thatthe necessarytrainingin statisticsand othermethods
of descriptivesociologycan be best given in connectionwithconcreteinvestigations.
So each studentis expected to make a special studyof the social life of a family,a
and a city,and embodythe resultsin carefullyprepared papers. The
community,
same methodis thenextendedto the studyof Iowa and the United States,use being
made of the census and otherstatistics-of newspapers,novels,books of historyor
sectionsof thecountry. Attention
travel,describingor illustratingthelifeof different
is given to the influencesupon society of physical conditions,race characteristics,
scarcityor densityof population,and voluntarysocializingmovements.
2. Industrial historyand problemsof labor. Beginnings of industry;Greece;
Rome; mediaevalEurope; English labor history;the guild system; industrialrevolutions; modernfactorysystem; Americanindustrialhistory;trade-unions;factory
legislation; co-operation; profit-sharing;communisticand socialistic ideals and
experiments;the capitalistsystem.

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN UNITED

STAl TES

259

3. Charitiesand penology. Early Christiancharity;medieval churchcharity;


and methods;philanthropy. The
English poor-lawdevelopment;moderninstitutions
criminal; causes of crime; classical theories; influenceof school of criminalanthroretaliation,seclusion,reformation.Develpology; treatment
of crime; extermination,
and methods.
opmentof institutions
4. Evolutionof society. The horde,clan, family,tribe,and nation; primitive
of the family;developmentof social organs; rise
methodsof control; modifications
ofmodernsociety.
ofmodernsocial institutions
and processesof modification;structure
5. Sociology and social reform. Half the termis spent on a studyof the more
importantcontributionsto social philosophymade by Hobbes, Vico, Montesquieu,
Comte,Spencer,Tarde, and the principal American sociologists. The work of the
movementsof England and Americaduringthelast century
leaders in thegreatreform
is then taken up. The natureof the appeal and the methodsemployedare the chief
objects of attention.
6. The city. Citystateof Greece and Rome; feudalism; rise of cities in Italy
and Germany;the guild government;the modernindustrialcity;municipalfunctions
in Europe; the sphere of the municipality;city governmentand administration;
recentprogressin America.
SIMPSON COLLEGE.
ECONOMICS.
2. Applicationsof economictheoryto social and civic problems.

3. Field workin the studyof social problems.

STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.


SOCIOLOGY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
MR. CADY.
PROFESSORLoos, ASSISTANT
PROFESSORPATrERSON,

Social structureand growth. A study of the


lectureson anthroprimaryfactorsand forcesof social phenomena,withintroductory
pologyand ethnology,followedby a systematicexaminationof the genesis of social
institutions,
gentileand civic. The coursecloses with a briefreviewof social theory
fromPlato to Spencer. ProfessorLoos.
2. Generalsociology,Part II. Social amelioration. (i) The general theoryof
social amelioration: police, sanitation, charities,correction,public utilities,and
education. (2) Municipal administration,dealing with the social and economic
problemsof moderncities. ProfessorLoos.
3. Theoryand techniqueof statistics- see politicaleconomyI 3. AssistantProfessorPatterson.
4. Social statistics. Population in its social aspects,with special referenceto
conditions,education,crime,and income. Assistant
modern cities,tenement-house
ProfessorPatterson.
5. Domestic institutions. The originsof marriageand the family;evolutionary,
progressof types; forcesleading to the survivalof the monogamictype; economic
and utilitarianbases of domestic ethics; presentindustrialdangersto domesticfoundations; the problemof divorce. Mr. Cady.
6. Charitiesand correction. Criminologyand penology;pauperismand methods
of relief-institutional care of dependentsand defectives; philanthropic
financiering
-social
settlements. Mr. Cady.
i. General sociology, Part I.

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26o

THE

AMERICAN

JOURNAL

OF SOCIOLOGY

8. Introductionto politicalphilosophy. Lectureson the developmentof political


philosophyand the elementsof legal history. The class will read Plato's Repfublic
and Laws, Aristotle'sPolitics,Machiavelli's Prince, Hobbes's Leviathan, and other
selections. ProfessorLoos.
9. The distribution
of wealth. A studyof modern theoriesof distribution,
with
an accountof the fundamentalsocial institutions
that are regulativein the distribution of income. ProfessorLoos.
IO. Socialism and contemporary
social legislation. A critical examination of
contemporary
socialismand currenttendenciesin legislation,i860-i900. Professor
Loos.
I I-12. Political philosophy. Studiesin politicaland social philosophy,withspecial referenceto modernconditionsand problems. The class will read Spencer's
Man vs. the State, Huxley's AdministrativeNihilism, Ritchie'sPrinciples of State
Interference,
selectionsfromthe writingsof Thomas Hill Greenand othermodern
philosophers,and Schmoller's Einige Grundfragender Socialpolitik. Professor
Loos.
I3-I4. Graduateseminaryin sociology. Designed to assist graduatestudentsin
specificlinesof research. ProfessorLoos.
POLITICAL

ECONOMY.

