Sunteți pe pagina 1din 180

Syd Barrett

The Complete Guide

PDF generated using the open source mwlib toolkit. See http://code.pediapress.com/ for more information.
PDF generated at: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 12:08:30 UTC

Contents
Articles
Overview

Syd Barrett

Discography

15

Syd Barrett discography

Studio albums

15
18

The Madcap Laughs

18

Barrett

27

Live albums

34

The Peel Session

34

The Radio One Sessions

35

Compilation albums

37

Syd Barrett

37

Opel

39

Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett

42

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?

44

An Introduction to Syd Barrett

46

Box sets
Crazy Diamond

Singles
"Octopus"

Songs

48
48
52
52
55

"Baby Lemonade"

55

"Bob Dylan Blues"

56

"Dark Globe"

57

"Here I Go"

60

"Milky Way"

62

"Terrapin"

63

Musical instruments

66

Danelectro

66

Fender Esquire

74

Family
Max Barrett

Associated acts
Pink Floyd
Stars

Associated people

78
78
82
82
111
115

David Gilmour

115

Roger Waters

128

Richard Wright

142

Nick Mason

148

Andrew King

154

Peter Jenner

155

Associated places

158

UFO Club

Miscellany

158
161

List of songs recorded by Syd Barrett

161

Blackhill Enterprises

163

Beyond the Wildwood

164

Joy of a Toy

165

"Singing a Song in the Morning"

168

References
Article Sources and Contributors

170

Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors

175

Article Licenses
License

177

Overview
Syd Barrett
Syd Barrett
Syd Barrett in 1969
Background information
Birth name

Roger Keith Barrett

Also known as

Syd

Born

6 January 1946
Cambridge, England

Died

7 July 2006 (aged60)


Cambridge, England

Genres

Psychedelic rock, space rock, psychedelic folk, blues rock, experimental rock, avant-garde, psychedelic pop

Occupations

Musician, singer-songwriter, artist, poet

Instruments

Vocals, guitar, bass guitar, organ, ukulele, banjo

Years active

19641974

Labels

Harvest

Associated acts Pink Floyd, Stars


Website

Official website

[1]
Notable instruments
Danelectro DC-59
Fender Esquire
Fender Telecaster

Roger Keith "Syd" Barrett (6 January 1946 7 July 2006) was an English musician, composer, singer, songwriter
and painter. He was a founder member of the band Pink Floyd, and was the lead vocalist, guitarist and principal
songwriter during the band's psychedelic years, providing major musical and stylistic direction in their early
compositions. He is credited with naming the band, but left the group in April 1968 and was briefly hospitalized
amid speculation of mental illness exacerbated by drug use.
Barrett was musically active for fewer than ten years. He recorded four singles with Pink Floyd, the debut album
(and contributed to the second one), plus several unreleased songs. In 1969, Barrett initiated his solo career when he
released the single, "Octopus", taken from his first solo album, The Madcap Laughs (1970). The album was recorded
over the course of one year (19681969) with five different producers (Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, David Gilmour,
Roger Waters and Barrett himself). Nearly two months after Madcap was released, Barrett began working on his
second and final album, Barrett (produced by Gilmour and featuring contributions from Richard Wright), which was
released in late 1970. He then went into self-imposed seclusion lasting until his death in 2006. In 1988, an album of
unreleased tracks and outtakes, Opel, was released by EMI with Barrett's approval.
Barrett's innovative guitar work and exploration of experimental techniques, such as using dissonance, distortion and
feedback, had an enormous impact on many musicians, from David Bowie to Brian Eno to Jimmy Page. His
recordings were also noted for their strongly British-accented vocal delivery. In his post-music life, Barrett continued

Syd Barrett
with painting and dedicated himself to gardening. Biographies began appearing in the 1980s. Pink Floyd wrote and
recorded several tributes to him, most notably the 1975 album Wish You Were Here, which included "Shine On You
Crazy Diamond", a memorial to Barrett.

Biography
Early years
Syd Barrett was born as Roger Keith Barrett in the English city of Cambridge to a middle-class family living at 60
Glisson Road. Barrett was the third of five children. His father, Arthur Max Barrett, was a prominent pathologist and
he was relatedWikipedia:Please clarify to Elizabeth Garrett Anderson. In 1951 his family moved to 183 Hills Road.
Barrett played piano occasionally, but usually preferred writing and drawing. He got a ukulele at 10, a banjo at 11[2]
and a Hofner acoustic guitar at 14.[3] A year after he got his first acoustic guitar, he bought his first electric guitar
and built his own amplifier. One story of how Barrett acquired the nickname "Syd" is that at the age of 14 he was
called after an old local Cambridge jazz double bassist,[3][4] Sid "the beat" Barrett, which claims Syd Barrett changed
the spelling to differentiate himself from his namesake.[5] Another story is that when he was 13, his schoolmates
nicknamed him "Syd" after he showed up to a field day at Abington Scout site wearing a flat cap instead of his Scout
beret because "Syd" was a "working-class" name.[6] He used both names interchangeably for several years. His sister
Rosemary stated, "He was never Syd at home. He would never have allowed it."[4]
At one point at Morley Memorial Junior School he was taught by Roger Waters' mother, Mary.[7] Later, in 1957, he
attended Cambridgeshire High School for Boys[8] (with Waters). His father died of cancer on 11 December
1961,[3][9] less than a month before Barrett's 16th birthday.[10] Also on this day, Barrett had left the entry in his diary
for this date blank.[3] By this time, his brothers and sisters had left home and his mother decided to rent out rooms to
lodgers.[9][11] Eager to help her son recover from his grief, Barrett's mother encouraged the band in which he played,
Geoff Mott and The Mottoes, a band which Barrett formed,[3] to perform in their front room. Waters and Barrett
were childhood friends, and Waters often visited such gigs.[3][12] At one point, Waters even organised a gig, a CND
benefit at Friends Meeting House on 11 March 1962, but shortly afterwards Jeff Mott joined the Boston Crabs, and
the Mottoes broke up.[3]
In September 1962, Barrett had taken a place at the Cambridge Technical College art department, where he met
David Gilmour. During the winter of 1962 and early 1963, The Beatles made an impact on Barrett. For a while
Barrett began to play Beatles songs at parties and at picnics. In 1963, Barrett became a Rolling Stones fan and
Barrett and then-girlfriend Libby Gausden saw them perform at a village hall in Cambridgeshire. It was at this point
Barrett started writing songs; one friend recalls hearing "Effervescing Elephant" (later to be recorded on his solo
album, Barrett).[13] Also around this time, Barrett and Gilmour occasionally played acoustic gigs together. Barrett
had played bass guitar with Those Without during the summer of 1963 and both bass and guitar with The Hollerin'
Blues the next summer. In 1964, Barrett and Gausden saw Bob Dylan perform. After this performance, Barrett was
inspired to write "Bob Dylan Blues". Barrett, now thinking about his future, decided to apply for Camberwell
College of Arts in London. Barrett enrolled in the college in the summer of 1964 to study painting.

Pink Floyd years (196568)


Main article: Pink Floyd
Starting in 1964, the band that would become Pink Floyd evolved through various line-up and name changes
including "The Abdabs",[14] "The Screaming Abdabs", "Sigma 6",[15] and "The Meggadeaths". In 1965, Barrett
joined them as The Tea Set (sometimes spelled T-Set). When they found themselves playing a concert with another
band of the same name, Barrett came up with "The Pink Floyd Sound" (also known as "The Pink Floyd Blues Band",
later "The Pink Floyd").[16] whom he had read about in a sleeve note for a 1962 Blind Boy Fuller album: "Curley
Weaver and Fred McMullen, [...] Pink Anderson or Floyd Councilthese were a few amongst the many blues

Syd Barrett
singers who were to be heard in the rolling hills of the Piedmont, or meandering with the streams through the
wooded valleys."[17]</ref> During 1965, they went into a studio for the first time, when a friend of Richard Wright's
gave the band free time to record.[18] "Double O Bo" and "Lucy Leave" survive as vinyl acetates.</ref> In the
summer of 1965, Barrett began an affair with Lindsay Corner.
During this summer Barrett had his first LSD trip in the garden of friend, Dave Gale, with Ian Moore and Storm
Thorgerson.[19] In one period of experimentation with LSD, Barrett and another friend, Paul Charrier, ended up
naked in the bath, reciting: "No rules, no rules". That summer, as a consequence of the continuation of drug use, the
band became absorbed in Sant Mat, a Sikh sect. Storm Thorgerson (then living on Earlham Street) and Barrett went
to a London hotel to meet the sect's guru; Thorgerson managed to join the sect, while Barrett, however, was deemed
too young to join. Thorgerson perceives this as a deeply important event in Barrett's life, as he was intensely upset by
the rejection. While living within close proximity of his friends, Barrett decided to write more songs ("Bike" was
written around this time).
London Underground, Blackhill Enterprises and gigs
Main article: Blackhill Enterprises
While Pink Floyd began by playing cover versions of American R&B songs, by 1966 they had carved out their own
style of improvised rock and roll,[20] which drew as much from improvised jazz. After Bob Klose departed from the
band, the band's direction changed. However, the change was not instantaneous,[21] however, mixed in with several
original songs: "Let's Roll Another One", "Lucy Leave", "Butterfly", "Remember Me" and "Walk with Me
Sydney".</ref> with more improvising on the guitars and keyboards. Mason reflected, "It always felt to me that most
of the ideas were emanating from Syd at the time."[22] and The Beatles' Revolver, repeatedly. All these albums were
connected by their proto-psychedelic feel, which had begun to guide Barrett's songs, as much as R&B had,
previously. "Interstellar Overdrive" (included into the band's setlist from autumn), for example, was inspired by the
riff from Love's "My Little Red Book", the free-form section (and also, "Pow R. Toc H.") was inspired by Frank
Zappa's free-form freak-outs and The Byrds' "Eight Miles High". The Kinks' "Sunny Afternoon" was an important
influence on Barrett's songwriting.</ref>
At this time, Barrett's reading reputedly included: Grimm's Fairy Tales, Tolkien's The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings,
Carlos Castaneda's The Teachings of Don Juan, and The I-Ching. During this period, Barrett wrote most of the songs
for Pink Floyd's first album, and also songs that would later appear on his solo albums. In 1966, a new rock concert
venue, the UFO (pronounced as "you-foe"), opened in London and quickly became a haven for British psychedelic
music. Pink Floyd, the house band, was its most popular attraction and after making appearances at the rival
Roundhouse,[23][24] became the most popular musical group of the so-called "London Underground" psychedelic
music scene.
By the end of 1966, Pink Floyd had gained a reliable management team in Andrew King and Peter Jenner. Towards
the end of October 1966, Pink Floyd, with King and Jenner, set up Blackhill Enterprises, to manage the group's
finances. Blackhill was staffed by lodgers Jenner found in his Edbrooke Road house, and among others, Barrett's
flatmate, Peter Wynne Wilson (who became road manager, however, since he had more experience in lighting, he
was also lighting assistant). King and Jenner wanted to prepare some demo recordings for a possible record deal, so
at the end of October, they booked a session at Thompson Private Recording Studio, in Hemel Hempstead.[25] King
said of the demos: "That was the first time I realised they were going to write all their own material, Syd just turned
into a songwriter, it seemed like overnight."[26]
King and Jenner befriended American expatriate Joe Boyd, the promoter of the UFO Club, who was making a name
for himself as one of the more important entrepreneurs on the British music scene. The newly hired booking agent,
Bryan Morrison, and Boyd had proposed sending in better quality recordings. From Morrison's agency the band
played a gig outside London for the first time. In November, the band performed the first (of many) strangely named
concerts: Philadelic Music for Simian Hominids, a multimedia event arranged by the group's former landlord, Mike

Syd Barrett
Leonard, at Hornsey College of Art. They performed at the Free School for the following two weeks, before
performing at the Psychodelphia Versus Ian Smith event at the Roundhouse in December, arranged by the Majority
Rule for Rhodesia Campaign, and an Oxfam benefit at the Albert Hall (the band's biggest venue up to this point).
Releases
Tonite Lets All Make Love in London
Main article: Tonite Lets All Make Love in London
At the beginning of 1967, Barrett was dating Jenny Spires (who would later marry future Stars member, Jack
Monck), however, unknown to Barrett, Spires had an affair with Peter Whitehead. Spires convinced Whitehead (who
thought the band sounded like "bad Schoenberg") to utilise Pink Floyd in a film about the swinging London scene.
So at the cost of 80, in January, Whitehead took the band into John Wood's Sound Techniques in Chelsea, with
Boyd in tow. Here, the band recorded a 16-minute version of "Interstellar Overdrive" and another composition,
"Nick's Boogie". Whitehead had filmed this recording, which was used in the film, Tonite Let's All Make Love in
London and later on the video release of London '66'67. Whitehead later commented about the band that: "They
were just completely welded together, just like a jazz group".
Record deal
Boyd attempted to sign the band with Polydor Records. However, Morrison had convinced King and Jenner to try to
start a bidding war between Polydor and EMI. In late January, Boyd produced a recording session for the group, with
them returning to Sound Techniques in Chelsea again.[27]</ref> After the aforementioned bidding war idea was
finished, Pink Floyd signed with EMI. Unusually for the time the deal included recording an album, which meant the
band had unlimited studio time at EMI Studios, in return for a smaller royalty percentage. The band then attempted
to re-record "Arnold Layne", however, the Boyd version from January was released instead.
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
Main article: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
The band's first studio album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, was recorded intermittently between February and
July 1967 in Studio 3 at Abbey Road Studios, and produced by former Beatles engineer Norman Smith.[28] At the
same time, The Beatles were recording "Lovely Rita" for their album, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, in
Studio 2. By the time the album was released on 4 August, "Arnold Layne" (which was released months earlier, on
11 March) had reached number 20 on the British singles charts (despite being banned by Radio London) and the
follow-up single, "See Emily Play", had done even better, peaking at number 6. The album was successful in the UK,
hitting number 6 on the British album charts. Their first three singles (including their third "Apples and Oranges"),
were written by Barrett, who also was the principal visionary/author of their critically acclaimed 1967 debut album.
Of the eleven songs on Piper, Barrett wrote eight and co-wrote another two.[29]

Departure from Pink Floyd


Through late 1967 and early 1968, Barrett's behaviour became increasingly erratic and unpredictable, partly as a
consequence of his reported heavy use of psychedelic drugs, most prominently LSD. Many reports described him on
stage, strumming one chord through the entire concert, or not playing at all. At a show at The Fillmore in San
Francisco, during a performance of "Interstellar Overdrive", Barrett slowly detuned his guitar. The audience seemed
to enjoy such antics, unaware of the rest of the band's consternation. Interviewed on Pat Boone's show during this
tour, Syd's reply to Boone's questions was a "blank and totally mute stare," according to Nick Mason, "Syd wasn't
into moving his lips that day." Barrett exhibited similar behaviour during the band's first appearance on Dick Clark's
popular TV show American Bandstand.[30] Although surviving footage of this appearance shows Barrett miming his
parts of the song competently,[31] during a group interview afterwards, when asked two questions by Clark, Barrett's

Syd Barrett
answers were terse, almost to the point of rudeness (though, as Clark admitted, they had been flying non-stop from
London to Los Angeles). During this time, Barrett would often forget to bring his guitar to sessions, damage
equipment and occasionally was unable to hold his plectrum.[32] Before a performance in late 1967, Barrett
reportedly crushed Mandrax tranquilliser tablets and an entire tube of Brylcreem into his hair, which subsequently
melted down his face under the heat of the stage lighting,[33] making him look like "a guttered candle". Nick Mason
later disputed the Mandrax portion of this story, stating that "Syd would never waste good mandies".
During their UK tour with Jimi Hendrix in November 1967, guitarist David O'List from The Nice was called in to
substitute for Barrett on several occasions when he was unable to perform or failed to appear. And sometime around
Christmas, David Gilmour (Barrett's old school friend) was asked to join the band as a second guitarist to cover for
Barrett, whose erratic behaviour prevented him from performing. For a handful of shows Gilmour played and sang
while Barrett wandered around on stage, occasionally deciding to join in playing. The other band members soon
grew tired of Barrett's antics and, on 26 January 1968, when Waters was driving on the way to a show at
Southampton University, the band elected not to pick Barrett up: one person in the car said, "Shall we pick Syd up?"
and another said, "Let's not bother."[34] As Barrett had, up until then, written the bulk of the band's material, the
initial plan was to keep him in the group as a non-touring memberas The Beach Boys had done with Brian
Wilsonbut this soon proved to be impractical.[35] Gilmour subsequently became a full-time member of the band
from that point onward.
According to Roger Waters, Barrett came into what was to be their last practice session with a new song he had
dubbed "Have You Got It Yet?". The song seemed simple enough when he first presented it, but it soon became
impossibly difficult to learn and they eventually realised that while they were practising it, Barrett kept changing the
arrangement. He would then play it again, with the arbitrary changes, and sing "Have you got it yet?". Eventually
they realised they never would and that they were simply bearing the brunt of Barrett's idiosyncratic sense of
humour.[36] Waters had called it "a real act of mad genius".
Barrett did not contribute material to the band after A Saucerful of Secrets was released in 1968. Of the songs he
wrote for Pink Floyd after The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, only one ("Jugband Blues") made it to the band's second
album; one ("Apples and Oranges") became a less-than-successful single, and two others ("Scream Thy Last
Scream" and "Vegetable Man") were never officially released. Barrett supposedly spent time outside the recording
studio, in the reception area, waiting to be invited in. He also showed up to a few gigs and glared at Gilmour. Barrett
played slide guitar on "Remember a Day" (which had been first attempted during the Piper sessions), and also
played on "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun".[37] On 6 April 1968, the group officially announced Barrett
was no longer a member, the same day the band's contract with Blackhill Enterprises was terminated.

Solo years (196872)


After leaving Pink Floyd, Barrett left the public eye. At the behest of EMI and Harvest Records, he embarked on a
brief solo career, releasing two solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett (both 1970), and a single, "Octopus".
Some songs, "Terrapin", "Maisie" and "Bob Dylan Blues", reflected Barrett's early interest in the blues.[38]
The Madcap Laughs
Main article: The Madcap Laughs
After Barrett left Pink Floyd, Jenner followed suit. He led Barrett into EMI Studios to record some tracks in May
that would later be released on Barrett's first solo album, The Madcap Laughs. However, Jenner said: "I had
seriously underestimated the difficulties of working with him".[39] By the sessions of June and July, most of the
tracks were in better shape; however, shortly after the July sessions, Barrett broke up with girlfriend Lindsay Corner
and went on a drive around Britain in his Mini, ending up in psychiatric care in Cambridge. During New Year 1969,
a somewhat recovered Barrett had taken up tenancy in a flat on Egerton Gardens, Earls Court, London, with artist
Duggie Fields. Here, Barrett's flat was so close to that of Gilmour's that Gilmour could look right into Barrett's

Syd Barrett
kitchen. Deciding to return to music, Barrett contacted EMI and was passed to Malcolm Jones, the then-head of
EMI's new prog rock label, Harvest (after Norman Smith and Jenner declined to produce Barrett's record, Jones
produced it). Barrett wanted to recover the Jenner-produced sessions recordings; several of the tracks were improved
upon.
The Jones-produced sessions started in April 1969 at EMI Studios. After the first of these sessions, Barrett brought
in friends to help out: Humble Pie drummer, Jerry Shirley and Jokers Wild (Gilmour's old band) drummer, Willie
Wilson. For the sessions, Gilmour played bass. Talking to Barrett wasn't easy, said Jones: "It was a case of following
him, not playing with him. They were seeing and then playing so they were always a note behind". A few tracks on
the album feature overdubs by members of the band Soft Machine. During this time, Barrett also played guitar on the
sessions for Soft Machine founder Kevin Ayers' debut LP Joy of a Toy, although his performance on "Religious
Experience" (later titled "Singing a Song in the Morning") was not released until the album was reissued in 2003.
One time, Barrett had told his flatmate that he was going off "for an afternoon drive". However, he followed Pink
Floyd to Ibiza (according to legend, he skipped check-ins and customs, ran onto the runway and attempted to flag
down a jet). One of his friends, J. Ryan Eaves, bass player for the short-lived but influential Manchester band
"York's Ensemble", later spotted him on a beach wearing messed-up clothes and with a carrier bag full of money. At
this point, during the trip, Barrett had asked Gilmour for his help in the recording sessions.
After two of the Gilmour/Waters-produced sessions,[40] they remade one track from the Soft Machine overdubs and
recorded three tracks. These sessions came to a minor halt when Gilmour and Waters were mixing Pink Floyd's
newly recorded album, Ummagumma, to Barrett's dismay. However, through the end of July, they managed to record
three more tracks. The problem with the recording was that the songs were recorded as Barrett played them "live" in
studio. On the released versions a number of them have false starts and commentaries from Barrett. Despite the track
being closer to complete and better produced, Gilmour and Waters left the Jones-produced track "Opel" off
Madcap.[41]
Gilmour, on the sessions for The Madcap Laughs:
"[Sessions] were pretty tortuous and very rushed. We had very little time, particularly with The Madcap
Laughs. Syd was very difficult, we got that very frustrated feeling: Look, it's your fucking career, mate. Why
don't you get your finger out and do something? The guy was in trouble, and was a close friend for many years
before then, so it really was the least one could do."
David Gilmour,
Upon the album's release in January 1970, Malcolm Jones was shocked by the substandard musicianship on the
Gilmour and Waters-produced songs: "I felt angry. It's like dirty linen in public and very unnecessary and unkind".
Gilmour said: "Perhaps we were trying to show what Syd was really like. But perhaps we were trying to punish
him". Waters was more positive: "Syd is a genius".
"It's quite nice but I'd be very surprised if it did anything if I were to drop dead. I don't think it would stand as
my last statement."
Barrett,
Barrett
Main article: Barrett (album)
The second album, Barrett, was recorded more sporadically than the first, with sessions taking place between
February and July 1970. The album was produced by David Gilmour, and featured Gilmour on bass guitar, Richard
Wright on keyboard and Humble Pie drummer Jerry Shirley. The first two songs attempted were for Barrett to play
and/or sing to an existing backing track. However, Gilmour thought they were losing the "Barrett-ness". One track
("Rats") was originally recorded with Barrett on his own. That would later be overdubbed by musicians, despite the
changing tempos. Shirley said of Barrett's playing: "He would never play the same tune twice. Sometimes Syd

Syd Barrett
couldn't play anything that made sense; other times what he'd play was absolute magic." At times Barrett would say:
"Perhaps we could make the middle darker and maybe the end a bit middle afternoonish. At the moment it's too
windy and icy".
These sessions were happening while Pink Floyd had just begun to work on Atom Heart Mother. On various
occasions, Barrett went to "spy" on the band as they recorded their album.
Wright said of the Barrett sessions:
Doing Syd's record was interesting, but extremely difficult. Dave [Gilmour] and Roger did the first one (The
Madcap Laughs) and Dave and myself did the second one. But by then it was just trying to help Syd any way
we could, rather than worrying about getting the best guitar sound. You could forget about that! It was just
going into the studio and trying to get him to sing.
Richard Wright,
Performances
Despite the numerous recording dates for his solo albums, Barrett undertook very little musical activity between
1968 and 1972 outside the studio. On 24 February 1970, he appeared on John Peel's BBC radio programme Top
Gear playing five songsonly one of which had been previously released. Three would be re-recorded for the
Barrett album, while the song "Two of a Kind" was a one-off performance (possibly written by Richard Wright).[42]
According to David Gilmour, Wright wrote the song but an increasingly confused Barrett insisted it was his own
composition (and wanted to include it on The Madcap Laughs).</ref> Barrett was accompanied on this session by
Gilmour and Shirley who played bass and percussion, respectively.[43]
Gilmour and Shirley also backed Barrett for his one and only live concert during this period. The gig took place on 6
June 1970 at the Olympia Exhibition Hall as part of a Music and Fashion Festival. The trio performed four songs,
"Terrapin", "Gigolo Aunt", "Effervescing Elephant" and "Octopus". Poor mixing left the vocals barely audible until
part-way through the last number. At the end of the fourth song, Barrett unexpectedly but politely put down his
guitar and walked off the stage. The performance has been bootlegged. Barrett made one last appearance on BBC
Radio, recording three songs at their studios on 16 February 1971. [44] All three came from the Barrett album. After
this session, he took a hiatus from his music career that lasted more than a year, although in an extensive interview
with Mick Rock and Rolling Stone in December, he discussed himself at length, showed off his new 12-string guitar,
talked about touring with Jimi Hendrix and stated that he was frustrated in terms of his musical work because of his
inability to find anyone good to play with.

Later years (19722006)


Stars and final recordings
See also: Stars (British band)
In February 1972, after a few guest spots in Cambridge with ex-Pink Fairies member Twink on drums and Jack
Monck on bass using the name The Last Minute Put Together Boogie Band (backing visiting blues musician Eddie
"Guitar" Burns and also featuring Henry Cow guitarist Fred Frith), the trio formed a short-lived band called Stars.
Though they were initially well received at gigs in the Dandelion coffee bar and the town's Market Square, one of
their gigs at the Corn Exchange in Cambridge with the MC5 proved to be disastrous. A few days after this final
show, Twink recalled that Barrett stopped him on the street, showed him a scathing review of the gig they had
played, and quit on the spot, despite having played at least one subsequent gig at the same venue supporting Nektar.
Free from his EMI contract on 9 May 1972, Barrett signed a document that ended his association with Pink Floyd,
and any financial interest in future recordings. Barrett attended an informal jazz and poetry performance by Pete
Brown and former Cream bassist Jack Bruce in October 1973. Brown arrived at the show late, and saw that Bruce
was already onstage, along with "a guitarist I vaguely recognised", playing the Horace Silver tune "Doodlin'". Later

Syd Barrett
in the show, Brown read out a poem, which he dedicated to Syd, because, "he's here in Cambridge, and he's one of
the best songwriters in the country" when, to his surprise, the guitar player from earlier in the show stood up and
said, "No I'm not".[45] By the end of 1973, Barrett had returned to live in London, staying at various hotels and, in
December of that year, settling in at Chelsea Cloisters. He had little contact with others, apart from his regular visits
to his management's offices to collect his royalties, and the occasional visit from his sister Rosemary.
In August 1974, Jenner persuaded Barrett to return to Abbey Road Studios in hope of recording another album.
According to John Leckie, who engineered these sessions, even at this point Syd still "looked like he did when he
was younger..long haired".[46] The sessions lasted three days and consisted of blues rhythm tracks with tentative and
disjointed guitar overdubs. Barrett recorded 11 tracks. Once again, Barrett withdrew from the music industry. He
sold the rights to his solo albums back to the record label and moved into a London hotel. During this period, several
attempts to employ him as a record producer (including one by Jamie Reid on behalf of the Sex Pistols, and another
by The Damned, who wanted him to produce their second album) were all fruitless.[47]
Withdrawal to Cambridge
In 1978, when Barrett's money ran out, he moved back to Cambridge to live with his mother. He returned to live in
London again in 1982, but lasted only a few weeks and soon returned to Cambridge for good. Barrett walked the 50
miles (80km) from London to Cambridge.[48] Until his death, Barrett received royalties from his work with Pink
Floyd from each compilation and some of the live albums and singles that featured his songs. Gilmour commented
that he (Gilmour) "[made] sure the money [got] to him all right".
In 1996, Barrett was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Pink Floyd; he did not attend the
ceremony.
According to a 2005 profile by biographer Tim Willis, Barrett, who had reverted to using his original name of Roger,
continued to live in his late mother's semi-detached home in Cambridge, and had returned to painting, creating large
abstract canvases. He was also said to have been an avid gardener. His main point of contact with the outside world
was his sister, Rosemary, who lived nearby. He was reclusive, and his physical health declined, as he suffered from
stomach ulcers and type 2 diabetes.
Although Barrett had not appeared or spoken in public since the mid-1970s, time did little to diminish interest in his
life and work. Reporters and fans still travelled to Cambridge to seek him out, despite his attempts to live a quiet life
and public appeals from his family for people to leave him alone. Many photos of Barrett being harassed by
paparazzi when walking or cycling, from the 1980s until his death in 2006, have been published. Apparently, Barrett
did not like being reminded about his musical past. The other members of Pink Floyd had no direct contact with him.
He visited his sister's house in November 2001 to watch the BBC Omnibus documentary made about him
reportedly he found some of it "a bit noisy", enjoyed seeing Mike Leonard of Leonard's Lodgers again, calling him
his 'teacher', and enjoyed hearing "See Emily Play" again.
Death and aftermath
After suffering from diabetes for several years, Barrett died at home in Cambridge on 7 July 2006, aged 60. The
cause of death was pancreatic cancer.[49] The occupation on his death certificate was "retired musician". He was
cremated, with his ashes given to a family member or friend. In 2006, his home in St. Margaret's Square, Cambridge,
was put on the market and reportedly attracted considerable interest. After over 100 showings, many by fans, it was
sold to a French couple who bought it simply because they liked it; reportedly they knew nothing about Barrett. On
28 November 2006, Barrett's other possessions were sold at an auction at Cheffins auction house in Cambridge,
raising 120,000 for charity. Items sold included paintings, scrapbooks and everyday items that Barrett had
decorated. NME produced a tribute issue to Barrett a week later with a photo of him on the cover. In an interview
with The Sunday Times, Barrett's sister revealed that he had written a book: "He read very deeply about the history of
art and actually wrote an unpublished book about it, which I'm too sad to read at the moment. But he found his own

Syd Barrett
mind so absorbing that he didn't want to be distracted."
According to local newspapers, Barrett left approximately 1.7million to his two brothers and two sisters. This sum
was apparently largely acquired from royalties from Pink Floyd compilations and live recordings featuring songs he
had written while with the band. A tribute concert called Games for May was held at the Barbican Centre, London
on 10 May 2007 with Robyn Hitchcock, Captain Sensible, Damon Albarn, Chrissie Hynde, Kevin Ayers and his
Pink Floyd bandmates performing. A series of events called The City Wakes was held in Cambridge in October 2008
to celebrate Barrett's life, art and music. Barrett's sister, Rosemary Breen, supported this, the first-ever series of
official events in memory of her brother. After the festival's success, arts charity Escape Artists announced plans to
create a centre in Cambridge, using art to help people suffering from mental health problems.

Legacy
Wish You Were Here sessions
Barrett had one noted reunion with the members of Pink Floyd, in 1975 during the recording sessions for Wish You
Were Here. He attended the Abbey Road session unannounced, and watched the band record "Shine On You Crazy
Diamond" a song that happened to be about Barrett. By that time, the 29-year-old Barrett had become quite
overweight, had shaved off all of his hair (including his eyebrows), and his ex-bandmates did not at first recognise
him. Barrett's behaviour at the session was erratic; he spent part of the session brushing his teeth.[50] Roger Waters
finally managed to ask him what he thought of the song and he simply said "sounds a bit old". He briefly attended
the reception for Gilmour's wedding to Ginger that immediately followed the recording sessions; however, he left
early without saying goodbye.
Apart from a brief encounter between Waters and Barrett in Harrods a couple of years later[51] (during which, when
Barrett saw Waters he ran outside, dropping his bags full of sweets in the process), this was the last time any member
of Pink Floyd saw him. A reflection on the day appears in Nick Mason's book Inside Out: A Personal History of
Pink Floyd. A reference to this reunion also appears in the film The Wall, where the character Pink, played by Bob
Geldof, shaves his body hair after having a mental breakdown, just as Barrett had.

Compilations
In 1988, EMI Records (after constant pressure from Malcolm Jones) released an album of Barrett's studio out-takes
and previously unreleased material recorded from 1968 to 1970 under the title Opel. The disc was originally set to
include the unreleased Barrett Pink Floyd songs "Scream Thy Last Scream" and "Vegetable Man", which had been
remixed for the album by Jones, but the band pulled two songs[52] before Opel was finalised.[53] In 1993 EMI issued
another release, Crazy Diamond, a boxed set of all three albums, each with further out-takes from his solo sessions
that illustrated Barrett's inability/refusal to play a song the same way twice. EMI also released The Best of Syd
Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me? in the UK on 16 April 2001 and in the US on 11 September 2001. This was the first
time his song "Bob Dylan Blues" was officially released, taken from a demo tape that Gilmour had kept after an
early 1970s session. Gilmour kept the tape, which also contains the unreleased "Living Alone" from the Barrett
sessions. In October 2010 Harvest/EMI and Capitol Records released An Introduction to Syd Barretta collection of
both his Pink Floyd and remastered solo work. The 2010 compilation An Introduction to Syd Barrett includes the
downloadable bonus track "Rhamadan", a 20-minute track recorded at one of Syd's earliest solo sessions, in May
1968. In 2011, it was announced that a vinyl double album version would be issued for Record Store Day.
Bootleg editions of Barrett's live and solo material exist. For years the "off air" recordings of the BBC sessions with
Barrett's Pink Floyd circulated, until an engineer who had taken a tape of the early Pink Floyd gave it back to the
BBCwhich played it during a tribute to John Peel on their website. During this tribute, the first Peel programme
(Top Gear) was aired in its entirety. This show featured the 1967 live versions of "Flaming", "Set the Controls for
the Heart of the Sun", and a brief 90-second snippet of the instrumental "Reaction in G". In 2012, engineer Andy

Syd Barrett

10

Jackson said he had found "a huge box of assorted tapes", in Mason's possession, containing versions of R&B songs
that (the Barrett-era) Pink Floyd played in their early years.

Creative impact and technical innovation


Barrett wrote most of Pink Floyd's early
material. He was also an innovative guitarist,
using extended techniques and exploring the
musical and sonic possibilities of dissonance,
distortion, feedback, the echo machine, tapes and
other effects; his experimentation was partly
inspired by free improvisation guitarist with the
group AMM, active at the time in London, Keith
Rowe.[54] One of Barrett's trademarks was
playing his guitar through an old echo box while
sliding a Zippo lighter up and down the
fret-board to create the mysterious, otherworldly
sounds that became associated with the group.
Barrett was known to have used Binson delay
units to achieve his trademark echo sounds.
Daevid Allen, founder member of Soft Machine
and Gong, has cited Barrett's use of slide guitar
with echo as a key inspiration for his own
"glissando guitar" style.

Barrett's first acoustic guitar

Barrett's free-form sequences of "sonic carpets"


pioneered a new way to play the rock guitar.[55]
He played several different guitars during his
tenure, including an old Harmony hollowbody
electric, a Harmony acoustic, a Fender acoustic,
a single-coil Danelectro 59 DC, several different
Fender Telecasters and a white Fender
Stratocaster in late 1967. A silver Fender Esquire
with mirrored discs glued to the body was the
guitar he was most often associated with and the
guitar he "felt most close to."
Mirrored Fender Esquire

Musical and pop culture influence


Many artists have acknowledged Barrett's influence on their work. Paul McCartney, Pete Townshend, Blur,[56]
Kevin Ayers, Gong, Marc Bolan, Tangerine Dream,[57] Julian Cope and David Bowie were inspired by Barrett;
Jimmy Page, Brian Eno, and The Damned[58] all expressed interest in working with him at some point during the
1970s. Bowie recorded a cover of "See Emily Play" on his 1973 album Pin Ups. The track "Grass", from XTC's
album Skylarking was influenced when Andy Partridge let fellow band member Colin Moulding borrow his Barrett
records. Robyn Hitchcock's career was dedicated to being Barrett-esque; he even played "Dominoes" for the 2003
BBC documentary The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story.
Barrett's decline had a profound effect on Roger Waters' songwriting, and the theme of mental illness permeated
Pink Floyd's later albums, particularly 1973's The Dark Side of the Moon and 1975's Wish You Were Here which was

Syd Barrett
a deliberate and affectionate tribute to Barrett, the song, "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", and also 1979's The Wall.
"Wish You Were Here", partly about Barrett, borrows imagery of a "steel rail" from Barrett's solo song, "If It's in
You," from The Madcap Laughs album.
In 1987, an album of Barrett cover songs called Beyond the Wildwood was released. The album was a collection of
cover songs from Barrett's tenure with Pink Floyd and from his solo career. Artists appearing were UK and US indie
bands including The Shamen, Opal, The Soup Dragons, and Plasticland.
Other artists who have written tributes to Barrett include his contemporary Kevin Ayers, who wrote "O Wot a
Dream" in his honour (Barrett provided guitar to an early version of Ayers' song "Religious Experience: Singing a
Song in the Morning"). Robyn Hitchcock has covered many of his songs live and on record and paid homage to his
forebear with the songs "The Man Who Invented Himself" and "(Feels Like) 1974". Phish covered "Bike", "No
Good Trying", "Love You", "Baby Lemonade" and "Terrapin". The Television Personalities' single "I Know Where
Syd Barrett Lives" from their 1981 album And Don't the Kids Love It is another tribute.[59]</ref> In 2008, The Trash
Can Sinatras released a single in tribute to the life and work of Syd Barrett called "Oranges and Apples", from their
2009 album In The Music. Proceeds from the single go to the Syd Barrett Trust in support of arts in mental health.
Johnny Depp showed interest in a biographical film based on Barrett's life. Barrett is portrayed briefly in the opening
scene of Tom Stoppard's play Rock 'n' Roll (2006), performing "Golden Hair". His life and music, including the
disastrous Cambridge Corn Exchange concert and his later reclusive lifestyle, are a recurring motif in the work.
Barrett died during the play's run in London.

Mental state
There has been much speculation concerning Barrett's psychological well-being. Many believe he suffered from
schizophrenia.[60] Barrett's use of psychedelic drugs, especially LSD, during the 1960s is well documented. In an
article published in 2006, in response to notions that Barrett's problems came from the drug, Gilmour was quoted as
saying: "In my opinion, his nervous breakdown would have happened anyway. It was a deep-rooted thing. But I'll
say the psychedelic experience might well have acted as a catalyst. Still, I just don't think he could deal with the
vision of success and all the things that went with it." Many stories of Barrett's erratic behaviour off stage as well as
on are also well-documented. In Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey, author Nicholas Schaffner
interviewed people who knew Barrett before and during his Pink Floyd days. These included friends Peter and Susan
Wynne-Wilson, artist Duggie Fields (with whom Barrett shared a flat during the late 1960s), June Bolan and Storm
Thorgerson, among others.
"For June Bolan, the alarm bells began to sound only when Syd kept his girlfriend under lock and key for three days,
occasionally shoving a ration of biscuits under the door."[61] A claim of cruelty against Barrett committed by the
groupies and hangers-on who frequented his apartment during this period was described by writer and critic Jonathan
Meades. "I went [to Barrett's flat] to see Harry and there was this terrible noise. It sounded like heating pipes
shaking. I said, 'What's up?' and he sort of giggled and said, 'That's Syd having a bad trip. We put him in the linen
cupboard'". Storm Thorgerson responded to this claim by stating "I do not remember locking Syd up in a cupboard.
It sounds to me like pure fantasy, like Jonathan Meades was on dope himself." Watkinson and Anderson included
quotes from a story told to them by Thorgerson that underscored how volatile Barrett could be. "On one occasion, I
had to pull him off Lindsay (Barrett's girlfriend at the time) because he was beating her over the head with a
mandolin".[62] On one occasion, Barrett threw a woman called Gilly across the room, because she refused to go to
Gilmour's house. According to Gilmour in an interview with Nick Kent, the other members of Pink Floyd
approached psychiatrist R. D. Laing with the 'Barrett problem'. After hearing a tape of a Barrett conversation, Laing
declared him "incurable".[63][64]
After Barrett died, his sister Rosemary insisted that Barrett neither suffered from mental illness nor received
treatment for it at any time since they resumed regular contact in the 1980s. She allowed that he did spend some time
in a private "home for lost souls"Greenwoods in Essexbut claimed there was no formal therapy programme

11

Syd Barrett
there. Some years later, Barrett apparently agreed to sessions with a psychiatrist at Fulbourn psychiatric hospital in
Cambridge, but Breen claimed that neither medication nor therapy was considered appropriate. His sister denied he
was a recluse or that he was vague about his past: "Roger may have been a bit selfishor rather self-absorbedbut
when people called him a recluse they were really only projecting their own disappointment. He knew what they
wanted, but he wasn't willing to give it to them." Barrett, she said, took up photography and sometimes they went to
the seaside together. "Quite often he took the train on his own to London to look at the major art collectionsand he
loved flowers. He made regular trips to the Botanic Gardens and to the dahlias at Anglesey Abbey, near Lode. But of
course, his passion was his painting", she said.

Discography
Main article: Syd Barrett discography
See also: Pink Floyd discography
Studio albums
The Madcap Laughs (1970)
Barrett (1970)

Filmography
London '66'67 (1967)
Tonite Lets All Make Love in London (1967)
The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story (2003)

References
Footnotes
[1] http:/ / www. sydbarrett. com
[2] Manning 2006, pp.910.
[3] Manning 2006, p.10.
[4] Chapman 2010, p.12.
[5] Mason, Nick. Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004) ISBN 978-0-297-84387-0.
[6] Chapman 2010, p.1112.
[7] Chapman 2010, p.8.
[8] Chapman 2010, p.9.
[9] Blake 2008, p.17.
[10] Chapman 2010, p.31.
[11] Chapman 2010, p.33.
[12] Schaffner 2005, p.22-23.
[13] Manning 2006, pp.1112.
[14] Manning 2006, p.14.
[15] Blake 2008, p.38.
[16] Barrett e devised the name "Pink Floyd" by juxtaposing the first names of Pink Anderson and Floyd Council<ref name=Irgh53>
[17] Manning 2006, p. 19
[18] They recorded a cover of Slim Harpo's "I'm a King Bee", and three Barrett originals: "Double O Bo", "Butterfly" and "Lucy Leave".<ref>
[19] While under the influence of the acid, Barrett had placed an orange, a plum and a matchbox into a corner, while staring at the fruit, which he
claimed symbolised "Venus and Jupiter". UNIQ-ref-0-b6a3d64c509b10e6-QINU UNIQ-ref-1-b6a3d64c509b10e6-QINU Thorgerson later
used this imagery, by adding the previously mentioned items to the cover of the double album combination of Barrett's solo albums, Syd
Barrett.
[20] Blake 2008, p.45.
[21] The band were still playing R&B hits as late as early 1966,<ref name=Irgh86>
[22] Barrett, frequently at his Earlham Street residence, played The Mothers of Invention's Freak Out!, The Byrds' Fifth Dimension, The Fugs'
and Love's debut albums,<ref name=manning14>
[23] Manning 2006, p. 27

12

Syd Barrett
[24] Chapman 2010, p. 115
[25] The demo recordings consist of "I Get Stoned" (aka "Stoned Alone"), "Let's Roll Another One", "Lucy Leave" and a 15-minute version of
"Interstellar Overdrive".
[26] Manning 2006, pp.2829.
[27] The Sound Techniques session resulted in a recording of the single "Arnold Layne", and the recording of other songs: "Matilda Mother",
"Chapter 24", "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Let's Roll Another One" (which was renamed to "Candy and a Currant Bun", at the suggestion of
Waters). Referring to the choice of "Arnold Layne", Nick Mason said: "We knew we wanted to be rock'n'roll stars and we wanted to make
singles, so it seemed the most suitable song to condense into 3 minutes without losing too much".<ref name="manning20">
[28] Manning 2006, p.34.
[29] EMI Records Ltd., "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" insert
[30] Schaffner 2005, p.13.
[31] Chapman 2010, p.199.
[32] Willis 2002, p.102.
[33] Manning 2006, p.42.
[34] Blake 2008, p.112.
[35] Schaffner 2005, p.265.
[36] DiLorenzo, Kris. "Syd Barrett: Careening Through Life." (http:/ / www. schizophrenia. com/ stories/ sbarrett. htm) Trouser Press February
1978 pp. 2632
[37] 1993 Guitar World interview with David Gilmour
[38] Manning 2006, p.9.
[39] Manning 2006, p.70.
[40] Parker 2001, p.iv.
[41] Manning 2006, pp.7172.
[42] "Two of a Kind" was credited to Richard Wright on the original Peel Session release, but to Barrett on later releases, including The Best of
Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?.<ref>
[43] These five songs were originally released on Syd Barrett: The Peel Session.
[44] These three songs, along with the five from the Top Gear performance, were released on Syd Barrett: The Radio One Sessions.
[45] Palacios 2010, p.401.
[46] Parker 2001, p.194.
[47] Schaffner 2005, p.213.
[48] Palacios 2010, p.414.
[49] Watkinson & Anderson 2001.
[50] Palacios 2010, p. 408
[51] Palacios 2010, p.412.
[52] Manning 2006, p.186.
[53] Schaffner 2005, pp.116117.
[54] Palacios 2010, p.101.
[55] Denyer, Ralph (1992). The Guitar Handbook. London: Dorling Kindersley Ltd. ISBN 0-679-74275-1, p 23
[56] Pink Floyd - Syd Barrett Article - Q Magazine January 2004 (http:/ / www. pinkfloydz. com/ artqmagsydjan2004. htm)
[57] Manning 2006, p.285286.
[58] Schaffner 2005, p.214.
[59] The Television Personalities became the subject of controversy and derision when, as they had been selected as the opening act on Gilmour's
About Face tour in the early 1980s, lead singer Dan Treacy decided to read aloud Barrett's real home address to the audience of thousands.
Gilmour removed them from the tour immediately afterwards.<ref>Schaffner 2005, p. 123
[60] "Syd Barrett, Founder of Pink Floyd band, Sufferer of Schizophrenia, Passed Away this Week." (http:/ / www. schizophrenia. com/ sznews/
archives/ 003640. html) Schizophrenia Daily News Blog. 12 July 2006
[61] Schaffner 2005, p.77.
[62] Watkinson & Anderson 2001, p.83.
[63] Kent, Nick. Syd Barrett feature. New Musical Express, 13 April 1974.
[64] Schaffner 2005, pp.106107.

Citations

13

Syd Barrett

Sources
Blake, Mark (2008). Comfortably Numb: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo.
ISBN0-306-81752-7.
Chapman, Rob (2010). Syd Barrett: A Very Irregular Head (Paperback ed.). London: Faber.
ISBN978-0-571-23855-2.
Jones, Malcolm (2003). The Making of The Madcap Laughs (21st Anniversary ed.). Brain Damage.
Manning, Toby (2006). The Rough Guide to Pink Floyd (1st ed.). London: Rough Guides. ISBN1-84353-575-0.
Mason, Nick (2011) [2004]. Philip Dodd, ed. Inside Out A Personal History of Pink Floyd (Paperback ed.).
Phoenix. ISBN978-0-7538-1906-7.
Palacios, Julian (1997). Lost in the Woods: Syd Barrett and the Pink Floyd. Boxtree. ISBN0-7522-2328-3.
Palacios, Julian (2010). Syd Barrett & Pink Floyd: Dark Globe (Rev. ed.). London: Plexus. ISBN0-85965-431-1.
Parker, David (2003). Random Precision: Recording the Music of Syd Barrett 19651974. Cherry Red.
ISBN1-901447-25-1.
Parker, David (2001). Random Precision: Recording the Music of Syd Barrett, 19651974. Cherry Red Books.
Schaffner, Nicholas (2005). Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey (New ed.). London: Helter Skelter.
ISBN1-905139-09-8.
Watkinson, Mike; Anderson, Pete (2001). Crazy Diamond: Syd Barrett & the Dawn of Pink Floyd.
Willis, Tim (2002). Madcap: The Half-Life of Syd Barrett, Pink Floyd's Lost Genius. Short Books.
ISBN1-904095-24-0.

External links
The Syd Barrett Archives (http://www.sydbarrett.net/)
Official Syd Barrett Fund Website (http://www.syd-barrett-trust.org.uk/)
Syd Barrett (http://www.mtv.com/artists/syd-barrett) at MTV

14

15

Discography
Syd Barrett discography
Syd Barrettdiscography
Releases
Studio albums

Live albums

Compilation albums 6
Singles

Main article: Syd Barrett


Syd Barrett was the original frontman, and song-writer for Pink Floyd.
With Pink Floyd he recorded and wrote the majority of songs for their first album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
and was credited for one song ("Jugband Blues") on their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets. To this day, his Pink
Floyd songs are used frequently on the band's various compilations.
After he left Pink Floyd, he recorded two solo albums: The Madcap Laughs and Barrett (both 1970). Both albums
were re-released as a double album, after the unexpected success of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon. On 24
February 1970, he recorded five songs (one from The Madcap Laughs, three from Barrett, and a one-off, "Two of a
Kind") for the BBC Radio show Top Gear. These songs were released as a mini-album, in 1987, as Syd Barrett: The
Peel Session. In 2004, the five songs from Top Gear, and three songs from a then-newly discovered tape of Bob
Harris show, were released as The Radio One Sessions.

Solo career
Albums
Studio
Year

Album details

Peak chart positions

UK
1970 The Madcap Laughs

Barrett

40

Released: 3 January 1970


Label: Harvest/EMI

Released: 14 November 1970


Label: Harvest/EMI
"" denotes a release that did not chart.

Syd Barrett discography

16

Live
Year

Album details

Peak chart positions

UK
1987 The Peel Session

Released: 25 January 1987


Label: Strange Fruit

2004 The Radio One Sessions

Released: 29 March 2004


Label: Strange Fruit
"" denotes a release that did not chart.

Compilations
Year

Album details

Peak chart positions

1974 Syd Barrett

Released: 19 October 2010


Label: Harvest/EMI
"" denotes a release that did not chart.

Singles

104

Released: 16 April 2001


Label: Harvest/EMI

2010 An Introduction to Syd Barrett

Released: April 1993


Label: Harvest/EMI

2001 The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?

163

Released: 29 May 1992


Label: Cleopatra Records

1993 Crazy Diamond

Released: 17 October 1988


Label: Harvest/EMI

1992 Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett

US

Released: 14 November 1974


Label: Harvest/EMI

1988 Opel

UK

Syd Barrett discography

17

Year

Single

Peak chart positions

Album

UK

1969

"Octopus"

The Madcap Laughs

"" denotes releases that did not chart or weren't released in that country.

Appearances
Joy of a Toy by Kevin Ayers (November 1969) Plays guitar on "Religious Experience" ("Singing a Song in the
Morning") bonus track on remastered 2003 CD.

References
Biblobiography
Povey, Glenn (2007). Echoes (http://books.google.com/?id=qnnl3FnO-B4C). Mind Head Publishing.
ISBN0-9554624-0-1. Retrieved 15 June 2012{{inconsistent citations}}

18

Studio albums
The Madcap Laughs
For the double album containing The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, see Syd Barrett (album).

The Madcap Laughs


Studio album by Syd Barrett
Released

3January1970

Recorded 28 May 1968 5 August 1969


Abbey Road Studios, London
Genre

Psychedelic folk, blues rock

Length

37:47 (Original release)


57:13 (Crazy Diamond reissue)

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol (US)

Producer Syd Barrett, Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, David Gilmour, Roger Waters
Syd Barrett chronology

The Madcap
Laughs
(1970)

Barrett
(1970)

Singles from The Madcap Laughs


1. "Octopus"
Released: 14 November 1969
Crazy Diamond reissue
Crazy Diamond reissue cover

The Madcap Laughs is the debut solo album by the English singer-songwriter Syd Barrett. It was recorded after
Barrett had left Pink Floyd in April 1968. The album had a chequered recording history, with work beginning in
mid-1968, but the bulk of the sessions taking place between April and July 1969, for which five different producers
were credited including Barrett, Peter Jenner (1968 sessions), Malcolm Jones (early-to-mid-1969 sessions), and
fellow Pink Floyd members David Gilmour and Roger Waters (mid-1969 sessions). Among the guest musicians are
Willie Wilson from (Gilmour's old band) Jokers Wild and Robert Wyatt of the band Soft Machine.
The Madcap Laughs, released in January 1970 on Harvest in the UK, and on Capitol Records in the US, enjoyed
minimal commercial success on release, reaching number 40 on the UK's official albums chart, while failing to hit
the US charts. It was re-released in 1974 as part of Syd Barrett (which contained The Madcap Laughs and Barrett).
The album was remastered and reissued in 1993, along with Barrett's other albums, Barrett (1970) and Opel (1988),
independently and as part of the Crazy Diamond box set. A newly remastered version was released in 2010.

The Madcap Laughs

Background
In the second half of 1967 and through to early 1968, when Syd Barrett was still part of Pink Floyd, Barrett's
behaviour became increasingly erratic and unpredictable. Many report having seen him on stage with the group
during this period, strumming on one chord through an entire concert or not playing at all. In August 1967, Pink
Floyd were forced to cancel their appearance at the prestigious National Jazz and Blues Festival, informing the
music press that Barrett was suffering from nervous exhaustion. Band manager Peter Jenner and Roger Waters
arranged for Barrett to see a psychiatrist (an appointment he failed to attend), while a stay on the Spanish island of
Formentera with Sam Hutt, a doctor well established in the underground music scene, led to no visible improvement
in Barrett's behaviour. A few dates in September were followed by the band's first tour of the United States. At this
point, Barrett's condition grew steadily worse. At a show at The Fillmore in San Francisco, during a performance of
"Interstellar Overdrive", Barrett slowly detuned his guitar; the audience seemed to enjoy such antics, unaware of the
rest of the band's consternation. Sometime in October, Jenner transferred tapes of "In the Beechwood", two takes of
"Vegetable Man", and a 5-minute backing track called "No Title", which Jenner hoped Barrett would finish
eventually.
Around Christmas 1967, David Gilmour was asked by the other members of Pink Floyd to join as a second guitarist,
to cover for Barrett, whose unpredictable behaviour prevented him from performing. For several shows Gilmour
sang and played while Barrett wandered around on stage, every now and then deciding to join in playing. Waters and
fellow band members Richard Wright and Nick Mason soon grew weary of Barrett's on-stage antics and, on 26
January 1968, when Waters was driving his bandmates from London to a show at Southampton University, they all
agreed to go without Barrett: according to Gilmour's recollection, one person asked, "Shall we pick Syd up?" and
another said, "Let's not bother." Since Barrett had written or co-written 10 of the 11 songs on their debut album, The
Piper at the Gates of Dawn, as well as the band's three singles up to this point, the original plan was to keep him in
the group as a non-touring member in a similar arrangement to what The Beach Boys had done with Brian Wilson
but this soon proved to be unworkable. On 6 April, the group officially announced that Barrett was no longer a
member of Pink Floyd. Upon leaving the Floyd, Barrett said to Melody Maker: "I suppose it was really just a matter
of being a little offhand about things".

Recording
Peter Jenner sessions
After Barrett left Pink Floyd in April 1968, Peter Jenner and Andrew King, from the band's management, followed
suit. In May, Jenner led Barrett into the then-named EMI Studios, on Abbey Road in northwest London, to record
some solo material, only part of which would later appear on The Madcap Laughs. Jenner thought Barrett would like
to finish the tracks that Jenner transferred the previous October, Barrett on the other hand, had other plans. During
these first, tentative sessions, Jenner failed to properly record any vocals at all, for the tracks "Golden Hair",[1] "Late
Night", "Clowns and Jugglers" (later retitled "Octopus"),[2] An early version of "Clowns and Jugglers", involving
military-style drumming and organ overdubs was included on the standard version of Opel, while a stripped-down
version is included on the Crazy Diamond reissue of Opel.</ref> "Silas Lang",[3]</ref> or "Lanky (Parts One and
Two)". After recording had resumed in June and July, progress continued on these tracks, especially "Swan Lee",
and a new, improved version of "Clowns and Jugglers" was taped at this point also. Barrett wouldn't commit to
recording the track "Rhamadan" to tape properly, however.
Although Jenner claims he got on well with the singer, he would also state that the 1968 sessions had not gone
smoothly, admitting: "I had seriously underestimated the difficulties of working with him..." Shortly after the July
dates, Barrett abruptly stopped recording, breaking up with girlfriend Lindsay Corner and then going off on a drive
around Britain in his Mini; he ended up in psychiatric care in Cambridge.

19

The Madcap Laughs

20

By the start of 1969, a somewhat recovered Barrett decided to return to his musical career and revisit the
Jenner-produced recordings. He contacted EMI, and was passed on to Malcolm Jones, then-head of EMI's new prog
rock label, Harvest. After both Jenner and Norman Smith, Pink Floyd's producer at the time, declined to work on the
album, Jones agreed to take on the role.

Malcolm Jones sessions


Jones had little difficulty in persuading his boss, Roy Featherstone, and
Ron White, authoriser of EMI recordings, to allow Barrett to record
with the company again. In April 1969, the young executive took over
the project and Barrett began working on newer material, while
reworking the 1968 recordings. Jones would later explain the rationale
behind EMI letting Barrett record again: "What was decided was to see
what was the strength of Syd's new material, and plan accordingly. If it
worked, then, O.K. we'd do an album. If not, we'd call it a day..." In a
Recording took place at Abbey Road Studios
meeting at Barrett's flat in Earls Court, unsure of Jenner's production
technique, Jones asked to hear some of the previous year's tapes; Barrett played him "Swan Lee", "Late Night",
"Rhamadan", "Lanky (Parts One and Two)" and "Golden Hair". Of these, "Swan Lee" had no vocals, but Jones saw
potential in the song; "Late Night" did have vocals and, Jones remarked, "a certain charm"; while "Golden Hair" was
"great". After the playbacks, Barrett performed several songs on guitar for Jones: "Opel" and "Clowns and Jugglers"
(both attempted during the sessions with Peter Jenner), and the newly written "Terrapin" and "Love You".
The Jones-produced sessions commenced on 10 April 1969 at EMI's Studio 3, with that day being dedicated to going
through the 1968 tapes again to see what could be improved upon. The first track to be worked on was "Swan Lee",
which received vocal overdubs and a new guitar track, and several ideas for "Clowns and Jugglers" were considered;
Barrett and Jones both felt that the results were superior to the previous versions. The following day, in about five
hours, Barrett recorded vocal and guitar tracks for four recently recorded songs, starting with "Opel",[4]</ref> and
two old ones. Barrett and his new producer were in agreement that "Opel" was among the best of the new recordings
at this time; only two complete takes of the song were taped, though, after multiple false starts. The next song
attempted was "Love You", the first take of which featured a faster tempo than the officially released take 2. After
"Love You", they recorded "It's No Good Trying", which was similarly completed in just a few takes. Barrett was in
"great form, and very happy", Jones recalled, and "very together". During the lunch break that day, they talked about
improving some of the other songs from the Jenner sessions, particularly "Golden Hair" and "Late Night", the last of
which was just a backing track at this point. After returning to the studio, they worked on "Terrapin", with Barrett
requiring just a single take, and added slide guitar and vocals to "Late Night".

The Madcap Laughs

The following session took place on 17 April, in Studio 2 at Abbey Road. Jones
arrived there to find that Barrett had brought in friends of his as support
musicians: Jerry Shirley, drummer with Humble Pie, and Willie Wilson, Jokers
Wild's drummer, although for this occasion he was playing bass. The problem
with this new set-up, though, was that the songs were recorded as Barrett played
them live in the studio; on the released versions, a number of them have false
starts and commentaries from Barrett. The first track Barrett and his fellow
musicians worked on was "No Man's Land", after Barrett had played through the
song several times, to allow Shirley and Wilson to pick up the segments. Once
the rehearsal was through, they went for a take, to check how the band sounded
and to test the equipment from within the control room. After these tests, the
band recorded three takes, the last of which became the master take for "No
Man's Land"; the bass, however, was re-recorded at a later date. Playing along
with Barrett wasn't easy, according to Jones: "It was a case of following him, not
playing with him. They were seeing and then playing so they were always a note
behind..." Shirley said of Barrett: "He gave the impression he knew something
you didn't. He had this music sort of giggle..."

21

Barrett used a Fender Telecaster,


similar to this one, for recording
rhythm guitar on the album

Next, they recorded a song that Barrett had written in a few minutes, "Here I
Go", which required no overdubs at all. This session for "No Man's Land" and
"Here I Go" lasted just three hours. When asked if he had any new songs for the
following week's session, on 23 April, Barrett's replied that he had "a weird idea I want to try out" and that other
musicians would not be required. Afterwards, Barrett mentioned that he was interested in revisting one of the Jenner
tracks "Rhamadan". On the morning of the 23rd, Barrett arrived at the studio with a cassette player, on which he
had recorded motorbike sounds; these, he told Jones, were "all ready to [be] put onto the 'Rhamadan' four track". The
producer described the sound quality as "terrible", an opinion that was confirmed once Barrett's player had been
hooked up to a 4-track machine. Instead it was decided that Barrett should source the motorbike sounds from EMI's
large sound effects library. The selection process took up to an hour, at which point Jones started to lose faith in
Barrett. Later on, Barrett changed his mind and abandoned the idea.
The session on 25 April was almost cancelled, due to Jones becoming ill from colitis. Beforehand, it had been agreed
that this session would be dedicated to transferring their previously recorded, 4-track recordings onto Studio 3's
newer 8-track machine, for further overdubs in later sessions. At Jones' suggestion, and despite warnings the
producer had received that Barrett should not be in the studio unaccompanied. Barrett went in on his own to carry
out the mixing. It had been decided that nearly all of the tracks that were recorded up to that point needed further
overdubbing except for "No Man's Land" and "Here I Go". At this point, Barrett considered placing "Opel" on the
album, Jones calls it among Barrett's "best and most haunting" songs. On the session for 3 May, three tracks on the
album were overdubbed by Robert Wyatt, Hugh Hopper and Mike Ratledge, all members of the band Soft Machine:
The three songs were "Love You", (now dropping "It's") "No Good Trying", and "Clowns and Jugglers".[5] Even
after the Soft Machine members added overdubs to "Clowns and Jugglers", Barrett wished to add bass and drums to
it.[6]</ref>
Robert Wyatt had said that the musicians would ask "What key is that in, Syd?", to which Barrett would simply reply
"Yeah" or "That's funny". During this time, Barrett also played guitar on the sessions for Soft Machine founder
Kevin Ayers' debut LP, Joy of a Toy, although his performance on "Religious Experience" was not released until the
album was reissued in 2003. The next day's session had Barrett adding backwards guitar to "No Good Trying", and
lead to "Terrapin" and "No Man's Land". It was around this time that Jones' involvement came to an end during
these last few sessions, Gilmour had started taking an interest in how Barrett was getting along with his album.
Although Barrett had told his flatmate that he was going off "for an afternoon drive", he instead followed Pink Floyd

The Madcap Laughs

22

out to Ibiza. During the trip, he asked David Gilmour for his help on the album, and, at the end of May, Malcolm
Jones abandoned his production responsibilities.

