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Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter1, what do we learn and how do we learn it?

SETTING:What do we learn?

1920/22 America, East/West Egg, Nick/Tom graduated at New Haven-Yale.


>Nick goes to great war/teutonic migration(p4)=lost generation-misses war, explains his move from the West to the East of America
(going against norms of American society/against the grain) but does live in the less fashionable(p5) west egg like Gatsby but
Tom+Daisy live in East egg.
>Toms house- elaborate/extravagant descriptions deployed by Carraway eg cheerful red and white Georgian colonial Mansion/french
windows, glowing now with reflected gold/bright rose-coloured space(p6)=Nick blown away,awe struck by this house,romantic
atmosphere as if nothing could go wrong- natural light is present=symbolism used by Fitzgerald after the natural light disappearslast
sunshine fell with romantic affection upon her(daisys) glowing face/ the glow faded(p11) our first hint of a turning point > Toms got
some woman in New York(p12) when Tom returns to the table artificial lighting is present the crimson room bloomed with light/ the
lamplight bright on his boots(p14) = change in the atmosphere of the house and Nicks view of Buchanans = made them less remotely
rich/I was confused and a little disgusted(p15)= reader gets mixed views of the Buchanans through Nicks narration.

SETTING:How do we learn it?

>We gain all the information throughs Carraways narration-the character/setting description and what order and how the story is told is
up to him.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?
>Carraway-his father taught him not to be judgemental and that is his goal gave me some advice which was whenever you
feel like criticising anyone,just remember that all people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had(p3) ,although
he states that he is inclined to reserve all judgements he goes on to state that he is a victim of not a few old veteran
bores(p3)=we know hes hypocritical/judgemental/biased. >hisfamily were well-to-do people in this middle western
city(p4)=nick is originally from the middle west. clan/Descended from the Dukes of Baccleuch(p4)=old money-contradiction
of old money with new money as his parents own a wholesale hardware business(p4)=new money. New york=east(new
money)-against norms as the wealthy place was the west(old money).>Lost generation=enjoyed war as he labels it the great
war(p4). he states that when he comes back he feels restless as he enjoyed the counter raid so thoroughly(p4)= from this +
the fact that hes a writer reader gathers hes lost generation. He moves from west to east as he felt west was no longer the
warm centre of the universe(p4) but rather the ragged edge of the universe=west is not enough for him/misses war so moves
against the norms. >Nicks area/house= he moves east to learn the bond business(p4)where he finds a weather beaten
bungalow(p5) in the less fashionable west egg but the contradicts and states that thats a superficial tag to describe the
bizarre and not a little sinister contrast between them(p5). Nicks house is at the very tip of the egg and is squeezed between
two huge places(p5) the one on the right was Gatsbys. >Nick as a character/narrator: he introduces himself as an
unbiased/objective person this is later contradicted.>Nicks dinner party at Buchanans: across the bay the white palaces of the
fashionable east egg glittered along the water(p6) he says that the history of the summer(p6)began on the evening he drove
over to have dinner with the Tom Buchanans. when he first arrives hes brought in to an enchanting illusion of the house +
characters. there he also meets Jordan Baker. Finds out about Toms affair so begins to come back to reality and the dinner
partys conversation ends in small talk by the end of chapter as nick leaves disgusted as he's brought back to reality by the
events that developed over the evening.Nick gets his first sighting of Gatsby a figure had emerged from the shadow of my
neighbours mansion (p16)=sees Gatsby staring at the green light at the end of the dock.
>Tom Buchanan-arrogant/selfish man=comes from an old social/wealthy family(old money) were enormously wealthy(p6) tom
was born to inherit/inhabit a certain world/to marry a certain type of woman and to live a certain style of lifesnobbish/selfish/ignorant+graduated at Yale=high social standing+profanity. He's a self absorbed character= Im stronger and
more of a man than you are(p7)-ignorant,inconsiderate etc.Just as flashy as Gatsby but has more respect due to his
family/arrogance/class/history/power/style of living. e.g. he came east in a fashion that took your breath away(p6)hed brought
a string of ponies from Lake Forest uses this to show off his wealth. Toms known for sports= among various physical
accomplishments/ national figure(p6) for playing football. Reader gets the idea that Tom still has stick names the poloplayer/the athlete(chapter1). Tom is seen as an idol sturdy/supercilious manner(p6). Hes seen as aggressive/violent=
Nicks initial description shinning arrogant eyes/the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward then seconded by
objected Tom crossly(p10). overall he is said to convey fractiousness.>He did some reading and now believes that the lesser
races are going to knock the nordics(p11)off their privilege pedestal as he states if we don't look out the white race will be-will
be totally submerged(p10/11).>His relationship with Daisy: Daisy calls him a brut of a man,a great big hulking physical
specimen(p10)=he uses his power/comes by his power in the least classy way as hes just bigger and stronger than anyone
else(chapter 1)=he uses this as the root of all power as it has nothing to do with being naturally superior races or as he believes
she gives the idea that its just whether you're big enough to steal someone elses money/woman/belongings. we also find out
that he is cheating so therefore he is cruel and doesn't really care about atone elses feelings but his own.

>Daisy Buchanan(nee Fay)-shes Nicks second cousin&is married to tom its difficult for the reader to figure out what she's
thinking making her an interesting character.>First impressions of Daisy:shes laying on a couch and is surrounded by lots of
floating material. she is the constancy when everything else is moving shown by her being sat on the only stationary object in
the rooman enormous couch(p7) and the connotations of purity/innocence attached to her such as her white dress buoyed
up as though they had been blown back in after a short flight around the house (p7) angel/fairy(Fitzgeralds clever way of
portraying the name Fay) which creates a delicate image of beauty and innocence etc.>second opposing idea of Daisy= Nick
and her are sitting on the porch she opens up to him that when her daughter was born Tom was god knows where(p13) and on
hearing that it was a girl she said alright I'm glad its a girl and i hope shell be a fool thats the best thing a girl can be in this
world a beautiful little fool=shows Daisy not to be as naive as first made up to be as she is aware that toms got some woman
in new york as we are made aware by Jordan through Nick and it is visible that daisy is certainly not oblivious to this and she
attempts to distract Nick and indeed herself when the woman phones up at dinner by stating you remind me of a rose(p11).
Reader is constantly exposed to the fact that in every happy description of Daisy there is an undercutting of sadness making her
complicated and interesting. we get the idea that Fitzgerald wants the reader to be confused by her character.
>Jordan Baker- professional golf player, Nick is fascinated by the way she holds herself and demeanour with her chin raised a
little as if she were balancing something on it that he almost wanted to apologise for having disturbed her by coming in(p8)
this and image of her and daisy floating around in the room(p7) shows her to be out of this world/amazing. Nick was attracted to
Jordan as he enjoyed looking at her with her charming,discontented face(p9) this shows that there is an undercut of sadness
within Jordan just like Daisy as if something is missing and shes lost within herself.>she is described in quite an androgynous
way, with her cadet like stance, and small-breasted-ness.(p8) she also seems to have quite a prickly manner, speaking
contemptuously(p14) to Nick and seeming to have mastered a certain hardy scepticism. These traits paint her as a woman
who, understandably, is unwilling to expose her weaknesses. Perhaps it comes from her playing a male-dominated sport
competitively and for a living that gives her this quality, and Nick seems to like it.> we can also see a little of the futility of her
actions. She is talked over when attempting to add something to the conversation which Tom seems determined to dominate
with his racist rant, and though she does achieve some level of elevation in this chapter, it is marred by the fact that it is largely
achieved through her decidedly more masculine(p7)actions. >Given the restrictions of the time, she manages to gain a certain
level of freedom - from being ruled over by a husband or father, although the former seems near in her future by the end of the
novel. That she does this by playing the societal game is hardly to be criticised - is it not the sensible option? The ultimate
futility of her quest for the American Dream (which was promised to all Americans, including women, but which Fitzgerald shows
may have been merely an empty dream that was only really achievable by the male elite) does not undermine her efforts. She
seems to live a somewhat more fulfilled existence than Daisy and Tom.
> Gatsby is first found in this setting- Fitzgerald is careful to weave synaesthetic descriptions around the encounter by going into
great detail about the quality of Nicks surroundings - he talks of the loud, bright night, with wings beating in the trees and a
persistent organ sound as the full bellows of the earth blew the frogs full of life. (p15)Here he brings together sight, sound and
touch to create a very real image within the readers head, and the mention of the full bellows of the earth(p15)bestowing
nearby animals with life seems to give the moment importance beyond the individual consciousness of the narrator. >not just the
depth of the description that is important here - it is the quality of it. Gatsby is bonded with heady, romantic imagery - he comes
out to see the silver pepper of the stars(p15), and is spotted when the silhouette of a moving cat wavered across the
moonlight(15). By combining Gatsby with the romantic images of the stars and the moon, beautiful and natural lights, Fitzgerald
perfectly aligns the purity and romance of Gatsbys dream with the purity and romance of these symbols. However, when he
gives a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone(p16)by stretching out his arms towards the dark water in a curious
way(p16) and trembling(p16), it is not toward a romantic, natural light. On the contrary, it is towards a single green light,
minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. This insubstantial and artificial light provides the object of
Gatsbys quest - which we will find out in later chapters but is important to consider at this stage also - and its contrast the purity
of his feelings for it (symbolised by the romantic imagery mentioned before) seems to be a bad omen. >This, briefest of
glimpses, is all we see of Gatsby, for immediately afterward is Nick alone again in the unquiet darkness(p16). Fitzgerald has
expertly navigated our interest in Gatsby - aroused at various points leading up to this one - from a source of mild curiosity to a
strong desire for more information. The points about his dream and the lights are significant when looked back upon later on, but
reading this for the first time, the romantic connotations to the mysterious man in the moonlight are overwhelming, and the
mystery around him palpable.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?

>We gain all the information throughs Carraways narration-the character/setting description and what order and how the story is told is
up to him.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

> Introduced to Carraway and his history-my family were prominent, well-to do people/ descended from the dukes of
bacchleuch/wholesale hardware business(p3,4,5)
>Then introduced to Daisy(Nicks cousin)and Tom, her husband+ Nicks old friend from Yale this is where Carraway states the summer
really begins(p6).(p6,7,8,9,10,(11-where things start to take a turn)-natural lighting exists

>Jordan Baker hints there are problems in Daisys+Toms relationship. Toms got some woman in New York(p11,12)
>Brief moment of awkwardness/uncomfortable atmosphere after the phone call/argument- artificial lighting enters (p13/14)
>Nick leaves the dinner feeling confused and disgusted (p15)before returning to his estate.
>Introduced to Nicks first sighting of Gatsby as he stretched out his arms towards the dark water in a curious way/he was
trembling(p16). > Readers first introduction to the green light(representation of Gatsbys dream-Daisy).
>Overall, Carraway begins in the present but looks to the past straightaway-he doesn't always talk about the past sometimes we are
brought in to the present as well as the future.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?

>Nicks narration is how the reader gains the information, we gain the idea that he is writing those events rather tun telling them to us
throughout the novel.

VOICES:What do we learn?

>Chapter 1 (and novel)is told in Carraways voice(1st person) we get a biased self-conscious voice. reader gains all info/story through
Carraway-everything is told to us through his eyes so we get his opinion on the events in the story whether theyd be
judgemental/hypocritical or biased were sometimes forced to agree with his views subconsciously as hes the narrator. although Nick is
not reliable hes the perfect narrator due to his temperament as were told by him he's tolerant,open-minded, quiet and a good listener
(chapter1) and as a result of this other characters talk to him+tell him their secrets e.g. Gatsby as they feel confident in them,meaning
that the reader gains more info.
>Daisys voice/laughter is used as a symbol for her complicated/confusing character throughout novel. eg low thrilling voice(p8)=her
voice is that of an angel/enchanting draws you in.

VOICES:How do we learn it?

>We gain all the information throughs Carraways narration-the character/setting description and what order and how the story is told is
up to him.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>The story is told in the first person, through the eyes of Nick Carraway. The primary and most visible story is about Jay Gatsby and his
devotion to his dream. Other stories, also told through Carraway's eyes, include Tom's reconciliation with his wife Daisy, Nick's own
relationship with Jordan, and Nick's evolving friendship with Gatsby. Nick is only able to tell these stories through his limited
omniscience. At times, he is able to narrate scenes despite not being present - but he rarely takes advantage of this fact. Although the
story is told in the first person, Nick Carraway is able to easily become part of the wallpaper. His major character trait-reserving judgment
- allows him to be almost an "invisible" narrator, similar to a traditional third-person omniscient point of view. Ultimately, however, if we
lost Nick's point-of-view, we would never understand the evolution of his character. He is the invisible man until the end of the book,
when suddenly, he has opinions about everybody.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

>We gain all the information throughs Carraways narration-the character/setting description and what order and how the story is told is
up to him.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter2, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>Valley of Ashes= half way between West Egg and New york between two wealthy places is this desolate area of land where the
motor road hastily joins the railroad(p16)=ugly/uninhabited/rural area of land which is avoided by rich/wealthy people as only these
types of people were able to afford a motor(car) so they dont want to know anything about this lifeless place and the people within it- a
metaphor of where people end up when they dont make it in life-this lifeless place suggested by gray/ashes(p16). valley of
ashes(p16)= juxtaposed language as valley=nature/garden of Eden/paradise/beauty but ashes=death/hell/burning/depression as
well as screening the illegal activities that are taking place in order for people to get by. This area and its inhabitants are very poor as
ashes take the forms of houses suggesting that the building within the area are of poor condition built by it inhabitants as well as
suggesting the whole area is covered in ash from the houses to the people. there is a constant use of juxtaposed language/alliteration
e.g. fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat/grotesque garden=emphasis by Nick on how deserted and ugly this place is and how
the people in it are at a point of despair. a gleam of hope+but above the gray land..you perceive after a moment the eyes of Doctor T.J
Eckleburg which are blue and gigantic(p16)=god-like description almost as if this thing is judging the people in the valley
blue=innocence/arian race.maybe he's questioning God on how this can be allowed to happen? as he had a persistent stare(p17)
>Gearge Wilsons garage= unprosperous and bare/shadow of a garage(p17)=bleak place, depressing everything within it is covered
in dust and ash as if it was burnt and abounded like a ghost city as suggested by shadow persistently used by Fitzgerald.Cars are a

symbol of wealth and mobility and power and modernisation but they also represent labor and subordination (men like George Wilson
service the cars of their betters), and they introduce new dangers, especially when the rich use them carelessly.
>Tom/Myrtles apartment in New York=small living room/small bedroom=this is a small apartment used for affairs. theres constant
mention of european furniture versailles(p20)=france is romantic/small apartment filled with large,grand furniture=sense of showing off
by Myrtle as this is the beset thing shes ever had bit in no way does it reflect Tom/his lifestyle.

SETTING:How do we learn it?

Fitzgerald portrays a sinister image of the Valley of ashes and the people/buildings in it to the reader through Nicks narration. Fitzgerald
makes Nick use various languages techniques in this chapter in order to emphasise the bleakness of this place and give the reader a
sinister image, which allows Fitzgerald to portray the lifestyle of the lower classes in the 1920s to the reader deployed by Carraway.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>George Wilson=he was a blond, spiritless man, anaemic, and faintly handsome. When he saw us a damp gleam of hope sprang
into his light blue eyes.(p17)=George is poor-wealth/no hope/no life as soon as he sees civilisation he finds a bleak sense of hoperepresentation of men in lower classes of 1920s.He owns a shadow of a garage(p17) that isnt doing well in this ghost town that is the
valley of ashes.His wife, Myrtle treats him as if hes not there when around other people as she walked through her husband as if he
were a ghost(p18)=unimportant/insignificant & no respect even though he is a man as he cant provide her the dream that she wants
due to a lack of money/lifestyle-reference to ghost/him already being dead physically and alive in spirit only>seconded by he was
mingling immediately with the cement colour of the walls(p18)=gray/death/covered in ash/no hope>seconded by -white ashen dust
veiled his dark suit and his pale hair(p18)-sibilance creates a sinister/saddening effect/image to the reader.+ ashes=colour
gray/death/hell-thus showing that Wilsons life is nearly hanging on a line(his wife/garage)>linking to time and how life is shortened.
+veiled= a veil of death smothers Georges life-now trying to move on his suit suggesting an end soon.>time.-Tom states hes so
dumb he doesn't know hes alive(p18)
>Myrtle Wilson=represents women in lower classes=treats her husband(lower class) badly as she knows he cant provide for her so she
looks for someone that canwalking through her husband as if he were a ghost,shook hands with Tom(p18)=readers aware shes
having an affair with Tom, her affair is her attempt to rise and get out of the Valley of ashes because she doesn't fit in the suggested
byher facecontained no fave or gleam of beauty,but there was an immediately perceptible vitality about her(p18) shes shown to be
more alive than anyone else in this gray/dingy place/ shes shown not to fit in the lower class by Fitzgerald and shes aware of this and
therefore uses Tom to remove herself from the ghost town for at least a few hours however in the future she hopes to permanently
remove herself from the Valley of ashes. when she's with tom her character is shown to change and she uses every opportunity to use
Toms wealth such as in the station drugstore (she bought) some cold cream and a small flask of perfume(p18)=uses every opportunity
to provide for herself before getting a dog i want one of those dogs(p19)and she let four taxicabs drive away before she selected a
new one,lavender-coloured with grey upholstery=tries to get luxury and act upper class but grey(depression) always follows her as she
is a member of the lower class. Nick describes her using adverbs such asenthusiastically/haughtily(p19)=shows a sense of
hope/life/self absorbance and a front of trying to be something shes not as she tries to act as if she is naturally from the upper class but
yet she has to have sex/affair with a man in order to be satisfied with her life(so she can get what she wants)>with the influence of the
dress her personality had also undergone a change(p21)/ her gestures,her assertions became more violently
affected(p21).>Domestic dialogue between her &Tom =Some time toward midnight Tom Buchanan and Mrs. Wilson stood face to face
discussing, in impassioned voices, whether Mrs. Wilson had any right to mention Daisy's name."Daisy! Daisy! Daisy!" shouted Mrs.
Wilson. "I'll say it whenever I want to! Daisy! Dai "Making a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand.
(p25)=She got punched as she talked too much for Toms liking and because she's lower class no one was really that concerned as Tom
didnt care and Nick and Mr Mckee made their way out after the incident asap=big contrast to how everyone acted when Daisy hurt her
little finger(p10)= the contrasting treatment of women in different classes.
>Tom Buchanan=Tom uses/takes advantage of women such as Myrtle as theyre weaker(no money/wealth) he can provide for her and
have an affair-hes not afraid to flaunt his affair even to Nick who is Daisys cousin-doesnt see him as an equal, Nick is weaker=The fact
that he had one (a mistress) was insisted upon wherever he was known. His acquaintances resented the fact that he turned up in
popular restaurants with her and, leaving her at a table, sauntered about, chatting with whomever he knew. (p17)/were getting off, he
insisted. I want you to meet my girl(p17)= not afraid to flaunt the affair and disrespects women esp Daisy by blatantly cheating on her.
Toms violent characteristics are apparent throughout e.g. its a bitch,said Tom decisively(p19)>seconded when he hits Myrtle Making
a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand.(p25)=Fitzgerald displays men attitudes towards
women+upper class attitudes to lower classes.
>Nick Carraway= it had occurred to me that this shadow of a garage must be a blind, and that sumptuous and romantic apartments
were concealed overhead(p17) =This represents Nicks inability to understand what poverty is-all he has lived in is mansions with maids
and he cannot understand that others dont have equal wealth+self conscious character, whenever he feels awkward e.g. when tom and
myrtle both disappeared(p20) he is uncomfortable with the affair that is going on so he begins to over describe everything in extreme
detail e.g. read a chapter of Simon Called Peter, either it was terrible stuff or the whiskey had distorted things because it didn't make
any sense to me(p20)/description of Catherine(p20). in this chapter Carraway is shown to favour the views of men e.g. when tom hits
Myrtle he doesn't help her instead he finds the first instance to leave and escape from what just happened taking my hat of the
chandelier, I followed(p25).

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?

>We gain all the information through Carraways narration- intentional by Fitzgerald as he is the perfect narrator=knows character
secrets as they trust him enough to confide in him. but also he has different character traits eg hes self conscious so whenever he feels

as if hes not providing the full story he enables the reader to know this for instance he states i have been drunk just twice in my life, and
the second time was that afternoon:so everything that happened has a dim, hazy cast over it- he explains to us using his own critical
judgements that the events that hes about to tell us about may not be exactly what happened that night as he was drunk and does not
fully remember-enabling the reader to realise that we cant fully trust what he says- the way we gain our information is distorted=the
information we gain may also be distorted.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

> Going to New York on train Tom&Carraway=the valley of ashes is bounded on by one side by a small foul river(p16)
> Getting off the train=when we stopped by the ash-heaps he jumped to his feetforced me out of the car(p 17)
>Going to New York= Tom Buchanan and his girl and I went up together to New york(p18)
> Journey to the apartment= we went on,cutting back again over the Park toward the west hundreds. At 158th street the cab stopped at
one slice in a long white cake of apartment-houses(p19)
>Going Back to West egg= then i was laying half asleep in the cold lower level of the Pensylvania Station(p26)

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?

The information Fitzgerald intended us to know we find out everything trough Nicks Narration.