Loos,ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PATTERSON, MR. THOMAS.


2. Recent economichistory. A studyof recent economic historywith detailed
analysisof the industrialrevolutionin itseconomicand social aspects. Special attention will be given to the developmentof the individualisticphilosophyand its reaction
on practicalpolitics and legislation-the factoryacts, trade-unionism,
and the trust
problem. Open to all studentsexceptfreshmen. ProfessorLoos.
3. Debating course. Selected topics in economics, politics, and sociology.
Open onlyto studentswho have taken at least one course in one of thesesubjects.
Studentsmay scheduleforthis courseat the beginningof each semester. Professors
Loos and Wilcox,AssistantProfessorPatterson.
PROFESSOR

CORNELL COLLEGE.
POLITICAL

ECONOMY,

SOCIOLOGY,

TEACHING.

I. Sociology. The aim of the workwill be to give a knowledgeof the character


and contentof the science. Its principles and historywill be discussed and some
lectureswill be given,and reportsand book reviews will be required.Giddings's
ElementsofSociologywill be used as a text,otherauthorswill be examined,and, in
orderto give the studentsome idea of the practicalside of sociology,Warner'sAmerican Charitieswill be read.
TABOR COLLEGE.

Sociology. This coursewill embrace the studyof social problems,withspecial


referenceto the defective,dependent,and criminalclasses. Communism,
socialism,
the factorysystem,and the tenementwill be subjectsforcarefulinvestiimmigration,
gation. Studentswill be trainedin researchand in the reviewof books and special
magazine articles. Wright'sPracticalSociologywill serveas the basis forclass work.
In the second termtherewill be a carefulstudyof thecriminal. Drahm's The Criminal is the text. ProfessorFarnham.

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN

WESTERN
POLITICAL

UNITED

STATES

26I

COLLEGE.

ECONOMY

AND

SOCIOLOGY.

II. Sociology. Small and Vincent'stextis used as a guide,while Giddingsand


other authors are studied. Bryce, The American Commonwealth;Gilman, ProfitSharing; Shaw, Municipal Governmentin GreatBritain; and Mayo-Smith,Statisticsand Sociology.
KA NSA S-

MIDLAND

COLLEGE.

VII. Social science. This course makes a systematicintroductory


studyof the
origin,development,and scope of sociology,and aims at a scientificexpositionof the
" social organism" and its variousfunctions. Small and Vincent'sIfntroduction
tothe
Study of Societyis used as a text-book,supplementedby lectures on social reform.
General sociology. Small and Vincent.
BAKER
POLITICAL

UNIVERSITY.

AND SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

B. Sociology. Three hoursper week duringsecond termof senioryear. Study


of the science of society,togetherwiththe natureand scope of sociologyand methods
of sociological study; the defectiveand delinquentclasses; pauperismand charity;
immigration;the family;the state; the nation.
CAMPBELL
POLITICAL

UNIVERSITY.

SCIENCE

AND

SOCIOLOGY.

PROFESSOR WALTER GIDINGHAGEN.

Sociology. Originand growthof sociology,sociology and ethics,social reform,


social evolution; competitionand combination,association, nature and stages of
civilization,race psychology,social organization,natural selection in society,law of
survival,natureand end of society. Giddings'sElementsof Sociologyformsthe basis
of the work. Referenceis made to otherworks on sociologyand articlesfoundin
magazines.
KANSAS

CITY

UNIVERSITY.

Social problems. Introductory


to the general principlesof social science,including historicaland criticalviews of varioustheoriesand ideals of societyand the state.
UNIVERSITY

OF KANSAS.

SOCIOLOGY.
UNDERGRADUATECOURSES.

I. Elementsof sociology. This studyincludesthe principlesof sociology,and a


carefulsurveyof social laws, social theories,and social organization. Lecturesand
text-book,with collateral reading and investigationin the libraryrequired. ProfessorBlackmar.
II. Social pathology. A general study of pauperism,crime,charitiesand corrections,and social problems. Practicalinvestigationand studyrequired of all students. Writtenreportsof special investigationsrequired. ProfessorBlackmar.
III. Socialization and social control. Lectures upon principles, laws, and
methods,with collateral readings and reportson same by students. Conductedon
the seminaryplan. ProfessorBlackmar.
IV. Social statistics. A practical coursein social relationsand social problems
by the use of statistics. Practical studyin the statisticaldetermination
of society.
Conductedon the seminaryplan. ProfessorBlackmar.

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262

THE AMERICA N JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY


GRADUATE COURSE.