David Gilmour and Roger Waters sessions


In his book The Making of the Madcap Laughs, Jones states that "when Dave came to me and said that Syd wanted
him and Roger to do the remaining parts of the album, I acquiesced". Roger Waters and David Gilmour were in the
process of completing Pink Floyd's Ummagumma album when they got involved with The Madcap Laughs that July
and helped Barrett finish his album "in a two-day sprint", according to Pink Floyd biographer Rick Sanders. "We
had very little time," Gilmour recalled in a May 2003 interview. "Syd was very difficult, we got that very frustrated
feeling: Look, its your fucking career, mate. Why don't you get your finger out and do something? The guy was in
trouble, and was a close friend for many years before then, so it really was the least one could do."
After the first session with new producers Gilmour and Waters, on 12 June, they had remade "Clowns and Jugglers"
into "Octopus", from the Soft Machine's overdubbed version; then, they re-recorded "Golden Hair",[7] and recorded
"Long Gone"[8] and "Dark Globe".[9]</ref> As the following day's session was dedicated to overdubbing "Octopus",
this became Barrett's final session for over a month, due to a temporary halt while Gilmour and Waters mixed
Ummagumma, to Barrett's dismay, and a Floyd tour in the Netherlands. However, towards the end of July, on the
26th, they managed to record "She Took a Long Cold Look at Me",[10] "Feel", "If It's in You", another version of
"Long Gone",[11] an attempt at a re-make of "Dark Globe",[12] and even a medley of "She Took" / "Feel" / "If It's in
You". Barrett would not allow the musicians to rehearse or to re-record their overdubs, insisting that they sounded
fine. After several months of intermittent recording, the album was finally deemed complete. After the final
recording sessions for the album had been completed, Gilmour and Waters mixed not just the tracks they had
produced, but also the Jones tracks, in a matter of two days.[13] Five tracks were mixed on 5 August: "Long Gone",
"She Took", "Feel", "If It's in You", and "Octopus". The following day, three tracks, "Golden Hair", "Dark Globe",
and "Terrapin", were mixed in just three hours. The track order was sequenced by Barrett and Gilmour on 6
October.[14]

Release, reception, and aftermath


Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
Rolling Stone
Sputnikmusic

"Octopus" was released as a single in November 1969[15]</ref> and The Madcap Laughs followed on 3 January
1970.[16] The album was released by Harvest in the UK,[17]</ref> while in the US it was issued by Capitol Records.
It sold 6,000 copies in the first few months and reached number 40 in the UK and was fairly well-reviewed by music
critics. Upon release, Gilmour said: "Perhaps we were trying to show what Syd was really like. But perhaps we were
trying to punish him..." While Barrett admitted that "I don't think it would stand as my last statement", Waters was
more optimistic, declaring Barrett a "genius". Initial sales and reaction were deemed sufficient by EMI, to sanction a
second solo album.
Malcolm Jones was shocked by the substandard musicianship on the Gilmour and Waters-produced songs, however:
"I felt angry. It's like dirty linen in public and very unnecessary and unkind..." Barrett later said of the album: "I
liked what came out, only it was released far too long after it was done. I wanted it to be a whole thing that people

The Madcap Laughs


would listen to all the way through with everything related and balanced, the tempos and moods offsetting each
other, and I hope that's what it sounds like." In a bid to increase sales, Jones wrote a letter to music magazine,
Melody Maker, under an alternate name, writing how great the album was.
It's quite nice but I'd be very surprised if it did anything if I were to drop dead. I don't think it would stand as
my last statement."
Barrett,
On 6 June 1970, Barrett gave his one and only solo performance, the performance was held at the Kensington
Olympia, backed by Gilmour and Shirley, and baffled the audience (including Gilmour and Shirley) when he
abruptly took off his guitar during the fourth number and walked off stage. They played "Terrapin", "Gigolo Aunt",
"Effervescing Elephant", and "Octopus". From the start of the performance up to (but not including) "Octopus", the
vocals were inaudible. The performance has been bootlegged.

Cover artwork
For the album cover, Barrett painted the floor of his bedroom in Wetherby
Mansions orange and purple. The nude woman appearing on the back of the
record sleeve was an acquaintance of his known as "Iggy the Eskimo".
Photographer Mick Rock says, "When I arrived for 'The Madcap Laughs' photo
session, Syd was still in his underpants .. His lady friend of two weeks, 'Iggy the
Eskimo', was naked in the kitchen .." Iggy met Barrett in the summer of 1966,
through Barrett's then-girlfriend, Jenny Spires. A year after Barrett had moved
into Wetherby Mansions, Iggy moved in after Spires suggested. Iggy didn't know
who Barrett was, that he was previously in Pink Floyd. Barrett had played to
Iggy several songs that would later appear on the album, one being "Terrapin",
The cover for the album was taken in
which she called "quite catchy". In October 2010 she was interviewed, revealing
Syd's flat in Wetherby Mansions near
that her name was Evelyn. The album was designed by Storm Thorgerson and
Earl's Court in London
Aubrey Powell of Hipgnosis. The original sleeve featured no musician credits,
barring producer credit;[18] later issues contain musician credits. On the original release, track 10 is listed as "She
Took a Long Cold Look", although on the 2010 remaster the track is re-titled to "She Took a Long Cool Look", in
similar vein to An Introduction to Syd Barrett.[19]

Reissues
As part of Harvest Records's "Harvest Heritage" series of reissues and to capitalise on the breakthrough
commercial success of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon The Madcap Laughs was re-released in September
1974 as record one of a double album, record two being Barrett's second and last solo album, Barrett. (The cover of
the double album was also designed by Storm Thorgerson.) In 1993, The Madcap Laughs (along with Barrett and
Opel) was reissued both independently[20]</ref> and as part of the Crazy Diamond Barrett box set,[21]</ref> on 26
April 1993. A remastered version was released in 2010.[22]</ref> For release on An Introduction to Syd Barrett in
2010, Gilmour laid down a new bass track to four songs, three from Madcap: "Octopus", "She Took a Long Cold
Look" and "Here I Go".

23

The Madcap Laughs

24

Track listing
All songs written by Syd Barrett, except "Golden Hair" (music by Barrett, based on a poem by James Joyce). All
track info taken from album booklet.

Original release
Side one
No. Title
1. "Terrapin"

Notes

Length

Take 1, recorded 11 April 1969, overdubs added 4 May


Produced by Malcolm Jones

5:04

2. "No Good Trying"

Take 3, recorded 11 April 1969, overdubs added 34 May


Produced by Malcolm Jones

3:26

3. "Love You"

Take 4, recorded 11 April 1969, overdubs added 3 May


Produced by Malcolm Jones

2:30

4. "No Man's Land"

Take 5, recorded 17 April 1969, overdubs added 4 May


Produced by Malcolm Jones

3:03

5. "Dark Globe"

Take 1, recorded 5 August 1969


Produced by David Gilmour and Roger Waters

2:02

6. "Here I Go"

Take 5, recorded 17 April 1969


Produced by Malcolm Jones

3:11

Side two
No. Title

Notes

Length

7. "Octopus"

Take 11, recorded 12 June 1969, overdubs added 13 June


Produced by Syd Barrett and David Gilmour

3:47

8. "Golden Hair"

Take 11 (Remake), recorded 12 June 1969


Produced by Syd Barrett and David Gilmour

1:59

9. "Long Gone"

Take 1, recorded 26 July 1969


Produced by David Gilmour and Roger Waters

2:50

10. "She Took a Long Cold Look"

Take 5, recorded 26 July 1969


Produced by David Gilmour and Roger Waters

1:55

11. "Feel"

Take 1, recorded 26 July 1969


Produced by David Gilmour and Roger Waters

2:17

12. "If It's in You"

Take 5, recorded 26 April 1969


Produced by Malcolm Jones

2:26

13. "Late Night"

Take 2, recorded 28 May 1968, overdubs added 11 April 1969


Produced by Pete Jenner, Malcolm Jones (overdubs)

3:10

Total length:

1993 reissue

37:47

The Madcap Laughs

25

Bonus tracks
No. Title

Notes

14. "Octopus"

Takes 1 and 2, recorded 12 June 1969


Produced by Syd Barrett and David Gilmour

3:09

15. "It's No Good Trying"

Take 5, recorded 11 April 1969


Produced by Malcolm Jones

6:22

16. "Love You"

Take 1, recorded 11 April 1969


Produced by Malcolm Jones

2:28

17. "Love You"

Take 3, recorded 11 April 1969


Produced by Malcolm Jones

2:11

18. "She Took a Long Cold Look at Me"

Take 4, recorded 26 July 1969


Produced by David Gilmour and Roger Waters

2:44

19. "Golden Hair"

Take 5, recorded 8 June 1968


Produced by Pete Jenner

2:28

Total length:

Personnel

Syd Barrett guitar, vocals, production


David Gilmour bass, 12-string acoustic guitar, drums (on "Octopus"), production
Jerry Shirley drums
Willie Wilson bass
Robert Wyatt drums (tracks 2, 3)
Hugh Hopper bass (tracks 2, 3)
Mike Ratledge keyboards (tracks 2, 3)

Production personnel

Syd Barrett producer (tracks 7, 8)


David Gilmour producer (tracks 5, 711)
Peter Jenner producer (track 13)
Malcolm Jones producer (tracks 14, 6, 12, 13)
Roger Waters producer (tracks 5, 911)
Phil McDonald engineer
Peter Mew engineer
Mike Sheady engineer
Jeff Jarratt engineer
Tony Clark engineer
Mick Rock photography
Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell of Hipgnosis cover designs

Length

57:13

The Madcap Laughs

References
Footnotes
[1] This version originally closed the standard edition of Opel. UNIQ-ref-0-b6a3d64c509b10e6-QINU
[2] The first take, a false start, and the second take of "Octopus" was released on the 1993 Crazy Diamond reissue of The Madcap Laughs.<ref
name=autogenerated13>
[3] Titled "Silas Lang" on the recording sheet, later retitled to "Swan Lee".<ref name=MCLM15>
[4] Despite the "Opel" being almost complete and better produced, Gilmour and Waters decided to leave the track off Madcap.<ref>
[5] The version of "Clowns and Jugglers" that was overdubbed, was the first version that Jones and Barrett had worked on during their first
session together. UNIQ-ref-1-b6a3d64c509b10e6-QINU
[6] Gilmour and Waters may have heard the Soft Machine version of "Clowns and Jugglers", which may have been the reason to why they later
re-made it.<ref name=MCLM9-10>
[7] 11 takes were recorded for both new versions of "Octopus" and "Golden Hair".
[8] Not finishing it in this session, it was attempted and finished at a later date.
[9] After only recording two takes of "Dark Globe", it was deemed finished, however, by the end of the session they recorded a third take.
Although the version recorded earlier in the session was issued instead.<ref name=MCLM11-12>
[10] Jones' reaction to this version was that of disappointment.
[11] This later version of "Long Gone" became the album master.
[12] For this session, "Dark Globe" was titled "Wouldn't You Miss Me" on the recording sheet.
[13] The GilmourWaters-produced tracks were mixed first by Gilmour and Waters, while the Jones-produced tracks for mixed by Gilmour
alone on 16 September.
[14] According to Jones, Barrett was "pissed off", with the delay, as was Jones himself.
[15] UK EMI Harvest HAR 5009<ref>
[16] At Jones' choice, it was backed by the GilmourWaters-produced version of "Golden Hair" as the b-side.
[17] UK EMI Harvest SHVL 765<ref>
[18] Back in the 60s and 70s, labels were being resistant to letting their stars appear on other rival label releases. In the case of Madcap, Jones
thought this gained it "an air of mystery".
[19] http:/ / www. brain-damage. co. uk/ archive/ an-introduction-to-syd-barrett-coming-from-emi-harvest-in-oc. html
[20] UK EMI Harvest 7243 8 28906 2 1 / CDGO 2053<ref>
[21] UK EMI Harvest 0777 7 81412 2 8 / SYD BOX 1<ref>
[22] UK EMI Harvest 5099991755827<ref>

Citations

26

Barrett

27

Barrett
For the double album containing The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, see Syd Barrett (album).

Barrett
Studio album by Syd Barrett
Released

14November1970

Recorded 26 February 21 July 1970, at Abbey Road Studios


Genre

Psychedelic rock, blues rock

Length

38:43 (Original release)


56:13 (Crazy Diamond reissue)

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol Records (US)

Producer David Gilmour


Syd Barrett chronology

The Madcap
Laughs
(1970)

Barrett
(1970)

Syd
Barrett
(1974)

Barrett is the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett.
Recording began at Abbey Road Studios on 26 February 1970, and lasted for 15 sessions until 21 July. The album
was produced by Pink Floyd's guitarist David Gilmour, who also contributed on bass guitar, and features
contributions from fellow Pink Floyd member Richard Wright on keyboard and previous Madcap contributor Jerry
Shirley on drums.
Barrett was released in November 1970 on Harvest in the United Kingdom and Capitol in the United States, but
failed to chart in both markets; it was re-released in 1974 as part of Syd Barrett. No singles were issued from the
album. It was remastered and reissued in 1993, along with Barrett's other albums The Madcap Laughs (1970) and
Opel (1988) independently and as part of the Crazy Diamond box set. A newly remastered version was released in
2010.

Background
From mid to late 1967, Syd Barrett's erratic behaviour became more apparent, and at one performance of the band's
first US tour, Barrett slowly detuned his guitar. The audience seemed to enjoy such antics, unaware of the rest of the
band's consternation. Interviewed on Pat Boone's show during this tour, Barrett's reply to Boone's questions was a
"blank and totally mute stare". Initial sales and reaction of Barrett's first solo album, The Madcap Laughs, were
deemed sufficient by EMI to sanction a second solo album. On 24 February 1970, a month after releasing Madcap,
Barrett appeared on John Peel's Top Gear radio show, where he performed only one song from the newly released
album ("Terrapin"), three that would later be recorded for Barrett ("Gigolo Aunt", "Baby Lemonade" and
"Effervescing Elephant") and a one-off ("Two of a Kind", possibly written by Richard Wright).[1] Wright reportedly
wrote the song but Barrett insisted it was his own composition (and wanted to include it on The Madcap
Laughs).</ref> The session producers had no verbal contact with Barrett, having only communication to him via
Gilmour. For the radio session, Gilmour and Humble Pie drummer Jerry Shirley accompanied Barrett on bass and
bongos, respectively. The version of "Gigolo Aunt" recorded for the radio session (and later released on 1988's The
Peel Session) was unfinished, as Barrett had sung the opening verse three times. Barrett played slide guitar on the

Barrett
radio version of "Baby Lemonade", with Gilmour on organ.
Two days later, he began working on his second album in Abbey Road Studios, with Gilmour as producer, and a trio
of musicians: Richard Wright, Shirley and Gilmour himself. The main aim for the Barrett sessions was to give
Barrett the structure and focus many felt was missing during the long and unwieldy sessions for The Madcap
Laughs. Thus, the sessions were more efficiently run and the album was finished in considerably less time than The
Madcap Laughs (six months, compared to Madcap's one year). On 6 June 1970, Barrett gave his one and only
official solo performance, at the Olympia in Kensington, backed once more by Gilmour and Shirley. At the end of
"Octopus", the fourth number of the set, Barrett baffled the audience and his backing musicians by abruptly taking
off his guitar and walking off stage.

Recording
The first session was on 26 February, three of the first songsfully
recordedattempted during the session were "Baby Lemonade",
"Maisie" and "Gigolo Aunt".[2] However, Gilmour thought they were
losing the "Barrett-ness". After "Baby Lemonade" was attempted, 2
takes of "Maisie" were recorded before Barrett went into 15 takes of
"Gigolo Aunt".[3] The next day, two-track demos of "Wolfpack",
"Waving My Arms in the Air", "Living Alone" and "Bob Dylan
Blues", were recorded. The former two made it to the album; the latter
two didn't. On the recording sheet, it lists Gilmour as having taken
Recording took place at Abbey Road Studios
home a copy of the latter two, Gilmour later returned and took the
master tapes too. Gilmour has since said "Those sessions were done so
quickly. We were rushing to gigs every day and had to fit recording sessions in between. I probably took it away to
have a listen and simply forgot to take it back. It wasn't intended to be a final mix. Syd knocked it off, I took a tape
home." Despite some minor work made to "Gigolo Aunt", Barrett wouldn't return to Abbey Road Studios until 1
April, due to Pink Floyd working on their 1970 album, Atom Heart Mother. On various occasions, Barrett would
"spy" on the band as they recorded the album. Again, Barrett recorded some work to a song, "Wolfpack," on the 3rd,
before the sessions were postponed until 5 June, this time due to Gilmour and Wright going on tour in the US with
Pink Floyd.
On the session of 5 June, Barrett managed to record an unknown number of two-track demos for three songs: "Rats",
"Winded and Dined", and "Birdie Hop".[4] The "Rats" demo recorded here, became the basis for the album master,
and would later be overdubbed by musicians, despite the changing tempos. Two days later, on the 7th, Barrett
recorded "Milky Way",[5] "Millionaire", before being rounded off with overdubs for "Rats". "Millionaire" was
originally titled "She Was a Millionaire", was originally recorded by Pink Floyd. Barrett recorded two attempts at a
backing track before abandoning it, and adding vocals. Yet another break in recording occurred, until 14 July, where
Barrett recorded several takes of "Effervescing Elephant", while numerous overdubs were added to Barrett's "Wined
and Dined" demo by Gilmour. Three takes of "Dominoes" ensued,[6] with an unknown number of takes of "Love
Song",[7] "Dolly Rocker" and "Let's Spilt" were recorded.[8] "Love Song" and "Dolly Rocker" were both
overdubbed, the former being overdubbed from 17 to 21 July, but overdubs for the latter were wiped. On 21 July,
Barrett worked on another Untitled track (later to be titled as "Word Song"), recording only one take,[9] before
recording 5 takes of the last new song to be recorded for Barrett: "It Is Obvious".[10] the first take of "It Is Obvious"
would become the album master. Take 2 (with Barrett on electric guitar) was included on the Crazy Diamond
version of Barrett, while takes 3 & 5 (former with Barrett on acoustic guitar, and features a riff similar to Muddy
Waters' "I'm a Man", while the latter with Barrett on electric guitar) were included on the Crazy Diamond version of
Opel.</ref> Barrett worked on remakes of two tracks: "Maisie", and "Waving My Arms in the Air" (the latter now
seguing into a new track, "I Never Lied to You").[11]</ref>

28

Barrett

29
We really had basically three alternatives at that point, working with Syd. One, we could actually work with
him in the studio, playing along as he put down his tracks which was almost impossible, though we
succeeded on 'Gigolo Aunt'. The second was laying down some kind of track before and then having him play
over it. The third was him putting his basic ideas down with just guitar and vocals and then we'd try and make
something out of it.
David Gilmour,

Shirley said of Barrett's playing: "He would never play the same tune twice. Sometimes Syd couldn't play anything
that made sense; other times what he'd play was absolute magic." Barrett's direction to the other musicians were
limited to pronouncements like "Perhaps we could make the middle darker and maybe the end a bit middle
afternoonish. At the moment it's too windy and icy".

Songs
Side one
"Baby Lemonade" is a blues folk tune, reminiscent of The Byrds. The intro was actually Barrett simply warming-up
on guitar, that Gilmour had managed to record and placed it at the start of the album, making it seem like an intro to
the song. The lyrics that describe the way for a person to kill time (such as the line "In the clock they sent / Through
a washing machine"). The solo was performed by Barrett, not Gilmour as is often noted. A recurring theme in the
album, starting with "Baby Lemonade", is the weather. Barrett performed the song twice, both times for the BBC
(previously recorded on 24 February 1970, for John Peel's Top Gear, and later for Bob Harris' show on 16 February
1971).
"Love Song" tells the story of an ex-girlfriend fondly remembered ("I knew a girl and I like her still"). It is the first
of two songs which feature dreamlike-senses in the lyrics ("I'll lay my head down and see what I see"). Barrett
performed the song for Bob Harris' show in 1971.
"Dominoes" features imagery of regret and recollection in the lyrics. The song features a backwards guitar solo by
Barrett, and organ by Wright which was inspired by The Doors' "Riders on the Storm". The song's "You and I" lyric
hints to The Turtles' "Happy Together", which refers to the tail end relationship Barrett had with Lindsay. The first
of three songs on the album which lyrics point to anguish ("In my tears, my dreams"). Animals are also a recurring
item in not only the album, but Barrett's entire solo output, in "Dominoes" though, larks are mentioned ("Overhead a
lark today"). Barrett performed the song for Bob Harris' show in 1971.
"It Is Obvious" is the second of two songs which feature dreamlike-senses in the lyrics ("Creep into bed when your
head's on the ground"). It is also the second of three songs on the album which lyrics point to anguish ("Remember
those times I could call / Through the clear day time / And you would be there"). The theme of weather is referenced
again ("The softness, the warmth and the weather in suspense"). The song also references the Cambridge quarry pits,
and the landscape. Animals are also a recurring item throughout the album, in "It Is Obvious" though, sparrows are
mentioned.
"Rats" started off as a jam, but eventually evolved into a structured song. It contains taunting and maniacal lyrics
("Rats rats lay down flat / We don't need you we act like that"). Animals are also a recurring item throughout the
album, in "Rats" though, rats and spiders are mentioned.
"Maisie" is a blues jam, with Barrett muttering the lyrics. The song was influenced by Howlin' Wolf's "Spoonful".
Animals are also a recurring item throughout the album; in "Maisie", bulls are mentioned ("Bad luck, bride of a
bull").

Barrett

30

Side two
"Gigolo Aunt" is based on Jeff Beck's "Hi Ho Silver Lining", with the same chord progression. Barrett performed the
song for Top Gear in 1970. For Barrett's only solo performance, at the Kensington Olympia in 1970, he played four
songs, one of them being "Gigolo Aunt".
"Waving My Arms in the Air" hints to the then-recently released Rolling Stones song, "Midnight Rambler". The
song contains an echo of "Octopus" ("Waving my arms in the air / Pressing my feet to the ground"). The lyrics refer
to a hard-learned experience. The song features a childlike section ("No care / No no"). Animals are also a recurring
item throughout the album, in "Waving My Arms in the Air" though, cats and dogs are mentioned. The song segues
into "I Never Lied to You" with the aid of Wright's organ.
"I Never Lied to You" is the final of three songs on the album which lyrics point to anguish ("It's been so hard to
bear with you not there").
"Wined and Dined" dated from Barrett's Cambridge days, and is about the relationship between Barrett and his
then-girlfriend, Gayla Pinion, a model from Cambridge. The song reflects on about Mediterranean evenings ("Musk
winds blow"), and haunting's of Barrett's childhood ("Chalk underfoot / Light ash of blue").
"Wolfpack" had been mentioned by Barrett in an interview, he said the song was one of favourites, out of all his
material. Animals are also a recurring item throughout the album, in "Waving My Arms in the Air" though, wolves
are mentioned.
"Effervescing Elephant" was pastiche of the verse form of Hilaire Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children. In contrast
to "Dominoes", "It Is Obvious", "Rats", "Waving My Arms in the Air", and "Wolfpack" previously mentioning one
or two animals, "Effervescing Elephant" contains references to a whole jungle full of animals. Barrett performed the
song for Top Gear in 1970. For Barrett's only solo performance, at the Kensington Olympia in 1970, he played four
songs, one of them being "Effervescing Elephant".

Release and aftermath


Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
Rolling Stone

The cover of the album was designed by Barrett, it was originally one of many drawings Barrett had done in
Cambridge, years earlier. Barrett was released in November 1970 to less interest than had greeted The Madcap
Laughs earlier in the year, and as a result, failed to reach the chart. Talks of more singles and a third album were
rumoured over the following months. Barrett dismissed the album and Madcap, saying: "They've got to reach a
certain standard and that's probably reached in Madcap once or twice and on the other one only a little just an echo
of that. Neither of them are much more than that." Allmusic reviewer Ritchie Unterberger called the album "a bit
fuller and smoother than the first album", referring to "Baby Lemonade", "Gigolo Aunt", and "Effervescing
Elephant" as "among his peppiest and best-loved tunes"; however, "the tone is darker and more meandering" in the
rest of the album. In an overview of Barrett's career, Rolling Stone referred to both Barrett's solo albums as
"entrancing".
On 16 February 1971, Barrett recorded a short set for BBC Radio 1's Sound of the Seventies radio show; in contrast
to 1970s radio appearance where Barrett performed new material, this time he played songs from Barrett: "Baby
Lemonade", "Dominoes" and "Love Song". Bored and directionless, Barrett headed back to his hometown of

Barrett

31

Cambridge and but for a brief dalliance with a band called Stars in 1972, and some abortive recording sessions in
1974 left his music career behind for good.
Doing Syd's record was interesting, but extremely difficult. Dave [Gilmour] and Roger [Waters] did the first
one (The Madcap Laughs) and Dave and myself did the second one. But by then it was just trying to help Syd
any way we could, rather than worrying about getting the best guitar sound. You could forget about that! It
was just going into the studio and trying to get him to sing.
Richard Wright,
The album was reissued in late 1974 with his first solo album The Madcap Laughs as record two of the 2-record set
Syd Barrett in Harvest's series of Harvest Heritage reissues. In 1993, Barrett (along with The Madcap Laughs and
Opel) was reissued both independently[12]</ref> and as part of the Crazy Diamond Barrett box set,[13]</ref> on 26
April 1993. "Bob Dylan Blues" would later turn up on 2001's The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?. A
newly remastered version was released in 2010.[14]</ref> For release on An Introduction to Syd Barrett in 2010,
Gilmour laid down a new bass track to four songs, only one from Barrett: "Dominoes".

Track listing
All songs written by Syd Barrett. All track info taken from album booklet.

Original release
Side one
No. Title

Notes

Length

1. "Baby Lemonade"

Take 1, recorded 26 February 1970

4:10

2. "Love Song"

Take 1, recorded 17 July 1970, overdubs added 17 July

3:03

3. "Dominoes"

Take 3, recorded 14 July 1970

4:08

4. "It Is Obvious"

Take 1, recorded 17 July 1970, overdubs added 20 July

2:59

5. "Rats"

Demo, recorded 7 May 1970, overdubs added 5 June

3:00

6. "Maisie"

Take 2, recorded 26 February 1970

2:51

Side two
No. Title
7. "Gigolo Aunt"

Notes
Take 15, recorded 27 February 1970, overdubs added 2 April

5:46

8. "Waving My Arms in the Air"

Take 1, recorded 27 February 1970, overdubs and new vocal track 2 April

2:09

9. "I Never Lied to You"

Take 1, recorded 27 February 1970, overdubs and new vocal track 2 April

1:50

10. "Wined and Dined"

Take 10, recorded 14 July 1970

2:58

11. "Wolfpack"

Take 2, recorded 3 April 1970

3:41

12. "Effervescing Elephant"

Take 9, recorded 14 July 1970

1:52

Total length:

Length

38:43

Barrett

32

1993 reissue
Bonus tracks
No. Title

Notes

13. "Baby Lemonade"

Take 1, recorded 26 February 1970


Guitar and double-track vocals only

3:46

14. "Waving My Arms in the Air"

Take 1, recorded 26 February 1970


Guitar and vocals only

2:13

15. "I Never Lied to You"

Take 1, recorded 27 February 1970


Guitar and vocals only

1:48

16. "Love Song"

Take 1, recorded 14 July 1970

2:32

17. "Dominoes"

Take 1, recorded 14 July 1970

0:40

18. "Dominoes"

Take 2, recorded 14 July 1970

2:36

19. "It Is Obvious"

Take 2, recorded 17 July 1970


Electric guitar and vocal

3:51

Total length:

Length

56:13

Personnel
Syd Barrett guitars, lead and backing vocals
David Gilmour production, bass guitar, organ (second organ on "It Is Obvious" and "Gigolo Aunt", "Wined and
Dined"), drums ("Dominoes"), 12-string guitar
Richard Wright piano, harmonium, Hammond organ
Vic Saywell tuba
Jerry Shirley drums and percussion
Willie Wilson percussion
John Wilson drums
Peter Bown engineering
Gareth Cousins mixed Crazy Diamond bonus tracks

References
Footnotes
[1] "Two of a Kind" was credited to Richard Wright on the original Peel Session release, but to Barrett on later releases, including The Best of
Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?.<ref>
[2] "Baby Lemonade" and "Gigolo Aunt", were a go for Barrett to play and/or sing to an existing backing track.
UNIQ-ref-0-b6a3d64c509b10e6-QINU
[3] Out of the 15 takes for "Gigolo Aunt", three were complete: Take 7, Take 9, and Take 15. Take 9 is included on Opel, while the latter became
the album master. UNIQ-ref-1-b6a3d64c509b10e6-QINU
[4] Each of these would be later issued on Opel.
[5] "Milky Way" was later issued on Opel.
[6] Takes 1 & 2 (former being a false start, latter being a complete take) were included on the Crazy Diamond version of Barrett.
[7] At this point, "Love Song" was Untitled.
[8] Both, "Dolly Rocker" and "Let's Spilt", would find their way on to Opel.
[9] "Word Song" would also be included on Opel.
[10] Originally titled "Mind Shot",<ref name=Irgh261>
[11] Despite several attempts at recording "Waving My Arms in the Air" on several occasions, it would always be the first take of each of these
occasions that would be marked as "best".<ref name=DarkG368>
[12] UK EMI Harvest 7243 8 28907 2 0 / CDGO 2054<ref>
[13] UK EMI Harvest 0777 7 81412 2 8 / SYD BOX 1<ref>

Barrett
[14] Europe EMI Harvest 5099991755728<ref>

Citations

33

34

Live albums
The Peel Session
The Peel Session
EP by Syd Barrett
Released

25 January 1987

Recorded

24 February 1970

Genre

Psychedelic rock

Length

12:32

Label

Strange Fruit SFPS043

Producer

John Walters
Syd Barrett chronology

Syd
Barrett
(1974)

Syd Barrett: The Peel


Sessions
(1987)

Opel
(1988)

Alternative cover
Syd Barrett: The Peel Session reissue cover

Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic

The Peel Session is a collection of recordings by Syd Barrett released on 25 January 1987. This EP contains the five
songs he performed for the John Peel Top Gear show, recorded on 24 February 1970 and broadcast shortly after.

Track listing
All songs written by Syd Barrett (with the possible exception of "Two of a Kind").[1] Wright reportedly wrote the
song but Barrett insisted it was his own composition (and wanted to include it on The Madcap Laughs). When asked
about the matter in a 1996 interview, Wright's reply was enigmatic: "Can't answer, I am looking into this."</ref>
1.
2.
3.
4.

"Terrapin" 3:02
"Gigolo Aunt" 3:35
"Baby Lemonade" 2:37
"Effervescing Elephant" 0:57

5. "Two of a Kind" 2:28

The Peel Session

35

Personnel
Syd Barrett Acoustic guitar, vocals
David Gilmour Bass guitar, electric guitar, organ, backing vocals
Jerry Shirley Percussion

References
Footnotes
[1] "Two of a Kind" was credited to Richard Wright on the original Peel Session release, but to Barrett on later releases, including The Best of
Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?.<ref>

Citations

The Radio One Sessions


The Radio One Sessions
Live album by Syd Barrett
Released

29 March 2004 (UK)


11 May 2004 (US)

Recorded

24 February 1970 & 16 February 1971

Genre

Psychedelic rock

Length

20:01

Label

Strange Fruit

Producer

Pete Dauncey & John Muir


Syd Barrett chronology

Wouldn't You Miss


Me?
(2001)

The Radio One


Sessions
(2004)

An Introduction to Syd
Barrett
(2010)

Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
BBC

Favourable

Pitchfork

6.3/10

The Radio One Sessions is a live album by former Pink Floyd vocalist and guitarist, Syd Barrett.

The Radio One Sessions

Content
It features the complete Peel Session recordings that Barrett did on 24 February 1970, plus three unreleased songs
recorded for a Bob Harris show on 16 February 1971. For the latter, the BBC no longer held the tapes, however, the
source tape used for this album was an off-air bootleg-sound recording of the show made during its original
broadcast.

Track listing
All songs by Syd Barrett (with the possible exception of "Two of a Kind").[1] Wright reportedly wrote the song but
Barrett insisted it was his own composition (and wanted to include it on The Madcap Laughs). When asked about the
matter in a 1996 interview, Wright's reply was enigmatic: "Can't answer, I am looking into this."</ref>
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Terrapin" 3:09
"Gigolo Aunt" 3:42
"Baby Lemonade" 2:34
"Effervescing Elephant" 1:02
"Two of a Kind" 2:35
"Baby Lemonade" 2:23

7. "Dominoes" 3:02
8. "Love Song" 1:27

Personnel
Syd Barrett: Acoustic Guitar, vocals.
David Gilmour: Bass guitar, organ, electric guitar, backing vocals.
Jerry Shirley: Percussion.
Pete Dauncey: Producer.
John Muir: Producer.
Barry Plummer: Cover photo.

References
Footnotes
[1] "Two of a Kind" was credited to Richard Wright on the original Peel Session release, but to Barrett on later releases, including The Best of
Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?.<ref>

Citations

36

37

Compilation albums
Syd Barrett
Syd Barrett
Compilation album by Syd Barrett
Released

14 November 1974

Recorded Abbey Road, May 1968 July 1970


Genre

Rock

Length

76:30

Label

Harvest/EMI

Producer Syd Barrett, Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, Roger Waters and David Gilmour
Syd Barrett chronology

Barrett
(1970)

Syd
Barrett
(1974)

Syd Barrett:
The Peel
Sessions
(1987)

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
Robert Christgau

(B)

Syd Barrett is a 1974 double-album pairing of Syd Barrett's two solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, both
originally released in the UK in 1970.

Cover
During the summer of 1965, Barrett had his first acid trip in the garden of his friend Dave Gale, with Ian Moore and
Storm Thorgerson. While on the influence of the acid, Barrett had placed an orange, plum and a matchbox into a
corner, while staring at the fruit, which he claimed symbolized "Venus and Jupiter". Thorgerson used this imagery
when he added these items to the cover of Syd Barrett.

Release
After the unexpectedly massive success of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon, EMI re-issued the Barrett-era
albums The Piper at the Gates of Dawn and A Saucerful of Secrets as A Nice Pair in the hope that fans would be
interested in the band's earlier work with Barrett. Once that was a success, primarily in the US where both albums
had initially flopped, Syd Barrett was compiled to meet demand.

Syd Barrett
As a result, The Madcap Laughs/Barrett (as it was titled in the US) made number 163, giving Barrett his only US
chart album.

Track listing
All songs by Syd Barrett, except where noted.

Disc 1 The Madcap Laughs


Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Terrapin" 5:04
"No Good Trying" 3:26
"Love You" 2:30
"No Man's Land" 3:03
"Dark Globe" 2:02
"Here I Go" 3:11

Side two
"Octopus" 3:47
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"Golden Hair" (Syd Barrett/James Joyce) 1:59


"Long Gone" 2:50
"She Took a Long Cold Look" 1:55
"Feel" 2:17
"If it's in You" 2:26
"Late Night" 3:11

Disc 2 Barrett
Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Baby Lemonade" 4:11


"Love Song" 3:05
"Dominoes" 4:09
"It is Obvious" 3:00
"Rats" 3:02
"Maisie" 2:51

Side two

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Gigolo Aunt" 5:47


"Waving My Arms in the Air" 2:07
"I Never Lied to You" 1:52
"Wined and Dined" 2:59
"Wolfpack" 3:41
"Effervescing Elephant" 1:54

38

Syd Barrett

39

Charts
Album - Billboard
Year Chart

Position

1974 Pop Albums 163

References

Opel
Opel
Compilation album by Syd Barrett
Released

17 October 1988

Recorded Abbey Road, 14 May 1968 17 July 1970


Genre

Psychedelic folk, psychedelic rock

Length

45:08 (original release)


65:15 (Crazy Diamond reissue)

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol (US)

Producer Syd Barrett, Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, Roger Waters and David Gilmour
Syd Barrett chronology

Syd Barrett:
The Peel
Sessions
(1987)

Opel
(1988)

Octopus: The Best of Syd


Barrett
(1992)

Crazy Diamond reissue


Crazy Diamond reissue cover

Opel is an album compiled from recordings made by former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett between 1968[1]</ref>
and 1970.[2] On the Crazy Diamond reissue, however, the latest material is "It Is Obvious", the final of three tracks
recorded during the last session.</ref> The album is a compilation of unreleased material and alternate takes of
recordings from sessions for Barrett's solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett. Before they were vetoed by
Pink Floyd, the album was to include two unreleased tracks that Barrett had worked on while with Pink Floyd,
"Scream Thy Last Scream" and "Vegetable Man".
Opel was released in October 1988 on Harvest in the UK, and on Capitol Records in the US. The album was
remastered and reissued in 1993, along with Barrett's other albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett (both 1970),
independently and as part of the Crazy Diamond box set. A newly remastered version was released in 2010.

Opel

40

Background
The album was originally set to include the unreleased Barrett Pink Floyd songs "Scream Thy Last Scream" and
"Vegetable Man", which had been remixed for the album by Jones. However, the two songs were pulled by Pink
Floyd, before Opel was finalised.
While Barrett only released two albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, both in 1970, the existence of unreleased
studio work was widely reported. After years of demand from Barrett's considerable fan base, Opel was compiled
and released. Barrett approved the new release.

Release and content


Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
Rolling Stone

Opel consists of eight previously unreleased songs and alternate versions of six already released songs. The album
was released due to the constant pressure from The Madcap Laughs producer, Malcolm Jones. Despite its positive
reviews, it failed to chart. Allmusic reviewer Richie Unterberger said the album was "charming", with the title track,
"Swan Lee (Silas Lang)", "Dark Globe" and "Milky Way" as highlights.
Opel (along with The Madcap Laughs and Barrett) was reissued both independently[3]</ref> and as part of the Crazy
Diamond Barrett box set,[4]</ref> on 26 April 1993. A newly remastered version was released in 2010.[5]</ref>

Track listing
All songs written by Syd Barrett, except "Golden Hair" (music by Barrett, based on a poem by James Joyce). All
track information is taken from the Crazy Diamond version of Opel.

Original release
Side one
No. Title
1. "Opel"

Notes

Length

Take 9, recorded 11 April 1969


Produced by Malcolm Jones

6:26

2. "Clowns and Jugglers (Octopus)"

Take 2, recorded 20 July 1968


Produced by Peter Jenner

3:27

3. "Rats"

Demo, recorded 5 June 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

3:00

4. "Golden Hair"

Take 6, recorded 12 June 1969


Produced by Syd Barrett and David Gilmour

1:44

5. "Dolly Rocker"

Take 1, recorded 14 July 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

3:01

6. "Word Song"

Take 1, recorded 17 July 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

3:19

Opel

41
7. "Wined and Dined"

Demo, recorded 5 June 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

3:03

Side two
No. Title

Notes

Length

8. "Swan Lee (Silas Lang)"

Take 9, recorded 11 April 1969


Take 5, recorded 28 May 1968, overdubs added 8 June 1968
Produced by Peter Jenner
Further overdubs added 25 April 1969
Produced by Malcolm Jones

3:13

9. "Birdie Hop"

Demo, recorded 5 June 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

2:30

10. "Let's Split"

Take 1, recorded 14 July 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

2:23

11. "Lanky (Part One)"

Take 1, recorded 14 May 1968


Produced by Peter Jenner

5:32

12. "Wouldn't You Miss Me (Dark Globe)"

Take 1, recorded 26 July 1969


Produced by David Gilmour and Roger Waters

3:00

13. "Milky Way"

Take 5, recorded 7 June 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

3:07

14. "Golden Hair (Instrumental version)"

Take 1, recorded 14 May 1968


Produced by Peter Jenner

1:56

Total length:

45:08

1993 reissue
Bonus tracks
No. Title

Notes

15. "Gigolo Aunt"

Take 9, recorded 27 February 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

4:02

16. "It Is Obvious"

Take 3, recorded 17 July 1970


Electric guitar and vocal
Produced by David Gilmour

3:44

17. "It Is Obvious"

Take 5, recorded 17 July 1970


Acoustic guitar and vocal
Produced by David Gilmour

3:06

18. "Clowns and Jugglers"

Take 1, recorded 20 July 1968


Produced by Pete Jenner

3:33

19. "Late Night (Instrumental)"

Take 2, recorded 28 May 1968


Produced by Pete Jenner

3:19

20. "Effervescing Elephant"

Take 2, recorded 14 July 1970


Produced by David Gilmour

1:28

Total length:

Length

65:15

Opel

42

Personnel

Syd Barrett Guitar, vocals, producer


David Gilmour Producer
Peter Jenner Producer
Malcolm Jones Producer
Roger Waters Producer
Gareth Cousins - Mix engineer

Guest musicians on "Clowns and Jugglers":


Mike Ratledge Organ
Robert Wyatt Drums
Hugh Hopper Bass

References
Footnotes
[1] The earliest recorded material being "Lanky (Part One)" and "Golden Hair", recorded mid-May 1968.<ref>
[2] The latest recorded material, released on the standard edition of Opel, being "Word Song", the first of three tracks recorded mid-to-late July
1970.<ref name=B2010_2>
[3] UK EMI Harvest 7243 8 28908 2 9 / CDGO 2055<ref>
[4] UK EMI Harvest 0777 7 81412 2 8 / SYD BOX 1<ref>
[5] Europe EMI Harvest 5099991755629<ref>

Citations

Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett


Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett
Greatest hits album by Syd Barrett
Released 29 May 1992
Genre

Rock

Length

52:14

Label

Cleopatra Records

Producer Syd Barrett, David Gilmour, Malcolm Jones and Peter Jenner
Syd Barrett chronology

Opel
(1988)

Octopus: The Best of Syd


Barrett
(1992)

Crazy
Diamond
(1993)

Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett

43

Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic

Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett, released 29 May 1992, is a one-disc compilation of songs by Syd Barrett. It
contains songs from his two solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, and the compilation outtakes/rarities
album, Opel. This album was later superseded by The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?.

Track listing
1. "Octopus" 3:48
2. "Swan Lee (Silas Lang)" 3:14
3. "Baby Lemonade" 4:10
4. "Late Night" 3:14
5. "Wined and Dined" 2:56
6. "Golden Hair" 2:00
7. "Gigolo Aunt" 5:45
8. "Wolfpack" 3:45
9. "It Is Obvious" 2:56
10. "Lanky (Part 1)" 5:32
11. "No Good Trying" 3:25
12. "Clowns and Jugglers" 3:27
13. "Waving My Arms in the Air" 2:07
14. "Opel" 6:26

References

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?

44

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?


The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?
Greatest hits album by Syd Barrett
Released

16 April 2001 (UK)


11 September 2001 (US)

Recorded

Abbey Road
May 1968 July 1970

Genre

Rock

Length

73:21

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol (US)

Producer

Syd Barrett, Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, Roger Waters and David Gilmour
Syd Barrett chronology

Crazy
Diamond
(1993)

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss


Me?
(2001)

Syd Barrett: The Radio One


Sessions
(2004)

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
Pitchfork Media
NME

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me? is a compilation album by Syd Barrett, released in 2001 and spans
Barrett's entire solo career.

Content
Comprising highlights from Syd Barrett's two 1970 albums The Madcap Laughs (seven songs), Barrett (nine songs),
and the 1988 out-takes collection Opel (four songs), the album was issued to service casual Barrett fans who
presumably would only require one disc of his music.
As a bonus to dedicated Barrett followers, The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me? includes "Two of a
Kind", from Barrett's John Peel radio show performance in February 1970, and, courtesy of David Gilmour's
personal collection, Barrett's previously-unreleased "Bob Dylan Blues", an original recorded a few days after "Two
of a Kind", that before this release was a very rare and sought-after song.

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?

45

Track listing
All songs by Syd Barrett, except where noted.
No. Title

Writer(s)

Original album

Length

1. "Octopus"

The Madcap Laughs

3:48

2. "Late Night"

The Madcap Laughs

3:14

3. "Terrapin"

The Madcap Laughs

5:03

4. "Swan Lee (Silas Lang)"

Opel

3:14

5. "Wolfpack"

Barrett

3:45

6. "Golden Hair"

Barrett, James Joyce The Madcap Laughs

1:59

7. "Here I Go"

The Madcap Laughs

3:11

8. "Long Gone"

The Madcap Laughs

2:49

9. "No Good Trying"

The Madcap Laughs

3:25

10. "Opel"

Opel

6:26

11. "Baby Lemonade"

Barrett

4:10

12. "Gigolo Aunt"

Barrett

5:45

13. "Dominoes"

Barrett

4:06

14. "Wouldn't You Miss Me (Dark Globe)"

Opel

3:00

15. "Wined and Dined"

Barrett

2:56

16. "Effervescing Elephant"

Barrett

1:53

17. "Waving My Arms in the Air"

Barrett

2:07

18. "I Never Lied to You"

Barrett

1:49

19. "Love Song"

Barrett

3:02

The Peel Session

2:35

21. "Bob Dylan Blues"

Previously unreleased

3:14

22. "Golden Hair" (Instrumental)

Opel

1:50

20. "Two of a Kind"

Total length:

73:21

^ Possibly written by Richard Wright (according to David Gilmour), though Barrett insisted it was his
own composition.

Production

Syd Barrett Producer


Tim Chacksfield Project Coordinator
David Gilmour Producer
Peter Jenner Producer
Malcolm Jones Producer, Overdub Producer
Peter Mew Transfers, Remastering
Mark Paytress Liner Notes
Nigel Reeve Project Coordinator
Phil Smee Package Design

The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?

46

References

An Introduction to Syd Barrett


An Introduction to Syd Barrett
Greatest hits album by Syd Barrett
Released

4 October 2010

Recorded January 1967 July 1970, at Sound Techniques Studios, Abbey Road, London
Genre

Rock

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol Records (US)

Producer Joe Boyd, Syd Barrett, Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, Roger Waters and David Gilmour
Syd Barrett chronology

Syd Barrett: The Radio One


Sessions
(2004)

An Introduction to Syd
Barrett
(2010)

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic
BBC

(no rating)

PopMatters

An Introduction to Syd Barrett is a 'best of' compilation featuring the work of Syd Barrett spanning the period
19671970, including both material written during his time with Pink Floyd and his post-band solo career.

Release
The album was released in the UK and Europe on 4 October 2010, with different release dates for the rest of the
world. The album features a series of new remasters and remixes, all overseen by Pink Floyd's David Gilmour. The
cover art, featuring various images relating to songs contained within the album, was designed and created by
long-term Pink Floyd conceptual artist Storm Thorgerson. The album reached 104 in the UK charts.
An extra track for CD and iTunes buyers is the previously-unreleased 20-minute long instrumental "Rhamadan",
available with a link to download it.

An Introduction to Syd Barrett

Track listing
All songs written and composed by Syd Barrett.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Arnold Layne" (2010 digital remaster) 3:48


"See Emily Play" (2010 digital remaster) 3:14
"Apples and Oranges" (2010 digital remaster) 5:03
"Matilda Mother" (Alternate version; 2010 mix) 3:14
"Chapter 24" (2010 digital remaster) 3:45
"Bike" (2010 digital remaster) 2:00

Tracks 16 are performed with Pink Floyd


7. "Terrapin" (2010 digital remaster) 3:11
8. "Love You" (2010 digital remaster) 2:49
9. "Dark Globe" (2010 digital remaster) 3:01
10. "Here I Go" (2010 remix) 3:25
11. "Octopus" (2010 mix) 3:54
12. "She Took a Long Cool Look" (2010 mix) 1:46
13. "If It's in You" (2010 digital remaster) 2:23
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

"Baby Lemonade" (2010 digital remaster) 4:10


"Dominoes" (2010 mix) 4:06
"Gigolo Aunt" (2010 digital remaster) 5:45
"Effervescing Elephant" (2010 digital remaster) 1:55
"Bob Dylan Blues" (2010 digital remaster) 3:14

Bonus track
"Rhamadan" 20:09
Available only as a download when the album is bought on CD, or from iTunes

References
External links
An announcement of compilation, from David Gilmour's official blog (http://www.davidgilmourblog.com/
2010/08/an-introduction-to-syd.html)

47

48

Box sets
Crazy Diamond
Crazy Diamond
Box set by Syd Barrett
Released

26 April 1993

Recorded Abbey Road May 1968 July 1970


Genre

Rock

Length

2:58:37

Label

Harvest

Producer Syd Barrett, Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones, Roger Waters and David Gilmour
Syd Barrett chronology

Octopus: The Best of Syd


Barrett
(1992)

Crazy
Diamond
(1993)

Wouldn't You Miss


Me?
(2001)

Professional
ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

Allmusic

Crazy Diamond is a 1993 triple-CD boxed set of Syd Barrett's two 1970 albums The Madcap Laughs and Barrett,
and Opel, an out-takes compilation from 1988. All discs are further augmented by various alternate takes.
Our main plan was to find Syd's acoustic takes, before the other musicians were drafted in to overdub
them. But we stumbled across some fascinating material that sheds new light on Syd's working methods.
Phil Smee

Design and release


The box set is packaged in a 6 x 12-inch longbox, and also contains a 24-page booklet.
Simultaneously with this release, EMI reissued The Madcap Laughs, Barrett and Opel separately as well, along with
the new bonus tracks of alternate takes.
Two unreleased Syd Barrett songs with Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream" and "Vegetable Man" were remixed
by Malcolm Jones, and were planned to be released on Opel, but they were pulled, apparently by Pink Floyd.

Crazy Diamond

Title
The album is named after "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", a composition by Pink Floyd about and dedicated to
Barrett, who led the band during its earlier years.

Track listing
All songs written by Syd Barrett, except where noted.

Disc 1 The Madcap Laughs


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

"Terrapin" 5:04
"No Good Trying" 3:26
"Love You" 2:30
"No Man's Land" 3:03
"Dark Globe" 2:02
"Here I Go" 3:11
"Octopus" 3:47
"Golden Hair" (Syd Barrett/James Joyce) 1:59

9. "Long Gone" 2:50


10. "She Took a Long Cold Look" 1:55
11. "Feel" 2:17
12. "If it's in You" 2:26
13. "Late Night" 3:11
14. "Octopus" (Takes 1 & 2) 3:09
15. "It's No Good Trying" (Take 5) 6:22
16. "Love You" (Take 1) 2:28
17. "Love You" (Take 3) 2:11
18. "She Took a Long Cold Look at Me" (Take 4) 2:44
19. "Golden Hair" (Take 5) (Barrett/Joyce) 2:28
Tracks 1419: Bonus tracks

Disc 2 Barrett
1. "Baby Lemonade" 4:11
2. "Love Song" 3:05
3. "Dominoes" 4:09
4. "It is Obvious" 3:00
5. "Rats" 3:02
6. "Maisie" 2:51
7. "Gigolo Aunt" 5:47
8. "Waving My Arms in the Air" 2:07
9. "I Never Lied to You" 1:52
10. "Wined and Dined" 2:59
11. "Wolfpack" 3:41
12. "Effervescing Elephant" 1:54
13. "Baby Lemonade" (Take 1) 3:46
14. "Waving My Arms in the Air" (Take 1) 2:13
15. "I Never Lied to You" (Take 1) 1:48
16. "Love Song" (Take 1) 2:32

49

Crazy Diamond
17. "Dominoes" (Take 1) 0:40
18. "Dominoes" (Take 2) 2:36
19. "It Is Obvious" (Take 2) 3:51
Tracks 1319: Bonus tracks

Disc 3 Opel
1. "Opel" 6:26
2. "Clowns and Jugglers" 3:27
3. "Rats" 3:12
4. "Golden Hair" (Barrett/Joyce) 1:44
5. "Dolly Rocker" 3:01
6. "Word Song" 3:19
7. "Wined and Dined" 3:03
8. "Swan Lee (Silas Lang)" 3:13
9. "Birdie Hop" 2:30
10. "Let's Split" 2:23
11. "Lanky (Part One)" 5:32
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

"Wouldn't You Miss Me (Dark Globe)" 3:00


"Milky Way" 3:07
"Golden Hair" 1:56
"Gigolo Aunt" (Take 9) 4:02
"It Is Obvious" (Take 3) 3:44
"It Is Obvious" (Take 5) 3:06
"Clowns and Jugglers" (Take 1) 3:33
"Late Night" (Take 2) 3:19
"Effervescing Elephant" (Take 2) 1:28

Tracks 1520: Bonus tracks


Tracks that were later officially released, not included in this collection:
1. "Bob Dylan Blues" 3:14
As seen on The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me? and An Introduction to Syd Barrett.
2. "Matilda Mother" (Alternate version) 3:14
As seen on An Introduction to Syd Barrett.
3. "Rhamadan" 20:09
As seen on An Introduction to Syd Barrett.
4. All 8 tracks from The Radio One Sessions.

50

Crazy Diamond

Personnel

Syd Barrett Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Vocals, Producer


Tim Chacksfield Project Coordinator
David Gilmour Producer
Brian Hogg Liner Notes, Compilation, Mixing, Compilation Supervisor, Remix Supervision
Peter Jenner Producer
Malcolm Jones Producer
Alan Rogers Illustrations
Phil Smee Compilation, Mixing, Package Design, Compilation Supervisor, Remix Supervision
Roger Waters Producer
Rick Wright Producer and Keyboards

References

51

52

Singles
"Octopus"
"Octopus"
French picture sleeve
Singleby Syd Barrett
from the album The Madcap Laughs
B-side

"Golden Hair"

Released

14 November 1969

Format

7" vinyl

Recorded

May 1968, and 12 and 13 June


1969
20 July 1968 (Opel version)

Genre

Psychedelic folk, psychedelic rock

Length

3:47 (single and Madcap version)


3:27 (Opel version)

Label

Harvest Records

Writer(s)

Syd Barrett

Producer(s)

Syd Barrett and David Gilmour

"Octopus"

53

The Madcap Laughs track listing

13 tracks
Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Terrapin"
"No Good Trying"
"Love You"
"No Man's Land"
"Dark Globe"
"Here I Go"

Side two

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"Octopus"
"Golden Hair"
"Long Gone"
"She Took a Long Cold Look"
"Feel"
"If It's In You"
"Late Night"

Opel track listing

"Opel"
(1)

"Clowns and Jugglers


(Octopus)"
(2)

"Rats"
(3)

An Introduction to Syd Barrett track listing

18 tracks

"Arnold Layne"

"See Emily Play"

"Apples and Oranges"

"Matilda Mother"

"Chapter 24"

"Bike"

"Terrapin"

"Love You"

"Dark Globe"

"Here I Go"

"Octopus"

"She Took a Long Cool Look"

"If It's In You"

"Baby Lemonade"

"Dominoes"

"Gigolo Aunt"

"Effervescing Elephant"

"Bob Dylan Blues"

"Octopus" (originally recorded as "Clowns and Jugglers", later remade as "Octopus") is a song by Syd Barrett. It
appeared on his first solo album, The Madcap Laughs.

"Octopus"

54

Writing
I carried that about in my head for about six months before I actually wrote it so maybe that's why it came out
so well. The idea was like those number songs like "Green Grow the Rushes Ho" where you have, say, twelve
lines each related to the next and an overall theme. It's like a fool-proof combination of lyrics, really, and then
the chorus comes in and changes the tempo but holds the whole thing together.
Syd Barrett,
"Octopus" directly quotes a section from the poem "Rilloby-Rill" by Sir Henry Newbolt. The song features a variety
of other influences as well.

Recording
After Barrett left Pink Floyd in April 1968, Peter Jenner from the band's management followed suit. Jenner led
Barrett into EMI Studios to record some tracks in May, that would later be released on Barrett's first solo album.
During the May sessions, Jenner failed to record, properly, any vocals at all, for several tracks one of them, "Clown
and Jugglers". Sessions stopped once Barrett was in psychiatric care, apparently after a drive around Britain in his
mini.
After New Year 1969, a somewhat recovered Barrett decided upon returning to a musical career; Barrett contacted
EMI, and was passed on to Malcolm Jones, the then-head of EMI's new prog rock label, Harvest. Barrett wanted to
recover the Jenner-produced sessions recordings; several tracks, including "Clowns and Jugglers", were improved
upon.
An early version of the song was released on the Barrett rarities album Opel (1988) under the title "Clowns and
Jugglers", which was recorded with the band Soft Machine. The 1993 re-releases of The Madcap Laughs and Opel
contain alternate versions of "Octopus" and "Clowns and Jugglers" respectively, as bonus tracks.

Release
The album's title came about as a result of co-producer David Gilmour mishearing a line from this song ("Well, the
mad cat laughed at the man on the border..." - although the word "madcap" does figure in another of the song's
lyrics, "To a madcap galloping chase"). "Octopus" is known for being Barrett's only single as a solo artist. It was
released on 14 November 1969, two months before the release of The Madcap Laughs. In France, the single gained a
picture sleeve, which had the drawing of an octopus on it.
It was included on the multi-artist Harvest compilation A Breath of Fresh Air A Harvest Records Anthology
19691974 in 2007. For later release in 2010, on An Introduction to Syd Barrett, David Gilmour added bass to four
tracks, including "Octopus". In 2011, as part of Record Store Day Black Friday, a limited edition tin-set featuring a
replica of the "Octopus" single yellow vinyl, with a 120-page book of photos of Barrett by photographer, Mick Rock,
was released in the US.

References

55

Songs
"Baby Lemonade"
"Baby Lemonade"
Song by Syd Barrett from the album Barrett
Released

14 November 1970

Recorded

26 February 1970

Genre

Psychedelic rock, blues rock

Length

4:10

Label

Harvest/EMI
Capitol Records (US)

Writer

Syd Barrett

Producer

David Gilmour
Barrett track listing

"Baby
Lemonade"
(1)

"Love
Song"
(2)

"Baby Lemonade" is the opening track to Syd Barrett's second studio album, Barrett. "Baby Lemonade", and
another song, "Gigolo Aunt", they were a go for Barrett to play and/or sing to an existing backing track. The solo
was performed by Barrett, not David Gilmour as is often noted. The intro was actually Barrett simply warming-up on
guitar, that Gilmour had managed to record and placed it at the start of the album, making it seem like an intro to the
song. It was included on the multi-artist Harvest compilation, A Breath of Fresh Air A Harvest Records Anthology
19691974 in 2007.

Live
The song, was performed along with 4 other songs (3 songs that would later be recorded for Barrett, and one that
was originally from The Madcap Laughs) was recorded for BBC Radio on 24 February 1970. These five tracks were
later released on The Peel Session, and even later with 3 added songs (one being another version of "Baby
Lemonade") from another BBC Radio show, as The Radio One Sessions.

References

"Bob Dylan Blues"

56

"Bob Dylan Blues"


"Bob Dylan Blues"
Song by Syd Barrett from the album The Best of Syd
Barrett
Wouldn't You Miss Me?
Released

16 April 2001 (UK)


11 September 2001 (US)

Recorded

1970

Genre

Folk rock, blues rock

Length

3:14

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol Records (US)

Writer

Syd Barrett

Producer

David Gilmour

An Introduction to Syd Barrett track listing

18 tracks

"Arnold Layne"

"See Emily Play"

"Apples and Oranges"

"Matilda Mother"

"Chapter 24"

"Bike"

"Terrapin"

"Love You"

"Dark Globe"

"Here I Go"

"Octopus"

"She Took a Long Cool Look"

"If It's In You"

"Baby Lemonade"

"Dominoes"

"Gigolo Aunt"

"Effervescing Elephant"

"Bob Dylan Blues"

"Bob Dylan Blues" is a song written in 1965 by Syd Barrett, the founder of Pink Floyd. Recorded during sessions
for Barrett, it was thought lost until it turned up in 2001 and was released on The Best of Syd Barrett.

"Bob Dylan Blues"

57

Writing and recording


It was in a friendly way both gently lampooning Bob Dylan's early style and success while also embracing Dylan.
The song was supposedly written by Barrett after attending a concert in 1964. This song, along with "Terrapin" and
"Maisie", reflected Barrett's early interest in the blues.
The song was recorded in 1970, and largely forgotten about. The recording was lost until recently when David
Gilmour discovered the tapes, in his personal collection. It was released in 2001 on the Barrett compilation The Best
of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me?.

References

"Dark Globe"
"Dark Globe"
Song by Syd Barrett from the album The Madcap Laughs
Published

Lupus Music Ltd

Released

3 January 1970

Recorded

12 June 1969
26 July 1969 (Opel version)

Genre

Folk

Length

2:02
3:00 (Opel version)

Label

Harvest (UK)
Capitol (US)

Writer

Syd Barrett

Producer

David Gilmour, Roger Waters


The Madcap Laughs track listing

13 tracks
Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Terrapin"
"No Good Trying"
"Love You"
"No Man's Land"
"Dark Globe"
"Here I Go"

Side two

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"Octopus"
"Golden Hair"
"Long Gone"
"She Took a Long Cold Look"
"Feel"
"If It's In You"
"Late Night"

"Dark Globe"

58

Opel track listing

"Lanky
(Part
One)"
(11)

"Wouldn't You Miss


Me
(Dark Globe)"
(12)

"Milky
Way"
(13)

An Introduction to Syd Barrett track listing

18 tracks

"Arnold Layne"

"See Emily Play"

"Apples and Oranges"

"Matilda Mother"

"Chapter 24"

"Bike"

"Terrapin"

"Love You"

"Dark Globe"

"Here I Go"

"Octopus"

"She Took a Long Cool Look"

"If It's In You"

"Baby Lemonade"

"Dominoes"

"Gigolo Aunt"

"Effervescing Elephant"

"Bob Dylan Blues"

"Dark Globe" (also known as "Wouldn't You Miss Me") is a song by Syd Barrett, released on his first solo album
The Madcap Laughs.

Recording
A session was held on 12 June 1969, with producers David Gilmour and Roger Waters, at which recording "Dark
Globe", among others. Though, despite two takes deeming the song finished by both Gilmour and Waters, a third
attempt was done towards the end of the session. The version recorded at the start of the session was released on the
finished album. On 26 July, "Dark Globe" was re-made. This take was titled "Wouldn't You Miss Me" on the
recording sheet. The track, along with two others, was mixed on 6 August.

Covers

"Dark Globe"

59

"Dark Globe"
Singleby David Gilmour
A-side

"Arnold Layne"

Released

26 December 2006

Genre

Folk

Length

2:23

Label

EMI

Producer(s)

David Gilmour

David Gilmour singles chronology

"Smile"
(2006)

"Arnold
Layne"
(2006)

This song has been covered by R.E.M. while touring to support Document and Green, first released by them in 1989
on the single "Orange Crush", and re-released in 1993 on the British "collector's edition" of the single for
"Everybody Hurts", and also as one of four cover versions within the rare "Automatic Box." In an interview for the
DVD The Pink Floyd & Syd Barrett Story, Roger Waters recalls visiting backstage with R.E.M. and being amused
when a previously rude Michael Stipe performed "Dark Globe" by himself during the encore. The song has also been
covered by Placebo. It has been played live by Gene Ween, Soundgarden and Chris Cornell.
The song was revived in live performance by Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, on some of his concerts in July
2006, as a tribute to Barrett shortly after he died. A version was released on a live single entitled "Arnold Layne"
later that year.

References
External links
Full lyrics of this song (http://www.metrolyrics.com/dark-globe-lyrics-syd-barrett.html) at MetroLyrics

"Here I Go"

60

"Here I Go"
"Here I Go"
Song by Syd Barrett from the album The Madcap Laughs
Published

Lupus Music Ltd

Released

3 January 1970

Recorded

17 April 1969

Genre

Psychedelic folk, experimental rock

Length

3:11

Label

Harvest Records/EMI (UK)


Capitol Records (US)

Writer

Syd Barrett

Producer

Malcolm Jones
The Madcap Laughs track listing

13 tracks
Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Terrapin"
"No Good Trying"
"Love You"
"No Man's Land"
"Dark Globe"
"Here I Go"

Side two

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"Octopus"
"Golden Hair"
"Long Gone"
"She Took a Long Cold Look"
"Feel"
"If It's In You"
"Late Night"

"Here I Go"

61

An Introduction to Syd Barrett track listing

18 tracks

"Arnold Layne"

"See Emily Play"

"Apples and Oranges"

"Matilda Mother"

"Chapter 24"

"Bike"

"Terrapin"

"Love You"

"Dark Globe"

"Here I Go"

"Octopus"

"She Took a Long Cool Look"

"If It's In You"

"Baby Lemonade"

"Dominoes"

"Gigolo Aunt"

"Effervescing Elephant"

"Bob Dylan Blues"

"Here I Go" is a song by former singer/songwriter of Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett and is the sixth track on his first solo
album, The Madcap Laughs.
The song tells the story in which the narrator's girlfriend leaves him because "a big band is far better" than himself.
He attempts to win her back by writing her a song, but when he goes to her house to show it to her, he instead finds
himself falling in love with her sister.