VOICES:What do we learn?

>Georges voice faded off(p17)=reinforces the fact that George is seen as insignificant and of no use to society=a representation of
those in lower classes of 1920s.
>Tom= said coldly(p17)=agressive tone/manner>seconded when he hits Myrtle=represents men in upper classes of 1920s.
>Nick=self conscious-confides in the reader throughout chapter 2 e.g. i have been drunk just twice in my life, and the second time was
that afternoon:so everything that happened has a dim, hazy cast over it(p20)- he explains to us using his own critical judgements that
the events that hes about to tell us about may not be exactly what happened that night as he was drunk and does not fully rememberenabling the reader to realise that we cant fully trust what he says- the way we gain our information is distorted=the information we gain
may also be distorted.
>Myrtle=hopeful/extreme vitality voice= said enthusiastically/ asked delicately(p19)=naive character with a lot of hope to remove
herself from the valley of ashes where she does not fit in=representation of women in lower classes in 1920s

VOICES:How do we learn it?

>Although the only voice that we get is of our unreliable narrator Nick Fitzgerald uses Carraway to portray the voices and tones of other
characters as they speak and act so that we get a sense of their traits and behaviour. an example is when Carraway deploys that Myrtle
went haughtily in(p19) to the apartment block which suggests that she is pretending to act as if she's from the upper class as she
believes that acting snobbish will make her look more sophisticated and as if she was born wealthy and into the upper class.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>We only gain the perspective of Carraway throughout this chapter as he is our narrator so he tells us about the events that occurred
throughout the chapter however he does defend himself in saying that everything that happened has a dim, hazy cast over it(p20)
which means that the view that we get of these characters may be an illusion and could be distorted as he doesn't fully remember the
occurrences after he started drinking.
> We are only told as much as Nick witnesses which means we may not gain the full image of everything that happened that night
meaning some parts of the story may be missing in the readers mind.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

>We gain this information through caraway because he confides in the reader and tells them that this is what happened-Fitzgerald uses
this as a way to communicate and tell the reader that this chapter may be confusing and not in order due to the narrator not being fully
sober.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter3, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>Gatsbys party/house=two opposing images carried out by Carraway:


>1)enchantment=in his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths(p26)=metaphoric language suggests magical
atmosphere a sense of enchantment./bewitched to a dark gold(p26)=Bewitched is the language of magic and tricks. The gaudiness
of the party is enriched. Harlequin can even be a good representation of the whole party. The scene is as absurd and comical as it is
extravagant and luxurious because the rich are totally indulging in their wealth, interacting according to the rules of behavior associated
with amusement parks(p27)/the lights grow brighter as earth lurches away from the sun, and now the orchestra is playing yellow
cocktail music,and the opera of voices pitches a key higher(p27)=Fitzgerald uses Nick to explain that as the night goes on, people are
getting more intoxicated. Thus making everything seem different.(syneasthesia)(i.e the lights are brighter, and the pitches are higher
butyellow=hollowness so Nick was blown away at first but theres a sense of vacuity&shallowness but also represents a sense of
/floated rounds of cocktails permeate the garden outside(p27)=The image of cocktails floating appears multiple times in the description
of Gatsbys party. In reality the cocktails are being carried on trays by waiters that Gatsby has hired, however the guests at the party are
ignoring the servants and only seeing the trays. They ignore the servants because the idea of someone working seems so absurd to
them at a moment like this because of the indulgent atmosphere that Gatsby has created >2)vacuity=in his blue gardens men and girls
came and went like moths(p26)=Fitzgeralds use of the blue gardens in this passage is in an marked contrast from the grotesque
gardens of the last chapters start. In the valley of ash description beforehand, the use of a colour, even though it is still in the cool
spectrum.The moth imagery is significant because it conveys a sort of unconsciousness that Gatsbys party guests embody. Insects
are traditionally viewed as unintelligent followers, traveling about without a specific purpose or reason. Likewise, the people attending
Gatsbys parties are overall superficial, bouncing around without purpose.moths are particularly significant because they are tragic
creatures; they move toward light for a sense of security, only to find that the light source is actually a harbinger of death. Comparing
Gatsbys guests to moths implies that they are attracted to the brightness of the partys extravagance, yet unknowingly leading
themselves towards self-destruction.The groups change more swiftly, swell with new arrivals, dissolve and form in the same
breath(p27)=connotation of alcohol flowing thorough the party from words such as spill, and swell and phrases such as glide on
through the sea-change of faces. Like alcohol,/People were not invited they went there. They got into automobiles which bore them
out to Long Island, and somehow they ended up at Gatsbys door.(p27)=Gatsbys parties arent an invite-only affair, but a gathering of
friends and friends of friends and friends of those friends, who wander and gather together with the simple desire to party. All they want
to do is have a good time, and bathe themselves in the glow of Gatsbys luxurious lifestyle. Lost men and women ended up at Gatsbys
door, as if its some kind of mysterious wonderland, an informal gathering of a diversity, a rainbow of the interesting and artistic elite of
New York City, and all those who had managed to find their way there with the motive to become one of these vips.

SETTING:How do we learn it?

>We learn this trough Carraway's contradictory narration.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>Carraway=I believe that on the first night I went to Gatsbys house I was one of the few guests who had actually been invited.(p27) and
then repeats I had been actually invited.(p27)=By reiterating to the reader that he had actually been invited, Nick lets it be known that
he is one of the elite few at the party, asserting his power over the other lesser guests.He reassures not only the reader, but himself that
he is wanted here and has come by choice, an option only those with high social mobility have. In a way, this simple fact confirms Nicks
status as a member of Old Wealth, at least in his mind.>Dressed up in white flannels I went over to his lawn a little after seven, and
wandered around rather ill at ease among swirls and eddies of people I didnt know(p27/28)=Carraway is new to town, and he does not
yet realize that the hundreds of guests at the party are congregating in the house of a stranger. Carraway feels a bit of unease, believing
that he is the only one at the party who is not yet a personal friend of the mysterious Gatsby. So he wanders through the crowds of
people trying to find the host and exploring the rest of the mansion.>as soon as i arrived i made an attempt to find my
host(p28)=Carraway believes it would be rude of him if he did not at least introduce himself to Gatsby, not knowing that many of the
frequent guests hadnt even met him before. It is obviously his priority of the night, considering its the first thing he plans on doing.
> Nick is unreliable=before he meets Gatsby he states we were sitting at a table with a man of about my age(p31)=Before he realises
that this is Gatsby Nick doesn't see anything amazing about this man.But after Gatsby introduces himself (p32) Nick states that He
smiled understandinglymuch more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that
you may come across four or five times in life.(p32)=Nick seems amazed and enchanted by this man now that he knows its Gatsby hes
almost shocked.Also After hearing so many rumors about this Jay Gatsby, Nick was expecting either some incredibly intimidating figure
or someone stuck up. He wasnt expecting Gatsby to be so well-mannered and charming. He blends in so well its like hes a guest at his
own party. however this could be because I had taken two finger-bowls of champagne, and the scene had changed before my eyes into
something significant, elemental, and profound.(p31)=he was getting drunk again so everything including Gatsby could have been an
illusion in Nicks head.>Most of the remaining women were now having fights with men said to be their husbands. Even Jordans party,

the quartet from East Egg, were rent asunder by dissension. One of the men was talking with curious intensity to a young actress, and
his wife, after attempting to laugh at the situation in a dignified and indifferent way, broke down entirely and resorted to flank attacksat
intervals she appeared suddenly at his side like an angry diamond, and hissed: You promised! into his ear.=The evening is breaking
down. What started off as a magical night is slowly deteriorating into fights, adultery and broken promises. This mirrors the breakdown of
the magical lifestyle of the wealthy that Nick notices during the course of the novel.
>Jordan Baker=represents one aspect of the glamorous life of a New York socialite. Beautiful and inviting, yet dishonest and
shameless(cheating in golf).>as jordan+nick were talking two girls approached them and saidHello! they cried together. Sorry you
didnt win.That was for the golf tournament. She had lost in the finals the week before(p28)Fitzgerald reminds the reader of Jordan
Bakers job. She is a professional golfer. Though her golfing is not exactly significant to the plot of the story, she later in the novel cheats
during a tournament. Almost every aspect of Ms. Baker features something corrupt, including her occupation.You dont know who we
are, said one of the girls in yellow, but we met you here about a month ago.(page 28)=Gatsbys parties arent about building lasting
relationships. They are all about having casual fun for a night. Jordan met these girls at the last party and forgot about them by morning.
>Owl eyes= When Nick+Jordan attempt to find Gatsby they Stumble upon a library where they meetA stout, middle-aged man, with
enormous owl-eyed spectacles, was sitting somewhat drunk on the edge of a great table, staring with unsteady concentration at the
shelves of books.(p30)The spectacles are first associated with Doctor T.J. Ecklebergs blue and gigantic eyesfrom a pair of
enormous spectacles in the Valley of Ashes, Here that are used to exemplify the wealthys aversion from the poverty and strife that the
Valley holds.Ive been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library.(p30)=Through Owl-eyes,
Fitzgerald emphasizes the affect alcohol had on Americans in the early 20th century. Owl-eyes being drunk for about a week alludes to
him being an alcoholic, like many Americans in this time period.>Fifty feet from the door a dozen headlights illuminated a bizarre and
tumultuous scene. In the ditch beside the road, right side up, but violently shorn of one wheel, rested a new coupe which had left
Gatsbys drive not two minutes before.(p35)=Drunken driving, recklessness and damage to property are the result of this magical
evening.>You dont understand, explained the criminal. I wasnt driving. Theres another man in the car.(p36)=Foreshadowing for later
chapters- Nick uses the word criminal to describe Owl Eyes even as hes claiming he wasnt the driver. Not the last time in this book
someone gets blamed for the reckless driving of the other person in the car.>a ghostly pause. Then, very gradually, part by part, a pale,
dangling individual stepped out of the wreck, pawing tentatively at the ground with a large uncertain dancing shoe.(p36)=There are a lot
of ghost words (pale, ghostly, apparition, adding onto the fact that he just seemed to appear out of the car and no one knew he was
there except Owl Eyes) to describe this man and scene and it almost serves the purpose of contrasting the magical liveliness of
Gatsbys party with the aftermath and outcome of the guests- which is a lot more bleak and really really drunk to the point of functioning
like ghosts, drifting away so carelessly that they crash not a couple feet from Gatsbys door. It also could refer back to the moth analogy
and contrasting with that. (Guests coming to Gatsbys are moths but leave as ghosts)
>Jay Gatsby= We know that Gatsby throws these extravagant parties hoping that daisy would turn up. however these so called guests
just use him,his hospitality and wealth like parasite moths and suck out the wealth of Gatsby. we also find out that hes very
generous/caring(p29)>we were sitting at a table with a man of about my age(p31)= Fitzgeralds incredibly inconspicuous introduction to
Jay Gatsby. After building Gatsby up as some mythical figure through the rumors in the first 2 chapters, Fitzgerald just casually
introduces him as an average guy. This indicates that all the outlandish rumors arent true and Gatsby is a lot more normal than his
reputation states.He smiled understandinglymuch more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal
reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life.(p32)=Fitzgerald could have simply said Gatsby had a charming
smile or something of the sort, but instead chose to dedicate a paragraph to how enchanting it is and how it made people feel. Gatsby
has a way of making people feel like he is only thinking about them which helps him come off as more sincere. Gatsby is obsessed with
winning people over (Nick, Cody, and obviously Daisy), so Fitzgerald helps elaborate on why he is so successful. By doing this
Fitzgerald showed the full effect Gatsby had on Carraway once he established it was him..he was drawn into an
illusion/enchantment.>we find out that he gets phone calls from other countries e.g. chicago (p32) all the time-our and Nicks first
insight to what gatsby does for a living(illegal activities)

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?

>Every piece of information we gain is through Carraway. He is the mouthpiece between the reader and Fitzgerald who is the author.
Nick is used to tell the story to the reader.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

>Carraway is formally invited to Gatsbys party.i was one of the few guests that was actually invited(p27)
>Gatsby has an extravagant over the top house party but does not socialise much apart from when he speaks briefly to Nick(this is
Carraways first communicative encounter with the great gatsby.
>Gatsby is known to rarely socialise with the guests as most of them don't know him personally they just turn up for his parties and this
therefore causes various rumours to go around about of how he killed a man once(p29)/he was a German spy during the war(p29)
>a weird instance in the high gothic library(p30) with Jordan and a stout,middle-aged man,with enormous owl-eyed spectacles(p30)
>Nick meets Gatsby. has a brief conversation before gatsby gets a call from Chicago(p32) and excuses himself.
>Jordan and Nick talk about Gatsby
>Gatsby asks to have a private conversation with Jordan(p33)
>Nick observes people for the rest of the party which is coming to an end(p34)
>Jordan comes back extremely excited(p35)

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?

>We know this is the sequence of events as Nick tells the story in this order however we as the reader may not fully trust him as we
know he is not fully reliable so the events that we are told about if they did occur may not have occurred in the same order that night as
we are told as Carraway is writing this storey he is remembering everything that happened over the summer and he was drunk half of
the time therefore making the sequence and time of the events in the novel questionable by the reader.

VOICES:What do we learn?

>Fitzgerald uses both voice of his narrator Nick and the setting that Nick presents in order to tell the story at the end of Chapter 3. When
Nick relays how the lights grow brighter as the earth lurches away form the sun(p Fitzgerald is telling the story by creating the unearthly
atmosphere that surrounds Gatsbys life as the setting draws the guests like moths to Gatsbys artificial world of drunken stars.
Furthermore, Fitzgerald tells the story by highlighting how the narrative is unreliable as the narrator Nick lurches into the extravagance
of both Gatsbys party and his life at this part of the novel. Fitzgerald emphasises the point in the irony of how, although he doesnt drink,
Nick is intoxicated by the gaudy brilliance of the setting; thus, Fitzgerald has also told the story through his use of voice as he reminds
the reader that Nicks narrative filters reality as the character does not, in fact, reserve all judgementsespecially when the Great
Gatsby is involved.

VOICES:How do we learn it?

>The reader does not get a sense of anyones voice for themselves it is through Carraway that we know how he and others sound
throughout the novel so therefore what he says the characters are like may not be completely true as we know he is unreliable.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>the events in the first half of the book all seem to be narrated as though the events occur over a few days-but this isn't the case when
Nick states: I see I have given the impression that the events of three nights several weeks apart were all that absorbed me. On the
contrary, they were merely casual events in a crowded summer, and, until much later, they absorbed me infinitely less than my personal
affairs.(p37)=Nick assures his readers that he isnt actually lost in the decadent, materialistic, and drunken lifestyle of the 20s. He was
much more concerned about things like his job while this all was actually happening.But when he decided to go back and write a story
about his time with Gatsby, he decided to write about the most exciting and Gatsby-related things that have happened to him over the
course of several weeks, and thats why they were brought up instead of the regular boring stuff like going to work, etc. and the book
takes part in the prolonged summer

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

>reading over what i have written so far(p37)=Nick reminds us that he is literally writing out this story. And his purpose behind writing
this whole story is so that he can sort out the events that have happened to him in New York and therefore tell us the story.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter 4, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>Gatsbys car= Everybody had seen it. It was a rich cream color, bright with nickel, swollen here and there in its monstrous length with
triumphant hat-boxes and supper-boxes and tool-boxes, and terraced with a labyrinth of wind-shields that mirrored a dozen suns. Sitting
down behind many layers of glass in a sort of green leather conservatory, we started to town(p41)=the phrases that Nick uses to
describe the car: a monstrous, terraced with a labyrinth, and swollen with various boxes.-Nick doesnt approve of Gatsbys
conspicuous consumption and also could show that something is missing in Gatsbys life so he tries to compensate it by the size etc of
this car/hes trying to prove something e.g. the fact that he's old money when he actually is not=nothing humble bout his possessions
and him?
>Fitzgerald is implicitly commenting on the gaudy materialism of the era. The car is triumphant, suggesting that with this overblown
circus wagon (to use Toms words), Gatsby is closer to fulfilling his quest for his dreams.+everybody=popular/extravegant/eyecatching-Gatsby flaunting his wealth, because everybody seen it its not that interesting anymore?bright=luminous represents the
journey with Gatsby but Nickel=cheap metal, oxymoronic phrase showing something missing in his life/first clue to Gatsbys criminal
involvement that this whole facade is fake. Many layers of glass=refraction hence distortion/about to tell Carraway about his life-two
faced= many layers to gatsby? important as he maybe shattered by himself and his obsessions/Gatsbys shield for protection.
mirrored a dozen suns=light/happiness symbolism/romantic atmosphere Nick is mesmerised again brought in to fake illusion that will
soon be shattered(character/characterization).
>His car and their journey to New York represents Gatsby and his american dream in many ways= Over the great bridge, with the
sunlight through the girders making a constant flicker upon the moving cars, with the city rising up across the river in white heaps and
sugar lumps all built with a wish out of non-olfactory money.(p44)=great-great Gatsby+The sunlight flickering is a symbol of
enlightenment and a switch back and forth between contradictory societies. as well as the illusion/romanticism which overwhelms Nick
created by Gatsby that Nick constantly is forced to enter as well as Gatsbys dream constantly apparent-always there.The city rising is a
symbol of growth, being built from real money that was earned by hard labor. this contrasts the easy way out of old wealth.
>white city rising up across the river in white heaps and sugar lumps all built with a wish out of non-olfactory money=Carraway is
aware the city isn't built on honest money this sweet image of the city is shown to be ruined by illegal activity -reference to Gatsbys
dream being ruined.

>The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the
beauty in the world.(p44)=The view from the Queensboro Bridge is the first glimpse you would get of Manhattan. It represents hope and
promise, and for immigrants it represents the American Dream. The view from the bridge is untainted with negative experiences from the
city and that is what makes it so beautiful.=here is Carraways realisation of the real reason hes here opposing to his previous illusional
view=anything can happen now that weve slid over this bridge, I thought anything at all(p44).
>this is where the truth comes out= Roaring noon. In a wellfanned Forty-second Street cellar I met Gatsby for lunch. Blinking away
the brightness of the street outside, my eyes picked him out obscurely in the anteroom, talking to another man.(p44)=it was busy
Midday. blinking away= sees the other side of Gatsby-brough to treaty by change in light just like at the Buchanan dinner party/
foretelling that gatsbys hope is going to be crushed as he's wasting his dream-romantic description=crushed reality of
Gatsbys.brightness of the street outside=contrasting ideas of light=negative/positive. my eyes picked him out obscurely in the
anteroom=Nick moves from dream to reality where he is unrecognisable in this underworld/ obscurely=adverb.=hes about to find out
what Gatsby really does for a living and this illusion is going to be crushed.

SETTING:How do we learn it?

