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HEARTBEAT OF THE NATION 500 Ks. WWW.MMTIMES.COM DAILY EDITION ISSUE 44 | MONDAY, MAY 18,
HEARTBEAT OF THE NATION 500 Ks. WWW.MMTIMES.COM DAILY EDITION ISSUE 44 | MONDAY, MAY 18,
HEARTBEAT OF THE NATION
500
Ks.
WWW.MMTIMES.COM
DAILY EDITION
ISSUE 44 | MONDAY, MAY 18, 2015

PAGE

6

PHOTO: NAW SAY PHAW WAA

44 | MONDAY, MAY 18, 2015 PAGE 6 PHOTO: NAW SAY PHAW WAA NEWS 3 Govt

NEWS 3

Govt to probe reports of shelling Chinese territory

President’s Office spokesperson confirms shells hit Chinese territory but says investigation will focus on whether the Tatmadaw or Kokang rebels were responsible.

on whether the Tatmadaw or Kokang rebels were responsible. NEWS 4 Malaysia threatens emergency ASEAN meet

NEWS 4

Malaysia threatens emergency ASEAN meet

Myanmar’s apparent refusal to engage

in talks over thousands of migrants

stuck on boats in the Andaman Sea prompts ASEAN chair to threaten an

emergency meeting of the bloc.

VIEWS 7

Ethnicity and Nay Pyi Taw

The challenge of reaching a political settlement between Nay Pyi Taw and the groups on Myanmar’s restive

fringes will dominate not just President

U Thein Sein’s government but

administrations well into the future.

BUSINESS 8

German chamber of commerce launches

The German Myanmar Business Chamber joins French and British chambers in setting up in Yangon, with backers saying they hope the body can drive more German investment.

A young boy shouts in excitement as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi gives a speech in the Mon State capital Mawlamyine on May 16. The National League for Democracy leader continued on to Thanbyuzayat in southern Mon State yesterday, where she was greeted by hundreds of residents. The trip is ostensibly to mark the 100 th anniversary of the birth of her father, independence hero Bogyoke Aung San, but had all the appearances of a party campaign rally.

San, but had all the appearances of a party campaign rally. Digicel, Yoma to sell tower

Digicel, Yoma to sell tower JV

Sources have told The Myanmar Times that several initial bids have been made for Myanmar Tower Company, a joint venture between Digicel and Yoma Strategic that has agreed to build 1250 towers for the Ooredoo networks. BUSINESS 8

Digicel and Yoma Strategic that has agreed to build 1250 towers for the Ooredoo networks. B

2 News

NMAR TIMES May 18, 2015
NMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

Page 2 Kayleigh Long | kayleighelong@gmail.com THE INSIDER: (because it’s on the inside page)
Page 2
Kayleigh Long |
kayleighelong@gmail.com
THE INSIDER: (because it’s on the inside page)
Once was Burma Archival material courtesy of Pansodan Gallery First floor, 286 Pansodan, upper block,
Once was Burma
Archival material courtesy of Pansodan Gallery
First floor, 286 Pansodan, upper block, Kyauktada township
Life drawing in the socialist era. Forward magazine, 1970.

Gathering dust The British Foreign Office has unearthed a treasure trove of colonial-era government documents which had, up until this point, escaped declassification by virtue of the fact that they were held in a separate storage

facility. It had been reported by The Guardian

in

2013 that the FCO had hoarded hundreds

of

thousands of historic documents, in what

was perceived as an attempt to sidestep declassification and handing over of the files

to the National archives.

During a Commons session in January of 2015, it was revealed that these other files existed. How did the FCO find out? It was the result of “an internal management audit”. “We became aware in July last year that

a substantial number of legacy paper files

are held outside the main FCO archive,” the Hansard reads. “Following this file audit we have identified a number of collections of records across the FCO which contain files overdue for review under the Public Records act. The total number of files in these record series is just under 170,000. Unlike records held in the main FCO archive, a significant proportion of these files contain copies of original records or routine management, finance, personnel and consular records. Some files, however, are likely to require permanent preservation.” While the individual documents are unlikely to get released any time soon, the FCO has helpfully provided a manifest stating the number of boxes they’ve turned up, their origin, how many documents are inside, and very rough summary about the nature of the files’ contents. a number of them are classified “Top Secret” and originated in the Colonial Office, which oversaw the various outposts of the British Empire. Intriguingly, one of the documents listed is a “Record of destruction of secret and top secret papers”. a quick search for “Burma” turns up some potentially interesting results. The box containing documents from 1711 to 1999 is named ”Confidential print:

France”. Here’s a rundown of its contents:

“Treaties with foreign powers; Newfoundland fisheries; armistice of 1859; neutrality of Chablais; extradition; Congress of Rastadt; foreign coins; monetary conference; spies; Desolation Island; flag at Donganta; arrest of British subjects; exhibition of 1889; budget; medical practice; army; navy; mail ships; St Paul and amsterdam Islands; horse breeding; channel tunnel (19th Century); construction of harbours; salaries of officials in France; Suez Canal; Indian emigration to Reunion; commercial

regulations; proposed channel tunnel and railway; independence of the New Hebrides; relations between France and Burma; French establishment in the Pacific; ship brokerage; France in West africa; anglo-French agreements; annual reports; diplomatic reports; leading personalities; report on French leaflet campaign; Savarkar arbitration; Waima collision; case of the Minquier and the Ecreous - International Courts of Justice case; Tunisia.” Most of the documents would appear to be consular files and registers 1948-2014, as well as some paperwork about pensions and compensation from British subjects for war damage in Burma. and for the World War II fans, there are three boxes which contain information on the following: “Operations in Burma (1941- 1942); Burma campaign; annual reports; diplomatic reports; leading personalities 1937 – 1999”. Now we might finally get to the bottom of what happened to those damned Spitfires.

‘I don’t apologise in any way for the action that Australia has taken to preserve safety at sea by turning boats around where necessary. And if other countries choose to do that, frankly, that is almost certainly absolutely necessary if the scourge of people smuggling is to be beaten.’

Australia’s inexplicably-still-there Prime Minister Tony Abbott demonstrates a thorough understanding of the crisis unfolding on the andaman Sea

Prime Minister Tony Abbott demonstrates a thorough understanding of the crisis unfolding on the andaman Sea
Prime Minister Tony Abbott demonstrates a thorough understanding of the crisis unfolding on the andaman Sea

www.mmtimes.com

NEWS EDITOR: Thomas Kean | tdkean@gmail.com

News 3

Govt promises probe after shells again land in China

‘Strong dissatisfaction’ in China as Shan State fighting creeps over the international border

as Shan State fighting creeps over the international border GUY DINMORE YE MON INTENSE fighting in
as Shan State fighting creeps over the international border GUY DINMORE YE MON INTENSE fighting in

GUY DINMORE

YE MON

INTENSE fighting in the Kokang region of Shan State has pushed retreating ethnic Chinese rebels right up to Myanmar’s border with Yunnan province, with artil-

lery fire reported to have wound-

ed several civilians on the Chinese

side of the frontier, according to official accounts. Independent sources spoke of mounting casualties being treat- ed in hospitals in China, raising concerns as to how Myanmar’s giant neighbour will respond to the conflict and whether the rebel forces are receiving help from in- side China. U Zaw Htay, director of the President’s Office, confirmed of- ficial Chinese media reports that artillery shells had hit Chinese territory. He told The Myanmar Times that the government would investigate whether the fire had come from Tatmadaw forces or Kokang insurgents. “The real facts can come out soon. Once we know the real situ- ation then we will discuss with China,” he said, adding that Myan- mar’s ambassador to Beijing had

been told by the Chinese govern- ment to take responsibility for the incident. Official Chinese media quoted

a statement from the local au- thorities in Lincang town close

to the border that five villagers –

four Myanmar nationals and one Chinese – had been injured by two artillery shells on the night of May 14. Two were said to be in a criti- cal condition. On May 15, Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chu- nying expressed China’s “strong dissatisfaction” and urged Myan- mar to restore stability to the re- gion “as soon as possible”, accord- ing to Chinese state media. The rebel Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army (MN- DAA) said its forces were fighting close to the border but denied the artillery fire came from its side. Fighting between the Tatmad- aw and the MNDAA erupted in the heart of the Kokang region on February 9, forcing tens of thou- sands of mostly ethnic Chinese civilians to flee to safety in China. In recent weeks the conflict has focused on hilly ranges close to the frontier. The deaths of five Chinese farm workers in a cross-border strike by a Myanmar aircraft on March 13 led to a strong warning from Beijing that China would take “resolute and decisive measures” to protect the safety of its peo- ple if such an incident occurred again. Myanmar formally apolo- gised after a joint investigation and agreed to pay compensation. The Tatmadaw was stepping up attacks and preparing to capture

hill point 2070, “the last strong- hold of the MNDAA”, the official Global New Light of Myanmar re- ported on May 16. It said the army took two pris- oners and recovered 24 rebel bod- ies after days of heavy fighting – including artillery barrages, air strikes, tanks and close combat – that culminated in the capture of

hill points 2202 and 2017 late last week. The army “suffered some casualties”, the daily said. An independent Myanmar source, who asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue, said the Chinese military had es- tablished a field hospital near the border which was overflowing with casualties from Myanmar. He also said the Tatmadaw believed that MNDAA fighters were receiv- ing aid inside China and were able

to cross the border with ease, rais-

ing questions over how costly it would be for the armed forces to hold onto the newly captured hill posts.

China has repeatedly denied helping the MNDAA and has called on Myanmar to hold ne- gotiations with the rebels, whose militia was formed out of the

‘The real facts can come out soon. Once we know the real situation the we will discuss

with China.’

U Zaw Htay Director of the President’s Office

China.’ U Zaw Htay Director of the President’s Office break-up of the China-backed Communist Party of

break-up of the China-backed Communist Party of Burma in

1989.

“China has a huge amount to gain from the peace process be-

ing successful in Myanmar,” said

U Thant Myint-U, an adviser to

President U Thein Sein. “There is no reason to think that they want anything else other than peace and stability on the border,” he told The Myanmar

Times on the sidelines of an eco- nomics summit in Yangon organ- ised by The Economist. But he conceded that China was a “very opaque system” and

it was difficult to assess “how dif- ferent parts of the system may have different views”. Elements in China had had long relations to the successors of the Communist Party of Burma along the border,

he noted.

Asked whether the president and the military were on the same page over prosecuting war in Ko- kang while trying to negotiate a nationwide ceasefire accord with Myanmar’s other more powerful ethnic armed groups, U Thant Myint-U replied, “As far as I can tell, there is no conflict.”

replied, “As far as I can tell, there is no conflict.” A factory worker adds her

A factory worker adds her suggestion for how to improve labour rights protections during a May 17 forum. Photo: Zarni Phyo

National Unity Party promises to take up factory workers’ cause

NYAN LYNN AUNG

29.nyanlynnaung@gmail.com

THE National Unity Party is trying hard to woo the factory workers’ vote. The party yesterday held a labour rights forum in Yangon’s Shwe Pyi Thar Industrial Zone where members pledged their solidarity and support for the workers’ cause. Politicians yielded the floor and lent their ear to

union leaders and worker representa- tives, who used their day off to press the party on the minimum wage, a labour protection law and healthcare. Among the scores of issues and gripes discussed at the open forum, one thing was clear: Myanmar work- ers are demanding better protection of their rights. “There are so many issues to talk about with labour rights but the

basic point is that the laws protecting workers are weak. So, whatever we de- mand, it won’t matter until the laws are reviewed,” said Myanmar Trade Unions Federation member Ko Naw Aung, who was among the hundreds of workers at the discussion. The representatives managed to chisel their concerns into 41 points presented to the party. “The party will report those points to parliament, issue a statement with the points and preserve them as party priorities,” said Ma Myo Myo Aye, a member of the NUP. Party executive U Han Shwe pressed the importance of the factory worker voting bloc. “We sponsored the forum be- cause the labourers have big power to change the country and build it up. But the labourers don’t know the

extent of their power,” he said. Ma Moe Wai, head of the union at the Tiri Foot Factory in Hlaing Tharyar Industrial Zone, said she hopes that the party will really work to improve the situation for the workers and not just make hollow pre-elections promises. “We need a just and fair resolu- tion to labour disputes and all labour laws,” she said. “So we want this forum to result in workers’ needs really being represented.” The NUP was established by for- mer members of Ne Win’s Burma Socialist Programme Party after the latter was dissolved in 1988. It was the major opponent of the National League for Democracy in the 1990 election, winning 21.2 percent of the vote but just 10 seats. In 2010 it won 12 seats in the lower house and five in the upper house.