VIII. Criminologyand penology. A carefulstudyand comparisonof the more


with investigationof prison reports.
scientificauthorson crimes and punishments,
The studyof criminalsand penal institutionsby visitation. ProfessorBlackmar.
IX. American and European charities. Careful study of the conditionsand
methodsof conductingcharitableinstitutions. Librarywork and reportsof same,
and studyby visitationof institutions. ProfessorBlackmar.
X. Social theories and social problems. Lectures on the various theoriesof
societyand social organizations,withparticularreferenceto theirbearingson present
problemsof society. ProfessorBlackmar.
SOUTHWESTKANSASCOLLEGE.
SOCIOLOGY.
PROFESSOR

GILSON.

i. General sociology. The aim of thiscourseis to acquaint the studentwiththe


scientificprinciplesof sociology. It is the basis of all subsequentworkin the department. Veryparticularattentionis paid in class-roomdiscussions to the meanings,
aims,methods,relations,and limitationsof sociologyas a science. A term thesis is
required. Giddings'sElementsofSociologyis used as a text-book.
2. Practical sociology. In thiscoursethe practicalsocial problemsof American
societyare studiedhistoricallyand analytically. These includequestions of populaetc. A termthesisis required.
labor, education,immigration,
tion,family,poor-relief,
Collateralreading and researchis done by theclass. Wright'sPracticalSociologyis
the text-book.
3. During the thirdterm,forthe firsthalf,Le Bon's The Crowdis used as a text,
sentiments,
ideas, and leaders of
and an analyticstudyis made of the constitution,
crowds. In the second half the text is Ely's SocialAspectsof Christianity. Special
attentionis paid to class-roomdiscussionon the textand on collateralreading.
WASHBURN COLLEGE.

DEPARTMENTOF SOCIOLOGY.
PROFESSOR

DANIEL

MosEs FISK.

fromsuch sciences
I. A briefgeneraloutlineof the fieldand of the contributions
as biologyand psychology,withcritical attentionto those factsof associated human
life whichgive the necessarydata fora science of society.
of history.
2. An advanced courseon the social interpretation
KENTUCKY-

BEREA COLLEGE.

Sociology.Lectureson the advantages


Sociology. CarrollD. Wright'sPractical
and dutiesconnectedwith society. Essays by studentson assigned topics. Spring
term,fivehoursa week, everyeven year.
CENTRE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
Senior elective in sociology. Third term,followinga coursein ethics. Second
term. Instructionby text-book. Lecturesand papers,coveringa wide range of subjects, prepared by membersof the class. ProfessorW. H. Johnson.

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

LOUISIANA-

IN UNITED

STATES

263

TULANE UNIVERSITY.
ECONOMICS
ASSOCIATE

AND SOCIOLOGY.
PROFESSOR

ALDRICH.

CRADUATE COURSES.

3. Principlesof sociology.
4. Comparativeeconomicand social conditionof workingmen. The labor questionin Europe, Australia,and the United States.
5. Race problems. The Indian, the Chinaman, and the negro in the United
States.
6. Economic and social historyof the United States.
II. Research course. Competentstudentsare encouragedto conductinvestigations,underthe guidance of the instructor,
in such subjectsas the economicstatus of
the negro,economicaspects of colonies,etc.
MAINE-

BOWDOIN
ECONOMICS

COLLEGE.

AND

PROFESSOR

SOCIOLOGY.

CALLENDER.

2. Developmentof modernindustry,
and problemsrelatingto labor and capital.
Hobson's Evolutionof ModernCapitalism. Lecturesand assigned readings.
4. Economic and social historyof the United States,fromthe middle of the
eighteenthcenturyto the presenttime,with particularreferenceto the historyof
commerce,manufactures,
and agriculture,the currencyand revenue
transportation,
systems,and the more importantsocial and economicproblems,such as slaveryand
immigration.
COLBY

COLLEGE.

3. Sociology. The studyof practical social problems,with special referenceto


the defective,dependent,and criminal classes, communism,
socialism,immigration,
factorysystem,the tenement,etc. Text-books,assigned readings,lectures,reports,
trainingin researchand book-reviewing. ProfessorBlack.
BATES
ECONOMICS

COLLEGE.
AND SOCIOLOGY.

The methodsof instructionare similarto those pursued in the moreadvanced


workin history. Studentsare trained to scientifichabitsof thoughtupon economic,
industrial,and social phenomena,and are encouragedto independentthinking.
3. Social science. A study of the principlesof sociology,togetherwith living
social problems; the family;immigration;pauperism; charities; crime; socialism.
MARYLANDDEPARTMENT

JOHNS

HOPKINS

OF HISTORY,

UNIVERSITY.
POLITICS,

AND

ECONOMICS.