Fitzgerald uses the setting such as Gatsbys car as Nicks guide to the messages presented in his narration. The setting reveals many
things about Gatsby as he was created as this mysterious/illusional character in the previous chapter here we are told by Nick about his
lifestyle and him as a person in more detail and a more real/bitter tone which opposes this built up character of Gatsby that we believe is
amazing and grand. symbolism of light and colour is used throughout the chapter in order to emphasise certain parts of Gatsbys life
past and present.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>Gatsby=likes to use his wealth Gatsbys gorgeous car lurched up the rocky drive to my door(p41)=Like his house, Gatsbys car is
extravagant -another opportunity to show off his wealth.Gatsby drove a yellow Rolls Royce. The car is a symbol of wealth that he flaunts
to get Daisys attention. It also plays a major role in Gatsbys fate later in the novel.=hydroplane=old sport(p41)=Old sport is an
English term of endearment. Gatsby uses it constantly throughout the novel to bring attention to the short time he spent studying in
Oxford (since Oxford is considered a school strictly for old money, and Gatsby desperately wants to fit in). But the phrase old sport isnt
something that any English person would actually use=highlights that Gatsby doesnt really understand the way old money works as well
as he thinks he does as hes just a bootlegger(P39)
> He was balancing himself on the dashboard of his car(p41)=Gatsbys physical position, much like his social one, is contrived. Just as
Jordan Baker is described in Chapter 1She was extended full lengthand with her chin raised a little, as if she were balancing
something on it which was quite likely to fall.(p7)Nick describes Gatsby as balancing himself on the dashboard. He is constantly aware
of the way he presents himself, never drinking and maintaining his fictitious history of Old Money (which he is about to recite to Nick).
Gatsby cant let himself go and employs the physical balancing technique of the other wealthy characters to keep up his desired
appearance.
> He was never quite still; there was always a tapping foot somewhere or the impatient opening and closing of a hand.(p41)=The
anticipation of recreating his past with Daisy is overwhelming now that it is so near. So much so that he becomes like a batter waiting for
the pitch=nervous, sporadic games(p41)+ reader can sense Gatsbys impatience and restlessness, like the rest of the country during
the 20s, particularly in the case of Wall Street, the Mafia, and even the working class socialist/communist movements. It seems no one
in America could wait patiently for their dreams to come true.
> the illusion of Gatsby being amazing slowly starts to shatter(reference to his car)=Gatsby began leaving his elegant sentences
unfinished and slapping himself indecisively on the knee of his caramel-colored suit.(p41)=His elegant and well-crafted exterior (the
impression he tries to give people) is starting to fall apart.>Look here, old sport, he broke out surprisingly. Whats your opinion of me,
anyhow?(p41/42)=Gatsby is well aware of the legend that he has created and the rumours that are swirling around. He now seeks out
Nicks opinion, as Nick appears to be his only true friend. He uses this as a set up to tell Nick about his life, but one must be skeptical of
Gatsby when he claims to tell the Gods truth(p42)= Gatsby is trying so hard to convince Nick that he truly is old money that he has no
problem bringing up Gods name just to prove a point. We have plenty of evidence to believe he might be lying, but Gatsby is insistent
that this is the honest truth.God seems to have very little value, or at least, a very much corrupted value, throughout the novel. Just as
T.J Eckleburg is viewed as the eyes of God in this world, and thus mixes consumerism with religion, Gatsby isnt bothered about
claiming a lie is Gods truth.=I was brought up in America but educated at Oxford, because all my ancestors have been educated there
for many years. It is a family tradition.(p42)=Unlike Nick Carraway who never formally introduces the fact that he graduated from Yale
but instead alludes to it by referring to the Yale News, the people that he met there, and activities that he participated in Yale, Gatsby
constantly brings up the claim that he was educated at Oxford and tries really hard to make others believe that he is highly educated. He
also mentions that his ancestors all went to Oxford and it was a family tradition for him to go there in order to prove his aristocratic
ancestry and to display himself as a member of the old wealth. Despite his assiduous efforts, however, Nick, as well as many others, still
doubts the authenticity of his claim.as He hurried the phrase educated at Oxford, or swallowed it, or choked on it, as though it had
bothered him before(p42)=He wasnt comfortable saying he was educated at Oxford. He didnt believe that he was educated there and
he doubted that other people would so he tried to make it so other people werent sure they heard him right. He had said it before and he
rehearsed it like he wanted other people to find out he was lying because it bothered him to lie about that.
>And with this doubt, his whole statement fell to pieces, and I wondered if there wasnt something a little sinister about him, after
all(p42)While listening to Gatsbys tale, Nick is having an extreme internal struggle, sparked by Gatsby swallowing/choking on his
statement that he want to Oxford. This spark of doubt turned into something much more, when Nick used, for the first time, the word
sinister to describe Gatsby. Prior to this conversation only words like romantic, hope and readiness had been used to create an image of

Gatsby. By adding sinister to the mix, Fitzgerald opened a door that makes the reader reevaluate just who this Jay Gatsby is. A sinister
man would be capable of killing someone, or being a bootlegger verses a romantic man who will throw extravagant parties night after
night.
>carries on lying=My family all died and I came into a good deal of money.(p42)Fitzgerald illustrates that the supposedly praised selfmade man, who embodies the American Dream, is ultimately rejected from the exclusive circles of the wealthy who have only inherited
their money rather than earning it.>we learn Gatsby went to war=Then came the war, old sport. It was a great relief, and I tried very
hard to die, but I seemed to bear an enchanted life.(p42)=Gatsby viewed the war as a relief because he could take his mind off of the
tragedy that just happened as well as take his anger out on the enemy. He was so miserable that he wanted to die, which explains alot
about how he acts currently in the book. His mysteriousness and quietness are a result of the tragedy. He is traumatised, but seems to
be blessed by God with an enchanted life, and therefore doesnt die after his efforts in the war. This infers that there is something
special about Gatsby.
> then hes brought back into the illusion after Gatsby shows Nick a souvenir from oxford(p43) as Carraway states then it was all
true(p43)=illusion is back on track as Gatsbys His correctness grew on him as we neared the city.
>Gatsbys carefully-crafted exterior is being put back on as they draw closer to the city.>Gatsby seems to have priority over everything=
We slowed down. Taking a white card from his wallet, he waved it before the mans eyes.Right you are, agreed the policeman,
tipping his cap. Know you next time, Mr. Gatsby. Excuse me!(p44)=When Nick and Gatsby are driving, Gatsby easily evades the
authority of the police with a white card. Instead of performing his civic duties and enforcing the law, the officer treats Gatsby like an old
friend. The officers treatment of Gatsby suggests police corruption and a skewed system of justice that favours affluent people above
the average citizen. This type of behaviour illustrates the extent of control and influence the wealthy or prominent have in society
because they have methods and the means to work the system to their benefit.The white card is a figurative and literal symbol of
unethical privilege, entitlement, and freedom. Gatsby enjoys letting others know he has great advantages because it further establishes
his identity as a distinguished, rich man. Nick sees the more sinister, suspicious elements of Gatsbys personality unraveling. Since
Gatsby has connections with the police, it foreshadows that he may have some type of criminal history.
>Meyer Wolfsheim= Carraway meets him in the 42 street cellar=A small, flat-nosed Jew raised his large head and regarded me with two
fine growths of hair which luxuriated in either nostril. After a moment I discovered his tiny eyes in the half-darkness.(p45)=Fitzgerald
portrays the derogatory/anti-Semitic movement in the 1920s purposely. this man is intentionally meant to be comical/funny like a
caricature as displayed by many intentional misspellings in his speech e.g.He went to Oggsford College in England. You know Oggsford
College?(p46)=That Wolfsheim mispronounces Oxford and feels the need to explain its significance is indicative of his position, like
Gatsby, as an outsider to the East Egg, old wealth society. That Wolfsheim mispronounces Oxford and feels the need to explain its
significance is indicative of his position, like Gatsby, as an outsider to the East Egg, old wealth society. Though well-educated
themselves, Nick and Tom dont draw attention to their education, allowing it to be assumed, as when the narrator relates that he went
to New Haven instead of naming Yale.-half-darkness=gloomy/anti-Semitic atmosphere.
>he is said to have interesting cuff buttons which were Finest specimens of human molars, he informed me.((p46)=This little morbid
detail perfectly emphasises Wolfshiems malevolence in a subtle way.Wolfshiem is a purveyor if death in every sense of the word. Not
only is he a gangster who has people killed Wolfshiem is a purveyor if death in every sense of the word. Not only is he a gangster who
has people killed he also wears accessories which are remnants of death.
>Nick and reader find out what this man does= hes a gambler. Gatsby hesitated, then added coolly: Hes the man who fixed the
Worlds Series back in 1919.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?

In this chapter Carraways narration is made questionable by Fitzgerald as although we know he said he's inclined to reserve all
judgements he judges Gatsby as he is sceptical of the story he tells him of his past and doesn't fully believe until a souvenir from Oxford
is shown to him. this makes the reader question Nick as a narrator and whether he enforces a biased opinion/view upon the way we gain
all the information. He is also shown to judge Wolfsheim once he meets him using his anti-Semitic views.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

>Nick lists out all the guests of Gatsbys parties that summer from his old timetable(p39)
>Gatsby drives over to Carraways with his gorgeous car(p41)
>Gatsby and Carraway drive over to New York, on their way there Gatsby tells complete lies about his past in order to remove the
misconceptions formed by the rumours of Gatsbys party in Nicks head-Carraway is sceptical but in the end believes him(p42/43/44)
>just before the end of the drive Nick catches a glimpse of Mrs Wilson straining at the garage pump with painting vitality as we went on
by(p44)=Fitzgerald once again displays his knack for incorporating several prominent themes into a brief sentence.The imagery used
by Fitzgerald to depict Myrtle straining is symbolic for the constant strain of the lower class against the rigid class system that they are
bound into. Myrtle is straining at the gas pump in an attempt to break the chain that forces her stay in the lower class, while ironically
filling cars, which are used as symbols for mobilisation between classes. By incorporating the strenuous activity of working with cars,
Fitzgerald not only is suggesting Myrtles desire to transcend social classes, but also the means by which she plans to do so. This
imagery reinforces Fitzgeralds use of cars as a symbol for social mobility.Fitzgerald continues to utilise the word vitality to suggest a
desire to change social class, whether it be Daisys desire to break tradition and reunite with Gatsby at a lower class level, or Myrtles
strenuous attempts to elevate her social status through Tom. The word vitality is persistently incorporated by Fitzgerald in an attempt to
illustrate the strength of the desire to break the social paralysation that has ensued. The use of the word is especially ironic when
describing Myrtle, as her attempts, although even more desperate than Daisys, have no hope for success.

>Nick meets Gatsby for lunch in the 42 street cellar where he meets a gambler named Wolfsheim- and begins to realise what Gatsby
does for a living and the types of people he associates himself with=drops out of the illusion.(p45/4647)
>Nick sees Tom Buchanan and goes over to greet him with Gatsby, shortly after the greeting Gatsby seems to have disappeared and at
this point Nick doesn't know why.(p47/48)
>Nick meets Jordan in the plaza hotel where he is told about Daisys and Gatsbys past and her marriage with Tom(p48/49/50)
>Jordan explains why Gatsby presents himself as this grand man and flaunts his wealth throwing parties every evening- it was due to
the fact that he was hoping that she would drop in to one of these parties.(p51)
>Then explained the favour that Gatsby is asking of Carraway-to meet daisy for the first time after 5 years of no contact bar one letter at
Nicks house-this is because he wanted his house to look extremely grand so he could win her over and she would leave Tom and come
back to him as he is now able to provide for her where as before he was not-he is aware she is phased by money so hoped this will bring
her back to him. here she is not allowed to know that she will meet Gatsby she thinks shes just coming over for tea at Nicks house=all
set up by Gatsby.(p51/52)

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?

Trough Nicks narration as well as Jordan-there is constant jumps from past tense to present and the other way.

VOICES:What do we learn?

>Its through Jordans narration that is narrated back by Gatsby to the reader that Nick and reader finds out about Gatsbys and Daisys past as well as how
Jordan knows Gatsby =The officer looked at Daisy while she was speaking, in a way that every young girl wants to be looked at sometime, and because it
seemed romantic to me I have remembered the incident ever since. His name was Jay Gatsby(p48)=We finally discover more about why Gatsby has taken
such an interest in Jordan and Nick out of all people; they have a connection to his former lover Daisy. The connection between the two of them is so strong
that Jordan remembers exactly how they interacted even years later.=Wild rumors were circulating about herhow her mother had found her packing her
bag one winter night to go to New York and say good-by to a soldier who was going overseas.(p49)=We have enough evidence to know that this
mysterious soldier is the one and only James Gatz. We learn more about Gatsby and Daisys time together: it was interrupted when Gatsby had to leave for
WWI. And Daisy was so in love with him that she tried to travel from Louisville all the way to New York to say goodbye to him.Daisy was willing to be with
Gatsby, even though he was a poorer man, simply out of love. But losing him to the war made her extremely disillusioned to true love. She decided she
would rather be with a rich man that will always be there for her than risk dating someone like Gatsby again. So we learn that Gatsby leaving for the war
played a huge part in her reasoning in marrying a man like Tom. before she married Tom she had a step back where she got drunk due to the letter in the
other hand(p49)=The letter here is assumed to be from Gatsby while he is serving overseas. He must have heard the news that Daisy was set to marry Tom
and is making a last minute attempt to break it up. But she married him anyway.

VOICES:How do we learn it?


Through Carraways narration.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>After returning home from one of the parties Carraway gives reader an overview of those that attend Gatsbys majestic events this
schedule in effect,July 5th 1922.But I can still read the grey names(p39)here Carraway jumps through past and present tense. The fact
that this is on the 5th of july is significant as 4th of july in America is independence day=freedom/utopia-referring to Gatsbys party to
have this feel of hope and freedom(american dream)-yet ironic as everyone there goes are drunk/outlandish people who aren't living the
american dream=rules of behaviour associated with an amusement park(p27). grey=Fitzgerald uses colours to symbolise many
things throughout the story,the colour grey means unimportant, lifelessness, and forgotten.=Nicks view of these people.
>From East Egg, then, came the Chester Beckers and the Leeches, and a man named Bunsen(p39/40)=names are of sea
creatures/animals showing that people of 1920s are animalistic/uncontrollable-showing why alcohol was banned as suggested also by
Clarence endive who had a fight with a bum named Etty(40)-again referencing that there are no barriers/rules=a time period of
conflicting/materialistic/immoral behaviour= amusement park=anything can happen.
>opposing ideas of those from east&west egg=From East Egg(p39)=the names are Protestant, Western European (English German)
names -these would be descendants of the first Puritans and people who came over with money as investors in the New World and now
represent old money.
>From West Egg(p40)= The West Eggers' names are Eastern European, Irish or Jewish and represent later and present immigrants
who have come to start a new life, following the American Dream. They represent new money.=James B. (Rot-Gut.) Ferret and the De
Jongs and Ernest Lillythey came to gamble(p40)=The Wall Street of the lower orders, as exemplified by the frightening character
Meyer Wolfsheim. Nick himself deals in bonds, and Fitzgerald doubtless intended a parallel between illegal gambling and the kind of
Wall Street speculation that Nick is engaged in, and eventually quits when he leaves New York.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

>We always get Carraways point of view so we never know the true feelings/traits of other characters or setting and the events that take
place as everything is told to us by Nick and hes given the opportunity by Fitzgerald to put his own spin of what has happened in some
cases purely because he does not remember fully of what took place.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter 5, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>The day of the reunion arrived with pouring rain(p53)=not perfect-adding to Gatsbys worries+foretells the failure of Daisys and
Gatsbys relationship/Water represents rebirth and this is the day that Gatsby and Daisys relationship was reborn.
>Gatsby prepared Carraways house for this event as a greenhouse arrived from Gatsbys, with innumerable receptacles to contain
it(p54)=The inevitable hyperbole of Gatsbys provisions and how he does everything for daisy he wants this day to be perfect.
>Gatsby is showing Carraway and more importantly Daisy his house: we wandered through Marie Antoinette music-rooms and
Restoration salons(p58)=Marie Antoinette and Restoration are two styles that are associated with ostentatious wealth. Marie Antoinette,
is characterised by gold embellishments and colourful patterns that exemplify grandeur.whereas Restoration refers to an English style
that incorporates Dutch and French influences and focuses on exotic and ornate detailing.Gatsby uses both styles because they make
him not only appear to be very wealthy, but it makes him seem very culturally attuned. He obviously knows the two styles well enough to
incorporate them into his house, which makes him all the more appealing to people of old wealth, like Daisy.
>Sometimes, too, he stared around at his possessions in a dazed way, as though in her actual and astounding presence none of it was
any longer real. Once he nearly toppled down a flight of stairs(p59)=shows Gatsby to be drunk with daisy not chartreuse(p59) as
mentioned before which also is a reference to nature/green light.+His whole life is precarious, to the extent that he lacks stability in the
physical world. Reality is a loose concept to this dreamer because he has constructed such an in-credible world around himself. This
extends to include Daisy, who, in Gatsbys eyes, has grown in concept to unrealistic proportions.Worth noting that Nick Carraway finds
an element of humour in Gatsbys instability. Toppling down stairs can only be a comic image. Nick recognises the absurdity of Gatsby,
even whilst being amazed by him.
>His bedroom was the simplest room of all except where the dresser was garnished with a toilet set of pure dull gold.(p59)= his
room is the simplest because all this wealth etc is not for him its for Daisy.+so far in the novel, old-wealth families have made a case of
letting their wealth show through their possessions, much like Gatsby has done with his parties. However, at the very core of his
mansion, his own room is anything but pretentious, implying that his extravagant persona is only a front. Although this does not clarify
where Gatsbys money came from, it is a heavy hint as to where it did not come from; his room is simple because he came into his
fortune relatively recently, and therefore he has already lived a considerable part of his life without many luxuries. The golden toilet set
reinforces this idea because it is a rather ridiculous indulgence, suggesting that Gatsby has not yet learned how to handle all the surplus
money he has made
>and there was a pink and golden billow of foamy clouds above the sea(p60)=Pink is often brought up when Daisy and Gatsby are
together (later hell wear a pink suit when he insists to Tom that Daisy never loved him). It represents their love.

SETTING:How do we learn it?


Through Nicks descriptions

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>Gatsby= As Nick arrives home after the meeting with Jordan he thought his house was on fire but it was just Gatsbys house, lit from
tower to cellar.(p52) and states to Gatsby Your place looks like the Worlds Fair,(p52)= constants references to an amusement park/not
real/childrens play=Gatsby replies with does it?(p52)= hes not bothered as something(we know that its the tea party with nick and
Jordan outcome)is playing on his mind. Then he offers a variety of activities for Nick to do together e.g. lets go to Coney island,old
sport(p52) or take a plunge in the pool(p52) but this was all dismissed by Nick and also this is Gatsbys way of trying to hide his
emotions and what he really wants to know from Nick- doesnt want to annoy him but the unknowingness is killing him inside. and as
Nick was getting ready to go to bed(p52) Gatsby waited(p52) here he was waiting for Nick to mention his and Jordans conversation
and in turn Daisy as shes been on his mind for 5 years non stop and everything hes done is for her. Then Carraway asked him what
day would suit you?(p52) and Gatsby quickly corrected Nick by stating what day would suit you ?(p52)=showing Gatsbys extreme
anxiousness but he makes it seem as if he doesnt want to trouble Carraway but inside he is terribly nervous and excited and then feels
as if he has to repay Nick for this favour and offers him to get involved in a little business on the side, a sort of side line(p53) which we
know is illegal activity but he likes to call it a rather confidential sort of thing(p53) as He fumbled with a series of beginnings. Why, I
thoughtwhy, look here, old sport,(p53)displaying that he had false start an unusual characteristic not seen before, he stutters showing
he doesn't want to get any of this wrong and in chapter 4 he confidently lies about Oxford as it was rehearsed but here hes seen to be
different because this is a real situation and because he hasn't rehearsed it and its not a lie he finds it difficult to talk about it etc. after
he sends a person to mow the grass at Nicks Gatsby An hour later the front door opened nervously, and Gatsby, in a white flannel suit,
silver shirt, and gold-colored tie, hurried in. He was pale, and there were dark signs of sleeplessness beneath his eyes.(p54)=contrast
Gatsbys outer and inner state sumptuously dressed, but his inner lack of confidence shows in his physical appearance;white
represents purity Gatsby wants to woo her and seem like he is honest and pure. silver and gold represent old money Gatsby wants
to seem like an old money man, not a nouveau riche person. He wears these colours to represent gold and silver coins (the ultimate
old form of money

> as he heard Daisys car pull up to Nicks house Gatsby deserted the living room and then there was light dignified knocking at the
front door. I went out and opened it. Gatsby, pale as death, with his hands plunged like weights in his coat pockets, was standing in a
puddle of water glaring tragically into my eyes.(p55)= Gatsby was so scared/nervous that he ran away from the situation but then he
couldn't resist to meet his love after 5 years he came back soaked in water.
>Carraway uses a series of adverbs describing Gatsby from when he arrives at his house blankly(p54) vaguely(p54), hollowly(p54),
miserably his dream is on the verge of success or failure and he does not know which. Do they foreshadow the end? Do they reflect
the failure of his hope? It is as if he already lacks life.
> this is apparent when he states Of course, of course! Theyre fine! and he added hollowly, . . .old sport.(p54) when talking about
lemon cakes with Nick=Gatsbys excitement, bordering panic, can be seen in these exclamations. He is feverish over meeting Daisy and
is losing self-control.This is immediately contradicted by the adverb hollowly, which suggests that for all his excitement, he actually
lacks substance. This is reinforced by the ghostly ellipsis preceeding old sport, which turns the phrase into something threadbare and
lacking vitality. In many ways, Gatsby is already dead.
>Gatsby is afraid and states he is going home Nobodys coming to tea. Its too late! He looked at his watch as if there was some
pressing demand on his time elsewhere. I cant wait all day.(p54) =reference to time/Gatsby is getting cold feet about meeting Daisy.
The moment hes been preparing for, the destiny hes been creating for five years is going to happen in close to two minutes/ironic that
Gatsby cannot wait all day, because he has been waiting much longer (5 years) for Daisy.
>after meeting her it became awkward and Gatsby was even more nervous and was becoming clumsy and his well rehearsed lies were
now slipping up(p58)
>after another moment alone with Daisy there was a change in Gatsby that was simply confounding. He literally glowed; without a word
or a gesture of exultation a new well-being radiated from him and filled the little room.(p57)=It is not his silver shirt or gold tie that are
bright now, but Gatsby himself. His inner fear is resolved for the moment as the fulfillment of his dream seems to promise.
> He was running down like an overwound clock(p59)=he is too nervous and unprepared to accept the fact of Daisys reappearance. In
addition, clock relates to time. Gatsby strongly refused to accept the unchanging pasting of time. He was desperate to reverse the past
events in order to keep his relationship with Daisy to be as good as five years ago.
>Daisy= when Nick calls her to invite her for tea he states dont bring tom and she replies Who is Tom? she asked
innocently.(p53)Daisy is quite happy to keep Tom out of the picture, and this is without even knowing that it involves her lost love=shes
not really in love with Tom just uses his money. As she arrives at Nicks house she states Is this absolutely where you live, my dearest
one?(p54)showing she barely knows Nick/but also showing disbelief as there is a huge contrast to where she lives, almost like she's
looking down on him even though they are both from the same high class of old money.
>Carraways is mesmerised by her presence as if shes out of this world extraordinary as The exhilarating ripple of her voice was a wild
tonic in the rain. I had to follow the sound of it for a moment, up and down, with my ear alone, before any words came through.(p54)=he
presents her to have an amazing aura by which a man is lost in.
>By the end Gatsby begins to feel doubt as though a faint doubt had occurred to him as to the quality of his present
happiness.(p61)=Gatsby could be bewildered by his love for Daisy, finally becoming real in the flesh and blood, or it could be revealing
the true nature of Gatsbys feelings. Now that Daisy is with him, she is more real than the Daisy that hes been building his life up to
impress for the last five years. Gatsby could be doubting all the time and heart hes dedicated to Daisy, or whatever idea of Daisy that
Gatsbys imagination has created. Five years is a long time, and people change, and the Daisy he loved before may not be the same
Daisy that is with him now.= colossal vitality of his illusion. It had gone beyond her, beyond everything. He had thrown himself into it with
a creative passion, adding to it all the time, decking it out with every bright feather that drifted his way. No amount of fire or freshness
can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart(p61/62)=The idea of Daisy that Gatsby has been cultivating all these years
is an illusion of perfection, of immense vitality and life. Daisy may not be living up to the expectations that Gatsby has set for her,
expectations that have been built and imagined upon from their love affair from five years ago. Its possible that Daisy has grown out of
the woman that she was then, and isnt the same girl that Gatsby is so madly in love with.-On the surface, his love has been intensified
by separation, yearning, and illusion; however, it is implied in beyond everything that his love has become deathless and surreal, disattached from the actual lover. The desperateness in the expressions decking it out with every bright feather and ghostly heart
suggests the dangerous, destructive nature of love.
>Daisy is mesmerised by Gatsbys possessions and indeed his wealth which is according to his plan that causes daisy to say It makes
me sad because Ive never seen such such beautiful shirts before.(p59)Daisy cries out about seeing the beautiful shirts because
they are so uncharacteristically like her memories of Gatsby before his transformation. These shirts are made of rich material and have
monograms. It is hard to tell whether she is shocked and impressed by Gatsbys new lavish style or is secretly longing for her original
memories of Gatsbys attire. Either way, the material objects has drawn a deep emotional reaction out of Daisy, and there is an obvious
tinge of regret in her cries.Senses like smell, touch, and sight easily trigger memories of the past. Daisy seeing the beautiful shirts
makes her think of her relationship with Gatsby and how romantic it was. Daisy is sad because their relationship cant be a reality
because she is with Tom and time has significantly changed things.The author is also referring to a typical phenomenon seen in
romantic figures: romantic love is very often much more about love as a splendid ideal than the lover, a particular agent of love. Creative
passion means that greater passion has been generated with past memories as its raw material.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?