21.2 percent of the vote but just 10 seats. In 2010 it won 12 seats in

4

News

THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015

4 News THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015 Chief Executive Officer Tony Child tonychild.mcm@gmail.com Editorial Director

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KO LIPE, THAILAND

Email: capitalbureau@myanmartimes.com.mm KO LIPE, THAILAND A boat off southern Thailand carrying Rohingya people from

A boat off southern Thailand carrying Rohingya people from Myanmar is towed back toward Malaysian waters by a Thai Navy vessel on May 16. Photo: Fiona MacGregor

‘Maritime ping-pong’ continues off Thai island

MacGregor ‘Maritime ping-pong’ continues off Thai island FIONA MACGREGOR fionamacgregor@hotmail.co.uk THAILAND pushed

FIONA

MACGREGOR

fionamacgregor@hotmail.co.uk

THAILAND pushed back to sea for the second time a boat carrying hundreds of people from Myanmar on May 16, as international pressure continued to grow on ASEAN countries to save thousands of refugees and migrants adrift in the ocean. Malaysian maritime authority or military vessels could be seen close to where Thailand let the boat go in the waters between the Thai island of Ko Lipe and Malaysia’s Langkawi. A Thai Navy official told reporters the boat was later “intercepted” by Malaysian authorities. The move was the latest in a grow- ing humanitarian and diplomatic crisis that has left an estimated 8000 refugees and migrants stuck at sea in dire conditions. Many were thought to be bound for Thailand, but a govern- ment crackdown has closed many of the trafficking camps on the border with Malaysia, and other countries in the region are turning them away. When The Myanmar Times reached the vessel on May 16, people were crammed onto an open deck in

the midday sun, huddled together. Women and children were crying, while others made pleading gestures with their arms. The green and red fishing boat was flying a flag proclaim- ing the passengers are “Myanmar Ro- hingya”. The boat was still adrift between the two countries yesterday morning and had re-entered Thai waters, ac- cording to naval authorities.

‘If they want to land in Thailand they have to accept our law, which means they will face charges.’

Lt Cmd Weerapong Nakpradit Royal Thai Navy

face charges.’ Lt Cmd Weerapong Nakpradit Royal Thai Navy Storms overnight only added to the misery

Storms overnight only added to the misery of those on board, most of whom are living out in the open. Passengers on the boat told report- ers on May 14 that they had been at sea for three months, and that the boat’s captain and crew abandoned them six days earlier. Ten people died

during the voyage, and their bodies were thrown overboard, the passen- gers said. The boat has been drifting between Malaysian and Thai waters for several days. It was intercepted by the Thai Navy on the afternoon of May 14 and towed out to sea. It then drifted into Malaysian waters between Ko Lipe and Langkawi on the night of May 15, according to Lieutenant Commander Weerapong Nakpradit of the Thai Navy. But by 12.30pm on May 16, when The Myanmar Times saw the boat, it had re-entered Thai waters and was being towed back to sea by the Thai Navy. After the Navy let it go, the boat then turned toward Malaysia, where two ships – apparently belonging to Malaysian maritime authorities – were waiting. Thai authorities have said that they will allow those on board the vessel to enter Thailand, but they will be charged under the country’s immigra- tion laws. “If they want to land in Thailand they have to accept our law which means they will face [immigration] charges, but at least they will receive assistance,” Lt Cmd Weerapong said. “We will say to the Rohingya, ‘What do you want? If you want to go to Thailand you are welcome. It will mean humanitarian [assistance],

food, water and medication.’” According to Thai Navy offic- ers who towed the boat back out to sea, some of those on board had wanted to land in Thailand, despite the threat of criminal charges, but had been persuaded not to by oth- ers on board who were determined to continue to Malaysia. It is unclear whether there are still traffickers on board the vessel. “The first day they all wanted to go to Malaysia. Today some of them wanted to go to Thailand, but [some men] on board forced them to [try to] get to Malaysia,” said one Thai officer, who declined to be named. The officer said they had provided those on board with food and wa- ter, and fixed the boat’s engine for a second time. It had previously been mended on May 14, when the passen- gers were also given food and water. Another of the Navy crew said yes- terday that none of the passengers was seriously ill or injured, but they were sleep deprived and hungry. However, their future remains per- ilous. It is unclear what authorities intend to do with the boat beyond pushing it back and forth between Ma- laysia and Thailand. The International Organization for Migration has con- demned the region’s governments for risking lives in a game of “maritime ping-pong”.

Myanmar hits back at international pressure

GUY DINMORE guydinmore@gmail.com

A SENIOR Myanmar official has lashed out at growing international pressure over the nation’s refusal to engage in talks about the boats floundering in the Andaman Sea while Malaysia yes- terday threatened to call an emergency ASEAN meeting to break the deadlock. In a hard-line statement, director of the President’s Office U Zaw Htay ac- cused Thailand and Malaysia of trying to shift the blame for a problem that has its root in human traffickers and corrupt officials exploiting migrant workers. The statement on May 15 came as

Western diplomats and other envoys worked at persuading Myanmar to ac- knowledge the exodus of stateless Ro- hingya Muslims from its territory and join a region-wide effort to deal with the crisis. Myanmar has not formally respond- ed to international calls for dialogue on the issue, including Thailand’s invi- tation to attend an urgent meeting of involved countries on May 29. Bangkok says it wants to find a solution to “an unprecedented increase of irregular migration”, including its “root causes” in countries of origin – a reference mainly to Myanmar and Bangladesh. The US says it will send a sen- ior delegation to the meeting, and its

ambassador in Yangon is among the foreign envoys lobbying Myanmar to attend. Last night, Malaysia’s foreign min- ister threatened to call an emergency meeting of the ASEAN, which his coun- try is chairing this year, if Myanmar re- fuses to participate in talks. “If necessary, we will call for an emergency [ASEAN] meeting,” Foreign Minister Anifah Aman told the state- run Bernama news agency. Mr Anifah said Malaysia “hopes My- anmar can sit together to find a solu- tion before it is brought to the interna- tional level”. U Zaw Htay made it clear that My- anmar would not accept being singled

out for blame. Writing on Facebook, he said corrupt officials in Thailand and Malaysia were taking money from hu- man trafficking gangs and hiding their guilt by making Myanmar appear re- sponsible for an exodus that originated primarily in Bangladesh. “As countries in ASEAN region, they need to deal with their own weaknesses and problems boldly. Their guilt won’t disappear if they just put the blame on Myanmar,” U Zaw Htay wrote. Associated Press quoted him as say- ing separately that Myanmar would not attend the special meeting if “Rohing- ya” was mentioned on the invitation. The government officially refers to the group as Bengalis.

6

News

THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015

President to hold ‘regular’ meet with parties EI EI TOE LWIN eieitoelwin@gmail.com PARTY leaders insist
President
to hold
‘regular’
meet with
parties
EI EI TOE LWIN
eieitoelwin@gmail.com
PARTY leaders insist they are not
excited about the invitation to meet
President U Thein Sein this afternoon
in the Yangon Region parliament
building. Nor are they making any
special preparations for the meeting,
not least because there is no agenda.
The most likely topic of discus-
sion appears to be maintaining a
stable political environment both
before and after next November’s
election, they say.
President’s Office director U Zaw
Htay described the meeting, which
will take place at 4pm today, as “reg-
ular”, as opposed to the sporadic six-
party talks which might, or might not,
hold the key to the country’s constitu-
tional problems.
“It is a regular meeting. The presi-
dent often meets with party repre-
sentatives to discuss the state of the
country,” said U Zaw Htay.
Another issue is likely to be the
peace process and the political dia-
logue associated with it. The president
also wants to hear about any difficul-
ties parties are having that he could
help to resolve through the various
government ministries, said U Zaw
Htay.
“This is nothing special. We don’t
know what will be discussed, other
than the current political situation.
We haven’t drawn up any specific
plans for the meeting,” said U Nyan
Win, spokesperson for the National
League for Democracy.
The chair of the Karen National
Party, U Saw Tun Aung Myint, said
he had received a summons over the
phone, but had not yet received a writ-
ten invitation. “I don’t know what top-
ics will come up,” he said.
But U Zo Zam, chair of the Chin
National Party, wants to take advan-
tage of the unstructured nature of
the meeting to bring up last year’s
census.
“The results will be published on
May 29. We are concerned whether or
not new types of ethnic minorities are
going to be announced,” he said. “That
would be a very controversial issue. In-
creasing the number of ethnic groups
could cause disunity among existing
groups.”
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at a National League for Democracy event in Thanbyuzayat, southern Mon State,
yesterday. Photo: Naw Say Phaw Waa
NLD chief woos voters
in unofficial campaign
NAW SAY
independence hero Bogyoke Aung
San.
In Mawlamyine she spoke at a
PHAWP
WAA
school sports centre, while yester-
day she travelled to Thanbyuzayat,
Chief Senior General Min Aung
Hlaing, she said all participants
had agreed on the need for regular
meetings to ensure stability after
the election.
to
the south of the state, and gave a
nawsayphawwaa@gmail.com
DAW Aung San Suu Kyi has urged
voters to consider the “back-
ground” of political parties when
deciding who to vote for in this
year’s election, scheduled for
November.
Speaking in the Mon State capi-
tal Mawlamyine on May 16, she
also told members of the audience
to vote for the National League for
Democracy if they like her.
“People should analyse the his-
tory of the political parties. We are
not afraid for them to do the same
to us. We don’t say that we don’t
have any weaknesses, but we try
to repair them as much as we can,”
she said.
The NLD leader was touring
Mon State to mark the 100 th anni-
versary of the birth of her father,
talk in front of the Allied war cem-
etery run by the Commonwealth
War Graves Commission.
At each of the events she an-
swered seven questions from resi-
dents after concluding her speech.
Asked if her party would par-
ticipate in the election, Daw Aung
San Suu Kyi said she would decide
after taking into the considera-
tion the desire and needs of the
people.
“We have one simple belief. We
should never break the promises
that we have made to the people. I
don’t want to say too many things.
“We need to holds more talks
regularly if we want our country to
be stable and peaceful.”
While official campaigning for
the election has not yet begun –
election rules permit events only
within 60 days of the vote – the
events resembled party rallies.
However, turnout was signifi-
cantly lower than when she toured
the country prior to the 2012 by-
elections. Some said this was be-
cause her visit had not been widely
promoted.
“It’s not yet campaign time for
the election so most people don’t
know about her trip,” Daw Kyaw
If
I do and I can’t fulfil it later, I
will be breaking my promise to the
people,” she said.
Questioned on the six-way talks
between herself and other key po-
litical leaders, including President
U
Thein Sein and Commander-in-
Way from Ye township, said after
yesterday’s event in Thanbyuzayat.
“I’m sure that if she comes on an
official campaign trip there will be
lots of people – the crowd is still in
the thousands here today.”
– Translation by Emoon

Parties ordered to avoid ‘personal’ attacks

LUN MIN MANG lunmin.lm@gmail.com

POLITICAL party members and offi- cials of the Union Election Commis- sion have jointly completed a code of conduct (COC) for parties during the coming electoral campaign. Meeting separately in Yangon on May 14 and 15, UEC members also introduced and demonstrated voting procedures to civil society organisations and po- litical parties. U Aung Than Tint, chair of the Bamar People’s Party (BPP), said the use of religious premises for cam- paigning was allowed under the new code. “The use of religious buildings for campaigning is not the same as the use of religion for political pur- poses, which is prohibited,” he said. The code of conduct stipulates that all campaign posters must be the same size, regardless of numbers. “I wish the numbers of posters were limited, so as to be free and fair,” said

U Aung Than Tint. Campaigners will also not be al-

lowed to attack rivals on personal issues, said commission member

U Win Ko. “Personal affairs should

not be used, but a candidate’s per- formance or past conduct can be the subject of campaigning,” he said. U Aung Than Tint said rival cam- paigns should be able to highlight not only the history or background but the current performance of candidates. “Compliance with the code of conduct is not compulsory. But if a party fails to comply with the code, the party will be publicly criticised and the image of the party could be harmed as a result,” he said. During the demonstration of vot- ing, the UEC used the first-past-the- post voting system for the Amyotha Hluttaw, though parliament has not yet ruled out the use of proportional representation in the upper house. Commission member U Win Ko,

however, said it would not be possi- ble to use PR in the coming election. “Although the Amyotha Hluttaw has not yet decided [whether to use

it], I think there is not enough time to explain the complexities of PR to the voters,” he said.

‘Personal affairs should not be used, but a candidate’s peformance or past conduct can be the subject of campaigning.’