Economics. Labor problems. The groupof movementshaving fortheirobject


the increase in the economicsecurityof the laboringclass. Each of the contingencies was considered in whichworkingmenare unable to earn wages, as disability,
accident,prematureinvalidity,old age, and inabilityto securework,and the efforts
now being made in Europe and the United States forprovidingforthem through
insuranceor otherwise. A few lectureswere also given on the organizationand
practicalworkof statisticalbureaus in variouscountries. Mr. W. F. Willoughby,of
the United StatesDepartmentof Labor.

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264

THE AMERICAN

JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY

Dr. J. R. Brackett,chairman of Board of Charity and Correction,Baltimore,


conducteda courseof tenlectureson " Public Aid, Charity,and Corrections." Attendance about thirty,
includingseveral physiciansand trainednursesactivelyinterested
in philanthropicwork,several clergymen,two or three colored,and studentsfrom
graduate and undergraduatedepartments. Ten conferencesof six studentswere
held; subjects: English poor-lawand charitablelaw and custom,reportsof meetings,
and reviewsof importantbooks and subjects.
HISTORY.

Associate Professor Vincent lectures to graduate students on the historyof


Europe. The courscs direct attentionto the social, economic,and constitutional
developmentof European peoples since the fall of the Roman empire. The subjects
followin consecutiveorder,the topics for each yearforminga complete and independentgroup. The whole seriesof coursesrequiresthree yearsfor completionand
forclose studyof mediaevaland earlymodernhistoryof the contioffersopportunity
nentand England.
MASSACHUSETTSAMHERST COLLEGE.
Ethics and sociologyin philosophy.
BOSTON COLLEGE.
ETHICS.

Special ethics. The philosophyof religion; individualrightsand duties; suicide;


dueling; charityand justice; freedomof conscience; rightof self-defense;ownership; socialism; societyin general; the family;marriage; emancipationof woman;
parental right; slavery;the state; origin of the state; false views of Hobbes and
of the state; powersand rightsof thestate; churchand state;
Rousseau; constitution
the school question; libertyof the press; internationallaw; intervention;treaties;
concordats; war.
POLITICAL

ECONOMY.

Second term. The distributionof wealth; real and nominal profits; rents;
wages; rich and poor; variousproposalsby communists,
socialists,anarchists,forthe
division of wealth; rightsof property;various social relations; needed reforms;
revenue and expenditureof government;taxation; public debts; wider aspects of
economicstudy; modernillusions.
BOSTON UNIVERSITY.
ECONOMICS,

SOCIAL

SCIENCE,

AND LAW.

PROFESSOR BALDWIN AND DR. FALL.

5. Elementsof social science. An introductary


course in the principlesof sociology and the historyof institutions.
6. Socialism and social reform. A descriptiveand critical courseshowing the
developmentof socialistic doctrines,and the rise and progressof the movementin
Germany,England, and America. Topical studyof presentproblemsof social reform.
See also under" Theological Seminaries."
HARVARD UNIVERSITY.
PHILOSOPHY.

5. The ethics of the social questions. The problemsof poor relief,the family,
temperance,and variousphases of the labor question,in the lightof ethical theory.

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN

UNITED

STA TES

265

Lectures, special researches,and prescribedreading. ProfessorPeabody and Dr.


Rand.
20b. Psychologicalseminary. Problems of comparativeand social psychology.
ProfessorMuinsterberg.
20e. Sociological seminary. Subject for the year: The Christian doctrine of
the social order. ProfessorPeabody.
This courseis designed foradvanced studentswho have a special interestin the
relationsof the Christianreligionto problemsof social duty.
ECONOMICS.