Recording
During the recording sessions for The Madcap Laughs, for the session on 17 April 1969, Barrett brought in fellow
musicians Jerry Shirley, drummer with Humble Pie, and Willie Wilson, Jokers Wild's drummer, although for this
occasion he was playing bass. Working in Abbey Road Studio 2, the musicians recorded "No Man's Land" together,
then they recorded a song Barrett had written in a few minutes, "Here I Go" the song required no overdubs of any
kind. The session for these two songs only lasted three hours.
For later release on An Introduction to Syd Barrett, David Gilmour added bass to four tracks, including "Here I Go".

References
External links
Full lyrics of this song (http://www.metrolyrics.com/here-i-go-lyrics-syd-barrett.html) at MetroLyrics

"Milky Way"

62

"Milky Way"
"Milky Way"
Song by Syd Barrett from the album Opel
Released

17 October 1988

Recorded

7 June 1970

Length

3:07

Label

Harvest/EMI (UK)
Capitol Records (US)

Writer

Syd Barrett

Producer

David Gilmour

Opel track listing

"Wouldn't You Miss


Me
(Dark Globe)"
(12)

"Milky
Way"
(13)

"Golden Hair (Instrumental


version)"
(14)

"Milky Way" is a song by Syd Barrett from the outtakes/rarities album Opel. The song was recorded on 7 June
1970, and produced by Barrett's friend and former bandmate David Gilmour. It was one of eight then-unreleased
tracks to be released on Opel.

References

"Terrapin"

63

"Terrapin"
"Terrapin"
Song by Syd Barrett from the album The Madcap Laughs
Published

Lupus Music Ltd

Released

3 January 1970

Recorded

11 & 26 April 1969

Genre

Folk rock, blues rock

Length

5:04

Label

Harvest/EMI (UK)
Capitol Records (US)

Writer

Syd Barrett

Producer

Malcolm Jones
The Madcap Laughs track listing

13 tracks
Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

"Terrapin"
"No Good Trying"
"Love You"
"No Man's Land"
"Dark Globe"
"Here I Go"

Side two

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"Octopus"
"Golden Hair"
"Long Gone"
"She Took a Long Cold Look"
"Feel"
"If It's In You"
"Late Night"

"Terrapin"

64

An Introduction to Syd Barrett track listing

18 tracks

"Arnold Layne"

"See Emily Play"

"Apples and Oranges"

"Matilda Mother"

"Chapter 24"

"Bike"

"Terrapin"

"Love You"

"Dark Globe"

"Here I Go"

"Octopus"

"She Took a Long Cool Look"

"If It's In You"

"Baby Lemonade"

"Dominoes"

"Gigolo Aunt"

"Effervescing Elephant"

"Bob Dylan Blues"

"Terrapin" is a song by Syd Barrett that appears as the first track off his first solo album The Madcap Laughs and is
notably the sole representative from that album that appears on The Peel Session. The song's arrangement is sparse,
like much of the album, and features only acoustic and electric guitar accompaniment to the vocals. This song, along
with "Maisie" and "Bob Dylan Blues"; reflected Barrett's early interest in the blues. Iggy the Eskimo, one of Barrett's
acquaintances, had called the song "quite catchy".
The Syd Barrett Appreciation Society titled its official magazine Terrapin (published from 19721976), in tribute to
the song. It was released on the multi-artist Harvest compilation, Picnic A Breath of Fresh Air.

Recording
While recording Madcap, in April 1969, Barrett played back several tapes of songs recorded up to that point to
producer Malcolm Jones, at Jones' request. After the play backs, Barrett performed on guitar several tracks to Jones,
one of them being "Terrapin". "Terrapin" was recorded in just one take on 11 April, The lead guitar for it was
overdubbed in the session on 26 April.

Covers
The song has been covered by Phish, The Smashing Pumpkins, Marc and the Mambas, The King Khan and BBQ
Show, as well as David Gilmour, who featured the song on the live album David Gilmour in Concert.
Gilmour had also performed the song at 1996's "A Day for Tibet" and 2001's Meltdown events.

"Terrapin"

References

65

66

Musical instruments
Danelectro
Danelectro
Type

Private

Industry

Musical instruments

Genre

Producer

Founded

1947

Founder(s)

Nathan Daniel

Headquarters original: Red Bank New Jersey, United States of America / later: Neptune City, New Jersey / modern: Camarillo California, United
States of America
Products

electric guitars, bass guitars, guitar amplifiers, effects units

Owner(s)

Evets Corporation

Website

danelectro.com

[1]

Danelectro is a US manufacturer of musical instruments and accessories, specializing in guitars, bass guitars,
amplifiers and effects units.

History
Danelectro was founded by Nathan "Nat" Daniel in 1947. Throughout the late 1940s, the company produced
amplifiers for Sears, Roebuck and Company and Montgomery Ward. In 1954, Danelectro started producing the
Danelectro lines of solidbody electric guitars and amplifiers. The company was also contracted to make guitars and
amplifiers that were branded not with the Danelectro name, but with the names of various store brands, such as
Silvertone and Airline. Later hollow-bodied guitars (constructed out of Masonite and plywood to save costs and
increase production speed), distinguished by Silvertone's maroon vinyl covering, Danelectro's light tweed covering,
the concentric stacked tone/volume knobs used on the two-pickup models of both series, and the "lipstick-tube"
pickupsinvented by placing the entire mechanism into spare lipstick tubesaimed to produce no-frills guitars of
reasonably good tone at low cost. In 1956, Danelectro introduced the six-string Baritone guitar. The baritone guitar
never proved especially popular but found an enduring niche in Nashville as the instrument of choice for "Tic-tac"
bass lines. In 1966, Danelectro was sold to MCA. A year later, the Coral line, known for its hollow-bodies and
electric sitars, was introduced. In 1969, the Danelectro plant was closed, due to MCA's attempt to market
Danelectros to small guitar shops rather than large department stores.
In the late 1990s, the Evets Corporation started selling primarily copies of old Silvertone and Danelectro guitars, as
well as newly designed effects pedals and small amplifiers. After initially selling well, guitar sales slowed to the
point where Danelectro stopped selling guitars after 2001, opting to concentrate on effects pedals. In 2006, the new
owners of Evets decided on a new marketing model for the guitars, selling a limited number of guitars each year.

Danelectro

Amplifiers

Amp-in-Case, 1962-1969
Cadet
Centurian 275
Centurion 272
Century 30
Challenger
Model 88 Commando, 1954-1960
Corporal 132
Dirty Thirty
DJ16 Bacon N' Eggs Mini-Amp (current)
DM 10
DM 25
DS 50
DS 100 (Danelectro badged version of the Silvertone 1485)
Envoy
Hodad H-1 (current)

Honeytone (current)
Honeytone e-Studio (current)
Leader
Master-Slave
Model 98
Nifty Fifty
Special, 1953-1958
Twin 15

67

Danelectro

68

Vintage Effects Units


Model 9100 Reverb Box

Guitars
1954-1969

Danelectro C
Danelectro U1
Danelectro U2
Danelectro Shorthorn, Which includes the following model range:

Standard models (Single Pickup: 3011,3012; Dual Pickups:


3021,3022,5025)
Deluxe models (Dual Pickups: 6026,6027,6028; Treble
Pickups: 6036, 6037, 6038)
Vibrato models (Single Pickup: 4011; Dual Pickups: 4021;)
Danelectro Amp-in-case
Dano Pro
Danelectro Baritone
Guitarlin
Stan & Dan

Innuendo Baritone
Longhorn Baritone
Vinnie Bell Bellzouki (12-string electric guitar with body based
on the bouzouki)

1962 Silvertone amp-in-case and guitar

Danelectro

69

1998-2001

56-U1
56-U2
56-U2 Lefty
56-U3
59-DC
59-DC Pro

59-DC Pro 12-string


6 string bass
Baritone
Convertible (acoustic/electric)
Convertible Pro
Danoblaster (with built in effects)

Hearsay (distortion)
Innuendo (distortion, tremolo, chorus, echo)
Rumor Bass (chorus)
DC-3
DC-12 (twelve string)
DC Bass
Doubleneck

6-string/12-string
6-string/baritone
Guitarlin
Hodad
Hodad
Hodad 12-string
Hodad Baritone
Hodad Bass
Longhorn
58-Longhorn
Longhorn Baritone
Longhorn Bass
Longhorn Pro
Mod
Mod 6 (6-string)
Mod 7 (7-string)

59-DC guitar, played by musicians


including Jimmy Page

Danelectro

70

2006-current
'56 Pro 2006
Longhorn Guitar and Bass 2006
Dano Pro 2007, 2012
'59 Dano 2007
Dano '63 Guitar, Baritone and Bass 2008
"Dead On '67" Guitar and Baritone 2009
"Dead On '58" Longhorn Bass 2009
DC-12 2009
'59-DC 2009
'56 Single Cutaway Guitar and Bass 2010
Wild Thing Guitar, Baritone and Bass 2011
'59 Modified, '59 Left-handed, and '59 12-string 2012
Hodad Guitar and Bass 2012

2007 Danelectro Pro reissue

Effects pedals
Today, Danelectro primarily produces effect pedals.
There are eight main runs of pedals: original effects,
FAB effects, mini effects, vintage effects, Wasabi
effects, Paisley effects, Cool Cat effects and other
miscellaneous effects. All run on 9V batteries or power
adapters. The original effects featured metal enclosures
and FET switching. Cool Cat models are the most
recent pedals, designed with metal enclosures and
true-bypass switching. Danelectro has begun rolling out
Three Danelectro effects pedals. Left to right: Fab Tone distortion,
Cool Cat V2 pedals, featuring extra 'under the hood'
Cool Cat chorus and Daddy O. overdrive.
features. Mini effects pedals are smaller, compact
pedals with effects resembling those of the original effects and the FAB effects. Vintage effects include the large,
rectangular Spring King and Reel Echo effect pedals. The discontinued Paisley series featured paisley-patterned
drive effects in original style enclosures. The Wasabi series features large, futuristic-looking metal enclosures. FAB
effects are the cheapest of the bunch, and feature plastic enclosures somewhat larger than the Mini effects series.
In 2006, a carrying case was developed to hold up to five mini effects in it. When the player is ready to play, the top
may be removed and the bottom acts as a pedals board. It has since been discontinued.[2] Not long after, another
carrying case was developed to fit five FAB or Cool Cat pedals, as well as serve in the pedal board function as
well.[3]
Despite the many advantages of the mini effects, FAB effects are the ones primarily seen today. The Mini effects are
often praised for their high quality tones, but the plastic construction makes them fragile.

Danelectro

Original effects

Daddy O. Overdrive (notably used by Mike Campbell)


Cool Cat Chorus
FAB Tone Distortion
Dan-Echo Simulated Tape Echo
Dan-O-Matic Tuner

FAB effects
The FAB series of guitar effect pedals is a budget range of pedals made by the Danelectro company that are
manufactured in China. The series was launched in 2005 with the release of the FAB Distortion, FAB Overdrive and
the FAB Metal pedals.
There are currently eight pedals available all of which share the same distinctive injection moulded plastic casing
and blue LED light. Each pedal has a mains power DC9 socket or can be powered using a 9v battery, access for
which involves removing the rubber covered metal base plate.
FAB Chorus
FAB Delay

FAB Distortion
FAB Echo
FAB Flanger
FAB Fuzz
FAB Metal
FAB Overdrive

Mini effects

Pastrami Overdrive
T-Bone Distortion
BLT Slap Echo
Corned Beef Reverb (discontinued)
Tuna Melt Tremolo
Hash Browns Flanger
Pepperoni Phaser
Milkshake Chorus
Surf and Turf Compressor
Grilled Cheese Distortion
Pedal Tuner
Chili Dog Octave
Fish and Chips 7-Band EQ
Chicken Salad Vibrato
French Toast Octave Distortion
PB&J Delay
Bacon & Eggs MiniAmp Distortion
Rocky Road Spinning Speaker
Black Coffee Metal Distortion
French Fries Auto-Wah

Black Licorice Beyond Metal

71

Danelectro

Vintage effects
Reel Echo
Spring King

Paisley effects (discontinued)


Blue Paisley PureDrive
Black Paisley Liquid Metal

Wasabi effects

Wasabi Overdrive
Wasabi Distortion
Wasabi Rock-A-Bye
Wasabi Forward-Reverse Delay
Wasabi Chorus-Trem

Miscellaneous effects

Shift Daddy
Trip-L Wah
Dan-O-Wah
Free Speech Talk Box
Psycho Flanger
Sitar Swami
Back Talk Reverse Delay

Cool Cat effects

Tremolo
Vibe
Metal
Fuzz
Fuzz V2
Drive
Drive V2
Transparent Overdrive
Transparent Overdrive V2
Distortion
Metal II
Chorus

72

Danelectro

References
[1] http:/ / www. danelectro. com/
[2] http:/ / www. musiciansfriend. com/ amplifiers-effects/ danelectro-mini-case
[3] http:/ / www. coolcattone. com/ product_pedal. html

External links
Danelectro Guitars (http://www.danelectro.com/) - official website
Tribute to Danelectro founder Nathan I. Daniel (http://www.pen4rent.com/pen4rent/tribute.aspx)
Neptune Bound - The Ultimate Danelectro Guitar Guide 2008 (http://www.neptunebound.com)

73

Fender Esquire

74

Fender Esquire
Fender Esquire

Manufacturer

Fender

Period

1949 (original run), 1951-1969 (second run), with reproductions available later
Construction

Body type

Solid

Neck joint

Bolt-on

Scale

25.5"
Woods

Body

Ash

Neck

Maple

Fretboard

Originally had no separate fingerboard (frets were installed directly into one-piece maple neck). Later, separate maple boards, and
then rosewood boards were available.
Hardware

Bridge

Fixed

Pickup(s)

1 Single-coil (some 1950 examples were equipped with 2 pickups)


Colors available
Originally blonde

The Fender Esquire is a solid body electric guitar manufactured by Fender, and was the first "Spanish" style guitar
sold by Fender, and debuted in 1950. Shortly after its introduction a two-pickup version named the Broadcaster was
introduced while the single pickup version retained the Esquire name, and The Gretsch Company at the time
marketed a drum set under the 'Broadkaster' name, and at their request Fender dropped the Broadcaster name,
eventually renaming it the 'Telecaster.' Although the one-pickup Esquire was manufactured first, it is now generally
regarded as a variant of the more popular Telecaster.

Fender Esquire

75

Early development

1st prototype in
1949

The first prototype for the Esquire (and the later Telecaster) was completed by Leo Fender in the
fall of 1949. The prototype shared with these guitars the now-familiar slab body shape with single
cutaway to allow easier access to the upper frets. It likewise featured the distinctive combination
bridge and pickup assembly, with a slanted pickup with individual pole pieces for each string, and
three bridge saddles which allowed adjustment of string length in pairs and individual string
height. The neck, like the first Esquires manufactured in 1950, was made from a single piece of
maple without a truss rod. The neck was attached to the body with four screws and an anchor
plate, unlike in traditional guitar construction, where a tenon on the neck is glued into the body.
Unlike the Esquire, the neck was wider at the nut, and the head had 3 tuners on each side. The
prototype differed from the later production guitars in several other respects: the body was made
of pinewood, it was painted opaque white, its pickguard did not extend above the strings, it lacked
a selector switch, and its volume and tone knobs were mounted on a slanted plate. Like the
production models, it had a removable pickup cover, but unlike the production models, the cover
had straight sides. The prototype had only one pickup, as did Esquires manufactured from 1951

onwards.
Over the winter of 1949/50, Fender refined the design. The neck width at the nut was narrowed, and the head
modified to accommodate all six tuners on one side. A tone selector switch was added, and the controls were
mounted on a plate parallel to the strings. The scratch plate was enlarged. Around the spring of 1950, Fender had
completed a neck pickup design, which was smaller than the lead pickup and was encased in a metal shielding cover.
However, this last feature was not to make it onto Fender's first commercially introduced guitar, as Fender's
distributor, the Radio & Television Equipment Company (RTEC), had decided that it would be easier to sell the
single pickup version of the guitar.

The 1950 Esquire


The single pickup guitar was first manufactured in April 1950, and made its commercial debut as the Esquire in
RTEC's Spring catalogue of that year. While the guitar pictured in the catalogue was painted black and had a white
scratch plate, most of the Esquires produced at the time were painted semi-transparent "butterscotch" blonde and had
a black scratch plate. Unlike the pinewood prototype, the bodies (thinner than the Broadcaster's at 1.5", instead of
1.75") were made of solid ash. The dual pickup version was first manufactured in June of that year. Neither version
had a truss rod at that time, though in November, the dual pickup version acquired one and was renamed the
Broadcaster. Following objections from Gretsch who produced the "Broadkaster" drum kit, this name was dropped,
and some guitars were shipped with only the "Fender" logo decal and no model name (commonly referred to these
days as the "Nocaster.") until the name Telecaster was adopted. The guitar was designed as an electronic instrument
with no acoustic manipulation of the tone. Rather the guitar's pickup was designed and placed to transmit the richest
signal for later manipulation by the tone switch and other electronics.

The Esquire from 1951 to present


Following the renaming of the dual pickup Broadcaster, production and promotion of the single pickup Esquire was
briefly discontinued. It was reintroduced with a truss rod in January 1951. The only external differences between
these second generation Esquires and the Broadcasters and Telecasters of 1951 are the lack of a neck pickup, and the
Esquire label on the head. Although the Esquire had only a single pickup, it retained the three-way switch of the
two-pickup guitars. This switch modified the tone of the pickup by making it bassier in the forward position, while
enabling use of the tone control knob in the middle position. With the switch in the rear position, these tone controls
were bypassed entirely for a "hotter" lead tone.

Fender Esquire
Use of the Fender Esquire by several country musicians is popularly credited for the creation of one of the most
distinctive and recognized sounds in American music history. In 1954 Luther Perkins played a slightly modified
Esquire, recording the first Johnny Cash songs "Wide Open Road" and "Hey Porter". This guitar can also be heard
on all records before "I Walk The Line", for which Luther played an Esquire. All through his career (which ended
with his death in a house fire in 1968) Perkins used Esquires in Blonde, White, Black, Red and Sunburst colors.
Even though he was given the new Jazzmaster and Jaguar guitars from Leo Fender personally, Luther Perkins
always returned to the guitar that had made possible the creation of the legendary "Boom Chicka Boom Sound" that
identified Johnny Cash's music.
Like the two-pickup guitar, these Esquires had a routing cavity in the neck pickup position. Thus, with the purchase
of a neck pickup and replacement or modification of the pickguard, players could upgrade their instrument to a guitar
identical to the Telecaster in every respect except for the model decal. Bruce Springsteen, for example, has long
played an Esquire modified in this way. Springsteen has claimed that the guitar he is pictured with on the Born To
Run album cover is, in fact, a hybrid of two guitars, a Telecaster body and Esquire neck. However, it is a
first-generation Esquire with two pickup routs. The Esquires had Esquire pickguards to cover the neck pickup hole.
His guitar has a neck pickup installed, but not connected. [1]
In 1966, Paul McCartney purchased a 1964 Fender Esquire model with a sunburst finish and rosewood fretboard:
McCartney bought this guitar, a right-handed model which he restrung and played "upside-down," during the
Revolver sessions. Also used on "Good Morning, Good Morning," "Helter Skelter", and "Maybe I'm Amazed,"
among other cuts from his solo career.
Jeff Beck used a 1954 Esquire with the Yardbirds to create the famous guitar parts on "Over Under Sideways
Down", "Shapes of Things", "I'm a Man," and "Heart Full of Soul". Beck bought it from the Walker Brothers
guitarist John Maus while on tour with them. Mous had hand-shaved the body to be contoured like a Stratocaster.
This guitar now belongs to pickup designer Seymour Duncan.
Syd Barrett, the original leader of Pink Floyd, was another prominent Esquire player. His successor David Gilmour,
while not as prominent a user as Barrett, used an Esquire with an added pickup (as Springsteen did) on several songs,
including "Dogs", "Run Like Hell" and his work on Paul McCartney's album Run Devil Run.[2]
On the single, "Born to Be Wild" by Steppenwolf, guitarist Michael Monarch played a single bridge pickup version
of the Fender Esquire.
The initial rationale for reintroducing the single pickup Esquire in 1951 had been to offer a more affordable option
for musicians who could not afford the two-pickup guitar. However, with the introduction of cheaper student models
such as the Mustang, the more expensive Esquire became a less attractive option, and it was sold in smaller and
smaller quantities. Consequently, Fender discontinued the Esquire in 1969.
In 1986, Fender Japan began producing the Esquire, based on the 1954 version. It featured threaded saddles and a
white pickguard with either a butterscotch blonde or metallic red finish. Some people report that there was also a
blackguard version, and a sunburst was also available. These Esquires were imported to the USA, and were
incredible guitars in terms of fit and finish. The necks, in particular, were especially nice. Overall, many players
prefer this era Esquire to the more recent Mexican-made reissues.
Fender currently offers several '50s Esquire reproductions in their online catalogue [3]. The company considers the
Esquire to be a member of the "family of Telecaster guitars." These Esquires are part of the MIM (made in Mexico)
series. The Fender Custom Shop also manufactures a 1959 Esquire reproduction as part of its "Time Machine"
series, a model distinguished by its top-loading bridge design. It is also notable that the Avril Lavigne Telecaster
sold under the Squier by Fender brand resembles an Esquire since it only has a single pickup.

76

Fender Esquire

Citations
[1] Ten Terrific Telecaster Guitars (http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20040607133625/ http:/ / fender. demonweb. co. uk/ fenderfiles/
TenTerrificTelecasterGuitars. asp)
[2] A closer look at Gilmour's 1955 Fender Esquire (http:/ / web. tampabay. rr. com/ richm/ ggg0006. htm)
[3] http:/ / www. fender. com/ products/ search. php?section=guitars& cat=esquire

References
Bacon, Tony (2005), Six Decades of the Fender Telecaster: The story of the world's first solidbody electric guitar,
Backbeat Books, ISBN0-87930-856-7.
Bacon, Tony; Day, Paul (1998), The Fender Book: A complete history of Fender electric guitars (2nd ed.),
Balafon Books, ISBN0-87930-554-1.
Duchossoir, A.R. (1991), The Fender Telecaster: The Detailed Story of America's Senior Solid Body Electric
Guitar, Hal Leonard Publishing Co., ISBN0-7935-0860-6.

External links
Current Esquire Classic (http://www.fender.com/products/search.php?partno=0131502301), with some
history.
Index (http://www.fender.com/products/search.php?section=guitars&cat=esquire) of current Esquire models.
(http://www.fenderesquire.org) Fender Esquire resource site
Ten Terrific Telecasters (http://web.archive.org/web/20040607133625/http://fender.demonweb.co.uk/
fenderfiles/TenTerrificTelecasterGuitars.asp) at Fender UK has descriptions of the very first Esquire/Telecaster
prototype guitar, and of Springsteen's upgraded Esquire (Archived version accessed 18 October 2006).

77

78

Family
Max Barrett
Arthur Max Barrett
Born

28 July 1909
Thaxted, Essex, England

Died

11 December 1961 (aged52)


Cambridge, England

Nationality

United Kingdom

Fields

Medicine (Pathology)

Institutions

University of Cambridge

Alma mater

Pembroke College, Cambridge

Knownfor

Influences

Henry Roy Dean

Barrett Room at Addenbrooke's Hospital


Father of Syd Barrett

Notable awards Raymond Horton-Smith Prize (1960)

Arthur Max Barrett, MD (28 July 1909 11 December 1961), also known as Dr. A. M. Barrett, was a university
morbid anatomist and histologist at the University of Cambridge, and an honorary consulting pathologist to the
United Cambridge Hospitals and to the East Anglian Regional Hospital Board. He wrote numerous works, often
cited in medical literature. The Barrett Room at Addenbrooke's Hospital is named in his honour. He was also the
father of Syd Barrett, a founding member of the band Pink Floyd.

Max Barrett

Biography
Early life
Arthur Max Barrett was born in 1909 in the
English town of Thaxted, in Essex, where he
spent his boyhood. His father Arthur Samuel
Barrett was a retail businessman (who employed
three men at Thaxted as Grocer, Draper & Farmer
Of 36 Acres). His mother Alice Mary (ne
Ashford) was daughter of Rev. Charles Ashford,
who was Congregational Minister at Thaxted for
19 years, and Ellen, ne Garrett, who was known
as a cousin of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson,
although a research on Syd Barrett genealogy has
not found any relation yet.
Max Barrett had a religious family background
and was educated first at the grammar school of
Newport, Essex (now Newport Free Grammar
Eric, Keith, Max, Roy and Doreen Barrett
School). When the family had moved to
Cambridge he attended the Cambridge and
County High School (now Cambridgeshire High School for Boys). Early he was interested in scouting (with the
Cambridge County School Troop he became troop leader and gained a King's Scout Badge) as well as in music,
aural birding and botany, which improved the expeditions with his sister Doreen for birds and flowers, and inspired
his later interests in music and science.

Later years
Deciding on a career in medicine, in 1927 he won a State Scholarship to Cambridge University, coming up to
Pembroke College in 1928. There he obtained a considerable number of awards and honours: a Major Scholarship in
1928; a Shoolbred Scholarship in 1930; a First Class place in the Natural Science Tripos Part I in 1930 and in Part II
in 1931 (Part II course in Pathology was introduced in 1925 by Prof. Henry Roy Dean, with whom he first came
under influence); a Foundress Scholarship in 1931; five prizes during his clinical training in the London Hospital
Medical College (where he went as an entrance scholar in Pathology); a Raymond Horton-Smith Prize for his MD
degree thesis (submitted in 1960). He graduated MB BCh in 1934.
He worked in the wards and laboratories of the London Hospital from 1934 to 1938 and was University
Demonstrator in Cambridge from 1938 to 1946, the only one in the Department of Pathology during the war years,
having a large part of the teaching responsibility. He was also an examiner for the Institute of Medical and
Laboratory Technology, London.
When he returned in Cambridge in 1938 other than teaching he was in the same time actively interested both in the
routine pathology services of Addenbrooke's Hospital, and as member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society as
well, where he was Honorary Secretary for more than 20 years, and where "an enviably deep bass" was reminded
among his musical abilities. In 1946, when that services were saddled to the university, he became consultant for the
hospital as University Morbid Anatomist and Histologist.
Being a keen botanist, he was provided with his own set of keys to the Cambridge University Botanic Garden. He
often made histological examinations of the field fungi he carefully preserved and recorded for his collection, and
gave some valued opinions on rare fungi during Autumn field meetings of the British Mycological Society.

79

Max Barrett

Death and legacy


A week before his death at 52 his pathological work continued. Inoperable cancer was diagnosed and Max Barrett
died suddenly on 11 December 1961. In his 1961 obituary it was said about him:
He believed in the precise use of language []. His advice was constantly sought by pathologists in
East Anglia and elsewhere, never without profit. [] When he spoke at the Faculty Board of Medicine
or as secretary of the Degree Committee everyone recognized it as a carefully balanced statement
worthy of consideration. [] His family life was a happy one: tea with the Barretts was fun, for he had
imparted to his family his unbounded curiosity, which was, in the view of many friends, his most
endearing characteristic.
The youngest of his five children, Roger, later known as Syd, and Rosemary, were 15 and 14 years old respectively.
Later a venue in a private ward at the Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, used for seminars, training, meeting,
consulting and conferences, was named Barrett Room in his honour.

Works
The following list of A. M. Barrett's works is taken from his obituary on the official journal of the Pathological
Society of Great Britain and Ireland (now The Journal of Pathology) published in January 1964. Here the list is in
MLA format. Some supposed minor works like the ones on mycology (study of the fungi) were missing there.
Barrett, A. M.; Stewart, Halley (1938). "A special form of erythrocyte possessing increased resistance to
hypotonic saline". The Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology 46 (3): 603. doi:10.1002/path.1700460319 [1].
Barrett, A. M. (2009). "The serological diagnosis of glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis): A new
technique" [2]. Journal of Hygiene 41 (3): 33043. doi:10.1017/S0022172400012535 [3]. PMC2199768 [2].
PMID20475599 [4].
Barrett, A. M.; Cole, L. (1944). "A Case of Tuberculous Pericarditis" [5]. Heart 6 (4): 18590.
doi:10.1136/hrt.6.4.185 [6]. PMC503542 [5]. PMID18609977 [7].
Barrett, A. M. (1944). "A method for staining sections of bone marrow". The Journal of Pathology and
Bacteriology 56: 1335. doi:10.1002/path.1700560116 [8].
Barrett, A. M. (1944). "On the removal of formaldehyde-produced precipitate from sections". The Journal of
Pathology and Bacteriology 56: 1356. doi:10.1002/path.1700560117 [9].
Bowen, WH; Barrett, AM (1946). "A case of anuria". The Clinical journal 75: 525. PMID21019000 [10].
Barrett, AM; Cole, L (1946). "Pulmonary Vascular Sclerosis with Right Ventricular Failure" [11]. British heart
journal 8 (2): 7682. doi:10.1136/hrt.8.2.76 [12]. PMC480996 [11]. PMID18610031 [13].
Needham, DM; Cohen, JA; Barrett, AM (1947). "The mechanism of damage to the bone marrow in systemic
poisoning with mustard gas" [14]. The Biochemical journal 41 (4): 6319. PMC1258550 [14]. PMID16748227
[15]
.
McCance, RA; Barrett, AM (1951). "Studies of undernutrition, Wuppertal 1946-9. III. The effect of
undernutrition on the skin". Special report series 275: 8396. PMID14866590 [16].
McCance, RA; Dean, RF; Barrett, AM (1951). "Studies of undernutrition, Wuppertal 1946-9. VI. Enlargement of
the parotid glands". Special report series 275: 1359. PMID14866593 [17].
Barrett, AM; Gairdner, D; McFarlan, AM (1952). "An outbreak of encephalitis, possibly due to poliomyelitis
virus" [18]. British Medical Journal 1 (4772): 131722. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.4772.1317 [19]. PMC2023751 [18].
PMID14935244 [20].
Barrett, A.M. (1954). "Sudden death in infancy". In Gairdner, D. Recent advances in pediatrics (London):
30120.
Barrett, AM; Fairweather, DV; McCance, RA; Morrison, AB (1956). "Genetic, clinical, biochemical, and
pathological features of hypophosphatasia; based on the study of a family". The Quarterly journal of medicine 25
(100): 52337. PMID13379604 [21].

80

Max Barrett
McCance, RA; Butler, RW; Barrett, AM (1958). "Unexplained destruction of the shaft of the femur in a child".
The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume 40B (3): 48793. PMID13575462 [22].
Barrett, A.M.; Gresham, G.A. (1958). "Acute Streptococcal Myositis". The Lancet 271 (7016): 347.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(58)90971-1 [23].
Coombs, R.R.A; McLaughlan, P (1982). "The Enigma of Cot Death: Is the Modified-Anaphylaxis Hypothesis an
Explanation for Some Cases?". The Lancet 319 (8286): 1388. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(82)92503-X [24].
Parish, W.E.; Barrett, A.M.; Coombs, R.R.A.; Gunther, Mavis; Camps, Francise (1960). "Hypersensitivity to
Milk and Sudden Death in Infancy". The Lancet 276 (7160): 110610. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(60)92187-5 [25].
PMID13732812 [26].
Fairbank, T. J.; Barrett, A. M. (1961). "Vastus intermedius contracture in early childhood: Case report in identical
twins" [27]. The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume 43B (2): 32634.
Barrett, A. M. (1963). "Arterial measurements in the interpretation of cardiomegaly at necropsy: Cardiac
hypertrophy and myocardial infarction". The Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology 86: 920.
doi:10.1002/path.1700860103 [28]. PMID13969522 [29].

References
[1] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1002%2Fpath. 1700460319
[2] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pmc/ articles/ PMC2199768
[3] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1017%2FS0022172400012535
[4] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 20475599
[5] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pmc/ articles/ PMC503542
[6] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1136%2Fhrt. 6. 4. 185
[7] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 18609977
[8] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1002%2Fpath. 1700560116
[9] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1002%2Fpath. 1700560117
[10] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 21019000
[11] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pmc/ articles/ PMC480996
[12] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1136%2Fhrt. 8. 2. 76
[13] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 18610031
[14] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pmc/ articles/ PMC1258550
[15] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 16748227
[16] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 14866590
[17] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 14866593
[18] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pmc/ articles/ PMC2023751
[19] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1136%2Fbmj. 1. 4772. 1317
[20] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 14935244
[21] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 13379604
[22] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 13575462
[23] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1016%2FS0140-6736%2858%2990971-1
[24] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1016%2FS0140-6736%2882%2992503-X
[25] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1016%2FS0140-6736%2860%2992187-5
[26] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 13732812
[27] http:/ / web. jbjs. org. uk/ content/ 43-B/ 2/ 326. citation
[28] http:/ / dx. doi. org/ 10. 1002%2Fpath. 1700860103
[29] http:/ / www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ pubmed/ 13969522

81

82

Associated acts
Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd in January 1968, from the only known photo-shoot of all five members
Left to right: Mason, Barrett, Gilmour (seated), Waters, and Wright
Background information
Origin

London, England

Genres

Progressive rock, psychedelic rock, art rock, blues rock

Years active

19651995, 2005, 2014

Labels

EMI Columbia, Harvest, Capitol, Columbia, EMI, Parlophone

Website

pinkfloyd.com

Members

Nick Mason
David Gilmour

Past members

Roger Waters
Richard Wright
Syd Barrett

[1]

[2]

Pink Floyd are an English rock band formed in London, England. They achieved international acclaim with their
progressive and psychedelic music. Distinguished by their use of philosophical lyrics, sonic experimentation, and
elaborate live shows, they are one of the most commercially successful and musically influential groups in the
history of popular music.
Founded in 1965, Pink Floyd originally consisted of students Syd Barrett, Nick Mason, Roger Waters, and Richard
Wright. They first gained popularity performing in London's underground music scene during the late 1960s, and
under Barrett's creative leadership they released two charting singles and a successful debut album. David Gilmour
joined as a fifth member in December 1967; Barrett left the band in April 1968 due to his deteriorating mental
health. After Barrett's departure, Waters became the band's primary lyricist, and by the mid-1970s, their dominant
songwriter, devising the original concepts behind their critically and commercially acclaimed albums The Dark Side
of the Moon (1973), Wish You Were Here (1975), Animals (1977), The Wall (1979) and The Final Cut (1983).
Wright left Pink Floyd in 1979, followed by Waters in 1985. Gilmour and Mason continued as Pink Floyd and
Wright subsequently joined them as a paid musician. They continued to record and tour through 1994; two more
albums followed, A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987) and The Division Bell (1994). Inducted into the US Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005, by 2013[3] they had sold more than 250
million records worldwide, including 74.5 million certified units in the United States.
After nearly two decades of acrimony, Pink Floyd reunited in 2005 for a performance at the global awareness event
Live 8. In 2006, Gilmour was interviewed for an article printed in the Italian newspaper La Repubblica that declared
that Pink Floyd had dissolved. When asked about their future, Gilmour explained that the band was finished making
music, and that at the age of 60 he preferred to work on his own. Since then, both he and Waters have repeatedly
insisted that they have no plans to reunite with the surviving former members. Barrett died in 2006 and Wright in
2008. In 2011, Gilmour and Mason joined Waters at one of his The Wall Tour shows at The O2 Arena in London.

Pink Floyd
On July 5, 2014, multiple individuals including Gilmour's spouse announced that a new studio album based around
recordings made in 1994, said to be the "swan song" of Wright and titled The Endless River was scheduled for
release in October of that year.

196367: early years


Formation
Roger Waters met drummer Nick Mason while they were both studying architecture at the London Polytechnic at
Regent Street.[4] They first played music together in a group formed by Keith Noble and Clive Metcalfe with Noble's
sister Sheilagh. Keyboardist Richard Wright, a fellow architecture student, joined later that year and the group
became a sextet named Sigma6, the first band to include Waters, who was at this time playing lead guitar; Wright,
who at first played rhythm guitar since there was rarely an available keyboard; and Mason on drums.[5][6]</ref> The
band started performing during private functions, while rehearsing in a tearoom in the basement of the Regent Street
Polytechnic. They performed songs by the Searchers and material written by their manager and songwriter, fellow
student Ken Chapman.[7]
In September 1963, Waters and Mason moved into a flat at 39 Stanhope Gardens, near Crouch End London, owned
by Mike Leonard, a part-time tutor at the nearby Hornsey College of Art and the Regent Street
Polytechnic.[8][9]</ref> Mason moved out after the 1964 academic year, and guitarist Bob Klose moved in during
September 1964, prompting Waters' switch to bass.[10][11]</ref> Sigma6 went through a number of other transitory
names, including the Meggadeaths, the Abdabs and the Screaming Abdabs, Leonard's Lodgers, and the Spectrum
Five before settling on the Tea Set.[12][13] Architectural Abdabs is sometimes suggested as another variation; Povey
dismisses it as a misreading of a headline about the Abdabs [14] in the Polytechnic's student newspaper.[15] Povey
used the Tea Set throughout whereas Blake's claim of the alternative spelling, the T-Set, remains
unsubstantiated.[16]</ref> In 1964, as Metcalfe and Noble left to form their own band, guitarist Syd Barrett joined
Klose and Waters at Stanhope Gardens.[17] Barrett, two years younger, had moved to London in 1962 to study at the
Camberwell College of Art.[18] Waters and Barrett were childhood friends; Waters had often visited Barrett and
watched him play guitar at Barrett's mother's house.[19] Mason said this about Barrett: "In a period when everyone
was being cool in a very adolescent, self-conscious way, Syd was unfashionably outgoing; my enduring memory of
our first encounter is the fact that he bothered to come up and introduce himself to me."[20]
Noble and Metcalfe left the Tea Set in late 1963, and Klose introduced the band to singer Chris Dennis, a technician
with the Royal Air Force (RAF).[21] In December 1964, they managed to secure their first recording time, at a studio
in West Hampstead, through one of Wright's friends, who let them use some down time for free. Wright, who was
taking a break from his studies, did not participate in the session.[22][23]</ref> When the RAF assigned Dennis a post
in Bahrain in early 1965, Barrett became the band's frontman.[24][25]</ref> Later that year, they became the resident
band at the Countdown Club, near Kensington High Street in London, where from late night until early morning they
played three sets of ninety minutes each. During this period, spurred by the group's need to extend their sets in order
to minimise song repetition, came the band's "realisation that songs could be extended with lengthy solos", wrote
Mason.[26] After pressure from his parents and advice from his college tutors, Klose quit the band in mid-1965 and
Barrett took over on lead guitar.[27] The group first referred to themselves as the Pink Floyd Sound in late 1965.
Barrett created the name on the spur of the moment when he discovered that another band, also called the Tea Set,
were to perform at one of their gigs.[28] The name is derived from the given names of two blues musicians whose
Piedmont blues records Barrett had in his collection, Pink Anderson and Floyd Council.[29]
By 1966, the group's repertoire consisted mainly of rhythm and blues songs and they had begun to receive paid
bookings, including one for a performance at the Marquee Club in March 1966, where Peter Jenner noticed them. A
lecturer at the London School of Economics, Jenner was impressed by the sonic effects Barrett and Wright created,
and with his business partner and friend Andrew King, he became their manager.[30] The pair had little experience in

83

Pink Floyd
the music industry and used King's inherited money to set up Blackhill Enterprises, purchasing about 1,000 worth
of new instruments and equipment for the band. It was around this time that Jenner suggested they drop the "Sound"
part of their band name, thus becoming the Pink Floyd.[31][32]</ref> Under Jenner and King's guidance, the group
became part of London's underground music scene, playing at venues including All Saints Hall and the Marquee.[33]
While performing at the Countdown Club the band had experimented with long instrumental excursions, and they
began to expand upon these with rudimentary but visually effective light shows, projected by coloured slides and
domestic lights.[34] Jenner and King's social connections helped gain the band prominent coverage in the Financial
Times and an article in The Sunday Times which stated: "At the launching of the new magazine IT the other night a
pop group called the Pink Floyd played throbbing music while a series of bizarre coloured shapes flashed on a huge
screen behind them... apparently very psychedelic."[35]
In 1966, they strengthened their business relationship with Blackhill Enterprises, becoming equal partners with
Jenner and King and the band members each holding a one-sixth share.[31] By late 1966, their set included fewer
R&B standards and more Barrett originals, many of which would be included on their first album.[36] While they had
significantly increased the frequency of their performances, the band was not widely accepted at the time. Following
a performance at a Catholic youth club, the owner refused to pay them, claiming that their performance wasn't
music.[37] When their management filed suit in a small claims court against the owner of the youth organisation, a
local magistrate upheld the owner's decision. However, they were much better received at the UFO Club in London,
where a small fan base began to build up around the band.[38] Barrett's performances were enthusiastic, "leaping
around... madness... improvisation... [inspired] to get past his limitations and into areas that were... very
interesting. Which none of the others could do", wrote biographer Nicholas Schaffner.[39]

Signing with EMI


In 1967, Pink Floyd began to attract the attention of the mainstream music industry.[40][41]</ref> While in
negotiations with record companies, IT co-founder and UFO club manager Joe Boyd and Pink Floyd's booking agent
Bryan Morrison arranged for and funded the recording of some songs at Sound Techniques in West Hampstead.
Included were the standout track "Arnold Layne" and "Candy and a Currant Bun" as its B-side, both of which they
recorded on 29 January 1967.[42][43] Sometime around the sessions on 29 January, they produced a short music film
for "Arnold Layne" in Sussex.[44]</ref> Three days later Pink Floyd signed with EMI, receiving a 5,000 advance.
EMI released the band's first single, "Arnold Layne", on 10 March 1967, on its Columbia label.[45][46]</ref> The
song's references to cross-dressing led to a ban by several radio stations; however, some creative manipulation by the
retailers who supplied sales figures to the music business meant that the single peaked in the UK at number20.[47]
EMI-Columbia released Pink Floyd's second single, "See Emily Play", on 16 June 1967. It fared slightly better than
"Arnold Layne", peaking at number6 in the UK.[48] They performed on the BBC's Look of the Week, where Waters
and Barrett, erudite and engaging, faced tough questioning from Hans Keller.[49] They appeared on the BBC's Top of
the Pops, an immensely popular programme that controversially required artists to mime their singing and
playing.[50] Though Pink Floyd returned for two more performances, by the third, Barrett had begun to unravel, and
it was around this time that the band first noticed significant changes in his behaviour.[51] By early 1967, he was
regularly using LSD, and Mason described him as "completely distanced from everything going on".[52]

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn


Main article: The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
Morrison and EMI producer Norman Smith negotiated Pink Floyd's first recording contract, and as part of the deal,
the band agreed to record their first album at EMI Studios in London.[53][54]</ref> Mason recalled that the sessions
were trouble-free. Smith disagreed, stating that Barrett was unresponsive to his suggestions and constructive
criticism.[55] EMI-Columbia released The Piper at the Gates of Dawn in August 1967. The album peaked at number
6, spending 14 weeks on the UK charts.[56] Pink Floyd continued to draw large crowds at the UFO Club; however,

84

Pink Floyd
Barrett's mental breakdown was by then causing serious concern. The group initially hoped that his erratic behaviour
would be a passing phase, but some were less optimistic, including Jenner and his assistant, June Child, who
commented: "I found [Barrett] in the dressing room and he was so... gone. Roger Waters and I got him on his feet,
[and] we got him out to the stage... The band started to play and Syd just stood there. He had his guitar around his
neck and his arms just hanging down."[57]
Forced to cancel Pink Floyd's appearance at the prestigious National Jazz and Blues Festival, as well as several other
shows, King informed the music press that Barrett was suffering from nervous exhaustion.[58] Waters arranged a
meeting with psychiatrist R. D. Laing, and though Waters personally drove Barrett to the appointment, Barrett
refused to come out of the car.[59] A stay in Formentera with Sam Hutt, a doctor well established in the underground
music scene, led to no visible improvement. The band followed a few concert dates in Europe during September with
their first tour of the US in October.[60][61]</ref> As the US tour went on, Barrett's condition grew steadily worse.[62]
During appearances on the Dick Clark and Pat Boone shows in November, Barrett confounded his hosts by not
responding to questions and staring off into space. He refused to move his lips when it came time to mime "See
Emily Play" on Boone's show. After these embarrassing episodes, King ended their US visit and immediately sent
them home to London.[63][64]</ref> Soon after their return, they supported Jimi Hendrix during a tour of England;
however, Barrett's depression worsened as the tour continued, reaching a crisis point in December, when the band
responded by adding a new member to their lineup.[65][66] Wynne-Willson left his position as lighting director and
assisted the guitarist with his daily activities.[67]</ref>

196877: transition and international success


Gilmour replaces Barrett
In December 1967, the group added guitarist David Gilmour as the fifth member of Pink Floyd.[68][69] Gilmour
already knew Barrett, having studied with him at Cambridge Tech in the early 1960s.[19] The two had performed at
lunchtimes together with guitars and harmonicas, and later hitch-hiked and busked their way around the south of
France.[70] In 1965, while a member of Joker's Wild, Gilmour had watched the Tea Set.[71]</ref> Morrison's
assistant, Steve O'Rourke, set Gilmour up in a room at O'Rourke's house with a salary of 30 per week, and in
January 1968, Blackhill Enterprises announced Gilmour as the band's newest member; the second guitarist and its
fifth member, the band intending to continue with Barrett as a nonperforming songwriter.[72] Jenner commented:
"The idea was that Dave would... cover for [Barrett's] eccentricities and when that got to be not workable, Syd was
just going to write. Just to try to keep him involved".[73][74]</ref> In an expression of his frustration, Barrett, who
was expected to write additional hit singles to follow up "Arnold Layne" and "See Emily Play", instead played the
band "Have You Got It Yet?", intentionally changing the structure on each performance so as to make the song
impossible to follow and learn.[68] In a January 1968 photo-shoot of the five-man Pink Floyd, the photographs show
Barrett looking detached from the others, staring into the distance.
Working with Barrett eventually proved too difficult, and matters came to a head in January while en route to a
performance in Southampton when a band member asked if they should collect Barrett. According to Gilmour, the
answer was "Nah, let's not bother", signalling the end of Barrett's tenure with Pink Floyd.[75][76]</ref> Waters later
admitted, "He was our friend, but most of the time we now wanted to strangle him".[77] In early March 1968, Pink
Floyd met with business partners Jenner and King to discuss the band's future; Barrett agreed to leave.[78]
Jenner and King believed Barrett to be the creative genius of the band, and decided to represent him and end their
relationship with Pink Floyd.[79] Morrison then sold his business to NEMS Enterprises, and O'Rourke became the
band's personal manager.[80] Blackhill announced Barrett's departure on 6 April 1968.[81][82]</ref> After Barrett's
departure, the burden of lyrical composition and creative direction fell mostly on Waters.[83] Initially, Gilmour
mimed to Barrett's voice on the group's European TV appearances; however, while playing on the university circuit,
they avoided Barrett songs in favour of Waters and Wright material such as "It Would Be So Nice" and "Careful

85

Pink Floyd

86

with That Axe, Eugene".[84]

A Saucerful of Secrets
Main article: A Saucerful of Secrets
In 1968, Pink Floyd returned to Abbey Road Studios to record their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets. The LP
included Barrett's final contribution to their discography, "Jugband Blues". Waters began to develop his own
songwriting, contributing "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun", "Let There Be More Light" and "Corporal
Clegg". Wright composed "See-Saw" and "Remember a Day". Smith encouraged them to self-produce their music,
and they recorded demos of new material at their houses. With Smith's instruction at Abbey Road, they learned how
to use the recording studio to realise their artistic vision. However, Smith remained unconvinced by their music, and
when Mason struggled to perform his drum part on "Remember a Day", Smith stepped in as his replacement.[85]
Wright recalled Smith's attitude about the sessions, "Norman gave up on the second album... he was forever saying
things like, 'You can't do twenty minutes of this ridiculous noise.'"[86] As neither Waters nor Mason could read
music, to illustrate the structure of the album's title track, they invented their own system of notation. Gilmour later
described their method as looking "like an architectural diagram".[87]
Released in June 1968, the album featured a psychedelic cover designed by Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell of
Hipgnosis. The first of several Pink Floyd album covers designed by Hipgnosis, it represented the second time that
EMI permitted one of their groups to contract designers for an album jacket. The release peaked at number 9,
spending 11 weeks on the UK chart.[56] Record Mirror gave the album an overall favourable review, but urged
listeners to "forget it as background music to a party".[87] John Peel described a live performance of the title track as
"like a religious experience", while NME described the song as "long and boring... [with] little to warrant its
monotonous direction".[86][88]</ref> On the day after the album's UK release, Pink Floyd performed at the first ever
free concert in Hyde Park.[89] In July 1968, they returned to the US for a second visit. Accompanied by the Soft
Machine and the Who, it marked Pink Floyd's first significant tour.[90] In December of that year, they released "Point
Me at the Sky"; no more successful than the two singles they had released since "See Emily Play", it would be the
band's last until their 1973 release, "Money".[91]

Ummagumma, Atom Heart Mother, and Meddle


Main articles: Ummagumma, Atom Heart Mother and Meddle
Ummagumma represented a departure from their previous work. Released as a
double-LP on EMI's Harvest label, the first two sides contained live performances
recorded at Manchester College of Commerce and Mothers, a club in Birmingham.
The second LP contained a single experimental contribution from each band
member.[92] Ummagumma received positive reviews upon its release, in November
1969.[93] The album peaked at number 5, spending 21 weeks on the UK chart.[56]
In October 1970, Pink Floyd released Atom Heart Mother.[94][95]</ref> An early
version premired in France in January, but disagreements over the mix prompted the
hiring of Ron Geesin to work out the sound issues. Geesin worked to improve the
score, but with little creative input from the band, production was troublesome.
Waters performing with Pink
Geesin eventually completed the project with the aid of John Alldis, who was the
Floyd at Leeds University in
director of the choir hired to perform on the record. Smith earned an executive
1970
producer credit, and the album marked his final official contribution to the band's
discography. Gilmour said it was "A neat way of saying that he didn't... do
[96]
anything".
Waters was critical of Atom Heart Mother, claiming that he would prefer if it were "thrown into the

Pink Floyd
dustbin and never listened to by anyone ever again."[97] Gilmour was equally dismissive of the album and once
described it as "a load of rubbish", stating: "I think we were scraping the barrel a bit at that period."[97] Pink Floyd's
first number 1 album, Atom Heart Mother was hugely successful in Britain, spending 18 weeks on the UK chart.[56]
It premired at the Bath Festival on 27 June 1970.[98]
Pink Floyd toured extensively across America and Europe in 1970.[99][100] In 1971, Pink Floyd took second place in
a reader's poll, in Melody Maker, and for the first time were making a profit. Mason and Wright became fathers and
bought homes in London while Gilmour, still single, moved to a 19th-century farm in Essex. Waters installed a home
recording studio at his house in Islington in a converted toolshed at the back of his garden.[101]
In January 1971, upon their return from touring Atom Heart Mother, Pink Floyd began working on new material.[102]
Lacking a central theme, they attempted several unproductive experiments; engineer John Leckie described the
sessions as often beginning in the afternoon and ending early the next morning, "during which time nothing would
get [accomplished]. There was no record company contact whatsoever, except when their label manager would show
up now and again with a couple of bottles of wine and a couple of joints."[103] The band spent long periods working
on basic sounds, or a guitar riff. They also spent several days at Air Studios, attempting to create music using a
variety of household objects, a project which would be revisited between The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You
Were Here.[104]
Released in October 1971, "Meddle not only confirms lead guitarist David Gilmour's emergence as a real shaping
force with the group, it states forcefully and accurately that the group is well into the growth track again" wrote
Jean-Charles Costa of Rolling Stone.[105][106]</ref>[107] In October, they made the concert film Pink Floyd: Live at
Pompeii, before touring the US in November.[108]</ref> NME called Meddle "an exceptionally good album",
singling out "Echoes" as the "Zenith which the Floyd have been striving for."[109] However, Melody Maker's
Michael Watts found it underwhelming, calling the album "a soundtrack to a non-existent movie", and shrugging off
Pink Floyd as "so much sound and fury, signifying nothing."[110] Meddle is a transitional album between the
Barrett-influenced group of the late 1960s and the emerging Pink Floyd. The LP peaked at number 3, spending 82
weeks on the UK chart.[56]

The Dark Side of the Moon


Main article: The Dark Side of the Moon
Pink Floyd recorded The Dark Side of the Moon between May 1972 and January 1973, with EMI staff engineer Alan
Parsons at Abbey Road. The title is an allusion to lunacy rather than astronomy.[111] The band had composed and
refined the material on Dark Side while touring the UK, Japan, North America and Europe.[112] Producer Chris
Thomas assisted Parsons.[113] Hipgnosis designed the album's packaging, which included George Hardie's iconic
refracting prism design on the cover.[114] Thorgerson's Dark Side album cover features a beam of white light,
representing unity, passing through a prism, which represents society. The resulting refracted beam of coloured light
symbolises unity diffracted, leaving an absence of unity.[115] Waters is the sole author of the album's lyrics.[116]
Released in March 1973, the LP became an instant chart success in the UK and throughout Western Europe, earning
an enthusiastic response from critics.[117] Each member of Pink Floyd except Wright boycotted the press release of
The Dark Side of the Moon because a quadraphonic mix had not yet been completed, and they felt presenting the
album through a poor-quality stereo PA system was insufficient.[118] Melody Maker's Roy Hollingworth described
side one as "utterly confused... [and] difficult to follow", but praised side two, writing: "The songs, the sounds...
[and] the rhythms were solid... [the] saxophone hit the air, the band rocked and rolled". Rolling Stone's Loyd
Grossman described it as "a fine album with a textural and conceptual richness that not only invites, but demands
involvement."

87

Pink Floyd

Throughout March 1973, The Dark Side of the Moon featured as part
of Pink Floyd's US tour.[119] The album is one of the most
commercially successful rock albums of all time; a US number 1, it
remained on the Billboard chart for more than fourteen years, selling
more than 40 million copies worldwide.[120] In Britain, the album
peaked at number 2, spending 364 weeks on the UK chart.[56] Dark
Side is the world's second best-selling album, and the twenty-first
best-selling album of all time in the US.[121] The success of the album
Pink Floyd in 1973
brought enormous wealth to the members of Pink Floyd. Waters and
Wright bought large country houses while Mason became a collector
of expensive cars.[122] Disenchanted with their US record company, Capitol Records, Pink Floyd and O'Rourke
negotiated a new contract with Columbia Records, who gave them a reported advance of $1,000,000, which is worth
approximately $5,000,000 today. In Europe, they continued to be represented by Harvest Records.[123]

Wish You Were Here


Main article: Wish You Were Here (Pink Floyd album)
After a tour of the UK performing Dark Side, Pink Floyd returned to the studio in January 1975 and began work on
their ninth studio album, Wish You Were Here.[124] Parsons declined an offer to continue working with them,
becoming successful in his own right with the Alan Parsons Project, and so the band turned to Brian Humphries.[125]
Initially, they found it difficult to compose new material; the success of The Dark Side of the Moon had left Pink
Floyd physically and emotionally drained. Wright later described these early sessions as "falling within a difficult
period" and Waters found them "torturous".[126] Gilmour was more interested in improving the band's existing
material. Mason's failing marriage left him in a general malaise and with a sense of apathy, both of which interfered
with his drumming.[126]
Despite the lack of creative direction, Waters began to visualise a new concept after several weeks.[126] During 1974,
Pink Floyd had sketched out three original compositions and had performed them at a series of concerts in
Europe.[127] These compositions became the starting point for a new album whose opening four-note guitar phrase,
composed purely by chance by Gilmour, reminded Waters of Barrett.[128] The songs provided a fitting summary of
the rise and fall of their former bandmate.[129] Waters commented: "Because I wanted to get as close as possible to
what I felt... [that] indefinable, inevitable melancholy about the disappearance of Syd."[130]
While Pink Floyd were working on the album, Barrett made an impromptu visit to the studio, during which
Thorgerson recalled that he "sat round and talked for a bit, but he wasn't really there."[131] He had changed
significantly in appearance, and the band did not initially recognise him. Waters was reportedly deeply upset by the
experience.[132][133] The inspiration behind the cover image, designed by Thorgerson, is the idea that people tend to
conceal their true feelings for fear of "getting burned", wrote Pink Floyd biographer Glen Povey. Therefore, it
features two businessmen shown shaking hands; one of them is on fire.[134]</ref> Most of Wish You Were Here
premiered on 5 July 1975, at an open-air music festival at Knebworth. Released in September, it reached number one
in both the UK and the US.[134]

88

Pink Floyd

Animals
Main article: Animals (Pink Floyd album)
In 1975, Pink Floyd bought a three-storey group of church halls at 35
Britannia Row in Islington, and began converting the building into a
recording studio and storage space.[135] In 1976, they recorded their
tenth album, Animals, in their newly finished 24-track studio.[136] The
concept of Animals originated with Waters, loosely based on George
Orwell's political fable, Animal Farm. The album's lyrics described
different classes of society as dogs, pigs, and sheep.[137][138]</ref>
Hipgnosis received credit for the packaging of Animals; however,
Battersea Power Station features in the cover
Waters designed the final concept, choosing an image of the ageing
image for Animals
Battersea Power Station, over which they superimposed an image of a
pig.[139][140] The difficult shoot had resumed before they decided to
superimpose the image of the pig onto the photograph of the power station.[141]</ref>
The division of royalties was a source of conflict between band members, who earned royalties on a per-song basis.
Although Gilmour was largely responsible for "Dogs", which took up almost the entire first side of the album, he
received less than Waters, who contributed the much shorter two-part "Pigs on the Wing".[142] Wright commented:
"It was partly my fault because I didn't push my material... but Dave did have something to offer, and only managed
to get a couple of things on there."[143] Mason recalled: "Roger was in full flow with the ideas, but he was really
keeping Dave down, and frustrating him deliberately."[143][144]</ref> Gilmour, distracted by the birth of his first
child, contributed little else toward the album. Similarly, neither Mason nor Wright contributed much toward
Animals; Wright had marital problems, and his relationship with Waters was also suffering.[145] Animals is the first
Pink Floyd album that does not include a writing credit for Wright, who commented: "Animals...wasn't a fun record
to make... this was when Roger really started to believe that he was the sole writer for the band... that it was only
because of him that [we] were still going... when he started to develop his ego trips, the person he would have his
conflicts with would be me."[145]
Released in January 1977, the album peaked on the UK chart at number two, and the US chart at number three.[146]
NME described the album as "one of the most extreme, relentless, harrowing and downright iconoclastic hunks of
music", and Melody Maker's Karl Dallas called it "[an] uncomfortable taste of reality in a medium that has become in
recent years, increasingly soporific".[147]
They performed much of the album's material during their "In the Flesh" tour, Pink Floyd's first experience playing
large stadiums, the size of which caused unease in the band.[148] Waters began arriving at each venue alone,
departing immediately after the performance. On one occasion, Wright flew back to England, threatening to leave
the band.[149] At the Montreal Olympic Stadium, a group of noisy and enthusiastic fans in the front row of the
audience irritated Waters so much that he spat at one of them.[150][151]</ref> The end of the tour marked a low point
for Gilmour, who felt that the band achieved the success they had sought, with nothing left for them to
accomplish.[152]

89

Pink Floyd

197885: Waters-led era


The Wall
Main articles: The Wall and Pink Floyd The Wall
In July 1978, amid a financial turmoil caused by negligent investments, Waters presented the group with two original
ideas for their next album. The first was a 90-minute demo with the working title, Bricks in the Wall, and the other
would later become Waters' first solo album, The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking. Although both Mason and Gilmour
were initially cautious, they chose the former to be their next album.[153][154] Pink Floyd eventually sued NWG for
1M, accusing them of fraud and negligence. NWG collapsed in 1981: Andrew Warburg fled to Spain; Waterbrook
purchased Norton Warburg Investments, and many of its holdings sold at a significant loss. Andrew Warburg began
serving a three-year jail sentence upon his return to the UK in 1987.[155]</ref> Bob Ezrin co-produced, and he wrote
a forty-page script for the new album.[156] Ezrin based the story on the central figure of Pinka gestalt character
inspired by Waters' childhood experiences, the most notable of which was the death of his father in World War II.
This first metaphorical brick led to more problems; Pink would become drug-addled and depressed by the music
industry, eventually transforming into a megalomaniac, a development inspired partly by the decline of Syd Barrett.
At the end of the album, the increasingly fascist audience would watch as Pink tore down the wall, once again
becoming a regular and caring person.[157][158] In March 1979, the band's dire financial situation demanded that they
leave the UK for a year, or more and recording moved to the Super Bear Studios near Nice.[159]</ref>
During the recording of The Wall, Waters, Gilmour and Mason became increasingly dissatisfied with Wright's lack
of contribution to the album.[160] Gilmour said that Wright "hadn't contributed anything of any value whatsoever to
the albumhe did very, very little" and that is why he "got the boot".[161] According to Mason, "Rick's contribution
was to turn up and sit in on the sessions without doing anything, just 'being a producer'."[162] Waters commented:
"[Wright] was not prepared to cooperate in making the record... [and] it was agreed by everybody... either [he] can
have a long battle or [he] can agree to... finish making the album, keep [his] full share... but at the end of it [he
would] leave quietly. Rick agreed."[163][164] Toward the end of The Wall sessions, Mason left the final mix to
Waters, Gilmour, Ezrin and Guthrie, travelling to New York to record his debut solo album, Nick Mason's Fictitious
Sports.[165]</ref>
Although Pink Floyd had not released a single since 1973's "Money", "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)" supported
the album, topping the charts in the US and the UK.[166] Released on 30 November 1979, The Wall topped the
Billboard chart in the US for fifteen weeks, reaching number three in the UK.[167] The Wall ranks number three on
the RIAA's list of the all-time Top 100 albums, with 23 million certified units sold in the US. The cover is one of
their most minimalist designs, with a stark white brick wall, and no trademark or band name. It was also their first
album cover since The Piper at the Gates of Dawn not designed by Hipgnosis.[168]
Gerald Scarfe produced a series of animations for the subsequent live shows, The Wall Tour. He also commissioned
the construction of large inflatable puppets representing characters from the storyline including the "Mother", the
"Ex-wife" and the "Schoolmaster". Pink Floyd used the puppets during their performances of the album.[169]
Relationships within the band were at an all-time low; their four Winnebagos parked in a circle, the doors facing
away from the centre. Waters used his own vehicle to arrive at the venue and stayed in different hotels from the rest
of the band. Wright returned as a paid musician and was the only one of the four to profit from the venture, which
lost about $600,000.[170]
The Wall concept also spawned a film, the original idea for which was to be a combination of live concert footage
and animated scenes. However, the concert footage proved impractical to film. Alan Parker agreed to direct and took
a different approach. The animated sequences would remain, but scenes would be acted by professional actors with
no dialogue. Waters was screen-tested, but quickly discarded and they asked Bob Geldof to accept the role of Pink.
Geldof was initially dismissive, condemning The Wall's storyline as "bollocks".[171] Eventually won over by the
prospect of participation in a significant film and receiving a large payment for his work, Geldof

90

Pink Floyd
agreed.[172][173]</ref> Screened at the Cannes Film Festival in May 1982, Pink Floyd The Wall premired in the
UK in July 1982.[174][175]</ref>

The Final Cut


Main article: The Final Cut (album)
In 1982, Waters suggested a new musical project for the band, with the working title Spare Bricks, originally
conceived as the soundtrack album for Pink Floyd The Wall; however, with the onset of the Falklands War, Waters
changed artistic direction and began writing new material. Waters saw Margaret Thatcher's response to the invasion
of the Falklands as jingoistic and unnecessary, and he dedicated the new album to his late father. Immediately there
were arguments between Waters and Gilmour, who felt that the album should include all new material, rather than
recycling a number of songs passed over for The Wall. Waters felt that Gilmour had contributed little to the band's
lyrical repertoire.[176] Michael Kamen, a contributor to the orchestral arrangements of The Wall, mediated between
the two, also performing the role traditionally occupied by the then absent Wright.[177][178]</ref> The tension within
the band grew. Waters and Gilmour worked independently; however, Gilmour began to feel the strain, sometimes
barely maintaining his composure. After a final confrontation, Gilmour's name disappeared from the credit list,
reflecting what Waters felt was his lack of songwriting contributions.[179][180]</ref>
Though Mason's musical contributions were minimal, he stayed busy recording sound effects for an experimental
Holophonic system to be used on the album. With marital problems of his own, he remained a distant figure. Pink
Floyd did not use Thorgerson for the cover design, Waters choosing to design the cover himself.[181][182]</ref>
Released in March 1983, The Final Cut went straight to number one in the UK and number six in the US.[183] Waters
wrote all the lyrics, as well as all the music on the album.[184] Gilmour did not have any material ready for the album
and asked Waters to delay the recording until he could write some songs, but Waters refused.[185] Gilmour later
commented, "I'm certainly guilty at times of being lazy... but he wasn't right about wanting to put some duff tracks
on The Final Cut."[185][186]</ref> Rolling Stone magazine gave the album five stars, with Kurt Loder calling it "a
superlative achievement... art rock's crowning masterpiece".[187][188]</ref> Loder viewed The Final Cut as
"essentially a Roger Waters solo album".