U Win Ko Union Election Commission

of campaigning.’ U Win Ko Union Election Commission Commission member U Win Kyi also explained the

Commission member U Win Kyi also explained the current status of nationwide voter registration, and urged the parties to help improve public participation. The Yangon Region chair of the election sub-commission, U Ko Ko, said the first display of provisional voters’ lists on March 30 provoked little response from voters. “We need more cooperation from the CSOs and political parties. According to our re- cords, only about 30,000 people [of more than 200,000 listed] checked their names during the first display in 10 townships in Yangon.” Further displays of the provisional voters’ lists will be held throughout the country on May 25, June 8 and June 22 before the final display. On May 25, voters’ names will be displayed in 14 townships in Yangon Region and the south and north districts of Nay Pyi Taw. The UEC says voter registration will be completed in August, at least two months ahead of the election.

IN BRIEF

3MDG to fund construction of 100 health centres in remote areas

Healthcare provision in 100 remote vil- lages is to be improved thanks to new facilities to be provided by the Three Millennium Development Goal Fund

(3MDG). Dr Paul Sender, fund director of 3MDG, said the goal was to improve services to poor and vulnerable rural residents. The 100 sub-rural health centres will be built, by the end of 2016, in Mag- we, Sagaing and Ayeyarwady regions and Chin, Kayah and Shan states, at an estimated cost of US$15 million. “The villages that we selected are very remote, and the villagers face great difficulty in accessing healthcare. We hope these facilities will improve the health of mothers and children,” Dr Sender said. Dr Yin Thandar Lwin, deputy director of the Department of Public Health, said 3MDG will fund the construction, and the ministry will provide the medi- cines and the staff for the centres.

A ground-breaking ceremony for the

sub-rural health centre in Seikphyu township, Magwe Region, was held on May 14, led by Dr Yin Thandar Lwin. 3MDG is a multi-donor fund that supports the provision of health ser- vices, with the three goals of reducing child mortality, improving maternal health, and combating HIV, tuberculo- sis and malaria. – Myint Kay Thi

State insurer pays out over Russian trawler sinking

The families of 12 of the Myanmar seamen who died in the sinking of the Russian trawler Dalniy Vostok in the freezing Okhotsk Sea last month will receive compensation today. State-run Myanma Insurance says it will pay out

a total of K5 million to each family at its offices. There were 42 Myanmar seamen aboard the vessel when it sank on April 2, of whom 22 were saved. Rescuers recovered 16 bodies, and four were never found.

U Aye Min Thein, managing direc-

tor of Myanma Insurance, said that it would not pay out for all the deaths. “Though 16 Myanmar seamen died in the sinking, we will give compensa- tion only for 12 seamen because four of the known deceased were not insured,” he said, adding that families received K5 million each. Two of the four missing were also insured, but families would have to wait two years for the payout, he said. “We have had experience of people

returning alive after four or five years, after the insurance money has already been spent. We took no action, but in this case, we will have to wait two years.” – Shwegu Thitsar, translation by Thiri Min Htun

Chin parties to draw electoral plan

Ethnic Chin parties have agreed to work together to give both the ruling Union Solidarity and Development Party and the opposition National League for Democracy a run for their money in Chin State. Following a two- day meeting in Yangon, eight Chin par- ties agreed on steps toward electoral cooperation that should improve their

chances of victory in November. At the meeting in Yangon on May 16, 48 representatives of the eight parties agreed to form a strategy committee. The two-day meeting was agreed by the parties at their first meeting last March. At their next scheduled meet- ing, in July, the newly formed commit- tee will report on progress and discuss further details of the strategy. “Working together will help our par- ties’ policies reach local voters,” said U Ngai Serk, head of the Chin League for Democracy. The Chin parties are also urging the government and ethnic armed groups to sign the nationwide ceasefire agree- ment not later than June, and to start political dialogue before the election. However, the Chin parties do not want the election postponed to accom- modate the political dialogue.

– Lun Min Mang

www.mmtimes.com

News 7

www.mmtimes.com News 7 Views Ethnic politics from the capital NICHOLAS FARRELLY nicholas.farrelly@glenlochadvisory.com

Views

www.mmtimes.com News 7 Views Ethnic politics from the capital NICHOLAS FARRELLY nicholas.farrelly@glenlochadvisory.com

Ethnic politics from the capital

News 7 Views Ethnic politics from the capital NICHOLAS FARRELLY nicholas.farrelly@glenlochadvisory.com W

NICHOLAS

FARRELLY

nicholas.farrelly@glenlochadvisory.com

W HEN you have 135 offi- cial ethnic, or “nation- al race”, categories, it’s hardly surprising that ethnic politics take up

a great deal of space. Consider what happens in grandiose Nay Pyi Taw. On the northern outskirts of the city the National Landmark Garden

is a distillation of all that is good and

glorious. It is a mini-version of Myan- mar, with selected sights and specta- cles packed into the sprawling site. On foot or in a motorised buggy, it is possible to venture from Tanintharyi to Putao, and almost everywhere in between. The presentation of Myanmar so- ciety is predictable enough. There are stupas and mountains, palaces and forts. And across the length and breadth there are hints of ethnic flavor and diversity. Energetic tourists can even dress in their favourite minority costumes for photo-shoots. While that might seem patronising in the eyes of outsiders, it has clear appeal in a place where ethnic uniforms are standard. On the other side of town, the hluttaw, or parliamentary, compound showcases another side of ethnic di- versity. The ceremonial foyer of the upper house (Amyotha Hluttaw), which is where “national” (Amyotha) rather than “people’s” (Pyithu) rep- resentatives take their seats, has a display of mannequins to showcase Myanmar’s ethnic dimensions. The life-sized dolls are neatly adorned with all the recognisable outfits. When flesh-and-blood representa- tives of minority groups attend the hluttaw, they always wear their dis- tinctive clothes. Instead of boring business suits, the average ethnic MP takes the floor of parliament each day wearing eye-catching fabric and a dis- tinctive headdress. They are marked out from the crowd of USDP members, who make for a much less colourful scrum. For ethnic politicians the distinction of their clothes says a lot about the country’s history. The basic point is that since inde- pendence in 1948 most of Myanmar’s minorities have spent at least some period in open warfare with the cen- tral government. They have fought for the chance to represent their own interests, even to run their own shows. For some groups, particularly among the Kayin, Shan and Kachin, that conflict has almost never ended.

Shan and Kachin, that conflict has almost never ended. J Yaw Wu, an ethnic Lisu representative

J Yaw Wu, an ethnic Lisu representative from Kachin State in Myanmar’s Amyotha Hluttaw, or upper house, puts on his parliamentary outfit. Photo: Christopher Davy

When ceasefires are agreed they tend to signal merely a pause in hostilities. There is no escaping the fact that ethnic politics in Myanmar are the hardest politics. The government of President U Thein Sein has, un- surprisingly, found it difficult to get new policies in place. Achieving sus- tainable accommodations that mean minority rebels are content to live

Ethnic leaders know the great personal and social cost of conflict, but also appreciate that many of their people still yearn for greater independence.

many of their people still yearn for greater independence. peacefully in Myanmar has remained the over-riding

peacefully in Myanmar has remained the over-riding challenge. In the ranks of the Tatmadaw there is also wariness. The army has long fought against internal opponents and still accuses some of seeking to destroy the sacred unity of the coun- try. The fighting these recent months in Kokang reinforces a siege mental- ity. That Facebook is now awash with supportive messages for the army’s Northeastern Command is another sign of the times. Such messages suggest that the Tatmadaw has become savvy to the value of visible popular support. While few visitors to Nay Pyi Taw ever make it out to the Defence Services Museum, which happens to be next door to the National Landmark Gar- den, there is a growing pride in some quarters of Myanmar society that the army keeps national disintegration at bay. Of course, ethnic leaders, includ- ing some who take their seats in the Hluttaw, heavily contest such a view. They know the great personal and

social cost of conflict, but also appre- ciate that many of their people still yearn for greater independence, even if they remain in a federal union. What this means is that today’s ethnic politics point to problems not just for the current government, but also for any that follow. It was Gen- eral Aung San who recognised the need for including minorities in the formation of the independent nation. It is his successors who now have the responsibility for making it work. For now, far from the pomp and ceremony of Nay Pyi Taw, one of the first areas requiring attention is the demilitarisation in ethnic areas. In places where ethnic minorities live in large numbers, the forward deploy- ments of the Tatmadaw are an obvi- ous grievance. Even when troops are well behaved and effectively disciplined, which isn’t always the case, they remain a con- cern. Nobody really likes living down the street, or over the ridge, from heavily armed men whose primary purpose is to stamp out dissent.

There is, all the same, a need to get the balance right between major- ity interests and the stakes claimed by minorities. This is sometimes framed as an economic question, but of course it has other dimensions too. There are issues of language use, access to education and the mainte- nance of human rights. Given the history of political vio- lence in Myanmar, and the prospect of its continuation, the story of mi- norities will also need to be told in new ways. For this mission, sites like the National Landmark Garden will prove increasingly important. If Myanmar’s fragile peace agreements are ever to become permanent then all the country’s people will need to know more about this history, warts and all.

Nicholas Farrelly is director of the Australian National University’s Myanmar Research Centre. He is also the co- convenor of the ANU Myanmar Update Conference to be held in Canberra on June 5 to 6.

EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

International loans demand sound state management

ONE of the most visible and tangible outcomes of the reforms launched by Myanmar’s quasi-civilian govern- ment is the re-engagement of multi- lateral lenders, including the Asian Development Bank. Myanmar joined the ADB in 1973 as a member and the Manila-based development institution started operations here shortly after. How- ever, Myanmar stopped repaying its loans in 1987, a year before the mili- tary crackdown on the pro-democ- racy movement. Over the years the

interest accrued on the loans, but Myanmar refused or was unable to clear its debts. Engagement between the government and ADB was mini- mal. But U Thein Sein’s government realised that it needed support from multilateral lenders to achieve its economic ambitions. It sought to re- pay its old debts to access new loans. As a result, the ADB in 2012 an- nounced plans for US$1.8 billion in loans, grants and aid to 2016. Some of this funding has already arrived

and is being spent on the ground. The influx of loans and grants from international financial insti- tutions like the ADB and the World Bank, along with inflows of foreign direct investment, are important in- dications of the international com- munity’s confidence in the democratic reforms taking place inside Myanmar. In this particular case of ADB’s commitment, the plan is to promote reforms in state-owned enterprises, to support public-private partner- ships, to develop the financial sectors,

and to strengthen the legal and regu- latory business environment. The plan also focuses to some extent on rural development. All of this assistance is needed. The problem is when one considers who will manage and implement the projects. The ADB itself may have a few experts in Nay Pyi Taw and Yan- gon overseeing the implementation of projects, but the task of mak- ing things happen – in a proper and transparent way – lies with the

Myanmar officials.

A loan is a loan. It has to be re-

paid. Sometimes the interest rate may be as low – less than 1 percent,

if it’s on concessionary terms – but the burden of paying back the loan and any interest lies squarely on the people of Myanmar.

It is only natural that the public

demands for transparency and ef- ficient management of such loans. The ball is now in the government’s

court to prove they are up to the task.