3. Principles of sociology. Theories of social progress. Assistant Professor


Carver.
Course 3 begins with a studyof the structureand developmentof societyas
outlined in the writingsof Comte and Spencer. This is followedby an analysisof
of the social structureand
the factorsand forceswhichhave produced modifications
secureda greaterdegree ofadaptation between man and his physicaland social surroundings. The relationsof property,thefamily,the competitivesystem,religion,
and legal controlto social well-being and progressare studiedwithreferenceto the
problemof social improvement. Spencer's Princifilesof Sociology,Bagehot's Physics
and Politics,Ward's Dynamical Sociology,Giddings'sPrinciplesof Sociology,Patten's
TheoryofSocial Forces,and Kidd's Social Evolution are each read in part. Lectures
are given at intervals,and studentsare expected to take part in the discussion
of the authors read and the lectures delivered.
92hf. The labor questionin Europe and the United States. Half-course(second
half-year). Mr. Willoughby.
Course 9 is chieflyconcernedwithproblemsgrowingout of the relationsof labor
and capital in theUnited Statesand European countries. There is carefulstudyof the
slidingscales,
methodsof industrialremuneration- the wages system,profit-sharing,
and collectivebargaining;of thevariousformsof co-operation;of labor organizations;
of factorylegislation and the legal status of laborers and labor organizations; of
for the preventionand adjustmentof industrialdisputes; of
state and privateefforts
employer'sliabilityand compulsorycompensationacts; of the insuranceof workingmen against accidents,sickness,old age, and invalidity;of providentinstitutions,
such as savingsbanks,friendlysocieties,and fraternalbenefitorders; of the problem
will necessarilybe descriptiveto a considof the unemployed. While the treatment
of the movementsconerable extent,the emphasiswill be laid on the interpretation
sideredwitha view to determiningtheir causes and consequences,and the merits,
defects,and possibilitiesof existingreformmovements. A systematiccourseof reading willbe required,and topicswill be assigned forspecial investigation.
ga2hf. Problems of industrial organization. Half-course (second half-year).
Mr. Willoughby.
This coursewill give a criticalstudyof modern industry,
withspecial reference
to the efficiencyof productionand the relations existing between employers and
employees. The actual organizationof industrialenterpriseswill firstbe considered.
the factorysystem,the
Under thishead will be treatedsuch subjectsas corporations,
concentrationand integrationof industry,and the trustproblemin all its phases.
Following this, or in connectionwith it, will be studied the effectof the modern
and changes now taking place, upon efficiency
of producorganizationof industry,

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266

THE A MERICAN

JOURIAL

OF SOCIOLOGY

tion,stabilityof employment,
and industrialdepressions. Careful attentionwill be
given to the relations existingbetween employersand employees,and the functions
of organizationsof bothclasses. Finally will be consideredthe positionof the individual underthe presentsystem-his preparationfora tradethroughapprenticeship,
technical education,or otherwise; his opportunitiesforadvancement; his economic
independence. Conditionsin Europe as well as in the United States will be shown.
Topics will be assigned forspecial investigation,and the resultsof such inquirieswill
be consideredin class.
TUFTS COLLEGE.
DEPARTMENT

OF POLITICAL

SCIENCE -SOCIOLOGY.

PROFESSOR METCALF.

I5. Practical sociology. A general course on the natureand methodsof social


of the family,
science,comprisinga studyof the laws of population,the institution
ruraland urban communities,
pauperism,charities,social treatmentof crime,and so
on. Lectures,readings,and visitsto charitableand correctionalinstitutions
in Boston and vicinity.
I6. Seminaryin economicsand sociology.
(See also Tufts DivinitySchool.)
WILLIAMS COLLEGE.
DEPARTMENT

OF POLITICAL

AND SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

DR. BASCOM, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BULLOCK, AND DR. MUNRO.

3. Sociology. The aim of this course is to give economics,ethics, and civics


theirtrueand immediatebearingon our social life.
4. Municipal government. Statistical studies of city growth; a comparative
of urbanand rural populations,togetherwitha discussionof
analysisof the structure
the greater problems of municipal governmentas these presentthemselvesin the
largercenters.
CLARK UNIVERSITY.

INCIDENTAL

WORK

IN ANTHROPOLOGY,

PSYCHOLOGY,

AND EDUCATION.

PSYCHOLOGY.

A complete coursein psychologyat Clark Universityincludesthe followingsubjects:


VII. Historyof psychologyand philosophy,including the chiefcultureinstitutions, science, medical theories,Christianity,and education generally. Dr. Hall's
historicalcoursesand Dr. Sanford'sseminary.
III. The psychologyof Jesus. This course involvesa critical considerationof
the lives ofJesusand theotherliteratureconcerninghis personand teachingfromthe
standpointof modernpsychology,fromwhichthesesubjectshave notyetbeen treated.
PresidentHall.
ANTHROPOLOGY.

DR. CHAMBERLAIN.

A. General,embracing: (d) Ethnology,includingsociology; originand development of the arts and sciences; mythology;folk-lore;religions. (f) Criminal and
pathologicalanthropology; ethnicmorals. (g) Historical and archaeological; primitive man and primitiveculture.
B. Special courses upon anthropologicaltopics most akin to psychologyand

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN UNITED

STA TES

267

pedagogy,embodyingtheresultsof the mostrecentand importantstudiesand investigations; the physical anthropologyof infancy,childhood,youth,manhood,old age;
the anthropological phenomena of growth,arrested development,degeneration;
anthropologicalaspects of heredityand environmentin the individual and in the
race; uncivilizedraces and civilizedraces; the evolutionproblemsof humanity;education among primitivepeoples; the anthropologicalhistoryof America; the interpretation of folk-lore; the psychologyof primitivepeoples; the trend of human
progress.
The lecturesin anthropologywill have special bearing upon the courses in
and everyeffort
will be made to utilize
psychologyand pedagogy in the university,
the latestresultsof anthropologicalinvestigations.
From time to timethe most importantcurrentliteraturewill be reviewed and
studentsmade acquaintedwith the best contributionsto anthropologicalscience in
the variousforeignlanguages. The importanceof a thoroughacquaintancewiththe
bibliographyof theirsubjectsis impressedupon all students,and all possible assistance in thisdirectionis always at theirdisposal.
EDUCATION.

