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NewbieSeriesCurriculum

Lesson

Topic

Greetings-and-etiquette

Introductions

Conversation

Goodbye

Agreeing, old-friends,
phone-greeting

Key Vocabulary

Key Phrases

Target Grammar

, ,

(ssi) is the honorific suffix.


(annyeonghaseyo) can be used in almost any
situation where the English greeting "Hello" can be used.

N/A

,
, .

: " (name)"(jeo-neun 'name'imnida)


you can use the phrase to introduce your name to somebody.

N/A

, ,
, , ,

(gamsahamnida) is a polite way to say "Thank you."


(gomapseumnida) is another polite way to say
"Thank you." This phrase is a bit less formal than the former
(gamsahamnida).

N/A

,
,

(annyeonghi gaseyo) : "goodbye" and it's used in


situations when someone is leaving. Literally, "go peacefully."
(annyeonghi gyeseyo) : "goodbye" and it's said
by someone who is leaving.

(yeoboseyo) is used when making or receiving a


phone call.
(oraenman-ieyo) can be used like"It's been a long
time."

N/A

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NewbieSeriesCurriculum
Lesson

10

Topic

Conversation

Food, hunger

Likes, kimchi

Dislikes, kimchi

tastes, kimchi

Key Vocabulary

, -/

, , ,

Key Phrases

, ,

Target Grammar
? (jal isseosseoyo?) is used to ask if one has been
good for that time.
[noun] + -/? (-eun/neunyo?) - "How about [noun]?"

(baegopeuda) means "to be hungry" or "to have a


hungry stomach". Literally, it means "stomach is hungry.
(gopeuda):"to be hungry".
(manta) is "to be many" In the context of this conversation.
It was used in its adverbial form

(johahaeyo) is "to like".


(Object)/ . (Object)eul/reul johahaeyo. (Object)
like.
(jinjja) is used very much in the same manner with English
"really".

(sireohaeyo) is used just like the English "don't like" or


"dislike."
(Object)/ . (Object)eul/reul silheohaeyo. (Object)
dislike.
The object marking particle is (eul) or (reul). (eul) is
used for objects that end in consonants. (reul) is used for
obejcts that end in vowels.

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(wae) means "why", which is typically used at the beginning


of the sentence.
(masitda) means "delicious." (mat):"taste"+
(itda):"to exist". Literally this phrase means "taste exists."

NewbieSeriesCurriculum
Lesson

11

12

13

14

15

Topic

mother, phone-calls

Key Vocabulary

N/A

questioning, jail, police

, , ,

interrogation, confession,
police, jail

, , ,
/

jail, apologies, mother

numbers, Native-KoreanNumbers

, , , ,
, , ,
, , ,
,

Key Phrases

, , ,

Target Grammar
(isseoyo): Stating the Existence or Possession of
Something
(eopseo): Stating the Absence or Non-presence of
Something
?(igeo mwo-yeoyo?):What is this?
(igeo) is written as (igeot). But (igeo) flows much
easier than (igeot).? (mwo-yeyo?) " (mwo)
means "what" and (yeyo) means "is."

N/A

/:Demonstrative Pronouns
(igeo): "this refers to items that are close to the listener.
(geugeo) : "that" is used to refer to objects that are far
from the speaker, yet close to the listener.

, ,
,
.

(mianhae) is Im sorry in the intimate politeness level


and can be used among people who are very close in
relationship.
(gwenchanha): Ok, It's Alright, is in the intimate
politeness level

The numbers 1 to 10 are as follows:1 - (hana) 2 - (dul)


3 - (set) 4 - (net) 5 - (daseot) 6 - (yeoseot) 7 (ilgop) 8 - (yeodeolp) 9 - (ahop) 10 - (yeol).
These numbers are used when counting sequentially : reciting
one's age, ordering food at a restaurant, seating people.

KoreanClass101.com

NewbieSeriesCurriculum
Lesson

Key Vocabulary

age, Native-KoreanNumbers

, , ,
,

17

days, months, dates,


birthdays, sino-koreannumbers

, , , , ,
, , , , ,
, , ,

18

Native-Korean-Numbers,
hour, sino-koreannumbers, numbers, Time

, ,

19

day-of-the-week,
birthday

, ,
, ,
, ,
,

gifts, birthdays

, , ,
, , ,
,

16

20

Topic

Key Phrases

Target Grammar

? (myeot sal-ieyo?): How Old Are You?, It is a way


to ask the age in the standard politeness level.
The numbers in the tens' place : 10 is (yeol) /20 is
(seumul) When reciting age, the counter, (sal): "years of
age,which is attached to the end of a number.

N/A

(il) - 1 / (i) 2/ (sam) - 3 /


The phrase ? (myeochil-ieyo?) is used to ask the
date.
? (saengil-i eonje-yeoyo?) is used to ask
someone when their birthday is.

N/A

A Native-Korean number+(si):hour.
A Sino-Korean number +(bun):minute.
[noun] + -/? (-eun/neunyo?) - "How about [noun]?"
-? (-eunyo?) is applied to nouns that end in consonants.
Cont

- (-yoil) is attached to (wol - Monday), (hwa Tuesday), (su - Wednesday), (mok - Thursday), (geum
- Friday), (to - Saturday) and (il - Sunday).
Cont

Noun+[isseyo]:Noun exists.
: Stating the Existence or Possession of Something
? (mwo-yeyo?): What is it?
: (mwo):"what" and (yeyo) :"is".

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NewbieSeriesCurriculum
Lesson

21

22

23

Topic

money, sino-koreannumbers

strangers, titles

food, water

Key Vocabulary

, , , ,

, , ,
, , ,
,

Key Phrases

, ,

, , ,

KoreanClass101.com

Target Grammar
The Sino-Korean number system is typically used for reciting
phone numbers, time (minutes), months, years, counting
money, and a number of other things. With the numbers one
through ten, one can count till 99.
(baek) - 100
(cheon) - 1,000
(man) - 10,000
(eok) - 100,000,000
(ajeossi) - This title is used for older men approximately
in their 30's and above.
(ajumma) is used for older women approximately in their
mid 30's and above. But women do not desire to be called
because it means they are not considered young anymore.
and are neither considered rude nor impolite.
(haksaeng) :student is used for young people, both male
and female of this age.
(juseyo) is conjugated in the standard politeness level.
Noun + (juseyo): Please give me (noun)
(jom) is an abbreviated form of (jogeum) :"a little" or "a
bit"
However, (jom) softens the speech and makes a request
politer than just saying directly.

NewbieSeriesCurriculum
Lesson

24

25

Topic

directions, locations,
police-station

money, police-station,
knives, revenge

Key Vocabulary
, , ,
, , ,
, , , ,

N/A

Key Phrases

Target Grammar

, , , , (ap, dwi, oreunjjok, oenjjok, yeop) are


Location Words used with the location particle (e), and the
verb of existence (itda)
(Directional word) . (-e isseoyo)
? (eodi-yeyo?) is asking where something is.
?(eodi-yeyo?) :Where is (it)?

, , ,
,

(an dwae) is literally translated as "it cannot become," but


is used as "it cannot be," "it shouldn't be" when referring to a
situation.
negative adverb (an)+ the verb (doeda) 'to become.
(ttaemune) is a grammatical structure which provides
reason for something.
Continued

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