8

THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015

Business

Coal provokes debate AUNG SHIN koshumgtha@gmail.com THE concerns of civil society must be taken into
Coal provokes debate
AUNG SHIN
koshumgtha@gmail.com
THE concerns of civil society must
be taken into account and strong
technology must be used if the nega-
tive effects of coal-fired power gener-
ation are to be minimised, according
to experts.
The future use of coal power has
been opposed by some local residents
and civil society groups, who are con-
cerned about possible environmental
and social affects. Earlier this month,
senior officials from the Ministry of
Electric Power told The Myanmar
Times they plan to move forward on
several coal-fired projects, claiming
they are necessary to improve the poor
domestic electrification rates.
Local and international experts are
split on the issue, with some claiming
coal is exceptionally environmentally
unfriendly and should be stopped, and
others saying it is necessary to move
forward with the dozen or so projects
for which Myanmar has signed memo-
randums of understanding since 2010.
Speaking at a Yangon summit host-
ed by The Economist on May 15, Asian
Development Bank vice president
Stephen Groff said there is a place for
coal generation in Asia’s future energy
supply.
“There are good and bad technolo-
gies when it comes to coal, but there
are energy poverties that need to be
addressed, so using some coal is una-
voidable,” he said.
“We need to make sure the latest
technology is available in order to
minimise [any] negative impact.”
Not everyone said they agreed with
Mr Groff’s assessment. U Win Myo
Thu, co-founder and managing direc-
tor of Ecodev, said at the summit that
there are a range of groups in opposi-
tion to the fuel.
“Today, coal power is a great con-
cern internationally as the world is
looking at to reduce carbon emis-
sions [which cause] climate change,”
he said.
“I think international institutions
advising the government such ADB
should help deliver this concern.”
Mr Groff said the ADB is focusing
on improving the transmission and
distribution system, as power loss is
as high as 25 percent. The institution
has worked on two transmission pro-
jects in Myanmar as well as an off-grid
renewable plan with the Ministry of
Electric Power, he said.
“There is always set to be a balance
between energy poverty and potential
negative impacts. We need to make
sure we take these concerns into ac-
count when designing projects to min-
imise negative impacts,” he said.
Ken Tun, chief executive officer of
local firm Parami Energy, said that
many of these infrastructure projects
also do not allow a large portion for a
local owner. Myanmar firms may own
less than 5pc of the total new invest-
ment in the local energy sector.
“Whatever projects are implement-
ed, the question is what is the net ben-
efit for Myanmar,” he said.
IN PICTURES
Speakers converse on stage at The Economist’s Myanmar
Summit 2015 on May 15: from left to right, Information
Minister U Ye Htut, moderator Richard Cockett, presidential
economic adviser U Aung Tun Thet, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s
senior legal adviser Robert San Pe, and First Private Bank
chair U Sein Maung. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing
Myanmar Tower Co in
talks for firm’s sale
German chamber
comes to town
JEREMY MULLINS
jeremymullins7@gmail.com
THE German Myanmar Business
Chamber launched last week, be-
CLARE
HAMMOND
conducting business from regional or
international offices, as well as local
companies doing business with Ger-
man counterparts.
German Myanmar Business Cham-
ber president Jens Knoke, who is also
the general manager of Henkel My-
anmar, said Germany has a strong
manufacturing and industrial base to
clarehammo@gmail.com
Serge Pun.
After Ooredoo and Telenor won
the licences, Digicel and YSH re-
structured Digicel Asian Holdings
and formed a subsidiary called
Myanmar Tower Company, which
signed an agreement in 2013 with
Ooredoo to develop, construct and
lease 1250 telecommunications
towers. Unlike other towers com-
panies such as Irrawaddy Green
Towers, MTC did not provide pow-
er to Ooredoo.
separate European Chamber was
TOWERS
tricky approvals process and im-
pact from the rainy season slowed
down the construction. Besides
MTC, Ooredoo had an agreement
with Pan Asia Towers to build its
sites.
Myanmar’s land-use law has
posed challenges for the compa-
nies building telecoms towers. For
example, the law specifies more
than 10 types of land and also of-
ten requires that projects receive
approval from more than one min-
istry or department.
In December last year, the
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
approved a loan of up to $100 mil-
lion to Yoma Strategic to “improve
infrastructure connectivity”. It was
not clear how much of this loan
would have been used to build tel-
ecommunication towers.
Digicel Group Limited is an in-
ternational telecommunications
provider with operations in 31
markets in the Caribbean, Cen-
tral America and Asia Pacific. It
is owned by Irish businessperson
Denis O’Brien, and has been in op-
eration for 13 years.
Mr O’Brien’s businesses also
own Myanmar electronic pay-
ments company Red Dot Network,
as well as a major shareholder of
MyJobs, one of Myanmar’s main
recruitment companies.
Earlier this month, Mr O’Brien
and his business partner Leslie
Buckley sold their China recruit-
ment business ChinaHR.com to
online classifieds company 58.com.
coming the first membership organ-
isation in the country specifically
for German businesses and their lo-
cal counterparts.
It joins the already-established
British and French chambers in
representing business from the 28
European Union member nations.
its
economy, meaning German compa-
MYANMAR Tower Company
(MTC), which is owned by Digi-
cal Asian Holdings, a joint ven-
ture between Digicel Group and
YSH Finance, has been put up for
sale, including all its contracts and
sites, according to several market
sources.
Several companies have made
an initial bid and are now carry-
ing out the due diligence process
on MTC, according to a source at
one of the companies, who did not
want to be named as the matter is
sensitive.
MTC and Yoma Strategic both
declined to comment.
Digicel Group first came to My-
anmar with a view to securing one
of two international telecommu-
nications licences tendered by the
government, which were eventu-
ally won by Norway’s Telenor and
Qatar’s Ooredoo.
Digicel Asian Holdings com-
prised Digicel Group, George So-
ros’s Quantum Strategic Partners
and YSH Finance, according to
company statements at the time.
YSH Finance comprises Yoma Stra-
tegic Holdings and First Myanmar
Investment Company, both chaired
by prominent local businessperson
nies are well-placed to locate in Myan-
mar and support domestic business
and suppliers through equipment and
A
also launched last year, and is being
set up by a consortium led by the
French chamber.
German Chamber executive di-
rector Monika Staerk said that while
German investment is relatively low
know-how.
Ms Staerk said she has fielded
number of enquiries from firms
looking to source from Myanmar.
“They say, ‘We know we need to
a
develop our suppliers. We are well
aware the industrial base is not yet
in
Myanmar, it has been expanding
1250
rapidly over the past few years.
“German companies are not the
first companies to invest, but I think
their investment is extremely valu-
able,” she said.
“Germans are renowned for their
patient capital. Once they invest,
they don’t expect a quick return.”
Germany is the fourth-largest
economy and third-largest exporter
that mature to supply European
markets. We have been there before.
20 years back we did the same thing
in
China.’”
Number of sites Myanmar Tower
Company agreed to construct for
Ooredoo in 2013
The European Union is also ne-
gotiating an investment protection
agreement with Myanmar.
Laura Ahrens, head of the eco-
nomic and commercial section at the
German embassy, said that the next
round of negotiations are set for My-
in the world. Largely manufactur-
er-driven, its exports to Myanmar
reached 130 million euros (US$148
anmar in about a week.
The EU will negotiate on behalf
of
the 28 member countries. A deal
In May 2014, Yoma increased
its stake in MTC from 8 percent to
million) in 2014. Its imports from My-
anmar were largely textiles last year,
and amounted to US$100 million.
The German Myanmar Business
Chamber launched on May 14. There
are currently about 40 registered
German companies in Myanmar, of
which 30 have joined the chamber
and more expect to join shortly. It
would provide a certain amount of
25pc.
Ooredoo launched its services
in August 2014 in Yangon, Manda-
lay, Nay Pyi Taw and surrounding
area. Senior company officials said
at the time that they wish they had
more towers to provide coverage
particularly in Yangon, though a
legal protection for the two bodies’
bilateral investments.
“I think it’s a very important pro-
cess, it cannot be underestimated,”
said Ms Ahrens. “Germany has in-
vestment protection agreements
with nearly every country in the
world except Myanmar and a couple
is
also open to German companies
of
others.”

BUSINESS EDITOR: Jeremy Mullins | jeremymullins7@gmail.com

9

Obama renews authority to maintain remaining US sanctions

BUSINESS 10

ADB signs agreement to assist private projects

AYE THIDAR KYAW ayethidarkyaw@gmail.com

THE Asian Development Bank has signed an agreement with the gov- ernment that will allow the bank to provide loans, investment, guar- antees and trade finance directly to private firms and projects. The bank aims to support Myan- mar projects in areas such as con- nectivity, electricity distribution and trade finance, according to officials at a May 15 ceremony held at Yan- gon’s Sule Shangri-La. “The ADB can provide financial or technical assistance to connectiv- ity or energy projects in the private sector, from now on,” said deputy finance minister Dr Maung Maung Thein. He added that international in- stitutions need the guarantees the agreement provides to begin lending

to the domestic private sector. ADB vice president Stephen Groff

said at the ceremony that there are

a number of areas requiring invest-

ment in the country. “The role of private sector invest- ment in meeting infrastructure fi-

nancing requirements and providing

important expertise and technology

is critical,” he said.

The ADB said it expects to ap- prove up to US$1 billion in non- soverign investment until 2016, in a number of areas including logistics, power, telecoms, urban development and the financial sector. It has already disbursed some funds for domestic private-sector development such as providing $100 million in loans for infrastruc- ture to Yoma Strategic Holdings in December last year. Yoma is a Singapore-listed, Myanmar-focused company.

year. Yoma is a Singapore-listed, Myanmar-focused company. Deputy finance minister Dr Maung Maung Thein (left) speaks,

Deputy finance minister Dr Maung Maung Thein (left) speaks, while ADB vice president Stephen Groff looks on. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

IN BRIEF

Korea week to boost trade links

South Korea will hold a series of events from May 21 to 26 to promote trade and investment with Myanmar. Korea Trade-Investment Promo- tion Agency managing director Ahn Jae-yong said some Korean compa- nies may be hesitating, waiting to see the local political situation unfold, but many are convinced it is the right time to invest in Myanmar. The week aims to mark the 40 th anniversary of Korea-Myanmar diplomatic relations. Trade has grown significantly between the two coun- tries, reaching US$10 million in 1975 and growing to $1.38 billion last year. The trade balance currently favours Korea, with Myanmar’s imports at about $800 million and exports to Korea at about $500 million. Ahn Jae-yong said garments are likely the main source for Korean investment in Myanmar. – Su Phyo Win

SEAOP hands out phones

South East Asia Oil Pipeline (SEAOP) aimed to better relations with the residents of Made Island by handing out mobile phones. The island is the landing point for the SEAOP pipeline, which stretches across Myanmar to southern China.

A soft opening for the pipeline was

held in January, with both China and Myanmar investing in the US$2.45 billion, 771-kilometre (481-mile) pipeline. It offers the ability for Middle East-produced oil to be shipped across Myanmar by pipeline rather than reaching China through the crowded Malacca Strait near Singapore. The company has installed a telecommu- nications tower and handed out about 350 phones and SIM cards, according to a press release. – Aung Shin

Food and hotel exhibition coming

The second Food and Hotel Myanmar

2015 exhibition will take place from June 3 to 5 at Yangon’s Myanmar Event Park, according to officials.

U Yan Win, chair of the Myanmar

Tourism Federation, said technology

and know-how from international food and hotel companies will be on display, which could assist with developing the domestic tourism standard. Organised by Bangkok Exhibition Services, the show aims to include 250 exhibitors from 20 countries. “Myanmar people can learn about

food supplies and technology

without

travelling to foreign countries,” said Daw Win Win Kyi, chair of Food Science and Technology Association. – Ei Ei Thu

India’s Modi signs $22 billion in deals with China

BUSINESS 13

Exchange Rates (May 17 close)

Currency

Buying

Selling

Euro

K1233

K1245

Malaysia Ringitt

K302

K315

Singapore Dollar

K809

K822

Thai Baht

K33

K35

US Dollar

K1087

K1090

Thai Baht K33 K35 US Dollar K1087 K1090 A man walks through Pazundaung station yesterday. Photo:

A man walks through Pazundaung station yesterday. Photo: Aung Khant

First rail station to be redeveloped this year

Aung Khant First rail station to be redeveloped this year AYE NYEIN WIN ayenyeinwin.mcm@gmail.com THE tender

AYE

NYEIN

WIN

ayenyeinwin.mcm@gmail.com

THE tender for the redevelopment of Pazundaung railway station in Yangon will close this coming July, according to general manager U Htun Aung Thin from Myanma Railways, of the Ministry of Rail Transportation. The station will be the first of many to be upgraded as part of a large-scale plan to modernise Yan- gon’s circular railway, which could cost up to US$2 billion for the track alone. The Pazundaung railway station is located on a 2-acre site on upper Pazundaung Road, in the eastern district of Yangon region.

The site is divided into two yards. In yard 1 is a commodities ware- house, which was built before the Second World War. This will not be demolished, but will be used as an office, or turned into a museum. Railway staff currently occupy yard 2. There are also 34 shops on the site, but their leases expired in May 2014, and will not be renewed. In their place, the tender win- ner will be licenced to build car parks, offices and other multi-sto- rey buildings. The open tender to redevelop the site was called on April 27 and will close on July 27. ‘’We called a direct tender for this development project, and 10 companies have bought the form so far. We will favour local companies and we will start the pro- ject within this year,” said U Htun Aung Thin. The developer must build a rail- way station and office tower including

car parking space in yard 1, as well as multi-storey buildings to resettle the railway staff. “For this, we will use a 50-year Build, Operate and Transfer [BOT] contract, with two options to extend it by 10 years to a total of 70 years. It will be open to local citizens and for- eign companies, under the foreign investment law,” said U Htun Thin. The first phase of the Yangon circular railway line upgrade will cover half of the track, from Dayin Gone station in northwest Yangon, through southern Yangon, to Pa- zundaung station in the southeast. The project is overseen by the Ministry of Rail Transportation and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), which has already agreed to partly fund the project. Yangon’s circular railway is 46 kilometres long and connects 39 sta- tions. The train takes three hours to finish a complete circuit.