B. Principles of education. This coursetreatscertainfundamentaleducational


principles and involves also a studyof several importantchaptersin the historyof
education,with a brief accountof a fewrepresentativeeducational systems. Such
topics as the followingwill be included: Educational ideals. The dominantaim at
different
stages of development. The correlationof educational forces. The family
and education. The churchand education. State aid and control. The field of
scientificstudy in education. Antitheticeducational principles. The historyof
natureversusconventionin education. Rousseau, Pestalozzi as "pedagogical socialist." Modern Social-Padagogik. Present problems and tendencies. One hour a
week; halfa year.
Education. Dr. Hall will offera coursealmostentirelynew. Beginningwitha
briefreviewof systemsof marriagefroma biological standpoint,includingage and
mode of lifeso faras theybear on fecundity,
the lectureswill summarizethe laws of
embryonicdevelopment,birth customs,treatmentof early infancyamong different
walking,
races, the firststages of development,growth,regimen,teething,nutrition,
at drawing,singing,plays
the beginnings of speech and its implication,firstefforts
and games, social relations,methodsof studyingthe firststages of childhood. The
and educationof childrenduring this periodwill involve a
environment,
treatment,
considerationof the kindergarten.
HOLY CROSS COLLEGE.
Special ethicstreats,int. al., the followingtopics: Societyin general; natureand
of matrimony;divorce; parental
end of domesticsociety; unityand indissolubility
authority;educationof the child; civil society,its nature,end, origin; false theories
on the originof civil society;Hobbes, Rousseau; scholasticdoctrine; formsof civil
government;citizenship; freedomof worship; freedomof the press; state education.
MICHIGAN-

ALMA

Sociology.
Sociology.
ish social life.

COLLEGE-SCHOOL

KINDERGARTEN

OF PEDAGOGY.

TRAINING

COURSE.

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268

THE

AMERICAN

JOURNAL

OF SOCIOLOGY

VI. Principles of sociology. An advanced general course. It includes an


analysisand classificationof social facts; discussionof the principlesof social theory
and the processof socialization; a studyof social feeling,public opinion,and organized action; an inquiryintothe causes of emotional epidemics,panics,mob violence,
revolutions;an explanationof the growthof public opinion on great questions; an
attemptto show fromhistoryand currentevents that public action is governedby
definitelaws of social chance. Giddings'sPrinciples of Sociologyis used as a text.
UNIVERSITY

OF MICHIGAN.

PHILOSOPHY.

to the
2. Principlesof ethical,social, and aestheticevolution. An introduction
originand developmentof modernliteraryand politicalthought,and of modernviews
of society. ProfessorWenley.
4. Ethics of social evolution; a studyof ethicaltypesas seen in social and industrialrelations. ProfessorWenley.
i8. Systematicethics. Practical philosophy. Ethical problemsin theirrelation
to the individual and to social life and conduct. Paulsen. ProfessorWenley.
i6. Political philosophy. A criticalstudyof society. The principlesof political
to fundaassociation and evolution; relationsof political and industrialinstitutions
mental ideas of philosophyand religion; outlineof the historyof the theories of
society; applications to present-daysocial problems. Lectures, discussions,theses.
ProfessorLloyd.
SCIENCE

AND ART OF TEACHING.

Social phases of education. A considerationofthe school as a social factor


in its relationto the child,to the home,to the church,tothe state; also a discussionof
the relationof educationto vocationand to crime. Lectures and recitations.Dutton,
Social Phases. ProfessorWhitney.
IO.

DEPARTMENT

OF ECONOMICS

AND SOCIOLOGY.

5. Problemsin politicaleconomy. The immigrationproblem,industrialcrisis,


freetrade and protection,the railwayproblem,the municipalor trustproblem,taxation. ProfessorAdams.
communism,
5a. Social and industrial reforms. Co-operation,profit-sharing,
insurance,tradesunions,industrialfederasocialism,factorylegislation,workingmen's
tion. ProfessorAdams.
14. Seminaryin economics. Labor organizations. Webb's historyof tradeunionism. ProfessorAdams.
has been appointedlectureron ruralsociology.
Mr. Kenyon L. Butterfield
i9. Principlesof sociology. Lecturesand quiz. AssistantProfessorCooley.
By special permissionstudentsmay elect this course withoutthe quiz to countas
threehours. This courseaims at a systematicand comprehensivestudyof the underlying principlesof social science. The general plan followedis to begin withpersonal relationsin theirsimplestand mostdirectform; proceedingthenceto the more
complex formsof association,to an analysisof the processesof social change, and,
finally,to a studyof social tendencyand the theoryof progress. Historical referof existingsociety,
ences are freelyused, but the main aim is a rationalinterpretation
illustrationis givenof theprinciplesadvanced. While some
and ample contemporary
views of prominentwriters,thecourse,in the main,is
attentionis paid to the differing