Through the way Carraway chooses to describe the characters

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

>Carraway returns from tea with Jordan Baker and asks Gatsby when he would like to see Daisy(p52)-Gatsby feels obliged to return the
favour somehow and offers Nick an extra bit of work(illegal)(p53).
>Carraway calls Daisy and tells her to come over without her husband(p53)
>Gatsby sends a person to cut Carraways grass and brings loads of flowers in to his house before turning up himself not looking the
best (p54)
>Gatsby threatens to leave as he believes it is too late for Daisy to turn up and she wont come-only does this to hide his nerves(p54)
>Daisy arrives and Gatsby disappears and then comes back soaked by rain(p55)
>Nick lets them have a moment outside when he returns it seems the awkwardness and worries of Gatsbys have gone (p55)
>Gatsby regrets inviting Daisy due to his nerves (p56)
>Gatsby invites daisy and Nick to go over to his house, they do and take a tour to show her that he is wealthy now(p56/57/58/59/60)
>Gatsby is shown to be disappointed as Daisy is not as perfect as he remembered her to be.(p61/62)
>Luckily the clock took this moment to tilt dangerously at the pressure of his head, whereupon he turned and caught it with trembling
fingers, and set it back in place.(P55)=constant reference to clocks and time/represents Gatsbys and Daisys fragile/broken relationship
because he cant turn back time he cant save this relationship.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?

The way the story is told and the sequence of events that take place in a specific order deployed by Carraway

VOICES:What do we learn?

> As Nick tells Gatsby about the arrangement Gatsby feels as if he needs to repay him but Carraway states because the offer was
obviously and tactlessly for a service to be rendered, I had no choice except to cut him off there.(p53)Nicks voice, his ingrained
attitudes of right and wrong creep into his tone and comments often. Here he feels insulted that Gatsby would expect him to want to be
paid for services rendered.
> When Gatsby throws out loads of shirts at Daisy=Theyre such beautiful shirts, she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds.
(p59)=Daisys reaction to Gatsbys shirts demonstrates how well he hides his true self. Even she, the love of his life, is tricked into
thinking that Gatsby is as beautiful as his costumes. Her voice, which is a symbol for old money, is muffled in the fabric; through the
shirts, all voices sound the same, quieted, just as Gatsbys voice (origins of his money) is disguised by the way he dresses, speaks,
and where he lives./Because Tom is having an affair, Daisy feels that her life has become bleak and colorless in a sense. Upon
meeting Gatsby, his whole house and life style revolves around excitement and life. The shirts push her over the edge because of the
intense colors that symbolize the life she could be living.
>Gatsby plays a song=
One things sure and nothings surer
The rich get richer and the poor get children
In the meantime
In between time(p61)=The songs message about the unimportance of wealth suggests that Gatsby and Daisys love is more
important then the material possessions they surround themselves with.
>daisys voice exhilarates Gatsby=as she said something low in his ear he turned toward her with a rush of emotion. I think that voice
held him most, with its fluctuating, feverish warmth, because it couldnt be over-dreamed that voice was a deathless song=Daisys
voice is a powerful tool that moves Gatsby unlike anything else about her. Whenever her voice emerges, low and murmuring, it captures
everybody around her and embodies all of Gatsbys rags-to-riches dreams with Daisy./By writing Daisys voice was a deathless song,
Fitzgerald suggests that Daisy promises eternal life. Youth during this time is associated with the wealthy because it is only the wealthy
who can have a life so full of leisure that there is no stress or manual labour to make them age.Because of the weightless nature of
Daisys lifestyle, she is in a sense deathless, which Fitzgerald suggests illustrates by the song of her voice.

VOICES:How do we learn it?

>We learn about the character voices through the narration of Nick and the way he chooses to describe the voice of each character, the
sense that we get from Nicks descriptions is enforced by his choice of words and language techniques to describe them with.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?


>Nick is usually the observer in many situation in the novel because he is our narrator he needs to be there as otherwise the reader

wouldn't know what is happening. however Fitzgerald removes Nick from the room as he was in the hall(p55) when Gatsby and Daisy
initially meet for the first time after 5 years, so the reader is unaware of how this moment unfolds. Fitzgerald does this in order to show
that the true sense of their love cannot be captured in a text, it shows a mystique in their romance as the reader doesn't know anything.
> we are again left out not knowing what happened between Daisy and Gatsby when Nick leaves the room/house..(p62)

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

> We learn this as we see that Carraway sometimes leaves the situation which means the reader also leaves and does not here the full
story so it is through his narrative and his choice what we find out and what we dont.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter 6, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

> Gatsbys party=Tom was evidently perturbed at Daisys running around alone, for on the following Saturday night he came with her to
Gatsbys party. Perhaps his presence gave the evening its peculiar quality of oppressivenessit stands out in my memory from
Gatsbys other parties that summer. There were the same people, or at least the same sort of people, the same profusion of
champagne, the same many-colored, many-keyed commotion, but I felt an unpleasantness in the air, a pervading harshness that hadnt
been there before.(p67)= A foreshadow of something bad about to happen, Toms presence is setting a negative atmosphere at one of
Gatsbys party that are known to be full of happiness/music/enchantment.
>Daisys disappointment of west egg=She was appalled by West Egg, this unprecedented "place" that Broadway had begotten upon a
Long Island fishing village(p69)=This line describes Daisys prejudices against new wealth and that culture, especially Broadway and the
culture of rich people that come from there. In this context, West Egg has become the place for newly wealthy people who got their
money from Broadway success to live their lavish lifestyles, and Daisy resents them because these newly wealthy people created this
unprecedented place instead of actually being born in and a part of the upper class. She sees it as no more than some pompous
houses on a Long Island Fishing Village. She didnt care if they were famous because all that matters to her is whether or not someone
was born into wealth.
>Gatsby feels that Daisy is just out of reach i.e. reference to green light/Gatsbys dream=He looked around him wildly, as if the past
were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand(p70)=Very similar imagery to the image used when we first
met Gatsby. In the first chapter he is stretch[ing] out his arms toward the water in a curious way towards the green light. The same idea

is used here to reaffirm that Gatsbys green light, his American Dream, is to recreate the past and everything that comes with it which is
Daisy.
>Out of the corner of his eye Gatsby saw that the blocks of the sidewalks really formed a ladder and mounted to a secret place above
the trees(p70)=Gatsby sees Daisy as his connection to the Upper Class lifestyle, or his ladder up the social hierarchy. The life of
luxury without burden, the one that Daisy and Tom live now, is Gatsbys ultimate goal. Money is the most powerful thing in the world, and
no earthly limits or rules can stop someone with a lot of it. The wealthy are inducted into this secret place above the trees, where they
are higher than everything. Gatsby thinks if he can get to Daisy alone, meaning if Daisy did not choose to marry another man from her
social circle, then he will be able to suck out of her the wealth that will support his dream.+given that Gatsby views himself as a son of
God who must be about his fathers business, he might have even higher aspirations here. If Gatsby were able to become rich and
powerful he would view himself as somewhat of a demigod; so the ladder he is talking about might by his version of the stairway to
heaven.-he could climb to it, if he climbed alone, and once there he could suck on the pap of life, gulp down the incomparable milk of
wonder.(p70)=When Gatsby is telling Nick his life story, it is clear that Gatsby desperately wanted to live beyond his means and move up
in class. At first, Gatsby struggles to even make ends meet and is only rich in his dreams. This changes, however, when he meets Cody
and through him comes up in life. With this boost, Gatsby is closer to fulfilling his dreams and having access to all that life offers
monetarily. Being closer to wealth also makes him closer to achieving his deity status, which he has yearned for. Both of these are the
palp of life and milk of wonder that Gatsby is referring to.Being close to a rising status is bringing Gatsby closer not only to money
and being a god, but also his american dream. Gatsbys dream of rising from rags to riches is the basis for many peoples American
dream, which makes Gatsbys story an ideal example of the American dream.+Additionally, Gatsbys relationship with Daisy aids him in
his quest to reach the top of the social ladder because a potential relationship with her would give him access to her old wealth,
inherited and more reputable than his rags to riches story. Moreover, the phrases suck on the pap of life and gulp down the
incomparable milk of wonder illustrate a connection between Daisys care or nursing of Gatsby in their potential relationship by
providing for his social status needs and in turn, his direct connection to the eternal and immortal characteristics of old wealth.

SETTING:How do we learn it?

>The way setting/symbols/possessions are described by Carraway enables the reader to pull out certain aspects/atmospheres and
tones of the situations and characters that enable the author to convey specific ideas/images in the readers minds.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>Gatsby= real name isnt actually Gatsby=James Gatz that was really, or at least legally, his name.(p62)=Not until Chapter VI, more
than halfway through the novel, do we hear of Gatsbys legal name. Indeed, before this point, we dont even know that Gatsby isnt his
real name. Clearly, Gatsby makes no sincere attempts to reveal his family name, instead hiding it from society; his former, legal title
appears as invisible as his servants.Gatsby doesnt want his name to be associated with anonymity, but instead to be as well-known as
the names of famous,aristocratic families. As a result,not only literally changes his obscure family name, making himself a new one, but
figuratively attempts to make himself a nametoo.=He had changed it at the age of seventeen and at the specific moment that
witnessed the beginning of his career when he saw Dan Codys yacht drop anchor over the most insidious flat on Lake
Superior.(p62)=As a lake straddling the American-Canadian border, that would be the perfect place to smuggle alcohol into America, to
sell for a massive profit.
> We find out about His background= I suppose hed had the name ready for a long time, even then. His parents were shiftless and
unsuccessful farm people his imagination had never really accepted them as his parents at all. The truth was that Jay Gatsby of West
Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself.(p63)=Since Gatsby was young, he already had big plans in store for
himself, which suggests he had been patiently waiting for an opportunity to come along. Through hard work and a fervent desire to
become a heavily romanticised version of himself, he was eventually able to distance himself from the unsuccessful farm people that
were his parents, as he had dreamed of for a long time now. To achieve his dream, he became the exact opposite: a successful, urban
socialite.
>His determination to achieve the dream=So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen-year-old boy would be likely to
invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end(p63)=Early in his lifetime Gatz created the concept of what he wanted to be
when he grew up, and refused to let go of this dream as long as he lived. Although he appears to be faithful to the person he truly is at
heart, James successfully manipulates the exterior of his person, creating for himself everything from a new name to massive amounts
of wealth. However, Fitzgerald hints that James' true self is still steadfastly intact, and that he is unable to alter his genuine
personality/disposition but he doesn't let this hold him back he does everything to reach his dream.
>He became restless due to the power of his dream=But his heart was in a constant, turbulent riot. The most grotesque and fantastic
conceits haunted him in his bed at night.(p63)=Gatsby is restless, not content with his status economically or socially. His dreams and
aspirations haunt him, but lend him the tenacity to conquer and rise above his humble beginnings. A blessing and a curse, Gatsby is
never quite satisfied with his life, beleaguered by a constant sense of inferiority.+Grotesque and fantastic are both adjectives used to
describe the Valley of Ashes. Their repetition here signifies Gatsbys current place of humble beginnings. The fact that they haunt him
illustrate his awareness of his social position and desperation to escape.However, his conceits, or dreams of self-improvement, are
constantly on his mind, even so much as to make him lose sleep. He continues to get lost in his imagination with obsessive dreams of
grandeur.
>His attempt to find and secure his dream lead him to Minnesota=An instinct toward his future glory had led him, some months before,
to the small Lutheran college of St. Olaf in southern Minnesota. He stayed there two weeks, dismayed at its ferocious indifference to the
drums of his destiny, to destiny itself, and despising the janitors work with which he was to pay his way through.(p63)=Seeking future
glory Gatsby finds himself in the cold, frozen abyss of Minnesota, where St. Olaf starkly contrasts Oxford, which he later claims to
have attended.Gatsby, in the restless mindset of the period, leaves his small college, nameless and insignificant compared to the

prestigious Oxford.In fact, Gatsby doesnt merely resent his own anonymity. Rather, he directs his frustration at his college, absurdly
blaming an inanimate object for not recognising the drums of his destiny. Once again, Gatsby is stuck in an invisible, unable-to-becontrolled existence, far from his dreams of future glory, far from the beat of his own drums. Nick emphasises Gatsbys insignificance
and lack of free will with repeated d alliteration, connoting a dull, dead existence. As a lower class janitor, Gatsby, like a servant, like an
African American, is socially dead in 1920s America.
>Gatsbys reason for drinking so little=It was indirectly due to Cody that Gatsby drank so little. Sometimes in the course of gay parties
women used to rub champagne into his hair; for himself he formed the habit of letting liquor alone.(p64)=Gatsby doesnt partake in
drinking because hes seen the negativity and loss of control thats associated with it through Codys actions. Alcohol lowers ones
inhibition and causes them to act out in ways that are socially disgraceful or that might reflect their true inner feelings. The key to
Gatsbys facade is his awareness of his surroundings and representing himself in the most correct manner. Gatsby refrains from drinking
to remain focused on his goal of impressing daisy. When Gatsby is sober, he has some leverage over situations to further manipulate his
plan of rekindling his love with Daisy.+ by not drinking, Gatsby decidedly sets his actions apart from the actions of everyone elseelevating himself to a higher standard. He portrays his aristocracy at all times and does not get involved in reckless activities like
drinking/fighting that take place at his parties.
>When Nick visited Gatsby after a while he met Buchanan at his house and here we see how Gatsby feels around Tom=He was
profoundly affected by the fact that Tom was there. But he would be uneasy anyhow until he had given them something, realizing in a
vague way that that was all they came for.(p65)=Gatsby felt uncomfortable because Tom was in his house and he is Daisys husband
who Gatsby is so in love with and cannot have her thus cant reach his dream due to Tom-Tom is like an obstacle in Gatsbys dream/
way.+shows people just come to Gatsby when they want something like parasites sucking out his wealth and kindness.
>After the greetings of Buchanans and party=Daisy and Gatsby danced. I remember being surprised by his graceful, conservative foxtrotI had never seen him dance before.(p68)=Gatsby has often been found lurking in the corners of his lavish parties; but it isnt
because he is awkward or scared to talk to people. It is because the only reason he threw these parties was so that Daisy might make
an appearance at one of them. Now that she is finally here he cuts loose and finally enjoys his own party.
>Tom=By God, I may be old-fashioned in my ideas, but women run around too much these days to suit me.(p66)=Here Tom associates
Daisy with the new liberated women of the 1920s, often referred to as flappers.Ironically, whilst Tom is uncomfortable with his own wife
travelling and socialising independently, he doesnt seem to apply the same standards to his mistress, Myrtle. This is a prime example of
Toms hypocrisy; he puts on a front, like the rest of the wealthy characters.
>Tom doesn't like Gatsby because he is new money and states that he believes him to be a bootlegger(p69) and then states=Well, he
certainly must have strained himself to get this menagerie together.(p69)=Tom frequently uses language to degrade the things that
other people admire about Gatsby. By calling his house party a menagerie, he makes it sound disordered and ridiculous, and not in a
good way. Similarly, Tom looks down on Gatsbys yellow car as a circus wagon; in spite of the wealth it took Gatsby to acquire this
lifestyle, Tom knows he is new money and so refuses to be impressed by his achievements.+Nick adores Gatsby and defends him by
stating Not Gatsby, I said shortly.(p69)
>Daisy=When Tom proposes that he is going to eat with other people Daisy makes a snarky remark=Go ahead, answered Daisy
genially, and if you want to take down any addresses heres my little gold pencil.(p68)=Daisy brings up Toms history of cheating here
to make him feel uncomfortable. That is because she is planning to leave him for Gatsby at this time. So she has no problem with him
writing down the address of all the girls he meets because she doesnt need him anymore.
>We see that Daisy is not naive or stupid=she looked around after a moment and told me the girl was common but pretty, and I knew
that except for the half-hour shed been alone with Gatsby she wasnt having a good time.(p68)=although Tom claims to be going to
another table for amusing conversation, he is really in pursuit of a woman. The fact that Daisy seems to know this contrasts with
Gatsbys dedication to her; Tom has her and cant stop looking at other women, but Gatsby has thrown every previous party in the hope
that Daisy would show up.+ She only enjoys herself when she is with Gatsby showing she still loves him.
>We see a couple more new traits to Daisy's personality at the party when she states= "I like her," said Daisy, "I think she's lovely."
(p69)=Daisy has no real basis on which to like the starlet other than her appearance. This comment sums up the values of Daisy and
her careless, shallow companions, and recalls her opinions of her daughter in Chapter 1: I hope shell be a fool- thats the best thing a
girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool. Society has judged Daisy all her life for her beauty, and she has come to accept and
employ this herself.=But the rest offended her-- and inarguably, because it wasn't a gesture but an emotion.(p69)=Daisy, as a member
of the aristocracy, is very used to living with gestures, as throughout the book Nick heavily emphasises how the upper class hides
under a facade of propriety. These manners are fake and lack warmth, such as the times when we see Jordan Baker carefully balancing
a non-existent object on her chin more than once. Other artificial gestures in Daisys life include maintaining her marriage with time by
pretending they both love each other-because that is the socially acceptable behaviour -and the way she treats her daughter as an
object to be marvelled at rather than a human being.On the other hand, there are the emotions that Daisy deplores. Emotions are raw,
irrational, and real, and they are representative of the struggle for self-improvement associated with new wealth and the American
Dream. She is offended because she is accustomed to her one-dimensional, casual life of the upper class, and the stark contrast
between that and the vitality of the party scene disgusts her, so she looks down on the crowd full of emotion in contempt.
>Daisys views of people that are new money are displayed=the too obtrusive fate that herded its inhabitants along a short-cut from
nothing to nothing(p69)=Daisy sees the American Dream as a hopeless endeavour. In her opinion, even if a person can rise from
nothing (poverty), without a title, he or she still has nothing. There is no rags to riches story because without argument, no one from
the lower class can work their way into creating a history, nobility, and a true name for himself.This obtrusive fate forced upon those in
the lower class is maintained by people who are part of the exclusive club that is old wealth. They do not accept new members,
regardless of economic standing.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?

>We get a sense of different character traits an qualities and their reaction to certain events that unravel in the chapter the way Nick
describes the characters and their speech/actions, he chooses particular words that convey an image or a sense which enables him to
portray Fitzgeralds aim of each character and the reader is able to understand each character as it was intended by Carraway.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

>Carraway tells the reader about Gatsbys past and his early life , his real name, his family and his background + aspiration to make his
dream come true that he has had for so long(p62/63/64/65)
>Nick goes over to Gatsbys house where he finds unusual guests in the form of Tom buchanan(p65)
>Gatsby is invited to a dinner party at some womens house and Tom states that women have too many rights to his liking they all drive
to have dinner leaving Gatsby at home with Nick as he was making them wait for too long.(p66)
>Gatsby invites Tom to come to one of his parties-he comes with Daisy as he doesn't want her to go anywhere by herself(p67)
>Tom is suspicious of Gatsby and what he does and is making this his point to find out.(p69)
>Gatsby does everything to ensure she enjoys the party but by the end still believes that she didn't like it and feels disappointed within
her as he sees a change in her after 5 years (70/71)
>Gatsby believes he can turn back time in order to fulfil his dream and have Daisy just like he did in 1917-nick dismisses this as he is
realistic and know it will never be the same (70/71)
>Carraway resites Gatsby and Daisys kiss that happened 5 years ago and Nick questions love and life in general (70/71)

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?