Value Chains for Rural Development Call for Applications: Innovative Grants Fund The Value Chains for
Value Chains for Rural Development
Call for Applications: Innovative Grants Fund
The Value Chains for Rural Development Project invites qualified producer groups, for profit businesses, non-governmental
organizations, community based organizations, and non-profits to propose initiatives under one or more of the Project’s
broad objectives:
1) to improve agricultural productivity of smallholder producers;
2) to strengthen value chains;
3) to enhance private sector engagement
Grants will fund initiatives that support value chains found within Southern Shan and the Dry Zone. This competition
is open for one year (May 18, 2015 – May 17, 2016) for grants up to 300,000,000 Myanmar kyat (approximately
$300,000) to be implemented over a 6-18 month period. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis. The deadline for
applications to be considered under the first review round is June 30, 2015. Grants are available in the following award
amounts:
Small Grants:
Medium Grants:
Large Grants:
Up to 50,000,000 MMK
50,000,000 MMK – 150,000,000 MMK
150,000,000 MMK – 300,000,000 MMK
Solicitation workshops will be held on the following dates/venues:
• May 20, 2015 at 10:00 – 12:00 Yangon at Sedona Hotel
• May 22, 2015 at 10:00 – 12:00 Taunggyi at Winrock International’s Taunggyi Office
Held in the Myanmar language, the workshops will provide an opportunity for potential applicants to ask questions and
better understand the application process and grant parameters. Interested applicants are encouraged to confirm their
attendance via email to VCRD.Myanmar@winrock.org prior to each workshop.
The full Annual Program Statement and application materials can be downloaded on Winrock’s website at:
http://www.winrock.org/news.

10

Business

THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015

Obama renews authority to maintain sanctions

CLARE HAMMOND clarehammo@gmail.com

US President Barack Obama has renewed his authority to maintain sanctions on Myanmar for another year, as international alarm increases over the Rohingya-Bengali migrant crisis, according to US media. Media reported that the White House notified Congress of the re- newal on May 15 – five days before the existing authority was due to finish. Reportedly, the decision was made as concerns remain over con- flict and humans rights abuses, par- ticularly in ethnic minority areas and Rakhine State. When Mr Obama extended sanc- tions against Myanmar through the National Emergencies Act last year, he cited ongoing conflict and human rights abuses in ethnic areas, as well as the continued role of the military in the country’s political and economic activities, as reasons for the decision. His decision to renew sanctions comes at a time when rights group estimate some 8000 impoverished Ro- hingya – generally called Bengalis in Myanmar – and also people from Bang- ladesh, are adrift at sea, abandoned by those who smuggled them through

international waters – and abandoned by the neighbouring nations that insist Myanmar bears responsibility for a problem it has long described as a do- mestic issue. While many of those so far res- cued say they are from Myanmar, Nay Pyi Taw denies it bears any respon-

‘We continue to stress that we see a need for Burma to fulfill its previous commitments.’

Jeff Rathke US State Department spokesperson

Jeff Rathke US State Department spokesperson sibility. President’s Office director U Zaw Htay

sibility. President’s Office director U Zaw Htay previously said those who arrived in Indonesia and Malaysia “might not be from Myanmar”. The US remains deeply concerned about the urgent situation faced by the migrants, and has discussed the possibility of Thailand providing

temporary shelter for them with the Thai secretary of state, said press of- ficer at the US Department of State Jeff Rathke during his daily press briefing on May 15. “We continue to stress that we see a need for Burma to fulfill its previous commitments to improve the living conditions of everybody affected in Rakhine State, and we press the Burmese government as well to address migrant smuggling and human trafficking of Rohingya, and we think that’s extremely im- portant,” he said. The US government plans to send a senior delegation to the regional con- ference hosted by Thailand in Bang- kok on May 29, which will focus on illegal migration in the region, he said. It is unclear whether representa- tives from Nay Pyi Taw will also attend. In 2012, Mr Obama’s government began to ease long-standing sanc- tions on business with Myanmar. Last month, U Win Aung and his two companies, Dagon International Ltd and Dagon Timber Ltd, became the first to be taken off the Specially Designated Nationals list, prompt- ing speculation that other blacklist- ed individuals and companies would also be removed.

ed individuals and companies would also be removed. US President Barack Obama speaks in Yangon last

US President Barack Obama speaks in Yangon last year. Photo: Kaung Htet

SHENZEN

The little village that could: Shenzhen set to surpass nearby Hong Kong

WHATEVER happened to Shenzhen? Remember the place that spawned China’s meteoric rise in manufactur- ing? The little fishing village opposite Hong Kong on the Pearl River delta that became a sprawl of factories and pollution and 10 million migrants from all over the nation? Well, the city has reinvented itself once more, with an economy set to overtake Hong Kong’s this year. The sheds full of workers banging out the world’s toys and clothes are mostly gone. The board-stuffing elec- tronics lines filled with migrant work- ers are headed the same way. In their place are bankers, tech entrepreneurs, researchers and hipsters. Shenzhen reported a 7.8 percent rise in gross domestic product in the first quarter, topping the biggest Chinese cities. Gone is the model of cheap labour and foreign investment pioneered by Deng Xiaoping; it’s now driven by a force current Premier Li Keqiang wants replicated across Chi- na: innovation. “It’s a true paradise if you want to create your own business,” said James Wang, a 39-year-old internet entrepreneur based in Kexing Sci- ence Park, where the canteen can serve 12,000 diners. “Shenzhen is no longer a fishing village or a sweat- shop. There are thousands of firms like mine in this park.” Mr Deng made Shenzhen a test ground for a market-based economy in 1980, and it succeeded beyond all expectations. In the Nanshan dis- trict, the technology heartland of the city, the per-capita GDP last year was 308,700 yuan (US$49,730), higher than Japan’s, Germany’s and Hong Kong’s. The city is home to many of China’s most successful companies, including telecom giant Huawei Tech- nologies, web portal Tencent Holdings and Ping An Insurance (Group) Co. “In China, while places like the rust- belt in the northeast or the coal-mine area of Shanxi are falling into econom- ic stagnation, Shenzhen is offering new hope,” said Shen Jianguang, chief Asia economist at Mizuho Securities Asia in Hong Kong. “Shenzhen’s growth is

Securities Asia in Hong Kong. “Shenzhen’s growth is People sit on a bench at night in

People sit on a bench at night in the Luohu district of Shenzhen, China. Photo: Bloomberg

relying on innovation, technology and the efficient use of capital.” The switch to innovation and fi- nance helped almost double the size of the city’s economy to 1.6 trillion yuan in the five years to 2014. At that rate it would this year eclipse Hong Kong, whose economy is growing more slowly. Behind that recent growth are com- panies like SZ DJI Technology, maker

‘[Shenzen] is a true paradise if you want to create your own business.’

James Wang

Tech entrepreneur

to create your own business.’ James Wang Tech entrepreneur of the top-selling Phantom drones, and OnePlus,

of the top-selling Phantom drones, and OnePlus, whose smartphones are taking on Samsung Electronics and Apple under co-founder Carl Pei, who is in his mid-20s. “You want to do something or get something, you can get it here,” said Hellen Tse, director of venture capi- talist Oneworld Investment, while sipping tea in her 30 th -floor office, surrounded by books and statues of the Buddha. Outside her window, construction crews are finishing the 600-metre (1968 foot) Ping An Finan- cial Center, one of about a dozen sky- scrapers over 200m. The breakneck speed of Shenz- hen’s rise has come with the usual corruption and pollution that per- meated China’s boom years. Jiang Zunyu, a former district party chief, is suspected of taking more than 250 million yuan in bribes in an official probe that caused the country’s first

developer bond default by Shenzhen’s Kaisa Group Holdings. While the air quality is better than other major Chinese cities, the rivers are still tainted by the city’s industries, despite billions of dollars spent trying to clean up the province’s waterways. Two of the most polluted rivers in Guangdong in the first quarter flowed through Shenzhen, according to the lo- cal environmental protection agency. Even so, Shenzhen is doing bet- ter than most places in the country, which had the slowest expansion last year since 1990, as the central government grapples to stamp out corruption and inefficiency in domi- nant state-run companies. Profits at China’s state-owned enterprises fell by 8 percent in the first quarter from the same period a year earlier. “State companies value seniority and formality, but the Shenzhen gene is different,” said Shorn He, 36, who

moved to the city four years ago after working for a decade in a Beijing-based state company. He rented a small fac- tory near the airport to process after- market smartphone screens. “Shenz- hen has everything I need – the clients, the materials, the trained workers and the knowledge.” It’s a combination that made drone- maker DJI the darling of investors. In less than a decade, it has gone from start-up to a valuation estimated in the billions of US dollars. “It’s the first time for a Chinese company to create a new global market,” said spokesperson Michael Perry, from Texas, who estimates the company sells more than half the world’s private drones. When Mr Perry joined a year and a half ago, the company occupied three floors. Now it has 11. Downtown, on a scrolling tick- er board in front of the dark-grey Shenzhen Stock Exchange, an abun- dance of the lucky colour red shows China’s equities market is having another bullish day. The bourse’s benchmark index has more than doubled in 12 months. In the new financial free-trade zone of Qianhai to the west of the city, com- panies have special dispensation to borrow yuan from Hong Kong at lower rates than mainland banks offer. Each working day, 100 new companies regis- ter in the zone, according to an official report. One was WeBank, China’s first private- funded Internet-based bank, where Premier Li hit the button to make the first loan in January. One thing that hasn’t changed in Shenzhen is a feeling that this city is special in China – that here, things are done differently. “The biggest advantage of Shenz- hen used to be policies: You could get things done in Shenzhen that were impossible in other parts of China,” said Ye Qing, chair of the Shenzhen Institute of Building Research, which designs eco-friendly buildings. “That advantage has gone completely. The new advantage for Shenzhen is its people, the young and ambitious peo- ple who love the city.” – Bloomberg

www.mmtimes.com

International Business 11

New York

US pushes pedal on ‘talking cars’

ENGINEERS have known for some time that if cars could only “talk” to each other, they could avoid a lot of accidents. Vehicles could be driven more safely with information about an- other car, obstacle or pedestrian around a blind curve, for example. But the hurdles to implement- ing these systems are numerous:

They require a legal framework and the allocation of wireless spectrum to enable vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications. The US administration an- nounced this month it was speed- ing up efforts to promote V2V in a push for better road safety and to help facilitate the self-driving cars which are on the horizon. Transportation Secretary An- thony Foxx said during a visit to Silicon Valley that he hopes to have regulations for these technologies by the end of the year. “We’re accelerating our timeta- ble on a proposed rule that would require vehicle-to-vehicle, or V2V, technology that allows cars to ‘talk’ to one another,” Mr Foxx said. “And it is something that we believe can have a huge impact on preventing accidents from ever happening, and in helping us even- tually produce a car that can drive itself better than a human can.”

‘What happens when someone

hacks the system

and

shuts down traffic in an entire city?’

effectively

randal o’Toole Senior fellow, the Cato Institute

randal o’Toole Senior fellow, the Cato Institute The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which has been testing V2V since 2012, said the technology can accomplish a number of things such as determin- ing if a car can safely make a left turn across traffic by calculating the speed of oncoming vehicles, wheth- er it is feasible to overtake another car and if it is safe to enter an inter- section with limited visibility. Researchers say systems which cost around US$350 per car can avoid 592,000 accidents and save 1083 lives per year, if the fleet of US cars is equipped with the technology. Aside from the technical issues, vehicle-to-vehicle communications could be held back by debate over issues of legal liability if something goes wrong and by privacy ques- tions about the creation of a new database. Randal O’Toole, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, said it would appear to be positive if a broken-down vehicle sends out a signal that allows mo- torists to take a different route to avoid congestion. “That sounds good, but what happens when someone hacks the system and puts out radio signals in a thousand critical urban inter- sections that effectively shut down traffic in an entire city?” Mr O’Toole said in a blog post. – AFP

Liberia

Buried alive: Young Liberians risk all in deadly mines

PETER Kollie was digging for gold in the forests of southeastern Li- beria when the deep shaft he had carved out of the earth collapsed, turning into a dark, airless tomb. But that was a risk the 20-year- old, like thousands of desperate and impoverished young men working the illegal gold-mining camps of the border region by Ivory Coast, had been prepared to take. “In such cases there is nothing we can do. We leave the body there and abandon the area for a while,” Lomax Saydee, a fellow miner and youth welfare volunteer, told AFP a few days after Mr Kollie’s death. “After a certain period of time we go back and re-open the place and generally in that case you dis- cover a huge quantity of gold in the area where the person died underground. “So it is like you are digging your own grave sometimes, because if it closes on you no one can help you.” Mr Kollie had been working in the Dark Forest, in the heart of Grand Gedeh County, where Libe- ria’s unofficial alluvial gold sector

is a booming but poorly regulated business. Boys aged from seven or eight toil alongside men in their 30s in expansive open pits, digging into narrow shafts which drop as far as 100 metres (330 feet) to gold seams from where ore is lifted to the sur- face in baskets on ropes. “Fatalities from tunnel collapses are not uncommon,” said a 2012 re- port by the United Nations Panel of Experts on Liberia. The miners, mostly Liberians but also former fighters fleeing political violence in Ivory Coast, live under vast encampments of tarpaulin, cooking bush meat on open fires. The more remote camps lack ba- sic services and are overcrowded, putting their inhabitants at risk of waterborne infections. Drug abuse is “widespread”, ac- cording to the UN panel, which has voiced concern about the “potential threat to border security that these itinerant and disaffected young men pose”. The government says it ap- praised 416.5 kilograms of gold val-

ued at US$16.5 million for export in the first nine months of 2013, although industry sources estimate the real annual production is likely to be closer to 3,000kg. The government sees little of those revenues, about $500,000 in 2013, but it is the miners who really lose out, sometimes making a few dollars in a day and often nothing at all. Meanwhile, legitimate brokers complain the market has become

‘It is like you are digging your own grave sometimes, because if it closes on you no one can help you.’