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY

IN

UNITED

TES

SYl

269

constructiveratherthan critical. Each student is assigned special reading and


requiredto writean essay uponiit.
20. Problemsin sociology. Lectures,quiz,and assignedreading. AssistantProfessorCooley.
This course embraces a study of the laws of population, degeneracy, the
liquor problem,poor relief (public and private),vagrancy,crime,and penology,the
divorce problem and kindred questions,the assimilationof the foreignelementin
American population,the developmentof cities,the tenementquestion,slums,social
settlements,
and othersociological questionsof presentinterest. The class is supplied
witha list of about twenty-five
topics,accompaniedby references,and each studentis
requiredto choose one of thesetopics and writean essay upon it.
2I. Historical developmentof sociological thought; studyof Comte, Spencer,
Ward, Giddings,and others. For advanced students. Assistant ProfessorCooley.
This courseis intended to furnishan opportunity
for comparativestudyand discussionof the writerswho have contributedmost to the growthof sociology. The
class consistschieflyof graduatestudentsand is conducted somewhatas a seminary.
22. Psychologicalsociology. For advanced students. AssistantProfessor
Cooley.
This courseis similar in characterto Course 24 and usually,thoughnot necessarily,succeeds it. The views of Baldwin, Giddings, Tarde, Durkheim,and others
are carefully
studied,but,as in othercourses,it is endeavored to make thisstudyconstructiveratherthanmerelycritical.
2Ia. Special workwithgraduatestudents. AssistantProfessorCooley.
HILLSDALE
DEPARTMENT

OF HISTORY

COLLEGE.

AND POLITICAL

AND

SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

Introductionto the study of sociology. Concretedescriptivestudyof American


and
societywill be made, dealing with the population,its groupings,institutions,
ideals. Wright,
PrinciplesofSociology.
KALAMAZOO COLLEGE.
SOCIAL

AND POLITICAL

SCIENCE.

I. Sociology. The organicconceptionof society. The social elements;land and

population. The primarysocial group; the family. The life of society; social
intelligence,social feeling,social volition. Moralityand law. ProfessorStetson.
OLIVET COLLEGE.
SOCIAL

SCIENCE.

The firstsemesterwill give a general introductionto sociology,statingits problems and indicatingthe methodsfortheirsolution. In the latterpart of the course
special attentionwill be given to the practicalproblemsof charitiesand penology.
MINNESOTA-

UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT

OF MINNESOTA.

OF POLITICAL

SCIENCE.

Mr. SAMUEL G. SMITH.


SOCIOLOGY.

Course I. Elementsof sociology.


Course II. Social pathology.
Course III. Social theory.

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THE AMERICA N JO URNAL OF SOCIOL OG Y

270

CARLETON

COLLEGE.

POLITICAL

SCIENCE.

I. Sociology. A studyof the characterand organizationof society,the causes

and modes of social activity,and the processesof social development. Lecturesfrom


men who are prominentin practical sociological workin Minnesota,text-book,class
discussions,and writtenreportson collateralreadingin the library.
HAMLINE
DEPARTMENT

OF HISTORY

UNIVERSITY.
AND POLITICAL

ECONOMY.

"The seniorclass takes sociologyfourhoursa week duringspringterm; elective.


We take generalsociologyand practicalworkby investigationand topics."
MISSOURI-

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI.
SOCIOLOGY.
PROFESSOR ELLWOOD.
FOR UNDERGRADUATES.

i. Elementary sociology.

Lectures on certain fundamental social problems, as,

e. g., theoriginand evolutionof the family,the growthof population,immigration,


the race problem,the growthof cities,the natureof society,etc. Studyby the class
of special subjectsforinvestigation.
2. The social teachings of Jesus. A lecture course open to all studentsof the
university.

3a. Modern philanthropy. Lectures on the social treatmentof the dependent


etc. Reports by the class on
and defectiveclasses, managementof state institutions,
special subjects of investigation.
3b. Criminalsociology. Lectures on criminalanthropologyand on the social
treatmentof criminals.

4. Advanced sociology. Lectures,discussions,and reportson special investigationsby the class.


PRIMARILY FOR GRADUATES.

races of
5a. Ethnology. A studyof the evolutionand relationsof the different
mankind.
5b. Race psychology. A study of the comparative psychologyof races as
shown in their customs, institutions, and social organization.