"A spent force"


Gilmour had recorded his second solo album, About Face, in 1984, and he used it to express his feelings about a
variety of topics; from the murder of John Lennon to his relationship with Waters. He later stated that he used the
album to distance himself from Pink Floyd. Soon afterwards, Waters began touring his first solo album, The Pros
and Cons of Hitch Hiking.[189] Wright formed Zee with Dave Harris and recorded Identity, which went almost
unnoticed upon its release.[190][191]</ref> Mason released his second solo album, Profiles, in August 1985.[192]
After Waters had declared Pink Floyd "a spent force", he contacted O'Rourke to discuss settling future royalty
payments. O'Rourke felt obliged to inform Mason and Gilmour, and this angered Waters, who wanted to dismiss him
as the band's manager. Waters then went to the High Court in an effort to prevent their use of the Pink Floyd
name.[193] When his lawyers discovered that the partnership had never been formally confirmed, Waters returned to
the High Court in an attempt to obtain a veto over further use of the band's name. Gilmour responded by issuing a
carefully worded press release affirming that Pink Floyd would continue to exist. He later told The Sunday Times:
"Roger is a dog in the manger and I'm going to fight him".[194]
Waters wrote to EMI and Columbia declaring his intention to leave the band, and asking them to release him from
his contractual obligations. Gilmour believed that Waters left to hasten the demise of Pink Floyd. Waters later stated
that, by not making new albums, Pink Floyd would be in breach of contractwhich would suggest that royalty
payments would be suspendedand that the other band members had forced him from the group by threatening to
sue him. With the case still pending, Waters dismissed O'Rourke and employed Peter Rudge to manage his
affairs.[192][195]</ref>

91

Pink Floyd

198695: Gilmour-led era


A Momentary Lapse of Reason
Main article: A Momentary Lapse of Reason
In 1987, Gilmour began recruiting musicians for what would become
Pink Floyd's first album without Waters, A Momentary Lapse of
Reason.[196][197]</ref> There were legal obstacles to Wright's
readmittance to the band; however, after a meeting in Hampstead Pink
Floyd invited Wright to participate in the coming sessions.[198]
Gilmour later stated that Wright's presence, "would make us stronger
legally and musically"; Pink Floyd employed him as a paid musician
with weekly earnings of $11,000.[199] Recording sessions for the album
began on Gilmour's houseboat, the Astoria, moored along the River
The Astoria recording studio
Thames.[200][201]</ref> Gilmour worked with several songwriters,
including Eric Stewart and Roger McGough, eventually choosing
Anthony Moore to write the album's lyrics.[202] Gilmour would later admit that the project was difficult without
Waters' creative direction.[203] Mason, concerned that he was too out of practice to perform on the album, made use
of session musicians to complete many of the drum parts. He instead busied himself with the album's sound
effects.[204][205] Recording later moved to Mayfair Studios and then to Los Angeles.[206]</ref>
Released in September 1987, Storm Thorgerson, whose creative input was absent from The Wall and The Final Cut,
designed the album cover.[207] In order to drive home the point that Waters had left the band, they included a group
photograph on the inside cover, the first since Meddle.[208][209]</ref> The album went straight to number three in the
UK and the US.[210] Waters commented: "I think it's facile, but a quite clever forgery... The songs are poor in
general... [and] Gilmour's lyrics are third-rate."[211] Although Gilmour initially viewed the album as a return to the
band's top form, Wright disagreed, stating: "Roger's criticisms are fair. It's not a band album at all."[212] Q Magazine
described the album as essentially a Gilmour solo effort.[213]
The associated tour had a rough start because Waters attempted to subvert it by contacting promoters in the US and
threatening to sue them if they used the Pink Floyd name. Gilmour and Mason funded the start-up costs with Mason
using his Ferrari 250 GTO as collateral.[214] Early rehearsals for the upcoming tour were chaotic, with Mason and
Wright entirely out of practice. Realising he had taken on too much work, Gilmour asked Bob Ezrin to assist them.
As Pink Floyd toured throughout North America, Waters' Radio K.A.O.S. tour was on occasion, close by, though in
much smaller venues than those hosting his former band's performances. Waters issued a writ for copyright fees for
the band's use of the flying pig. Pink Floyd responded by attaching a large set of male genitalia to its underside to
distinguish it from Waters' design.[215] The parties reached a legal agreement on 23 December; Mason and Gilmour
retained the right to use the Pink Floyd name in perpetuity and Waters received exclusive rights to, among other
things, The Wall.[216]

The Division Bell


Main article: The Division Bell
For several years Pink Floyd had busied themselves with personal pursuits, such as filming and competing in the La
Carrera Panamericana and recording a soundtrack for a film based on the event.[217][218]</ref> In January 1993, they
began working on a new album, returning to Britannia Row Studios, where for several days, Gilmour, Mason and
Wright worked collaboratively, ad-libbing material. After about two weeks, the band had enough ideas to begin
creating songs. Ezrin returned to co-produce the album and production moved to the Astoria, where from February to
May 1993, they worked on about twenty-five ideas.[219]

92

Pink Floyd

93

Contractually, Wright was not a member of the band; he commented: "It came close to a point where I wasn't going
to do the album".[220] However, he earned five co-writing credits on the album, his first on a Pink Floyd album since
1975's Wish You Were Here.[220] Another songwriter credited on the album was Gilmour's then girlfriend, Polly
Samson. She helped him write several tracks, including, "High Hopes", a collaborative arrangement which, though
initially tense, "pulled the whole album together" commented Ezrin.[221] They hired Michael Kamen to arrange the
album's orchestral parts; Dick Parry and Chris Thomas also returned.[222] Writer Douglas Adams provided the album
title and Thorgerson the cover artwork.[223][224]</ref> Thorgerson drew inspiration for the album cover from the
Moai monoliths of Easter Island; two opposing faces forming an implied third face about which he commented: "the
absent facethe ghost of Pink Floyd's past, Syd and Roger".[225] Eager to avoid competing against other album
releases, as had happened with A Momentary Lapse, Pink Floyd set a deadline of April 1994, at which point they
would resume touring.[226] The album reached number 1 in both the UK and the US.[121] It spent 51 weeks on the
UK chart.[56]
Pink Floyd spent more than two weeks rehearsing in a hangar at Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino,
California, before opening on 29 March 1994, in Miami, with an almost identical road crew to that used for their
Momentary Lapse of Reason tour.[227] They played a variety of Pink Floyd favourites, and later changed their setlist
to include The Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety.[228][229]</ref> The tour ended on 29 October 1994, with the
final performance of the last Pink Floyd tour.[230][231]</ref>

2005present
See also: Live 8
On 2 July 2005, Waters, Gilmour, Mason and Wright performed
together as Pink Floyd for the first time in more than 24years, at the
Live 8 concert in London's Hyde Park.[232] Organiser Bob Geldof
arranged the reunion, having called Mason earlier in the year to
explore the possibility of their reuniting for the event. Geldof asked
Gilmour, who turned down the offer, and then asked Mason to
intercede on his behalf. Mason declined, but contacted Waters who
was immediately enthusiastic. Waters then called Geldof to discuss the
event, scheduled to take place in one month. About two weeks later
Waters called Gilmour, their first conversation in two years, and the
next day the latter agreed. Gilmour then contacted Wright who
immediately agreed. In their statement to the press, they stressed the
unimportance of the band's problems in the context of the Live8 event.[118]

Waters (right) rejoined his former bandmates at


Live 8

They planned their setlist at the Connaught Hotel in London, followed by three days of rehearsals at Black Island
Studios.[118] The sessions were problematic, with minor disagreements over the style and pace of the songs they
were practising; the running order decided on the eve of the event.[233] At the beginning of their performance,
Waters told the audience: "[It is] quite emotional, standing up here with these three guys after all these years,
standing to be counted with the rest of you... we're doing this for everyone who's not here, and particularly of course
for Syd."[234] At the end, Gilmour thanked the audience and started to walk off the stage. Waters then called him
back, and the band shared a group hug. Images of that hug were a favourite among Sunday newspapers after Live
8.[235][236] Gilmour subsequently declared that he would give his share of profits from this sales boost to charity,
urging other associated artists and record companies to do the same.</ref> Waters commented on their almost twenty
years of animosity: "I don't think any of us came out of the years from 1985 with any credit... It was a bad, negative
time, and I regret my part in that negativity."[237]
Though Pink Floyd turned down a contract worth 136million for a final tour, Waters did not rule out more
performances, suggesting it ought to be for a charity event only.[235] However, Gilmour told the Associated Press

Pink Floyd
that a reunion would not happen, stating: "The [Live 8] rehearsals convinced me [that] it wasn't something I wanted
to be doing a lot of... There have been all sorts of farewell moments in people's lives and careers which they have
then rescinded, but I think I can fairly categorically say that there won't be a tour or an album again that I take part
in. It isn't to do with animosity or anything like that. It's just... I've been there, I've done it." In February 2006,
Gilmour was interviewed by Gino Castaldo from the Italian newspaper La Repubblica; the resulting article declared:
"Patience for fans in mourning. The news is official. Pink Floyd the brand is dissolved, finished, definitely
deceased." When asked about the future of Pink Floyd, Gilmour responded: "The band? It's over... I've had enough.
I'm 60 years old... [and] it is much more comfortable to work on my own." Since then, both Gilmour and Waters
have repeatedly insisted that they have no plans to reunite with the surviving former members.[238]</ref>
Barrett died on 7 July 2006, at his home in Cambridgeshire, aged60. His family interred him at Cambridge
Crematorium on 18 July 2006; no Pink Floyd members attended. After Barrett's death, Wright commented: "The
band are very naturally upset and sad to hear of Syd Barrett's death. Syd was the guiding light of the early band
line-up and leaves a legacy which continues to inspire." Although Barrett had faded into obscurity over the previous
35years, the national press praised him for his contributions to music.[239][240]</ref> On 10 May 2007, Waters,
Gilmour, Wright and Mason performed during a Barrett tribute concert at the Barbican Centre in London. Gilmour,
Wright and Mason performed the Barrett compositions, "Bike" and "Arnold Layne", and Waters performed a solo
version of his song "Flickering Flame". Wright died of cancer on 15 September 2008, aged65. After his death, his
surviving former bandmates praised him for his influence on the sound of Pink Floyd.
On 10 July 2010, Waters and Gilmour performed together at a charity event for the Hoping Foundation. The event,
which raised money for Palestinian children, took place at Kiddington Hall in Oxfordshire, England, where they
played to an audience of approximately 200. In return for Waters' appearance at the event, Gilmour agreed to
perform "Comfortably Numb" at one of Waters' upcoming performances of The Wall.[241]</ref> On 12 May 2011, at
The O2 Arena in London, Gilmour honoured his commitment to Waters. Gilmour sang the first and second chorus
and played the two guitar solos. Near the end of the show, after the wall had fallen down, Waters said to the crowd:
"So now we know tonight was the night when David did me the enormous honour of coming to play 'Comfortably
Numb'. So, please welcome David Gilmour!... By a strange and extraordinary, happy coincidence, there is another
remnant of our old band here tonight. Please welcome Mr. Nick Mason to the stage!" Gilmour and Mason, with
respectively a mandolin and a tambourine, joined Waters and the rest of his band for "Outside the Wall".[242]</ref>
On 26 September 2011, Pink Floyd and EMI launched an exhaustive re-release campaign under the title Why Pink
Floyd...?, reissuing the band's back catalogue in newly remastered versions, including "Experience" and "Immersion"
multi-disc multi-format editions. James Guthrie, co-producer of The Wall, remastered the albums.

The Endless River


Main article: The Endless River
On 5 July 2014, Polly Samson, David Gilmour's wife, revealed on Twitter that a new Pink Floyd album titled The
Endless River featuring recordings from the 1994 recording sessions with Rick Wright and other music was due in
October 2014. Shortly after, long-time Pink Floyd backing vocalist Durga McBroom revealed on Facebook that the
basis of the music on the new album was the long-fabled instrumental project recorded at the same time as The
Division Bell known as The Big Spliff with more work done by Gilmour and Mason, since. McBroom also revealed
that tour plans are not confirmed yet and that Guy Pratt, Pink Floyd's bassist since 1986, is also involved, indicating
that this is probably the Pink Floyd team from A Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell.

94

Pink Floyd

95

Musicianship
Genres
Considered one of the UK's first psychedelic music groups, Pink Floyd began their career at the vanguard of
London's underground music scene. Some categorise their work from that era as a space rock.[243][244] Despite
sounding what Mason considered "too radical for the general viewer", they earned a callback for a second audition,
with the caveat that they play material more familiar to the judges; they did not earn an appearance on the show.[245]
Also in 1965, they auditioned for the Melody Maker Beat Contest, losing to the eventual national winners.[245]</ref>
According to Rolling Stone: "By 1967, they had developed an unmistakably psychedelic sound, performing long,
loud suitelike compositions that touched on hard rock, blues, country, folk, and electronic music."[246] Released in
1968, the song "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" helped galvanise their reputation as an art rock group.[84] Critics
also describe them as an acid rock band.[247] By the late 1960s, the press had begun to label their music progressive
rock.[248] O'Neill Surber comments on the music of Pink Floyd:
Rarely will you find Floyd dishing up catchy hooks, tunes short enough for air-play, or predictable
three-chord blues progessions; and never will you find them spending much time on the usual pop
pablum of romance, partying, or self-hype. Their sonic universe is expansive, intense, and challenging...
Where most other bands neatly fit the songs to the music, the two forming a sort of autonomous and
seamless whole complete with memorable hooks, Pink Floyd tends to set lyrics within a broader
soundscape that often seems to have a life of its own... Pink Floyd employs extended, stand-alone
instrumentals which are never mere vehicles for showing off virtuoso but are planned and integral parts
of the performance."[249]
In 1968, Wright commented on Pink Floyd's sonic reputation: "It's hard to see why we were cast as the first British
psychedelic group. We never saw ourselves that way... we realised that we were, after all, only playing for fun...
tied to no particular form of music, we could do whatever we wanted... the emphasis... [is] firmly on spontaneity
and improvisation."[250] Waters gave a less enthusiastic assessment of the band's early sound: "There wasn't anything
'grand' about it. We were laughable. We were useless. We couldn't play at all so we had to do something stupid and
'experimental'...Syd was a genius, but I wouldn't want to go back to playing "Interstellar Overdrive" for hours and
hours."[251] Unconstrained by conventional pop formats, Pink Floyd were innovators of progressive rock during the
1970s and ambient music during the 1980s.[252]

Gilmour's guitar work


Main article: David Gilmour
[253]

"While Waters was Floyd's lyricist and conceptualist, Gilmour was the band's voice and its main instrumental focus."
Alan di Perna, in Guitar World, May 2006

Music critic Alan di Perna praised Gilmour's guitar work as being an integral element of Pink Floyd's sound.[253]
Rolling Stone ranked him number 14 in their "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" list and di Perna described him as
the most important guitarist of the 1970s, calling him "the missing link between Hendrix and Van Halen."[254] In
2006, Gilmour commented on his playing technique: "[My] fingers make a distinctive sound... [they] aren't very
fast, but I think I am instantly recognisable... The way I play melodies is connected to things like Hank Marvin and
the Shadows".[255] Gilmour's less is more approach to guitar solos; his ability to use fewer notes than most to express
himself without sacrificing strength or beauty, drew a favourable comparison to jazz trumpeter Miles Davis.[256]
In 2006, Guitar World writer Jimmy Brown described Gilmour's guitar style as "characterised by simple,
huge-sounding riffs; gutsy, well-paced solos; and rich, ambient chordal textures."[256] According to Brown,
Gilmour's solos on "Money", "Time" and "Comfortably Numb" "cut through the mix like a laser beam through
fog."[256] Brown described the "Time" solo as "a masterpiece of phrasing and motivic development... Gilmour paces

Pink Floyd
himself throughout and builds upon his initial idea by leaping into the upper register with gut-wrenching
one-and-one-half-step 'over bends', soulful triplet arpeggios and a typically impeccable bar vibrato."[257] Brown
described Gilmour's sense of phrasing as intuitive, singling it out as perhaps his best asset as a lead guitarist. Gilmour
explained how he achieved his signature tone: "I usually use a fuzz box, a delay and a bright EQ setting... [to get]
singing sustain... you need to play loudat or near the feedback threshold. It's just so much more fun to play...
when bent notes slice right through you like a razor blade."[256]

Sonic experimentation
Throughout their career, Pink Floyd experimented with their sound. Their second single, "See Emily Play" premiered
at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, on 12 May 1967. During the performance, the group first used an early
quadraphonic device called an Azimuth Co-ordinator.[258] The device enabled the controller, usually Wright, to
manipulate the band's amplified sound, combined with recorded tapes, projecting the sounds 270 degrees around a
venue, achieving a sonic swirling effect.[259] In 1972, they purchased a custom-built PA which featured an upgraded
four-channel, 360-degree system.[260]
Waters experimented with the EMS Synthi A and VCS 3 synthesisers on Pink Floyd pieces such as "On the Run",
"Welcome to the Machine", and "In the Flesh?".[261] He used a Binson Echorec 2 echo effect on his bass-guitar track
for "One of These Days".[262]
Pink Floyd used innovative sound effects and state of the art audio recording technology during the recording of The
Final Cut. Mason's contributions to the album were almost entirely limited to work with the experimental
Holophonic system, an audio processing technique used to simulate a three-dimensional effect. The system used a
conventional stereo tape to produce an effect that seemed to move the sound around the listener's head when they
were wearing headphones. The process enabled an engineer to simulate moving the sound to behind, above or beside
the listener's ears.[263]

Film scores
Pink Floyd also composed several film scores, starting in 1968, with The Committee.[264] In 1969, they recorded the
score for Barbet Schroeder's film More. The soundtrack proved beneficial; not only did it pay well but, along with A
Saucerful of Secrets, the material they created became part of their live shows for some time thereafter.[265] While
composing the soundtrack for director Michelangelo Antonioni's film Zabriskie Point, the band stayed at a luxury
hotel in Rome for almost a month. Waters claimed that, without Antonioni's constant changes to the music, they
would have completed the work in less than a week. Eventually he used only three of their recordings. One of the
pieces turned down by Antonioni, called "The Violent Sequence", later became "Us and Them", included on 1973's
The Dark Side of the Moon.[266] In 1971, the band again worked with Schroeder on the film La Valle, for which
they released a soundtrack album called Obscured by Clouds. They composed the material in about a week at the
Chteau d'Hrouville near Paris, and upon its release, it became Pink Floyd's first album to break into the top50 on
the US Billboard chart.[267]

96

Pink Floyd

97

Live performances
Main article: Pink Floyd live performances
Regarded as pioneers of live music performance and renowned for
their lavish stage shows, Pink Floyd also set high standards in sound
quality, making use of innovative sound effects and quadraphonic
speaker systems. From their earliest days, they employed visual effects
to accompany their psychedelic rock music while performing at venues
such as the UFO Club in London.[38] Their slide-and-light show was
one of the first in British rock, and it helped them became popular
among London's underground.[246]
A live performance of The Dark Side of the Moon

To celebrate the launch of the London Free School's magazine


at Earls Court, shortly after its release in 1973:
International Times in 1966, they performed in front of 2,000 people at
(l-r) Gilmour, Mason, Dick Parry, Waters
the opening of the Roundhouse, attended by celebrities including Paul
McCartney and Marianne Faithfull.[268] In mid-1966, road manager Peter Wynne-Willson joined their road crew,
and updated the band's lighting rig with some innovative ideas including the use of polarisers, mirrors and stretched
condoms.[269] After their record deal with EMI, Pink Floyd purchased a Ford Transit van, then considered
extravagant band transportation.[270] On 29 April 1967, they headlined an all-night event called The 14 Hour
Technicolour Dream at the Alexandra Palace, London. Pink Floyd arrived at the festival at around three o'clock in
the morning after a long journey by van and ferry from the Netherlands, taking the stage just as the sun was
beginning to rise.[271][272]</ref> In July 1969, precipitated by their space-related music and lyrics, they took part in
the live BBC television coverage of the Apollo 11 moon landing, performing an instrumental piece which they called
"Moonhead".[273]
In November 1974, they employed for the first time the large circular screen that would become a staple of their live
shows.[274] In 1977, they employed the use of a large inflatable floating pig named "Algie". Filled with helium and
propane, Algie, while floating above the audience, would explode with a loud noise during the In the Flesh Tour.[275]
The behaviour of the audience during the tour, as well as the large size of the venues, proved a strong influence on
their concept album The Wall. The subsequent The Wall Tour featured a 40 feet (12m) high wall, built from
cardboard bricks, constructed between the band and the audience. They projected animations onto the wall, while
gaps allowed the audience to view various scenes from the story. They commissioned the creation of several giant
inflatables to represent characters from the story.[276] One striking feature of the tour was the performance of
"Comfortably Numb". While Waters sang his opening verse, in darkness, Gilmour waited for his cue on top of the
wall. When it came, bright blue and white lights would suddenly reveal him. Gilmour stood on a flightcase on
castors; an insecure setup supported from behind by a technician. A large hydraulic platform supported both Gilmour
and the tech.[277]
During The Division Bell Tour, an unknown person using the name Publius posted a message on an internet
newsgroup inviting fans to solve a riddle supposedly concealed in the new album. White lights in front of the stage at
the Pink Floyd concert in East Rutherford spelled out the words Enigma Publius. During a televised concert at Earls
Court on 20 October 1994, someone projected the word "enigma" in large letters on to the backdrop of the stage.
Mason later acknowledged that their record company had instigated the Publius Enigma mystery, rather than the
band. As of 2014 the puzzle remains unsolved.[228]

Pink Floyd

Lyrical themes
Marked by Waters' philosophical lyrics, Rolling Stone described Pink Floyd as "purveyors of a distinctively dark
vision".[247] Author Jere O'Neill Surber wrote: "their interests are truth and illusion, life and death, time and space,
causality and chance, compassion and indifference."[278] Waters identified empathy as a central theme in the lyrics of
Pink Floyd.[279] Author George Reisch described Meddle's psychedelic opus, "Echoes", as "built around the core
idea of genuine communication, sympathy, and collaboration with others."[280] Despite having been labeled "the
gloomiest man in rock", author Deena Weinstein described Waters as an existentialist, dismissing the unfavourable
moniker as the result of misinterpretation by music critics.[281]
Disillusionment, absence, and non-being
Waters' lyrics to Wish You Were Here's "Have a Cigar" deal with a perceived lack of sincerity on the part of music
industry representatives.[282] The song illustrates a dysfunctional dynamic between the band and a record label
executive who congratulates the group on their current sales success, implying that they are on the same team while
revealing that he erroneously believes "Pink" is the name of one of the band members.[283] According to author
David Detmer, the album's lyrics deal with the "dehumanizing aspects of the world of commerce", a situation the
artist must endure in order to reach their audience.[284]
Absence as a lyrical theme is common in the music of Pink Floyd. Examples include the absence of Barrett after
1968, and that of Waters' father, who died during the Second World War. Waters' lyrics also explored unrealized
political goals and unsuccessful endeavors. Their film score, Obscured by Clouds, dealt with the loss of youthful
exuberance that sometimes comes with aging.[285] Longtime Pink Floyd album cover designer, Storm Thorgerson,
described the lyrics of Wish You Were Here: "The idea of presence withheld, of the ways that people pretend to be
present while their minds are really elsewhere, and the devices and motivations employed psychologically by people
to suppress the full force of their presence, eventually boiled down to a single theme, absence: The absence of a
person, the absence of a feeling."[286] Absence is a key element in the existentialism of Albert Camus, who defined
absurdity as the absence of a response to the individual's need for unity.[115]</ref> Waters commented: "it's about
none of us really being there... [it] should have been called Wish We Were Here".[287]
O'Neill Surber explored the lyrics of Pink Floyd and declared the issue of non-being a common theme in their
music.[278][288]</ref> Waters invoked non-being or non-existence in The Wall, with the lyrics to "Comfortably
Numb": "I caught a fleeting glimpse, out of the corner of my eye. I turned to look, but it was gone, I cannot put my
finger on it now, the child is grown, the dream is gone."[285] Barrett referred to non-being in his final contribution to
the band's catalogue, "Jugband Blues": "I'm most obliged to you for making it clear that I'm not here."[285]
Exploitation and oppression
Author Patrick Croskery described Animals as a unique blend of the "powerful sounds and suggestive themes" of
Dark Side with The Wall's portrayal of artistic alienation.[289] He drew a parallel between the album's political
themes and that of Orwell's Animal Farm.[289] Animals begins with a thought experiment, which asks: "If you didn't
care what happened to me. And I didn't care for you", then develops a beast fable based on anthropomorphized
characters using music to reflect the individual states of mind of each. The lyrics ultimately paint a picture of
dystopia, the inevitable result of a world devoid of empathy and compassion, answering the question posed in the
opening lines.[290]
The album's characters include the "Dogs", representing fervent capitalists, the "Pigs", symbolizing political
corruption, and the "Sheep", who represent the exploited.[291] Croskery described the "Sheep" as being in a "state of
delusion created by a misleading cultural identity", a false consciousness.[292] The "Dog", in his tireless pursuit of
self-interest and success, ends up depressed and alone with no one to trust, utterly lacking emotional satisfaction
after a life of exploitation.[293] Waters used Mary Whitehouse as an example of a "Pig"; being someone who in his
estimation, used the power of the government to impose her values on society.[294] At the album's conclusion,
Waters returns to empathy with the lyrical statement: "You know that I care what happens to you. And I know that

98

Pink Floyd

99

you care for me too."[295] However, he also acknowledges that the "Pigs" are a continuing threat and reveals that he
is a "Dog" who requires shelter, suggesting the need for a balance between state, commerce and community, versus
an ongoing battle between them.[296]
Alienation, war, and insanity
"When I say, 'I'll see you on the dark side of the moon'...what I mean [is]... If you feel that you're the only one... that you seem
[297]

crazy [because] you think everything is crazy, you're not alone."


Waters, quoted in Harris, 2005

O'Neill Surber compared the lyrics of Dark Side's "Brain Damage" with Karl Marx's theory of self-alienation;
"there's someone in my head, but it's not me."[298][299]</ref> The lyrics to Wish You Were Here's "Welcome to the
Machine" suggest what Marx called the alienation of the thing; the song's protagonist preoccupied with material
possessions to the point that he becomes estranged from himself and others.[298] Allusions to the alienation of man's
species being can be found in Animals; the "Dog" reduced to living instinctively as a non-human.[300] The "Dogs"
become alienated from themselves to the extent that they justify their lack of integrity as a "necessary and
defensible" position in "a cutthroat world with no room for empathy or moral principle" wrote Detmer.[301]
Alienation from others is a consistent theme in the lyrics of Pink Floyd, and it is a core element of The Wall.[298]
War, viewed as the most severe consequence of the manifestation of alienation from others, is also a core element of
The Wall, and a recurring theme in the band's music.[302] Waters' father died in combat during the Second World
War, and his lyrics often alluded to the cost of war, including those from "Corporal Clegg" (1968), "Free Four"
(1972), "Us and Them" (1973), "When the Tigers Broke Free" and "The Fletcher Memorial Home" from The Final
Cut (1983), an album dedicated to his late father and subtitled A Requiem for the Postwar Dream.[303] The themes
and composition of The Wall express Waters' upbringing in an English society depleted of men after the Second
World War, a condition that negatively affected his personal relationships with women.[304]
Waters' lyrics to The Dark Side of the Moon dealt with the pressures of modern life and how those pressures can
sometimes cause insanity.[305] He viewed the album's explication of mental illness as illuminating a universal
condition.[306] However, Waters also wanted the album to communicate positivism, calling it "an exhortation... to
embrace the positive and reject the negative."[307] Reisch described The Wall as "less about the experience of
madness than the habits, institutions, and social structures that create or cause madness."[308] The Wall's protagonist,
Pink, is unable to deal with the circumstances of his life, and overcome by feelings of guilt, slowly closes himself off
from the outside world inside a barrier of his own making. After he completes his estrangement from the world, Pink
realises that he is "crazy, over the rainbow".[309] He then considers the possibility that his condition may be his own
fault: "have I been guilty all this time?"[309] Realizing his greatest fear, Pink believes that he has let everyone down,
his overbearing mother wisely choosing to smother him, the teachers rightly criticising his poetic aspirations, and his
wife justified in leaving him. He then stands trial for "showing feelings of an almost human nature", further
exacerbating his alienation of species being.[310] As with the writings of philosopher Michel Foucault, Waters' lyrics
suggest Pink's insanity is a product of modern life, the elements of which, "custom, codependancies, and
psychopathologies", contribute to his angst, according to Reisch.[311]

Pink Floyd

Recognition and influence


Pink Floyd were one of the most commercially successful and influential
rock bands of all time. They have sold more than 250 million records
worldwide, including 74.5 million certified units in the United States, and
37.9 million albums sold in the US since 1993.[312] The Sunday Times Rich
List, Music Millionaires 2013 (UK), ranked Waters at number 12 with an
estimated fortune of 150 million, Gilmour at number 27 with 85 million
and Mason at number 37 with 50 million.
In 2004, MSNBC ranked Pink Floyd number 8 on their list of "The 10 Best
Rock Bands Ever". Rolling Stone ranked them number 51 on their list of
"The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time". Q named Pink Floyd as the biggest
Clockwise (from top left): Waters, Gilmour,
band of all time. VH1 ranked them number 18 in the list of the "100
[313]
Wright and Mason
Greatest Artists of All Time".
Colin Larkin ranked Pink Floyd number
3 in his list of the 'Top 50 Artists of All Time', a ranking based on the
cumulative votes for each artist's albums included in his All Time Top 1000 Albums.
Pink Floyd have won several awards, including a "Best Engineered Non-Classical Album" Grammy in 1980 for The
Wall, and a BAFTA award for "Best Original Song" in 1982 for "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)" from The Wall
film.[314] In 1995, they won a Grammy for best "Rock Instrumental Performance" for "Marooned". In 2008, King
Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden presented Pink Floyd with the Polar Music Prize for their contribution to modern music;
Waters and Mason attended the ceremony and accepted the award. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame in 1996, the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005, and the Hit Parade Hall of Fame in 2010.[315]
The music of Pink Floyd influenced numerous artists: David Bowie called Barrett a significant inspiration, and the
Edge from U2 bought his first delay pedal after hearing the opening guitar chords to "Dogs" from Animals.[316]
Other bands who cite Pink Floyd as an influence include: Queen, Tool, Radiohead, Kraftwerk, Marillion,
Queensrche, Nine Inch Nails, the Orb and the Smashing Pumpkins.[317]

Discography
Main article: Pink Floyd discography
Studio albums

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967)


A Saucerful of Secrets (1968)
More (1969)
Ummagumma (1969)
Atom Heart Mother (1970)
Meddle (1971)
Obscured by Clouds (1972)
The Dark Side of the Moon (1973)
Wish You Were Here (1975)
Animals (1977)
The Wall (1979)
The Final Cut (1983)
A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987)

The Division Bell (1994)


The Endless River (2014)

100

Pink Floyd

Tours
Main article: Pink Floyd live performances

Pink Floyd World Tour (1968)


The Man and The Journey Tour (1969)
Atom Heart Mother World Tour (1970)
Meddle Tour (1971)
Dark Side of the Moon Tour (197273)
French Summer Tour (1974)
British Winter Tour (1974)
Wish You Were Here Tour (1975)
In the Flesh Tour (1977)
The Wall Tour (198081)
A Momentary Lapse of Reason Tour (198790)
The Division Bell Tour (1994)

Notes
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]

http:/ / www. rollingstone. de/ news/ meldungen/ article602472/ pink-floyd-neues-album-im-oktober. html


http:/ / pinkfloyd. com
http:/ / en. wikipedia. org/ w/ index. php?title=Pink_Floyd& action=edit
: Mason meeting Waters while studying architecture at the London Polytechnic; : Waters meeting Mason while studying architecture at the
London Polytechnic.
[5] : Wright was also an architecture student when he joined Sigma 6; : The formation of Sigma 6; : Instrumental line-up of Sigma 6: Waters
(lead guitar), Wright (rhythm guitar) and Mason (drums).
[6] Wright studied architecture until 1963, when he began studying music at London's Royal College of Music.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake20083940">Blake 2008, pp.3940.
[7] Blake 2008, pp.3839.
[8] Mason 2005, pp.2426.
[9] Leonard designed light machines, which used electric motors to spin perforated discs, casting patterns of lights on the walls. These would be
demonstrated in an early edition of Tomorrow's World. For a brief time, Leonard played keyboard with them using the front room of his flat
for rehearsals.<ref name="FOOTNOTEMason20052426">Mason 2005, pp.2426.
[10] Povey 2008, p.14.
[11] Wright also briefly lived at Leonard's.<ref name="FOOTNOTEPovey200814">Povey 2008, p.14.
[12] Povey 2008, pp.1318.
[13] Povey spelled it Meggadeaths but Blake spelled it Megadeaths.<ref>: Megadeaths; : Meggadeaths.
[14] http:/ / sigma6. livejournal. com/ 850. html
[15] Povey 2008, pp.1415.
[16] : The T-Set as an alternate spelling; : The Tea Set used throughout.
[17] Blake 2008, p.41.
[18] Povey 2008, p.13.
[19] Schaffner 1991, pp.2223.
[20] Mason 2005, p.27.
[21] Blake 2008, pp.4244.
[22] Mason 2005, pp.2930.
[23] The four-song session became the band's first demo and included the R&B classic "I'm a King Bee", and three Syd Barrett originals,
"Butterfly", "Lucy Leave" and "Double O Bo", a song Mason described as "Bo Diddley meets the 007 theme".<ref
name="FOOTNOTEMason20052930">Mason 2005, pp.2930.
[24] Povey 2008, p.19.
[25] According to Povey, by 1964 the group began calling itself the Abdabs.<ref name="FOOTNOTEPovey200814">Povey 2008, p.14.
[26] Mason 2005, p.30.
[27] : Klose quit the band in mid 1965 and Barrett took over on lead guitar (secondary source); : Klose quit the band in mid 1965 (primary
source).
[28] Povey 2008, pp.1819.
[29] : The origin of the band name Pink Floyd (primary source); : The origin of the band name Pink Floyd (secondary source).
[30] : Jenner was impressed by Barrett and Wright; : Jenner and King became Pink Floyd's business managers.

101

Pink Floyd
[31] Schaffner 1991, pp.3233.
[32] Soon after, someone stole the equipment, and the group resorted to purchasing new gear on a payment plan.<ref
name="FOOTNOTESchaffner199132">Schaffner 1991, p.32.
[33] Mason 2005, pp.5051.
[34] : (primary source); : (secondary source).
[35] : Jenner and King's connections helped gain the band important coverage; : "apparently very psychedelic."
[36] Mason 2005, p.49.
[37] Mason 2005, p.54.
[38] Mason 2005, pp.5458.
[39] Schaffner 1991, p.49.
[40] : Pink Floyd as a spack rock band; : The music industry began to take notice of Pink Floyd.
[41] They dropped the definite article from the band's name at some point in early 1967.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake200879">Blake 2008,
p.79.
[42] Povey 2008, p.37.
[43] Previous to this session, on 11 and 12 January, they recorded a long take of "Interstellar Overdrive".<ref
name="FOOTNOTEPovey200837">Povey 2008, p.37.
[44] Mason 2005, pp.5963.
[45] : Release date for "Arnold Layne"; : Signing with EMI.
[46] Shaffner described the 5,000 advance as generous; however, Povey suggested it was an inadequate agreement which required that the
money be disbursed over five years.<ref name="FOOTNOTEPovey200837">Povey 2008, p.37.
[47] Mason 2005, pp.8485.
[48] Povey 2008, p.342.
[49] Blake 2008, pp.8687.
[50] Mason 2005, pp.8687.
[51] Povey 2008, p.43.
[52] : Barrett was "completely distanced from everything going on"; : Barrett's increasing LSD use starting early 1967.
[53] : Smith negotiated Pink Floyd's first record contract; : Morrison negotiated Pink Floyd's first contract and in it they agreed to record their
first album at EMI Studios.
[54] At EMI, Pink Floyd experimented with musique concrte and watched the Beatles record "Lovely Rita".<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake200885">Blake 2008, p.85.
[55] Mason 2005, pp.9293.
[56] Roberts 2005, p.391.
[57] : "The band started to play and Syd just stood there"; : June Child was Blackhill's assistant and secretary.
[58] Povey 2008, p.67.
[59] Blake 2008, p.123.
[60] Povey 2008, pp.6771.
[61] Blackhill's late application for work permits forced Pink Floyd to cancel several of the US dates.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEPovey200869">Povey 2008, p.69.
[62] Schaffner 1991, pp.8890.
[63] Schaffner 1991, pp.9192.
[64] Pink Floyd released the single "Apples and Oranges" in November 1967 in the UK.<ref name="FOOTNOTEPovey200872">Povey 2008,
p.72.
[65] : Barrett's mental deterioration and Pink Floyd's first US tour (primary source); : Barrett's mental deterioration and Pink Floyd's first US tour
(secondary source).
[66] Barrett's absence on more than one occasion forced the band to book David O'List as his replacement.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEFitch2005224">Fitch 2005, p.224.
[67] Blake 2008, p.102.
[68] Povey 2008, p.47.
[69] In late 1967, Barrett suggested adding four new members; in the words of Waters: "two freaks he'd met somewhere. One of them played the
banjo, the other the saxophone... [and] a couple of chick singers".<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008110">Blake 2008, p.110.
[70] Mason 2005, p.28.
[71] Mason 2005, p.34.
[72] : "the band intending to continue with Barrett"; : O'Rourke set Gilmour up in O'Rourke's home; : Gilmour was officially announced as a new
member of Pink Floyd.
[73] Schaffner 1991, p.107.
[74] One of Gilmour's first tasks was to mime Barrett's guitar playing on an "Apples and Oranges" promotional film.<ref
name="FOOTNOTESchaffner1991104">Schaffner 1991, p.104.
[75] Povey 2008, p.78.
[76] Mason is unsure which member of Pink Floyd said "let's not bother".<ref name="FOOTNOTEMason2005111">Mason 2005, p.111.

102

Pink Floyd
[77] Blake 2008, p.112.
[78] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[79] Povey 2008, p.7880.
[80] Mason 2005, pp.112114: On O'Rourke becoming the band's manager, 127131: On O'Rourke becoming the band's manager.
[81] Schaffner 1991, pp.107108.
[82] For a short period after, Barrett turned up at occasional performances, apparently confused about his standing with the band.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008112114">Blake 2008, pp.112114.
[83] Blake 2008, pp.3, 9, 113, 156, 242, 279, 320, 398: After Barrett's departure, the burden of lyrical composition and creative direction fell
mostly on Waters.
[84] di Perna 2002, p.13.
[85] Blake 2008, pp.116117.
[86] Blake 2008, p.117.
[87] Blake 2008, p.118.
[88] Thorgerson had attended Cambridgeshire High School for Boys with Waters and Barrett.<ref name="FOOTNOTEFitch2005311">Fitch
2005, p.311.
[89] Povey 2008, p.84.
[90] Mason 2005, pp.127131.
[91] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[92] Povey 2008, pp.8789.
[93] Povey 2008, pp.135136.
[94] Povey 2008, p.344.
[95] The band recorded their previous LPs using a four-track system; Atom Heart Mother was their first album recorded on an eight-track
machine.<ref name="FOOTNOTESchaffner1991154">Schaffner 1991, p.154.
[96] Blake 2008, p.148.
[97] Schaffner 1991, p.144.
[98] Schaffner 1991, pp.140147.
[99] Povey 2008, pp.128140.
[100] A theft of the band's equipment, worth about $40,000, after a May 1970 show at the Warehouse in New Orleans, nearly crippled their
finances. However, hours after the band notified the FBI they had recovered most of the stolen equipment.
[101] Schaffner 1991, pp.150151.
[102] Povey 2008, p.122.
[103] : "a couple of bottles of wine and a couple of joints";
[104] Harris 2005, p.72.
[105] For "Meddle not only confirms lead guitarist David Gilmour's emergence" see: ; : The release dates for Meddle.
[106] Povey states that the UK release date was 5 November, but Pink Floyd's official website states 13 November. All sources agree on the US
release date of 30 October.<ref>: A 5 November UK release date for Meddle; For a 13 November UK release date for Meddle see:
[107] Meddle's production consisted of sessions spread over several months; the band recorded in the first half of April, but in the latter half
played at Doncaster and Norwich before returning to record at the end of the month. In May, they split their time between sessions at Abbey
Road, rehearsals and concerts across Great Britain. They spent June and July performing at venues across Europe, and August in the far east
and Australia, returning to Europe in September.<ref>: (primary source); : (secondary source)
[108] Povey 2008, pp.155: Touring the US in November;174: Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii.
[109] Schaffner 1991, p.155.
[110] Watts 1996, p.5657.
[111] : Recording schedule for Dark Side; : Alan Parsons as an engineer on Dark Side; : The Dark Side of the Moon as an allusion to lunacy,
rather than astronomy.
[112] Povey 2008, pp.164173.
[113] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[114] Harris 2005, p.151.
[115] Weinstein 2007, p.86.
[116] Harris 2005, pp.1213, 8889.
[117] Schaffner 1991, p.166.
[118] Povey 2008, p.160.
[119] Schaffner 1991, pp.166167.
[120] For Billboard chart history see: ; : A US number 1.
[121] Povey 2008, p.345.
[122] Harris 2005, pp.172173.
[123] Schaffner 1991, p.173.
[124] Povey 2008, p.184.
[125] Mason 2005, pp.177: Parsons declined an offer to continue working with Pink Floyd, 200: Pink Floyd hired Humphries.

103

Pink Floyd
[126] Schaffner 1991, pp.184185.
[127] Schaffner 1991, pp.178184.
[128] : The motif reminded Waters of Barrett; : Gilmour composed the motif entirely by accident.
[129] Schaffner 1991, pp.185186.
[130] Schaffner 1991, p.184.
[131] Watkinson & Anderson 2001, p.120.
[132] Blake 2008, p.231.
[133] Immediately after the session, Barrett attended a pre-party held for Gilmour's upcoming first wedding, but eventually left without saying
goodbye and none of the band members ever saw him again, apart from a run-in between Waters and Barrett a couple of years later.<ref
name="FOOTNOTESchaffner1991189190">Schaffner 1991, pp.189190.
[134] Povey 2008, p.346.
[135] Blake 2008, p.236.
[136] Povey 2008, p.200.
[137] Blake 2008, pp.241242.
[138] Brian Humphries engineered the album, which was completed in December 1976.<ref name="FOOTNOTEMason2005218220">Mason
2005, pp.218220.
[139] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[140] The band commissioned a 30 feet (9.1m) pig-shaped balloon and photography began on 2 December. Inclement weather delayed filming,
and the balloon broke free of its moorings in strong winds. It eventually landed in Kent, where a local farmer recovered it, reportedly furious
that it had frightened his cows.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008246">Blake 2008, p.246.
[141] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[142] Blake 2008, pp.242245.
[143] Blake 2008, p.242.
[144] "Pigs on the Wing" contained references to Waters' romantic relationship with Carolyne Anne Christie. Christie and Rock Scully, manager
of the Grateful Dead, were married at the time. Waters' marriage to Judy had produced no children, but he became a father with Christie in
November 1976.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008244245">Blake 2008, pp.244245.
[145] Blake 2008, pp.242243.
[146] Povey 2008, p.347.
[147] Blake 2008, p.247.
[148] Blake 2008, pp.252253.
[149] Mason 2005, pp.235236.
[150] Povey 2008, p.207.
[151] Waters was not the only person depressed by playing in large venues, as Gilmour refused to perform the band's usual twelve-bar blues
encore that night.<ref name="FOOTNOTEMason2005235236">Mason 2005, pp.235236.
[152] Mason 2005, p.230.
[153] Blake 2008, pp.258259.
[154] In 1976, Pink Floyd had become involved with financial advisers Norton Warburg Group (NWG). NWG became the band's collecting
agents and handled all financial planning, for an annual fee of about 300,000. NWG invested between 1.6million and 3.3million of the
band's money in high-risk venture capital schemes, primarily to reduce their exposure to UK taxes. It soon became apparent that the band were
still losing money. Not only did NWG invest in failing businesses, they also left the band liable for tax bills as high as 83 per cent of their
income. The band eventually terminated their relationship with NWG and demanded the return of any funds not yet invested, which at that
time amounted to 860,000; they received only 740,000.<ref name="FOOTNOTESchaffner1991206208">Schaffner 1991, pp.206208.
[155] Schaffner 1991, pp.206208.
[156] Blake 2008, p.260.
[157] Blake 2008, pp.260261.
[158] James Guthrie replaced engineer Brian Humphries, emotionally drained by his five years with the band, for the recording of the album.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEMason2005238">Mason 2005, p.238.
[159] : (primary source); : (secondary source).
[160] Simmons 1999, pp.7695.
[161] : That's why Wright "got the boot"; : Wright, "hadn't contributed anything of any value".
[162] Mason 2005, p.246.
[163] Simmons 1999, p.88.
[164] Although Wright's name did not appear anywhere on the finished album, Pink Floyd employed him as a paid musician on their subsequent
The Wall tour.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008269: Wright's name did not appear on the album, 285286: Wright as a paid musician
during the tour">Blake 2008, pp.269: Wright's name did not appear on the album, 285286: Wright as a paid musician during the tour.
[165] Mason 2005, p.249.
[166] : Peak US chart position for "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)"; : Peak UK chart position for "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)".
[167] : Peak UK chart position for The Wall; : Peak US chart position for The Wall.
[168] Blake 2008, p.279.

104

Pink Floyd
[169] Scarfe 2010, pp.91115.
[170] Blake 2008, pp.285286.
[171] Blake 2008, p.289.
[172] Blake 2008, pp.288292.
[173] Waters took a six-week leave during filming and returned to find that Parker had used his artistic license to modify parts of the film to his
liking. Waters became incensed; the two fought, and Parker threatened to walk out. Gilmour urged Waters to reconsider his stance, reminding
the bassist that he and the other band members were shareholders and directors and could outvote him on such decisions.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008288292">Blake 2008, pp.288292.
[174] Povey 2008, p.229.
[175] Pink Floyd created a modified soundtrack for some of the film's songs.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008288292">Blake 2008,
pp.288292.
[176] Blake 2008, pp.294295.
[177] Blake 2008, pp.296298.
[178] Recording took place in eight studios, including Gilmour's home studio at Hookend Manor and Waters' home studio at East Sheen.<ref>:
(secondary source); : (primary source)
[179] : (secondary source); : (primary source)
[180] During the sessions, Waters lost his temper and began ranting at Kamen who, out of frustration during one recording session, had started
repeatedly writing "I Must Not Fuck Sheep" on a notepad in the studio's control room.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008296298">Blake
2008, pp.296298.
[181] Blake 2008, p.299.
[182] Waters commissioned his brother-in-law, Willie Christie, to take photographs for the album cover.<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008299">Blake 2008, p.299.
[183] : Peak US chart position for The Final Cut; : Peak UK chart position for The Final Cut.
[184] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[185] Blake 2008, p.295.
[186] Though Gilmour's name did not appear on the production credits, he retained his pay as musician and producer.<ref>: (secondary source); :
(primary source).
[187] Schaffner 1991, p.243.
[188] Released as a single, "Not Now John", with its chorus of "Fuck all that" bowdlerised to "Stuff all that"; Melody Maker declared it "a
milestone in the history of awfulness".<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008300">Blake 2008, p.300.
[189] Blake 2008, pp.302309.
[190] Blake 2008, pp.309311.
[191] Wright was also in the midst of a difficult divorce and later said that the album was, "made at a time in my life when I was lost."<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008309311">Blake 2008, pp.309311.
[192] Blake 2008, pp.311313.
[193] : O'Rourke's involvement in the settlement; : "a spent force".
[194] Schaffner 1991, p.271.
[195] Waters went on to record the soundtrack for When the Wind Blows, as well as his second solo album, Radio K.A.O.S..<ref
name="FOOTNOTESchaffner1991263266">Schaffner 1991, pp.263266.
[196] Schaffner 1991, pp.264268.
[197] Artists such as Jon Carin and Phil Manzanera worked on the album, joined by Bob Ezrin.<ref
name="FOOTNOTESchaffner1991264268">Schaffner 1991, pp.264268.
[198] Blake 2008, pp.316317.
[199] : Pink Floyd employed Wright as a paid musician with weekly earnings of $11,000; : "would make us stronger legally and musically".
[200] Blake 2008, p.318.
[201] Andy Jackson engineered the album.<ref name="FOOTNOTEFitch2005158">Fitch 2005, p.158.
[202] Mason 2005, pp.284285.
[203] Blake 2008, p.320.
[204] Mason 2005, p.287.
[205] In a departure from previous Pink Floyd albums, they recorded A Momentary Lapse of Reason using a 32-channel Mitsubishi digital
recorder using MIDI synchronisation with the aid of an Apple Macintosh computer.<ref>: (primary sources); : (secondary source).
[206] Blake 2008, p.321.
[207] Schaffner 1991, p.273.
[208] Blake 2008, p.166.
[209] Wright's name appears only on the credit list.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008366">Blake 2008, p.366.
[210] Povey 2008, p.349.
[211] Blake 2008, p.328.
[212] Blake 2008, p.327.
[213] Blake 2008, pp.326327.

105

Pink Floyd
[214] Blake 2008, p.322.
[215] Schaffner 1991, p.277.
[216] Blake 2008, pp.329335.
[217] Mason 2005, pp.311313.
[218] Gilmour divorced his wife Ginger and Mason married actress Annette Lynton.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008352">Blake 2008,
p.352.
[219] Mason 2005, pp.314321.
[220] Blake 2008, p.355.
[221] Blake 2008, p.356.
[222] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[223] Blake 2008, p.359.
[224] Thorgerson also provided six new pieces of film for the upcoming tour.<ref name="FOOTNOTEMason2005322">Mason 2005, p.322.
[225] Blake 2008, pp.357358.
[226] Mason 2005, p.319.
[227] ; : Rehearsing for over two weeks at Norton Air Force Base before opening in Miami.
[228] Blake 2008, pp.363367.
[229] Waters declined their invitation to join them as the tour reached Europe.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008367">Blake 2008, p.367.
[230] Blake 2008, p.367.
[231] In 1995, Pink Floyd released the live album, Pulse, and an accompanying concert video.<ref name="FOOTNOTEPovey2008264, 285,
351352: ''Pulse''">Povey 2008, pp.264, 285, 351352: Pulse.
[232] : (primary source); : (secondary source).
[233] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[234] Povey 2008, p.287.
[235] Blake 2008, p.386.
[236] In the week following their performance, there was a resurgence of commercial interest in Pink Floyd's music, when according to HMV,
sales of Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd rose more than one thousand per cent, while Amazon.com reported a significant increase in sales of
The Wall.<ref name="Live8">
[237] Blake 2008, p.395.
[238] In 2006, Gilmour began a tour of small concert venues with contributions from Wright and other musicians from the post-Waters Pink
Floyd tours. Gilmour, Wright, and Mason's encore performance of "Wish You Were Here" and "Comfortably Numb" marked the only
appearance by Pink Floyd since Live 8 as of 2012 (http:/ / en. wikipedia. org/ w/ index. php?title=Pink_Floyd& action=edit).<ref
name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008387389">Blake 2008, pp.387389.
[239] Blake 2008, pp.390391.
[240] Barrett left more than 1.25M in his will, to be divided among his immediate family, who then auctioned some of his possessions and
artwork.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake2008394">Blake 2008, p.394.
[241] On 4 January 2011, Pink Floyd signed a five-year record deal with EMI, ending the legal dispute regarding the distribution of their
catalogue. They successfully defended their vision to support their albums as cohesive units versus individual tracks.<ref>
[242] It was the first time since Live 8 that the three men shared a stage and the first time that the line-up from The Final Cut appeared in
concert.<ref>
[243] : Pink Floyd as a spack rock act; : Pink Floys as one of the UK's first psychedelic music groups.
[244] In early 1965, Pink Floyd auditioned for ITV's Ready Steady Go!, which Mason described as "the definitive music show of the day".<ref
name="FOOTNOTEMason200531">Mason 2005, p.31.
[245] Mason 2005, pp.3132.
[246] George-Warren 2001, p.761.
[247] George-Warren 2001, p.760.
[248] Povey 2008, p.85.
[249] O'Neill Surber 2007, pp.192199.
[250] Fitch 2001, p.45.
[251] Hibbert 1996, p.147.
[252] George-Warren 2001, pp.760761.
[253] di Perna 2006, p.59.
[254] : "the missing link"; For Rolling Stone "100 Greatest Guitarists" list see:
[255] di Perna 2006, pp.5859.
[256] Brown 2006, p.62.
[257] Brown 2006, p.66.
[258] Blake 2008, p.86.
[259] Blake 2008, p.134.
[260] Blake 2008, p.178.
[261] : Synthesiser use in "On the Run"; : Synthesiser use on "Welcome to the Machine"; : Synthesiser use on "In the Flesh?".

106

Pink Floyd
[262] Mabbett 1995, p.39.
[263] Blake 2008, pp.297298.
[264] Mason 2005, pp.133135.
[265] Schaffner 1991, p.128.
[266] Schaffner 1991, pp.135136.
[267] Schaffner 1991, pp.156157.
[268] Schaffner 1991, pp.4243.
[269] : Peter Wynne-Willson; : Wynne-Willson updated the band's lighting rig with some innovative ideas.
[270] Mason 2005, p.70.
[271] Povey 2008, p.58.
[272] Road manager Peter Watts joined them before touring Europe in 1968.<ref name="FOOTNOTEMason2005115119">Mason 2005,
pp.115119.
[273] Povey 2008, pp.87: The television audience, 111: Pink Floyd performed a piece titled "Moonhead".
[274] Povey 2008, p.183.
[275] Fitch 2005, p.241.
[276] Blake 2008, pp.280282.
[277] Blake 2008, pp.284285.
[278] O'Neill Surber 2007, p.192.
[279] Croskery 2007, p.36.
[280] Reisch 2007, p.268.
[281] Weinstein 2007, pp.8182.
[282] Fitch 2005, p.133.
[283] Detmer 2007, p.77.
[284] Detmer 2007, p.75.
[285] O'Neill Surber 2007, p.197.
[286] Thorgerson's design for Wish You Were Here's cover included four sides, counting the inner jacket, which represented four absences related
to the classical categories of substance: earth, air, fire and water. His Dark Side album cover features a beam of white light, representing unity,
passing through a prism, which represents society. The resulting refracted beam of coloured light symbolizes unity diffracted, leaving an
absence of unity.<ref name="FOOTNOTEWeinstein200786">Weinstein 2007, p.86.
[287] Weinstein 2007, p.90.
[288] Philosophy originated from the Greek poet, Parmenides, who wrote a poem in which the protagonist takes a cosmic chariot ride guided by
a goddess who shows him that there are only two paths in life, being, which leads to truth, and non-being, which leads to confusion and
discontent. The goddess also told Parmenides: "thought and being are one".<ref name="FOOTNOTEO'Neill Surber2007191">O'Neill Surber
2007, p.191.
[289] Croskery 2007, p.35.
[290] Croskery 2007, pp.3536.
[291] Croskery 2007, pp.3740.
[292] Croskery 2007, p.40.
[293] Croskery 2007, pp.3738.
[294] Croskery 2007, p.39.
[295] Croskery 2007, p.41.
[296] Croskery 2007, pp.4142.
[297] Harris 2005, p.89.
[298] O'Neill Surber 2007, p.195.
[299] Marx considered insanity the ultimate form of self-alienation.<ref name="FOOTNOTEO'Neill Surber2007195">O'Neill Surber 2007,
p.195.
[300] O'Neill Surber 2007, p.196.
[301] Detmer 2007, p.73.
[302] O'Neill Surber 2007, pp.195196.
[303] : The Final Cut dedicated to Waters' late father; : A Requiem for the Postwar Dream.
[304] Blake 2008, pp.294295: The influence of WWII on The Wall, 351: An English society depleted of men after WWII.
[305] Blake 2008, pp.194195.
[306] Weinstein 2007, p.85.
[307] Harris 2005, p.81.
[308] Reisch 2007, p.257.
[309] Reisch 2007, p.263.
[310] Reisch 2007, pp.263264.
[311] Reisch 2007, pp.258264.
[312] For 250 million records sold see: ; For 74.5 million RIAA certified units sold see: ; For 37.9 million albums sold since 1993 see:

107

Pink Floyd
[313] For VH1's "100 Greatest Artists of All Time" see:
[314] : Grammy award for The Wall; For the 1982 BAFTA awards see:
[315] : Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction; : The UK Hall of Fame induction; For the Hit Parade Hall of Fame induction see:
[316] For Bowie naming Barrett an inspiration see: ; For Edge buying his first delay pedal see:
[317] For Queen citing Pink Floyd as an influence see: ; For Kraftwerk see: ; For Marillion see: ; For Tool see: ; : Queensryche, the Orb,
Nemrud, the Smashing Pumpkins; 289: Radiohead; : For Nine Inch Nails see the back cover.

References
Sources
Blake, Mark (2008). Comfortably NumbThe Inside Story of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
?id=hKXhLoWCPQ8C&lpg=PP1&dq). Da Capo Press. ISBN978-0-306-81752-6.
Bronson, Fred (1992). "The Billboard Book of Number One Hits" (http://books.google.com/
books?id=PgGqNrqfrsoC&dq). In Weiler, Fred. Billboard Books (3rd revised ed.). ISBN978-0-8230-8298-8.
Brown, Jimmy (May 2006). "Sorcerer Full of Secrets". Guitar World 27 (5).
di Perna, Alan (May 2006). "Shine On". Guitar World 27 (5).
di Perna, Alan (2002). "Mysterious Ways" (http://books.google.com/books?id=nQ1f7Vasrv8C&dq). In Kitts,
Jeff; Tolinski, Brad. Guitar World Presents: Pink Floyd. Hal Leonard. ISBN978-0-7546-6708-7.
Croskery, Patrick (2007). "Pigs Training Dogs to Exploit Sheep: Animals as a Beast Fable Dystopia" (http://
books.google.com/books?id=qxlBF7G5tjcC&dq). In Reisch, George A. Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful
with that Axiom, Eugene!. Open Court. ISBN978-0-8126-9636-3.
Detmer, David (2007). "Dragged Down by the Stone: Pink Floyd, Alienation, and the Pressures of Life" (http://
books.google.com/books?id=qxlBF7G5tjcC&dq). In Reisch, George A. Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful
with that Axiom, Eugene!. Open Court. ISBN978-0-8126-9636-3.
Fitch, Vernon (2005). The Pink Floyd Encyclopedia (Third ed.). Collector's Guide Publishing.
ISBN978-1-894959-24-7.
Fitch, Vernon (2001). Pink Floyd: The Press Reports 19661983. Collector's Guide Publishing Inc.
ISBN978-1-896522-72-2.
Fitch, Vernon; Mahon, Richard (2006). Comfortably Numb-A History of "The Wall" Pink Floyd 19781981 (1st
ed.). PFA Publishing, Inc. ISBN978-0-9777366-0-7.
George-Warren, Holly, ed. (2001). The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll (2005 revised and updated
ed.). Fireside. ISBN978-0-7432-9201-6.
Harris, John (2005). The Dark Side of the Moon (First Hardcover ed.). Da Capo. ISBN978-0-306-81342-9.
Hibbert, Tom (1996) [1971]. "Who the hell does Roger Waters think he is?" (http://books.google.com/
books?id=b7J3K2snuhAC&dq). In MacDonald, Bruno. Pink Floyd: Through the eyes of the band, its fans and
foes. Da Capo. ISBN978-0-306-80780-0.
Kitts, Jeff; Tolinski, Brad, eds. (2002). Guitar World Presents: Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=nQ1f7Vasrv8C&dq). Hal Leonard. ISBN978-0-7546-6708-7.
Mabbett, Andy (1995). The complete guide to the music of Pink Floyd (1st UK paperback ed.). Omnibus Press.
ISBN978-0-7119-4301-8.
Manning, Toby (2006). The Rough Guide to Pink Floyd (First ed.). Rough Guides. ISBN978-1-84353-575-1.
Mason, Nick (2005) [2004]. Dodd, Philip, ed. Inside Out A Personal History of Pink Floyd (Paperback ed.).
Phoenix. ISBN978-0-7538-1906-7.
Povey, Glenn (2008) [2007]. Echoes: The Complete History of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
?id=qnnl3FnO-B4C&pg=RA4-PT76&dq). Mind Head Publishing. ISBN978-0-9554624-1-2.
Reisch, George A (2007). "The Worms and the Wall: Michael Foucault on Syd Barrett" (http://books.google.
com/books?id=qxlBF7G5tjcC&dq). In Reisch, George A. Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful with that Axiom,
Eugene!. Open Court. ISBN978-0-8126-9636-3.

108

Pink Floyd
Roberts, David, ed. (2005). British Hit Singles & Albums (18 ed.). Guinness World Records Limited.
ISBN978-1-904994-00-8.
Rosen, Craig (1996). "The Billboard Book of Number One Albums". In Lukas, Paul. Billboard.
ISBN978-0-8230-7586-7.
Schaffner, Nicholas (1991). Saucerful of Secrets (First ed.). Sidgwick & Jackson. ISBN978-0-283-06127-1.
Scarfe, Gerald (2010). The Making of Pink Floyd: The Wall (1st US paperback ed.). Da Capo Press.
ISBN978-0-306-81997-1.
Simmons, Sylvie (December 1999). "Pink Floyd: The Making of The Wall". Mojo Magazine (Emap Metro) 73.
O'Neill Surber, Jere (2007). "Wish You Were Here (But You Aren't): Pink Floyd and Non-Being" (http://books.
google.com/books?id=qxlBF7G5tjcC&dq). In Reisch, George A. Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful with that
Axiom, Eugene!. Open Court. ISBN978-0-8126-9636-3.
Watkinson, Mike; Anderson, Pete (2001). Crazy Diamond: Syd Barrett & the Dawn of Pink Floyd (http://books.
google.com/?id=kPJlLjf4OogC) (First ed.). Omnibus Press. ISBN978-0-7119-2397-3.
Watts, Michael (1996) [1971]. "Pink's muddled Meddle". In MacDonald, Bruno. Pink Floyd: through the eyes
of... the band, its fans, friends, and foes. Da Capo Press. ISBN978-0-306-80780-0.
Weinstein, Deena (2007). "Roger Waters: Artist of the Absurd" (http://books.google.com/
books?id=qxlBF7G5tjcC&dq). In Reisch, George A. Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful with that Axiom,
Eugene!. Open Court. ISBN978-0-8126-9636-3.