Lomax Saydee

Miner

it closes on you no one can help you.’ Lomax Saydee Miner increasingly dominated by illegal

increasingly dominated by illegal traders and their agents from Mau- ritania, Senegal, The Gambia and Mali. From the Dark Forest the gold is smuggled by ethnic Mandingo and Fulani traders to Monrovia or into Guinea and Ivory Coast, where it is smelted into bullion and then trafficked on to the United Arab Emirates. Jasper Tomapu, 12, sweats pro- fusely as he struggles with a spade which looks much too big for him in a township of some 3000 min- ers called Benin, in the heart of the forest. “I want to go to school but I have no one to pay the fees. My parents are jobless. Since I was born I have not seen a classroom,” he says. Moses Kerkula, who tells AFP he is just eight, says he needs gold “so I can buy some clothes”, adding that there is no school in Benin. Officials from Liberia and the UN agreed in 2012 to suspend all alluvial gold mining in the border regions, but the decision has never been implemented. – AFP

in 2012 to suspend all alluvial gold mining in the border regions, but the decision has

TRADE MARK CAUTION

NOTICE is hereby given that Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals

a company organized under the laws of Ireland and having its

principal office at Operations Support Group, Ringaskiddy, County

Cork, Ireland (formerly located at Pottery Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co., Dublin, Ireland) is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademark:-

LIPITOR

(Reg: Nos. IV/3884/2001 & IV/1232/2007)

in respect of: - “Pharmaceutical preparations for use in the

treatment of cardiovascular disorders and cholesterol reduction”

– Int’l Class: 5

Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law.

U Kyi Win Associates

for Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals

P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 18 th May, 2015

TRADEMARK CAUTION

3M Company, a company incorporated and existing under the laws of Delaware, United States of America, and having its registered office at 3M Center, 2501 Hudson Road, St. Paul, Minnesota 55144, United States of America, hereby declares that the Company is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trademark.

FUTURO

Reg. Nos. IV/689/2015 (29 January 2015) The above trademark is used in respect of “Orthopedic articles:

orthopedic braces and supports; orthopedic elastic bandages and wraps; orthopedic cervical collar; orthopedic sling; hot packs; cold packs; therapeutic hosiery; compression hosiery; anti-embolism hosiery; therapeutic arch supports” in Class 10.

Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the above mark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law.

Daw Thit Thit Kyaw, (H.G.P.) For 3M Company, c/o BM Myanmar Legal Services Limited (Baker & McKenzie)

# 1206, 12th Floor, Sakura Tower,

339 Bogyoke Aung San Road, Kyauktada Township, Yangon, The Republic of the Union of Myanmar. Dated: 18 May 2015

TRADEMARK CAUTIONARY NOTICE Hood River Distillers Imports LLC, a company organized under the laws of
TRADEMARK CAUTIONARY NOTICE
Hood River Distillers Imports LLC, a company organized under
the laws of Oregon and having its principal office at 660 Riverside
Drive, Hood River, Oregon 97031, United States of America is the
owner and sole proprietor of the following Trademark :-
Myanmar Registration Number 4/13079/2013
LUCID
Myanmar Registration Number 4/13080/2013
Used in respect of : -
“Liquor, distilled spirits” in class 33.
Any unauthorized use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent
intentions of the above mark will be dealt with according to law.
Tin Ohnmar Tun, Tin Thiri Aung & The Law Chambers
Ph: 0973150632
Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm
(For. Domnern Somgiat & Boonma,
Attorneys at Law, Thailand)
Dated. 18 th May, 2015

12 International Business

THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

Tokyo

Japan banks raise shareholder returns after strong profits

MITSUBISHI UFJ Financial Group plans to buy back more shares and Mizuho Financial Group is raising its dividend as Japan’s largest banks in- crease shareholder returns after profit exceeded their expectations. Mitsubishi UFJ will spend 100 bil- lion yen (US$836 million) in its second buyback in the past year, the nation’s biggest bank said on May 15, after an- nual profit surpassed 1 trillion yen for the first time. Mizuho raised its full- year dividend by 1 yen to 7.5 yen and surprised analysts by forecasting net income will climb to 630 billion yen in the year ending March. Mitsubishi UFJ stands alone among Japan’s three so-called megabanks in buying back stock as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe urges companies to boost returns to shareholders. The Tokyo- based lenders face the dilemma of either sharing more earnings with in- vestors or putting the money into ex- panding abroad to counter shrinking loan profitability at home. “How the banks return profits to shareholders was a big theme for in- vestors during this earnings season,” said Naoki Fujiwara, Tokyo-based

chief fund manager at Shinkin Asset Management Co. “Banks answered those expectations to an extent, and that will be a catalyst for their share prices to rise as they’ve been low.” Net income at Mitsubishi UFJ rose 5 percent to a record 1.03 trillion yen for the year ended March, exceeding its target for 950 billion yen, helped by interest income on loans abroad. Profit will probably slip to 950 billion yen in the current year, the bank said. That’s lower than the 1.06 trillion yen average estimate of analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. Mitsubishi UFJ will continue to “enhance returns to shareholders, maintain an ample capital base and use capital to boost revenue”, presi- dent Nobuyuki Hirano, 63, said at a briefing in Tokyo on May 15. The com- pany also bought back shares for 100 billion yen late last year. At Mizuho, the country’s third-biggest bank by market value, net income declined 11 percent to 611.9 billion yen in the year ended March. That was still higher than the company’s forecast for 550 billion yen. This year’s 630 billion-yen profit goal exceeded analysts’ estimate

for 580 billion yen. The lenders, along with Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc, are count- ing on a domestic lending revival to offset shrinking interest margins. They are also expanding abroad, with Mizuho this year agreeing to buy North American loans from Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc for about $3.5 billion and hire people from the British bank to boost its client base. “It’s positive for Mizuho to send the message that it intends to raise dividends and return profit to share- holders, even if it’s inch by inch,” said Takaaki Nishino, an analyst at Morgan Stanley MUFG Securities Co in Tokyo. Mizuho will consider acquisitions abroad and may target banks, bro- kerages or asset managers, chief ex- ecutive officer Yasuhiro Sato, 63, told reporters. At home, loan demand is spreading from large manufacturers to smaller makers as the economy picks up and capital spending increas- es, he said. All three megabanks trade at less than their book value even after their shares gained this year, data compiled by Bloomberg shows. – Bloomberg

kuala lumpur

A man in Kuala Lumpur cooks chicken. Photo: AFP
A man in Kuala Lumpur
cooks chicken. Photo: AFP

Export decline slows Malaysia’s economy

MALAYSIA’S economic growth eased last quarter on weaker exports, a slow- down that could deepen after the start

of a new consumption tax in April.

Gross domestic product rose 5.6 percent in the three months through

March from a year earlier, after climb- ing a revised 5.7pc in the final quarter

of 2014, the central bank said in Kuala

Lumpur on May 15. Malaysia’s central bank has re- frained from joining global coun- terparts in easing monetary policy, saying interest rates are delivering support for growth while guarding against inflation risks. Economic ex- pansion may lose steam as an uneven global recovery hurts export demand and prompts consumers and compa- nies to hold back spending. “We see growth continue to slow down a bit moving into the second

quarter,” Edward Lee, regional head of research at Standard Chartered Plc in Singapore, said before the announce- ment. “After the initial pre-GST con- sumption spurt, we will possibly get

a bit of slowdown as well in private

consumption. We see the export sector remaining very weak.” The ringgit was Asia’s worst per-

former last quarter as a drop in crude prices hurt government finances and dented investor confidence. It has since swung to become the region’s second-best amid a rebound in oil.

The Malaysian economy is forecast to grow 4.5pc to 5.5pc this year, down from an earlier projection of as much as 6pc. The government trimmed ex- pectations as it cut expenditure amid lower expected revenue from oil. The central bank left its key rate unchanged for a fifth straight meet- ing this month, saying prospects are for the economy to remain on a steady growth path. Governor Zeti Akhtar Aziz signaled last month she sees no need for a rate cut in the near future, barring the threat of a “funda- mental” downturn. Prime Minister Najib Razak’s ef- forts to broaden the tax base through a 6pc goods and services tax has pushed up prices at supermarkets, restaurants

and retailers. While the experience in

other countries showed a moderation in consumer spending in the first year of such a tax, lower oil prices may be a buffer to an expected easing in con- sumption, Mr Zeti said in April. Exports fell 0.6pc in the first quarter from a year earlier, after in- creasing 1.9pc in the previous three months. Manufacturing growth quickened to 5.6pc, while private in- vestment rose 11.7pc. Private consumption expenditure climbed 8.8pc last quarter from a year ago, accelerating from 7.6pc in the previous period. Household consump- tion was “high” on food and beverag- es, transport and communication, the statistics department said in a state- ment on May 15. Malaysia’s current-account surplus widened to 10 billion ringgit ($2.87 billion) in the first quarter from a re- vised 5.7 billion ringgit surplus in the preceding three months. That com- pared with the median estimate of 6.1 billion ringgit in a Bloomberg survey of five analysts.

– Bloomberg

www.mmtimes.com

International Business 13

SHANGHAI

Raft of China deals inked by Modi

INDIAN Prime Minister Narendra Modi got down to business on the fi- nal day of his trip to China on May 16, saying his country was open for invest- ment as firms signed deals worth more than US$22 billion. “Let us work together in mutual in- terest and for progress and prosperity of our great countries,” Mr Modi told executives from 200 Chinese and In- dian companies at a business forum in the Chinese commercial hub Shang- hai. “Now India is ready for business.” The nationalist leader was on the final day of a three-day trip to his fel- low Asian giant, as the two jockey for regional influence and India’s trade deficit with China balloons. Despite his hardline reputation, Mr Modi has moved to engage with Beijing since his election last year, and he was looking for an economic boost from the visit, seeking to deliver on election promises for foreign investment. China is India’s biggest trading partner, with two-way commerce totalling $71 billion in 2014. But India’s trade deficit with China has soared from just $1 billion in 2001- 02 to more than $38 billion last year, Indian figures show. Indian embassy trade counsellor Namgya Khanpa said the 21 agree- ments signed at the Shanghai event were “worth over $22 billion”, with an- other five exchanged earlier. Many of the contracts were for Chinese banks to finance Indian firms, and also included deals in the telecom, steel, solar energy and film sectors, she said.