>We learn this through the series of events that are told to us by Carraway who is the narrator, the order in which he tells us everything
is ultimately up to him therefore the sequence and time of this chapter is dependant upon his narration.

VOICES:What do we learn?

>Gatsby chooses to show around the Buchanans to the rest of the party guests and we get a feel of Gatsbys manner/voice=Mrs.
Buchanan . . . and Mr. Buchanan After an instants hesitation he added: the polo player.Oh no, objected Tom quickly, not
me.But evidently the sound of it pleased Gatsby, for Tom remained the polo player. for the rest of the evening.(p67)=While introducing
Daisy and Tom, Gatsby needs something else to call them by to make them appear more interesting. Tom objects to the false claim that
he is a polo player but the other guests seem to remember this false tidbit about him.All of the characters in the novel are constantly
conscious of their public image; Gatsby recites his false history, Jordan Baker is the cool sportswoman and Nick, in his first passage,
attempts to portray himself as a man without judgement. Gatsbys introduction of Tom as the polo player thus robs Tom of some of his
power; it is Gatsby, not Tom, who paints a picture of the Buchanans to his party guests.
>Fitzgerald uses Daisys voice as a power tool to exclaim emotion/atmosphere=Daisy began to sing with the music in a husky, rhythmic
whisper, bringing out a meaning in each word that it had never had before and would never have again. When the melody rose, her
voice broke up sweetly, following it, in a way contralto voices have, and each change tipped out a little of her warm human magic upon
the air.(p69)=Daisy's voice is being described as being very soft and low in pitch, a combination that is often linked with sexual appeal.
A soft voice means the listener has to come close to hear, drawing potential lovers into closer physical contact. The quiet sounds of her
spoken words give new emphasis to words, or perhaps it was difficult to be certain of exactly what she was saying because the volume
was so low - similar to the changes in messages that occur when you play the "Telephone" game and whisper a message around the
circle.As the pitch of her voice rises and drops, it sounds like a song, revealing aspects of her warmth and personality in the melody.
Daisy was a warm and loving individual, regardless of how superficial her attachments may have been.

VOICES:How do we learn it?

>We get a sense of different voices in this chapter the way Nick describes the characters and their speech, he chooses particular words
that convey an image or a sense which enables him to portray Fitzgeralds aim of each character and the reader is able to understand
each character as it was intended by Carraway.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>As Nick talks about Tom and Daisy coming to Gatsbys party and setting a negative atmosphere he states =Or perhaps I had merely
grown used to it, grown to accept West Egg as a world complete in itself, with its own standards and its own great figures, second to
nothing because it had no consciousness of being so, and now I was looking at it again, through Daisys eyes.(p67)=Through Nicks
eyes, we get to know the dignity and recognition of West Egg in the mind of those who are living there. In their views, money can bring
everything, including social status and respect. Nick, as an outsider of West Egg, regards these people as a group of respectable upperclass men as well. However, at that particular night, Tom and Daisy who come from East Egg which is a place full of noblemen, look at it
in a different way. They deem that people from West Egg are uneducated, supercilious, and rude. The gap between West Egg and East
Egg and the contempt of Gatsbys wealth reveals the theme of this novel: American dream which give a number of people hope can
never reach peoples dream of it. For instance, Gatsby is a typical man who pursues his dream of being rich, but even if he succeeds, he
actually loses everything he has. It is a sad thing, because it cruelly exposes a fact that peoples life-long hope is pointless.
>we get daisys point of view of Gatsby and his parties when she states Lots of people come who havent been invited, she said
suddenly./They simply force their way in and hes too polite to object.(p69)=here Daisy is shown to be on Gatsbys side even though
hes new money she seems to ignore this fact because she's in love with him and when Tom states that Id like to know who he is and

what he does, insisted Tom. And I think Ill make a point of finding out.(p69)she makes it her objective to indirectly defend him and
state that I can tell you right now, she answered. He owned some drug-stores, a lot of drug-stores. He built them up himself.(p69)a
sense of respect towards Gatsby almost comes from Daisy.
>Gatsby gives his view of the fact that he believes Daisy didn't enjoy the party although Gatsby tried to make it as perfect as possible
just as he has all his life and he seems to find it difficult to grasp the fact that people change and Daisy is not the same as he
remembered but states that you can turn back time so everything can be as it was.="And she doesn't understand," he said. "She used to
be able to understand. We'd sit for hours-"/He broke off and began to walk up and down a desolate path of fruit rinds and discarded
favors and crushed flowers/"I wouldn't ask too much of her," I ventured. "You can't repeat the past."(p70)=Gatsby is struggling to accept
that things and people can change in 5 years. He expected Daisy to just leave Tom and fall back in love with him the second she found
out he was rich, but she is having trouble making a decision on what to do. Nick is aware of this because he is a fairly reasonable man.
But Gatsby is so set on recreating 1917 and the love he and Daisy had before he went to war that he is almost detached from reality.
This is where we learn that even with all his charm and wealth, the Great Gatsby is still greatly flawed and somewhat delusional.
>Carraways perspective of Gatsby when he says that he will turn back time="I'm going to fix everything just the way it was before," he
said, nodding determinedly. "She'll see.(p71) Carraway states= He talked a lot about the past, and I gathered that he wanted to recover
something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy. His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if
he could once return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was(p71)=Gatsby has not
moved on from his past and is obsessed with trying to recreate it because that was the time in which he was happiest. With Daisy in his
life, Gatsby felt secure and complete. Without Daisy there to ground him, Gatsby feels that his life has no purpose and that he has lost a
significant part of who he is. Although Gatsby is desperate to make his life the same as it was five years ago, he does not take into
account that people change and that it is impossible for life to be the exact same as it was in the past. Unless Gatsby lets go of his past
he will never be able to be happy with his life in the present.
>Carraways view on Gatsby=He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath,
his mind would never romp again like the mind of God.(p70)=Although (in this memory of his former self), Gatsby desperately desires to
kiss Daisy, he understands that as soon as hes committed the act, he will lose the idealistic perception of her floating within his
imagination. Indeed, only from a distance can Gatsby (and others) truly believe in the loftiest ideas. As soon as he approaches the
concrete limitations of reality, he can no longer invent reality within his mind, shaping and crafting it to his own magnificent
specifications. Instead, reality begins to shape and craft his mind. No longer can he romp, roaming freely with the same creative
powers of a God.With proximity fades perfection. When Gatsby binds his unutterable visions, unspoken and imaginary, to the
physical reality of Daisy with her perishable breath, he metaphorically kills those visions, degrading them to the level of reality.Even in
his memory, Gatsby has lost the ideal that Daisy represents. Nonetheless, after not seeing her for several years, he persists with his
fascination, which their separation conjures and intensifies.From a distance, Daisy can reach flawless perfection, an unattainable
ideal.Close up, however beautiful and charming, Daisy falls within the confines of reality.=So he waited, listening for a moment longer to
the tuning-fork that had been struck upon a star. Then he kissed her. (p70)=Gatsby is acknowledging that as soon as his commits to his
relationship with Daisy, takes it to a level where his intentions are undeniable, and perhaps makes Daisy fall in love with him, he cant go
back. He knows that he is secretly manipulating her to achieve his dream of wealth, but he tells himself once his unutterable visions
come true, he will never use people, playing the role of God, again. However, before Gatsby goes through with this, he pauses to reflect
on the situation, and if it really is the answer to his dreams. He may have wished for these dreams on a star, another allusion to his
romantic readiness and inclination to turn his life into a fairy tale.=At his lips' touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the
incarnation was complete(p70)=In the moment when Gatsby achieves that which he desired most, a chance at social mobility disguised
as a kiss from Daisy, it becomes apparent that a phase of his life is over, and his journey, in a sense, has come to a climax. The pinnacle
of this incarnation has ended his era of imagination and idleness about not only a future with Daisy, but also a life of social status,
bringing a sense of reality of the situation, even as the situation maintains a sense of Gatsby drama, as Gatsbys performance births a
new perspective in his pursuit of prestige. The kiss symbolises reciprocation in Gatsbys infatuation with the wealthy and higher-class
characters in the novel, as his recent performances, with characters such as Dan Cody, had made him of interest to their kind, giving
him the social mobility he so desired in his previous stage of life.+The use of the word incarnation invokes a divine aura about Gatsby
and his relationship with Daisy, as he has come from a humble past and rises up to a seemingly omnipotent position. Nick describes
Gatsby as a Son of God and suggests that Gatsbys persona developed into a Platonic being; perhaps, then, this was the moment
that the transformation took place, as he was locked into an eternal addiction to Daisys love and status (F. Scott Fitzgerald 98). He was
driven by the desire not only for Daisys love and approval, but for social status: to become a godlike, all-powerful entity among men.
>Carraways view=Through all he said, even through his appalling sentimentality, I was reminded of something-an elusive rhythm, a
fragment of lost words, that I had heard somewhere a long time ago. For a moment a phrase tried to take shape in my mouth and my
lips parted like a dumb man's, as though there was more struggling upon them than a wisp of startled air. But they made no sound, and
what I had almost remembered was uncommunicable forever(p70)=The Lost Generation were a group of disillusioned writers working
around the era of World War I. They were considered lost because they had abandoned faith in America and its promises of
opportunity and love, expatriating to France. This league of writers included Hemingway, T.S.Eliot, and F.Scott Fitzgerald, the author of
The Great Gatsby.=Like the members of the Lost Generation, Nick is disillusioned, too. A story of true love seems like words he had
once heard but long had been forgotten. He tries to remember, but he finds it impossible. The famous writers, in some senses, were
travelling to France to become an illusion again. But like Nick, it was an endeavour in vain for them as well. On the other hand, Gatsby,
despite fighting in the war, is illusional. He still believes in hope, and he speaks with appalling sentimentality. His raw emotion when
talking of Daisy demonstrates that he has not yet given up on the American Dream or love.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

>We get a sense of different views of different characters in this chapter the way Nick describes the characters and their speech, he
chooses particular words that convey an image or a sense which enables him to portray Fitzgeralds aim of each character and the
reader is able to understand each character as it was intended by Fitzgerald and their views to certain events or other characters.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter 7, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>Gatsby wasn't seen for a while and Nick didn't see him either=it was when curiosity about Gatsby was at its highest that the lights in
his house failed to go on one Saturday night(p71)=all these extravagant parties were now put on to a halt and everyone was interested
why-not the wellbeing of Gatsby but his affairs and personal business as well as the fact there was now no place for people to blow off
steam as the automobiles which turned expectantly into his drive stayed for just a minute and then drove sulkily away(p71).
>The day of Daysis/Toms/Nicks/Gatsbys/Jordans dinner had arrived and it was- The next day was broiling, almost the last, certainly the
warmest, of the summer.(p72)=This is the hottest day of the summer that Daisy mentioned in chapter 1. Also, its towards the end of the
summer which implies we are getting close to the end of this story. Strong heat usually brings out strong emotions, so it appears that we
are finally going to see something big happen in the Daisy/Gatsby/Tom love triangle.+The story lasts in the prolonged summer and as
the story evolves the weather goes from cool to a hot/heated summer.
>As Nick+Gatsby arrive at the Buchanan's he seems to describe everything, the heat seemed to have an effect on him(p72/73) one of
which was to describe the two girls similarly positioned to when he first met them in chapter 1=The room, shadowed well with awnings,
was dark and cool. Daisy and Jordan lay upon an enormous couch, like silver idols weighing down their own white dresses against the
singing breeze of the fans.(p73)=angelic description even in this heat the women don't seem to change they are still amazingly beautiful
and well mannered. Nick explains that In this heat every extra gesture was an affront to the common store of life.(p73)=suggesting that
everything that took place that day may be blown out of proportion slightly due to the extreme/unbearable heat.
>Jordan requires Tom to stop and get some gas, they stop at the valley of ashes where Tom is very rude to George who says that he is
sick(p78) the lower classes i.e. George were disrespected by upper classes eg Tom even when they were practically dying as In the
sunlight his face was green.(p78).George asks Tom for the car that he promised to give because he=But I need money pretty
bad(p78). Tom offers him Gtasbys car pretending that he bought it last week(p78)=Even Mr. Old Money Tom Buchanan, who claims
to hate things bright and showy is jealous of Gatsbys yellow Rolls-Royce. It will end up being important that the Wilsons see Tom riding
Gatsbys yellow car. Then Tom asks why Wilson needs the money and he states that Ive been here too long. I want to get away. My
wife and I want to go West. but Tom is shocked =Your wife does, exclaimed Tom, startled.(p78)=Tom cant believe that Myrtle would
consent to leaving town and not being with Tom anymore. So he implies that Mr. Wilson is the only one who actually wants to
leave+Toms wife is already driving away with the man she is cheating on him with (Gatsby), and now the news that his mistress will also
be leaving town is overwhelming him.George replies with=Shes been talking about it for ten years. He rested for a moment against the
pump, shading his eyes. And now shes going whether she wants to or not. Im going to get her away.(p78)=This strongly implies that
Wilson knows Myrtle is seeing someone else. That is the reason he and Myrtle are moving West, to make sure she wont see this
mystery man. Even though that man is actually the person Wilson is talking to (Tom).
>When they got to the Plaza hotel tension was high between Gatsby and Tom and Tom started making negative remarks at
Gatsby=Thats a great expression of yours, isnt it? said Tom sharply./All this old sport business. Whered you pick that up?(p81)
>Tom began questioning Gatsby about Oxford in the hotel room and Gatsby did break his lieu he gave a completely good reason for why
he was at Oxford and Nick states=I wanted to get up and slap him on the back. I had one of those renewals of complete faith in him that
Id experienced before.(p82)=Nick really wants to like Gatsby and believe what he has to say, but all the mysteries and unanswered
questions around him make this difficult. But when Gatsby addresses the rumour that he never went to Oxford with a completely
reasonable response, Nick feels relieved that he can trust him again.
>Tom now started to loose it and asked Gatsby=What kind of a row are you trying to cause in my house anyhow?(p82) however Daisy
defends Gatsby by saying he is not the one causing the row it is in fact Tom and tells him to have a little self-control(p82)but Tom was
having none of it and states=Self-control! Repeated Tom incredulously. I suppose the latest thing is to sit back and let Mr. Nobody
from Nowhere make love to your wife. Well, if thats the idea you can count me out. . . . Nowadays people begin by sneering at family life

and family institutions, and next theyll throw everything overboard and have intermarriage between black and white.(p82/83)=here he
acts completely hypocritical as he too is having an affair with another woman+That said, although Tom wouldnt know it, Mr. Nobody
from Nowhere perfectly describes Gatsby and his attempt desperately to be Somebody.
>After this remark Gatsby was loosing control over himself and said the following=Your wife doesnt love you, said Gatsby. Shes never
loved you. She loves me.(p83)After 6 chapters of slow progression to this moment, we finally reach the boiling point (fitting, since it is
the hottest day of the year). Gatsby confronts Tom at last, claiming not only that Daisy would choose him, but that she never loved him
in the first place.the certainty and finality in the way he says this. He doesnt even consider the fact that Daisy might not agree with
everything he says. He probably played this scenario through his mind a million times the last 5 years, but never even imagined that
anything could go wrong.= She never loved you, do you hear? he cried. She only married you because I was poor and she was tired
of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her heart she never loved any one except me!(p83)=This is how Gatsby rationalised
Daisy marrying Tom to himself, so that he could keep the dream of reuniting with Daisy alive. He assumes that the only reason she
could ever marry anyone except him was money, and now that he had money she would pretend that the last 5 years never happened.
He never asked Daisy about any of this, he just assumed it had to be true.
>After Gtasbys car killed Myrtle he was snooping outside Buchanans house and as Nick returned to the eggs he heard his name and
then he states=I could think of nothing except the luminosity of his pink suit under the moon.(p91)=the colour of the suit was a symbol
of Gatsbys love for Daisy the fact that it was now luminous shows that at this point he loves her more than anything and his love is
stronger than anything or anyone which is ironic for what we are about to find out.
> when he finds out that the woman his car ran over was dead Gatsby goes on to say -I thought so; I told Daisy I thought so. Its better
that the shock should all come at once. She stood it pretty well.= and Carraway states that He spoke as if Daisys reaction was the only
thing that mattered.(p92)=He doesnt really care about the fact that they killed a woman, hes just worried about himself and his
relationship with daisy as hes desperate to be with her.
>Nick asks how the incident happened and Gatsby says=Well, I tried to swing the wheel He broke off, and suddenly I guessed at
the truth.(p92)=Nick is smart enough to work out that Daisy was driving and now that Gatsby is covering for her.+Could show his love for
Daisy as he tries to take the blame of killing someone. To him its just another crime but its a big thing to Daisy so he tries to take the
blame for her. As seconded by when he says:and I drove on.(p92)=The prohibition made committing all types of crime far more
acceptable- Gatsby counts the murder of Myrtle as being just another crime shown by the fact he just drove on he is not at all
traumatised about the incident and all he is concerned of is Daisys reaction He spoke as if Daisys reaction was the only thing that
mattered.
>Gatsby is still full of hope=if he tries any brutality shes going to turn the light out and on again.(p92)=Gatsby, despite the fact that his
dream has slipped away, pretends that his relationship with Daisy can survive, like a light thats dark only momentarily before being
turned back on=this is seconded when Nick asks how long he will wait outside the house and he says All night, if necessary. Anyhow,
till they all go to bed.(p92)=Gatsby doesnt want to admit that his American dream is over and he cant get Daisy. He thinks that if he
waits, and finds that Tom and Daisy have a fight, he still has a chance of being with her. Hes waiting for Tom to mess up which is really
unlikely as Tom is also quite desperate to keep Daisy.But Gatsby is so keen that he lets Nick go home and stays there as stated by
Nick=So I walked away and left him standing there in the moonlightwatching over nothing.(p93).