Further reading
Bench, Jeff; O'Brien, Daniel (2004). Pink Floyd's The Wall: In the Studio, On Stage and On Screen (First UK
paperback ed.). Reynolds and Hearn. ISBN978-1-903111-82-6.
Hearn, Marcus (2012). Pink Floyd. Titan Books. ISBN978-0-85768-664-0.
Jones, Cliff (1996). Another Brick in the Wall: The Stories Behind Every Pink Floyd Song.
ISBN978-0-553-06733-0.
Mabbett, Andy (2010). Pink Floyd The Music and the Mystery. Omnibus Press. ISBN978-1-84938-370-7.
Mabbett, Andy; Miles (1988). Pink Floyd: 25th Anniversary Edition (Visual Documentary).
ISBN978-0-7119-4109-0.
Miles, Barry (2007). Pink Floyd. Omnibus Press. ISBN978-1-84609-444-6.
Palacios, Julian (2001). Lost in the Woods: Syd Barrett and the Pink Floyd. ISBN978-0-7522-2328-5.
Povey, Glen; Russell, Ian (1997). Pink Floyd: in the flesh, the complete performance history (http://books.
google.com/books?id=KrOPQni4yTsC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). St. Martin's Press.
ISBN978-0-9554624-0-5.
Reising, Russell (2005). Speak to Me. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. ISBN978-0-7546-4019-6.
Ruhlmann, William (2004). Breaking Records. Routledge. ISBN978-0-415-94305-5.
Ruhlmann, William (1993). Pink Floyd. Smithmark. ISBN978-0-8317-6912-3.
Snider, Charles (2008). The Strawberry Bricks Guide to Progressive Rock. Strawberry Bricks.
ISBN978-0-615-17566-9.
Documentaries
CreateSpace (2009). Pink Floyd: Meddle (Streaming video) (in English). Sexy Intellectual. ASIN B002J4V9RI
(http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002J4V9RI).
John Edginton (Director) (2012). Pink Floyd: The Story of Wish You Were Here (Colour, NTSC, DVD) (in
English). Eagle Rock Entertainment. ASIN B007X6ZRMA (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007X6ZRMA).
Matthew Longfellow (Director) (2003). Classic Albums: The Making of The Dark Side of the Moon (Colour,
Dolby, NTSC, DVD) (in English). Eagle Rock Entertainment. ASIN B0000AOV85 (http://www.amazon.com/
dp/B0000AOV85).

109

Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd (2007). Pink Floyd Then And Now (Colour, NTSC DVD) (in English). Pride. ASIN B007EQQX04
(http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007EQQX04).
Pink Floyd (2010). Pink Floyd Whatever Happened To Pink Floyd? (Colour, NTSC, DVD) (in English). Sexy
Intellectual. ASIN B004D0AMN8 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004D0AMN8).

External links
Pink Floyd's official website (http://www.pinkfloyd.com/)
Pink Floyd companies (http://opencorporates.com/corporate_groupings/Pink Floyd) grouped at
OpenCorporates

110

Stars

111

Stars
Stars
Origin

Cambridge, England, United Kingdom

Genres

Progressive rock, psychedelic rock, folk rock, jazz fusion

Years active

1972

Associated acts Pink Floyd, Tomorrow, The Pretty Things, The Pink Fairies, Delivery
Past members

Syd Barrett
John "Twink" Alder
Jack Monck

Stars was a short-lived British supergroup that played a small number of live concerts in Cambridge in February
1972. Its members were Syd Barrett on guitar, Twink on drums, and Jack Monck on bass.[1]

Beginnings
After a spell in Morocco, Twink (ex-Pink Fairies) moved to Cambridge and worked with the 'Last Minute Put
Together Boogie Band', initially with vocalist/guitarist Bruce Michael Paine (ex-Apple Pie & star of the San
Francisco production of 'Hair') and John 'Honk' Lodge (Junior's Eyes, Quiver) playing bass. The Last Minute Put
Together Boogie Band, now with ex-Delivery bass player Jack Monck, backed American Blues guitarist Eddie
"Guitar" Burns at King's College Cellar on 26 January 1972. Jack's wife Jenny Spires, a friend of Twink's and former
girlfriend of Syd Barrett (ex-Pink Floyd), went with Syd down to the gig and he brought his guitar along and jammed
with them in the last set.[2] At the "Six Hour Technicolor Dream" at the Cambridge Corn Exchange the next day (27
January), the Last Minute Put Together Boogie Band, with guests Fred Frith and Syd Barrett, played on a bill with
Hawkwind and the Pink Fairies.[3] The Boogie Band played five tracks before being joined on stage by Syd for a
further three.
Within the next day or two Jenny, Jack & Twink said 'wouldn't it be great to get Syd playing again'. Twink recalled:
"We went round to his house and... Syd came to the door and Jenny said, 'Jack and Twink were thinking
it would be nice to form a band, just the three of you.' So he said 'Yeah, alright, come in'. And that was
that. We started rehearsing down in the basement of his house, that's how it started." "We were doing all
of Syd's stuff, old material like 'Lucifer Sam'. We did about half a dozen gigs. I think it was a pretty tight
set but some of the gigs were kind of loose because we didn't have road managers, we just had people
helping out and stuff. We played all around the Cambridge area, didn't go out of Cambridge, just places
like coffee bars - and we played the Market Square, that was the most memorable gig. It was a good gig,
it was really brilliant."[4] "And we did a few in the Dandelion Coffee Bar, I think we did two there &
they were also good."
This gig was recorded, and while one mastertape was confiscated by EMI in 1985, another copy surfaced in
2005.[5][6] In June 2010 this tape was offered for auction but failed to reach its reserve price.[7] It was then purchased
by the Easy Action label, who also hold the tapes of the Pink Fairies and Hawkwind sets from the same show. Easy
Action released the Hawkwind set as an album licensed from EMI Music in 2012, and are currently restoring and
mastering the Last Minute Put Together Boogie Band tape for an official release in Spring 2014.

Stars

112

Performances
All 'Stars' performances contained early Pink Floyd songs and tracks from Barrett's 1970 solo albums The Madcap
Laughs and Barrett. At one point in each show Barrett entered one of the catatonic trances that had plagued his later
Pink Floyd performances, the worst coming in a concert where Barrett became almost completely frozen and had to
be carried off stage. The posters for the MC5 / Skin Alley gig also billed an appearance from a new line-up of the
Last Minute Put Together Boogie Band - Bruce Paine, Rick Fenn, Bill Gray & Gary Luvaglia.[8] Paine went on to
join Steamhammer for a tour of Europe in late 1972 before returning to the United States.[9][10]
Stars roadie and occasional bass player Joly MacFie said:
"Stars played a number of times at a hippie-community cafe called 'The Dandelion' and then one
Saturday outdoor in the main square in Cambridge and then two shows at the (huge, cavernous) Corn
Exchange on a Thursday and Saturday, two days later. Nektar had state of the art audio... I mixed the
band. Another roadie was Nigel, who took care of the stage. I think it was a friend of his that taped the
show. I was lent the tape by Nigel some months later and it sounded good; I gave it back without
copying. I later heard he lost it... The MC5 show was not recorded and was not a good show. The
promoter of these shows - Steve Brink - had promised that there would be no press; however he did
invite a guy from the Melody Maker, Roy Hollingworth, who had some sort of nervous breakdown at the
[MC5] show. He wrote a piece that came out the next Wednesday detailing a wave of absolute
alienation he sensed at the show, and used Syd as a metaphor for it."[11]
Hollingworth wrote:
"He played a demented solo that ran ragged lines of up to 10 minutes. His raggled hair fell over a face
that fell over a guitar and seldom looked up. He changed time almost by the minute, the keys and chords
made little sense. The fingers on his left hand met the frets like strangers. They formed chords, reformed
them - apparently nearly got it right - and then wandered away again. Then Syd scratched his nose and
let loose a very short sigh. It was like watching somebody piece together a memory that had suffered the
most severe shell-shock. I don't know how much Syd Barrett remembered, but he didn't give in. Even
though he lost his bassist and even though Twink couldnt share Syd's journey, Syd played on. ...He has
a beard now, but his eyes are still deep cavities hiding an inexplicable vision. Tuning up presents
awkward problems. He holds his guitar like hes never held a guitar before. He keeps scratching his
nose. 'Madcap Laughs' opened the set. It didnt sound much like it used to. But Syds voice did. A
well-spoken wine - "Barth", "Larf". See Emily Play? The chords are out of tune and he keeps looking to
his right and sort of scowling at Twink and the bassist, as though in disagreement. I stood and watched
and thought he was bloody great. A girl gets up on stage and dances; he sees her, and looks fairly
startled. As the clock ticked into the small hours of Friday morning, Syd retreated to the back of the
stage trying to find one of those runs. He messes chords together. There is no pattern but if you think
hard you can see a faint one, you can see some trailers in the sky. The large concrete floor is littered
now, not with people but with their relics. Plastic cups that contained orange juice or lemon or coffee.
And some squashed wholenut scones and buns. And underground papers. And Syd played on. Will
anyone listen to the Madcap?" - "The Madcap Returns" (Melody Maker, 4 March 1972)[12]
Jack Monck, speaking in 2001, agreed that the gig was below-par:
"I remember looking across at Syd, and just thinking 'you don't want to be here, do you?' He was kind
of, like, going through the motions, the mic was here and he'd just sort of be singing like this [gesturing
off to one side], and everybody just knew that the wheels had come off. You were just witnessing the
breakdown of someone in performance. Some gigs are good and some are bad. Some are really bad,
and that was probably the worst."[13]
The Terrapin fanzine was more charitable in its review of what it called Syd's Final Performance (January 1973).

Stars

113
"[Syd] did versions of 'Octopus' and 'No Man's Land from the Madcap album: 'Waving My Arms in the
Air' and 'Baby Lemonade' from Barrett: and 'Lucifer Sam' from the legendary first Floyd album. Twink
played drums and Jack Monck played bass until his amp decided it couldn't cope with Syd's musical
journey and went dead! The lyrics were, for the most part, inaudible due to the terrible P.A., and Syd
did no talking between the numbers, which were sadly under-rehearsed. But that was a genius on stage
and he did show odd flashes of brilliance, but after about an hour Syd decided he had had enough, so he
slowly unplugged and went home."
The damage had already been done when Barrett read the Melody Maker review the following week, despite Joly's
assertion that the Cambridge Corn Exchange gig with Nektar, two days later, was an improvement - a claim which
Twink seemed to back up:
"I did have once one of the Stars gigs, between me & Joly, who was a friend I was working with at the
time. He used to make badges. He had a tape but I don't know what happened to it. The tapes were
good. The band didn't stay together very long. Straight after that gig the bad press that we got, I think it
was Roy Hollingworth, Melody Maker, he did a piece & he killed the band in fact, with that review. 'Cos
Syd came round with it in his hand the next day, he saw it & says 'I don't want to play anymore'. So that
was it. I mean I expected that, I thought that that was a possibility that something like that might
happen, but it was a shame that it did. We tried to do [a proposed gig at Essex University] without Syd,
because Syd had said that he didn't want to play anymore - but we had that booked so we all went down
there with the intention of playing, I'd brought another couple of musicians in to cover for Syd. But in
fact the promoter didn't want us to play 'cos Syd wasn't there - so it was a bit of a disaster... It was the
wrong thing to do, we should've pulled out. But we decided to go down there and it didn't work out."
Guitarist Bernie Elliot was the musician recruited for the Syd-less Stars gig, alternatively recalled as having been at
Seymour Hall in London. At some point during 1972, Twink, Monck, Dan Kelleher (guitar/keyboards) and George
Bacon (guitar) completed a recording session at London's Polydor Studios, with one song later surfacing on a 1991
compilation album.[14] In late 1972, Monck started a new band called Rocks Off with Rusty Burnhill.

Aftermath
Shortly thereafter Syd Barrett left music and his public life altogether and began living in seclusion, although poet
Pete Brown maintains that he saw Syd perform with Jack Bruce in Cambridge during the Summer of 1973.
Recordings of Stars performances were made but remain lost. American photographer Victor Kraft is known to have
recorded (and photographed) the Dandelion gigs, but after his death in 1976 his possessions were removed from his
flat by his Cambridge landlord. As mentioned above, the concert with Nektar was recorded but the tapes were lost,
although the Boogie Band show with Hawkwind and the Pink Fairies still exists, and a recording of the Eddie
"Guitar" Burns gig is also rumoured to have survived. Twink also claimed that Syd had recorded all of their
rehearsals on cassette and kept the tapes, but their fate is unknown. Roy Hollingworth, told of the cause of Stars'
breakup several years later, was deeply upset. "It was never my intention to harm Syd because I was his biggest fan.
He was one of my heroes. I wrote about what I saw and heard as sensitively as I could and it certainly wasn't meant
to be a big put down. A little piece of me died that night too. But on a personal level if it hurt Syd I'm very sorry.
Ideally, I'd have loved it if he had made a great comeback and gone on and on and on."

Stars

114

Known 'Stars' appearances

Saturday 29 January 1972 The Dandelion Coffee Bar, Cambridge


Saturday 5 February 1972 The Dandelion Coffee Bar, Cambridge
Saturday 12 February 1972 Petty Cury (near the Market Square), Cambridge
February 1972 The Dandelion Coffee Bar, Cambridge
Thursday 24 February 1972 The Corn Exchange, Cambridge (with MC5 & Skin Alley)
Saturday 26 February 1972 The Corn Exchange, Cambridge (with Nektar)

References
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[6]

Staff. "*Stars* At Cambridge." Terrapin (January 1973)


Interview with Twink Opel #11 (http:/ / www. spacewardstudios. ukf. net/ stories. htm) (December 1985)
Spaceward Studios (Jim Gillespie recollections) (http:/ / www. spacewardstudios. ukf. net/ stories. htm) (July 2005)
Twink/Bevis Interview Ptolomaic Terrascope (http:/ / www. terrascope. co. uk/ MyBackPages/ Twink. pdf) (May 1989)
FraKcman's blog (http:/ / www. nsblog. co. uk/ FraKcman/ 131/ ) (November 2005)
Lost Syd Barrett concert recording - found! (http:/ / www. brain-damage. co. uk/ archive/ lost-syd-barrett-concert-recording-found-2. html)
(November 2005)

[7] Auction lot details of Syd Barrett reel-to-reel tape recording (http:/ / www. bonhams. com/ cgi-bin/ public. sh/ WService=wslive_pub/
pubweb/ publicSite. r?sContinent=EUR& screen=lotdetailsNoFlash& iSaleItemNo=4634253& iSaleNo=17973& iSaleSectionNo=1) (June
2010)
[8] MC5 & Stars poster (http:/ / makemyday. free. fr/ 72/ mc5_posters_1972_1. htm)
[9] Bruce Michael Paine's YouTube profile (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ user/ iguanaband1)
[10] Bruce Michael Paine's IMDb biography (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ name/ nm0656825/ bio)
[11] Syd Barrett Stars - Everything (So Far) (http:/ / www. sydbarrettpinkfloyd. com/ 2010/ 02/ syd-barrett-stars-its-so-long-ago-now. html)
[12] Crazy Diamond - Syd Barrett & the Dawn of Pink Floyd, Mike Watkinson & Pete Anderson (1993)
[13] Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond, 'Omnibus' documentary (2001)
[14] Twink - Odds & Beginnings LP (Twink Records, 1991)

External links
Photo of a bearded Syd Barrett and Twink performing as 'Stars' in The Market Square, printed in the Cambridge
Evening News (http://www.sydbarrettpinkfloyd.com/uploaded_images/Syd-Barrett-Stars-705073.jpg)
Photo of Twink and Jack Monck performing as 'Stars' in The Market Square, courtesy of Jenny Spires (http://3.
bp.blogspot.com/-GOrVuibAWqo/Tkbuav2owqI/AAAAAAAAAUE/NImke0gUAi8/s1600/
Monck-Delivery%2CTwink-Pretty-Things-Stars.jpg)
'Poster' for the Cambridge Corn Exchange concerts (http://makemyday.free.fr/72/mc5_posters_1972_1.htm)
Jack Monck/The Relatives YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/jacket938)

115

Associated people
David Gilmour
This article is about the English rock musician. For the eponymous album, see David Gilmour (album). For the
American jazz guitarist, see David Gilmore.
For other people named David Gilmour, see David Gilmour (disambiguation).

David Gilmour
CBE

Gilmour performing in Munich, Germany, on 29 July 2006


Background information
Birth name

David Jon Gilmour

Born

6 March 1946
Cambridge, England

Genres

Progressive rock, psychedelic rock, art rock

Occupations

Musician, singer, songwriter, producer, music programmer

Instruments

Vocals, guitar, bass, keyboards, saxophone

Years active

1963present

Labels

EMI Columbia, Harvest, Capitol, Columbia, Sony, EMI

Associated acts Jokers Wild, Pink Floyd, Kate Bush, the Orb, Paul McCartney, Bryan Ferry
Website

www.davidgilmour.com

[1]

Notable instruments

'The Black Strat' Fender Stratocaster


'The Red Strat' Fender Stratocaster
'The 0001 Strat' Fender Stratocaster
Fender Telecaster

David Jon Gilmour, CBE (born 6 March 1946), is an English musician, singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist.
He is best known for his work as the guitarist and co-lead vocalist of the progressive rock band Pink Floyd. It is
estimated that by 2012 the group had sold over 250 million records worldwide, including 74.5million units sold in
the United States.[2]
In addition to his work with Pink Floyd, Gilmour has produced a variety of artists, and has enjoyed a successful
career as a solo artist. He has also been actively involved with many charities. In 2005, Gilmour was appointed CBE

David Gilmour
for his services to music.[3] He was awarded with the Outstanding Contribution title at the 2008 Q Awards. In 2011,
Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 14 in their list of the greatest guitarists of all time.

Early life
David Jon Gilmour was born on 6 March 1946, in Cambridge, England.[4] His father, Douglas Gilmour, eventually
became a senior lecturer in zoology at the University of Cambridge, and his mother, Sylvia (ne Wilson), was a
teacher and film editor who later worked for the BBC. At the time of Gilmour's birth they lived in Trumpington,
Cambridgeshire, but in 1956 after several relocations the couple moved their family to Grantchester
Meadows.[5][6]</ref>
Gilmour's parents encouraged him to pursue his interest in music, and in 1954 he bought his first single, Bill Haley's
"Rock Around the Clock".[7] His enthusiasm for music was stirred the following year by Elvis Presley's "Heartbreak
Hotel", and later "Bye Bye Love" by the Everly Brothers piqued his interest in guitar. He then borrowed one from
his neighbour, but never gave it back. Soon afterward, he started teaching himself to play using a book and record set
by Pete Seeger.[8] At age 11, Gilmour began attending the Perse School on Hills Road, Cambridge, which he "didn't
enjoy".[9] While there he met future Pink Floyd guitarist Syd Barrett, and bassist Roger Waters, who attended
Cambridgeshire High School for Boys, which was also situated on Hills Road.[10]
In 1962, Gilmour began studying A-Level modern languages at Cambridge Technical College.[9] Despite not
finishing the course, he would eventually learn to speak fluent French.[9] Barrett was also a student at the college,
and he spent his lunchtimes practising guitar with Gilmour.[9] In late 1962, Gilmour joined the blues-rock band
Jokers Wild. They recorded a one-sided album and a single at Regent Sound Studio, in London, but only fifty copies
of each were made.[9] In August 1965, Gilmour busked around Spain and France with Barrett and some other
friends, performing songs by the Beatles. They were not successful, getting arrested on one occasion and living a
virtually hand-to-mouth existence, which resulted in his requiring treatment for malnutrition.[11] Gilmour and Barrett
later trekked to Paris, where they camped outside the city for a week and visited the Louvre.[12]
Gilmour travelled to France in mid 1967 with Rick Wills and Willie Wilson, formerly of Jokers Wild. The trio
performed under the band name Flowers, then Bullitt; they were not successful. After hearing their uninspired covers
of current chart hits, club owners were reluctant to pay them, and soon after their arrival in Paris, thieves stole their
equipment.[13] In May, Gilmour briefly returned to London in search of new gear. During his stay, he watched Pink
Floyd record "See Emily Play", and was shocked to find that Barrett did not seem to recognise him.[14] When Bullitt
returned to England later that year, they were so impoverished that their tour bus was completely empty of petrol and
they had to push it off the ferry.[13]

Pink Floyd
In late December 1967, drummer Nick Mason approached Gilmour and asked him if he would be interested in
joining Pink Floyd. He accepted and soon afterward became their fifth member; they initially intended to continue
with Barrett as a nonperforming songwriter.[15] One of the group's business partners, Peter Jenner, commented: "The
idea was that Dave would... cover for Barrett's eccentricities and when that got to be not workable, Syd was just
going to write. Just to try to keep him involved".[16] By March 1968, working with Barrett had become too difficult,
so Pink Floyd met with business partners Jenner and Andrew King to discuss the situation.[17] During the meeting,
Barrett agreed to leave the band and the others committed to moving on without him.[18] Waters later admitted: "He
was our friend, but most of the time we now wanted to strangle him".[19] Jenner and King, who believed Barrett to be
the creative genius of the band, decided to represent him and end their relationship with Pink Floyd.[20]
After Barrett's departure, Gilmour sang much of Pink Floyd's lead vocals; Waters and keyboard player Richard
Wright also occasionally sang lead. After the successes of The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here,
Waters took greater control of the band, writing and singing lead on most of Animals and The Wall. Wright was fired

116

David Gilmour
during the sessions for The Wall, and the relationship between Gilmour and Waters would further deteriorate during
the making of the eponymous film, and later during recording sessions for The Final Cut. The last band performance
of The Wall took place on 16 June 1981, at Earls Court, London; it was Pink Floyd's last appearance with Waters
until the band's reunion on 2 July 2005, at the Live 8 concert in London's Hyde Park, 24 years later.[21]
By the late 1970s, Gilmour began to think that his musical talents were
being underused by Pink Floyd, so in 1978 he channeled his ideas into
the eponymous solo album, David Gilmour, which showcased his
guitar playing and songwriting skills. Music written during the
finishing stages of the album, but too late to be used, were incorporated
into song by Waters, which became "Comfortably Numb", which was
included on The Wall.[22] The negative atmosphere surrounding the
creation of The Wall album and subsequent film, compounded by The
Final Cut's virtually being a Roger Waters solo album, led Gilmour to
produce his second solo album, About Face, in 1984. He used it to
express his feelings about a range of topics, from the murder of John
Lennon to his relationship with Waters. He has since admitted that he
Gilmour performing with Pink Floyd in the
mid-1970s
also used the album to distance himself from Pink Floyd. He toured
Europe and the US along with support act the Television Personalities,
who were promptly dropped from the line-up after revealing Syd Barrett's address on stage.[23] Mason also made a
guest appearance on the UK leg of the tour, which despite some cancellations eventually turned a profit.[24] When he
returned from touring, Gilmour played guitar with a range of artists, and also produced The Dream Academy, who
had a top ten hit with "Life in a Northern Town".[25]
In 1985, Waters declared that Pink Floyd were "a spent force creatively".[26] Gilmour and Mason responded with a
press release stating that Waters had quit the band and they intended to continue without him.[27] Gilmour assumed
full control of the group and produced A Momentary Lapse of Reason in 1987 with some contributions from Mason
and Richard Wright. Wright officially rejoined the band after the release of the album for a lengthy world tour and
helped create 1994's The Division Bell. Gilmour explained: "I had a number of problems with the direction of the
band in our recent past, before Roger left. I thought the songs were very wordy and that, because the specific
meanings of those words were so important, the music became a mere vehicle for lyrics, and not a very inspiring
one. Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here were so successful not just because of Roger's contributions,
but also because there was a better balance between the music and the lyrics than there has been in more recent
albums. That's what I'm trying to do with A Momentary Lapse of Reason; more focus on the music, restore the
balance." In 1986, Gilmour purchased the houseboat Astoria, which is moored on the River Thames near Hampton
Court, and transformed it into a recording studio.[28] The majority of the two most recent Pink Floyd albums, as well
as Gilmour's 2006 solo release On an Island, were recorded there.
On 2 July 2005, Gilmour played with Pink Floydincluding Roger Watersat Live 8. The performance caused a
temporary sales increase of Pink Floyd's album Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd. Gilmour donated all of his resulting
profits to charities that reflect the goals of Live 8 saying: "Though the main objective has been to raise consciousness
and put pressure on the G8 leaders, I will not profit from the concert. This is money that should be used to save
lives." Shortly after, he called upon all artists experiencing a surge in sales from Live 8 performances to donate the
extra revenue to Live 8 fund-raising. After the Live 8 concert, Pink Floyd were offered 150million to tour the
United States, but the band turned down the offer.
On 3 February 2006, he announced in an interview with the Italian newspaper La Repubblica that Pink Floyd would
most likely never tour or write material together again. He said: "I think enough is enough. I am 60 years old. I don't
have the will to work as much any more. Pink Floyd was an important part in my life, I have had a wonderful time,
but it's over. For me it's much less complicated to work alone."

117

David Gilmour
Regarding agreeing to play at Live 8, he said: "There was more than one reason, firstly to support the cause. The
second one is the energy-consuming and uncomfortable relationship between Roger and me that I was carrying along
in my heart. That is why we wanted to perform and to leave the trash behind. Thirdly, I might have regretted it if I
declined." On 20 February 2006, Gilmour commented again on Pink Floyd's future when he was interviewed by
Billboard.com, stating, "Who knows? I have no plans at all to do that. My plans are to do my concerts and put my
solo record out."
In December 2006, Gilmour released a tribute to Syd Barrett, who had died on 7 July of that year, in the form of his
own version of Pink Floyd's first single "Arnold Layne".[29] Recorded live at London's Royal Albert Hall, the single
featured versions of the song performed by Richard Wright and special guest artist David Bowie.[29] The single
peaked on the UK Top 75 singles chart at number nineteen.
Since their Live 8 appearance in 2005, Gilmour has repeatedly said that there will be no Pink Floyd reunion. With
the death of Pink Floyd keyboardist Richard Wright in September 2008, another reunion of the core group members
became impossible. After his death, his surviving former bandmates praised him for his influence on the sound of
Pink Floyd. Gilmour said of Wright: "In the welter of arguments about who or what was Pink Floyd, Rick's
enormous input was frequently forgotten. He was gentle, unassuming and private but his soulful voice and playing
were vital, magical components of our most recognised Pink Floyd sound. Like Rick, I don't find it easy to express
my feelings in words, but I loved him and will miss him enormously. I have never played with anyone quite like
him."

Musical style
Gilmour is primarily regarded as a lead guitarist. His own solo style is often characterized by blues-influenced
phrasing, expressive note bends and sustain.Wikipedia:Please clarify In 2011, Gilmour was rated the 14th greatest
guitarist by Rolling Stone magazine. In January 2007, Guitar World readers voted Gilmour's solos, "Comfortably
Numb", "Time" and "Money" into the top 100 Greatest Guitar Solos ("Comfortably Numb" was voted the 4th,
"Time" was voted the 21st and "Money" was voted the 62nd greatest solo of all time).
Early in his career with Pink Floyd, Gilmour played a multitude of Fender Stratocasters. He recorded one of his
guitar solos, for "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", in one take using no editing or mixing using a 1955 Gibson Les
Paul Gold Top guitar equipped with P-90 pick-ups.[30] In 1996, Gilmour was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame as a member of Pink Floyd. Gilmour's solo on "Comfortably Numb" was voted as one of the greatest guitar
solos of all time in several polls by listeners and critics.[31]
Although mainly known for his guitar work, Gilmour is also a proficient multi-instrumentalist. He also played bass
on a portion of Pink Floyd tracks, keyboards, synthesiser, banjo, lap steel, mandolin, harmonica, and drums on the
Syd Barrett solo track "Dominoes". He also plays the saxophone.
Many critics have been very favourable towards Gilmour and his style, music critic Alan di Perna has praised
Gilmour's guitar work as being an integral element of Pink Floyd's sound. Rolling Stone ranked him number 14 in
their "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" list and di Perna described him as the most important guitarist of the 70's,
Perna also referred to Gilmour as "the missing link between Hendrix and Van Halen." In a 2006 interview with
Gilmour, he commented on his playing technique: "[My] fingers make a distinctive sound ... [they] aren't very fast,
but I think I am instantly recognisable ... The way I play melodies is connected to things like Hank Marvin and the
Shadows".
In 2006, writer for Guitar World, Jimmy Brown described Gilmour's playing style as "characterised by simple,
huge-sounding riffs; gutsy, well-paced solos; and rich, ambient chordal textures." According to Brown, Gilmour's
solos on "Money", "Time" and "Comfortably Numb" "cut through the mix like a laser beam through fog." Brown
described the "Time" solo as "a masterpiece of phrasing and motivic development ... Gilmour paces himself
throughout and builds upon his initial idea by leaping into the upper register with gut-wrenching
one-and-one-half-step 'over bends', soulful triplet arpeggios and a typically impeccable bar vibrato." Brown

118

David Gilmour
described Gilmour's sense of phrasing as intuitive, singling it out as perhaps his best asset as a lead guitarist. Gilmour
explained how he achieved his signature tone: "I usually use a fuzz box, a delay and a bright EQ setting ... [to get]
singing sustain ... you need to play loudat or near the feedback threshold. It's just so much more fun to play ...
when bent notes slice right through you like a razor blade."

Solo projects
Gilmour has recorded four solo albums, all four of which charted in the
US Top 40: 2006's On an Island peaked at number 6 in 2006, 2008's
Live in Gdansk peaked at number 26, his 1978 self-titled solo debut
peaked at number 29 in 1978 and 1984's About Face peaked number
32 in 1984.
Taking time off from Pink Floyd's schedule, Gilmour also took up
various roles as a producer, sideman and even concert sound engineer
for a wide variety of acts which included former bandmate Syd Barrett,
Gilmour performing in Brussels in 1984, on his
About Face tour
Paul McCartney, Kate Bush, Berlin, John Martyn, Grace Jones, Tom
Jones, Elton John, Eric Clapton, B. B. King, Seal, Sam Brown, Jools
Holland, Bob Dylan, Pete Townshend, the Who, Supertramp, Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, Alan Parsons, Peter
Cetera, and various charity groups among others.
In 1985, Gilmour was a member of Bryan Ferry's band. He played on Ferry's album Boys and Girls, as well as the
song "Is Your Love Strong Enough" for the US release of the Ridley Scott-Tom Cruise film Legend. A music video
for the latter was created, incorporating Ferry and Gilmour into footage from the film (released as a bonus on the
2002 "Ultimate Edition" DVD release). Later that year, Gilmour played with Ferry at the London Live Aid concert;
his first collaboration with Ferry's keyboard player Jon Carin, later to tour with Pink Floyd.
Gilmour also took part in a comedy skit titled The Easy Guitar Book Sketch with comedian Rowland Rivron and
fellow British musicians Mark Knopfler, Lemmy from Motorhead, Mark King from Level 42, and Gary Moore.
Guitar tech Phil Taylor explained in an interview that Knopfler used Gilmour's guitar rig and managed to sound like
himself when performing in the skit.[32] In 1994, Gilmour played guitar for the video game Tuneland, along with the
addition of Scott Page, a saxophonist who had frequently worked with Pink Floyd. On 14 December 1999, Gilmour
played a show at The Cavern Club in Liverpool with Paul McCartney, Mick Green, Ian Paice & Pete Wingfield.

119

David Gilmour

2000s
In 2001 and 2002, Gilmour performed a total of six acoustic solo concerts in London and Paris, along with a small
band and choir, which was documented on the In Concert release.[33] On 24 September 2004, he performed a three
song set at The Strat Pack concert at London's Wembley Arena, marking the 50th anniversary of the Fender
Stratocaster guitar.[34]
On 6 March 2006, Gilmour's 60th birthday, he released his third solo
album, On an Island.[35] It debuted at number 1 in the UK charts, and
reached the top five in Germany and Sweden. The album earned
Gilmour his first US top-ten as a solo artist, reaching number six in
Billboard 200. Produced by Gilmour along with Phil Manzanera and
Chris Thomas, the album features orchestrations by renowned Polish
composer Zbigniew Preisner.[36] The album features David Crosby and
Graham Nash performing background vocals on the title track, Robert
Wyatt on cornet and percussion, and Richard Wright on Hammond
Gilmour in performance, Frankfurt 2006
organ and vocals.[37] Other contributors include Jools Holland, Georgie
Fame, Andy Newmark, B. J. Cole, Chris Stainton, Willie Wilson, Rado
Bob Klose on guitar and Leszek Moder on piano.[36] The album also features Gilmour's debut with the
saxophone.[37] Gilmour toured Europe, US and Canada from 10 March to 31 May 2006 to promote On an Island.
There were 10 shows in the US and Canadian leg of the tour. Pink Floyd alumnus Richard Wright, and frequent
Floyd collaborators Dick Parry, Guy Pratt and Jon Carin also accompanied him on the tour. More shows took place
in Europe from July to August in 2006.[38] In a press release to promote the tour, Gilmour stated: "I'm rather hoping
that with this tour announcement, people will believe me when I say, honestly, this is the only band I plan to tour
with!"
On 10 April 2006, On an Island was certified platinum in Canada, with sales of over 100,000 copies. A video
recording of a show from Gilmour's solo tour, titled Remember That Night Live at the Royal Albert Hall, was
released on 17 September 2007.[39] The double DVD, directed by David Mallet, contains over five hours of footage,
including an on-the-road documentary and guest appearances by David Bowie and Robert Wyatt.[39] The final show
of David Gilmour's On an Island tour took place at the Gdask Shipyard on 26 August 2006. The concert was held
before a crowd of 100,000, and marked the twenty-sixth anniversary of the founding of the Solidarity trade union.[40]
The show was recorded, resulting in a live album and DVD release: Live in Gdask. For the occasion Gilmour
performed with an orchestra, using the 38-piece string section of the Polish Baltic Philharmonic Orchestra,
conducted by Zbigniew Preisner.[40]
On 25 May 2009, he participated in a concert at the Union Chapel in Islington, London. The concert was part of the
'Hidden Gigs' campaign against hidden homelessness, which is organised by Crisis, a UK-based national charity
campaigning against homelessness. In the concert he collaborated with the Malian musicians Amadou and Mariam.
On 4 July 2009, he joined his friend Jeff Beck onstage at the Royal Albert Hall. David and Jeff traded solos on
Jerusalem and closed the show with Hi Ho Silver Lining.
In August 2009, he released an online single, Chicago Change the World, on which he sang and played guitar, bass
and keyboards, to promote awareness of the plight of Gary McKinnon. A re-titled cover of the Graham Nash song
Chicago, it featured Chrissie Hynde and Bob Geldof, plus McKinnon himself. It was produced by long-time Pink
Floyd collaborator Chris Thomas. A video was also posted on-line.

120

David Gilmour

2010s
On 11 July 2010, Gilmour gave a performance for the charity Hoping Foundation with Roger Waters in Oxfordshire,
England. The performance was presented by Jemima Khan and Nigella Lawson, and according to onlookers, it
seemed that Gilmour and Waters had ended their long-running feud, laughing and joking together along with their
respective partners. Waters subsequently confirmed on his Facebook page that Gilmour would play "Comfortably
Numb" with him during one of his shows on his upcoming The Wall Live tour Gilmour performed the guitar solo
on 12 May 2011 at the O2 Arena, London and, with Nick Mason, played with the rest of the band playing "Outside
the Wall" at the conclusion of the show.
Gilmour released an album with the Orb in 2010 entitled Metallic Spheres, on which he co-wrote every track and
their subsequent parts, and produced, played guitar and sang. In 2011, Rolling Stone placed Gilmour at number 14 in
a list of the hundred greatest guitarists of all time.[41]
Graham Nash and Phil Taylor, Gilmour's guitar technician have both stated that Gilmour is currently working on a
new studio album which should be completed during 2014 and will feature Nash along with his long-time
collaborator David Crosby. Gilmour's wife, Polly Samson has also stated via her Twitter account that she has been
writing lyrics for her husband.

Equipment
Some of the equipment Gilmour has used on his solo or Pink Floyd records and
tours include many versions of the Fender Stratocaster, several Les Paul, and
other guitar models. His primary stage and studio guitar is a 1969 Fender
Stratocaster. Black with a black pickguard, it has white pick-up covers and
knobs. It does not have the original neck. The guitar has an added switch that
combines the neck and bridge pick-ups. It has a Seymour Duncan SSL-1C
(SSL-5 Prototype) bridge pick-up. The guitar strap that Gilmour pairs with this
instrument once belonged to Jimi Hendrix. His main guitar for the post-Roger
Waters era Pink Floyd tours was a Candy Apple Red 1984 1957 Stratocaster
reissue. It has a set of EMG SA active pick-ups. This guitar still continues to be
used for specific songs during Gilmour's live performances. Gilmour owns a
Stratocaster # 0001. This is not the first model made. Others include:
Gilmour playing a Fender
Cream coloured 1957 reissue Stratocaster. This guitar was used on Gilmour's
Stratocaster in 1984
1984 solo tour to support the About Face album and also during the early part
of the 19871990 Pink Floyd tour. During the 1994 Pink Floyd tour it was
used as a spare guitar. During Pink Floyd's Live 8 set sidesman Tim Renwick was seen playing it. It has the same
EMG setup as his red '57 Reissue model. After it was used for Live 8, the neck from the cream Stratocaster was
transferred to Gilmour's main black Stratocaster.

'57 Lake Placid Blue. (Serial number #0040). This guitar was used during The Wall recording sessions.
Sonic Blue "Eric Clapton" signature Stratocaster with Fender Lace Sensor pick-ups given to Gilmour by Fender
Musical Instruments Corporation used most prominently on an episode of French and Saunders. Incidentally
Mark Knopfler used Gilmour's EMG red Strat in the same sketch.
Double-neck Stratocaster. Custom made body by guitar builder Dick Knight and using standard Fender necks. It
was used in the early 1970s.
1959 sunburst Stratocaster body with a 1963 neck with a rosewood fingerboard. This guitar was given to Gilmour
by Steve Marriott. Gilmour didn't like the guitar enough to use it for very long but did like the neck better than the
original one on his black Stratocaster and the two were switched. The sunburst model was used as A spare and for
slide guitar in subsequent years.

121

David Gilmour
White with white pickguard. Used in the late 1960s. Received as a gift from the rest of the band.
Gilmour used a Stratocaster equipped with the Doug Wilkes 'Answer' sliding pick-up system on the 'Momentary
Lapse of Reason' recording.
Telecaster
Blonde body with white pickguard. Used on the On an Island tour.
'52 Butterscotch Reissues with black pickguard. Used between 1987 and 1995. The first guitar was tuned in
Dropped D rather than a standard tuning and was used for "Run Like Hell". The second served as a backup
instrument and had a regular guitar tuning. Gilmour used this guitar for Astronomy Domine.
'59 Custom Telecaster with sunburst ash body, white binding on the body, rosewood fingerboard, and a white
pickguard. A Gibson Humbucker was briefly placed in the neck position but this was removed before it was used
on the Animals' recording sessions. Last seen at rehearsals during the On an Island tour.
'61 Telecaster used during The Wall recording sessions. Also used live in the post-Waters era for "Run Like
Hell". Last seen on the Syd Barrett memory concert in 2007.
1960s brown-faded body. Used in the late 1960s.
1960s blonde ash body with white pickguard. This was Gilmour's main guitar during his first year with Pink
Floyd, but it was lost by an airline company in 1968, prompting Gilmour to buy the brown-faded Telecaster.
Esquire '55 Sunburst body a.k.a. "The workmate Tele". Neck pick-up added. Used at the recording sessions for
his first solo album and seen on the back cover of his second solo album, and used in The Wall recording sessions
and subsequent tour. Also seen when Gilmour performed with Paul McCartney in the late 1990s, at the Jerry
Leiber and Mike Stoller tribute concert and at the AOL Elvis Tribute on the song Don't both in 2001.

Other electric guitars


Along with the Fender models, Gilmour has also used a Gibson Les Paul goldtop model with P-90 pick-ups during
recording sessions for The Wall and A Momentary Lapse of Reason.[42] It was used for the guitar solo on 'Another
Brick in the Wall, Part 2'.
Gilmour also plays a Gretsch Duo-Jet, a Gretsch White Falcon, and a "White Penguin". He played a Bill Lewis
24-fret guitar during the Meddle and Dark Side of the Moon recording sessions, and a Steinberger GL model which
was his main guitar during A Momentary Lapse of Reason recording sessions.[43]

Acoustics
Gilmour has used many different acoustic guitars throughout his career including a Gibson "Chet Atkins" classical
model, and a Gibson J-200 Celebrity acoustic guitar.[44] Gilmour used several Ovation models including a Custom
Legend 1619-4, and a Custom Legend 1613-4 nylon string guitar, both during The Wall recording sessions.[45]
Martin models used include a D-35, and a D12-28 12-string.[45] Gilmour's large acoustic collection also includes
many models from Taylor, Takamine and Guild.

122

David Gilmour

123

Steel guitar
Throughout his recording career Gilmour has added a different element
to his guitar style with his use of steel guitars. A pair of Jedson pedal
steel guitars were used frequently in the early 1970s. Originally
purchased from a pawn shop while Gilmour was in Seattle in 1970, the
Jedson was used during recording of "One of These Days" from
"Meddle" and "Breathe" and "Great Gig in the Sky" from The Dark
Side of the Moon.[46] Gilmour also owns a Fender Deluxe lap steel,
which he used during The Division Bell tour in 1994.[44] Gilmour also
owns a Champ lap steel model. Along with the Fender steel models
Gilmour has also used: a Gibson EH150, and two Jedson models: one
red (1977-tuned D-G-D-G-B-E for Shine On You Crazy Diamond,
Parts 69, 19872006: Tuned E-B-E-G-B-E for High Hopes) and one
blonde. He also uses a ZB steel model.[45]

Gilmour playing lap steel guitar, 26 January 1977

Bass guitars
Gilmour has played bass both in the studio and onstage, and has played many different bass models including: an
Ovation Magnum, a Fender Bass VI, Fender Precision and Jazz bass models and a Charvel fretless (all used during
The Wall recording sessions). He also owns a Doug Wilkes built Precision-style single pick-up bass which was used
on the 'Momentary Lapse of Reason' sessions. During the 1991 Amnesty International concert Gilmour used a Music
Man Fretless Stingray bass while conducting the house band and again during Spinal Tap's performance of "Big
Bottom".

Fender Signature Stratocaster


In November 2006, Fender Custom Shop announced two reproductions of
Gilmour's "Black" Strat for release on 22 September 2008. Gilmour's website
states the release date was chosen to coincide with the release of his Live in
Gdansk album. Both guitars are based on extensive measurements of the original
instrument, each featuring varying degrees of wear. The most expensive is the
David Gilmour Relic Stratocaster which features the closest copy of wear on the
original guitar. A pristine copy of the guitar is also made, called the David
Gilmour NOS Stratocaster.

David Gilmour Signature


Stratocaster NOS (without tremolo
arm) in its case

David Gilmour

124

Personal life
Gilmour's first marriage was to American-born model and artist
Virginia "Ginger" Hasenbein, on 7 July 1975. The couple had four
children: Alice (born 1976), Claire (born 1979), Sara (born 1983) and
Matthew (born 1986).[47] They originally attended a Waldorf School,
but Gilmour called their education there "horrific". In 1994, he married
journalist Polly Samson. His best man was his teenage friend and Pink
Floyd album artwork designer Storm Thorgerson. The couple have
four children: Gilmour's adopted son Charlie (born 1991 to Samson
and Heathcote Williams), Joe (born 1995), Gabriel (born 1997) and
Romany (born 2002).[48] Charlie's voice can be heard on the telephone
to Steve O'Rourke, at the end of "High Hopes" from The Division
Bell.[4]
Gilmour at Live 8 in July 2005

Gilmour has been associated with various charity organisations. In


May 2003, Gilmour sold his house in Little Venice to the ninth Earl
Spencer and donated the proceeds worth 3.6million to Crisis to help fund a housing project for the homeless. He
has been named a vice president of the organisation. Other charities to which Gilmour has lent support include
Oxfam, the European Union Mental Health and Illness Association, Greenpeace, Amnesty International, The Lung
Foundation, Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy, Teenage Cancer Trust, and People for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (PETA). He also donated 25,000 to the Save the Rhino foundation in exchange for Douglas Adams's name
suggestion for the album that became The Division Bell.
Gilmour is an experienced pilot and aviation enthusiast. Under the aegis of his company, Intrepid Aviation, he had
amassed a collection of historical aircraft. He later decided to sell the company, which he had started as a hobby,
feeling that it was becoming too commercial for him to handle. In a BBC interview, he stated:
Intrepid Aviation was a way for me to make my hobby pay for itself a little bit, but gradually over a few
years Intrepid Aviation became a business because you have to be businesslike about it. Suddenly I
found instead of it being a hobby and me enjoying myself, it was a business and so I sold it. I don't have
Intrepid Aviation any more. I just have a nice old biplane that I pop up, wander around the skies in
sometimes...
Gilmour has stated in interviews that he doesn't believe in an afterlife and that he is an atheist.[49][50] On 22 May
2008, Gilmour won the 2008 Ivor Novello Lifetime Contribution Award, recognizing his excellence in music
writing. In autumn 2008, he was awarded for outstanding contribution for music by the Q Awards. He dedicated his
award to his bandmate Richard Wright, who died in September 2008. On 11 November 2009, Gilmour received an
honorary doctorate from the Anglia Ruskin University.
When it comes to Gilmour's political views he has stated that he is left wing, and that his beliefs spring from that of
his parents; David stated that his parents were "Proper Manchester Guardian readers", and went onto say "Some of
their friends went on the Aldermaston marches. Mine never did to my knowledge, but they were both committed to
voting for the Labour Party"; Gilmour inherited his parents' liberalism, stating "I still consider myself to be more a
socialist than anything else, even if I can't quite stick with party politics".

David Gilmour

Discography
Main article: David Gilmour discography
See also: Pink Floyd discography
Studio albums
David Gilmour (1978)
About Face (1984)
On an Island (2006)

Notes
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[6]
[7]
[8]
[9]

http:/ / www. davidgilmour. com/


For 250 million records sold see: ; For 74.5 million RIAA certified units sold see:
Blake 2008, p.378.
Fitch 2005, p.115.
: the house in Trumpington; .
Gilmour has three siblings: Peter, Mark and Catherine.<ref name="FOOTNOTEBlake200814">Blake 2008, p.14.
Manning 2006, pp.1011.
Blake 2008, pp.1819.
Manning 2006, p.11.

[10] Blake 2008, pp.1517.


[11] : arrested for busking; : malnutrition.
[12] Manning 2006, p.18.
[13] Manning 2006, p.44.
[14] Manning 2006, p.38.
[15] : (primary source); : (secondary source).
[16] Schaffner 1991, p.107.
[17] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[18] Blake 2008, pp.112.
[19] Blake 2008, pp.90113, 112.
[20] Povey 2008, pp.7880.
[21] Povey & Russell 1997, p.185.
[22] Schaffner 1991, pp.221222.
[23] Schaffner 1991, p.123.
[24] Blake 2008, p.304.
[25] Blake 2008, p.312.
[26] Povey 2008, pp.240241, 246.
[27] Povey 2008, p.240.
[28] Blake 2008, p.318.
[29] Mabbett 2010, pp.140141.
[30] Fitch & Mahon 2006, pp.7576.
[31] David Gilmour's Guitar Solo is Number 1 (Musicjot) (http:/ / www. musicjot. com/ music/
david-gilmours-comfortably-numb-solo-is-number-1)/
[32] "David Gilmour DVD Draw" (http:/ / www. davidgilmourblog. com/ 2007/ 12/ dvd-draw. html) The Phil Taylor Interview
[33] Povey 2008, pp.306, 314315.
[34] Povey 2008, p.315.
[35] Blake 2008, p.387.
[36] Povey 2008, p.298.
[37] Mabbett 2010, pp.139140.
[38] Povey 2008, pp.306310.
[39] Mabbett 2010, pp.141142.
[40] Povey 2008, p.310.
[41] Wenner 2011, p.59.
[42] Fitch 2005, pp.428, 431.
[43] Fitch 2005, pp.420: Bill Lewis 24-fret guitar, 431: Steinberger GL model.
[44] Fitch 2005, p.434.
[45] Fitch & Mahon 2006, p.268.

125

David Gilmour
[46] Fitch 2005, p.424.
[47] Fitch 2005, p.116.
[48] : Romany, : Charlie, Joe and Gabriel.
[49] Newsday, published 30 March 2006: "I'm an atheist, and I don't have any belief in an afterlife..."
[50] "The theme of the new album those Pink Floyd habits die hard is mortality. One song, 'This Heaven', reflects Gilmour's atheism".The
Sunday Telegraph (London), 28 May 2006, Section Seven, Pg. 8.

Citations
Sources
Blake, Mark (2008). Comfortably Numb: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=hKXhLoWCPQ8C&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). Da Capo Press. ISBN978-0-306-81752-6.
Fitch, Vernon (2005). The Pink Floyd Encyclopedia (http://books.google.com/books?id=HNkiAQAAIAAJ&
q) (Third ed.). Collector's Guide Publishing, Inc. ISBN978-1-894959-24-7.
Fitch, Vernon; Mahon, Richard (2006). Comfortably Numb: A History of "The Wall" Pink Floyd 19781981
(1st ed.). PFA Publishing, Inc. ISBN978-0-9777366-0-7.
Mabbett, Andy (2010). Pink Floyd The Music and the Mystery (1st UK paperback ed.). Omnibus Press.
ISBN978-1-84938-370-7.
Manning, Toby (2006). The Rough Guide to Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=yHsZAQAAIAAJ&q) (1st US paperback ed.). Rough Guides Ltd. ISBN978-1-84353-575-1.
Mason, Nick (2005). Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=idOGghPNM6UC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). Chronicle Books. ISBN978-0-8118-4824-4.
Povey, Glen (2008). Echoes: The Complete History of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=qnnl3FnO-B4C&dq) (2nd UK paperback ed.). 3C Publishing Ltd. ISBN978-0-9554624-1-2.
Povey, Glen; Russell, Ian (1997). Pink Floyd: In the Flesh: The Complete Performance History (http://books.
google.com/books?id=KrOPQni4yTsC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). St. Martin's Press.
ISBN978-0-9554624-0-5.
Schaffner, Nicholas (1991). Saucerful of Secrets: the Pink Floyd Odyssey (http://books.google.com/
books?id=xfqremepxrkC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). Dell Publishing. ISBN978-0-385-30684-3.
Wenner, Jann, ed. (8 December 2011). David Gilmour (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/
100-greatest-guitarists-20111123/david-gilmour-20111122). "Rolling Stone: The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All
Time". Rolling Stone (1145).

Further reading
Di Perna, Alan (2002). Guitar World Presents Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=nQ1f7Vasrv8C&dq). Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN978-0-634-03286-8.
Fitch, Vernon (2001). Pink Floyd: The Press Reports 19661983. Collector's Guide Publishing Inc.
ISBN978-1-896522-72-2.
Fricke, David (December 2009). "Roger Waters: Welcome to My Nightmare... Behind The Wall". Mojo (Emap
Metro) 193: pp.6884.
Harris, John (2005). The Dark Side of the Moon: The Making of the Pink Floyd Masterpiece (http://books.
google.com/books?id=8ioY6m4EHKkC&dq). Da Capo. ISBN978-0-306-81342-9.
Hiatt, Brian (September 2010). "Back to The Wall". Rolling Stone 1114: pp. 5057.
MacDonald, Bruno (1997). Pink Floyd: through the eyes of ... the band, its fans, friends, and foes (http://books.
google.com/books?id=b7J3K2snuhAC&dq). Da Capo Press. ISBN978-0-306-80780-0.
Mabbett, Andy (1995). The Complete Guide to the Music of Pink Floyd (1st UK paperback ed.). Omnibus Press.
ISBN978-0-7119-4301-8.

126

David Gilmour
Miles, Barry (1982). Pink Floyd: A Visual Documentary by Miles. New York: Putnam Publishing Group.
ISBN978-0-399-41001-7.
Scarfe, Gerald (2010). The Making of Pink Floyd: The Wall (1st US paperback ed.). Da Capo Press.
ISBN978-0-306-81997-1.
Simmons, Sylvie (December 1999). "Pink Floyd: The Making of The Wall". Mojo (London: Emap Metro) 73: pp.
7695.
Watkinson, Mike; Anderson, Pete (1991). Crazy Diamond: Syd Barrett & the Dawn of Pink Floyd (1st UK
paperback ed.). Omnibus Press. ISBN978-1-84609-739-3.

External links
Official website (http://www.davidgilmour.com/)
Official blog (http://www.davidgilmourblog.com/)
Bootleg recordings (http://www.bootlegpedia.com/artist/David-Gilmour)

127

Roger Waters

128

Roger Waters
Roger Waters

Waters at The O2 Arena in 2008


Background information
Birth name

George Roger Waters

Born

6 September 1943
Great Bookham, Surrey, England

Genres

Progressive rock, psychedelic rock, art rock, opera

Occupations

Musician, singer, songwriter, composer, producer

Instruments

Vocals, bass guitar, guitar, synthesiser

Years active

1964present

Labels

Capitol, Columbia, Sony, Harvest

Associated acts Pink Floyd, the Bleeding Heart Band


Website

roger-waters.com

[1]

Notable instruments
Fender Precision Bass, Rickenbacker 4001, Martin acoustic guitars

Roger Waters's voice


from the BBC programme Desert Island Discs, 29 May 2011.

George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English musician, singer, songwriter and composer. In 1965,
he co-founded the progressive rock band Pink Floyd with drummer Nick Mason, keyboardist Richard Wright and
guitarist, singer and songwriter Syd Barrett. Waters initially served as the group's bassist and co-lead vocalist, but
following the departure of Barrett in 1968, he also became their lyricist and conceptual leader.
Pink Floyd subsequently achieved international success with the concept albums The Dark Side of the Moon, Wish
You Were Here, Animals, The Wall and The Final Cut. By the early 1980s, they had become one of the most
critically acclaimed and best-selling acts in the history of popular music; as of 2013, they have sold more than 250
million albums worldwide, including 74.5 million units sold in the United States. Amid creative differences within

Roger Waters
the group, Waters left in 1985 and began a legal dispute with the remaining members over their intended use of the
band's name and material. They settled out of court in 1987, and nearly eighteen years had passed before he
performed with them again.
Waters' solo career has included three studio albums: The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking, Radio K.A.O.S. and
Amused to Death. In 1990, he staged one of the largest and most extravagant rock concerts in history, The Wall
Live in Berlin, with an official attendance of 200,000. As a member of Pink Floyd, he was inducted into the US Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. That same year he released a Ira, an opera
in three acts translated from tienne and Nadine Roda-Gils' libretto about the French Revolution. Later that year, he
reunited with Pink Floyd bandmates Mason, Wright and David Gilmour for the Live 8 global awareness event; it was
the group's first appearance with Waters since 1981. He has toured extensively as a solo act since 1999 and played
The Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety for his world tour of 20062008. In 2010, he began The Wall Live and in
2011 Gilmour and Mason appeared with him during a performance of the double album in London. As of 2013, the
tour is the highest-grossing of all time by a solo artist.
Waters has been married four times; first in 1969 to his childhood sweetheart Judy Trim; they had no children
together and divorced in 1975. The following year he married Lady Carolyne Christie; the marriage produced a son,
Harry Waters, a musician who has played keyboards with his father's touring band since 2006, and a daughter, India
Waters, who has worked as a model. Christie and Waters divorced in 1992, and in 1993, he married Priscilla
Phillips. They had one son together, Jack Fletcher, before getting divorced in 2001. In 2012, Waters married actress
and filmmaker Laurie Durning.

19431964: early years


George Roger Waters was born on 6 September 1943, the younger of two boys, to Mary (ne Whyte; 1913-2009)
and Eric Fletcher Waters (1913-1944), in Great Bookham, Surrey.[2] His father, the son of a coal miner and Labour
Party activist, was a schoolteacher, a devout Christian, and a Communist Party member.[3] In the early years of the
Second World War, his father was a conscientious objector who drove an ambulance during the Blitz.[3] He later
changed his stance on pacifism and joined the British Army, and as a 2Lt. of the 8th Royal Fusiliers died at Aprilia,
between Anzio and Rome in Italy, on 18 February 1944, when Roger was five months old.[4] On 19 February 2014,
Waters unveiled a monument to his father and other war casualties there, and was made an honorary citizen of
Anzio. Following her husband's death, Mary Waters, also a teacher, moved with her two sons to Cambridge and
raised them there.[5] Roger Waters' earliest memory is of the VJ Day celebrations. Mary Waters died in 2009, aged
96.
Waters attended Morley Memorial Junior School in Cambridge and then the Cambridgeshire High School for Boys
(now Hills Road Sixth Form College) with Syd Barrett, while his future musical partner, David Gilmour, lived
nearby on the city's Mill Road, and attended the Perse School.[6] At 15, Waters was chairman of the Cambridge
Youth Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (YCND),[7] having designed its publicity poster and participated in its
organisation.[8] Though he was a keen sportsman and a highly regarded member of the high school's cricket and
rugby teams,[9] he disliked his educational experience; according to Waters, "I hated every second of it, apart from
games. The regime at school was a very oppressive one... the same kids who are susceptible to bullying by other
kids are also susceptible to bullying by the teachers."[10] Whereas Waters knew Barrett and Gilmour from his
childhood in Cambridge, he met future Pink Floyd founder members Nick Mason and Richard Wright in London at
the Regent Street Polytechnic (later the University of Westminster) school of architecture. Waters enrolled there in
1962, after a series of aptitude tests indicated he was well-suited to that field.[11] He had initially considered a career
in mechanical engineering.[12]

129

Roger Waters

130

19651985: Pink Floyd


Main article: Pink Floyd

Formation and Barrett-led period


By September 1963, Waters and Mason had lost interest in their studies; they had
moved into the lower flat of Stanhope Gardens, owned by Mike Leonard, a
part-time tutor at the Regent Street Polytechnic.[13] Waters, Mason and Wright
first played music together in the autumn of 1963, in a band formed by vocalist
Keith Noble and bassist Clive Metcalfe.[14] They usually called themselves
Sigma6, but also used the name the Meggadeaths.[8] Waters played rhythm
guitar and Mason played drums, Wright played on any keyboard he could
arrange to use, and Noble's sister Sheilagh provided an occasional vocal
accompaniment.[15] In the early years the band performed during private
functions and rehearsed in a tearoom in the basement of Regent Street
Polytechnic.[16]
When Metcalfe and Noble left to form their own group in September 1963, the
remaining members asked Barrett and guitar player Bob Klose to join.[17] By
January 1964, the group became known as the Abdabs, or the Screaming
[18]
Abdabs.
During the autumn of 1964, the band used the names Leonard's Lodgers, Spectrum Five, and eventually,
[19]
the Tea Set.
Sometime during the autumn of 1965, the Tea Set began calling itself the Pink Floyd Sound, later the
Pink Floyd and by early 1966, Pink Floyd.[20]
Waters performing with Pink Floyd
at Leeds University in 1970

By early 1966 Barrett was Pink Floyd's front-man, guitarist, and songwriter.[21] He wrote or co-wrote all but one
track of their debut LP The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, released in August 1967.[22] Waters contributed the song
"Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk" (his first sole writing credit) to the album.[23] By late 1967, Barrett's
deteriorating mental health and increasingly erratic behaviour,[24] rendered him "unable or unwilling"[25] to continue
in his capacity as Pink Floyd's singer-songwriter and lead guitarist.[22] In early March 1968 Pink Floyd met with
managers Peter Jenner and Andrew King of Blackhill Enterprises to discuss the band's future. Barrett agreed to leave
Pink Floyd, and the band "agreed to Blackhill's entitlement in perpetuity" regarding "past activities".[26] The band's
new manager Steve O'Rourke made a formal announcement about the departure of Barrett and the arrival of David
Gilmour in April 1968.[27]

Waters-led period
Filling the void left by Barrett's departure in March 1968, Waters
began to chart Pink Floyd's artistic direction. He became the principal
songwriter, lyricist and co-lead vocalist (along with Gilmour, and at
times, Wright), and would remain the band's dominant creative figure
until his departure in 1985.[28] He wrote the lyrics to the five Pink
Floyd albums preceding his own departure, starting with The Dark Side
of the Moon (1973) and ending with The Final Cut (1983), while
exerting progressively more creative control over the band and its
music. Every Waters studio album since The Dark Side of the Moon
has been a concept album.[29] With lyrics written entirely by Waters,
The Dark Side of the Moon was one of the most commercially

A live performance of The Dark Side of the Moon


at Earls Court, shortly after its release in 1973:
(l-r) David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Dick Parry,
Roger Waters

Roger Waters

131

successful rock albums ever. It spent 736 straight weeks on the Billboard 200 chartuntil July 1988and sold over
40 million copies worldwide. It was continuing to sell over 8,000 units every week as of 2005. According to Pink
Floyd biographer Glen Povey, Dark Side is the world's second best-selling album, and the United States' 21st
best-selling album of all time.[30]
Waters produced thematic ideas that became the impetus for the Pink Floyd concept albums The Dark Side of the
Moon (1973), Wish You Were Here (1975), Animals (1977) and The Wall (1979)written largely by Watersand
The Final Cut (1983)written entirely by Waters.[31] He referred or alluded to the cost of war and the loss of his
father throughout his work, from "Corporal Clegg" (A Saucerful of Secrets, 1968) and "Free Four" (Obscured by
Clouds, 1972) to "Us and Them" from The Dark Side of the Moon, "When the Tigers Broke Free", first used in the
feature film, The Wall (1982), later included with "The Fletcher Memorial Home" on The Final Cut, an album
dedicated to his father.[32] The theme and composition of The Wall was influenced by his upbringing in an English
society depleted of men after the Second World War.[33]
I think things like "Comfortably Numb" were the last embers of mine and Roger's ability to work collaboratively together.