They included an agreement for the China Development Bank to fund a power plant for India’s Adani Power, as well as a steel project between Indian conglomerate Welspun and two Chi- nese firms, according to a list released by Indian officials. No individual deal values were given. Mr Modi welcomed potential Chinese investment in sectors in- cluding housing, renewable energy, high-speed rail, metro, ports and airports, adding that India was ea- ger to draw on China’s expertise in mass manufacturing. “We are very keen to develop the sectors where China is strong,” he told the business forum ahead of the signing ceremony. “We need your involvement.” “I strongly believe that this century belongs to Asia,” he said as he sought to stress historical links between the two countries. But they have followed significantly different economic paths in recent dec- ades, with China rising to become the world’s second-largest economy while India has lagged behind, although Mr Modi’s election raised hopes for reform among investors. Earlier during Mr Modi’s visit Chinese President Xi Jinping wel- comed him in Xian, the capital of his ancestral home province Shaanxi, in what his host said was an unprec- edented gesture. Nonetheless relations between the world’s two most populous nations are soured by a long-running border dis- pute that saw them fight a brief war in

1962, and on May 15, Mr Modi told Pre- mier Li Keqiang that China needs to “reconsider its approach” to their ties. “Our relationship has been com- plex in recent decades,” Mr Modi said in Beijing, adding there were issues that “trouble smooth develop- ment of our relations”. His comments stood out from the usual public declarations by diplomat- ic visitors to the Chinese capital, who normally stick to uninterrupted pledg- es of friendship and good relations. Both countries are members of the BRICS grouping of major emerging economies, but China has vowed to pour investment into India’s arch-rival Pakistan as it rolls out infrastructure development plans across Asia, much of which bypasses India. On May 16, Mr Modi also opened a centre for Indian and Gandhian stud- ies – referring to the former Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi – at prestig- ious Fudan University. Mr Modi, elected in a landslide vic- tory at polls a year ago, said on May 15 that democracy was an advantage for his country. But when a group of Indian students studying at Fudan chanted his name as he arrived, suspi- cious Chinese security guards moved toward them before being waved off. “We just wanted to greet him,” one of the students said. Mr Modi left China late on May 16 to arrive in Ulan Bator, where he will stay for one day as the first Indian prime minister ever to visit Mongolia, according to a tweet by the external af- fairs ministry. – AFP

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks last week. Photo: AFP
Indian Prime Minister
Narendra Modi speaks
last week. Photo: AFP
to a tweet by the external af- fairs ministry. – AFP Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi

14

THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015

15

World

WORLD EDITOR: Kayleigh Long

New volcano rises to the surface in Japan

WORLD 17

Long New volcano rises to the surface in Japan WORLD 17 Ireland to vote on gay

Ireland to vote on gay marriage

WORLD 16

CAIRO

Ex-president Morsi sentenced to death

AN Egyptian court on May 16 sentenced deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi and more than 100

other people to death for their role in

a mass jailbreak during the 2011 up-

rising. Hours after the ruling, gunmen shot dead two judges, a prosecutor and their driver in the strife-torn Si- nai Peninsula, in the first such attack on the judiciary in the region. Mr Morsi, sitting in a caged dock in the blue uniform of convicts after already been sentenced to 20 years for inciting violence, raised his fists defiantly when the verdict was read. Judge Shabaan El-Shamy handed down the same sentence to more than 100 other defendants includ- ing Muslim Brotherhood leader Mo- hamed Badei, already sentenced to death in another trial, and his deputy Khairat al-Shater. Mr Morsi, elected president in 2012 as the Brotherhood’s compro- mise candidate after Shater was dis- qualified, ruled for only a year before mass protests spurred the military to overthrow him in July 2013. Many of those sentenced on Satur- day were tried in absentia, including prominent Qatar-based Islamic cleric Yusuf al-Qaradawi. The court will pronounce its final decision on June 2, since under Egyp- tian law, death sentences are referred to the mufti, the government’s inter- preter of Islamic law, who plays an advisory role. Defendants can still appeal even after the mufti’s recommendation. “If he (Morsi) decides that we ap-

peal against the verdict, then we will.

If he continues to not recognise this

court, then we won’t appeal,” said defence lawyer Abdel Moneim Abdel

Maksoud.

Amnesty International lashed out

at Saturday’s verdict, saying it reflect-

ed “the deplorable state of the coun- try’s criminal justice system”. “The death penalty has become the favourite tool for the Egyptian authorities to purge the political op- position,” the London-based rights watchdog said. After the May 16 verdict was pro- nounced, gunmen in the Sinai shot dead two judges and a prosecutor trav- elling to El-Arish for a court hearing. Their driver was also killed and another prosecutor was wounded, health ministry spokesman Hossam Abdel Ghaffar told AFP. Mr Morsi, 64, has yet to be sen-

tenced in the first of two trials that concluded on Saturday, in which the death penalty was given to 16 other defendants convicted of espionage.

They were all found guilty of col- luding with foreign powers, the Pales- tinian Islamist group Hamas and Iran to destabilise Egypt. The court will pronounce the ver- dicts for Mr Morsi and another 18 de- fendants in that trial on June 2. The court then delivered its ver- dict in the case in which Mr Morsi and 128 defendants were accused of plotting jailbreaks and attacks on police during the uprising that over- threw president Hosni Mubarak in

2011.

Mr Morsi and more than 100 of them were sentenced to death. Many of the defendants are Pales- tinians alleged to have worked with Hamas in neighbouring Gaza. They were tried in absentia, as was a Leba- nese Hezbollah commander. They were alleged to have col- luded with Mr Morsi’s Muslim Broth- erhood to carry out attacks in Egypt in what prosecutors allege was a vast conspiracy. Condemning the verdict, Hamas said that some of its members men- tioned in the proceedings were al- ready dead before the 2011 uprising, while some are in Israeli prisons. Mr Morsi and other former oppo- sition members have now been con- demned for violence during the anti- Mubarak uprising, while Mr Mubarak himself has been cleared of charges over the deaths of protesters during the 18-day revolt that toppled him. Mr Morsi was in prison when the

anti-Mubarak uprising erupted on January 25 2011, having been round- ed up with other Brotherhood leaders a few days earlier. On January 28, protesters fuelled

by police abuses torched police sta- tions across Egypt, allowing thou- sands of prisoners to escape when the force all but collapsed. Since Mr Morsi’s overthrow, the police has largely been rehabilitated in public eyes, with officials and loyal media blaming the Brotherhood and foreigners for the violence of the anti- Mubarak uprising. The army chief who overthrew Mr Morsi, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, was him- self elected president last year. He has pledged to eradicate the Brotherhood, once Egypt’s largest political movement.

– AFP

once Egypt’s largest political movement. – AFP Egypt’s deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi sits

Egypt’s deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi sits behind the defendant’s cage as the judge reads out a verdict sentencing him and more than 100 other defendants to death at the police academy in Cairo on May 16. Photo: AFP

death at the police academy in Cairo on May 16. Photo: AFP A rescued migrant is

A rescued migrant is carried to a waiting ambulance upon his arrival at the new confinement area in the fishing town of Kuala Langsa in Aceh province on May 15. Photo: AFP

SHAH PORIR DWIP, BANGLADESH

Human traffic: the business of smuggling

FRINGED with coconut trees and sandy beaches, Bangladesh’s near- deserted island of Shah Porir Dwip feels more like a sleepy fishing port than a launchpad for a multi- million-dollar people-smuggling industry. But while the shores are still lined with wooden fishing boats, the crews are nowhere to be seen and the nets have seen little action of late. “They all used to be boatmen or fishermen but gradually they real- ised how lucrative human traffick- ing is, so they became middlemen or traffickers themselves,” said lo- cal police officer Kabir Hossain on a tour of the island, the rolling hills of neighbouring Myanmar visible on the horizon. “More than 60 percent of the people living here are now either directly or indirectly involved with trafficking”, Hossain added. Activists estimate up to 8000 migrants may presently be at sea in Southeast Asia. Most of them are ethnic Rohingya, heading south from Bangladesh or Myan- mar to wealthier countries such as Malaysia.

But growing numbers of Bang- ladeshis are also trying to make the trip themselves, forking out up to US$3000 for a place on rickety and overcrowded trawlers that often fail to reach their destination. In doing so, they are fuelling a trade that offers riches far out- weighing the money that can be legally earned from fishing. Shah Porir Dwip, which is acces- sible from the Bangladeshi main- land at low tide, carries tell-tale signs of new wealth. Nearly all the houses are built out of brick and concrete rather than mud or straw as in towns further inland. Many appear to be freshly painted. Hossain was one of the few men on the streets, locals having fled in droves to avoid raids by security forces sparked by the recent dis- covery in Thailand of mass graves containing the remains of migrants from Bangladesh and Myanmar. More than 90 suspected human smugglers were arrested from Shah Porir Dwip and an adjoining village during the raids and they are now being held on remand. Three alleged smuggling king-

pins were also shot dead during the crackdown, all of them from Shah Porir Dwip. Normally home to around 12,000 people, the island has be- come something of a ghost town since the elite Rapid Action Bat- talion set up a checkpoint on the island and other agencies raided homes. A handful of elderly men who were milling around on the streets all refused to speak to an AFP re- porter although one teenager, who was waiting to go fishing, did let slip that his was one of the few boats that aimed to return fuller than when setting sail. “I’ve heard that people are being taken out in the fishing boats to the ships which are anchored in deep- sea,” said Mahmud Hossain. Police and other observers have identified scores of launchpads from where the migrants begin their journey, all in the Cox’s Bazar district of southern Bangladesh that borders Myanmar. While only around a dozen mi- grants get into the initial fishing boats, the larger vessels that then head toward Southeast Asia are

usually jam-packed with hundreds on board. A UN official based in Cox’s Bazar said the smuggling trade took off in 2001 when the first Ro- hingya attempted to reach Thai- land and Malaysia by sea. Bang- ladeshis, wanting a better life, started making the same journey around five years later. “It’s become one of the most profitable of all forms of organised crime,” said the official, who has been working with the Rohingya for many years and spoke on con- dition of anonymity. While Bangladeshi police don’t have figures on the number of sail- ings, their record of arrests point to the scale of the recent increase. While only 132 people were ar- rested in 2012 as they tried to trav- el illegally to Malaysia, that figure jumped to 1550 in 2014. The alleged kingpins who were shot dead included Dholu Hos- sain, whom police say smuggled more than 1000 refugees. Locals whisper that Hossain was shielded by a lawmaker, fuel- ling suspicions that officials have turned a blind eye for a cut of the

profits. Calls to a host of smug- glers who have previously been willing to speak to journalists went unanswered, highlighting their fears that phones are now being tapped. Mujibur Rahman, a police de- tective, said officers who moni- tored the phone and bank activity of one suspected smuggler found some 3.1 million Bangladeshi taka (US$40,000) had been paid into her account in six months. The woman is now in custody. Despite the newfound push to combat people smuggling, the authorities face an uphill task in reining in the trade in the long term. “There are around 9,000 fish- ing vessels plying the seas off Cox’s Bazar, mostly unlicensed. It’s very hard for the authorities to trace them once they are out at sea,” the UN official said. “If a crime such as people- trafficking can’t be detected and halted on land then the chances of it being prevented out at sea are even less.”

AFP

KABUL

Taliban strikes in Kabul again

THREE people including a foreigner working with a European Union po- lice unit were killed when a Taliban car bomber struck a foreign convoy

yesterday, the latest attack of Afghani- stan’s fighting season. At least 18 people were wounded in the attack, which comes three days after 14 people – mostly foreigners – were killed in a Taliban assault on a Kabul guest house that trapped doz- ens attending a concert. The suicide bomber detonated an explosives-laden car against the con- voy near Kabul airport during Sunday morning rush hour. The convoy in- cluded two vehicles of the European Union Police Mission in Afghanistan (EUPOL). “A suicide bomber detonated his Toyota sedan targeting a foreign forc- es convoy near Kabul airport today at 9am,” Kabul police spokesperson Ebadullah Karimi told AFP. “The target of the attacker was the foreign forces convoy. So far we have two women dead, 18 others wounded, all of them civilians,” he said, adding that three children were among those wounded.

A foreigner working with EUPOL

was also killed, a spokesperson for the unit told AFP, without specifying his nationality. “All we can say at this moment is

that two of EUPOL’s vehicles were there at the time of the attack. The

one killed inside a vehicle was a for- eigner who worked for EUPOL,” said Aziz Basam, senior press officer. Three mission members who were also in the vehicle suffered injuries which are not believed to be life- threatening, EUPOL said in a sepa- rate statement. An AFP photographer at the scene saw troops hauling away the body of

a person in a military-style uniform,

pulled out from the twisted wreck of a badly damaged sedan. Taliban insurgents, who launched their spring offensive across Afghani- stan late last month, claimed respon- sibility for the attack. “A suicide attack carried out on foreign forces near the gate of Kabul airport,” spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid said on Twitter. Afghan forces are facing their first fighting season against the Taliban without the full support of US-led for- eign combat troops. Deputy interior ministry spokes- person Najib Danish said three civil- ian vehicles, one of them belonging to foreign troops, were damaged at the site of the attack. Khalilullah Hodkhil, the deputy head of Wazir Akbar Khan hospital, said he had so far received the bod- ies of two young girls and 19 wounded people. “All of them are civilians, including women and children,” he told AFP. “They are under treatment and their wounds are not life-threatening.”