SETTING:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>As we previously know Nick cares about Gatsby and not seeing him for a few weeks was suspicious whether he was sick and went
over to his house where he was greeted by an unfamiliar butler with a villainous face which squinted at him suspiciously he wasn't
invited in by this butler and later states that My Finn informed me that Gatsby had dismissed every servant in his house a week ago and
replaced them with half a dozen others(p72)=Gatsby fires all his servants because he is afraid they will gossip about him and Daisy. He
doesnt seem to care who he has hired to be his servants, as long as none of them went into West Egg Village. In truth, his previous
servants might have been a little more loyal to him. The implication here, supported by later when we find out theyre Wolfgangs people,
is that these so-called servants are actually crooks who needed a cushy gig also supported when Nick states that the general opinion
in the village was that the new people werent servants at all.(p72) when Gatsby calls Nick on the phone the next day he states that I
wanted somebody who wouldnt gossip. Daisy comes over quite oftenin the afternoons. (p72) and that this was his reason for firing
his old servants.+ my Finn=A bit of contrast and irony here: while Nick may be considered poor by Gatsby and Daisy, he still is rich
enough to employ a servant full time.
>Nick later reveals to us that Gatsby was calling up at Daisys request(p72)to ask if he would go to lunch at her house and Carraway
knew that something was up=I couldnt believe that they would choose this occasion for a sceneespecially for the rather harrowing
scene that Gatsby had outlined in the garden.(p72)-this was the point that Gatsby expects Daisy to tell Tom the truth and go to live with
him or at least thats his plan but Nick believes that this is not a good idea.
>Daisy= realises that her husband is talking to the woman in New York as we are told by Jordan=The rumour is, whispered Jordan,
that thats Toms girl on the telephone.-We were silent. The voice in the hall rose high with annoyance: Very well, then, I wont sell you
the car at all. . . . Im under no obligations to you at all . . . and as for your bothering me about it at lunch time, I wont stand that at
all!-Holding down the receiver, said Daisy cynically.(p73)but Nick replies with=No, hes not, I assured her.(p73)=Tom has been
using the car he has been planning to sell to Mr. Wilson as an excuse to talk to Myrtle for the last few months. It appears that Tom
dialled Wilsons number to talk to Myrtle, then yelled about the car at the end to make it appear he was talking to Mr. Wilson. Daisy is no
fool though, and she knows he is probably talking to his mistress. Holding down the receiver means that one would have to hold down
the hook when pretending to make a phone call+But since Nick knows about both the car deal and Toms affair with Myrtle, he reassures

Daisy that he isnt just faking to make her feel better. Nick probably suspects that Tom is talking to Myrtle, but he doesnt want to upset
Daisy.
>Daisy comes up with a stupid excuse to get Tom out of the room of=Make us a cold drink, cried Daisy.(p74)=This mirrors the scene
from chapter 2 when Myrtle sends George to get chairs for Tom and Nick showing women in power finding their voices in the 1920s. and
then As he left the room again she got up and went over to Gatsby and pulled his face down, kissing him on the mouth.(p74)=here
Fitzgerald is showing that Daisy doesn't have any interest in Tom anymore she has refund her love for Gatsby and wants to be with him
as he is now rich enough to provide for her.
>When Daisy stops kissing Gatsby a freshly laundered nurse leading a little girl came into the room.(p74)=Tom claims that hes Nordic
and so he creates everything thats good. Meanwhile, he does not even create his own daughtershes an emotionless product of her
nurses.We see a lot of Tom and Daisy, but their daughter is rarely mentioned or seen. Shes toted as a possession and not as a
person.East Egg, despite their snobbery, really lacks traditional family values.And Daisy isn't interested in her daughter because she is
the product of a marriage that is built on lies and affairs.
>When her daughter is brought to the room by the nurse the girl says that she got dressed up and Daisy answers=Thats because
your mother wanted to show you off.(p74)=Her child is like a toy or doll to be dressed up and and shown to other people. This also links
in with the theme that her child is almost non-existent Daisy has a nanny yet she doesnt work, she doesnt really want to
acknowledge the child as a real person.
>As soon as the daughter mentions daddy Daisy is quick to reiterate that She doesnt look like her father, explained Daisy. She looks
like me. Shes got my hair and shape of the face.(p74)=Daisy emphasises her dislike for Tom at this point by pointing out how Pammy is
hers and resembles herleaving Tom out of the picture.
>We learn that Daisy isn't a good mother figure=With a reluctant backward glance the well-disciplined child held to her nurses hand
and was pulled out the door(p74)=Daisy pays rarely any attention to Pammy. In fact, this is the first we see of her in the entire novel and
it lasts all of 10 seconds, ending in a reluctant return to the motherless rooms in which Pammy resides.Tom doesn't even acknowledge
her as he returns to the room.
>Daisy is restless maybe due to Gatsby or due to boredom=Whatll we do with ourselves this afternoon? cried Daisy, and the day after
that, and the next thirty years?(p75)=Fitzgerald emphasises Daisys restlessness here. With a great fortune, social standing, and
material possessions, Daisy does not have much else to desire or seek in her life./The seemingly endless language that Daisy uses
draws attention to the upper class' restlessness in the 1920s. During this era of booming industrialisation and progress, restlessness
was solved with parties, drinking illegally during prohibition, and in Daisys case, day trips to New York.
>Daisy was now becoming more and more restless as=Who wants to go to town? demanded Daisy insistently.(p75)=Daisys
restlessness here illustrates her carefree and somewhat empty life. She has the freedom to do anything she pleases because she is
fortunately born into money and does not have any real worries.Daisys restlessness characterises part of the general mood of the
roaring 20s.
>Tom= is constantly described as a big/monstrous man by Nick and here is no difference as=Tom flung open the door, blocked out its
space for a moment with his thick body, and hurried into the room.(p74)=wherever he goes he seems to have this negative aura around
him where he seems aggressive and unpleasant.
>He also acts two faced when seeing Gatsby at his home=Mr. Gatsby! He put out his broad, flat hand with well-concealed dislike. Im
glad to see you, sir(p74)=he clearly doesn't like Gatsby but pretends to when he first sees him.
>Tom takes Gatsby outside=Come outside, he suggested to Gatsby, Id like you to have a look at the place.(p75)=Tom once again
asserts his control here, just as he did with Nick in Chapter 1 Tom has to be in control of where they go and what they look at. This
also shows Tom attempting to separate Gatsby and Daisy, and to assert to him that she is, in fact, his.
>Tom constantly tries to prove hes better than anyone else=but Im the first man who ever made a stable out of a garage.(p75)=Toms
narcissism, he plays up his own achievements to make himself seem better and he wants to show off for Gatsby.
>As they set to town Tom states=Well, you take my coupe and let me drive your car to town.=It seems Tom is actively attempting to
take Gatsbys place, both figuratively and literally, by driving his car. Gatsby found this suggestion distasteful(p77) and he says that
there isn't much gas in it but Tom is persistent and states=And if it runs out I can stop at a drug-store. You can buy anything at a drugstore nowadays.(p77)=This is one of Toms greatest digs at Gatsby. Tom had recently found out that Gatsby was the owner of many
drug stores, and sold bootleg alcohol at these stores. So hes making a not so subtle reference to that fact and it ends up being pretty
effective in silencing Gatsby.He then again has a dig at Gatsby by calling it Ill take you in this circus wagon.(p77)
>Tom is now aware of Daisy+Gatsbys relationship so Tom pushed the unfamiliar gears tentatively, and we shot off into the oppressive
heat, leaving them out of sight behind.(p77)=At this point, Tom has become familiar about the relationship between Gatsby and Daisy.
He shows his frustration of feeling betrayed by releasing his anger on the unfamiliar gas pedals providing a quick get-a-way from the
unexpected truth. Its ironic how Tom reacts considering he too is having an affair.
>After doing an investigation on Gatsbys past Tom dismisses him completely=An Oxford man! He was incredulous. Like hell he is!
He wears a pink suit.(p77)=Tom reveals that he doesnt think people should get in to Oxford just because they are intelligent. He thinks
only sophisticated, old money families with a long Oxford tradition should be allowed to go. And Gatsbys lavish lifestyle and pink suits
go against all the old money ideology Tom believes in. Therefore, Tom doesnt believe anyone as flamboyant as Gatsby could ever go to
Oxford.
>After hearing that his mistress is leaving Tom was feeling the hot whips of panic. His wife and his mistress, until an hour ago secure
and inviolate, were slipping precipitately from his control.(p79)=If there is one thing made clear about Tom in this novel, it is that he
loves and needs control. This becomes clear through the way he drags Nick around the city to his domestic abuse towards Daisy and
Myrtle. And right now he has no control, since his wife is speeding away with another man, and his mistress is leaving town soon.- he

aims to regain control when=Instinct made him step on the accelerator with the double purpose of overtaking Daisy and leaving Wilson
behind(p79)=Toms way of regaining control is by dominating the gas pedal again, so that he can get closer to Daisy and try to win her
back, and leave Wilson and the awful news he brought him.
>Jordan=Daisys daughter states that=Aunt Jordans got on a white dress too.(p74)=White represents innocence. Both the child and
Jordan associated with innocence. The child because she is, and Jordan because she wants to be.
>Gatsby=Upon finding out that Daisy had a child Gatsby was shocked as Carraway states I dont think he had ever really believed in its
existence before.(p74)
>Gatsby feels hurt=Daisy asks her daughter=How do you like mothers friends? Daisy turned her around so that she faced Gatsby. Do
you think theyre pretty? but the title girl without an answer about Gatsby or any other people in the room enquires= Wheres
Daddy?(p74)=Gatsby still struggles to come to grips with the fact that Daisy is indeed married to someone else and not him.so this is
nothing more than a brutal punch to the gut of Gatsbys already deteriorating psyche. Not only is Daisy married, this little girl that Daisy
has produced is not his and belongs to someone else. The small child does not fit into Gatsbys long planned blueprint of his relationship
with Daisy.
>When Gatsby/tom/Nick go on the veranda he states that Im right across from you.(p75)=the bay and how it separates them
represents the relationship Gatsby has with Daisy. He is so close he seems within grasp of her, but he will never have her.
>As they prepare to go to town Nick and Gatsby talk about Daisy briefly he states that=Her voice is full of money, he said suddenly.
and nick replied That was it. Id never understood before. It was full of moneythat was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it,
the jingle of it, the cymbals song of it. . . . high in a white palace the kings daughter, the golden girl. . . .(p76)=This is when we find out
exactly why Gatsby is so in love with Daisy. She represents money, plain and simple. Referring to jingle and cymbals, these seem
almost like her voice is a taunting advertisement to the rich lifestyle that Gatsby so desires. White is another representation of
innocence, and gold symbolises money again.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?

>Gatsby hasn't been seen for a while by caraway or anyone in fact so Nick visits him, without luck he goes back to his house but Gatsby
rings him the next day upon Daisys request and invites him to her house for lunch.
>Carraway and him go over to the Buchnanas where the atmosphere is tense and Gatsby is shocked to find out that Daisy has a
daughter who he meets at her house
>They have lunch at the house and Daisy begins to act strange as she knows that something is brewing in the air, Tom has worked out
what is going on between his wife and Gatsby-not happy.
>Daisy has an idea to go to town and tom pursues this idea and dismisses Gatsbys offer for the all to go in his car but rather suggests
that Gatsby takes his car instead-he wants Daisy to go with him but she chooses to travel with Gatsby as she loves him and not Tom at
this point.
>they reach the plaza hotel where they get a room Nick is not sure how or why but knows its due to an argument which is then carried
on in the room between Tom and Gatsby.
>In the argument Tom exposes Gatsbys past and present of bootlegging and crime-Gatsby doesn't care that much because all he
wants is Daisy and now that he's rich believes she will run back to him.
>due to this he requests Daisy to tell Tom she never loved him and she does but this is not sincere/true as she is forced by Gatsby
>Daisy tells the truth that she loved Tom but she also loved and still loves Gatsby-Gatsby holds on to the illusion that his and daises
relationship can still be perfect.
>Once Daisy has had enough of the argument she requests to go home and Gatsby is instructed to take her home by Tom.
>Wilson finds out myrtle has had an affair and locks her up, during an argument she escapes and is run over by a car.
>Tom/Nick/Jordan leave the plaza and drive to the area of incident, Tom realises that his mistress is dead/tries to comfort Wilson but
Wilson is convinced it was Tom that was driving and that in fact killed his wife-Tom reassures him that it wasn't him.
>They all return to the Buchanan house and Gatsby is outside spying on Daisy and as Nick is waiting for his taxi to go home he is called
over by Gatsby where he is told that Daisy was driving the car and she is the one that killed Myrtle.
>He keeps hoping to gain Daisy back by covering up her crime because to Gatsby this is just another crime where as to Daisy its much
more.
>Nick goes home,leaving Gatsby to see if Daisy will come back to him-she doesnt.
>As Tom and George were Talking=In one of the windows over the garage the curtains had been moved aside a little, and Myrtle
Wilson was peering down at the car(p79)=the car that Myrtle sees is Gatsbys yellow one, not Toms usual blue coupe. Myrtle will
assume that Tom is driving this car in the future, which will be the car that kills her.
>The story takes place in the prolonged summer, the more unbearable/unstable the events become the hotter it gets=it was a warm
windy evening(chapter 1). then her voice struggled through the heat (chapter6) and then i don't want to get stalled in this baking
heat(chapter7)= this is supported by the fact that Myrtle is killed(the climax of the novel) at the point of the novel where it the hottest day
of the year in this chapter.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

VOICES:What do we learn?

>Carraways narration voice may be a little unreliable in this chapter as Nick explains that In this heat every extra gesture was an affront
to the common store of life.(p73)=suggesting that everything that took place that day may be blown out of proportion slightly due to the
extreme/unbearable heat.
>later on in the valley of ashes when Tom was talking to Wilson about moving away Carraway states=The relentless beating heat was
beginning to confuse me and I had a bad moment there before I realised that so far his suspicions hadnt alighted on
Tom.(p79)=unreliable.
>At the beginning of chapter when Gatsby just arrives Daisy seems happy or hysterical one of the two=Gatsby stood in the centre of the
crimson carpet and gazed around with fascinated eyes. Daisy watched him and laughed, her sweet, exciting laugh(p73)=her voice
again is described with positive adjectives giving the impression that she is in fact extremely happy about Gatsbys presence and maybe
what is about to happen.
>Nick again confides in the reader about the fact that he doesn't fully remember everything that happened when he says=The prolonged
and tumultuous argument that ended by herding us into that room eludes me, though I have a sharp physical memory that, in the course
of it, my underwear kept climbing like a damp snake around my legs and intermittent beads of sweat raced cool across my
back(p80)=Nicks memory is a little fuzzy here. He knows that there was a pretty long argument/discussion on what the group should
do after they got to the hotel, but how they finally decided to get a room escapes him. The only thing he clearly remembers is how bad
he was sweating, because this was the hottest day of the year, and he probably felt nervous due to Tom and Gatsbys conflict over
Daisy.
>When arguing with Gatsby he states this to Daisy=Sit down, Daisy, Toms voice groped unsuccessfully for the paternal note. Whats
been going on? I want to hear all about it.(p83)=Once again, Tom asserts his self-entitled authority over Daisy. Toms ego/personality
requires him to be in control at all times, not only in situations like these, but also while having an affair with Myrtle. Tom, still occupying
a bully-like role, ignores any comments/feelings Daisy might be having in order to fulfil his desire for complete control of the situation.
But Gatsby answered for her=I told you whats been going on, said Gatsby. Going on for five yearsand you didnt know..Not
seeing, said Gatsby. No, we couldnt meet. But both of us loved each other all that time, old sport, and you didnt know. I used to laugh
sometimes.but there was no laughter in his eyes to think that you didnt know.(p83)=This is where we start to see that Gatsby is
detached from reality. He assumes that the last 5 years was just one string of unbroken love between him and Daisy, even though he
had only actually seen her for a fraction of that time.When Tom finds out that the actual affair didnt last 5 years, only a few months, he
isnt that phased by the news. Thats because he doesnt view the 5 year period the same way as Gatsby. Gatsby sees it all as a build
up to the moment where he and Daisy got back together. But Tom only sees more than 4 years of successful marriage until the man
with the pink suit came into the picture for a short time.Tom is able to see this short affair with Gatsby as a bump in the road of their
marriage, especially since he had been unfaithful to Daisy as well. He is willing to forgive her since he loves her and wants to stay with
her. But Gatsby will tolerate nothing less than perfection when it comes to Daisy, and anything less will crush him.This goes to show that
even though Gatsby really is the most hopeful man Nick had ever met and Daisy means more to him than she does to Tom, Gatsbys
expectations of Daisy will put her under unbelievable pressure and probably overwhelm her. Tom on the other hand is willing to forgive
her imperfections to make their marriage work.Most readers are sympathetic towards Gatsbys incredible devotion towards Daisy, no
matter how delusional it can seem at times. Everyone is going to root for the guy that would give anything to be with his love over the
abusive and unfaithful husband. But by choosing Gatsby over Tom she would essentially be wrecking her marriage and future stability
for a man with incredible expectations that she would never be able to live up to. So while everyone would love to see the story book
ending, you have to realise how unrealistic that would be.
>In reply to this Tom exploded(p84) and Daisy stated=Youre revolting, said Daisy. She turned to me, and her voice, dropping an
octave lower, filled the room with thrilling scorn(p84)=her voice was no longer angelic and Gatsby states=Daisy, thats all over now, he
said earnestly. It doesnt matter any more. Just tell him the truth that you never loved him and its all wiped out forever.(p84)=This
is the moment of truth for Gatsby. Daisy was just going off about Toms history of unfaithfulness, and realises she is vulnerable right now.
So he jumps in and pleads her to admit that her marriage with Tom never meant anything. If he can get her to do this, the 5 years he
spent waiting for her will all be worth it.Daisy replies by saying=Why how could I love him possibly?(p84)=This is different than
saying I never loved him. Daisy is confused because it makes no sense for her to love a man who cheats on her and possibly beats
her, but somehow she still love/This scene parallels the part of Tom and Myrtles party where Myrtle is asked if she loved Mr. Wilson.
Myrtle has no problem selling out Wilson to show off for Tom, but Daisy cant bring herself to do the same to be with Gatsby. But Gatsby
is persistent as he says=You never loved him.(p84)=Gatsbys absurd expectations for Daisy are starting to drive her farther away. He
should know that Daisy hates making the tough decisions, and he is forcing her into making the most extreme one of her life. If he was
just content with just letting her choose between him and Tom, she would probably choose Gatsby since it seems like she has more
actual love for him. But for her to choose Gatsby that also involves denouncing Tom, which makes the decision that much harder. So at
this point Toms realistic expectations make choosing him easier to do, even though she wants to be with Gatsby. and she gives in to
Gatsbys persuasions and says I never loved him, she said, with perceptible reluctance(p84)=what she's saying here is empty -She is
choosing Gatsby, but is unwilling to give in to all of his demands. She says these words to make Gatsby happy, but she knows she loved
Tom at some point
>upon hearing this Tom is breaking as There was a husky tenderness in his tone.. .. Daisy?(p84)=and Daisy states=Please dont.
Her voice was cold, but the rancor was gone from it. She looked at Gatsby. There, Jay,(p84)=Daisy chooses Gatsby over Tom for the
time being. But if this relationship were to continue it would be based on a lie that she was forced into. She is still unwilling to admit that
she never loved Tom because she know it isnt true even if she married him for his money she knows she grew to love him after the
marriage.Then she addresses Gatsby in a cold and defiant voice, indicating she is not happy at all with what he just made her do.

>She is now loosing control and states=Oh, you want too much! she cried to Gatsby. I love you now isnt that enough? I cant help
whats past. She began to sob helplessly. I did love him once but I loved you too.(p84)=Upon realising the sacred and almost divine
image Gatsby has of her, Daisy starts to feel the pressure that Gatsby is putting on her, and perceives his attempts to restore the past.
Gatsby wants nothing more than to recreate the past, while Daisy is only concerned with the future and how the rest of her life will play
out.Gatsby became extremely absorbed in his imagination of Daisy over the past five years, that is why he wants her so bad. And his
memory allows him to constantly add vitality to her image and thus created a flawless love. But the reality doesnt match up to the
expectation, since Daisy doesnt care about the past, and her reasons for choosing him would be different than what he hoped for.
Gatsby wants the reason she chooses him to be that she wants to go back to the way things were, but she is really doing it because she
thought it would be better for her going forward. Another example of how Gatsbys ridiculous demands and expectations are driving the
two further apart.Consequently, Daisy could not live up to the memories Gatsby had of her. Not because Daisy has changed so much
over the course, but because his imagination has grown so immense that Daisy could not possibly satisfy his hope and demand of her.
Gatsby lives in his past memories of their love and wants to restore the love that has already been distorted by his own illusions.
Because of his expectations for her to represent the perfect embodiment of love, Gatsby could not tolerate Daisy to have ever loved
another man, while Daisy, no matter how unwilling she is to admit, has loved Tom at some point of their marriage. Thus, Gatsby and
Daisys love is doomed and destruction is inevitable as both gradually realise the gap that time creates in their love that they will never
be able to overcome.
>Toms reply to what Daisy has said by Nicks description=The words seemed to bite physically into Gatsby(p85) Much like the news of
Myrtle leaving physically harmed Tom, the notion that Daisy could potentially love another man is actually killing Gatsby and he states=I
want to speak to Daisy alone, he insisted. Shes all excited now (p85)=Gatsby still hasnt abandoned hope yet, that just isnt the
way things work with him. He feels like Daisy is just overwhelmed by the moment and doesnt know what to decide, which is partly true.
But she has also made it pretty clear that she wont say she never loved Tom because its not true. This also continues the idea that
Gatsby feels like he can decide what Daisy wants for her, without even considering her opinion. But she states=Even alone I cant say I
never loved Tom, she admitted in a pitiful voice. It wouldnt be true.(p85)=Although Daisy is having a heated conversation with Tom
and Gatsby, her comments during the conversation almost seem to serve as an internal monologue. Daisy is conflicted about her
feelings concerning Gatsby and Tom because she recognises how her definition of love has changed over time. Her marriage to Tom
initially was a marriage of convenience because Tom promised great social status and wealth. Conversely, Gatsby and Daisys love
started as pure admiration for each other.However, after Gatsby returned from war, he decided to become a man that was good enough
to provide Daisy with the wealth and status she was accustomed to. During this time, Daisy was already growing into her life with Tom,
and essentially learning to love him instead of Gatsby. As Tom states during this conversation, Daisy and him have many fond memories
of fun vacations and simply being with each other. Toms tragic flaw is that he is a man of society and sees the world in terms of old
wealth and class. Yet in this passage, Fitzgerald demonstrates a more vulnerable side to Tom because, in his own way, Tom tries to
convey the emotions he has towards Daisy and still wants her love. Daisy attests to the fact that Tom is not a completely negative man
and that she did love Tom. Thus, the reconciliation Gatsby wants between himself and Daisy is almost impossible. There is a history
between Tom and Daisy that cannot be denied. Tom agrees with her and says he will take better care of her but Gatsby has other
ideas=You dont understand, said Gatsby, with a touch of panic. Youre not going to take care of her any more.(p85)=It seems Gatsby
is actually taking over Toms role by saying things that he would say. Hes asserting himself and being in control of the situation.Tom
fights back-Shes not leaving me! Toms words suddenly leaned down over Gatsby. Certainly not for a common swindler whod have to
steal the ring he put on her finger.(p85)=Toms main argument in stating Gatsby is not fit to love someone like Daisy is Gatsbys social
class. Although now he has enough money to purchase any ring Daisy could dream of, Gatsby comes from humble origins and is not
part of the aristocracy, who have had money under their names for various generations. To Tom, Gatsby will never actually constitute a
part of the upper class because the very members of the upper class are against common swindlers like him gaining a respectable
social status, and as far as Toms views on marriage between social classes and races go, it is atrocious for him to imagine a civilized
lady such as Daisy wasting her time on a self-made man like Gatsby. Daisy was feeling uneasy and states=I wont stand this! cried
Daisy. Oh, please lets get out.(p85)
>In order to scare Daisy away from Gatsby he attempts to prove that Gatsby is a criminal trying to assert his dominance in this
situation.=I found out what your drug-stores were. He turned to us and spoke rapidly. He and this Wolfshiem bought up a lot of sidestreet drug-stores here and in Chicago and sold grain alcohol over the counter. Thats one of his little stunts. I picked him for a
bootlegger the first time I saw him, and I wasnt far wrong.but Gatsby doesn't really care for Toms accusations and says that Toms old
money mate= He came to us dead broke. He was very glad to pick up some money, old sport.(p85)=Gatsby is not yet phased by
anything Tom is saying. The way he sees it, Gatsby did Walter Chase a favour by giving him a chance to make something of himself.But
Tom carries on=Dont you call me old sport! cried Tom. Gatsby said nothing. Walter could have you up on the betting laws too, but
Wolfshiem scared him into shutting his mouth.(p85/86)=Tom absolutely detests everything about Gatsby at this point, including his go-to
phrase. He hates how Gatsby is still pretending to be friendly with him even in the middle of their fight. Plus Tom considers old sport an
Oxford phrase, so he doesnt think Gatsby is worthy of saying it./Before Tom was just making broad statements about Gatsby being a
bootlegger that didnt really phase him. He mentioned a few of his associates too, but Gatsby knew that just throwing out a few names
wasnt really going to damage him. But now Tom is starting to drop some of the information he gathered when he got some men to look
into Gatsbys affairs, and making specific accusations that are a lot more effective than just calling him a bootlegger.And that caused
That unfamiliar yet recognizable look was back again in Gatsbys face.(p86)