[34]

David Gilmour

The double album The Wall was written almost entirely by Waters and is largely based on his life story,[35] and
having sold over 23million RIAA certified units in the US as of 2013, is one of the top three best-selling albums of
all time in America, according to RIAA. Pink Floyd hired Bob Ezrin to co-produce the album, and cartoonist Gerald
Scarfe to illustrate the album's sleeve art.[36] The band embarked on The Wall Tour of Los Angeles, New York,
London, and Dortmund. The last band performance of The Wall was on 16 June 1981, at Earls Court London, and
this was Pink Floyd's last appearance with Waters until the band's brief reunion at 2 July 2005 Live 8 concert in
London's Hyde Park, 24 years later.[37]
In March 1983, the last WatersGilmourMason collaboration, The Final Cut, was released. The album was
subtitled: "A requiem for the post-war dream by Roger Waters, performed by Pink Floyd".[38] Waters wrote all the
album's lyrics as well as the music. His lyrics were critical of the Conservative Party government of the day and
mention Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher by name.[39] At the time Gilmour did not have any new material, so he
asked Waters to delay the recording until he could write some songs, but Waters refused.[40] According to Mason,
after power struggles within the band and creative arguments about the album, Gilmour's name "disappeared" from
the production credits, though he retained his pay.[41] Rolling Stone magazine gave the album five stars, with Kurt
Loder describing it as "a superlative achievement" and "art rock's crowning masterpiece".[42] Loder viewed the work
as "essentially a Roger Waters solo album".
Amidst creative differences within the group, Waters left Pink Floyd in 1985, and began a legal battle with the
remaining band members regarding their continued use of the name and material.[43] In December 1985, Waters
"issued a statement to EMI and CBS invoking the 'Leaving Member' clause" on his contract. In October 1986, he
initiated High Court proceedings to formally dissolve the Pink Floyd partnership. In his submission to the High
Court he called Pink Floyd a "spent force creatively".[44] Gilmour and Mason opposed the application and
announced their intention to continue as Pink Floyd. Waters claims to have been forced to resign much like Wright
some years earlier, and he decided to leave Pink Floyd based on legal considerations, stating " ... because, if I hadn't,
the financial repercussions would have wiped me out completely."[45] In December 1987, an agreement between
Waters and Pink Floyd was reached.[43] According to Mason:
We eventually formalised a settlement with Roger. On Christmas Eve, 1987,... David and Roger
convened for a summit meeting on the houseboat [the Astoria] with Jerome Walton, David's accountant.
Jerome painstakingly typed out the bones of a settlement. Essentiallyalthough there was far more
complex detailthe arrangement allowed Roger to be freed from his arrangement with Steve
[O'Rourke], and David and me to continue working under the name Pink Floyd. In the end the court
accepted Jerome's version as the final and binding document and duly stamped it.[46]

Roger Waters

132

Waters was released from his contractual obligation with O'Rourke, and he retained the copyrights to The Wall
concept and his trademarked inflatable pig.[47] The Gilmour-led Pink Floyd released two studio albums: A
Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987), and The Division Bell (1994). As of 2013, it is estimated that Pink Floyd have
sold over 250million albums worldwide, including 74.5 million RIAA certified units sold in the US.[48]

1984present: solo career


19841996
Following the release of The Final Cut, Waters embarked on a solo
career that produced three concept albums and a movie soundtrack. In
1984, he released his first solo album, The Pros and Cons of Hitch
Hiking, a project about a man's dreams across one night that dealt with
Waters' feelings about monogamy and family life versus "the call of
the wild".[49] In the end the character, Reg, chooses love and
matrimony over promiscuity. The album featured guitarist Eric
Clapton, jazz saxophonist David Sanborn, and artwork by Gerald
Scarfe.[49] Kurt Loder described The Pros And Cons of Hitch Hiking as
a "strangely static, faintly hideous record".[50] Rolling Stone rated the
album a "rock bottom" one star."[49] Years later, Mike DeGagne of
Allmusic praised the album for its, "ingenious symbolism" and
"brilliant use of stream of consciousness within a subconscious realm",
rating it four out of five stars. Waters began touring in support of the
new album, aided by Clapton, a new band, new material, and a
selection of Pink Floyd favourites. Waters dbuted his tour in
Stockholm on 16 June 1984. Poor ticket sales plagued the tour, and
some of the larger venues had to be cancelled.[51] By his own estimate,
he lost 400,000 on the tour.[52] In March 1985, Waters went to North
America to play smaller venues with the Pros and Cons Plus Some Old
Pink Floyd Stuff North America Tour 1985. The Pros and Cons of
Hitch Hiking has been certified Gold by the RIAA.

Waters performing The Wall Live in Berlin,


Germany, on 21 July 1990

The Wall Live in Berlin, 21 July

In 1986, Waters contributed songs and a score to the soundtrack of the


1990
animated movie When the Wind Blows, based on the Raymond Briggs
book of the same name. His backing band featuring Paul Carrack was
credited as The Bleeding Heart Band.[53] In 1987, Waters released Radio K.A.O.S., a concept album based on a mute
man named Billy from an impoverished Welsh mining town who has the ability to physically tune into radio waves
in his head. Billy first learns to communicate with a radio DJ, and eventually to control the world's computers. Angry
at the state of the world in which he lives, he simulates a nuclear attack. Waters followed the release with a
supporting tour also in 1987.[54]
In November 1989, the Berlin Wall fell, and in July 1990 Waters staged one of the largest and most elaborate rock
concerts in history,[55] The Wall Live in Berlin, on the vacant terrain between Potsdamer Platz and the
Brandenburg Gate. The show reported an official attendance of 200,000, though some estimates are as much as twice
that, with approximately one billion television viewers.[56] Leonard Cheshire asked him to do the concert to raise
funds for charity. Waters' group of musicians included Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison, Cyndi Lauper, Bryan Adams,
Scorpions, and Sinad O'Connor. Waters also used an East German symphony orchestra and choir, a Soviet
marching band, and a pair of helicopters from the US 7th Airborne Command and Control Squadron. Designed by
Mark Fisher, the Wall was 25metres tall and 170metres long and was built across the set. Scarfe's inflatable puppets

Roger Waters
were recreated on an enlarged scale, and although many rock icons received invitations to the show, Gilmour,
Mason, and Wright, did not.[57] Waters released a concert double album of the performance which has been certified
platinum by the RIAA.
In 1990, Waters hired manager Mark Fenwick and left EMI for a worldwide deal with Columbia. He released his
third studio album, Amused to Death, in 1992. The record is heavily influenced by the events of the Tiananmen
Square protests of 1989 and the Gulf War, and a critique of the notion of war becoming the subject of entertainment,
particularly on television. The title was derived from the book Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman. Patrick
Leonard, who worked on A Momentary Lapse of Reason, co-produced the album. Jeff Beck played lead guitar on
many of the album's tracks, which were recorded with an impressive cast of musicians at ten different recording
studios.[58] It is Waters' most critically acclaimed solo recording, garnering some comparison to his previous work
with Pink Floyd.[59] Waters described the record as, a "stunning piece of work", ranking the album with Dark Side of
the Moon and The Wall as one of the best of his career.[60] The album had one hit, the song "What God Wants, Pt.
1", which reached number 35 in the UK in September 1992 and number 5 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock Tracks
chart in the US. Amused to Death was certified Silver by the British Phonographic Industry. Sales of Amused to
Death topped out at around one million and there was no tour in support of the album. Waters would first perform
material from it seven years later during his In the Flesh tour.[61] In 1996, Waters was inducted into the US and UK
Rock and Roll Halls of Fame as a member of Pink Floyd.

19992004
In 1999, after a 12-year hiatus from touring, and a seven-year absence from the music industry, Waters embarked on
the In the Flesh tour, performing both solo and Pink Floyd material. The tour was a financial success in the US and
though Waters had booked mostly smaller venues, tickets sold so well that many of the concerts were upgraded to
larger ones.[62] The tour eventually stretched across the world and would span three years. A concert film was
released on CD and DVD, named In the Flesh Live. During the tour, he played two new songs "Flickering Flame"
and "Each Small Candle" as the final encore to many of the shows. In June 2002, he completed the tour with a
performance in front of 70,000 people at the Glastonbury Festival of Performing Arts, playing 15 Pink Floyd songs
and five songs from his solo catalogue.[62]
Miramax announced in mid-2004 that a production of The Wall was to appear on Broadway with Waters playing a
prominent role in the creative direction. Reports stated that the musical contained not only the original tracks from
The Wall, but also songs from Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here and other Pink Floyd albums, as well as
new material. On the night of 1 May 2004, recorded extracts from the opera, including its overture, were played on
the occasion of the Welcome Europe celebrations in the accession country of Malta. Gert Hof mixed recorded
excerpts from the opera into a continuous piece of music which was played as an accompaniment to a large light and
fireworks display over Grand Harbour in Valletta.[63] In July 2004, Waters released two new tracks on the Internet:
"To Kill the Child", inspired by the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and "Leaving Beirut", an anti-war song "inspired by his
travels in the Middle East as a teenager".[64]

133

Roger Waters

134

2005present
In July 2005, Waters reunited with Mason, Wright, and Gilmour for
what would be their final performance together at the 2005 Live 8
concert in London's Hyde Park, Pink Floyd's only appearance with
Waters since their final performance of The Wall at Earls Court
London 24 years earlier.[65] They played a 23-minute set consisting of
"Speak to Me/Breathe"/"Breathe (Reprise)", "Money", "Wish You
Were Here", and "Comfortably Numb". Waters told the Associated
Press that while the experience of playing with Pink Floyd again was
positive, the chances of a bona fide reunion would be "slight"
considering his and Gilmour's continuing musical and ideological
differences.[66] Though Waters had differing ideas about which songs
they should play, he "agreed to roll over for one night only",[67]
Gilmour told the Associated Press, "The rehearsals convinced me it
wasn't something I wanted to be doing a lot of. There have been all
sorts of farewell moments in people's lives and careers which they have
then rescinded, but I think I can fairly categorically say that there won't
be a tour or an album again that I take part in. It isn't to do with
animosity or anything like that. It's just that ... I've been there, I've done
it." In November 2005, Pink Floyd were inducted into the UK Music
Hall of Fame by Pete Townshend of the Who.

Waters (far right) performing with Pink Floyd at


Live 8, 2 July 2005

In September 2005, Waters released a Ira (pronounced [sa ia],


French for "it will be fine"; Waters added the subtitle, "There is
Hope"), an opera in three acts translated from the late tienne
Waters playing "In the Flesh" on his
Roda-Gil's French libretto based on the historical subject of the French
Dark Side of the Moon Tour at
Revolution. a Ira was released as a double CD album, featuring
Viking Stadion, Stavanger, 26 June
2006
baritone Bryn Terfel, soprano Ying Huang and tenor Paul Groves.[68]
Set during the early French Revolution, the original libretto was
co-written in French by Roda-Gil and his wife Nadine Delahaye. Waters had begun rewriting the libretto in English
in 1989,[69] and said about the composition: "I've always been a big fan of Beethoven's choral music, Berlioz and
Borodin...This is unashamedly romantic and resides in that early 19th-century tradition, because that's where my
tastes lie in classical and choral music."[70] Waters appeared on television to discuss the opera, but the interviews
often focused instead on his relationship with Pink Floyd, something Waters would "take in stride", a sign Pink
Floyd biographer Mark Blake believes to be, "a testament to his mellower old age or twenty years of dedicated
psychotherapy".[70] a Ira reached number 5 on the Billboard Classical Music Chart in the United States.
In June 2006, Waters commenced The Dark Side of the Moon Live tour, a two-year, world-spanning effort that
began in Europe in June and North America in September. The first half of the show featured both Pink Floyd songs
and Waters' solo material, while the second half included a complete live performance of the 1973 Pink Floyd album
The Dark Side of the Moon, the first time in over three decades that Waters had performed the album. The shows
ended with an encore from the third side of The Wall. He utilised elaborate staging by concert lighting designer Marc
Brickman complete with laser lights, fog machines, pyrotechnics, psychedelic projections, and inflatable floating
puppets (Spaceman and Pig) controlled by a "handler" dressed as a butcher, and a full 360-degree quadraphonic
sound system was used. Nick Mason joined Waters for The Dark Side of the Moon set and the encores on select 2006
tour dates.[71] Waters continued touring in January 2007 in Australia and New Zealand, then Asia, Europe, South
America, and back to North America in June.

Roger Waters
In March 2007, the Waters song, "Hello (I Love You)" was featured in the science fiction film The Last Mimzy. The
song plays over the film's end credits. He released it as a single, on CD and via download, and described it as, "a
song that captures the themes of the movie, the clash between humanity's best and worst instincts, and how a child's
innocence can win the day". He performed at California's Coachella Festival in April 2008 and was to be among the
headlining artists performing at Live Earth 2008 in Mumbai, India in December 2008, but that concert was cancelled
in light of the 26 November terrorist attacks in Mumbai.
Waters confirmed the possibility of an upcoming solo album which
"might be called" Heartland, and has said he has numerous songs
written (some already recorded) that he intends to release when they
are a complete album. In June 2010, Waters released a cover of "We
Shall Overcome", a protest song rewritten and arranged by Guy
Carawan and Pete Seeger at the Highlander Folk School possibly
derived either from the refrain of a gospel hymn published by Charles
Albert Tindley in 1901, but more likely from Louise Shropshire's
hymn, "If My Jesus Wills." He performed with David Gilmour at the
Hoping Foundation Benefit Evening in July 2010. The four-song set
Roger Waters in Barcelona, during The Wall Live
in 2011
included: "To Know Him Is to Love Him", which was played in early
Pink Floyd sound checks, followed by "Wish You Were Here",
"Comfortably Numb", and "Another Brick in the Wall (Part Two)".
In September 2010, Waters commenced The Wall Live tour, an updated version of the original Pink Floyd shows,
featuring a complete performance of The Wall. According to Cole Moreton of the Daily Mail, "The touring version
of Pink Floyd's The Wall is one of the most ambitious and complex rock shows ever ...", and it is estimated that the
tour cost 37 million to stage. Waters told the Associated Press that The Wall Tour will likely be his last, stating:
"I'm not as young as I used to be. I'm not like B.B. King, or Muddy Waters. I'm not a great vocalist or a great
instrumentalist or whatever, but I still have the fire in my belly, and I have something to say. I have a swan song in
me and I think this will probably be it." At The O2 Arena in London on 12 May 2011, Gilmour and Mason once
again appeared with Waters and Gilmour performing "Comfortably Numb", and Gilmour and Mason joining Waters
for "Outside the Wall". For the first half of 2012, Waters' tour topped worldwide concert ticket sales having sold
more than 1.4 million tickets globally.[72] As of 2013, The Wall Live is the highest-grossing tour of all time by a solo
artist. Waters performed at the Concert for Sandy Relief at Madison Square Garden on 12 December 2012.

Personal life
In 1969, Waters married his childhood sweetheart Judy Trim, a successful potter; she was featured on the gatefold
sleeve of the original release of Ummagumma, but excised from subsequent CD reissues.[73] They had no children
together and divorced in 1975.[74] Trim died in 2001.[75]
In 1976, Waters married Lady Carolyne Christie, the niece of the 3rd Marquess of Zetland.[74] His marriage to
Christie produced a son, Harry Waters, a musician who has played keyboards with his father's touring band since
2006, and a daughter, India Waters, who has worked as a model.[76] Christie and Waters divorced in 1992.[74] In
1993, he married Priscilla Phillips; they had one son together, Jack Fletcher. Their marriage ended in 2001.[77] In
2004, he became engaged to actress and filmmaker Laurie Durning; the two married on 14 January 2012.

135

Roger Waters

Activism
After the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake and subsequent tsunami disaster, Waters performed "Wish You Were Here"
with Eric Clapton during a benefit concert on the American network NBC. He was outspoken against the Hunting
Act of 2004, and performed a concert for, and attended marches supporting, the Countryside Alliance. Waters
explained:
I've become disenchanted with the political and philosophical atmosphere in England. The anti-hunting
bill was enough for me to leave England. I did what I could, I did a concert and one or two articles, but
it made me feel ashamed to be English. I was in Hyde Park for both the Countryside Alliance marches.
There were hundreds of thousands of us there. Good, honest English people. That's one of the most
divisive pieces of legislation we've ever had in Great Britain. It's not a case of whether or not I agree
with fox hunting, but I will defend to the hilt their right to take part in it.[64]
In October 2005, he clarified: "I come back to the UK quite
often. I didn't leave as a protest against the hunting ban; I
was following a child in the wake of a divorce." After
leaving Britain, he moved to Long Island in New York with
his fianc Laurie Durning.[78] In June 2007, Waters became a
spokesman for Millennium Promise, a non-profit
organisation that helps fight extreme poverty and malaria. He
wrote an opinion piece for CNN in support of the topic. In
July, he participated in the American leg of the Live Earth
Waters performing "Comfortably Numb" during The Wall
Live in Kansas City, 30 October 2010
concert, an international multi-venue concert aimed at raising
awareness about global climate change, featuring the Trenton
Youth Choir and his trademarked inflatable pig. Waters told David Fricke why he thinks The Wall is still relevant
today:
The loss of a father is the central prop on which [The Wall] stands. As the years go by, children lose
their fathers again and again, for nothing. You see it now with all these fathers, good men and true, who
lost their lives and limbs in Iraq for no reason at all. I've done Bring The Boys Back Home in my encore
on recent tours. It feels more relevant and poignant to be singing that song now than it did in 1979.[79]
In 2012, Waters led a benefit for United States military veterans called Stand Up for Heroes. He invited a music
group of combat wounded veterans called MusiCorps to perform with him. In June 2013, Waters and numerous other
celebrities appeared in a video showing support for Bradley Manning.

Political views
Waters has been outspoken about Middle Eastern politics, and in June 2009 he openly opposed the Israeli West Bank
barrier, calling it an "obscenity [that] should be torn down". Later that year, he pledged his support to the Gaza
Freedom March, and in 2011 he announced that he had joined the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS)
movement against Israel.[80] Waters spoke about his support for BDS, stating that he has "been very disillusioned
with UK foreign policy... since Wilson. It was such a political turnabout from Keir Hardie and Attlee and the
principles of British socialism."
In October 2010, after an animated B52 bomber had been been shown dropping symbols including the Star of David
as part of The Wall Live tour, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) attacked Waters, saying that he had used
"imagery long associated with steretotypes about Jews and money" and had "cross[ed] the line into anti-Semitism."
In response, he wrote an open letter to The Independent in which he commented: "If I don't respond, people will see
the story and will come to believe I'm anti-Semitic, and I'm not. Nothing could be further from the truth." He
explained that the artwork used during his shows is "representative of religious and national and commercial

136

Roger Waters
interests, all of which have a malign influence on our lives and prevent us from treating each other decently". He
added: "You can attack Israeli policy without being anti-Jewish... It's like saying if you criticise the US policy you
are being anti-Christian. I'm critical of the Israeli policy of occupying Palestinian land and their policy of building
settlements, which is entirely illegal under international law, and also of ghettoising the people whose land they are
building on... It's that foreign policy I'm against. It's nothing to do with the religion."
In March 2013, during an interview with Electronic Intifada, Waters stated that the American media "was under
instructions from somewhere not to report [criticism of Israel] to the American public, on what grounds I cannot
guess."
On 20 July 2013, during a concert in Belgium, Waters' road crew released a pig-shaped balloon that had been painted
with symbols including a Star of David, other political symbols shown including representing fascist, communist and
capitalist representations. As the balloon floated over the audience, Waters sang the lyrics to "In the Flesh": "get him
up against the wall, that one looks Jewish and that one's a coon, who let all of this riff-raff into the room" while
holding "a machine gun replica and wearing a long black leather jacket with a red-and-white arm band reminiscent
of a Nazi uniform." Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center attacked him: "Waters
deployed a classic disgusting medieval anti-Semitic caricature widely used by both Nazi and Soviet propaganda to
incite hatred against Jews." Waters responded to the accusations, characterizing Cooper's statement as "wild and
bigoted" with an "entirely predictable resulting rant." Waters commented: "I should point out that in the show, I also
use the Crucifix, the Crescent and Star, the Hammer and Sickle, the Shell Oil Logo and the McDonalds Sign, a
Dollar Sign and a Mercedes sign." Waters explained that his father had died fighting Nazis and that he grew up in
post-war England, receiving an in-depth education about the war: "I was spared no horrific detail of the heinous
crimes committed in the name of that most foul ideology." Waters stated that the Wall Show: "is many things. It is
thoughtful, life affirming, ecumenical, humane, loving, anti-war, anti-colonial, pro-universal access to the law,
pro-liberty, pro-collaboration, pro-dialogue, pro-peace, anti-authoritarian, anti-fascist, anti-apartheid, anti-dogma,
international in spirit, musical and satirical. It is not anti-Semitic or pro-Nazi." Waters clarified his position regarding
the use of religious imagery: "the Star of David represents Israel and its policies and is legitimately subject to any
and all forms of non violent protest." Waters stated that the pig balloon represents "the evil of errant government."
He added: "For the sake of some perspective. The inflatable pig... has appeared at every Wall Show since September
2010, some 193 shows [and] yours is the first complaint."
During a December 2013 interview in CounterPunch magazine, Waters made statements urging musicians to boycott
Israel in response to their continued occupation of Palestine. He compared Israeli domestic policies with those of
Nazi Germany, stating: "the parallels with what went on in the 30's in Germany are so crushingly obvious". In
response, author Rabbi Shmuley Boteach accused Waters of anti-Semitism. Waters defended himself, pointing out
that he was not criticising Jews or Israelis in general, but the actions of the Israeli state against the Palestinians.

Equipment and instruments


Waters' primary instrument in Pink Floyd was the electric bass guitar. He briefly played a Hfner bass but replaced it
with a Rickenbacker RM-1999/4001S, until 1970 when it was stolen along with the rest of the band's equipment in
New Orleans.[18] He began using Fender Precision Basses in 1968, originally alongside the Rickenbacker, and then
exclusively after the Rickenbacker was lost in 1970. First seen at a concert in Hyde Park, London in July 1970, the
black P-Bass was rarely used until April 1972 when it became his main stage guitar and as of 2 October 2010, the
basis for a Fender Artist Signature model. Waters endorses RotoSound Jazz Bass 77 flat-wound strings. Throughout
his career he has used Selmer, WEM, Hiwatt and Ashdown amplifiers but has used Ampeg for the last few tours,
also employing delay, tremolo, chorus, stereo panning and phaser effects in his bass playing.[81]
Waters experimented with the EMS Synthi A and VCS 3 synthesisers on Pink Floyd pieces such as "On the Run",[82]
"Welcome to the Machine",[83] and "In the Flesh?"[84] He played electric and acoustic guitar on Pink Floyd tracks
using Fender, Martin, Ovation and Washburn guitars.[81] He played electric guitar on the Pink Floyd song "Sheep",

137

Roger Waters
from Animals,[85] and acoustic guitar on several Pink Floyd recordings, such as "Pigs on the Wing 1&2", also from
Animals,[86] "Southampton Dock" from The Final Cut,[87] and on "Mother" from The Wall.[88] A Binson Echorec 2
echo effect was used on his bass-guitar lead track "One of These Days".[89] Waters plays clarinet during concert
performances of "Outside the Wall".[90]

Discography
Main article: Roger Waters discography
See also: Pink Floyd discography

The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking (1984)


Radio K.A.O.S. (1987)
Amused to Death (1992)
a Ira (2005)

Citations
[1] http:/ / roger-waters. com
[2] Thompson 2013, p.7.
[3] Blake 2008, p.13.
[4] ; for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry on Eric Waters see:
[5] Manning 2006, pp.56.
[6] Watkinson & Anderson 1991, pp.1518.
[7] Mason 2005, pp.1213.
[8] Povey 2008, p.13.
[9] Watkinson & Anderson 1991, p.23.
[10] Blake 2008, pp.1419.
[11] Povey 2008, p.320.
[12] Blake 2008, p.36.
[13] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[14] : (secondary source); : (primary source).
[15] Mason 2005, pp.1718.
[16] Mason 2005, pp.1318.
[17] : (primary source); : (secondary source).
[18] Povey 2008, p.14.
[19] Povey 2008, pp.18, 28.
[20] : (primary source); : (secondary source).
[21] Mason 2005, p.87.
[22] Mason 2005, pp.87107.
[23] Blake 2008, p.91.
[24] Blake 2008, pp.90114.
[25] Mason 2005, p.129.
[26] Mason 2005, p.105.
[27] Mason 2005, p.106.
[28] Mason 2005, pp.106107, 160161, 265, 278.
[29] Blake 2008, pp.3, 9, 113, 156, 242, 279, 320, 398.
[30] Povey 2008, p.345.
[31] Mason 2005, pp.265269.
[32] Blake 2008, p.294.
[33] Blake 2008, pp.294295, 351.
[34] Blake 2008, p.275.
[35] Blake 2008, p.260.
[36] Blake 2008, pp.260261.
[37] Povey & Russell 1997, p.185.
[38] Povey 2008, p.230.
[39] Blake 2008, pp.294299.
[40] Blake 2008, p.295.

138

Roger Waters
[41]
[42]
[43]
[44]
[45]
[46]
[47]
[48]
[49]
[50]
[51]
[52]
[53]
[54]
[55]
[56]
[57]
[58]
[59]
[60]
[61]
[62]

Mason 2005, pp.264270.


: "art rock's crowning masterpiece"; : "a superlative achievement".
Povey 2008, pp.240241.
Povey 2008, pp.221, 237, 240241, 246.
Blake 2008, pp.312313.
Mason 2005, pp.293294.
Manning 2006, pp.139.
For Pink Floyd's worldwide album sales see: ; ; ; for Pink Floyd's US album sales see:
Schaffner 1991, pp.272273.
Blake 2008, pp.305306.
Blake 2008, pp.332333.
Blake 2008, p.309.
Fitch 2005, p.36.
Manning 2006, p.131.
Povey & Russell 1997, pp.246247.
Blake 2008, p.346.
Blake 2008, pp.342347.
Blake 2008, pp.348349.
Blake 2008, pp.347352.
Manning 2006, pp.141, 252.
Povey 2008, pp.323324.
Povey 2008, pp.329334.

[63] Povey 2008, p.334.


[64] Blake 2008, p.391.
[65] Povey 2008, pp.237, 266267.
[66] Schaffner 1991, p.308.
[67] Blake 2008, pp.382383.
[68] Povey 2008, pp.324325.
[69] Manning 2006, p.256.
[70] Blake 2008, p.392.
[71] Povey 2008, pp.319, 334338.
[72] "Roger Waters tops worldwide ticket sales for 2012" (http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ news/ entertainment-arts-18826218). BBC News. Retrieved
14 July 2012
[73] Mabbett 2010, p.50.
[74] Fitch 2005, p.335.
[75] Blake 2008, p.376.
[76] : India Waters; : Harry has performed with Waters since 2006.
[77] ; : Jack Fletcher.
[78] Blake 2008, pp.391392.
[79] Fricke 2009, p.74.
[80] For Waters' support of the BDS movement see: ; For Waters' support of the Gaza Freedom March see:
[81] Fitch 2005, pp.416430, 441445.
[82] Mason 2005, p.169.
[83] Fitch 2005, p.324.
[84] Fitch & Mahon 2006, p.71.
[85] Fitch 2005, p.285.
[86] Fitch 2005, pp.241242.
[87] Fitch 2005, p.295.
[88] Fitch 2005, p.213.
[89] Mabbett 1995, p.39.
[90] Fitch 2005, p.232.

139

Roger Waters

Sources
Blake, Mark (2008). Comfortably Numb: The Inside Story of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=hKXhLoWCPQ8C&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). Da Capo Press. ISBN978-0-306-81752-6.
Fitch, Vernon (2005). The Pink Floyd Encyclopedia (http://books.google.com/books?id=HNkiAQAAIAAJ&
q) (Third ed.). Collector's Guide Publishing, Inc. ISBN978-1-894959-24-7.
Fitch, Vernon; Mahon, Richard (2006). Comfortably Numb: A History of "The Wall" Pink Floyd 19781981
(1st ed.). PFA Publishing, Inc. ISBN978-0-9777366-0-7.
Fricke, David (December 2009). "Roger Waters: Welcome to My Nightmare ... Behind The Wall". Mojo (Emap
Metro) 193: pp.6884.
Mabbett, Andy (1995). The Complete Guide to the Music of Pink Floyd (1st UK paperback ed.). Omnibus Press.
ISBN978-0-7119-4301-8.
Mabbett, Andy (2010). Pink Floyd The Music and the Mystery (1st UK paperback ed.). Omnibus Press.
ISBN978-1-84938-370-7.
Manning, Toby (2006). The Rough Guide to Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=yHsZAQAAIAAJ&q) (1st US paperback ed.). Rough Guides Ltd. ISBN978-1-84353-575-1.
Mason, Nick (2005). Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=idOGghPNM6UC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). Chronicle Books. ISBN978-0-8118-4824-4.
Povey, Glen (2008). Echoes: The Complete History of Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=qnnl3FnO-B4C&dq) (2nd UK paperback ed.). 3C Publishing Ltd. ISBN978-0-9554624-1-2.
Povey, Glen; Russell, Ian (1997). Pink Floyd: In the Flesh: The Complete Performance History (http://books.
google.com/books?id=KrOPQni4yTsC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). St. Martin's Press.
ISBN978-0-9554624-0-5.
Schaffner, Nicholas (1991). Saucerful of Secrets: the Pink Floyd Odyssey (http://books.google.com/
books?id=xfqremepxrkC&dq) (1st US paperback ed.). Dell Publishing. ISBN978-0-385-30684-3.
Thompson, Dave (2013). Roger Waters: The Man Behind The Wall. Backbeat Books. ISBN978-1-61713-564-4.
Watkinson, Mike; Anderson, Pete (1991). Crazy Diamond: Syd Barrett & the Dawn of Pink Floyd (1st UK
paperback ed.). Omnibus Press. ISBN978-1-84609-739-3.

Further reading
Di Perna, Alan (2002). Guitar World Presents Pink Floyd (http://books.google.com/
books?id=nQ1f7Vasrv8C&dq). Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN978-0-634-03286-8.
Fitch, Vernon (2001). Pink Floyd: The Press Reports 19661983. Collector's Guide Publishing Inc.
ISBN978-1-896522-72-2.
Harris, John (2005). The Dark Side of the Moon: The Making of the Pink Floyd Masterpiece (http://books.
google.com/books?id=8ioY6m4EHKkC&dq). Da Capo. ISBN978-0-306-81342-9.
Hiatt, Brian (September 2010). "Back to The Wall". Rolling Stone 1114: pp. 5057.
MacDonald, Bruno (1997). Pink Floyd: through the eyes of ... the band, its fans, friends, and foes (http://books.
google.com/books?id=b7J3K2snuhAC&dq). Da Capo Press. ISBN978-0-306-80780-0.
Mabbett, Andy; Mabbett, Miles (1994). Pink Floyd : the visual documentary. Omnibus Press.
ISBN978-0-7119-1444-5.
Miles, Barry (1982). Pink Floyd: A Visual Documentary by Miles. New York: Putnam Publishing Group.
ISBN978-0-399-41001-7.
Scarfe, Gerald (2010). The Making of Pink Floyd: The Wall (1st US paperback ed.). Da Capo Press.
ISBN978-0-306-81997-1.
Simmons, Sylvie (December 1999). "Pink Floyd: The Making of The Wall". Mojo (London: Emap Metro) 73: pp.
7695.

140

Roger Waters

External links
Official website (http://www.roger-waters.com/)

Media related to Roger Waters at Wikimedia Commons

Quotations related to Roger Waters at Wikiquote

141

Richard Wright

142

Richard Wright
"Rick Wright" redirects here. For other uses, see Richard Wright.

Richard Wright

Wright performing in Munich, Germany, on 29 July 2006


Background information
Birth name

Richard William Wright

Also known as

Rick Wright

Born

28 July 1943
Hatch End, Middlesex, England

Origin

London, England

Died

15 September 2008 (aged65)


London, England

Genres

Progressive rock, psychedelic rock, experimental rock, electronic music, jazz, art rock

Occupations

Musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist

Instruments

Keyboards, vocals, vibraphone, xylophone, Appalachian dulcimer, Hammond organ, trombone, trumpet, cello, violin, guitar,
bass guitar, percussion

Years active

19622008

Labels

Capitol, Columbia, EMI, Harvest

Associated acts

Pink Floyd, Zee, David Gilmour, The Screaming Abdabs (Sigma 6)

Richard William "Rick" Wright (28 July 1943 15 September 2008) was an English musician, composer, singer
and songwriter, best known for his career with Pink Floyd. A multi-instrumentalist, Wright's richly textured
keyboard layers were a vital ingredient and a distinctive characteristic of Pink Floyd's sound. Wright frequently sang
harmony and occasionally lead vocals on stage and in the studio with Pink Floyd (most notably on the songs "Time",
"Echoes", "Us and Them", "Wearing the Inside Out", "Astronomy Domine" and "Matilda Mother").
Though not as prolific a songwriter as his band mates Roger Waters, Syd Barrett and David Gilmour, he wrote
significant parts of the music for classic albums such as Meddle, The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were
Here, as well as for Pink Floyd's The Division Bell.

Richard Wright

Early life
Wright, whose father was head biochemist at Unigate Dairies, grew up in Hatch End, North London and was
educated at the Haberdashers' Aske's School.
Wright taught himself to play guitar, trumpet and piano at age 12, and took private lessons in musical theory and
composition at the Eric Gilder School of Music. Uncertain about his future, he enrolled at Regent Street Polytechnic
in 1962. There he met fellow band members Roger Waters and Nick Mason, was a founding member of The Pink
Floyd Sound (as they were then called) in 1965, and also participated in its previous incarnations, Sigma 6 and The
(Screaming) Abdabs. Although Mason and Waters were competent students, Wright found architecture of little
interest and after only a year of study moved to the London College of Music.

Pink Floyd 1967 - 1981


In the early days of Pink Floyd, Wright was a prominent musical force in the group (although Syd Barrett was the
bands chief songwriter and front man at the time). Wright wrote and sang several songs of his own during
19671968. While not credited for vocals on The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he sang lead on Barrett-penned songs
like "Astronomy Domine" and "Matilda Mother", as well as harmonies on "The Scarecrow" and "Chapter 24".
Examples of his early compositions include "Remember a Day", "See-Saw", "Paint Box" and "It Would Be So
Nice". As the sound and the goals of the band evolved, Wright became less interested in song writing and focused
primarily on contributing his distinctive style to extended instrumental compositions such as "Cirrus Minor",
"Interstellar Overdrive", "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun", "Careful with That Axe, Eugene", "One of
These Days", "Dogs" and to musical themes for film scores (More, Zabriskie Point and Obscured by Clouds). He
particularly made essential contributions to Pink Floyd's long, epic compositions such as "Atom Heart Mother",
"Echoes" (on which he harmonized with Gilmour for the lead vocals) and "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". His most
commercially popular compositions are "The Great Gig in the Sky" and "Us and Them" from 1973's The Dark Side
of the Moon. He also contributed significantly to other mid-period Floyd classics such as "Breathe" and "Time",
singing the lead vocals on alternate verses of the latter with David Gilmour.
Wright recorded his first solo project, Wet Dream, which was released in September 1978 with minimal commercial
success. Battling both personal problems and an increasingly rocky relationship with Roger Waters, he was forced to
resign from Pink Floyd during The Wall sessions by Waters, who threatened to pull the plug on the album if Wright
did not leave the band. He was retained as a salaried session musician during the live concerts to promote that album
in 198081. Wright became the only member of Pink Floyd to profit from the initial run of the costly Wall shows,
since the net financial loss had to be borne by the three remaining "full-time" members. Wright did not attend the
1982 premiere of the film version of Pink FloydThe Wall. In 1983, Pink Floyd released The Final Cut, the only
album from the band on which Wright does not appear.

Later life
During 1984, Wright formed a new musical duo with Dave Harris (from the band Fashion) called Zee. They signed a
record deal with EMI Records and released only one album, Identity, which was a commercial and critical flop.
Wright worked as a salaried musician alongside Pink Floyd, following Waters' departure. Because of legal and
contractual issues from this "hired gun" status during The Wall world tour, his photo was not included in the 1987
album A Momentary Lapse of Reason and his name was listed in smaller letters than Mason and Gilmour. In 1994,
by which time his reinstatement in the band had become official, he co-wrote five songs and sang lead vocals on one
song ("Wearing the Inside Out") for the next Pink Floyd album, The Division Bell. This recording provided material
for the double live album and video release Pulse in 1995. Wright, like Nick Mason, performed on every Pink Floyd
tour.

143

Richard Wright
'Rick asked to be a part of "A Momentary Lapse of Reason," and we talked and argued and negotiated again,
and this time [The Division Bell] he's on a percentage of everything, not just the record. Last time Nick and
myself had put up all the money and taken all the risks on everything, including the lawsuits with Roger. If
you take all the risks, you expect to get more of the profits, quite simply. This is a wonderful artistic endeavour
we've spent all our adult lives working on, but reality comes into it as well.'
David Gilmour,
In 1996, inspired by his successful input into The Division Bell, Wright released his second solo album, Broken
China, including contributions from Sinad O'Connor on vocals, Pino Palladino on bass, Manu Katch on drums,
Dominic Miller (known from his guitar work with Sting) and Tim Renwick, another Pink Floyd associate, on electric
guitar. Broken China marked a new phase in Richard Wright's artistic development and playing style, with extensive
use of computer-based recording and production techniques, assisted by Anthony Moore with whom he co-wrote the
album's lyrics.[1]
On 2 July 2005, Wright, Gilmour and Mason were joined by Waters on stage for the first time since the Wall
concerts for a short set at the Live 8 concert in London. This was the last time that all four (post-Barrett) Pink Floyd
members performed together. Wright underwent eye surgery for cataracts in November 2005, preventing him from
attending Pink Floyd's induction into the UK Music Hall of Fame.
In 1999, keyboard player Jon Carin joined with Wright's wife to bring Wright and Waters back together after some
18 years apart; the two men met backstage after a tour date by Waters.
Wright contributed keyboards and background vocals to David Gilmour's solo album, On an Island, and performed
with Gilmour's touring band for over two dozen shows in Europe and North America in 2006. On stage with
Gilmour he performed on Hammond organ, piano, electric piano, Kurzweil K2600 workstation, and even his
long-inactive Farfisa organ, which was used for performing "Echoes" and two of Pink Floyd's and Syd Barrett's older
songs that Gilmour chose to revisit in his recent concerts. He also provided backing vocals and lead vocals (notably
on "Echoes", "Time", "Comfortably Numb", "Wearing the Inside Out" "Astronomy Domine" and "Arnold Layne"
the latter released as a live single). He declined an offer to join Roger Waters and Nick Mason on Waters' The Dark
Side of the Moon Live tour in order to spend more time working on a solo project.Wikipedia:Citation needed
On 4 July 2006, Wright joined Gilmour and Mason for the official screening of the PULSE DVD. Inevitably,
Live 8 surfaced as a subject in an interview. When asked about performing again, Wright replied he would be happy
on stage anywhere. He explained that his plan was to "meander" along and said about playing live:
...and whenever Dave wants me to play with him, Im really happy to play with him. And [to Gilmour] youll
play with me, right?
Wright's final vocal performance took place at "The Madcaps Last Laugh" a tribute concert at The Barbican in
London on 10 May 2007. It was organised by Joe Boyd in the memory of Syd Barrett who had died the previous
July. Boyd rounded up many musical guests all paying their tributes to Syd including Captain Sensible, Chrissie
Hynde, Damon Albarn, Kevin Ayers, Kate McGarrigle with Martha Wainwright and Lily Lankin, Mike Heron, Nick
Laird Clowes, Vashti Bunyan, Robyn Hitchcock and performing solo, Roger Waters.
Pink Floyd featuring David Gilmour, Nick Mason and Wright appeared at the end of the show as surprise guests
where they performed the song that had started it all, "Arnold Layne" with Wright on lead vocals.
Wright's final live performance was as part of David Gilmour's band at the premiere of Gilmour's concert DVD
Remember That Night. It took place on 6 September 2007 at the Odeon Leicester Square, London. After an edited
version of the film had been shown, the band took to the stage to jam and Wright played keyboards.

144

Richard Wright

Personal life
He married his first wife, Juliette Gale, in 1968. They had two children, Gala and Jamie, and divorced in 1982. He
married his second wife Franka in 1984. They divorced in 1990. Wright married his third wife Mildred "Millie"
Hobbs (to whom he dedicated his second solo album Broken China) in 1995, with whom he had a son, Ben. Their
marriage ended in 2007. From 1984 to 1994 he lived on the island Kefalonia. In 1996, Wright's daughter Gala
married Guy Pratt, a session musician who has played bass for Pink Floyd and bandmate David Gilmour since Roger
Waters' exit. In his later years, Wright lived in France and spent time on a yacht he owned in the Virgin Islands.

Death
Wright died at home, of an undisclosed form of cancer, on 15 September 2008 at age 65. At the time of his death, he
had been working on a new solo album, which was thought to comprise a series of instrumental pieces.
His death occurred one week before the release of David Gilmour's Live in Gdask CD, on which he appeared. On
July 6th, 2014, it was announced that a new album, "The Endless River" will be the first that Pink Floyd will release
since 1994. The album, being released in fall of 2014, was begun during the 1994 recording session. Tracks played
by Richard Wright will be included along with more original works by David Gilmour and Nick Mason.
No one can replace Richard Wright. He was my musical partner and my friend. In the welter of arguments
about who or what was Pink Floyd, Rick's enormous input was frequently forgotten. He was gentle,
unassuming, and private, but his soulful voice and playing were vital, magical components of our most
recognised Pink Floyd sound. I have never played with anyone quite like him. The blend of his and my voices
and our musical telepathy reached their first major flowering in 1971 on 'Echoes'. In my view all the greatest
PF moments are the ones where he is in full flow. After all, without 'Us and Them' and 'The Great Gig in the
Sky', both of which he wrote, what would 'The Dark Side of the Moon' have been? Without his quiet touch, the
album 'Wish You Were Here' would not quite have worked. In our middle years, for many reasons, he lost his
way for a while; but in the early Nineties, with 'The Division Bell', his vitality, spark and humour returned to
him, and then the audience reaction to his appearances on my tour in 2006 was hugely uplifting and it's a mark
of his modesty that those standing ovations came as a huge surprise to him (though not to the rest of us). Like
Rick, I don't find it easy to express my feelings in words, but I loved him and will miss him enormously.
Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason told Entertainment Weekly:
Like any band, you can never quite quantify who does what. But Pink Floyd wouldnt have been Pink Floyd if
[we] hadn't had Rick. I think theres a feeling now particularly after all the warfare that went on with Roger
and David trying to make clear what their contribution was that perhaps Rick rather got pushed into the
background. Because the sound of Pink Floyd is more than the guitar, bass, and drum thing. Rick was the
sound that knitted it all together... He was by far the quietest of the band, right from day one. And, I think,
probably harder to get to know than the rest of us... It's almost that George Harrison thing. You sort of forget
that they did a lot more than perhaps theyre given credit for.
Former bandmate Roger Waters' website was replaced with a photograph of an array of candles and poppies against
a black background; one of the screen images used for the song "Wish You Were Here" in his "Dark Side of the
Moon Live" Tour.
Waters issued a statement:
I was very sad to hear of Rick's premature death, I knew he had been ill, but the end came suddenly and
shockingly. My thoughts are with his family, particularly [his children] Jamie and Gala and their mum Juliet,
who I knew very well in the old days, and always liked very much and greatly admired. As for the man and his
work, it is hard to overstate the importance of his musical voice in the Pink Floyd of the '60s and '70s. The
intriguing, jazz influenced, modulations and voicings so familiar in 'Us and Them' and 'Great Gig in the Sky,'
which lent those compositions both their extraordinary humanity and their majesty, are omnipresent in all the

145

Richard Wright
collaborative work the four of us did in those times. Rick's ear for harmonic progression was our bedrock. I am
very grateful for the opportunity that Live 8 afforded me to engage with him and David [Gilmour] and Nick
[Mason] that one last time. I wish there had been more.
On 23 September 2008, David Gilmour performed "Remember a Day", a Wright composition from Pink Floyd's
second album, A Saucerful of Secrets (1968), on a live broadcast of Later... with Jools Holland on BBC Two as a
tribute to Wright. In an interview later on in the show, Gilmour said that Wright had intended to perform with him
that day, but that he had texted Gilmour a couple of weeks before his death to advise him that he would not be well
enough to attend. This was the first live performance of the song by any member of the band.
On 15 September 2008, Elton John, while playing a concert in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan dedicated the song
"Believe" to Wright who had died earlier that day.

Influence
Wright's style fused jazz, neoclassical and experimental music influences, which complemented the simple harmonic
structures of the more blues and folk-based songs of Roger Waters and David Gilmour. As a keyboardist, he was
more interested in complementing each piece with organ or synthesizer layers and tasteful piano or electric piano
passages. Unlike his contemporaries Rick Wakeman, Tony Banks or Keith Emerson, he opted for solo playing only
occasionally, notably in "Atom Heart Mother", "Echoes", "Any Colour You Like", "Shine On You Crazy Diamond"
Parts 15 and 69, "Welcome to the Machine", "Dogs", "Run Like Hell" and "Keep Talking". Wright was known for
his ghostly, atmospheric textures such as the Leslie piano arpeggios at the beginning of "Echoes", the echoed Farfisa
Organ in the live versions of "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" and "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun", the
distinctive Minimoog solo in "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" and the Wurlitzer passages in "Money", "Time" and
the Fender Rhodes riffs in "Sheep". In "A Saucerful of Secrets" and "Sysyphus" he experimented with 'treated piano'.
"Sysyphus" also made extensive use of Mellotron sounds, something of a rarity in the Pink Floyd canon.

Equipment
In the early days of the band, Wright dabbled with brass before settling on the Farfisa Compact Duo electronic organ
as his main instrument onstage (in addition to piano and Hammond Organ in the studio). For a brief period in 1969,
Wright played vibraphone on several of the band's songs and in some live shows, and he even played trombone on
"Biding My Time" (also dating from this experimental period). During the formative years of Pink Floyd with Syd
Barrett, Wright relied heavily on his Farfisa organ, fed through a Binson Echorec platter echo, to achieve distinctive
sounds that helped the band gain their "psychedelic rock" edge. He used a Mellotron on many Pink Floyd songs
recorded in 1968, on "Sysyphus" and on "Atom Heart Mother". He started using a Hammond organ regularly on
stage thereafter, and a grand piano later became part of his usual live concert setup when "Echoes" was added to
Pink Floyd's regular set list. For tours in the 1970s based around The Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here,
Animals and The Wall, the Farfisa was dropped (although it was brought back when Wright toured with David
Gilmour on his On An Island tour), and an array of other instruments were added to the lineup, such as: Fender
Rhodes & Wurlitzer Electric Pianos, Hohner clavinet, VCS 3, Minimoog, ARP String Ensemble and Prophet 5,
Roland D-50 synthesizers. From 1987 Wright favoured Kurzweil digital synthesizers (namely the K2000 keyboard
and K2000S rack modules & MIDI board) for reproducing his analogue synthesizer sounds, even though he still
used his favourite Hammond B-3 or C-3 organ, along with Leslie speaker system. According to Seth Goldman, Rick
tried ear moulds during the Division Bell tour, but "he didn't get on with them". Throughout his career, Wright was
also a proficient multi-instrumentalist. He also played violin, cello, bass, guitar, saxophone, and drums, amongst
others.

146

Richard Wright

Pink Floyd songs with Wright singing lead vocals

"Astronomy Domine", with Syd Barrett (1967)


"Matilda Mother", with Barrett (1967)
"Paintbox" (1967)
"It Would Be So Nice" (1968)
"Let There Be More Light", with David Gilmour and Roger Waters (1968)
"Remember a Day" (1968)
"Corporal Clegg", with Gilmour and Nick Mason (1968)
"See-Saw" (1968)
"Crumbling Land", with Gilmour (1970)
"Summer '68" (1970)
"Echoes", with Gilmour (1971)
"Burning Bridges", with Gilmour (1972)
"Stay" (1972)
"Time", with Gilmour (1973)
"Us and Them", with Gilmour (1973)
"Wearing the Inside Out", with Gilmour (1994)

Discography
With Pink Floyd
See Pink Floyd discography

With Syd Barrett


Barrett 14 November 1970
Plays keyboards

Solo albums
Wet Dream 15 September 1978, US number 203
Broken China 26 November 1996

Zee album
Identity 9 April 1984

With David Gilmour


David Gilmour in Concert (DVD) October 2002
Appears on two tracks: "Breakthrough" (Keyboard / Vocals) & "Comfortably Numb (With Bob Geldof)"
(Keyboard)
On an Island 6 March 2006
Appears on two tracks: "On an Island" (Hammond organ) & "The Blue" (Keyboards / Vocals)
Remember That Night (DVD/BD) September/November(BD), 2007
Live in Gdask (CD/DVD) released on 22 September 2008

147

Richard Wright

148

References
[1] Broken China sleeve credits

External links
The Richard Wright Archives (http://www.richardwright.net/)
Pink Floyd's official site (http://www.pinkfloyd.co.uk/)

Nick Mason
Nick Mason

Nick Mason in 2004


Background information
Birth name

Nicholas Berkeley Mason

Born

27 January 1944
Edgbaston, Birmingham, England

Genres

Progressive rock, psychedelic rock, experimental rock, instrumental rock

Occupations

Musician, drummer, record producer, author, auto racer

Instruments

Drums, percussion, keyboards, guitar, vocals

Years active

1964present

Labels

Capitol, Columbia, Sony, EMI, Harvest

Associated acts Pink Floyd, Sigma 6, The Screaming Abdabs, The Tea Set, Mason & Fenn, Robert Wyatt, Carla Bley, Michael Mantler

Nicholas Berkeley "Nick" Mason (born 27 January 1944) is an English musician and composer, best known as the
drummer of Pink Floyd. He is the only constant member of the band since its formation in 1965. Despite solely
writing only a few Pink Floyd songs, Mason has co-written some of Pink Floyd's most popular compositions such as
"Echoes" and "Time".
Mason is the only Pink Floyd member to be featured on every one of their albums. It is estimated that as of 2010, the
group have sold over 250 million records worldwide, including 74.5million units sold in the United States.
He competes in auto racing events, such as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.[1]
On 26 November 2012, Mason received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Westminster at the
presentation ceremony of the School of Architecture and Built Environment (he had studied architecture at the
University's predecessor, Regent Street Polytechnic, 19621967).[2]

Nick Mason

Early life
The son of the documentary film maker Bill Mason, he was born in Birmingham but brought up in Hampstead,
London (many online biographies mistakenly cite the street address Downshire Hill sometimes as "the Downshire
Hills" as a district of Birmingham), and attended Frensham Heights School, near Farnham, Surrey. He later studied
at the Regent Street Polytechnic (now the University of Westminster), where he teamed up with Roger Waters, Bob
Klose and Richard Wright in 1964 to form Pink Floyd's predecessor, Sigma 6.

Musical career
Mason has been the drummer on every Pink Floyd album (but not on every song; some feature session drummers
and drum machines).
The only Pink Floyd songs that are solely credited to Mason are "The Grand Vizier's Garden Party Parts 13" (from
Ummagumma) and "Speak to Me" (from The Dark Side of the Moon). The one-off song by the band titled "Nick's
Boogie" was named after him.
The only times Mason's voice has been included on Pink Floyd's albums are "Corporal Clegg", the single spoken line
in "One of These Days" and spoken parts of "Signs of Life" and "Learning to Fly" (the latter taken from actual
recording of Mason's first solo flight) from A Momentary Lapse of Reason. He does, however, sing lead vocals on
two unreleased but heavily bootlegged tracks, "Scream Thy Last Scream" (1967), penned by original leader Syd
Barrett and "The Merry Xmas Song" (197576). In live performances of the song "Sheep", he did the spoken
section. Mason also appears to sing lead vocals on the bridge to Waters' first composition Take Up Thy Stethoscope
and Walk.
Despite legal conflicts over ownership of the name 'Pink Floyd', which began when Waters left the group in 1986
and lasted roughly seven years, Waters and Nick Mason are now on good terms. Mason joined Waters on the last
two nights of his 2002 world tour to play drums on the Pink Floyd song "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun",
and he also played drums on some concerts of Waters' European tour in 2006, and during performances in Los
Angeles and New York City in the United States. On 12 May 2007, Mason joined Waters again on stage at Earls
Court to play The Dark Side of the Moon. Again, on 12 May 2011, Mason was featured, along with David Gilmour,
on the encore "Outside the Wall" at a concert by Waters, who was performing The Wall in its entirety. Gilmour also
performed on "Comfortably Numb" that night.
In July 2005, Mason, Gilmour, Wright, and Waters played together on stage for the first time in 24 years. A
four-song set was played at the Live 8 concert in London. Mason also joined Gilmour and Wright for the encore
during Gilmour's show at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on 31 May 2006, reuniting the post-Waters Pink Floyd.
Mason has also claimed to be the link between Gilmour and Waters, and believes the band will play live again,
mentioning the possibility of "playing again for a charitable cause" or even "a tour" in various interviews in the last
few years. He also stated in 2006 that Pink Floyd have not officially disbanded yet.
Unlike the other members of Pink Floyd, Mason has rarely played an instrument other than his drum kit or large
array of percussion instruments, although he has contributed sound effects to many Pink Floyd albums. He has only
ever played non-percussive instruments on "The Grand Vizier's Garden Party", his personal composition from
Ummagumma, where he provided some keyboard, guitar and bass noises, and on live versions of "Outside the Wall",
where he played acoustic guitar along with the rest of the band. However, on the Profiles album Mason released with
Rick Fenn in 1985, he is also credited with keyboards. He can be seen playing a vibraphone in the promo video for
"Lie for a Lie", but it is unknown if he actually played on the recording. Mason has also said that he took some failed
piano and violin lessons as a child before taking up drums.
Mason has done some work with other people, notably as a drummer and producer for Steve Hillage, Robert Wyatt
(with whom he appeared on Top of the Pops), The Damned and Gong. He also drummed for Michael Mantler.

149

Nick Mason
Nick Mason used Premier drums in the 1960s and occasionally in the 1970s (mainly on recordings up to Wish You
Were Here). After that, he used Ludwig drums from 1970 until 1992. He currently uses Drum Workshop (DW)
drums, pedals and hardware. His kit is a DW double bass kit with the Dark Side of the Moon logo on the drums. He
has also used Paiste cymbals during his entire career with Pink Floyd and currently uses a mixture of Paiste
Traditional, Signature and 2002 cymbals. He also endorses Remo drumheads, Latin Percussion and Pro-Mark sticks.
Mason's book, Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd, was published in the UK in October 2004. It is also
available, abridged, as a 3CD audio book, read by Mason. An updated edition was published, in paperback, in 2011.
He performed in the closing ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games on 12 August 2012.

Pink Floyd songs co-written by Mason

"Nick's Boogie" (1967) (London '66'67)


"Pow R. Toc H." (1967) (The Piper at the Gates of Dawn)
"Interstellar Overdrive" (1967) (The Piper at the Gates of Dawn)
"A Saucerful of Secrets" (1968) (A Saucerful of Secrets)
"Careful with That Axe, Eugene" (1968) (B-side of their single "Point Me at the Sky")
"Up the Khyber" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)

"Party Sequence" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)


"Main Theme" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)
"Ibiza Bar" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)
"More Blues" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)
"Quicksilver" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)
"Dramatic Theme" (1969) (Soundtrack from the Film More)
"The Grand Vizier's Garden Party" (1969) (Ummagumma)
"Atom Heart Mother" (1970) (Atom Heart Mother)
"Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast" (1970) (Atom Heart Mother)
"One of These Days" (1971) (Meddle)
"Seamus" (Meddle)
"Echoes" (1971) (Meddle)
"When You're In" (1972) (Obscured by Clouds)
"Speak to Me" (1973) (The Dark Side of the Moon)
"Time" (1973) (The Dark Side of the Moon)
"Any Colour You Like" (1973) (The Dark Side of the Moon)

Drumming style
Influenced by jazz and big band music, Nick was a pioneer who embraced acoustic drums (both single and double
headed), tuned percussion, electronic drums and Rototoms, melding all of these into a melodic whole. His snare
drum sound shifted from harsh demarcation of beats 2 and 4 ("Careful with that Axe, Eugene") to a fatter and gentler
timbre ("Echoes") a change that reflected growing studio chops. His style was gentler and more laid back than
other progressive rock drummers of the time. Mason soloed on a few Pink Floyd compositions including 'Nick's
Boogie', 'A Saucerful of Secrets', 'The Grand Vizier's Garden Party', 'Up The Khyber' and 'Time'. Due to the dynamic
live performances of Pink Floyd, Mason's style was more energetic and complex live, and can be heard on such
albums as Ummagumma and Live at Pompeii.

150

Nick Mason

151

Non-musical ventures
Nick Mason
Nationality

British

24 Hours of Le Mans career


Participating years 197980, 198284
Teams

Dorset Racing
Associates
EMKA Productions
Dome Racing
GTi Engineering

Best finish

18th (1979)

Class wins

Mason's first marriage was to Lindy Rutter, with whom he had two daughters Chloe and Holly. Lindy was also an
accomplished woodwind player and she played flute on The Grand Vizier's Garden Party off Ummagumma. The
couple divorced in the late 1980s and Mason is married to his second wife, Nettie, most famous for her adjudication
role on the second series of Treasure Hunt in 1984. They have two sons Cary and Guy and live in Hampstead,
London; however, they often stay in the Wiltshire town of Corsham in the former home of Camilla Parker Bowles.
Holly is married to sports car racer Marino Franchitti, the younger brother of multiple IndyCar champion Dario
Franchitti.
As Pink Floyd's recording and touring schedule grew more sporadic, Mason was left with more time to pursue his
favourite hobby: motor racing. He owns (through his company Ten Tenths) and races several classic cars, and has
competed successfully at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. His collection has been a subject of his 1998 book, Into the Red,
in which he documents his experience with his cars, along with some histories. He is also a qualified pilot, and flies
an Aerospatiale AS 350 Squirrel helicopter in specially painted colours.
Mason was invited by Ferrari to purchase one of their 400 Enzos, which he let Jeremy Clarkson borrow for
reviewing purposes on the BBC motoring programme Top Gear. Mason agreed, on the sole condition that
throughout the review, Clarkson promoted the release of the book Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd.
This led to Clarkson using Pink Floyd album titles in his description of the Enzo and The Stig driving round the track
with "Another Brick in the Wall"Wikipedia:Please clarify playing (despite the fact that the Enzo does not come
equipped with a stereo). Mason says that his favourite car of all time is the Ferrari 250 GTO, and owns one of the 39
built (valued between 16m and 30m).
His wealth amounts to 55 million, according to the Sunday Times Rich List 200607.[3]

Nick Mason

Views and advocacy


Mason has played concerts to raise funds for Countryside Alliance. He is a board member and co-chairman of the
Featured Artists' Coalition. Mason has resided at Middlewick House near Corsham, north Wiltshire, since 1996.

Discography
With Pink Floyd
Main article: Pink Floyd discography

Solo albums
Nick Mason's Fictitious Sports 3 May 1981

With Rick Fenn


Profiles 29 July 1985
White of the Eye 1987 (soundtrack)
Tank Malling 1988 (soundtrack)

With Michael Mantler

The Hapless Child 1976


Something There 1982
Live 1987
Review 2000
Concertos 2008

As a producer

Principal Edwards Magic Theatre The Asmoto Running Band (1971)


Principal Edwards Magic Theatre Round One (1974)
Robert Wyatt Rock Bottom (1974)
Gong Shamal (1976)
The Damned Music for Pleasure (1977)
Steve Hillage Green (1978); Co-produced with Steve Hillage. Mason also plays a drum on "Leylines to
Glassdom"

Books
Into the Red: 22 Classic Cars That Shaped a Century of Motor Sport (with Mark Hales) 3 September 1998 (first
edition), 9 September 2004 (second edition)
Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd 28 October 2004

References
[1] Discovery Channel Documentary, "World's Most Expensive Cars"
[2] University of Westminster presentation ceremony programme, 26 November 2012
[3] Sunday Times Rich List 20062007, A & C Black (ISBN 978-0-7136-7941-0)

152

Nick Mason

External links

Nick Mason's Drummerworld profile (http://www.drummerworld.com/drummers/Nick_Mason.html)


Nick Mason interviews (http://www.pinkfloydonline.com/interviews/nickmason/)
Ten Tenths official site (http://www.tentenths.co.uk/)
Inside Out book page from Pink Floyd official site (http://www.pinkfloyd.co.uk/insideOut/)
Pink Floyd Drums: The Division Bell Tour Drums (http://www.pinkfloyddrums.com)

153

Andrew King

154

Andrew King
Andrew King
Occupation

Music manager

Yearsactive

1960s-

Organization Blackhill Enterprises


Awards

2006 BACS Gold Badge Award

Andrew King (born 1942) is a music manager, formerly for Blackhill Enterprises, where he co-managed Pink Floyd
and others.
King, Peter Jenner and the original four members of Pink Floyd were partners in Blackhill Enterprises. Under their
guidance, Pink Floyd began performing on London's underground music scene, notably at a venue booked by the
London Free School in Notting Hill, as well as the notorious "Games For May" concert at London's Queen Elizabeth
Hall on May 12, 1967, an event set up by both Jenner and King. After Syd Barrett's departure from Pink Floyd in
1968 Jenner and King ended their relationship with Pink Floyd and continued as managers for Barrett and other
British rock bands.
Acts he has managed since the dissolution of Blackhill in the early 1980s include Ian Dury.
He is winner of 2006 BACS Gold Badge Award and board member for the Performing Rights Society.

Personal
He has three children, a son and two daughters. His daughter, Ianthe, attended Oxford University.

References

Peter Jenner

155

Peter Jenner
Peter Jenner

2013, Przystanek Woodstock


Born

1943

Almamater

University of Cambridge

Occupation

Music manager
Record producer

Organization

Blackhill Enterprises
Sincere Management

Peter Jenner (born 1943) is a British music manager and a record producer. Jenner, Andrew King and the original
four members of Pink Floyd were partners in Blackhill Enterprises.

Early career
After gaining a first-class honours degree in Economics from the University of Cambridge, Jenner, at the age of 21,
worked as lecturer at the London School of Economics. After four years at the LSE he left to manage the then
up-and-coming band Pink Floyd. Jenner put on a number of free concerts in London's Hyde Park which included the
1969 concert by The Rolling Stones.[1]

Management career
Jenner has managed Pink Floyd, T Rex, Ian Dury, Roy Harper, The Clash, The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy,
Robyn Hitchcock, Baaba Maal, Sarah Jane Morris, Denzil and Eddi Reader (Fairground Attraction). Jenner has also
managed Billy Bragg for more than 15 yearsWikipedia:Manual of Style/Dates and numbers#Chronological items.

Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd, then an unknown band, began to receive paid bookings including at the Marquee Club in March 1966
where they were watched by Jenner. The band played mostly rhythm and blues songs, but Jenner was impressed with
the strange acoustic effects that Barrett and Wright created during their performance. Jenner traced Waters and
Mason to their flat, and with his business partner and friend Andrew King was subsequently invited to become their
manager. Although the pair had little experience of the music industry, they shared an appreciation of music, as well
as a childhood history. Using inherited money they set up Blackhill Enterprises and purchased new instruments for
the band, as well as equipment which included a Selmer PA system. Under their guidance, Pink Floyd began
performing on London's underground music scene, notably at a venue booked by the London Free School in Notting
Hill, as well as the notorious "Games For May" concert at London's Queen Elizabeth Hall on May 12, 1967, an event

Peter Jenner
set up by both Jenner and King. Jenner and King's diverse array of social connections were meritorious, gaining the
band important coverage in The Financial Times and The Sunday Times. Jenner's voice can be heard at the start of
Pink Floyd's 1967 "Astronomy Domine", the opening track on the album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.[2]
Jenner and King formed a partnership with Pink Floyd called Blackhill Enterprises. After Syd Barrett's departure
from Pink Floyd in 1968 (Jenner and King believed Barrett to be the creative genius of the band, and decided to
represent him and dissolve their agreement with Pink Floyd as they could see no future in the band ^ Glenn Povey
2008 - Pink Floyd Biographer, p.13.) Jenner and King broke up with Pink Floyd and continued as managers for
other British rock bands.

Sincere Management
After Blackhill Enterprises disintegrated in the early 1980s, Jenner and his wife Sumi set up Sincere Management
which managed a range of artists including Billy Bragg, Eddi Reader, Sarah Jane Morris, Robyn Hitchcock, The
Unbending Trees, and Outside Royalty.[3]

Current work
Jenner continues to work at Sincere Management and ceased to be an executive of the International Music Manager's
Forum in 2006 International Music Managers' Forum, likewise a former director of the UK Music Managers' Forum.
Peter was involved in the Featured Artists Coalition many years ago.[4]
In August 2010, he wrote for the Labour Uncut website, during the guest editorship of Tom Watson MP.