6a. Psychologicalsociology. A critical studyof the writingsof Tarde, Le Bon,


and Baldwin,withsome attemptto make use of psychologicalprinciplesin the interpretationof social phenomena.
7b. Historyof social philosophy. Lectureson thedevelopmentof social thought
fromAristotleto the present,especially since the timeof Comte. Assigned reading.
8. Sociologyof religion. A studyof religious phenomenafromthe sociological
standpoint.
9. Seminar. Special trainingin the sociological investigationand research.
CHRISTIAN

UNIVERSITY.

"We have not opened a departmentof sociology,buthave had a courseof general lectureson the subjectgiven two hoursa week forsix weeks,attended by about
fortystudents. No examinationrequired."

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STUDY

OF SOCIOLOGY
MISSOURI

IN UNITED

VALLEY

J. W.

STA TES

271

COLLEGE.

GALLOWAY.

I. Descriptivesociology.
III. Social development.
WILLIAN

JEWELL

COLLEGE.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE.


CHARLES LEE SMITH.

Pauperism and charities. The causes of pauperism and the principles and
methodsof poor-relief.
NEBRASKA-

CENTRAL

COLLEGE.

WESLEYAN

ECONOMICS.

Socialism. Historyand theoryof social science. ProfessorAddicks.


GRAND

ISLAND

COLLEGE.

Sociology. Small and Vincent.


UNIVERSITY

OF NEBRASKA.

POLITICAL ECONOMY AND SOCIOLOGY.


PROFESSOR

Ross.

Seminaryon colonies and colonization. Round-tablework. Syntheticcourse


treatingof the special problemsof economics,sociology,finance,and government
presentedby the over-sea colony. Special attentionto the tropicalcolonizationand
to the colonial problemsof the United States.
24. Seminaryon cities. Round-tablework. The cityas to the laws of its locaits economic basis, and the laws of its growth. The populationof
tion,its structure,
the cityis comparedwiththatof the countryin respectto race, sex, and age composition,birthrate,marriagerate,divorce,longevity,pauperism,education,moralcharacter,political traits.
of the social
25. Sociology. Lectures and text; compositionand constitution
body; seeks to distinguishthe parts,organs,and force of the society; presentsthe
to the course
historicalevolutionof the leading social institutions. Complementary
in psychology of society.

26. The psychologyof society. Lectures and readings. The nature and laws
of mob-mind,collectivehysteria," craze," fashion,conventionality,
customand tradition, "standard of comfort," "spirit of the age," etc. Different races compared in
point of aptitude for social ascendency. These studies in imitation balanced by
studies in non-conformism, invention, innovation, leadership, the influence of great
men. Illustrations mainly from contemporary American life.
27. Charities. Economic and social aspects of poor-relief. Visits to charitable
institutions. Mr. Prevey.
28. Criminology. A study of the criminal class and of the systems and methods
of reformation and punishment.
DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY.
PROFESSOR

HILL.

Social psychology and race psychology.


others.

Readings

from Baldwin, Tarde, and

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272

THE A MERICAN JOURNA L OF SOCIOLOGY


NEBRASKA WESLEYAN

UNIVERSITY.

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY.


PROFESSOR
CLINE.

II. Sociology. Elementsof sociologyand Americancharities.


NEW HAMP SHIRE-

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE.
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY.
PROFESSOR
WELLS.

3. Anthropologicalgeography. This considersman in his relationto his physias determining


his dispersionover theface of the globe,his modeof
cal environment,
life,and the densityof population. It tracesthe bearingsof thenaturalsurroundings
upon man's physical and mental characteristics,
and followsthisfundamentaland
necessaryadjustmentthroughthe historyof thefamilyand the state,and in the evolutionof the formsof economiclife.
4. Social statistics. This coursebeginswitha studyof demography,or thesocial
groupsgiven by statistics. It considersthe classificationof the populationin modern
societydue to physicalor social causes. It then inquires into the resultsof vital
statistics,such as the mortality
fromdifferent
diseases,birthand marriagerates under
varyingclimaticand social conditions. Finally the above data are broughtinto connectionwith crime,pauperism,and social reform. It is a studyof the biologic side
social life.
5. Constructivesociology. This is an attemptto formulatethe laws of social
evolutionand social organization. It is an analysisof the phenomenathat are considered as at once physical and mental,but whoseultimateexplanation must be in
terms of social psychology. The end constantlyin view is a true interpretation
of
social facts,in the concretetermsof science.
History,theory,and techniqueof statistics.
Studies in Americanstatistics.
FRANK L. TOLMAN.
THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO.

[To be continued.1

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