VOICES:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>In most of this chapter Nick is just an observer and specifically when the argument starts is when he attempts to leave as he feels
uncomfortable= At this point Jordan and I tried to go, but Tom and Gatsby insisted with competitive firmness that we remainas though
neither of them had anything to conceal and it would be a privilege to partake vicariously of their emotions.(p83)=Just like in the very
first chapter, Jordan and Nick are the uncomfortable bystanders to a big dispute. Both of them want nothing more than to leave this
mess, but Gatsby and Tom both want an audience for when the win Daisy back over.+It would be a privilege to partake vicariously of
their emotions sounds like a quote associated with Tom, since he is the one who assumes everyone wants to be him. But in this
moment both Tom and Gatsby believe that Nick and Jordan want to live vicariously through them, because they both believe their selves
to be great. Gatsby usually doesnt try to establish his dominance over anyone, but his darker side comes out when hes fighting for
Daisy.
>after watching the fight between Gatsby and Tom for so long Nick attempts to distract himself by looking around where he saw that
Jordan begun to balance an invisible but absorbing object on the tip of her chin (p86)=Jordan has started the invisible balancing act on
her chin again, much like what we saw in Chapter 1. This situation is starting to get hectic, and the chin balancing makes her feel like
things are under control somehow. then he looks at Gatsby=was startled at his expression. He lookedand this is said in all contempt
for the babbled slander of his gardenas if he had killed a man. For a moment the set of his face could be described in just that
fantastic way.(p86)=This is a reference to Nicks first time at one of Gatsbys parties where he met some girls in the garden that spread
a rumor that Gatsby killed a man. Nick hates rumours like that being spread around, but at this moment Gatsby actually looks capable
of killing someone (Tom).But then=It passed, and he began to talk excitedly to Daisy, denying everything, defending his name against
accusations that had not been made. But with every word she was drawing further and further into herself, so he gave that up, and only
the dead dream fought on as the afternoon slipped away, trying to touch what was no longer tangible, struggling unhappily,
undespairingly, toward that lost voice across the room.(p86)=Gatsby realises that the real issue isnt proving his worth to Tom, it is
winning back Daisy, so he calms down and starts reassuring her. But Toms details have made it so blatantly obvious that Gatsby is a
criminal and a bootlegger that he doesnt have a chance of convincing her otherwise./Fitzgeralds choice to describe Gatsbys failed
attempts at winning Daisy back as a dead dream reaffirm the idea that Daisy was Gatsbys American Dream. The Dream dies when
Daisy decides to go back to Tom.Daisys lost voice across the room is the same exact idea as the green light across the bay. This
confirms once again that Gatsby views the green light at the end of the dock as a symbol for Daisy.The language Fitzgerald uses to
describe Gatsbys attempts to contact Daisy is similar to the how he describes reaching out for the green light at the end of the
novel.the dead dream fought on as the afternoon slipped away, trying to touch what was no longer tangible vs. his dream must have
seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it(p86)=The similar description of Daisy and the green light hammers home the point
that the two mean the same thing to Gatsby; they represent his American Dream.
>Daisy was now almost was having a descent to madness=The voice begged again to go./PLEASE, Tom! I cant stand this any
more./Her frightened eyes told that whatever intentions, whatever courage, she had had, were definitely gone.(p86)=Daisy hates
conflict and having to make decisions, so this situation is her worst nightmare. She pretty much chooses Tom by default, because she
would rather just go home than make a tough call. So Tom states=You two start on home, Daisy, said Tom. In Mr. Gatsbys
car.(p86)=Tom sends Daisy home in Gatsbys car to send a message. He is so confident that Daisy isnt interested in Gatsby anymore
that he orders her to drive home with him. Tom is so convinced he has crushed Gatsbys spirits that he puts the two of them in a perfect
position to make up-he knows that wont happen.The language used to describe the way Tom looks at Gatsby reinforces the idea that
Tom is just a man who looks down at everyone. He acts like the idea of Gatsby ever being with a girl like Daisy is something to be
laughed at, and refers to their relationship as a meaningless flirtation instead of love. and then They were gone, without a word,
snapped out, made accidental, isolated, like ghosts, even from our pity.(p86)=Toms destruction of Gatsby and his American Dream
make it seem like Gatsby and Daisy never even happened. Nick doesnt even have anything to say about what happened; one minute
they were there, the next they were gone.
>We find out that it/s Nicks birthday=I was thirty. Before me stretched the portentous, menacing road of a new decade.(p86)=While the
book was published in 1925, the end of this chapter, beginning at this point, hints at a certain clairvoyance on Fitzgeralds part. With the
remark about turning thirty, Fitzgerald is commenting also on the forthcoming end of the Roaring 20s, and how the recklessness of the
age must, at some point, come to a close and society, like Nick, must grow up. The new decade for America will prove to be
portentous and menacing indeed.=this is seconded by=Thirtythe promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to
know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.(p87)=Here is another reference to ageing that seems to foretell an end to the
freewheeling, youthful spirit of the Jazz Age.And then again=So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight.(p87)=Though
the signs of catastrophe were clear, the country raged on anyway through the Roaring Twenties toward death: toward the death of the
age. This book was published before the Great Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression (two direct results of the reckless American
society of the 1920s), so these two specific events arent being alluded to. But Fitzgerald seemed to know that something of that sort
was coming sooner rather than later.but also foreshadows what is about to happen.
>Wilson was now very sick and as his neighbour came into his office=he began to throw curious, suspicious glances at his visitor and
ask him what hed been doing at certain times on certain days.(p87)=Wilson, previously described as spiritless, has suddenly come
alive in attempts to find the man who is having an affair with his wife. He is usually the type to just let everyone pass by him but now he
has become distrustful of his society and wont let anyone walk by without being questioned.
>The argument between Wilson/Myrtle=Beat me! he heard her cry. Throw me down and beat me, you dirty little coward!(p87) and A
moment later she rushed out into the dusk, waving her hands and shoutingbefore he could move from his door the business was
over.(p87)=this was when Myrtle was killed by the death car. as the newspapers called it, didnt stop; it came out of the gathering
darkness, wavered tragically for a moment, and then disappeared around the next bend.(p88)=The car that hit Myrtle didn't stop
showing extreme insignificance that the people of lower class had to the upper class i.e. Daisy. And when questioned no one is sure

what the car was like apart from one man who ironically was not white and he stated=It was a yellow car, he said, big yellow car.
New.(p89)=Nick, Jordan, and Tom now know that Gatsbys Rolls-Royce was the death car, but no one else knows yet.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter 8, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>Carraway uses interesting adjectives to describe possessions in Gatsbys house whilst in search ofcigarettes=Ghostly,
dust, musty, stale, dry darkness(p94)=Here the setting is reflective of the atmosphere, Gatsbys house feels
abandoned, all the previous excitement from it is lost- Gatsbys loss of Daisy and the hope in the American dream is
deteriorating.
>Gatsbys house has changed just like the wether=we went about opening the rest of the windows down-stairs, filling the
house with gray-turning, gold-turning light. The shadow of a tree fell abruptly across the dew and ghostly birds began to
sing among the blue leaves. There was a slow, pleasant movement in the air, scarcely a wind, promising a cool, lovely
day.(p96)=Now that Gatsbys dream is shattered everything in his life has become absent/ghostly as if theres no need
for its existence and the wether was now cooler suggesting it was all over.
>Gatsby is aware that his dream is over=The track curved and now it was going away from the sun, which as it sank
lower, seemed to spread itself in benediction over the vanishing city where she had drawn her breath. He stretched out
his hand desperately as if to snatch only a wisp of air, to save a fragment of the spot that she had made lovely for him.
But it was all going by too fast now for his blurred eyes and he knew that he had lost that part of it, the freshest and the
best, forever.(p97)
>As Nick was returning back from work he was passing the valley of ashes and he moved to the side of the train as he
didn't want to see the crowds after last nights hit and run that Gatsby was blamed for he describes a man=some
garrulous man telling over and over what had happened, until it became less and less real even to him and he could tell it
no longer(p99),=This section recalls Gatsbys oft-repeated life history, which he recited to Nick on the way to New York.
Unlike the man in the street, whose tale becomes less and less real to him the more he tells it, Gatsbys belief in his
romantic American Dream is strengthened every time he tells people he comes from Old Money.
>The pool when Wislon killed Gatsby=There was a faint, barely perceptible movement of the water as the fresh flow from
one end urged its way toward the drain at the other with little ripples that were hardly the shadows of waves, the laden
mattress moved irregularly down the pool. A small gust of wind that scarcely corrugated the surface was enough to
disturb its accidental course with its accidental burden. The touch of a cluster of leaves revolved it slowly, tracing, like the
leg of compass, a thin red circle in the water.(p103)=In this scene there is a lot of words that relate to small or insignificance. It is
the death of the Great Gatsby and there is nothing great about it; in fact it is barely noticeable. In the end Gatsby caused only ripples
with all his parties and his effort to be accepted.He once again became anonymous with people knowing that he wasnt old money and
without Daisy to help him gain social status. The thin red circle in the water signified that he is going the way he came, being nobody in
the eyes of the rich. But for nature this is something accidental and irregular because he was one of the only humane characters in

the book that only from him do we know that there is blood.+The fact that Gatsby dies on/in the water recalls the symbolism of the bay
between his house and Daisys. He dies in a liminal space just as he lived in one. In life, Gatsby was in a constant state of flux, striving
to become the man he wanted to be an desperate to win Daisy for himself. He never achieves these dreams, as he is constantly building
on them, asking more and more of himself (and others) until the whole scheme collapses under the pressure like a house
of2929cards.Gatsbys watery death thus recalls the perpetuity of his striving state. He was never willing to relinquish his dream and so
dies in a hopeful state of waiting.
>It was after we started with Gatsby toward the house that the gardener saw Wilsons body a little way off in the grass, and the
holocaust was complete.(p103)=While Nick and the servants are carrying Gatsbys body into the house they notice Wilsons dead body
in the grass. The word holocaust is this sentence means sacrifice, which tells us that the killing of Gatsby and Wilson was a sacrifice.
This is a sacrifice to the old rich (Daisy and Tom) from the new rich and the poor (Gatsby and Wilson).The only people in the book
that die are the poor, or the working class people, who do so in order so that the rich may continue to live the way they do. This is shown
by Tom and Daisy leaving town unaffected by the events that have occurred. Fitzgerald uses this to relate to the uneven distribution of
wealth that persisted in the 1920s when The Great Gatsby was written.

SETTING:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>Carraway feels a sense of responsibility to look out for Gatsby as he=I felt that I had something to tell him, something to
warn him about, and morning would be too late.(P93) and as he couldnt sleep all night he went over and Crossing his
lawn, I saw that his front door was still open and he was leaning against a table in the hall, heavy with dejection or sleep.
(p93)=Readers see the length and the magnitude of Gatsbys yearning for Daisy. Willing to go to those measures by
watching her late into the night shows Gatsby had a tough time letting the love of his life go. Even at this stage it seems
Gatsby does not understand the barrier between him and happiness, which is the marriage of Tom and Daisy. He is
reaching out for something that he cant grasp.
>Gatsby automatically tells Nick about last nigh when he was waiting outside the Buchanan house=Nothing happened,
he said wanly. I waited, and about four oclock she came to the window and stood there for a minute and then turned out
the light.(p93)=Light is a recurring symbol of Daisys and Gatsbys relationship, most notably in the case of the green
light at the end of the Buchanan dock.Gatsby himself is characterised as a bright individual: his house gleams with light
and its as if his car reflects a dozen suns.The signal of turning the light off and on again if Tom gets violent, a plan of
Gatsbys design, suggests that Gatsby is desperate, in his tragically naive way, to see the afternoons events as but a blip
in their happiness.When Daisy turns out the light here, she is rejecting Gatsby for good. The fact that the incident occurs
at four in the morning makes it all the more harrowing.
>Gatsby was broken after last nights events with Tom/Daisy=It was this night that he told me the strange story of his
youth with Dan Codytold it to me because Jay Gatsby. had broken up like glass against Toms hard malice, and the
long secret extravaganza was played out.(p94)=The violence of the previous evening (and Toms regaining of power)
have basically destroyed Gatsbys idealistic dreaming, and he is able to finally be honest to Nick accordingly.+the info we
gain from Nick about Jay Gatz he learns at this point in time.
>Gatsby was more in love with Daisys wealth than Daisy herself=He found her excitingly desirable. He went to her
house, at first with other officers from Camp Taylor, then alone. It amazed him-he had never been in such a beautiful
house before(p94)=It reveals the real reason of Gatsby loves Daisy is that she is a wealthy girl, who was different from
the girls he met before, amazed him, not only by her personal charm but also by her wealth. He found her excitingly
desirable because Gatsby realises that Daisys life is what he dreamed of and he desires to have as much wealth as
Daisys family.House is the symbol of wealth and social status.
Meanwhile, the abandonment of Daisy also constitutes a significant reason, as well as an excuse. Gatsby recalls the first
impression of Daisy as the first nice girl he had ever known, because they did not have an indiscernible barbed wire
that separated them (Fitzgerald 148). To Gatsby, Daisy represents an entrance into the upper class, which is
demonstrated by the absence of barbed wire.
>Gatsbys want to use Daisy= it excited him too,that many men had already loved Daisy it increased her value in his
eyes.(p94)=Instead of considering Daisy his lover, Gatsby sees her as a means to enhance his reputation and popularity
and uses her as a tool to accelerate the process of attaining wealth and social success and as a shortcut to more quickly
climb to the top of the social ladder. Who Gatsby really wants is a girl not only with economic and social power, but also
popular, sought-after, and thus valuable. Once again, this proves that the love that Gatsby pursued for almost five years
is not real affection, but instead his love and desire for fortune and social hierarchy.
>Gatsby fooled Daisy in to believing=that he was a person from much the same strata as herself(p95)=Gatsby put an
immense amount of effort into masterminding a of facade of wealth to win over Daisy. However, the primary reason
Gatsby worked so hard to change himself is because he knows he intrinsically does not belong or fit into the same social
world that Daisy belongs in.

>Daisy is shown by Gatsby to have moved on quickly=Through this twilight universe Daisy began to move again with the
season;(p96)=Daisys spirits move with the season, which means she doesnt want to settle down (which was ONE of
the reasons why Daisy started the affair with Gatsby; Tom was settling down). This also means that if the two ever got
together, it wouldnt last, since Gatsbys entire life revolved around getting Daisy. The second he got his prize, hell be
content and settle down as well.
>Carraway makes a sweeping comment to Gatsby as he leaves his house to go to work=Theyre a rotten crowd, I
shouted across the lawn. Youre worth the whole damn bunch put together.(p98)=Nick, who is inclined to reserve all
judgments, finally makes a strong judgment here, calling Daisy, Tom, Jordan, and all the upper class morally rotten. He
knows and feels that Gatsby is worth more than them all and tells him so.Probably no one has ever complimented Gatsby
in this way before, even if he secretly agrees with Nick (see ecstatic cahoots below), which is why Gatsby breaks out
into a radiant smile.It is noteworthy that Gatsbys real history, however tainted by criminal enterprise, makes him more
admirable by classic moral standards than the initial impression he gives Nick. Whilst Gatsby (still) believes that coming
from Old Money and travelling the world as a man of leisure will give people the best impression of him, it is his private,
sentimental sidehis heroism in the war, his determination in the pursuit of his dreams, and his dogged devotion to the
love of Daisy- that forms Nicks final opinion of him here.
>Carraways relationship with Jordan becomes broken after a broken up phone call where both of them were not
pleasant=We talked like that for a while, and then abruptly we werent talking any longer. I dont know which of us hung
up with a sharp click, but I know I didnt care. I couldnt have talked to her across a tea-table that day if I never talked to
her again in this world.(p98/99)=At this point the only person Nick cared for was Gatsby. He adored Gatsby.
>Eyes of TJ Eckleburg when Wilson and his friend were talkin after the death of Myrtle(Nick is narrating as if he was
there-he was not)=the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg, which had just emerged, pale and enormous, from the dissolving
night.(p102)=Wilson and Michaelis discuss the eyes of Dr. T. J. Eckleburg being like the eyes of God, although they
could also refer to the characters views of themselves. Wilson says that the eyes will always see what a person has done
wrong which suggests that a person always knows his/her rights and wrongs. For all her reasons, Myrtle knows that she
has done the wrong thing by having an affair with Tom, and Wilsons mention of the eyes points to the retribution that one
must pay for his/her wrongs. Wilson then states=God sees everything, repeated Wilson.(p102) whilst looking at the
advertisement of Eckleburg=Wilsons reference to the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg as the eyes of God could be attributed to
his confusion, his grief, or his loneliness. Regardless of the motive, it reflects the nature of American society in the
1920s, whose morals had been corrupted, according to Fitzgerald (Fitzgeralds disillusionment with American society led
him to expatriate to France and become a part of the Lost Generation). Wilsons worshipping of an advertisement mirrors
the widespread worship of materialism that existed at that time and was showcased week after week at each of Gatsbys
parties.
>Wilson vanishes from the garage and Carraway states that he was looking for the person that killed his wife but this is
unreliable as he wasn't there so no one knows 100% of what actually happened however=By half-past two he was in
West Egg, where he asked someone the way to Gatsbys house. So by that time he knew Gatsbys name.(p102)=he
now believed that it was Gatsby that killed his wife and he was going to his house.
>Gatsby finally chose to use the pool he didn't use all summer=At two oclock Gatsby put on his bathing-suit and left
word with the butler that if any one phoned word was to be brought to him at the pool.(p102)=One of the major
separations between Old Wealth and New Wealth is how New Wealth buys things to be seen, but never actually uses
them. just like the books in Gatsbys library as described by owl eyes=What thoroughness! What realism! Knew when to
stop, too- didnt cut the pages.=Gatsby built a fantastic, Gothic library and filled it with real books. Most members of the
New Wealth class fill the shelves with pieces of wood painted to look like books, because they will never use them.
However Gatsby tries to appear like a member of the highest class by buying real books, replicating their behaviour.
However, Gatsby has never read any of the books, as he hasnt yet cut the pages. In older forms of bookbinding, the
pages were printed on pages four times the size of the book to make production faster. The book then would have
multiple pages attached together at the bottom of the page, which the reader would have to tear or cut.Without cutting
these pages, Gatsby is exemplifying his attempt to copy Old Wealth, but he doesnt actually read the books, showing that
he is not truly Old Wealth.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?


>After the war Gatsby returns to luisville where he first fell in love with Daisy who was now married=He stayed there a
week, walking the streets where their footsteps had clicked together through the November night and revisiting the out-of-

the-way places to which they had driven in her white car.(p97)=Direct reference to Chapter 6, when Gatsby replies to
Nick=Cant repeat the past? he cried incredulously. Why of course you can!(p70)
>As one of Gatsbys old servants states=Im going to drain the pool to-day, Mr. Gatsby. Leavesll start falling pretty soon,
and then theres always trouble with the pipes. Gatsby replies=Dont do it to-day,(p97)=Gatsby tries to defy the passage
of time and cling on to the past; even as the autumn leaves are beginning to fall, he wont let the servant clean the pool,
and instead decides to go swimming as though it were still the height of summer. This becomes an especially potent
symbol later on, when Wilson finds Gatsby in the pool and kills him; if Gatsby had been in the house, and not pursuing
hobbies out of season, things might have gone much differently, though of course, because of Gatsbys hamartia, this
could never be the case.

TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

VOICES:What do we learn?
>Daisys voice is again mentioned persistently in chapter 8 where Gatsby is telling his story to Nick=She had caught a
cold, and it made her voice huskier and more charming than ever(p95)=Throughout The Great Gatsby, Daisys voice
used as a symbol as to what allures Gatsby in the first place. Her voice exemplifies that eternal, unchanging life of Old
Wealth. This idea of old money reveals as the one thing that everyone wants to be but can not be achieved; Myrtle and
Gatsby are both fighting to become a part of this higher class and ironically end up being sacrificed to the old wealthys
way of life.
>Carraways voice is unreliable when he is telling the reader of what happened in the garage at Valley of ashes when he
and Tom etc left=he was not there so we cannot trust what he says.(p99-101)

VOICES:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?