On copyright
Jenner has been a regular commentaor on copyright and the music industry. Amongst others he was interviewed on
copyright by NetzpolitikTV[5] and for the documentary Good Copy Bad Copy.[6] An extensive interview with the
Future of Music Coalition about copyright and technology is available as a podcast as part of the Coalition's podcast
series[7]
Jenner has been critical of Digital Rights Management (DRM). He has argued that in response to Napster the music
industry invested heavely in DRM. He argues that the music industry "persuaded themselves they could follow these
files around and every time they were used a small amount of money would come magically to the companies. And
then everything would be fantastic. But of course it did not work out that way because the public hates DRM as it
stops them doing things they want to do in the digital domain." Jenner has long argued that governments should
impose blanket licences for music online to counter copyright infringement, with a fee being collected by internet
service providers (ISPs). He reasoned that "If we can get 1 a month from every person in this island for music, that
would give us 60 million a month," which according to Jenner comes close to the revenues of the music industry in
the UK.
More recently Jenner has been involved in efforts to build a music rights registry at European Union level, and has
argued for an international music registry, supported by the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).
According to Jenner "we dont know who owns what and where" and this holds back the copyright licensing of
music online. Jenner now wants to see a wide variety of online music services and business models being licensed,
through a mixture of blanket licenses and individual licences. Jenner argues that copyright, and intellectual property
more generally is a system which ensures that people get paid, he argues that "Intellectual property is not something
like a chair."

156

Peter Jenner

References
[1] Musictank speakers biographies (http:/ / www. musictank. co. uk/ resources/ speaker-biographies/
peter-jenner-sincere-management-secretary-general-immf)
[2] Pink Floyd who is who (http:/ / pinkfloydhyperbase. dk/ who/ j. htm)
[3] Sumi Jenner (http:/ / www. guardian. co. uk/ news/ 2006/ jan/ 10/ guardianobituaries. artsobituaries)
[4] The Great Escape Peter jenner biography (http:/ / www. escapegreat. com/ convention/ speaker/ display. rails?id=2193)
[5] NetzpolitikTV: Interview with Peter Jenner about Copyright in the digital age (http:/ / video. google. com/
videoplay?docid=1269920872401137058#)
[6] Good Copy Bad Copy credits (http:/ / www. goodcopybadcopy. net/ credits)
[7] Future of Music Coalitiona's Podcast Interview Series: Peter Jenner (http:/ / futureofmusic. org/ audio/
fmcs-podcast-interview-series-peter-jenner)

External links
Remix Culture Symposium 2005: Panel 3: Creativity and the Commons (inc. Peter Jenner) (http://www.archive.
org/details/REMIXCULTUREpanel3)
NetzpolitikTV: Interview with Peter Jenner about Copyright in the digital age (http://video.google.com/
videoplay?docid=1269920872401137058#)

157

158

Associated places
UFO Club
Coordinates: 51.518354N 0.132073W [1]
The UFO Club was a famous but short-lived UK underground club in London during the 1960s, venue of
performances by many of the top bands of the day.

History
The UFO Club (pronounced Yoof-oh) was founded by John Hopkins (usually known as "Hoppy") and Joe Boyd in
an Irish dancehall called the "Blarney Club" in the basement of 31 Tottenham Court Road, under the Gala Berkeley
Cinema. It opened on Dec. 23, 1966. Initially the club was advertised as "UFO Presents Nite Tripper". This had been
because Boyd and Hopkins could not decide on "UFO" or "Nite Tripper" as a name for their club.[2] Eventually they
settled on "UFO".
Soft Machine and Pink Floyd were booked for the first two Fridays, and then re-engaged as the club carried on into
1967 after its initial success. Initial events combined live music with light shows, avant garde films and slide shows,
and dance troupes.
Pink Floyd's tenure at UFO was short run. As their fame grew they were able to play bigger venues for higher fees.
Boyd protested that their increasing fame was largely due to the success of UFO, but the band's management wanted
to move on and an agreement was made for just three more Floyd performances at UFO, at an increased fee.
Hopkins and Boyd had to cast around for a new "house band" for UFO. They settled on Soft Machine but also started
booking other acts who were attracted by the club's reputation. Amongst them were The Incredible String Band,
Arthur Brown, Tomorrow, and Procol Harum, who played there when "A Whiter Shade of Pale" was No 1 in the
charts.
An advertisement featuring the Flammarion engraving in the Feb 1326 [3] issue of The International Times for
"UfOria! Festival of Love 10.30 till dawn" [sic] announced "feb.10 the bonzo dog doodah band
flixdalibunuel ginger johnson african drums" as well as "feb 17 soft machine mark boyle projections
movies food erogenius 3 + 4".
Hapshash and the Coloured Coat, consisting of Michael English and Nigel Waymouth, designed psychedelic posters
to advertise events. The food was macrobiotic and included brown rice rissoles, vegetarian stuffed vine leaves and
felafel.
Jack Braceland's (Fiveacres Lights) created some of the light shows with equipment which ranged from 16mm
projection of what we would now call 'art house' films (often projected sideways or projected into smoke) or 5 Kw
'Pani's' (effects projectors) borrowed from Samuelsons at Pinewood or Elstree film studios (or Strand Electric at
Vauxhall) to overhead projectors with transparent trays borrowed from refrigerators and filled with water/indian
ink/beer/whatever. A favorite was to use 'Aldis' slide projectors with dual layer 22 glass specimen slides with basic
designs created with wax crayons (drawn by Lou the oft naked lady) and then various substances introduced with
syringes indian inks, snot, semen in fact anything of imiscible viscosities. Bubbles made by injecting air between
the glass plates which were then squeezed (by a pair of long nose pliers in time to the music) would send folks
even further off their heads!
The UFO Clubs success was its downfall being too small to accommodate the increasing number of visitors. If a
big name such as Jeff Beck was playing, UFO broke even, but the club usually lost money. In October 1967 the UFO

UFO Club
Club at the Roundhouse folded.Wikipedia:Citation needed

UFO Club billings


Dec 23/30: Nite Tripper under Gala Berkeley Cinema; Warhol movies; Soft Machine; The Pink Floyd; Anger
movies; Heating warm; IT god
Jan 13: Pink Floyd; Marilyn Monroe movie; The Sun Trolley; Technicolor strobe; Fiveacre slides; Karate
Jan 20: Pink Floyd; Anger movie
Jan 27: AMM Music; Pink Floyd; Five Acre Light; Flight of the Aerogenius Chpt 1; International Times; IT Girl
Beauty Contest
Feb 3: Soft Machine; Brown's Poetry; Flight of the Aerogenius Chpt 2; Bruce Connor Movies
Feb 10: Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band; Ginger Johnson; Bank Dick WC Fields
Feb 17: Soft Machine; Indian Music; Disney Cartoons; Mark Boyle Feature Movie
Feb 24: Pink Floyd; Brothers Grimm
Mar 3: Soft Machine; Pink Floyd
Mar 10: Pink Floyd
Mar 17: St Patrick's day off
Mar 24: Soft Machine

Mar 31: Crazy World of Arthur Brown; Pink Alberts; 'spot the fuzz contest'
Apr 7: Soft Machine
Apr 14: Arthur Brown; Social Deviants; Special: the fuzz
Apr 21: Pink Floyd
Apr 28: Tomorrow; The Purple Gang
(Apr 29/30: 14-Hour Technicolor Dream at the Alexandra Palace)
May 5: Soft Machine; Arthur Brown
May 12: Graham Bond Organisation; Procol Harum
May 19: Tomorrow; Arthur Brown; The People Show
May 26: The Move
Jun 2: Pink Floyd
Jun 9: Procol Harum; The Smoke
Jun 10: Pink Floyd
Jun 16: Crazy World of Arthur Brown; Soft Machine; The People Blues Band 4.30am
Jun 23: Liverpool Love Festival; The Trip
Jun 30: Tomorrow; The Knack; Dead Sea Fruit
Jul 7: Denny Laine; Pretty Things
Jul 14: Arthur Brown; Alexis Korner; Victor Brox
Jul 21: Tomorrow; Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band
Jul 28: Pink Floyd; CIA v UFO; Fairport Convention
Aug 4: Eric Burdon; Family
Aug 11: Tomorrow
Aug 18: Arthur Brown; Incredible String Band
Sep 1/2: UFO Festival: Pink Floyd; Soft Machine; The Move; Arthur Brown; Tomorrow; Denny Laine
Sep 8: Eric Burdon & The New Animals; Aynsley Dunbar
Sep 15: Soft Machine; Family
Sep 22: Dantalian's Chariot w Zoot Money & His Light Show; The Social Deviants; The Exploding Galaxy

Sep 29: Jeff Beck; Ten Years After; Mark Boyle's New Sensual Laboratory; Contessa Veronica

159

UFO Club

References
[1] http:/ / tools. wmflabs. org/ geohack/ geohack. php?pagename=UFO_Club& params=51. 518354_N_-0. 132073_E_
[2] Boyd, Joe, White Bicycles - Making Music in the 1960s, Serpent's Tail, 2006. ISBN 1-85242-910-0
[3] http:/ / www. internationaltimes. it/ archive/ index. php?item=IT_1967-02-13_B-IT-Volume-1_Iss-8_016

External links
Original Founder John 'Hoppy' Hopkins (http://www.Hoppyx.com/)
Original Founder Joe Boyd (http://www.JoeBoyd.co.uk/index.html)
Original Fan Club (http://theufo.ning.com/)

Further reading
Hopkins, John, FROM THE HIP - Photographs by JOHN "HOPPY" HOPKINS in the 1960-66, DAMIANI. 2008.
ISBN 978-88-6208-018-7
Boyd, Joe, White Bicycles - Making Music in the 1960s, Serpent's Tail. 2007. ISBN 978-1-85242-489-3
Miles, Barry: In the Sixties. (London 2002)
Green, Jonathon: Days in the Life: Voices from the English Underground, 1961-71 (London 1998)
Saunders, William Jimi Hendrix London Roaring Forties Press. 2010. ISBN 978-0-9843165-1-9
Joe Beard's biography of The Purple Gang Taking the Purple contains many references to UFO. Available in
print ISBN 978-0-9928671-0-2 or online in Kindle format http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KLOEOIO ISBN
978-0-9928671-1-9[1][2]

160

161

Miscellany
List of songs recorded by Syd Barrett
The following is a sortable table of all songs by Syd Barrett:
The column Song list the song title.
The column Album lists the album the song is featured on.
The column Year lists the year in which the song was released.
If the song was never officially released on a studio album (but released on a compilation), Year will list
the year it was recorded (with year of compilation in brackets).
The column Notes lists if the song is instrumental, etc.
The column Length list the length/duration of the song.

Studio recordings
Song

Album

Year

Notes

Length

"Baby
Lemonade"

Barrett

1970

Take 1, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Barrett.

4:10

"Bob Dylan
Blues"

The Best of Syd


Barrett: Wouldn't
You Miss Me?

1970
(2001)

"Birdie Hop"

Opel

1970
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

2:30

"Clowns and
Jugglers"

Opel

1968
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel. Take 1, is included on the Crazy


Diamond (1993) reissue of Opel.

3:27

"Dark Globe"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

Take 1 (titled "Wouldn't You Miss Me?"), is included on the rarities/outtakes album,
Opel.

2:02

"Dolly Rocker"

Opel

1970
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

3:01

"Dominoes"

Barrett

1970

Takes 1 and 2, are included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Barrett. For
release on An Introduction to Syd Barrett, a new bass track was recorded by David
Gilmour.

4:08

"Effervescing
Elephant"

Barrett

1970

Take 2, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Opel.

1:52

"Feel"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

"Gigolo Aunt"

Barrett

1970

Take 9, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Opel.

5:46

"Golden Hair"

The Madcap Laughs

1969

Written by BarrettJoyce, based on a poem by Joyce. Take 5, is included on the


Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of The Madcap Laughs. Take 1 (instrumental), is
included on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

1:59

"Here I Go"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

For release on An Introduction to Syd Barrett, a new bass track was recorded by
David Gilmour.

3:11

"I Never Lied to


You"

Barrett

1970

Take 1, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Barrett.

1:50

3:14

2:17

List of songs recorded by Syd Barrett

162

"If It's in You"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

2:26

"It Is Obvious"

Barrett

1970

Take 2, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Barrett. Takes 3 and 5,
are included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Opel.

2:59

"Late Night"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

Take 2 (instrumental), is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Opel.

3:10

"Lanky (Part
One)"

Opel

1968
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

5:32

"Let's Split"

Opel

1970
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

2:23

"Long Gone"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

"Love Song"

Barrett

1970

Take 1, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Barrett.

3:03

"Love You"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

Takes 1 and 3, are included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of The Madcap
Laughs.

2:30

"No Good
Trying"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

Take 5 (titled "It's No Good Trying"), is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993)
reissue of The Madcap Laughs.

3:26

"No Man's Land" The Madcap Laughs

1970

3:03

"Maisie"

Barrett

1970

2:51

"Milky Way"

Opel

1970
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

"Octopus"

The Madcap Laughs

1969

Takes 1 and 2, are included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of The Madcap
3:47
Laughs. For release on An Introduction to Syd Barrett, a new bass track was recorded
by David Gilmour.

"Opel"

Opel

1969
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

6:26

"Rats"

Barrett

1970

Demo, included on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

3:00

"Rhamadan"

An Introduction to
Syd Barrett

1969
(2010)

Available only as a download, with a key code from copies of An Intro, or when the
whole album is bought from iTunes.

20:09

"She Took a
The Madcap Laughs
Long Cold Look"

1970

Take 4 (titled "She Took a Long Cold Look at Me"), is included on the Crazy
Diamond (1993) reissue of The Madcap Laughs. Re-titled "She Took a Long Cool
Look", for reasons unknown, on An Introduction to Syd Barrett. For release on An
Intro, a new bass track was recorded by David Gilmour.

1:55

"Swan Lee (Silas


Lang)"

Opel

1968
(1988)

Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

3:13

"Terrapin"

The Madcap Laughs

1970

"Two of a Kind"

The Peel Session

1970
(1987)

Never properly recorded. Part of a BBC Radio One session.

5:04

"Waving My
Arms in the Air"

Barrett

1970

Take 1, is included on the Crazy Diamond (1993) reissue of Barrett.

2:09

"Wined and
Dined"

Barrett

1970

Demo, is included on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

2:58

"Wolfpack"

Barrett

1970

"Word Song"

Opel

1970
(1988)

2:50

3:07

5:04

3:41
Released on the rarities/outtakes album, Opel.

3:19

List of songs recorded by Syd Barrett

163

References

Blackhill Enterprises
Blackhill Enterprises
Industry

Music management

Fate

Dissolved

Founded

1960s

Defunct

1980s

Headquarters London, England


Key people

Peter Jenner
Andrew King
Syd Barrett
Nick Mason
Roger Waters
Richard Wright

Blackhill Enterprises was a rock music management company, founded as a partnership by the four original
members of Pink Floyd (Syd Barrett, Nick Mason, Roger Waters and Richard Wright), with Peter Jenner and
Andrew King.
Blackhill were the organisers of the first Hyde Park free concerts.
After Syd Barrett left Pink Floyd, the partnership was dissolved, and Jenner and King continued Blackhill to manage
Barrett. Following Blackhill's eventual dissolution, both Jenner and King continued to work in music management.
They also managed:

Marc Bolan (who met his wife, June Child, while she was working as Blackhill's secretary)
Edgar Broughton Band
The Clash
Ian Dury
Roy Harper
Alberto Y Lost Trios Paranoias

References

Beyond the Wildwood

164

Beyond the Wildwood


Beyond the Wildwood A
Tribute to Syd Barrett
Compilation album by Various Artists
Released

1987

Genre

Alternative rock

Length

60:15

Label

Imaginary (UK)

Beyond the Wildwood A Tribute to Syd Barrett is a tribute album consisting of music written by Pink Floyd's
original guitarist, vocalist and primary songwriter Syd Barrett. The musicians performing on the album are British
and American indie rock artists. The songs featured come from Pink Floyd's singles; the albums The Piper at the
Gates of Dawn and A Saucerful of Secrets; and Barrett's two solo albums: The Madcap Laughs and Barrett.
Although Barrett's productive recording career had only lasted from 1967 though 1970, his music had a great
influence on the development of psychedelic rock, alternative rock and indie rock music.

Track listing
All songs written by Syd Barrett, except where noted.
Side one
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"No Good Trying" The Mock Turtles 3:31


"Octopus" Plasticland 3:30
"Arnold Layne" SS-20 3:05
"Matilda Mother" Paul Roland 2:55
"Long Cold Look" Fit and Limo 2:18
"Long Gone" The Shamen 3:47
"If the Sun Don't Shine (Adaptation of Jugband Blues)" Opal 4:35

Side two

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

"Baby Lemonade" The Ashes in the Morning 3:17


"Wolfpack" The Lobster Quadrille 3:04
"Golden Hair" (Barrett/Joyce) The Paint Set 1:58
"No Man's Land" Tropicana Fishtank 3:51
"Apples and Oranges" Television Personalities 3:14
"Two of a Kind" The Soup Dragons 2:51
"Scream Thy Last Scream" The Green Telescope 4:40

CD bonus tracks
"See Emily Play" The Chemistry Set 3:12
2. "Rats" What Noise 4:50
3. "Gigolo Aunt" Death of Samantha 5:31

Beyond the Wildwood

165

References

Joy of a Toy
Joy of a Toy
Studio album by Kevin Ayers
Released

November 1969

Recorded 17 June11 September 1969; Abbey Road Studios, London


Genre

Rock, Psychedelic Pop

Length

41:30 (original issue)


1:07:04 (2003 reissue)

Label

Harvest

Producer Kevin Ayers & Peter Jenner


Kevin Ayers chronology

Joy of a
Toy
(1969)

Shooting at the
Moon
(1970)

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source

Rating

AllMusic

[1]

Rolling Stone

[2]

The Times

[3]

Joy of a Toy is the debut solo album of Kevin Ayers, a founding member of Soft Machine. Its whimsical and unique
vision is a clear indication of how Soft Machine might have progressed under Ayers' tenure. He is accompanied on
the LP by his Soft Machine colleagues Robert Wyatt, Mike Ratledge and Hugh Hopper.
After a Soft Machine tour of the USA with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Ayers had decided to retire from the music
business. Hendrix however, presented Ayers with an acoustic Gibson J-200 guitar on the promise that he continue
his songwriting. Ayers repaired to a small London flat where he composed and arranged a whole LP which was then
presented to Malcolm Jones' fledgling Harvest label where it was recorded by Peter Jenner for the then exorbitant
sum of 4000.
Joy features many of Ayers' most enduring songs from "The Lady Rachel" to "Girl on a Swing", the latter still,
regularly covered by artists to this day like Candie Payne and The Ladybug Transistor. It was on Joy that Ayers
developed his sonorous vocal delivery, an avant-garde song construction and an affection for bizarre instrumentation
that would have a deep influence far into the 1970s and indeed the present day.
For the recording of Syd Barrett's first solo albumThe Madcap LaughsSoft Machine was brought in to do
overdubs for a few of Barrett's tracks. It was during this time, Barrett did guitar for Ayers on his track "Religious
Experience", (later titled "Singing a Song in the Morning") this version wasn't released until the 2003 reissue of Joy.

Joy of a Toy

Track listing
All tracks written by Kevin Ayers

Side 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

"Joy of a Toy Continued" 2:54


"Town Feeling" 4:54
"The Clarietta Rag" 3:20
"Girl on a Swing" 2:49
"Song for Insane Times" 4:00

Side 2
2.
3.
4.
5.

"Stop This Train (Again Doing It)" 6:05


"Eleanor's Cake (Which Ate Her)" 2:53
"The Lady Rachel" 5:17
"Oleh Oleh Bandu Bandong" 5:35
"All This Crazy Gift of Time" 3:57

Bonus tracks (2003 reissue)


"Religious Experience" [take 9] 4:46 ("Singing a Song in the Morning")
2. "The Lady Rachel" 6:42 (extended first mix)
3. "Soon Soon Soon" 3:23
4. "Religious Experience" [take 103] 2:50 ("Singing a Song in the Morning")
Featuring Syd Barrett
5. "The Lady Rachael" 4:51 (Single Version)
6. "Singing a Song in the Morning" 2:52 (Single Version)

Personnel

Kevin Ayers / Guitars, Bass and Vocals


Robert Wyatt / Drums
David Bedford / Piano, Mellotron, Arranger
Mike Ratledge / Organ
Hugh Hopper / Bass (1 & 5)
Paul Buckmaster / Cello
Rob Tait / Drums (6 & 9)
Paul Minns / Oboe

plus on "Religious Experience" / "Singing a Song in the Morning" :

Syd Barrett / Guitar (14)


Richard Sinclair / Bass
Richard Coughlan / Drums
David Sinclair / Organ
The Ladybirds / Backing vocals

Shortly after Barrett's death, Ayers told Mojo magazine that when Barrett arrived at the studio: "....he was
out-of-it....wasn't able to tune his guitar or find the chords". A third guitar is present on this track [take 103], most
noticeably at 0:54-1:03, 1:37-1:42 and 2:34-2:51.

166

Joy of a Toy

References
[1] [ AllMusic review]
[2] Rolling Stone review (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ artists/ kevinayers/ albums/ album/ 165361/ review/ 5947077/ joy_of_a_toy)
[3] The Times review (http:/ / entertainment. timesonline. co. uk/ tol/ arts_and_entertainment/ music/ article4172687. ece)

Kevin Ayers by Richard Williams (Melody Maker 25 Apr 1970)


Joy of a Toy liner notes by Mark Powell (EMI 2003)
Joy of a Toy liner notes by Martin Wakeling (Harvest Sept 2006)

External links
Joy of a Toy - Best Albums of All Time by Peter Paphides (http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/
arts_and_entertainment/music/article4172687.ece)

167

"Singing a Song in the Morning"

168

"Singing a Song in the Morning"


"Singing a Song in the Morning"
Singleby Kevin Ayers and The Whole World
B-side

"Eleanor's Cake (Which Ate Her)"

Released

Feb 1970

Format

7"

Genre

Psychedelic rock

Length

2:48

Label

Harvest HAR 5011

Writer(s)

Kevin Ayers

Producer(s)

Peter Jenner, Malcolm Jones

Kevin Ayers and The Whole World singles chronology

"Singing a Song in the


Morning"
(1970)

"Butterfly
Dance"
(1970)

"Singing a Song in the Morning" (originally titled "Religious Experience") was the first Kevin Ayers single,
released three months after his debut solo LP Joy of a Toy. It did not feature on the album, however, the b-side,
"Eleanor's Cake (Which Ate Her)", was taken from the album and is considered a classic Ayers recording.
For the recording of Syd Barrett's first solo albumThe Madcap LaughsSoft Machine was brought in to do
overdubs for a few of Barrett's tracks. It was during this time, Barrett did guitar for Ayers on his track "Religious
Experience", this version was not released until the 2003 reissue of Joy.

Track listing
All tracks written by Kevin Ayers.
1. "Singing a Song in the Morning"
2. "Eleanor's Cake (Which Ate Her)"

Personnel

Kevin Ayers Guitars and Vocals


David Sinclair Organ
Richard Sinclair Bass
Richard Coughlan Drums
The Ladybirds Backing Vocals
Syd Barrett Guitar

"Singing a Song in the Morning"

References
External links
Full lyrics of this song (http://www.metrolyrics.com/singing-a-song-in-the-morning-lyrics-kevin-ayers.html)
at MetroLyrics

169

Article Sources and Contributors

Article Sources and Contributors


Syd Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=615928136 Contributors: 0, 192.246.233.xxx, 1exec1, 2tuntony, 6, 75pickup, 777sms, A J Luxton, A Knight Who Says Ni,
AKucia, Aaron Schulz, Abebenjoe, Academic Challenger, Accordionman, Action Jackson IV, Adambro, Adamhauner, Adeptus Noctem, Adm58, Adz brez, Afireinside13t, Afromayun, Against
the current, Agrofe, Akersmc, Alangleaves, Alpha Quadrant, AlterBerg, Amb1997, Amire80, Amrush, Andremdesouza@wikipedia.com, Andycjp, Angel caboodle, Angela MacLean,
Angelo.romano, Anger22, Angmering, AnonMoos, Arbitrary username, Arcandam, Arizonasqueeze, Arm, AshFR, Ashley Pomeroy, Astroguato, Au6ergines, Aussie Ausborn, Azalea pomp,
BGC, BRG, BT14, BWernham, Babbage, BabuBhatt, Baconator332, Balph Eubank, BarrettJ, Barrettmagic, Barticus88, Bearcat, Beardo, Beastux, Beatnick, Being blunt, Beltline, Ben Culture,
BenFrantzDale, Beve, Bgwhite, Bigdaddy1981, Bigjimr, Binabik80, Bjarki S, Black Falcon, Blakwyte, BlkStarr, Bmicomp, Bobrayner, Bobyllib, Bodnotbod, Bongwarrior, Bonteburg, Boojum,
Bossrat, Brcreeper, Bright Darkness, Brighterorange, Brim, Browserlong, Brunellus, Bulbous, Bulldog73, Bumblebeebizarre, Bumm13, Burgermeister77, Burner0815, C777, CCS81, Cactus.man,
CalJW, Calidum, CamTarn, Camwrites, Candylegs, CanisRufus, Cansarp, Capricorn42, CaptainSobriety, Captainpancreas, Careful With That Axe, Eugene, Carl.bunderson, CassiasMunch,
CatherineMunro, Causa sui, Cavrdg, Cesarm, Cfortunato, Chaosdruid, Chiranjeev 2007, Chowbok, Chris 42, Chris Henniker, Chrishy man, Christo jones, CincinnatiWiki, Ckessler, Clearcontent,
Cmdrjameson, Colonies Chris, CombatWombat42, Comisdazied, CommonsDelinker, Conical Johnson, Contaminator, Coq Rouge, Cosprings, Cphwb556, Cpsen, Cro..Scream, Crystallina,
Cuchullain, Cunningham, Cwoyte, Cyanidesandwich, Cyanidethistles, D6, DDima, DJBullfish, DNewhall, Daguerio, Dajavo, Darcagn, Darkhorse82, DaveG12345, Davehard, David Gerard,
DavidLeighEllis, Davidiad, Davidswelt, Dcs1, DeXXus, Dead3y3, DeadCute20, Deadagain33, Deadly windex, Deb, Deba Tihs n Mad Dog, Deltabeignet, Denisarona, Derbyborn, Design,
Destevika, Dethomas, Deyyaz, Dfrg.msc, Dharmabum420, Dick Shane, Dismas, Dispenser, Dl2000, Dlivingstone, Dmn, DocWatson42, Doktor Who, Dopefish, Dori, Dou Gweler, Douglasr007,
Dr. Blofeld, Drivec, Drrngrvy, Drwhawkfan, Dthomsen8, Duncancumming, Dunks58, DynamoDegsy, Dyolf, E. Sn0 =31337=, EKindig, EOgas, Echoes71, Editor19841, Eduen, Egghead06,
Eirik, Electricsorbet, Eli.karikash, Elipongo, Elitropia, Elizabethkleszczewski, Elz dad, EmilyJones, EmmSeeMusic, Enaitzjga, Eras-mus, Erebus555, Eric Colvin, Eric Wester,
Erstwhilepromotions, Evenrd, Evertype, Everyking, Evilive, Ewks, Fabometric, Falco70, FanOfMetal, Felix Atagong, Filter1987, Finalnight, Fishanthrope, FlakBurger, Flamineo, Flamurai,
Flatty333, Flcelloguy, Floydgeo, Floydian, Fluppy, Flx82, Flying Hamster, Foday, Foetusized, FootyStavros, FotoPhest, Fourthords, Franciselliott, Francodamned, Frannyandzooey,
Freakofnurture, Frecklefoot, Fred J, Freddy engels, Freshfighter9, Fugu Alienking, Funeral, Fyyer, G Rose, GTBacchus, GabeMc, Gadfium, Gamaliel, Gargaj, Gaul, Gbeeker, Gbok, Geneb1955,
Gogo Dodo, GoingBatty, Gold Stur, Goldenband, Good Olfactory, GraemeL, GreyLantern, Grm wnr, Guidedbyalan, Gurch, Gwalla, Halda, Hallogallo, Hammersoft, Hapsiainen, Harej, Harry
Rivett, Hashamulhaq111, Hatto, Hattrem, Headbomb, HennessyC, Herrk, Hessamnia, HexaChord, Himtroy, HisSpaceResearch, Holdthelineloveisntalwaysontime, Hoops gza, Hpvpp,
Hughcharlesparker, I am the radiohead, I dream of horses, Ian Dalziel, Ian246, Iced Kola, Ilikeeatingwaffles, InTheFlesh?, Inky, Internet43, InverseHypercube, ItReallyDoes, J Milburn, J.
Newnham, J04n, JABEYE, JCSantos, JNW, Jacj, Jadez03, Jahsonic, Jaico78, Jakobco234, James599, Jamesinderbyshire, Jamesm557, Jampilot, Janejellyroll, JasonTP, Jaybee, Jaycey, Jbuck105,
Jchoma, Jdcooper, JeffTrotter3965, Jehochman, Jenny Wong, Jesustrashcan, Jfiling, Jgera5, Jim62sch, Jim856796, Jimbo Wales, Jmn100, Jmw0000, JoeChrisMorris, Joefromrandb, Joelhowells,
Joey Q. McCartney, Joeyramoney, John, John Cardinal, John Depp, John of Reading, JohnRussell, Johnfos, Jojhutton, Jooler, JosefK, Joshua Scott, Jpbowen, Jtsarles, Julesd, Jrdan, KYnQuinhe,
Kafziel, Kai81, Kaini, Kamahl90, Katieh5584, Kedi the tramp, Keith-264, Kejoxen, Kellen, Kentamanos, Kevimetal, Khazar2, Killing Vector, Kinneyboy90, Klanda, Koavf, Konczewski,
Kozumel, KrakatoaKatie, Krobertj, Krtki, Kupsztal, Kylu, Lartza, Leandrod, LeatherEngine, LeaveSleaves, LessHeard vanU, Lewvalton, Lfstevens, Licon, Liftarn, Ligulem, Lindenhurst
Liberty, Lisasmall, LizardJr8, Lkesteloot, Llort, Llywrch, Lockley, Longhair, Lordnecronus, Luca.gambazzi, Luckygoon, Ludivine, Lumos3, Lynchical, MBisanz, MC10, MDCore,
MMcCaghrey, Mackem-Roid, Madcap piper, Madmagic, Magnus Manske, MakeChooChooGoNow, Man with bunch of sticks, Mandarax, Mankar Camoran, Mark Arsten, Marlowe, MarnetteD,
Marshall Stax, Martarius, MartinSFSA, Martinevans123, Martiniminister, Martinp23, Martyn Smith, Mashford, Master of Puppets, Maximaximax, Mclaren715, Meegs, MegX, Mentahlfloss,
Metalmilitia130, Mezigue, MichaelXX2, Mick gold, Mike Rosoft, Mimr, Mitzimum, Mk5384, Mlpearc, Mmernex, Mogsy7, Moogolplex, Mordacil, Mordemur, Morfusmax, Mousebelt, Moxy,
Mr Stephen, Mr. Manu, Mr. mojo rison, Mr415, MrMathematique, Mu Mind, MuZemike, Multixfer, Murry1975, Musgrave Pi, Musiclover, Muugokszhiion, Myxomatosis57, Nadavspi, Naddy,
Nairobiny, Nanonano27, Natalie Erin, Naufana, NawlinWiki, Ndenison, Neilbeach, Neilc, Neschek, NewEnglandYankee, Nick Novikov, Nigel C. Fortune, Nite-Sirk, Nobaddude, Nobody of
Consequence, Noecker, Nomoretears, Not a slave, NotQuiteEXPComplete, Nv8200p, Nymf, Oblivious, Oda Mari, Ogre lawless, Ohconfucius, Ok9996, Old Moonraker, Ombrios, Oncamera,
Ondy, One Salient Oversight, Onikun, Onorem, Opa2299, Ortolan88, Otieo, Otto.fox, Owen, PCMorphy72, PRL42, Paidforit, Palica, PanAndScan, Patrick. R. Newbold, Patsobest, Patstuart, Paul
Barlow, Paxsimius, Pegua, Peregrine981, PetSounds, PeterDeWachter, Pethan, Pewwer42, PhantomS, Phbasketball6, Philip Trueman, PhiloLogos, Pibwl, Pieter202, Pigsonthewing, Piniricc65,
Pink Floyd For Free, Pinkadelica, Pisces22, Pjoef, Plant's Strider, Pmcm, Poindexter Propellerhead, Porchcorpter, Postdlf, Progrockerfan, Proteus71, Psicolabis, Psycho 79, PurplePlatypus,
Pyramidek, Qaz6, Quadell, Qwyrxian, QzDaddy, R'n'B, R.christie, Radiopathy, Raelthelamb, Raiyuu, Ral315, Rawmustard, Realxsalo, RedWolf, Reedy, Registered user 92, Rholton, Ribberboy,
Rich Farmbrough, Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ), Richerman, Ricky81682, Riordanmr, Ritchie333, Rjwilmsi, Rmocx, Rms125a@hotmail.com, RobMientjes, Robma, RodC, Rodhullandemu,
Rodw, RogDel, Rogerthat, Rolf Jordan, Rorschach567, Rory Carrol, Rothorpe, Rotring, RottweilerCS, Rowangsd, Rrmsjp, Rsrikanth05, Rubyinraybans, RxS, Rxnd, Ryansedgwick, Ryulong,
SCFilm29, SJP, SVG75, Sabrebd, Saccerzd, Sacularamacal13, Sadenia, Sal d'Ochin, Saltywood, Samantha555, Saulkaiserman, Scruss, Scwlong, Seabream, Sealman, Seaphoto, Selleck8289,
Semitransgenic, Ser Amantio di Nicolao, Sfan00 IMG, Sfear, Sgr927, SgtPetsounds, Shamrox, Shanescala, Sharcho, Sharksandwich999, ShelfSkewed, Shirudo, Shroomy1991, Shyam, SidP,
SilkTork, Silroquen, SimonClinch, SimonMayer, Sina, Sjc, Sjmcd, Skizzik, Slambo, Slapabalooza, Slashme, Slinto, Smokenot, Smuckola, Snaxe920, Snaxorb, Sojambi Pinola, Solipsist,
Sonicyouth86, Sophie means wisdom, Special-T, Spellmaster, Spike Wilbury, SqueakBox, Squid603, Srsrsr, Stargoat, StefanWirz, Stephen's black friend, Store Hadji, Str1977, Straw Cat,
Stronach, Substancep, Sudie2012, Sukka Punch, SummerPhD, SurlyRed, Surrehue, Suziecha, Swamp Ig, Sydbarrett74, Sydbarrettttt, Sydmorrison, Szyslak, Tableclothes, Tamfang, Targeman,
Taro-Gabunia, Tassedethe, TawsifSalam, Teiladnam, Tenniru, Tentinator, Tetedupet, Tetrg, Tezero, The Anome, The Parsnip!, The Thing That Should Not Be, The Uncyclopedian, The
Vegetable Man, The stuart, The wub, TheKoG, TheMadBaron, TheOnlyOne12, TheQuandry, TheScotch, Thebrid, Thecurran, Thedaveformula, Theodore Kloba, Thingg, Thomas Peardew,
Thoughtcat, Thumperward, ThunderPeel2001, Thuresson, Thymug, Tim35, Timeforemptyspaces, Timerrill, Timescribe, Timothyreal, Timrollpickering, Tirkfl, Tobias Hoevekamp,
Toindeedbeagawd, TomGreen, Tomcat7, Tomkurts, Tommy2010, Tony Corsini, Tony1, Toukola, Travelling Tragition, Treybien, Trishm, Tristanhughes, Tuskah, Twas Now, Twiin, Tyciol,
Tyrenius, Ummagumma23, Underorbit, Undertow87, UnicornTapestry, Universaladdress, Usually Right, Vague Rant, Vanamonde93, Vanished user 31lk45mnzx90, Vary, Verdatum, Verne
Equinox, Vesta987, Vijaychauhan1990, Vincentnufcr1, Vinhtantran, Vivekgopinath, Voopa, Voxel-Ux, Waldzazi, Walor, Ward3001, Werideatdusk33, Wester, WestwoodMatt, When Muffins
Attack, WhickedWilly, Whitespeck, Whotookthatguy, Widr, WikHead, Wiki alf, Wiki libs, Wikien2009, Wikiisntobjective, William Rehtworc, Wishmechaos, Wjvanb, Wknight94, Wodawik,
WolfenSilva, Woohookitty, Wwwhatsup, XXXtylerXXX, Xave, Xinit, Xnuala, Y0u, Y2kcrazyjoker4, Yahoogiddix, Yamla, Yankees76, Yeepsi, Yintan, Zafiroblue05, Zazaban, Zill, ZincOrbie,
Zkbrnr211, ZooFari, Zopwx2, Zubrowka74, , , 1503 anonymous edits
Syd Barrett discography Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=598469009 Contributors: Headbomb, Ohconfucius, Rothorpe, Rotlink, TangoTizerWolfstone, Yeepsi
The Madcap Laughs Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=603154661 Contributors: 75pickup, AB, Action Jackson IV, Ahpook, Alfredojahn, Alvareo, Amb1997, Apoc2400,
Arjayay, Arthur Rubin, BGC, Barbarajacob, BlkStarr, BoBoCTiberius, Bongwarrior, Bravo Plantation, CanisRufus, Cjmarsicano, Dantesque1, Darkhorse82, Darwin's Bulldog, Deadagain33,
Derek R Bullamore, Design, Dflock, Dmakatra, Doceddi, Doktor Who, Dubmill, Dyolf, E-Kartoffel, E.Goldstein, EoGuy, Felix Atagong, Floydfan93, Fnorp, Freekee, GoingBatty, GrahamColm,
Headbomb, HisSpaceResearch, J.delanoy, JG66, Jaycey, Jhsounds, John Depp, John of Reading, Kafziel, Khazar2, Koavf, Longhair, MOot3245t, Marek Koudelka, MartinSFSA, Martiniminister,
Mattbrundage, Mogism, Mr Stephen, Mr. Manu, NSR77, NathanSchulz, Neodop, Nick Number, Ohconfucius, Panchoytoro, PetSounds, Plant's Strider, Ramius, Rich Farmbrough, Richard Arthur
Norton (1958- ), Ritchie333, Rodhullandemu, Saltywood, Shaidar cuebiyar, SilkTork, Slysplace, Someoneinmyheadbutit'snotme, Soul Crusher, Swanrizla, Tenniru, The Drainpipe, Thebogusman,
Tnae2, Tothebarricades.tk, Txomin, Uberhill, Ugur Basak, Updatehelper, VPliousnine, WhickedWilly, WolfenSilva, Woovee, Wvoutlaw2002, Wwagner, Y2kcrazyjoker4, Yeepsi, 89 anonymous
edits
Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=616305677 Contributors: A Knight Who Says Ni, Adm58, Alonsolizano, AlterBerg, Aspects, BD2412, BauerPower, Blitterbug,
Brady Heston, CanisRufus, Cjmarsicano, Contaminator, Darkhorse82, Dekimasu, Digztytwo, DippyTheDog, Doktor Who, Dyolf, E.Goldstein, EoGuy, Erstwhilepromotions, Fritz Saalfeld,
FunkMonk, Headbomb, JG66, Jogers, John, Koavf, LodeRunner, MarkBuckles, Mattbrundage, Moez, Mr Stephen, Mr. Manu, Mungo Kitsch, Muugokszhiion, Ohconfucius, Owen, Panchoytoro,
Patrick Neylan, PetSounds, Radiopathy, Rich Farmbrough, Ritchie333, Rothorpe, Rustavizauri, Saltywood, Slysplace, Soren84, Soul Crusher, SouperAwesome, Sposato, SteinbDJ, Swanrizla,
Tabletop, Tbhotch, Tenniru, Tomkurts, Torenko, Trappist the monk, Warpozio, Will Beback Auto, Wizard909, WolfenSilva, Woovee, Xezbeth, Yeepsi, Yoursvivek, 39 anonymous edits
The Peel Session Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=598469669 Contributors: Arjayay, Bahar101, Beardo, BrownHairedGirl, CapitalLetterBeginning, Cesarm, Contaminator,
DaveGorman, Deba Tihs n Mad Dog, Design, Drummer070, Drwhawkfan, E-Kartoffel, Fantailfan, Finlux, Floydgeo, Fritz Saalfeld, Goldenband, Kingboyk, Koavf, Mr. Manu, NathanSchulz,
Ohconfucius, PetSounds, Playtime, Progjunky, Rich Farmbrough, RobinCarmody, Rothorpe, Saltywood, SgtPetsounds, Slapabalooza, Swanrizla, Tatrgel, Tenniru, Torenko, Trendall,
Underwater, Yeepsi, 8 anonymous edits
The Radio One Sessions Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=598463648 Contributors: DONOVAN, Design, Drwhawkfan, Egpetersen, Eightleggeddancer, Floydgeo,
Fylbecatulous, GoingBatty, Great Deku Tree, Koavf, Michael Barera, Mr. Manu, Ohconfucius, Pastoryam12, Petro, Rich Farmbrough, Saltywood, Slapabalooza, Stassats, SteinbDJ, Tassedethe,
The Parsnip!, Torenko, Yeepsi, 10 anonymous edits
Syd Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=590217663 Contributors: Assleap, Bahar101, CBM, CanisRufus, Cjmarsicano, Cmdrjameson, Darkhorse82, Design, Floydgeo,
Hardcore Harro, Headbomb, Koavf, Mark Lungo, Mattbrundage, Mr. Manu, Ohconfucius, PetSounds, Pigsonthewing, Rich Farmbrough, Rothorpe, Saltywood, Skier Dude, Slapabalooza, Sugar
Bear, Swanrizla, Torenko, Wbeek, Yeepsi, 8 anonymous edits
Opel Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=600948336 Contributors: Ary29, Bachi 2805, CanisRufus, Cjmarsicano, Contaminator, Darkhorse82, Design, DippyTheDog, Dmakatra,
E-Kartoffel, E.Goldstein, EoGuy, Floydgeo, Fritz Saalfeld, Haakon, Headbomb, Hriped, Koavf, Mattbrundage, Michael Slone, Mild Bill Hiccup, Mr. Manu, Multixfer, Ohconfucius, Panchoytoro,
PetSounds, Pigsonthewing, Rich Farmbrough, Rothorpe, Saltywood, Sidar, Slapabalooza, Swanrizla, Tableclothes, Tenniru, Ummagumma23, Underture, Wbeek, WolfenSilva, Yeepsi, 16

170

Article Sources and Contributors


anonymous edits
Octopus: The Best of Syd Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=590202721 Contributors: Alex Peppe, Asn, Bahar101, Bubba hotep, Floydgeo, Headbomb, John of
Reading, Koavf, Ohconfucius, Pastoryam12, Rich Farmbrough, Rothorpe, Skier Dude, Slapabalooza, The Vegetable Man, Vlad, Xihix, Yeepsi, 7 anonymous edits
The Best of Syd Barrett: Wouldn't You Miss Me? Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=600979045 Contributors: Apoc2400, Bahar101, Bongwarrior, CanisRufus,
CapitalLetterBeginning, Cjmarsicano, Cmdrjameson, Darkhorse82, Deae gecweald, Evilive, Floydgeo, Great Deku Tree, Headbomb, Koavf, L1A1 FAL, Mattbrundage, Mr. Manu, Multixfer,
Mwvandersteen, Nichlemn, Ohconfucius, Panchoytoro, PetSounds, Pigsonthewing, Rich Farmbrough, Saltywood, Shoessss, Silian87, Slapabalooza, Sposato, Swanrizla, Tenniru, Torenko,
Underwater, Unint, Yeepsi, 16 anonymous edits
An Introduction to Syd Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=589784448 Contributors: Alvin Seville, Bachi 2805, Bearcat, Codf1977, Colonies Chris, Darkshadow123,
Doomsdayer520, Floydgeo, Fuzzysun, Headbomb, Koavf, Madcap Lass, Mr. Frank, Ohconfucius, Tableclothes, Ummagumma23, Woohookitty, Yeepsi, 8 anonymous edits
Crazy Diamond Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=609257798 Contributors: Ashadeofgrey, Bachi 2805, Bahar101, CanisRufus, Cjmarsicano, Cmdrjameson, Darkhorse82,
Design, E.Goldstein, Floydgeo, FotoPhest, Fritz Saalfeld, Headbomb, JamesAM, Koavf, Manifestation, Mondeouamour, Mr. Manu, Multixfer, Ohconfucius, PCMorphy72, Pcg13, PetSounds,
Pigsonthewing, Rich Farmbrough, Rothorpe, Saltywood, Soul Crusher, Swanrizla, Torenko, Ummagumma23, Underwater, Yeepsi, Zidane tribal, 16 anonymous edits
"Octopus" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=614702508 Contributors: Amalas, CasperBraske, Clarkp, Crystallina, Danbo1999, David Eppstein, Djodjo666, Doron, Dr. Kadzi,
E-Kartoffel, E.Goldstein, Egor 2501, Elonka, Floydgeo, Headbomb, In ictu oculi, J.A.McCoy, Jobin RV, Koavf, Metadat, Middle Eye 512, Ohconfucius, Poimenlaon, Psychedelicpiper, Recury,
Richhoncho, Rothorpe, Sauron's Foot, TarSix, The Drainpipe, Torenko, Utcursch, Widr, Wknight94, Yeepsi, 25 anonymous edits
"Baby Lemonade" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=600885313 Contributors: Arjayay, GoingBatty, Headbomb, Ohconfucius, Yeepsi
"Bob Dylan Blues" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=607908899 Contributors: Ben Culture, Headbomb, Koavf, Mild Bill Hiccup, Mwvandersteen, Ohconfucius, Postcard
Cathy, Rich Farmbrough, Rjwilmsi, Rothorpe, The Evil IP address, Topolgnussy, Welsh, Yeepsi, Zackbrown2, 3 anonymous edits
"Dark Globe" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=589790964 Contributors: Amb1997, Avicennasis, Ben Culture, BluesD, Bransen, Clarefromscotland, Cranky1000, Dmakatra,
E-Kartoffel, Farid4fr, Firsfron, Floyd, Games4may, Hattrem, Headbomb, Inyourroom, Joefromrandb, Koavf, Leamanc, MegX, Mlpearc, Moon maniac, Nobody of Consequence, Ohconfucius,
Patrick Neylan, PiNk, Pvae, Richhoncho, Rjwilmsi, Rocket000, Rothorpe, Schroeder74, Sophysduckling, Tassedethe, The Parsnip!, Torenko, Torre878, Twsx, Vertigo Man-iac, Xnux, Yeepsi, 35
anonymous edits
"Here I Go" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=546015521 Contributors: Abutorsam007, Bachi 2805, Djodjo666, Eumolpo, Floydfan93, Headbomb, J36miles, Middle Eye
512, Richhoncho, Tassedethe, Yeepsi, 1 anonymous edits
"Milky Way" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=600936217 Contributors: Cognaut, Declan Clam, Goldenrowley, Headbomb, Katharineamy, Koavf, Luisdile02,
MacGyverMagic, Ohconfucius, Rothorpe, T-rex, Woodshed, Yeepsi, 2 anonymous edits
"Terrapin" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=590218924 Contributors: Cirt, E-Kartoffel, Goldenband, Headbomb, IllaZilla, Im.a.lumberjack, Jmundo, Justme89, Koavf,
NathanSchulz, Neokamek, Ohconfucius, Rich Farmbrough, Richhoncho, Rjwilmsi, Yeepsi, 6 anonymous edits
Danelectro Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=614120639 Contributors: A plague of rainbows, Ahpook, Alexrules43, Altenmann, Amroknian, Anger22, Brian.r.sorrell,
Brossow, Brotherjohnson68, BurnDownBabylon, Cephlapod, Chance mcfadden, Chris the speller, Clout, CommonsDelinker, Darcmaniak, Deltabeignet, Dental Floss Tycoon, Dinobass,
Djinn112, Doug Tulloch, Dougweller, Dream15, Edelmand, Emmanuel Martin, Evan Robidoux, Favouritesky, Ferdinand Pienaar, Freqsh0, Funeral, George Leung, GreyCat, HawkMcCain,
Headbomb, Hooperbloob, Hottentot, Howarddaniel, I feel like a tourist, Iggwilk, Izzy007, JJacket, Jakermaker, Jogers, Johnpacklambert, Joshcarrollsacount, Jsingerboston, JustAGal, Katxo,
LessHeard vanU, M1ck1, MER-C, MagnusW, MahavishnuChris, Marshall Stax, Martarius, McGeddon, Mesnenor, Millermk, Motelkey79, Mr GTO, Mr Graphic, OneTrucking, Owen, Pdsch81,
Poco a poco, Ponta2, PseudoSudo, Rbrwr, Ryankindelan, Salsa Shark, SamBlob, SchuminWeb, Scottpig1, ShellyT123, Soundguy99, Spencermontague, Spike Wilbury, Splash, Splenic,
Stratcat50, Stu Grimshaw, Tassedethe, Thaurisil, Tmcw, Tomaat, Trobert, Victuallers, WVhybrid, Wiki libs, Witchwooder, Worstnerdever, Yeepsi, ZombieSamuraiFromMars, 226 anonymous
edits
Fender Esquire Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=584535435 Contributors: AB, Andrewa, Anger22, BD2412, Bachian321, Brad Eleven, Brossow, Can't sleep, clown will eat
me, Chris the speller, Clusternote, Dddstone, Dental Floss Tycoon, Design, Download, Fair Deal, Fosterwikiterry, GoingBatty, Guitarsurfercody, John, JonathanDP81, JosipSB, Koavf, Lerb21,
Makeety Makondo, MattTC1028, MegX, Miq, Mormegil, Nono64, Ocee, Osakagreg, Ponta2, R'n'B, Rjwilmsi, Rohirok, Santiperez, Scarian, T@nn, Thaurisil, TheLetterM, Vytal, 92 anonymous
edits
Max Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=610397734 Contributors: Alpha Quadrant, Bgwhite, Chris Capoccia, Connor Behan, DuncanHill, Jac16888, Jellyman,
PCMorphy72, Pigsonthewing, Rjwilmsi, 5 anonymous edits
Pink Floyd Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=616110916 Contributors: (chubbstar), - tSR - Nth Man, -jkb-, 119, 130.94.122.xxx, 192.246.233.xxx, 1exec1, 2009James,
21stCenturyGreenstuff, 28421u2232nfenfcenc, 2T, 40 Watt, 6, 62.83.72.xxx, 666ph666, 75pickup, 96T, A Knight Who Says Ni, A Softer Answer, AAAAARGHHHH, ABCD, ACSE,
AGovernmentLie, AHTNF, AHands, AL9000, AOEU, ASDFGHJKL, ASpafford, AVand, Aaron Schulz, Aaron north, Abee, Abie the Fish Peddler, Acdx, Ace Class Shadow, Ace123361,
Acegikmo1, Aceterry, Across.The.Synapse, AdamjVogt, Addyfe, Aditya, Adjensen, Admrboltz, Adrianrorheim, Aeternus, Agentpsmith02, Ahoerstemeier, Aidje, Airplaneman, Aitias, Ajabbar,
Ajh16, Ajwnet, Akcarver, Alai, Alakasam, AlanFreestyle, Alangleaves, Alansohn, AlbertWesker1960, Albrozdude, Alcuin, Alex 101, Alex3212321, AlexR, Alhutch, Alig1995, Alkivar,
Allan4483, Allauro, Allilinin, Allmightyduck, Alpiazza, AlterBerg, Alxndr, Amaury, Amb1997, AmericanLeMans, Anarchangel, Anarchistdy, Andrei Stroe, Andrew Nutter, Andrewfahmy,
Andrewferrier, Andrewrp, AndromedaRoach, Andronimo, Andy Dingley, Andycjp, AnemoneProjectors, Angel caboodle, AngelOfSadness, Anger22, Ango74, Angryman991, Anillia,
Animosity2, Anna512, Another Believer, Anphanax, Antandrus, Antonrojo, Antster1983, Anupamsr, Aomarks, Apgov.1, Apollo2011, Apterygial, Arbero, Arbor to SJ, Arcadian, Arcai, Archaic,
Arda Xi, Areaseven, Arfed, Argcar5199, Arjun01, Arm, Armelbd, Artaxiad, Arthena, Artizle, Artur Buchhorn, Artvandelay, Arundhati bakshi, Aseely, Asimov123, Askrenes, Astatine,
Astonmartini, Asydwaters, AtheistFish, Atif.t2, Atilladrjb, Atlantik, Atlas-maker, Atottobc2, Attilios, Auddie, Audiodude, Audiosmurf, Auric, Aussie Ausborn, Australian audio guy, Auximines,
Aviper2k7, Axlrosen, AySz88, B standon, BB98uk, BD2412, BGC, BPinard, BRG, BRUTE, BTLizard, BWernham, BacheMosbat, Badbats, Badgernet, BaldBoris, Balph Eubank,
Bananasownapple, Barak Sh, Barberio, Barneyboo, Barrettmagic, BarronVonBtemeister, Barrympls, BassPlyr23, Baumi, Bcgpeter, Bdr9, Beadbud5000, Beanriffs, Bearcat, Beardo,
Beatlefan248, BeckStrat, Beeedy, BeekeeperGOP, Belcher32, Beltline, Ben Culture, Ben909, BenS1978, Beowulf13, Berean Hunter, BestEdit, Betterworld, Bhny, Bholleman, Bibliorock,
Bicman, Bigbuttsdontlie, Bigd 9 9, Biggle, Biker Biker, Bilinguru, Billbillbillbill, Billdescoteaux, Billythecock, Biruitorul, Bishonen, BiteMark1992, Bitmappity, Bkberry, Black Condor,
Blanchardb, Blastwizard, Blechnic, Bleck, Blightsoot, Blinknoodle, Bloodfall, Bluemargay, Bluesatellite, Blumenge, Bluorangefyre, Bob Palin, Bobbis, Bobblewik, Bobertoq, Bobet, Bobo The
Ninja, Bobo192, Bobomjon, Bodnotbod, Bonbeeno, Bongwarrior, Booger22, Bookofjude, Boothinator, BorisAndDoris, Bornyesterday, BowmanJason, Bpt, BrEnDan94, Bradenw 4,
Braindamaged, Brandmeister, Brendan Moody, Brian0918, BridesheadRecarpeted, Bright Darkness, Brighterorange, British cigarette, Broadwayfan1, Brother Dysk, Brownerc42, Bryanw03,
Bt8257, Bubba hotep, Bucephalus, Buchs, BuddyJesus, Budokaiman, Bulldog73, Bumblebeebizarre, Burbridge92, BurnDownBabylon, Burner0718, Bynhola, C.Fred, C1k3, C777, CCS81,
CHawke, CJCurrie, CJLL Wright, CPMcE, CPT Spaz, CPercy, CWY2190, Cain Mosni, Calibwam, Calidum, Calmypal, CambridgeBayWeather, Camembert, Campo1988, Camw, Can't sleep,
clown will eat me, CanadianLinuxUser, Candee69, Canihaveacookie, CanisRufus, CapitalQ, Capt. James T. Kirk, Captain-tucker, Captainpancreas, CardinalDan, Careful With That Axe, Eugene,
Carl.bunderson, Carnage100, Carolus, Cartoon Boy, Catapult, CatherineMunro, Causa sui, Cbcake, Cedars, Cedrikoo420, Cenarium, Ceyockey, Chad.netzer, Chairman S., Chaosdruid,
Chapecoense, Charles.O.Wilson, CharlotteWebb, Chekaz, Chfowler, Chie one, Chief Red Eagle, Chillllls, Chillum, Chipuni, Chris 42, Chris 73, Chris97, Chrislk02, Christo jones, Christopher
Parham, Chuunen Baka, Ciaranmitch, Cielomobile, Cimbalom, CincinnatiWiki, CinnamonCinder, Cinosaur, Circeus, Cje, Cjohn17, Ck lostsword, Ckyrider, Clarince63, Clark10, Closedmouth,
CloudNine, Clovis Sangrail, Clq, Cmg 09, Code E, Codes02, Coffeesonlyadime, Colchester121891, Coldcreation, Coldcreation2, Colonies Chris, ComaDivine, Confab, Connell66, Connoroxbow,
Conor Gorbett, Conversion script, Cool3, Coolsteralpha, CopperMurdoch, Coq Rouge, CoreyCD, Coreydragon, Corlen, Corpx, CortezK, Countertop, Courcelles, Cover2Cover, Cowards,
Cowman109, Cowmaster5005, Cowwarrior, Cpt. Grammar, Craigbuck, Crash Underride, Crazydiamond44, Creesyboo, Cristovao, Crk112, CrniBombarder!!!, CrocodileHuneterDundee, Crunchy
Numbers, Crusic, Crut33, Cryptic, CsAttila, Cst17, Ctoensing, Cubdukat, Cuneytcindoruk, Cureden, Curlymeatball38, Curps, Curtholr, Cyberbuddy, Cyde, Cyrius, D-Rock, DARTH SIDIOUS 2,
DDima, DH85868993, DJ Clayworth, DJ Eclipse, DKqwerty, DO'Neil, DSRH, Da Cow 2.7, Dadaist6174, Dainomite, Damiancorrigan, Danceage, Daniel Mannix1, Danil K., Darkhorse82,
Darkieboy236, Darksun, Darnotr, Dart169, Darth Panda, Darthgriz98, Darwinicus, Dasch, Dave Bass, Dave souza, Davehard, Davesawyer, Davewho2, David Gabriel Sforza, David Johnson,
David Sforza, David.Monniaux, DavidFarmbrough, Davidqwikk, Dawnseeker2000, Dbenbenn, Dcs1, DeLarge, Dead Horsey, DeadCow, Deadcorpse, Deckchair, Deckiller, Deleet, Delicious
Manager, Denis C., Deor, Der Golem, DerHexer, Derek Ross, Derekcurrie, Desai, Dethme0w, Dethomas, Devil Master, Devildrummer15, Devrimbaris, Dfeingold, Dharmabum420, Diannaa,
Dickdock, Digimortal, Dimarks2005, Dina, Discographer, Discospinster, Dismas, Dissolve, Divinoapollo, Dj Capricorn, Dj stone, Djodjo666, Dk7991, Dkelber, Dl2000, Doc Gloom, Doc
Strange, DocKino, DocWatson42, Doclalor, Dodobbins, Dogposter, Doktor Who, DomStapleton, DonQuixote87, Dontstopvibe, Dotancohen, Dougofborg, Dougrocks1994, Doulos Christos,
Dr..Dickweed, DrAftershave, DrStrangelove64, DraperyFalls91, Dreadstar, Dreftymac, Dremora, Dresian, Drivec, Drivenapart, Drnorton, Drunkasian, Dry., Dskodje, Dspradau, Dtbtm183,
DuaneThomas, Dugwiki, Dume7, DunDerD, DynamiteKid, DyolFkniP, Dyolf, E tac, EJSawyer, EJac, EKindig, ERobson, ESkog, East718, Eastfrisian, Eatmoreham4671102, Eclipsed by the
moon, Eddieireland, Edgarde, Edgars2007, EditorE, Eduen, Edward Roussac, Egerb, Egg Creations, Egghead06, El C, ElectricWheelchair, Electronique, EliasAlucard, Eliz81, Elliskev, Ellywa,

