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The Cask of Amontillado

1.What is the meaning of the phrase A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser?
The way I see it, Motesor is saying that when taking revenge on someone, you have to one up them, doing
something even worse than what they did to you for you to seek revenge.
2.Why did Montresor seek revenge on Fortunato?
It seems that Fortunato did bad things to Montresor before but it was physically. Montresor made no attempt to
avenge himself but as soon as Fortunato insulted him, Montesor wouldnt allow that and is now seeking revenge.
3.How did Montresor know that the house would be empty?
Montresor knew the house would be empty because he used reverse phycology to get his attendants to go
celebrate at the carnival when after he left. He said he wouldnt be back and to stay at the house. This only further
encouraged the attendants to leave after he left.
4.Where had the stone and mortar, used by Montresor to wall up the entrance to the niche, been hidden?
The stone and mortar used by Montresor to wall in Fortunato was beneath a pile of bones where they lay hidden.
5.In your own words, describe the catacombs that Fortunato is led through.
I would describe the catacombs as dangerous, ominous, and suspicous. The catacombs were dangerous as is
because of the nitre gas. It was ominous and suspicious because of the amount of bones and skeletons lay strewn about.
6.Where and when is the story set? Give reasons for your answer.
If I was to give my best guess, I would say maybe eighteenth or nineteenth century. Their vocabulary is what I am
mainly going on. Also the use of torches dates the story to sometimes probably before electricity.

7.Why does Montresor make sure Fortunato has drunk a lot of wine?
This makes Fortunato even more vulnerable both physically and mentally enough to the point that he could chain
him up before sealing him in.
8.What is Luchesis role in the story?
Luchesi is part of Montresors plan on persuading and encouraging Fortunato to come with him.
9.What preparations had Montresor made for his revenge?
Montresor clearly planed his revenge out. He hid the stone and mortar under bones also before even leading
Fortunato down to the cellar. He also planed the timing. He was able to have it so no one would know of Fortunatos
disappearance before it was too late because everyone was celebrating.
10.Why does Montresor appear concerned about Fortunatos health?
I can only think of two reasons to why Montresor would be at all concerned about Fortunatos health. I think that
he wanted to make sure Fortunato was well enough to know what he would do to him. Also I think he also wanted
Fortunato to suffer in the wall after he seeled it off.
11.Do you think Montresor should have killed Fortunato? Why or why not?
I can only say that I wouldnt have if I was Montresor. Otherwise, Poe made Montresor a vengeful character to
develop the story. Without Montresors desire for revenge, there would be no story.
12.What do you think Fortunato might have done to make Montresor want such a diabolical revenge?

It says at the begining of the story that Fortunato insulted Montresor. Others may seek revenge but not one severe
as death but Montresor must have had his pride hurt. Many men do not like getting their pride hurt.

13.In your opinion, did Montresor have to kill Fortunato? Is their any other way Montresor could have handled this
situation? Explain
Montresor could have handled the problem better with a simple conversation or discussion but decided to turn to
getting revenge. I would have done differently but Montresor is a vengeful person and there would be no story if he just
talked it out with Fortunato.
14.Do you think Montresor's crime will ever be discovered? Why or why not?
I highly doubt that his crime would ever be discovered becuase he planned it out so thoroughly. No one saw
Fortunato enter his house and even if they did search his cellar and his house, they wouldnt find anything but catacombs
and a new wall. No one would suspect a thing.
Dramatic Irony
The whole story is an example of dramatic irony because Fortunato is unaware of Montresor's plot to kill him while the
reader knows this from the very beginning. Montresor goes through an elaborate plan to lure Fortunato to the catacombs
beneath his house in order to punish him for an unknown insult Montresor feels Fortunato has inflicted upon him. We
know what Montresor is doing, but poor Fortunato has no idea until it's too late. Poe's use of dramatic irony allows us, the
readers, to be a part of Montresor's plan and to watch how he skillfully carries it out. We see Fortunato's reaction when he
realizes what is happening. We know what's coming, but it adds suspense to see how Fortunato will react to it.
Verbal irony
One example in The Cask of Amontillado, and probably the most obvious, is Montresor's cruel "Yes, for the love of God!".
This has multiple meanings, such as indicating that Montresor believes his actions are righteous, or that he is mocking
Fortunato (as in "yes, yes, blah blah for the love of God, I'm enjoying this"). The irony in this quote is in its implications
of Godly love; what Montresor is doing is anything but loving or Godly, and there is no interpretation in which this does
not strike the reader as the opposite of the meaning of the words.
Mood- One example in The Cask of Amontillado, and probably the most obvious, is Montresor's cruel "Yes, for the love
of God!". This has multiple meanings, such as indicating that Montresor believes his actions are righteous, or that he is
mocking Fortunato (as in "yes, yes, blah blah for the love of God, I'm enjoying this"). The irony in this quote is in its
implications of Godly love; what Montresor is doing is anything but loving or Godly, and there is no interpretation in
which this does not strike the reader as the opposite of the meaning of the words.