>Gatsbys/Fitzgeralds view=What was the use of doing great things if I could have a better time telling her what I was
going to do?(p95)= passage that neatly captures Gatsbys attitude (and Fitzgeralds critique of the American Dream in
1920s America)/Doing great things is only beneficial insofar as it gains you the prize at the end; Gatsby has no need for
real-world ambitions if he gets the prize (Daisy) without effort.
>As Nick struggled to leave Gatsby he finally set off and said he will call him at noon Gatsby replied with=I suppose
Daisyll call too. He looked at me anxiously, as if he hoped Id corroborate this.(p98)=Despite all that happened,
Gatsbys dream has not died. He still lives in hope that Daisy will return to him, despite the unlikeliness of it happening he
still hopes.
>Nick is speaking for Gatsby after he did not receive any phone call that he was expecting(from Daisy) he knew she
wasn't going to call and Nick believes that he no longer cared so Nick=If that was true he must have felt that he had lost
the old warm world, paid a high price for living too long with a single dream. He must have looked up at an unfamiliar sky
through frightening leaves and shivered as he found what a grotesque thing a rose is and how raw the sunlight was upon
the scarcely created grass.(p103)=Nick is putting himself in Gatsbys shoes, trying to imagine what its like to have lost
your entire dream, to have reality revealed. Daisy is gone, and if Gatsby has finally realised this, Nick imagines what its
like to have everything you worked for redefined. Gatsby worked his whole life long to achieve his American Dream,
which Daisy was a major part of, and now that she has made her choice of Tom over Gatsby, the last piece of his puzzle
is gone. Replaced by reality, his world, defined by a faade of money and indulgence, is gone. Hes found what a
grotesque thing a rose is, meaning the beauty and luxury that all his beautiful possessions represented have lost their
romanticised glitz. Its no longer soft, but raw, like the sunlight, his mind and eyes clear to see the kind of life hes been
living from a new perspective.=A new world, material without being real, where poor ghosts, breathing dreams like air,
drifted fortuitously about... like that ashen, fantastic figure gliding toward him through the amorphous trees.(p103)=Here
Fitzgerald uses double entendre to explain the society Gatsby has found himself in. New World, not only being a
common historical term for America, also represents the New Wealth, or those like Gatsby that have earned their
riches.To Material without being real signifies Gatsbys worlds obsession with wealth, without any concern for what
really matters, i.e. love and real relationships. Gatsbys loss of Daisy has made him finally realise that his dream of being
a wealthy society man will not lead to happiness, signifying his final disillusionment. The ghosts are merely men like
him, chasing the American Dream and having it consume them until they are shadows of themselves. They are poor
because their search for happiness in a society that worships materialism can only lead to emotional poverty.
>As wilson goes to kill Gatsby he is described as like that ashen, fantastic figure gliding toward him through the
amorphous trees.(p103)=When Wilson is walking up to kill Gatsby he is described as an Ashen FigureTo Gatsby, and
other members of the Upper Class, the Valley of the Ashes is a place filled with people that arent important. Gatsby

carries the disguise of an upper class elite by looking down on Wilson in the final moments of his life. Wilson is also
described as fantastic. Fantastic, in the context, doesnt necessarily mean wonderful, but it means shocking or
confounding. Wilsons appearance and his actions are shocking to Gatsby.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?


>Through Carraways narration.

Aspects of Narrative-Great Gatsby;chapter 9, what do we learn and how do we learn it?


SETTING:What do we learn?

>After walking around in his sons mansion Gatz, his father was now excited=Jimmy sent me this picture. He took out his
wallet with trembling fingers. Look there.It was a photograph of the house, cracked in the corners and dirty with many
hands. He pointed out every detail to me eagerly. Look there! and then sought admiration from my eyes. He had shown
it so often that I think it was more real to him now than the house itself.(p109/110)=The small detail of cracked in the
corners and dirty with many hands captures how proud Mr. Gatz is of his son: he has been showing off the picture to his
fellow dreamers, the unsophisticated, illusioned ones who naively think that social status can be altered with
wealth.The fact that his son acquired a mansion has long been his source of pride, yet the presence of the actual house
stuns him, as demonstrated by his trembling fingers. His excitement mingles with disbelief, because he still does not fit
into the pompous lifestyle of the rich; yet here he is, in Gatsbys personal palace. Of course, Nick takes a more arch
perspective.
>James Gatz still looking at the picture=I see now there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of
him.(p110)=At the end of the novel, Nick comments on Gatsby: Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future
that year by year recedes before usThe future is splendid and enthralling, but it also always seems out of reach.
However, Mr. Gatz has faith in the future just as much as Gatsby does. In a sense he is worshiping his son, who makes a
fortune and climbs up the social ladder, and explaining the teenaged Gatsbys running away with admiration. Gatsby
justifies himself as far as Mr. Gatz is concerned because he attains something that his father and grandfather cannot
achieve.
>When Gatsby was alive, people flocked to his house like moths to light. His parties were the talk of the town, and no one
wasnt invited.=Go on! He started. Why, my God! they used to go there by the hundreds. He took off his glasses and
wiped them again, outside and in.(p111)=Yet, through all of these exciting evenings, no one truly knew or cared about
Gatsby the person, only Gatsby the patron or Gatsby the host. So long as Gatsby funded the extravagant parties, people
would come. Essentially, the man was using his wealth to buy superficial friendships by the hundred.But in death,
Gatsbys hold on the public crumbleswith the party over, there is no reason to go to Gatsbys house. Since Gatsby was
still more of an anonymous money sack than a person, no one felt the need to pay their respects. Such is the difference
between old money and the nouveau riche. An person from East Egg would not have to prove their wealth to anyone
because their last name tells all. Therefore, they do not throw these extravagant parties. Their name will live on in all of its
grandeur for eternity, a deathless song. But for those of the new upper class, name recognition is not inherent, but
something that must be accomplished. As much as Gatsby tried to spread his name, he still could not have it ingrained in
the public mindset. Therefore, when he died, it was not as though a person died, but rather as though a long party had
come to a close, and no one wanted to clean up or see the aftermath.

SETTING:How do we learn it?


CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;What do we learn?

>Gatsby after death=Most of those reports were a nightmaregrotesque, circumstantial, eager, and
untrue.(p104)=Much like when he was alive, Gatsbys legacy is based upon rumors and speculation. People are still
eager to gossip about and criticise Gatsby even after hes gone.
>Catherine, who might have said anything, didnt say a word. She showed a surprising amount of character about it too
looked at the coroner with determined eyes under that corrected brow of hers, and swore that her sister had never seen
Gatsby, that her sister was completely happy with her husband, that her sister had been into no mischief whatever. She
convinced herself of it, and cried into her handkerchief, as if the very suggestion was more than she could endure. So
Wilson was reduced to a man deranged by grief. in order that the case might remain in its simplest form. And it rested
there.(p104)=Catherine allowed Gatsby to at least retain a little respect and dignity after he died. She claimed that Myrtle
never cheated on Wilson (even though she was blatantly aware of her affair with Tom). So instead of the crazy love affair
story, the case was just wrapped up as Wilson going crazy and killing a man. It doesnt really change anyones opinion on
Gatsby, they still dont care that hes gone, but it finally puts all of the rumours surrounding Gatsby to rest for good.
>Carraway was determined to make someone come to Gatsbys funeral=Next morning I sent the butler to New York with
a letter to Wolfshiem, which asked for information and urged him to come out on the next train. That request seemed
superfluous when I wrote it(p105)=Like he did with Daisy, Nick assumes that Wolfsheim will care about Gatsbys death
because he was closely involved with him during Gatsbys lifetime. Just to be safe, Nick still sends him a strongly worded
letter asking him to pay his respects.>however Nick was unsuccessful=DEAR MR. CARRAWAY. This has been one of the

most terrible shocks of my life to me I hardly can believe it that it is true at all. Such a mad act as that man did should
make us all think. I cannot come down now as I am tied up in some very important business and cannot get mixed up in
this thing now. If there is anything I can do a little later let me know in a letter by Edgar. I hardly know where I am when I
hear about a thing like this and am completely knocked down and out.(p105)
>Young Parkes in trouble, he said rapidly. They picked him up when he handed the bonds over the counter. They got a
circular from New York giving em the numbers just five minutes before. What dyou know about that, hey? You never can
tell in these hick townsHello! I interrupted breathlessly. Look herethis isnt Mr. Gatsby. Mr. Gatsbys dead.There
was a long silence on the other end of the wire, followed by an exclamation . . . then a quick squawk as the connection
was broken.(p106)=We finally get a peek into what Gatsbys illegal life looks like. This Slagle from Chicago assumes he
is talking to Gatsby, and tells him that someone that theyre associated with is in trouble with the law. This scene just
serves to confirm once and for all that Gatsby was a bootlegger involved in much more sinister things than drug
stores./when this Slagle finds out about Gatsbys death he doesnt even take a moment to pay respects. He just hangs up
out of fear that the illegal activities he was talking about will be traced back to him. He puts himself first and doesnt even
care about his fallen associate.
>It was Gatsbys father, a solemn old man, very helpless and dismayed, bundled up in a long cheap ulster against the
warm September day(p106)=Mr. Gatz is the opposite of The Great Gatsby, who was always hopeful and dressed in
bright and expensive clothes. This gives us an idea of what James Gatz might have been like if he never aspired to be
Gatsby.This proves that Gatsbys claim that all his family was dead was just a lie; but we know by now that a lot the
claims he made were simply made up.
>I didnt know what youd want, Mr. GatsbyGatz is my name.(p107)=Nick was so used to calling Gatsby by the
name that he conjured up that he forgot his real name was actually Gatz. Mr. Gatz quickly distances himself from the fake
name. It does seem that Mr. Gatz loves his son but it seems like he doesnt fully approve of him throwing away his old life
for the American dream.
>Nick wasn't sure how to answer Gatz when questioned of his relationship to Gatsby until he reflected= we were close
firends(p107)=Nick wasnt exactly sure how he felt about Gatsby when he was alive. He wanted to like Gatsby because
of his strong optimism and good motives, but he took part in so much lying and deception that sometimes Nick wasnt
sure if they could be friends. But when Nick looks back at his time with Gatsby as a whole, he realises that he meant a lot
to him. This is another example of Nick trying to strengthen his bond with Gatsby after his death.
>Carraway=I didnt want it to be in the papers and draw a sightseeing crowd, so Id been calling up a few people myself.
They were hard to find.(p107)=Nick doesnt want sight seers who will just go to Gatsbys funeral for the novelty of it. He
only wants people to go that cared about Gatsby when he was alive and were affected by his death. But its a lot harder to
find these type of people.
>Gatsbys perseverance of his dream=He opened it at the back cover and turned it around for me to see. On the last flyleaf was printed the word Schedule, and the date September 12, 1906, and underneath:
Rise from bed................ 6.00 a.m
Dumbbell exercise and wall-scaling...... 6.15-6.30
Study electricity, etc............ 7.15-8.15
Work..................... 8.30-4.30 p.m
Baseball and sports............. 4.30-5.00
Practice elocution, poise and how to attain it 5.00-6.00
Study needed inventions........... 7.00-9.00
This very passage epitomises Gatsbys perseverance and efforts. He works hard toward a certain orderly routine despite
his humble beginning. Clearly he has to work for livelihood, and that occupies him for the most of a normal day. However,
he exercises and learns on his own. The most amazing pursuit on the list might be practice elocution, poise and how to
attain it for one whole hour every day: he has been preparing himself for the big future!The book hints that his first
contact with the grand American Dream may be reading some kind of heroic western stories. But more than that, Gatsby
shows the simple wish of self-improvement, which allows us to surmise that, at one point, his dream might have been
pristine, totally uncorrupted by material desires. Gatsbys dream was not submerged in flood of gay colours at his parties;
he is Great for his the strength and determination he embodies.>Thats my Middle West not the wheat or the prairies
or the lost Swede towns, but the thrilling returning trains of my youth, and the street lamps and sleigh bells in the frosty
dark and the shadows of holly wreaths thrown by lighted windows on the snow.(p 112)=The expressive imagery used by
Fitzgerald is designed to describe Nicks real American Dream. The fresh, falling snow, the real snow parallels the
American Dream. The snow twinkles suggesting the draw of the American Dream, while the new snow stretching out
beside the train suggests that the Mid-west is not yet tarnished by wealth as the East coast is.The dim lights suggests a

connection with the bright lights of the Eggs, yet declares the lack of corruption because of the dimness of the light. Nick
describes the groups as drawing in deep breaths of the air, as if it is the first fresh air they have experienced in a long
time after spending time on the polluted, corrupt East coast. The suggestion that these students retain an identity in the
west creates the conception that the West still allows them to pursue their dreams, instead of melting indistinguishably
back into the impersonal struggle for wealth in the East.Nick claims that the Middle West is his here, illustrating his
nostalgia for home. The East, where he has been associated with for a while, represents materialism, corruption, and
superficialness. However, this isnt who Nick is and doesnt want to be about this way of living. He claims the Midwest
because its wholesome, innocent, and pure, all things Nick wants to be associated with.The scent of nostalgia wafts
from Nicks reminiscence. The holly wreath shadows on the snow are thrown by lighted windows, symbolizing the
security of home. The simpleness in this holiday image is in contrast with Gatsbys party.Nicks Middle West is the place
where street lamps and sleigh bells faithfully accompany him in dark, frosty nights, shielding him from the Eastern
coldness; Gatsbys party is the disarray of spectroscopic colors, but as soon as the lights are out, people scatter like
moths, leaving their host in bitter loneliness.Nicks birth decides gives him the luxury of a carefree childhood, although he
is still exposed to the harsh realities of adult world. At the end of the book, he steps back from the East Coast, trying to
retrieve that well-lit, cozy paradise of American Middle West.>After Gatsbys death the East was haunted for me like that,
distorted beyond my eyes power of correction.(p112)=after experiencing society in the East (2). He is tired and
disappointed with the corruption and superficiality that accompanies wealth and success. After Gatsbys death, Nick
cannot find any redeeming qualities or aspects in the East, which prompts his return home to the virtuous and moral Mid
West.

CHARACTER/CHARACTERISATION;How do we learn it?


TIME AND SEQUENCE:What do we learn?
TIME AND SEQUENCE:How do we learn it?
VOICES:What do we learn?

>Gatsbys voice in Nicks head even though he id dead=I went back to the drawing-room and thought for an instant that
they were chance visitors, all these official people who suddenly filled it. But, as they drew back the sheet and looked at
Gatsby with unmoved eyes, his protest continued in my brain:Look here, old sport, youve got to get somebody for me.
Youve got to try hard. I cant go through this alone.(p105)=Nick hears people entering the room where Gatsby was being
kept and hopes that people are finally coming to say goodbye to him. But then he sees it is just more cops and
photographers who couldnt care less about his death, and his hopes are dashed again.The fact that Nick still hears
Gatsby talking to him shows how deep their connection really was. Most people tried to distance themselves from Gatsby
after his death, but Nick is the only one who tries to get closer. This is because Nick saw so many disgusting acts by the
people around him that he would rather be associated with the one man that was actually driven by good intentions.

VOICES:How do we learn it?


POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:What do we learn?
>After two years I remember the rest of that day, and that night and the next day, only as an endless drill of police and
photographers and newspaper men in and out of Gatsbys front door.(p103)=The final chapter is written as a recollection
by Nick, about two years after the death and funeral of Gatsby.+Thus, here Nick uses a loose, hopeless time phrase to
introduce a sense of despondency and hopelessness into his narrative; no matter how hard one tries to forget the past
and move forward, we will be borne back ceaselessly. Of course this is less true for the likes of the Buchanans, whose
wealth, whilst not enough to buy them happiness, is enough to keep them socially safe, though this only heightens the
tragedy and Nicks consequent bitterness.
>I found myself on Gatsbys side, and alone.(p104)=To a reader it is hard to believe that a man who hosted endless
parties filled with endless people could be so quickly forgotten for that matter. The sad truth is that West Egg people, and
the upper class in New York seem utterly blind to the use of good manners and morals. The selfishness of the people is
appalling to the reader. Nick Carraway, one of the few who came from the midwest, still carried the values his father had
instilled in him at an early age. Unsurprisingly the reader sees Nick as the only person to pay proper respects to this
mans life. Slowly, over deep reflection, Nick is saddened by the ugly truth of human nature in the east, and consequently
he packs his bags back to the place where he first learned his midwestern values. His home.
>Carrway tried to make Gatsbys dream come true one last time even if he was now dead-he never gave up on Gatsby=
I called up Daisy half an hour after we found him, called her instinctively and without hesitation. But she and Tom had

gone away early that afternoon, and taken baggage with them.(p104)=Since all of the hopes and dreams of Gatsbys life
boiled down to being with Daisy, Nick automatically assumes Daisy will be there to pay respects at his funeral.But Daisy
hated the idea of choosing between Gatsby and Tom, and Gatsbys death eliminated the need for her to choose. So
Daisy tried to distance herself from Gatsby as much as she could after his death, so that she can just move on with her
life.The whole plot of this story revolved around the struggles between Tom, Daisy, and Gatsby. But after Gatsbys death
Tom and Daisy simply head off somewhere else to blow more of their enormous sum of money, and act like Gatsby was
never a part of their lives. Nick is desperate to get them to pay their respects, but they simply took off without a word right
before the funeral.
>I wanted to get somebody for him. I wanted to go into the room where he lay and reassure him: Ill get somebody for
you, Gatsby. Dont worry. Just trust me and Ill get somebody for you(p104)=Carraway shows how much empathy he
has for Gatsby. He knew how desperate and lonely Gatsby was in his life. Since Gatsby did confide in him before,
Carraway feels he is responsible for finding someone who cared about Gatsby. Carraway wants to prove to Gatsby that
he did not work for nothing and was not alone in the world.+Gatsby does have somebody there for him, in the form of
Nick. It is not surprising that nobody else wants to be there for Gatsby, but in a tragic way, it seems appropriate that no
one else is there at the end. The only people who come to Gatsbys funeral are the people who believed in him and his
realness in life. Whilst Daisy loved him, her eagerness to take the easy way out must in some part counteract any need
to be there. Owl-Eyes, Mr Gatz. and Nick Carraway are the only people who could really be at Gatsbys funeral and be
genuinely sorry.
>Nick was angry at klipsinger because he called up about a pair of shoes rather than out of respect for Gatsby which
Nick believed was the reason=However, that was my fault, for he was one of those who used to sneer most bitterly at
Gatsby on the courage of Gatsbys liquor, and I should have known better than to call him.(p107/108)=Nick blames
himself for having to endure what these fools had to say, since many of them had only enough bravery to twist their face
up at Gatsby. And that bit of liquid courage came only AFTER they got nice off the liquor Gatsby provided! All this further
underscores the fact that Gatsbys money bought him shitty friendsexcept Nick.
>Although wolfsheim claims he wants to go to Gatsbys funeral he then states=When a man gets killed I never like to get
mixed up in it in any way. I keep out. When I was a young man it was differentif a friend of mine died, no matter how, I
stuck with them to the end. You may think thats sentimental, but I mean itto the bitter end.(p109)=It is indicative of the
world Gatsby and Wolfsheim operated in that Wolfsheim feels he has to defend basic moral decency as sentimental.
Nick is already sticking with Gatsby after his death, and is trying everything he can to make his legacy and funeral more
respectful. However, in the callous, money-driven environment of 1920s America, his actions are neither seen as typical
nor expected.
>I heard a car stop and then the sound of someone splashing after us over the soggy ground. I looked around. It was the
man with owl-eyed glasses whom I had found marvelling over Gatsbys books in the library one night three months
before.(p111)=the man with the owl-eyed glasses, who hovers on the margins of all the parties, seems eagle-eyed in
being the only character besides Nick who is able to look past Gatsbys facade and see the man that he truly was.Nick
and Owl-eyes are the only ones to attend the funeral: they are the characters that could see clearer than the others.
However, with Gatsby dead, things seem fogged, as symbolically implied by Owl-eyes' having to wipe his glasses
constantly in order to see. Now even those who see things keenly, as from a birds-eye view, have trouble differentiating
between the real and unreal, the good and the bad in the world.
>I tried to think about Gatsby then for a moment, but he was already too far away, and I could only remember, without
resentment, that Daisy hadnt sent a message or a flower.(p111)=The idea that Gatsby was too far away alludes to the
final passage of the book Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It
eluded us then, but thats no matter to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. And one fine morning
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."Agreeing on some level with the
explanation by LeFlair on the final passage, the nature of the American dream is to move on and strive for a better future
regardless of the past. Even for Nick, a man who is obviously heavily influenced by Gatsby, struggles to think about his
dear friend at his funeral because it is the tendency of the American Dream to forget. The only thought that passes
through Nicks mind is the fact that Gatsby never attained the green light, the orgastic future that is Daisy. If the past is
supposed to be forgotten and a fruitful future is unattainable, Fitzgerald states that the American Dream is not meant to
be a realistic goal, but instead, to give meaning and hope to life itself.

POINT OF VIEW/PERSPECTIVE:How do we learn it?

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