171

Article Sources and Contributors


Emcee george, Emejia2005, EmilyJones, Emoguitar, Endomion, Enginear, Enviroboy, Epbr123, Epeefleche, Epolk, Eponerine, Epping232, Eraserhead72, Erebus Morgaine, Eredh, Ericoides,
Erik9, ErkinBatu, ErleGrey, Ervin rrahmani, Escape Orbit, Esurnir, EugeneZelenko, Evanh2008, Evanrox003, Everyking, Everyplatewebreak, Evil Monkey, Evilive, Evilmoo, Ewlyahoocom,
Excirial, Explicit, Eyedubya, F4280, FF2010, FMAFan1990, Fair Deal, FairHair, Falcon8765, Fallout boy, Fantailfan, Farkerburger, Fastily, Father McKenzie, Fatuglyman, Favonian, FayssalF,
Fbergo, Fdssdf, FeanorStar7, Fender1230, Fieldday-sunday, Filelakeshoe, Fin jackson, Flamurai, Flcelloguy, Flewis, Flowerpotman, Floyd, Floyd0991, Floyd12345, Floydbasket88,
Floydclaptonblues, Floydiac, Floydian, Floydian Tree, Floydoid, Flying Hamster, Fmph, Foozwah, Fozforus, Fractain, Fraggle81, Fran coral, Franamax, Francesco Malipiero, Francs2000,
Franklyhot09, Fratrep, Freakofnurture, Frecklefoot, Fred the Oyster, Freedom (song), Freefry, Freekee, FrenchIsAwesome, FreplySpang, Friginator, Frog you nono, Frog47, Frystogo,
Fuhghettaboutit, Funeral, Funguscheese, Fungusfrick, FurbyParade226, FuriousFreddy, Fusionmix, Fyrael, Faluinix, G.Batty, G.Morgan92, GCord52, GD57, GHe, Gab barrett, GabeMc,
Gadfium, Gadget850, Gahini8, Gail, Galen2112, Gareth Owen, Gargaj, Gary, Gary Kirk, Gbeeker, Gcasara, Gdavis2611, Gdo01, Ged UK, Geeky Randy, Geevee, GeezerB, Gen. Quon, Genes6,
George44, GermanJoe, Gerrish, GetMKWearMKFly, Gfoley4, Ghepeu, Giandrea, Gianmaria Framarin, Gifchief, Gimmetrow, Gjs238, Glen, Globe199, Gloss, Gman002, Goatasaur, Gobonobo,
Godfrey Daniel, Gogo Dodo, GoingBatty, Golfhaus, Goodnightmush, Goodyntox, Gorrrillla5, GraemeL, Graham87, GrahamColm, Grayshi, Green moofle, Greenapple22, Greenshed, GregAsche,
Gregalodon, Gregmc12, Grim23, Grimhim, Griot-de, GripTheHusk, Grojasp, Gst646, GuitarChief, Guitarmankev1, Gumwad, Gurch, Gurchzilla, Gusworld, Guyburns, Guyu, Gwernol, Gkhan,
H, H**** 3210, H2g2bob, HM211980, Haakon, Hadal, HaeB, Hagerman, Half-Blood Auror, Halibutt, Hall Monitor, Halmstad, HamadaFanFFSM, HamburgerRadio, Hamiltonstone, Hamster
Sandwich, Hannah Jacobs, Happymcgoo, Hatterman, Hatto, Haveacigar, Haza-w, Heartylunch, Hedpeguyuk, HeinzzzderMannn, Heisenbergthechemist, Helixblue, HellRaiser1974,
Hellishreignxx0, Hello3101, HelloWorld-ARC, Hendrx89, Henri Abboud, Henrique20mil, HereToHelp, Hessamnia, HexaChord, Hezza, Hiddekel, Hiesp, HighHopes, HighKing, Hiphats,
Hmdwgf, Honkey09, Hoobobba, Hoops gza, Hooverbag, Hoponpop69, Howenstein115, HrZ, Hschlarb, Hugh E, Hughcharlesparker, HughesJohn, Hula Hup, Hunter Kahn, Huw Powell,
Hydra225, Hydrogen Iodide, Hyukan, I already forgot, I dream of horses, IAMTHEEGGMAN, IL7Soulhunter, INaNimAtE, IPadPerson, IRP, Ian Dalziel, IanMcGreene, Ianeiloart, Iapetus,
Icarus3, Icculusioso, Ich901, Idjit, Ifnkovhg, Ihatecountrymusicalot22, Ike1000, Ike9898, Imadofus, Imoeng, InTheFlesh?, Indopug, Instinct, Intensity254, Inter, Invincible Ninja, Inxsfan,
Iothiania, Iridescent, Irishrockscholar, IronGargoyle, Island Monkey, Ispygoldeneye, Ispyhumanfly, IstvanWolf, Itinerant1, ItsNotLupusOnWheels, Ivailo bg 95, J Milburn, J. Finkelstein,
J.delanoy, J04n, JAF1970, JForget, JHMM13, JJ 65, JJ905l, JPNorman94, JPage, JR98664, JWSchmidt, JaGa, Jacj, Jackfork, Jackol, Jackrazn, Jacleb, Jahsonic, James Seneca, James086,
Jamesriv, Jampilot, Jaques O. Carvalho, Jaranda, Jareha, Java13690, JavierMC, Javit, Jaxl, Jayhare, JayzinSmith, Jazza5, Jdcooper, Jeff G., Jeffthejiff, Jeg3698, Jellyman, Jemijohn, Jennica,
Jerome Charles Potts, JerryFriedman, Jerryb1961, Jessiejames, Jevansen, JewishJake, Jfg284, Jgm, Jhinman, Jhs1776, JiMidnite, JiggaloBox, Jim Douglas, Jim Jackson, Jim1138, Jimcripps,
Jimp, Jivasor, Jk2q3jrklse, Jklin, Jmj713, Jmlk17, Jmrowland, Jmurison, JoanneB, Joefromrandb, Joey Q. McCartney, JoeyJ, Jogers, John, John F, John gibson, John of Reading, John254,
JohnSawyer, JohnThorne64, JohnWittle, Johnakinjr01, Johnbrownsbody, Johnny Sumner, JohnnyChicago, Jojhutton, Jojorocko, Jokerman25, Jon Cates, Jon742, Jonathan.s.kt, Jonclay,
Jongleur100, Jonth, Jordan Chandler, Jorvik, Josef12290, Josh Cherry, Joshuahernandez, Jossi, Journalist, Joyous!, Jpvandijk, Jsnrddl, Jss3255, Jsteele24, Jsx1200, Jtalvy, Jubakala,
Jubileeclipman, Judaispriest, Juggleandhope, Juliancolton, Juliuscaesar100-44, Jumble Jumble, Junebugmusic, Junuxx, Juriroosa, JustAGal, JustinLA, Justinc, Justinpinkfloyd99, Jyrkchicken,
Jna runn, KAtremer, Kaare, Kahenkilonsiika, Kaiser matias, Kakemann, Kaldari, Kalebkerley, Kanonkas, KaptKos, KaragouniS, Karajlic, Karljoos, Kawaiichan444, Kayley10, Kazrak,
Kbdank71, Kbh3rd, Keepsleeping, Keilana, Keithlard, KelleyCook, Kelly Martin, Kelpin, Kennylennon5, Keraunoscopia, Ket, Kevyn, Kg4yvw, KharBevNor, Kim's Broken Down Rocket, King
of the night, Kingboyk, Kingpin13, Kinu, Kirrages, Kitagz, Kiwinil, Kjammer, Kjnpf, Kjoonlee, Klextro, KnowledgeOfSelf, Koavf, Kocio, Korn1128, Kove, Koyaanis Qatsi, Kpjas, Krash,
Krautukie, Krobertj, Krtki, Kst447, Ksurrah, Kungfuadam, Kurtis, Kurtsantana, Kwen55, Kyle Barbour, Kyle pyle1, Kylu, KyraVixen, LMB, LOZmaster85RB, Laager, Lafraia, Lahiru k,
Lainzilla, Lankiveil, Laod, Lar, Laser brain, Latggt67, Lazyboy, Lcarscad, Leahtwosaints, Leandrod, Lectonar, Ledbetterman10, Leglock1, Leifbk, Lemons44, Leolapinos, LethalSRX, Levineps,
Lick, Lifeformnoho, Lightmouse, Lights, LikeLakers2, LilHelpa, Lilduff90, Lindenhurst Liberty, Linuxbeak, Lion-hearted II, LisaSandford, Liuzhou, Liveforevercover, Livermonkey, Lizard
Frog, Lizziebabes90, Llywrch, Lodar011, Logan, Lohengrin1991, Lolacocacola, Lollerpop, Longhair, Looxix, Lord Voldemort, Lord lefty, Lost on belmont, Louishitler, Lpavleti, Lr6800,
Luciahouse33, Lucifer Spam, Lucyinthesky, Ludivine, Luigi88888, LukeTheSpook, Lullabye Muse, Lulzearnos1336, Lurulu, Lxw, Lypheklub, MADCLOWN H, MK8, MMBKG, MTLskyline,
MZMcBride, Macarion, Mad Hatter, Madder, Maddie!, Madhero88, Madmagic, Madroxxide17, MagedMahfouz, Magioladitis, Magister Mathematicae, Mahanga, Mais oui!, Makeemlighter,
Malber, Malconfort, Malleus Fatuorum, Malo, Mandarax, Manifestation, Marauder40, Marcika, Marcus Brute, Marcus2, Mark Arsten, Mark.deane, Mark1973, Marked1234, Martin NH,
Martin451, MartinHvidberg, Martinevans123, Martiniminister, Martnym, Martpol, Martyn Smith, Master of Puppets, Mastercheif, Mathonius, Mato, Mattb112885, Mattgirling, Matj Grabovsk,
Mav, Maxim, Maximilianomilicich, Maximilli, Maxx573, MazYaz, Mazic, Mbralchenko, Mbranciforte, Mdd4696, Mdeloia, Mdf, Measles, Meatspin4life, Mecanav, Mediaisshite, Medico
Dimamico, MegX, Mehranghajar, MelanieB2, Melonkelon, Mendaliv, Mentifisto, Mercenary318, Merope, Merovingian, Metagraph, Metsfan31488, Mexicans4394, Michael Bednarek, Michael
Devore, Michael Hardy, Michael.m.winters, Michaelhodgins, Michig, Mick gold, Midgetman3, MightyMoose22, Mike Payne, Mike1, Mikeblas, Mikebrittain, Mikemoral, Miketory, Mikierusso,
Mild Bill Hiccup, Mimr, Mindmatrix, Minesweeper, Minority Report, Miranda, MisfitToys, Misnomer1, Mitch.asks.world, Mk5384, Mkamensek, Mlpearc, Mlpearc Phone, Mlpearc Public,
Mmarsh, Mmatin, Mmcm54, Mmm Halo, Moanzhu, Mobileur, Modemac, Modest Genius, Modulatum, Moeron, Mogism, Mojo Hand, Mojo8696, Mokgamen, Molerat, Molly-in-md,
Monkeydude101, Monkeyman222, Monkeymox, Monni95, Monty845, Mookie89, Moosedavid, Mordicus Egg, Moremoremore, Moriori, Morkyll, Morts2986, Morwen, Moshe Constantine
Hassan Al-Silverburg, Moveeby84, Mowen1302, Moxy, Mpj, Mr Fist, Mr Pyles, Mr Stephen, Mr c ox, Mr pand, Mr. Blevins, Mr. Brain, Mr. Frank, Mr.raver-gnome, MrFish, MrMacMan,
MrMarmite, MrSomeone, MrTaco, Mreissner, Mshecket, Msikma, Mtanne, MuZemike, Mulad, Multixfer, Mummra, Mungo Kitsch, Murry1975, Mushroom, Music News, Mutante96,
Muugokszhiion, Mwanner, Mydarkglobe, Mygerardromance, Myxomatosis57, N1RK4UDSK714, NCFan12311, NHRHS2010, NORD74, Nadav.dafni, Nadavspi, Nakedlunch123, Nakon,
Nandesuka, Narsamson, Natalie Erin, Nathanshah, Naturespace, Naur, Navnls, NawlinWiki, Necko, Neilbeach, Neilc, Nemo, Nepenthes, Netoholic, Nev1, NewElwood, NewTestLeper79,
Newnoise, NicholasJr7, Nick, Nick Levine, Nick04, Nick125, NickBush24, NickelKnowledge, Nickthekohlabear, Ninio, Nite-Sirk, Niteowlneils, Nivix, Nlu, Nn123645, No Guru, No-Bullet,
Noah1017, Nobody of Consequence, Noisemaker3, Noloop, Nomoretears, Normalchaos, NotFlabbu, Notorioussmac1, Nsaa, NuclearFunk, NuclearWarfare, Nuclearbombsrule, NuvieK, Nymf,
ONUnicorn, Oakshade, OctopoAnimA, Ohconfucius, Olderbro21, Olivier, Omigas, Omnipaedista, OnBeyondZebrax, Onanisland, Oniflad, Only, Onorem, Opelio, Optakeover, Orcy666, Ori,
Ortolan88, Oscar.dm, Oshimaida, Outlook, Ownedandpwned, Oxymoron83, PC78, PCP MC, PEJL, PJM, PL290, PS2pcGAMER, Pagesigguitar, Panchoytoro, Pandamoania, Paranoid Eyes,
Parkjunwung, Parky5904, Parrot of Doom, Paul From Ottawa, Paul G, Paulocampana, Pauly0, Pavlovi, PbakerODU, Pdcook, Pehresma, Pelago, Penguin1234321, Pepsidrinka, Perfecto,
Peridon, Persian Poet Gal, Peruvianllama, PetSounds, Pete Davis, Pete Hobbs, Peter Flass, Peter Fleet, Pharaoh of the Wizards, PhiIIip Swift, Philip Stevens, Philip Trueman, PhilyG, Phydend,
Physicistjedi, Piano non troppo, Pierre Caliari, Pigsonthewing, PinchasC, Pingveno, Pink Floyd For Free, Pink floyd 242640687, Pink-isnt-well, Pinkadelica, Pinkeee, Pinkfloyd123,
Pinkfloydmadchris, Pinkfloydtallica1, Pinkishness, Pinkroger, Pippu d'Angelo, Piriczki, Pitbullterrierne, Pizzaboy9010, Pizzamaniac09, Pjennings424, Pjoef, Plant's Strider, Plastikspork,
Plasynins, Pmcchesn, Poccil, Poindexter Propellerhead, Pomakis, Poodlehat09, Poorsod, Popsicle9, Positivityrulzz, Postwar, Potatohead1985, Prenigmamann, Preservedmoose, Prestonmcconkie,
Pringbat, Private Butcher, Prodego, Progrockerfan, ProhibitOnions, Proto-stuff, Protonk, Pseudoanonymous, Pseudomonas, PsychGazer, Psychedelicpiper, Psycho 79, Pudimuse, PurplePlatypus,
Pushit, Pwntang2009, Pyrospirit, Quadell, Quantpole, Quasibr, QuasyBoy, Quercusrobur, Quibus, Quincyq03, Quuxplusone, Qworty, Qwyrxian, Qxz, R Lowry, RMHED, Rabbiphilio,
Radiopathy, Ragesoss, RainbowOfLight, Raindrops65, Randr, Ranveig, RaseaC, Rasmus Faber, Raul pimentel, Raven4x4x, Razorhead, Razzola, Rdsmith4, Reallybored999, Reaper Eternal,
RedStripedd, RedWolf, Registered user 92, Relaxedanderson, Ren3, Renata3, Rentastrawberry, Requiems, Resolute, Restu20, Retromaniac, Rettetast, Revan ltrl, RexNL, Rfbarrington, Rhomboid
Man, Rich Farmbrough, Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ), Richard Lionheart, Richhoncho, Rick 20as, Rightfully in First Place, Ritchie333, Rjwilmsi, Rmosler2100, Roachgod, RoadhouseBlues3,
RobMientjes, Robert Nagle, RobertG, RobertGustafson, Robertwins, Robin klein, Robman94, Robnpov, Robost, Rock Soldier, Rock4arolla, RockMFR, Rockerkid0725, Rocket71048576,
Rocketjockey, Rockfan231, Rockmaniac2010, RockyMM, RodC, Rodericksilly, Rodhullandemu, Roflcopters, Roger Scheckler, Roger.Light, Rogihogi, RomeoVoid, Rookkey, Rooney228,
Rorschach567, Rorypykey, Rosiestep, Rothorpe, Rotlink, Rotring, RoyBoy, Royboycrashfan, Rpop, Rscallejas, Rsquire3, RttlesnkeWhiskey, Rusko, Rusted AutoParts, RxS, RyanCross,
RyanKoppelman, S-Priest, S-man, S.Camus, SAULGNRFAN, SECProto, SMC, SPARTAN-J024, SPUI, ST47, SU Linguist, SWAdair, Sabrebd, Sadf, Sahaiata, Saim.urman, Salamurai, Salih,
SaltyWater, Saltywood, Sam Korn, Samicas, Samscholes, San.jyn, SandyGeorgia, Sango123, Sannse, Santanaochollerbstavnner, Santori, Satori, Satori Son, Scarian, SchfiftyThree,
Schminkelstein, Schmiteye, Schneelocke, SchuminWeb, Scieberking, Scipo, Scjessey, Scorpion0422, ScotchMB, Scottfisher, Scs, Scwlong, Sdornan, Seabream, Sean D Martin, Search4Lancer,
Seasidesun, Seeaysee, Sefog, Segway, SenorPescados, Sergecross73, Seridius, Setanta747, Setanta747 (locked), Seth Whales, SeveredSpirit, Sezzawarb, Sfacets, Sfthenerd, SgtPetsounds,
Shadowjams, Shaky Spades, Shanel, Shanes, Shanescala, Shawn!, Shearlined, Sheetsofemptycanvas, Sheled Umlal, ShelfSkewed, Shipud, Shirulashem, Shoeofdeath, Shoessss, Shotgun mario,
ShowNoMercy, Shudde, Shutup999, Siege72, SilkTork, Silvarbullet1, Simon Lieschke, Simone Jackson, Sippan, Sirsir2010, Siryendor, Siva1979, Sixteen Left, Sjakkalle, Sjb90, Sjc, Sjorford,
Sk8erqueen123, Skarl the Drummer, Skater34212, Skeeter077, Skeletor2112, SkerHawx, SkinnerIJA, Skitzo, Sky Attacker, Sky83, Skykeeper, Skysmith, Slark, Slash3r357, Sleigh, Slinkydink,
Slof, Slon02, Slyne Head, Slysplace, Smalljim, Smashbros35, SmileToday, Smilledge, Smooth0707, Smorse, SnakeRambo, SnappingTurtle, Snideology, Snifferdog, Snoopy92, Snow1215,
Snowbound, Snowdog, Soakologist, Soarhead77, Sodapaps, Soetermans, Solatha, Solidbob, Solo22, Some jerk on the Internet, SonicAD, Sophie means wisdom, Soulresin, SouthernNights,
Sp4ever, SpNeo, Spark, Spatch, Spdodger, Spear, Spearhead30, Spellmaster, SpikeTorontoRCP, Spitfire, Splashface, SpongeBrain, Sposato, SpuriousQ, Spursfanee, SqueakBox, SquishyBeaver,
Srice13, Srushe, Stan Shebs, Starscream24, Stemacek, Stephen C. Carlson, Steve.hawtin, Steve748, SteveMacIntyre, Steveisawesomestinthebar, Stevenplunkett, Stevenrasnick, Stevertigo,
Stevielist, Stho002, StormCloud, Str1977, StratDune, Straw Cat, Strobilus, Stroika, Structurestrian, StuartH, Stwalkerster, Stween, Subash.chandran007, Suduser85, Sue Wallace, SugarKane,
Sumnjim, Sun Adder, Sunny256, Sunray, SupaStarGirl, Super Monkey Man, Super jedi droid, Superastig, Supernerd11, Supmyman7, SuvantoJ-, Swed5LyfeYOgangstashitson, Swedol, Swim
Jonse, Sword, Synchronism, Sysyphus, Szajci, Szesetszedziesitsze, TAF, TAS, TGilmour, TJSwoboda, TRBlom, TUF-KAT, Tableclothes, Taconizer, Tad.k.22, Taiga000, Tail,
Taintedstreetlight, TangerineFloyd, TangoTizerWolfstone, Tanvir Ahmmed, Targeman, Taro James, TarunAbhichandani, Tassedethe, Tbhotch, Tcsnell, Tdi7457, Te og kaker, TeaDrinker,
TechnoFaye, Ted Wilkes, TedE, Teiladnam, Teliwhy, TenOfAllTrades, TenPoundHammer, Tenniru, Terrell j shields, Terrorofdeath93, Testingggg, Tgeairn, Th4tswh4tsUp,
Thatguywiththecodes, Thaurisil, The Amazing Pudding, The Anome, The Country Girl, The Damaja, The Epopt, The Equaliser, The Great Duck, The Haunted Angel, The Master, The PNM, The
Parsnip!, The Pink Oboe, The Secretary of Funk, The Thing That Should Not Be, The Transhumanist, The Vegetable Man, The ed17, The wub, The-outlaw-torn, TheBigEyedFish,
TheDarkSideOfTheWiki, TheKoG, TheLimbicOne, TheMetalHead96, TheNethero, TheOldJacobite, TheOnlyOne12, TheSoundofTheStreets, TheSuave, Thebogusman, Thecheesykid, Theda,
Theevilbob, Thegreenj, Thejasonboy, ThemBrotherZ, Thembonesareme, Themcman1, Theologiae, Thesexualityofbereavement, Thingg, Thingholm, Think outside the box, Thiras, Thirdvertigo,
ThisisfromUzi, Thomas Westermann, ThrowingStick, Thryduulf, Thumperward, Thundermaster, Tide rolls, Tiger Trek, TigerShark, Tim!, TimDuncan, Timerrill, Tinton5, Tjdinvt, Tkd73,
Tobymoose, ToddC4176, Toddst1, Tohru Honda13, Toksoz, Tom harrison, TomGreen, TomKostapolis, TomTom789, Tomcat7, Tomkurts, Tonetwisted, Tony Corsini, Tony Sidaway, Tony! at
the disco, Tony1, TonyTheTiger, Torenko, Tpbradbury, TracerBuIIet, Trash00001, Trdsf, Tree Biting Conspiracy, Trinate, Triskell, Trusilver, Tualha, Tubby, Tupac13th, TutterMouse, Twaz,
Twe8k, Tweetsabird, Twidget1, Twit8514, Two-lost-souls, Tyrol5, UDScott, UKGuy, Uengi, UglowT, Ulgen1368, Ulmanor, Ulric1313, Ummagumma23, Umph, Umrguy42, UnaLaguna,
Unchained mammal, Uncle uncle uncle, Undertow87, Unicorn27, Unschool, Uphollandlatic, Urzadek, Userboy87, Usmale83814, Usually Right, Valenciano, Vanished user dkjsdfkljeritekk4,
Vanished user ikijeirw34iuaeolaseriffic, Vary, Vazor20X6, Veganjuan0, Veinor, Velvetron, Vercomtech, Veteran dj, Vianello, Victor Dorantes, Vikreykja, Villaever444, VincentXP38,

172

Article Sources and Contributors


Viperman99, Viriditas, Visor, Vladwin, VodkaJazz, Vorash, WafflesAreYAY, Wakleytom, Wallchopper, Ward3001, Warpozio, Wassup234, Wasted Time R, Wavelength, Wayward,
WebHamster, Weedman 420, Wellspring, WelshMatt, Wembwandt, WesleyDodds, Westmare, Wether B, Weyes, Whichdrama, Whiskey1011, Who, WichitaQ, WideArc, Wideofthemark, Widr,
WikHead, Wiki alf, Wiki libs, WikiLaurent, Wikiadud, Wikianon, Wikimatt79, Wikitam331, WildBadger, Will Beback Auto, Willrocks10, Wilson556, Wimt, Winchelsea, Winning500,
Winterheart, Wisdomtenacityfocus, Witchwooder, Wizardman, Wknight94, Wobbs, Woknam66, Wolfpacker96, Woman Man, Wood Thrush, Wood3lf369, Woodsstock, Woohookitty,
Wsmitchell3, Xiahou, Xnux, Y0u, Y2kcrazyjoker, Y2kcrazyjoker4, Yamamoto Ichiro, Yawaraey, Ybbor, Yeepsi, Yellowxander, YesThatMan, Yidisheryid, Yigitadv, Youssefsan, Ysangkok,
Yuzz, Z99zazn, ZXS9465, Zachlipton, Zanimum, Zanoni, Zappatista, Zapvet, Zarex, Zaudragon, Zazaban, ZeWrestler, Zedwas, Zelda911111, Zenecan, Zeneky, Zeppy9, Zimmerman1990,
Zntrip, Zone46, Zutroy Tibor, Zxmaster, Zzuuzz, , , , 5707 anonymous edits
Stars Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=590213926 Contributors: Asn, AttoRenato, Balph Eubank, Chris the speller, Clarkp, Darkhorse82, Dayvey, Derek R Bullamore,
Firsfron, Floydgeo, Frostie Jack, Gephart, Headbomb, Jspires49, Koavf, MagicManky, Nobody of Consequence, Ohconfucius, Owen, PanAndScan, Rich Farmbrough, The Parsnip!, Uncle Dick,
WikHead, Wikoman99, Yeepsi, 27 anonymous edits
David Gilmour Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=615807372 Contributors: 28bytes, 6, 75pickup, A Knight Who Says Ni, A. B., AKucia, AMoses, Aboutaboutabout, Acdx,
Acorrales, AdnanSa, Adrian Viera, Aenigmate, Aharm, Ajabbar, Alangleaves, Albatross9, Albino Ibis, Albrozdude, Alexius08, All Hallow's Wraith, All(an) knowing, AllySDude, Alpheus,
AlterBerg, Alvestrand, Andres, Andrewfahmy, Andycjp, Anger22, Anilsahal, Anthony Winward, Antonio Lopez, Apanuggpak, Arafel2, Arm, Arthur Holland, Arthur Rubin, Asimov123, Asn,
Atkinson 91, Attilios, Audreyrhyerdua, Aussie Ausborn, Autobahnsho, Auximines, Azipfel, BD2412, BGC, BNutzer, BRG, Badbilltucker, Baje Tiger, Bane1011, Bathrobe, Bearcat, BeckStrat,
Beyazid, Bigbluefish, Biglovinb, Binksternet, Birdyboops, Black Condor, BlakFlak, BlkStarr, Blokeski, BluesD, Bobdfg, Bobet, Bodnotbod, Bongwarrior, Boothferry, Brianhe, Brother Dysk,
Bufgold, C777, CJAllbee, CSWarren, CalJW, Calidum, CambridgeBayWeather, CanisRufus, Captain Waters, Careful With That Axe, Eugene, Catfish Jim and the soapdish, CatherineMunro,
Causa sui, Cdl obelix, Cgilbert76, Cglassey, CharlotteWebb, Chick Bowen, Chickencha, Chillum, Chris 42, Chris the speller, Chrisbwah, Christo jones, CincinnatiWiki, Ckatz, Ckuhtz,
Clarince63, Clausgroi, Closedmouth, Cobaltcigs, Colchester121891, ComaDivine, CommonsDelinker, CowboyPavel, Craigy144, Crazycomputers, Curps, Cxw, Cyde, D.L.J.R., D6, DDFFDDFF,
DDima, DStoykov, Dalexwats, DaltreyEntwistleMoonTownshend, Dandog77, Danga, Daniel Newman, Darkhorse82, Darth Kal Roox, Dashface, Davehard, David Gerard, David.Monniaux,
DavidX, Deltabeignet, Demize, Derek R Bullamore, DermotRathbone, Dgrant, Dharmabum420, Diannaa, Dipa1965, Discospinster, Dismas, Dissident, Djg2006, Dogosaurus, Doktor Who,
DomStapleton, Dominus, Doomsdayer520, Dopefish, Dr. Blofeld, Dremora, Dthomsen8, Dubmill, DuoDeathscyther 02, Dusti, Dyolf, Dziemecki, E tac, E-Kartoffel, E.Goldstein, EJSawyer,
ERcheck, ERobson, Edokter, Ehjort, ElectricWheelchair, Electricshadow, Elias Zandi, Engelbaet, Epicgenius, Epicurus B., Erjon, Erstwhilepromotions, Esprit15d, Esradekan, Evanh2008,
Evanreyes, EvergreenFir, Everyking, Ewlyahoocom, Ezhuks, Fade, Falco70, Farquaadhnchmn, Father McKenzie, Fatterrapin, Fbergo, Fenderpick, Fixblor, Florentino floro, Floyd, Floydian,
Floydian Tree, Fluffernutter, Foday, FotoPhest, Franklyhot09, Frecklefoot, Fredrik, FreeMorpheme, Funky Monkey, FurbyParade226, GabeMc, Ganglandboss, Garion96, Gauss, Gdavidp, Ged
UK, Geevee, GeezerB, George Ho, George Ponderevo, Gethuge98, Ghewgill, Gianmaria Framarin, Gili707, Gillesdemers, Goatasaur, Gogo Dodo, GoingBatty, Good Olfactory, Gprince007,
Gracz54, GraemeL, Gregbard, Grimhim, GripTheHusk, Gtmaster, Gtrmp, Guck hunter, Guitar juan, Gurch, H**** 3210, Habu974, Haider98, Hardyplants, Hatto, Haveacigar, Headbomb,
Heathencourt, Hedpeguyuk, Hellomynameistaken, HexaChord, HighHopes, Hiphats, Historyteacher10, Hogyn Lleol, Homagetocatalonia, Hooperbloob, Horways, Howcheng, Howenstein115,
Hpesoj00, Hullaballoo Wolfowitz, Huon, Hydrogen Iodide, IanMSpencer, Ibanez1976, Im.a.lumberjack, Imadofus, Imponderabilium, Imtrogdor, InTheFlesh?, Internerd36, InverseHypercube,
Ioeth, Italianlover07, J.delanoy, JABEYE, JJFoarde, JM13, JNW, JRomero, Jacj, James627, JamesBWatson, JamesMLane, Japanese Searobin, Jaxl, JayzinSmith, Jb423, Jeannetta23, Jeg833,
Jellyman, JenXRX50, Jennica, Jeodesic, Jerr0328, Jhs1776, Jim Michael, Jim204, Jimmyeightysix, Jjwhalen, Joe Vitale 5, JoeCatch, Jogers, John, John Cline, Johnny Cade, Johnny Totone,
JohnnyGerms, Jongleur100, Joshk, Jpbowen, Jrb007, Jumble Jumble, JustADude, Jna runn, K3nTjr3n6, Kaare, Kaelri, Kaiwynn, KaragouniS, Karpsmom, Kartano, Kayau, Keithgnield, Kelly
elf, Kenny Bobo, KerryO77, Kevin Ryde, Khjart, Kind Tennis Fan, Knucmo2, Koavf, Krash, Krautukie, Krenakarore, Kricxjo, Krobertj, Krtki, Kst447, Ktulu1115, LAlawMedMBA, LOL,
Lakn, Lapse Of Reason, Lau Kar-Yung, Laughing Cabbage, Leahtwosaints, LeaveSleaves, Lee M, Leolapinos, LessHeard vanU, Leszek Jaczuk, Liftarn, Lillygirl, Lindenhurst Liberty, Local
yokel, Longhair, Lord Hodne, Lord lefty, Lost tourist, Lucasbunchi, Ludivine, Luigi88888, Luna65, Lurulu, Lyverbe, MER-C, Mabol!, Madchester, Madness320, Manutd69, Marcelofloyd,
Marcolivierf@hotmail.com, Marek69, Mark Arsten, MarkRoberts, Markestabrook, MarnetteD, Maroonedsorrow, Martyn Smith, Mashford, Master of Puppets, Materialscientist, Mattgirling,
Matthew Fennell, Mav, Maximus Rex, Meegs, Memestream, Mfretton, Michael Drew, Michael Hardy, Michael Snow, Michael.Forman, Michael96686, MightyWarrior, Mihaly K, Mike Moreton,
Mikec32001, Mikemaniax, Milo12, Milton Stanley, Mimr, Mindmatrix, Mitchburndt, Mjmcb1, Mlfowler, Mlpearc, Mogism, Mokershipping, Mong Alcaraz, Montalban, Moon maniac, Morven,
Moswento, Moxy, Mr Pyles, Mr. Brain, Mr. Manu, MrMonday1, Mrz80, Ms2ger, Mungo Kitsch, Murry1975, Mwtoews, Mysloop, Nadavspi, Nadim Scolris, Natanael Barros, NawlinWiki,
Nehrams2020, Nev1, NewTestLeper79, Numb23, Nurg, Nymf, Off2riorob, Ohconfucius, Ohno, Oorreeoo, Op47, Orjanbye, P-TownLegit, PDH, PJLefty89, PJM, PL290, Panchoytoro, Parrot of
Doom, Patrick lovell, PaulTew, Pdxtwin, Perruche, Peter Fleet, Pfalex, Phil wink, Phill-XD, Physicistjedi, Pigsonthewing, Pink Floyd For Free, Pinnecco, Pizzamaniac09, Pjennings424, Plant's
Strider, Polarbearcub, Pollysqids, Popcornduff, Popeyedoyle, Prenigmamann, Prhartcom, Profoss, Progjunky, Progrockdude, ProhibitOnions, Pstoller, PurplePlatypus, Purplethinker, Qp10qp,
Quadell, QzDaddy, RA0808, Rabit, Racerx11, Radiopathy, RandyRhoadsRonnieDio, Rbb l181, RedWolf, Redrose64, Registered user 92, Requiems, Rich Farmbrough, Richard Arthur Norton
(1958- ), Ridernyc, Rizzoj, Rjwilmsi, Rmjones20031, Rock Soldier, Rodhullandemu, Roger Workman, Rogerd, RomeoVoid, Ronebofh, Rothorpe, Rotring, RttlesnkeWhiskey, RunOrDie, RxS,
Rye7392, SBS Club, SJH, Saltywood, Sam Francis, Sam8, Samuell, Sasuke Sarutobi, SchfiftyThree, Scieberking, Scottfisher, Screeching Halt, Sdestinyp, Seanb91, Sebek, Selby101,
SelfStudyBuddy, Ser Amantio di Nicolao, Shanes, ShayneM27, ShelfSkewed, Shingra, Shirudo, Siege72, Signalhead, Sir Stanley, Sixteen Left, Slipperlaunch, Slyne Head, Slysplace, Some jerk
on the Internet, Souljacker, Sp33dyphil, Spartaz, Spike Wilbury, Sposato, Staszek Lem, StaticElectric, StephenM UK, SteveLamacq43, Stevemor909, Stevenplunkett, Stlyter, Stomasz71,
Stuartcw, Stween, Sultanfromhell, Sunny256, SuzeOlbrich, Swern425, Sydbarrett74, Syvanen, TAF, TGilmour, Tableclothes, Tassedethe, Taylor Trescott, Technopat, Terry Foote, Teshik,
Thaurisil, The Anome, The Myst, The Parsnip!, The Vegetable Man, The goatfish, The monkeyhate, TheMadBaron, TheMightyOrb, TheOnlyOne12, TheQuandry, Thegearhead,
Therewillbehotcake, Thingg, ThomasC.Wolfe, Thomasgray1789, Thompson90, Tim1357, Timpletcher, Timrollpickering, Tjrappa, Tom harrison, TomGreen, Tomcat7, Tomkurts, Tony1,
TonyW, Torenko, ToriV, Toroa, TourBusLive.com, Tpbradbury, Trezjr, Tscole90, TubularWorld, Turkeyphant, TurtleSpartan, UglowT, Ummagumma23, Undertow87, Unixguy, Unneekway,
Unschool, Valk0010, Vaskogodfather, Vclaw, Viames, Videmus Omnia, Vishalbpatel, VodkaJazz, Vytal, Warren, Wawzenek, Wdjunkin, Welladjusted84, Wereon, WesleyDodds, Wether B,
WichitaQ, WideArc, WikHead, Wiki libs, WikiDao, Wikioogle=world take over, Wilburchloe, Wildhartlivie, Will Beback Auto, WillMak050389, Willrocks10, WiseDark, Wolfrock, Wondyfan,
Wurkshy, X!, Xmastree, Y2kcrazyjoker4, Yacht, Yeepsi, Yintan, ZacBowling, Zachary, Zaudragon, Zen Novalis, Zenomax, Zeppelin4Life, Zeppelin4life, Zetterberg40, Zzuuzz, ,
1391 anonymous edits
Roger Waters Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=610668087 Contributors: - tSR - Nth Man, 0x6D667061, 6, 75pickup, A Knight Who Says Ni, AaronWK, Abesboy7,
Acmthompson, Adashiel, Aeternus, Agnostihuck, Akersmc, Alang78, Alangleaves, Alansohn, Alex43223, Alkan, All Hallow's Wraith, AlterBerg, Alun009, AmonSl, Andersjallen,
Andreasegde, Android Mouse, AndrokleSasser, Angelczek, Anger22, Another Believer, Antivert, Arbero, Arbor to SJ, Are1981, Asydwaters, Atlantik, Ausiaso, Axver, Azipfel, BBird, BD2412,
BGC, BRG, Back ache, Badman730, Baine124, BaldBoris, Baseballnum5, BassPlyr23, Bbsrock, Be Black Hole Sun, BeckStrat, Bender235, Bertilvidet, BesigedB, Betty Noire, Bhgent, BigrTex,
Bihco, Billdescoteaux, Billyrobshaw, BingNorton, Bitterbob.daniel, Bjurbeck, Bkberry, Black Condor, Blackfyr, BlakFlak, Bobo192, Bodnotbod, Bongwarrior, Boobyman, Boomright, Br'er
Rabbit, Brad101, BrightStarSky, Brookeln, Bryan Derksen, Buck1470, Buckyboy28, ByTaranis, C1782T919ML, C777, CPAScott, CWY2190, CalJW, Calbanese, Caltas, CambridgeBayWeather,
CanisRufus, Canoe1967, CapitalQ, Capricorn42, Careful With That Axe, Eugene, Carl.bunderson, CarolGray, Carolus, Cartoon Boy, Casliber, Cecinestpasunepipe, Charles Matthews, Chie one,
Chowbok, Christian75, Christo jones, CinnamonCinder, Ciphergoth, Cirt, Ckeavney, Clarince63, Classicfilms, Cleethorpes, Clemenjo, Cloudbusterone, Clq, Cobaltcigs, Colchester121891,
Colmanian, Colonies Chris, Connormah, Cornwallace256, Corpx, Corvus cornix, CountMacula, Courcelles, Courcelles is travelling, Creol, Crunkmix, Crystallina, D6, DCrazy, DDima,
DH85868993, DShamen, Da Cow 2.7, Dan653, Darkhorse82, Darobsta, Darth Skynyrd, DavidHeap, Dblandford, Dchicago, Dcs1, DeadEyeArrow, Deanb, Deansjunk, Debresser, Deltaflyer12,
Der Golem, Dexileos, Dharmabum420, Digihoe, Discographer, Dismas, Dissolve, Doktor Who, DomStapleton, Dopefish, DougieLawson, Douglassteele, Dovea, Dowie100, Dr. Blofeld, Drsmoo,
Dstratus, Dtpartner, Duk, Dyna-musco, Dysepsion, E-Kartoffel, E.Goldstein, EJSawyer, Eastlaw, EccentricRichard, EchetusXe, Edgarde, Editor19841, Editorofthewiki, Eithin, ElationAviation,
Emcee george, Empaler, Epbr123, Evanh2008, Everyking, Everyme, Evil Monkey, ExRat, FairHair, Fattylikecake, Faulenzer, Festermunk, Fieldday-sunday, Fifelfoo, Firsfron, Flamurai, Flewis,
Floyd, Floydclaptonblues2, Floydian, Floydian Tree, Foday, Fodfan, Footwarrior, FotoPhest, Franci9, Francodamned, Franklyhot09, Freakofnurture, Frecklefoot, Fred the Oyster, Friginator, F,
GabeMc, Gaius Cornelius, Gamesformay, Gargaj, Gary, Gassy999, Gaul, Geevee, GeezerB, Geoffreywatson, Geoham, George Apple, Germa230, Gianmaria Framarin, Gif32, Gigioscillante,
Gijoeler, Ginsuloft, Glane23, GlastoEls, Gobonobo, Gogo Dodo, Goin'DownSouthPark, GoingBatty, Good Olfactory, Goodnightmush, GraemeL, GrahamColm, Gregalodon, Grrrreg, HaeB,
Hahc21, Hairhorn, Hamaxides, Hammondrckr, HarriPorten, Hatto, Hattrem, Headbomb, Hedpeguyuk, Henningklevjer, Hessamnia, HexaChord, Heydudelol, Heymister14, HisSpaceResearch,
Hogyn Lleol, Horways, Howcheng, Hpesoj00, Hyperionsteel, Iamrogerwaters, Iamrohanshah, Iamthedeus, Ian Pitchford, Iatzylalala, IgorMagic, Igordebraga, Imnotjimbob, InTheFlesh?,
Indioxide, Indopug, Intensity254, InverseHypercube, Invincible Ninja, Iridescentlavender, IronDuke, Iulian.serbanoiu, Ixfd64, J Milburn, J.delanoy, JM13, JPGR69, Jacj, Jacksonunited, Japanese
Searobin, Jappalang, Jarich, Jennica, JethroT, Jfiling, Jgoch, Jgroch, Jhsounds, Jim Douglas, Jkelly, Jmackie007, Joao Xavier, Joe h parsons, Joefromrandb, Jogers, John, John Nevard, John of
Reading, Johnbod, JohnnyChicago, JohnnyGerms, Jon Stockton, Jordgette, Josheisenberg, Jotaene, JustinH, JustinNichol, Kaare, Kadellar, Kalle, KaragouniS, Karanacs, Katharineamy,
Kbthompson, Kelson, Ketchupking, Kiefer.Wolfowitz, Killiondude, Kingslove2013, KittenKlub, Koavf, Krobertj, Krtki, Kwamikagami, Kwekubo, LSK, Lacrimosus, LanceManion1973,
Leahtwosaints, Lee M, Leftboy, Leolapinos, Leszek Jaczuk, Leuko, Light, LilHelpa, Lindenhurst Liberty, Ling.Nut, Lord Hodne, Lord lefty, Louis Norton, Lradrama, Lucifer Spam, Lugnuts,
Luigi88888, Luke C, M.C. Brown Shoes, MOF, Madchester, Madroxxide17, Mais oui!, MajorB, Malerooster, Malik Shabazz, Marcokon, Mark Arsten, MarkB79, Maroonedsorrow, Martin451,
Martiniminister, Martpol, Mashford, Materialscientist, Mattbr, Mattjarmyn, McSly, Mcnuggies, Mdandrea, MegX, Melba1, Merrowman, Michael Devore, MicheleFloyd, Mihirmodi, Mikesven,
Mild Bill Hiccup, Mimr, Mira, MithrandirAgain, Mk5384, Mmernex, Moanzhu, Modemac, Mojo Hand, Monoape, Moxy, Mr Larrington, Mr Pyles, Mr. Billion, MrMonday1, Mrsteed, Msa1701,
Mungo Kitsch, Mysloop, Nadavspi, Narek818, Nascar1996, Nasty Housecat, NawlinWiki, Nczempin, Nedrutland, Neil916, Nev1, Neverquick, NewEnglandYankee, Nigggerhater678,
Nikosgreencookie, No Guru, Nobaddude, Noctibus, NorthBySouthBaranof, Northamerica1000, Notary137, NowSaturate, Nufy8, Nymf, Objective3000, Odysseus1479, Ohconfucius,
Ohiostandard, Oldelpaso, Oldlaptop321, Olivier, Omnion, On the other side, Onikun, Orsoni, Ost316, Otisjimmy1, Oxymoron83, P-TownLegit, PJM, PL290, Paniak17, Paranoid Eyes, Parrot of
Doom, Paul Christensen, Persian Poet Gal, Peter Fleet, Peter Kaminski, PeterGrecian, Petersonnic991, Physicistjedi, Pieguy48, Pigsonthewing, Piledhigheranddeeper, Pink Floyd For Free,
Pinkfloydfreak, Pinkfloydguru, Piriczki, Pizzamaniac09, Pjennings424, Plant's Strider, Plastikspork, Politis, Popcornduff, Poyani, Prapoport, Prestonmcconkie, ProhibitOnions, Prolog, ProveIt,
PsyberS, Pugpitbullduck, PurplePlatypus, PzGren, Quadell, Queen75, Quentin X, Qwyrxian, Rachel1, Radiopathy, Radiowetter, RandomP, Ravenscroft32, RazorICE, Rbanzai, Red-eyed demon,
RedWolf, Redrose64, Refinnejann, Registered user 92, RenniePet, Revived, RexNL, Reza kalani, Rhinowing, Rich Farmbrough, Rick 20as, Rickeff, Ricky81682, Rjwilmsi, Rklawton,

173

Article Sources and Contributors


Rms125a@hotmail.com, Roastytoast, RobertGustafson, Robin klein, RobinCarmody, Robofish, Rock Soldier, Rodericksilly, Rodney Boyd, Rodw, Rogerwatersisahorse, Rory096, Rorylyng,
RossPatterson, Rothorpe, Rotring, Royabutler, Rror, RttlesnkeWhiskey, RushRhees, RxS, SColombo, Saambe, Saga City, Salih, Saltywood, Sam Hocevar, SamDeed, Samojoka, Samscholes,
Sasata, Schroeder74, ScottSteiner, Scottfisher, ScottyNolan, Scottywong, Scuiqui fox, Sean.hoyland, Search4Lancer, Seasidesun, Ser Amantio di Nicolao, Shadow Link, Shawnflee, ShelfSkewed,
Shepard, Shi Hou, Simon Beavis, SimonArlott, Sinandls, Sjmawson, Skylark42, Slark, SlimVirgin, Slof, Smurthwaite, Snowmanradio, Soerfm, Solo22, Someoneinmyheadbutit'snotme,
SonOfNothing, Special-T, Spectre440, Spinoff, Sposato, SqueakBox, Squiquifox, Sroc, Stevemor909, Stevenplunkett, Stevesmullet, Stevetrumpet59, Stlmopoet, Str1977, Strobilus, TGilmour,
Tabletop, TallFreak, Tanthalas39, Targeman, Tariqabjotu, Tarret, Tassedethe, Tbhotch, Tenticle, Terjero, The Keymaster, The Lucky Man, The Parsnip!, The Pink Oboe, The Sage of Stamford,
The Thing That Should Not Be, The Transhumanist, The ed17, The very model of a minor general, The wub, TheKMan, TheQuandry, TheQueenCorner, TheScotch, Theconcertgoer,
Themfromspace, Theroadislong, Thingg, ThomasC.Wolfe, Thomos, Thoughtcat, TigerShark, Timrollpickering, Tinton5, Tkd73, Toby Douglass, Toksoz, Tom Yates, Tomcat7, Tomkurts, Tony1,
TonyW, Torqueing, TourBusLive.com, Tpbradbury, Trader2000, Transcendence, Trevor GH5, Treybien, Trezjr, Troymacgill, Trusilver, U.M.B., Ucucha, Ugog Nizdast, Ultra megatron,
Ummagumma23, Uncledeath06, Unixguy, Unregistered.coward, Usually Right, VanzKantDanz, Vazor20X6, Viennese Waltz, Viper1aa, VituzzuMona, Vizli, VodkaJazz, Vorenus, Vunzmstr,
Vyruss, W.D., WNTTM, Waldzazi, Wareh, Warhorus, Warpozio, Wassup234, Wasted Time R, WebHamster, Webclient101, WesleyDodds, WestwoodMatt, Wiki libs, WikiLaurent, Wikih101,
Windward1, Wise.jacob, Wiz-Pro3, Womble bee, Woohoo5241, XenonEngine, Xiahou, Y, Y2kcrazyjoker4, Yanksfan092279, Yeepsi, Yeft, Yintan, Yworo, ZScarpia, Zepelin, Zero Gravity,
Zetterberg40, Ziggee, Zocky, Zoe, Zoomazooma, Zujine, , , 1382 anonymous edits
Richard Wright Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=616192723 Contributors: (jarbarf), 75pickup, A Knight Who Says Ni, AMoses, Aboudaqn, Abu badali, Adam McMaster,
Aeternus, Alamandrax, Alangleaves, AlterBerg, Amb1997, AndrewHowse, Angel caboodle, Anger22, Anthony Appleyard, Anti-Frisian 1, Anti-Frisian 2, Araen, Arizonasqueeze, Ashley
Pomeroy, Asn, Aspects, Athanchild, Atilladrjb, Attilios, BD2412, BGC, Bdubiscool, Bdubisgay, Beardo, Behruz, Binksternet, Bobo192, Bojars, Bongwarrior, Briaboru, Brianherman, Bulldog73,
CalJW, CanadianLinuxUser, Careful With That Axe, Eugene, Casliber, Celebrinerd, Chester Markel, Chrisandtaund, ChristianJosephAllbee, Christo jones, Clausule, Coburt56, Codona,
Colpocorto, CommonsDelinker, Cosprings, Cquencer, CrazyDiamond BG, Crystallina, Cyde, D6, DDima, DJzsef, Daemonic Kangaroo, Dandog77, Danga, Darth Kal Roox, David Gabriel
Sforza, DavidFarmbrough, Debesha, Decampos, Dekkanar, DerHexer, Derek R Bullamore, Dismas, Dl2000, Doceddi, Doktor Who, Dr Satutto, DrFishcake, Dstratus, Dyolf, E.Goldstein,
E104421, ESkog, Earthlyreason, Easwarno1, EchetusXe, Echoes71, Egmontaz, Elipongo, Elliott Peters, Elliskev, Entourage911, Ewen, Fabometric, Falco70, Fieldday-sunday, Flamurai,
Florentino floro, Floydian, Fluppy, Franklyhot09, Freakofnurture, Frizzer69, GabeMc, Galagoindigo, Gamaliel, Gdk411, Ged UK, Gianmaria Framarin, GoingBatty, Good Olfactory, Gprince007,
GraemeL, Greatbake89, Gtrmichael, HaeB, Halmstad, Hatto, Haydn01, Headbomb, Hengist Pod, Herosforghosts79, Hetzer, Horways, Horz, Huangdi, Hut 8.5, Illicit55, Im.a.lumberjack,
Impy4ever, Interplanet Janet, InverseHypercube, J.R. Hercules, JM13, JPlaxco, Jacj, Jamesontai, Jaraalbe, Jennavecia, Jimp, JoeSmack, Joefromrandb, Joeinwap, Joeyman365, Jogers, John,
Jorgenev, Jpbowen, Jprw, Jubileeclipman, Kaare, Kaneda2, Karada, Karenjc, Kevin Dorner, Khermanis, KimonVel, Kirsten07734, KittenKlub, Koavf, Kostisl, Krisfrosz133, Krobertj, Krtki,
Leahtwosaints, Liquidmetalrob, Longhair, Lord lefty, Lucifer Spam, Lugnuts, Luk, Luna65, MBCF, Mabol!, Malice1982, Manic-nirvana, MapsMan, Martyn Smith, Mashford, Mattgirling,
Matthew Gidley, Maximus Rex, McK, MegX, Merle rickard, Mikemaniax, Miketm, Mimr, Miq, Modify, Monni95, Montalban, Moogyboy, Moxy, Mr. Manu, MrMarmite, MrMonday1,
MrRandomPerson, Mrh30, Mrsteed, Mysid, Mzilikazi1939, NORD74, Navdigital, NawlinWiki, Necko, Nk, Normalchaos, Norman3412, Notreallydavid, Nymf, Ouishoebean, PC78, Panchoytoro,
Parrot of Doom, Pastoryam12, Pattyr48, Peregrine981, Pharaoh of the Wizards, Phill-XD, PhilyG, Pigsonthewing, Pjoef, Plant's Strider, Pro Game Master87, ProhibitOnions, Pure Collector,
Qzm, Radiopathy, Rainwarrior, RedWolf, Redrose64, Renegade MUFC, Rich Farmbrough, Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ), Richhallx, Rift, Ritchie333, Rock Soldier, Rodhullandemu, Roger
Pilgham, RttlesnkeWhiskey, Salty-horse, Saltywood, Samuel Blanning, Saninha, Schmiteye, Scieberking, Sealman, Seaphoto, Seasidesun, Sebek, Section 43, Seec77, Setanta747, SgtPetsounds,
Shadow Link, ShelfSkewed, Shineon11, Siege72, SilkTork, Simon Beavis, Sir Nasco, Sjorford, SlayerXTT, Slow Graffiti, Spacelamb, Sssoul, Stevenplunkett, Str1977, Stween, Subharanjan,
Sydbarrett74, TSP, Tableclothes, Targeman, Tassedethe, The Parsnip!, The Rambling Man, Theeraser, Theherald1000, There is no dark side of the moon, ThomasC.Wolfe, Tide rolls,
Timrollpickering, Tkd73, TomGreen, Tomcat7, Tomkurts, TonyW, Tuesdaily, Ummagumma23, Underwater, Ure, Vazor20X6, Versus22, Vhorvat, Viennese Waltz, Warren, Wasted Time R,
Wester, WichitaQ, Wiki libs, WikiDan61, Wikijens, Wikipelli, Willscrlt, Wilson556, Wisedog, Wknight94, Woohookitty, Wutsje, Xelgen, Xn4, Yeepsi, Zoicon5, Zzrbiker, Zzuuzz,
, 571 anonymous edits
Nick Mason Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=615881069 Contributors: 75pickup, A Knight Who Says Ni, AMoses, ASDFGHJKL, Aboudaqn, Akdrummer75,
AndrewHowse, Anger22, Areaseven, Arizonasqueeze, Atlantia, Austin8753, Avenue X at Cicero, BD2412, Badbilltucker, Bamyers99, Bibliorock, BillyPreset, Bobrayner, Bojars, Bongwarrior,
Calmer Waters, Canjth, Careful With That Axe, Eugene, Catgut, ChrisGualtieri, Christo jones, Closedmouth, Colchester121891, Comhippy, Completelyanon, Cosprings, Cphwb556, Craigantill,
Cs-wolves, D6, Da Joe, Dale Arnett, Davehard, Dear cobain, DerEikopf, Devilgolf01, Dewelar, Dezidor, Dismas, Djdaedalus, Doktor Who, Dstratus, Dubmill, Edwinstearns, Eirik, Epicgenius,
ErkinBatu, Ernste Musik, Evanreyes, Excirial, Falco70, Favonian, Fbergo, Flamurai, Floydian, Folks at 137, Fratrep, Ftg3plus4, Gareth E Kegg, Gargaj, Georgethe23rd, Geraldine123,
Ghlmustang, Gianmaria Framarin, GraemeL, Hatto, Hekerui, Hemanshu, HexaChord, Hiberniantears, HighHopes, Hornoofo, Hu12, InverseHypercube, IronGargoyle, Island, Ivan Bajlo, J04n,
Jacj, Japanese Searobin, JeLuF, Jellyman, Jesta, Jetman, Joe bh22, Joefromrandb, John, John Cardinal, Johncollinswork, Johnny Sumner, Johnny Totone, KPH2293, Kaare, KaragouniS, Keith D,
Kennvido, Koavf, Krobertj, Krtki, Kst447, Leahtwosaints, Little Savage, Llywrch, Lolo Lympian, Longhair, Lornova, Lucifer Spam, Lugnuts, Mad Hatter, Magioladitis, Malcolm,
Mansfieldatron, Maroonedsorrow, Mashford, Mattg82, Matthead, Mav, Memphisto, MerBabiesSuck, Merqurial, Michealomealoid, Mike Payne, Mike Rosoft, Mimr, Mogism, Moxy, Mr
Larrington, Mr Stephen, MrMonday1, Mwanner, NawlinWiki, Nehoccramcire, Nick, Nick Challoner, Night Ranger, Onkelringelhuth, PS2pcGAMER, Parrot of Doom, Pemilligan, Periklis p,
Philip Trueman, Pibex, Pigsonthewing, Plant's Strider, Polly, Pyrope, Qwyrxian, RMHED, Radiopathy, Raygirvan, RedWolf, Redrose64, Registered user 92, Rjwilmsi, Rodericksilly, Rothorpe,
SQL, Saltywood, Shirudo, Shyam, Sidar, Sjorford, Smjg, Snifferdog, Snorgy, Sophie means wisdom, Spellmaster, Stevenplunkett, Str1977, Suede67, Supine, Svdmolen, TAF, Tableclothes, Tarc,
Tassedethe, TenPoundHammer, The Evil IP address, The Parsnip!, The Vegetable Man, The359, TheParanoidOne, ThomasC.Wolfe, Timrollpickering, Tkd73, Tomcat7, Tomkurts, Tony1,
Torenko, Trident13, Ummagumma23, Vanished user kjdioejh329io3rksdkj, Vanished user ty12kl89jq10, Vazgina, Weggie, Weidnerlaw, Wicks Steve, Wik, WikHead, Wiki libs, Willirennen,
Wilson556, Wjejskenewr, Wspock50, Wtmitchell, Xn4, Yeepsi, Zain ch1, 330 anonymous edits
Andrew King Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=611043139 Contributors: A Knight Who Says Ni, Balph Eubank, Dl2000, E.Goldstein, Ged UK, Headbomb, Magioladitis,
Malcolma, Movieguy1000, Pigsonthewing, T@nn, Waacstats, 6 anonymous edits
Peter Jenner Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=611183375 Contributors: Adoorajar, Ary29, Caerwine, D6, Dsp13, E.Goldstein, Eatyourgreensltd, GoingBatty, Hooperbloob,
Itsahotun, Jack Greenmaven, Jag123, Jellyman, Johndarrington, Jordy Young, Kbthompson, Kylie Ramone, Mattsbrown, Nemo bis, Ouedbirdwatcher, Pigsonthewing, Rbrwr, SasiSasi, Sicherlich,
Steinsky, Suppendepp, Tassedethe, The Sage of Stamford, TheParanoidOne, Timrollpickering, Tony Corsini, Vanessaroseline, Wwwhatsup, Y2kcrazyjoker4, Yahoogiddix, 41 anonymous edits
UFO Club Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=613480068 Contributors: Augustfear, Biruitorul, Bob Dubery, BorisAndDoris, BrownHairedGirl, Brto 'd Sra, Clarince63,
Craigsams, Daimore, Darkhorse82, Dave souza, David Gabriel Sforza, Davidkinnen, Decampos, DudeatBish, Elitropia, Fee mercury moon, Firsfron, Floydgeo, Ghmyrtle, GoingBatty, Hailey C.
Shannon, Harleyg98, Hinto, Jdex29, Jogers, Larrybob, Lew19, Lieingfaker6969, Lightdarkness, LilHelpa, Moriori, Morkyll, Niamh.murray, Ptomato, RandomCritic, RegorA, SemperBlotto,
Slambo, Spatch, Tassedethe, Tim!, Tristan da chuna, Tyrenius, Vmercenaria, Wasted Time R, Yeepsi, 64 anonymous edits
List of songs recorded by Syd Barrett Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=600930480 Contributors: Amb1997, GoingBatty, Headbomb, Koavf, Ohconfucius, Richhoncho,
Yeepsi
Blackhill Enterprises Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=610957430 Contributors: Bearcat, Curps, E.Goldstein, Floydgeo, GoingBatty, Headbomb, Itsahotun, Kbthompson,
Lainagier, MER-C, Marek Koudelka, Moxy, Pigsonthewing, Sk8punk3d288, Steinsky, Wobble, Wwwhatsup, Yeepsi, ^musaz, 7 anonymous edits
Beyond the Wildwood Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=589788149 Contributors: Cosprings, E-Kartoffel, Fisherjs, Glyniss, Idraulico liquido, KConWiki, Koavf, Krtki,
Martiniminister, Ohconfucius, Prolog, Rettetast, Ronbo11, Sparklism, TenPoundHammer, Yeepsi, 4 anonymous edits
Joy of a Toy Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=607542966 Contributors: Arjayay, Beyond My Ken, Cosprings, E-Kartoffel, Ettrig, Fisherjs, Gnarliestgnome, Headbomb,
HisSpaceResearch, Koavf, Marek Koudelka, Mishka55, Mookiebomber, Ohconfucius, Pequod76, RobinCarmody, Rodhullandemu, Sheled Umlal, Soul Crusher, Ssbarker, Swanrizla, Varlaam,
WestwoodMatt, Yahoogiddix, Yeepsi, Zellin, 24 anonymous edits
"Singing a Song in the Morning" Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=605607924 Contributors: Arjayay, BNutzer, Balph Eubank, Centrx, Durova, E-Kartoffel, Headbomb,
LimeyCinema1960, Nono64, Ohconfucius, PigFlu Oink, Precious Roy, Richhoncho, Yahoogiddix, Yeepsi, 2 anonymous edits

174

Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors

175

Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors


File:BarrettHarmonyGuitar.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:BarrettHarmonyGuitar.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors: CarolSpears,
Denniss, FlickreviewR, GreyCat, Guitarpop, Harold, Infrogmation, Jmabel, Night Ranger, Shoulder-synth, SunOfErat, 1 anonymous edits
File:Syd_Barrett_Guitar.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Syd_Barrett_Guitar.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Francis pullen
File:Abbey road studios.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Abbey_road_studios.jpg License: GNU Free Documentation License Contributors: portum
File:Johannes et Jacobus Telecaster.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Johannes_et_Jacobus_Telecaster.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors:
John Clift
File:Star full.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Star_full.svg License: Public Domain Contributors: User:Conti from the original images by User:RedHotHeat
File:Star half.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Star_half.svg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.5 Contributors: User:Conti
File:Star empty.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Star_empty.svg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.5 Contributors: Cathy Richards, Conti, Djr13,
Juiced lemon, Magasjukur2, Rocket000, Sarang, Tiptoety, 7 anonymous edits
File:Wetherby Mews, Earls Court.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Wetherby_Mews,_Earls_Court.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.0
Contributors: Paul Farmer
File:Guitar inside amp-in-case.JPG Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Guitar_inside_amp-in-case.JPG License: Public Domain Contributors: Marshall Stax
File:1959 Danelectro shorthorn guitar.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:1959_Danelectro_shorthorn_guitar.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Wx5uuh
File:Danelectro Dano Pro (reissued in 2007) cropped.JPG Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Danelectro_Dano_Pro_(reissued_in_2007)_cropped.JPG License: Creative
Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Contributors: User:Marshall Stax
File:Danelectroeffects.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Danelectroeffects.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Contributors: User:Marshall
Stax
Image:Fender Esquire.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Fender_Esquire.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors: manley.josh
Image:Fender Esquire 1st prototype in 1949 at Fender Guitar Factory museum.jpg Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Fender_Esquire_1st_prototype_in_1949_at_Fender_Guitar_Factory_museum.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors:
FGF_museum_01._Leo_and_early_models.jpg: Mr. Littlehand derivative work: Clusternote
File:Eric,Keith,Max,Roy and Doreen.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Eric,Keith,Max,Roy_and_Doreen.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Foroa,
PCMorphy72
File:Roger waters leeds 1970.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Roger_waters_leeds_1970.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Contributors:
John Rettie - http://www.rocknrollphotographs.com/

File:ROCK CONCERT. (FROM THE SITES EXHIBITION. FOR OTHER IMAGES IN THIS ASSIGNMENT, SEE FICHE NUMBERS 42, 97.) - NARA - 553890.jpg Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:ROCK_CONCERT._(FROM_THE_SITES_EXHIBITION._FOR_OTHER_IMAGES_IN_THIS_ASSIGNMENT,_SEE_FICHE_NUMBERS_42,_97.)_-_NARA_-_553890.jp
License: Public Domain Contributors: Downtowngal, Y2kcrazyjoker4
File:Battersea Power Station in London.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Battersea_Power_Station_in_London.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0
Contributors: Gaetan Lee from London, UK
File:Astoria (Pniche).jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Astoria_(Pniche).jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Contributors: Clusternote, J
Milburn, Motmit, Olive10081980, Stunteltje
File:Pink floyd live 8 london.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Pink_floyd_live_8_london.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors: Dave Bushe http://www.flickr.com/people/davebushe/
File:DarkSideOfTheMoon1973.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:DarkSideOfTheMoon1973.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Contributors:
TimDuncan
File:Pinkfloyd.png Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Pinkfloyd.png License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.5 Contributors: one_schism, EddieBerman,
Jethro, Anarkangel.
File:David Gilmour in Munich July 2006-ed-.JPG Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_Gilmour_in_Munich_July_2006-ed-.JPG License: Creative Commons
Attribution 2.0 Contributors: Joep Vullings and deep_schismic @ flickr File:David Gilmour and stratocaster.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_Gilmour_and_stratocaster.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.0
Contributors: Jean-Pierre Jeannin
File:David gilmour brussels 1984.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_gilmour_brussels_1984.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors:
Frank Dumont - http://www.flickr.com/photos/80559753@N00/
File:David gilmour frankfurt 2006.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_gilmour_frankfurt_2006.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors:
Frank Dumont - http://www.flickr.com/photos/80559753@N00/
File:David Gilmour - 1984, Abou Face tour.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_Gilmour_-_1984,_Abou_Face_tour.jpg License: Creative Commons
Attribution-Sharealike 2.0 Contributors: Klaus Hiltscher
File:David Gilmour- Lap sleel guitar (cropped).jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_Gilmour-_Lap_sleel_guitar_(cropped).jpg License: Creative Commons
Attribution-Sharealike 2.0 Contributors: David_Gilmour-_Lap_sleel_guitar.jpg: Klaus Hiltscher derivative work: SpinningSpark
File:David gilmour signature strat in case.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_gilmour_signature_strat_in_case.jpg License: Creative Commons
Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Contributors: User:Dashface
File:David Gilmour - live 8 - edited.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:David_Gilmour_-_live_8_-_edited.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0
Contributors: user:Xett, originally Andy MacLarty.
File:Roger Waters 18 May 2008 London O2 Arena.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Roger_Waters_18_May_2008_London_O2_Arena.jpg License: Creative
Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors: Eddie Berman. Original uploader was GabeMc at en.wikipedia
File:Bundesarchiv Bild 183-1990-0722-405, Berlin, Auffhrung der Rockoper "The Wall".jpg Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1990-0722-405,_Berlin,_Auffhrung_der_Rockoper_"The_Wall".jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike
3.0 Germany Contributors: Felix Stember, Lotse, Shell Kinney, Soerfm, SunOfErat, Warburg, 3 anonymous edits
File:Bundesarchiv Bild 183-1990-0722-401, Berlin, Auffhrung der Rockoper "The Wall".jpg Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1990-0722-401,_Berlin,_Auffhrung_der_Rockoper_"The_Wall".jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike
3.0 Germany Contributors: Felix Stember, Lotse, Soerfm, SunOfErat
File:RogerWaters03.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:RogerWaters03.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Contributors: Christian
Leonard Quale (Clq 16:17, 12 July 2006 (UTC))
File:Roger Waters en el Palau Sant Jordi de Barcelona (The Wall Live) - 01.jpg Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Roger_Waters_en_el_Palau_Sant_Jordi_de_Barcelona_(The_Wall_Live)_-_01.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors:
Alterna2 http://www.alterna2.com
File:Roger Waters The Wall Live Kansas City 30 October 2010 2.jpeg Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Roger_Waters_The_Wall_Live_Kansas_City_30_October_2010_2.jpeg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Contributors:
GabeMc
file:Commons-logo.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Commons-logo.svg License: logo Contributors: Anomie
file:Wikiquote-logo.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Wikiquote-logo.svg License: Public Domain Contributors: -xfi-, Dbc334, Doodledoo, Elian, Guillom, Jeffq,
Krinkle, Maderibeyza, Majorly, Nishkid64, RedCoat, Rei-artur, Rocket000, 11 anonymous edits
File:Rickwright.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Rickwright.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Contributors: Deep Schism @ Flickr

Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors


File:Nick Mason cropped.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Nick_Mason_cropped.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.0 Contributors: Phil
Guest
File:Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom.svg License: Public Domain Contributors: Anomie, Good
Olfactory, MSGJ, Mifter
File:2013 Woodstock 009 Peter Jenner.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:2013_Woodstock_009_Peter_Jenner.jpg License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Contributors: Ralf Lotys (Sicherlich)

176

License

License
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0
//creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

177