The attack came after NATO on

May 13 formally announced plans to retain a small military presence in Af- ghanistan after 2016 to help strength- en local security forces. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said the future mission would be led by civilians and “will

have a light footprint, but

military component”. Afghan forces are now solely re- sponsible for security after NATO’s combat mission formally ended in De- cember, with a small follow-up force staying on to train and support local personnel. A Taliban suicide bomb hit a Eu- ropean Union police vehicle in Kabul in early January, killing at least one passer-by but not wounding any pas- sengers. The Taliban have waged a 13-year war to topple the US-backed govern- ment in Afghanistan. Official efforts to bring the insurgents to the nego- tiating table have so far borne little fruit.

[with] a

AFP

table have so far borne little fruit. [with] a – AFP An Afghan woman (L) sits

An Afghan woman (L) sits with her two sisters at a hospital after being wounded

after a suicide attack in Kabul on May 17. Photo: AFP

RABAT

Morocco to allow abortion

MOROCCO is to allow abortion in cas- es of rape or serious foetal malforma-

tion, the Royal Palace announced on May 15 after a heated debate on illegal abortions in the North African nation. Abortions will be allowed in the cas- es of “pregnancies resulting from rape or incest”, or “serious deformities and incurable diseases of the foetus”, the statement said.

It came after a royal audience at

which the ministers of justice and Is- lamic affairs and the president of the National Council of Human Rights (CNDH) gave their opinions. Legalising abortion will be limited

to these cases alone, it said.

In March, Health Minister El Hos- sein Louardi said he favoured “an ur- gent revision of the law” on abortion in cases involving rape, incest or foetal deformity. In a country of 34 million people where extramarital relations are illegal, abortion is currently punishable by be- tween one and five years in prison. Although there are no official fig- ures, it is estimated that between 600

and 800 abortions are carried out in Morocco every day. – AFP

TRADEMARK CAUTIONARY NOTICE

MASSEY FERGUSON CORP, a company incorporated under

the laws of United States and having its principal office at 4830 River Green Parkway, Duluth, Georgia 30136-2574, United States of America., is the owner and sole proprietor of the following

Trademark:-

MASSEY FERGUSON

Myanmar Registration Number. 115/1996

Used in respect of:

“Machines, implements and apparatus, all included in Class 7; and all for use in agriculture, harvesting, horticulture, mowing, forestry, earth or materials handling and moving, soil working, timber handling and moving, civil engineering construction, snow

shifting, beach cleaning, parts and fittings for all the aforesaid goods Class 12; Tractors and trailers (vehicles); land vehicles for use in agriculture, harvesting, horticulture, forestry, earth or materials handling and moving, soil working, timber handling and moving, snow shifting and civil engineering construction; parts

and fitting for all the aforesaid goods”.

Any unauthorised use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent intentions of the above mark will be dealt with according to law.

Tin Ohnmar Tun, Tin Thiri Aung & The Law Chambers

Ph:0973150632

Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm (ForDomnern Somgiat & Boonma, Attorneys at law, Thailand) Dated: 18 th May, 2015

16

World

THE MYANMAR TIMES MAY 18, 2015

DUBLIN

Ireland goes to vote on same-sex marriage

IRELAND could become the first coun- try in the world to vote for same-sex marriage in a historic referendum this week in this traditionally Catholic nation. Voters on May 22 will be asked whether or not to add an article to the Irish constitution saying, “Marriage may be contracted in accordance with law by two persons without distinction as to their sex.” The latest polls show the “Yes” side in the lead. Volunteers for and against gay marriage have been canvassing door to door in recent weeks and bill- boards have appeared appealing for votes, as a colourful “Yes” bus makes its way around the country. All the main political parties, in- cluding conservatives, are supporting the change – a seismic shift in a coun- try where homosexuality was only de- criminalised in 1993 and abortion is still illegal. But a “Yes” victory is by no means certain and there is concern among proponents about whether “Yes” sup- porters will come out and cast their ballots. “We will ensure that people will be treated equally, no matter who they love,” Prime Minister Enda Kenny has said. The move is opposed by the Catho- lic Church, whose influence has waned in Ireland amid growing secularisation and after a wave of child sex abuse scandals that badly discredited the hierarchy. “Marriage should be reserved for the unique and complementary

relationship between a woman and a man from which the generation and upbringing of children is uniquely pos- sible,” the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Con- ference said in a statement. An Irish Times/Ipsos MRBI poll published on May 16 showed 70pc sup- port for the “Yes” side and 30pc for the “No”. The same pollsters in March had given the “Yes” side 78 percent. There is a clear divide in the polls, with many older people and rural resi- dents intending to vote “No”. Eighteen countries around the world have so far legalised gay mar- riage or are about to do so, including 13 in Europe. Across the border in North- ern Ireland, gay marriage is banned even though it is legal in the rest of Britain. Referendums have previously been held in Croatia and Slovenia, and in both cases voters rejected legalising gay marriage. In Slovenia same-sex marriages were, however, legalised by parliament in March. The constitutional referendum in Ireland would have to be followed by specific legislation in parliament. While the country has undergone vast economic and social change in re- cent decades, abortion is still banned except in cases where the life of the mother is in danger. Thousands of Irish women seek abortions in Britain every year. The central “No” argument is that the constitutional amendment would undermine the traditional definition of marriage and would facilitate laws allowing gay couples to adopt or have

would facilitate laws allowing gay couples to adopt or have Locals wave flags during a gay

Locals wave flags during a gay pride parade on May 9 in Havana, Cuba. Photo: AFP

surrogate children. “Children are the real issue,” Mar- garet Hickey, a spokesperson for one of the leading “No” groups, Mothers and Fathers Matter, told AFP. “I think it’s important to defend the right of a child to a mother and to a father at least at the start of their lives,” she said. But officials have pointed out that same-sex couples can already adopt children under the current legislation. The debate has become increasingly heated, with the “No” campaign say- ing they have been vilified and some of their posters have been defaced.

The “Yes” side has been boosted by the support of sports, music and film

stars including Irish Hollywood A-lister Colin Farrell and U2 frontman Bono. “Trying to co-opt the word marriage

is like trying to co-opt the word love,”

Bono was quoted by the Irish Times as saying ahead of the start of his world tour in Canada last week. In a YouTube video supporting the

change, comedy TV star Mrs Brown –

a man dressed as an old woman – lik-

ened the furore to controversy in the past over marriages between Catholics and Protestants and between black and white people.

“They still went and got married and the world didn’t end and we all grew up a little bit,” she said in her “message from the mammy-in-chief”. Jerry Buttimer, a lawmaker with

Kenny’s Fine Gael party and one of the few openly gay politicians in Ireland, said it was about making Ireland a more equal nation. “As a country we have come on a journey,” he told AFP.

Amnesty International Ireland chief executive Colm O’Gorman said it would be a “phenomenal message for Ireland to send to the rest of the world”. – AFP

Colm O’Gorman said it would be a “phenomenal message for Ireland to send to the rest

www.mmtimes.com

World 17

TOKYO

New island offers natural laboratory

A BRAND-NEW island emerging off the coast of Japan offers scientists a rare opportunity to study how life be- gins to colonise barren land – helped by rotting bird poo and hatchling vomit. Researchers say bird waste will be the secret ingredient to kickstart Mother Nature’s grand experiment on what is a still-active volcano that only poked its head above the waves in No- vember 2013. That speck of land, some 1000 kilo- metres (620 miles) south of Tokyo, has grown to engulf its once-larger neigh- bour, Nishinoshima, a part of Japan’s Ogasawara island chain known for the wealth and variety of its ecosystem. The new Nishinoshima – a re- spectable 2.46 square kilometres (0.95 square miles), the Japan Coast Guard said in February, roughly the size of 345 football pitches – is currently almost all bare rock, formed from cooling lava. But scientists say it will one day be humming with plant – and possibly animal – life, as nature moves in to what is being called a “natural labora- tory” on one of the latest bits of real estate in the Pacific Ocean. “We biologists are very much fo- cusing on the new island because we’ll

be able to observe the starting point of evolutionary processes,” said Naoki Kachi, professor and leader of Tokyo Metropolitan University’s Ogasawara Research Committee. After the volcanic activity calms down, “what will probably happen first will be the arrival of plants brought by ocean currents and attached to birds’ feet,” he said. Those seabirds, who could use the re- mote rock as a temporary resting place, could eventually set up home there. Their excreta – along with their dropped feathers, regurgitated bits of food and rotting corpses – will eventu- ally form a nutrient-rich soil that of- fers fertile ground for seeds carried by the wind, or brought in the digestive systems of overflying birds. “I am most interested in the ef- fects of birds on the plants’ ecosystem – how their bodily-wastes-turned-or- ganic-fertilisers enrich the vegetation and how their activities disturb it,” Mr Kachi told AFP. The old Nishinoshima, measuring just 0.22 square kilometres, was home to bird colonies until the eruptions scared the creatures away. A small number have clung on to the only patch of the old island that is

have clung on to the only patch of the old island that is This handout picture

This handout picture taken by Japan Coast Guard on March 25 shows the newly created Nishinoshima island at the Ogasawara island chain, 1000 kilometres south of Tokyo. Photo: AFP

still visible, making their nests among ash-covered plants. Japan, which sits at the junction of several tectonic plates, is home to more than 100 active volcanoes. Scientists have no idea when Nishi- noshima will stop spewing lava, but its expansion is being offset by erosion around the edges. The island is expected to follow a route laid out by Surtsey, an island that emerged from the sea in 1963, around 30 kilometres from the coast of Iceland. The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage spot is known glob- ally as an outstanding example of a pristine natural laboratory where re- searchers have been able to trace the evolution of a habitat. “Since they began studying the is- land in 1964, scientists have observed the arrival of seeds carried by ocean currents, the appearance of moulds,

bacteria and fungi, followed in 1965 by the first vascular plant,” UNESCO says on its website. “By 2004, [vascular plants] num- bered 60, together with 75 bryophytes, 71 lichens and 24 fungi. Eighty-nine species of birds have been recorded on Surtsey, 57 of which breed elsewhere in Iceland. The 141 hectare island is also home to 335 species of inverte- brates.” Not bad for somewhere that has only existed for half a century. Nishinoshima might not be quite as quick as Surtsey to establish itself as a teeming wildlife haven – it is a long way from mainland Japan and not too close to its neighbours in the Ogasawara island chain, which limits the number of species of birds and seeds that will make it that far. Nonetheless, it is an exciting blank canvas, said Mr Kachi, and needs to be treated with respect – which means keeping out foreign invaders that

would not naturally drift or fly in. “I’d like to call on anyone who lands on the island to pay special at- tention to keeping it the way it is – not to take external species there,” he warned. He said when he conducted a field study on another island in the chain in 2007, his team prepared a fumigated clean room where they packed all re- search equipment, after making sure everything they had was either brand new or scrupulously clean. While Nishinoshima is currently only being monitored from the air, the first field researchers will need to take similar precautions. “Biologists know the business, but probably the first batch of scientists who will land on the island will be ge- ologists and vulcanologists – who may not be familiar with the problems,” he said. “I’d be pleased to offer advice on this to scientists in other fields.” – AFP

with the problems,” he said. “I’d be pleased to offer advice on this to scientists in
TRADEMARK CAUTIONARY NOTICE Megabass Inc., a company organized under the laws of Japan and having
TRADEMARK CAUTIONARY NOTICE
Megabass Inc., a company organized under the laws of Japan and
having its principal office at 1590-1, Nishigasaki-cho, Higashi-ku,
Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 431-3115, Japan is the owner and sole
proprietor of the following Trademarks :-
Myanmar Registration Number.
4/2703/2014, 4/2704/2014 & 4/2705/2014
Used in respect of : -
“Bags for sports; Waist Bags; Tote bags; Shoulder bags; Card
cases; Key Cases; Purses; Rucksacks; Travelling bags; Umbrellas;
Vanity cases, not fitted” in class 18.
“Clothing; Caps; Jackets; Jumpers; Parkas; Tee-shirts: Polo shirts;
Golf Shirts; Short-sleeve shirts; Fishing shirts; Sport shirt; Hooded
sweatshirts; Trousers; Vests; Bandanas; Belts; Sports shoes;
Wind resistant jackets; Waterproof clothing; Jerseys (clothing)”
in class 25.
“Fishing tackle; Lures for fishing; Fishing rods; Fishing lines;
Fishing hooks; Floats for fishing; Fishing sinkers; Reels for fishing;
Creels (Fishing equipment); Artificial fishing bait” in class 28.
Any unauthorized use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent
intentions of the above mark will be dealt with according to law.
Tin Ohnmar Tun, Tin Thiri Aung & The Law Chambers
Ph: 0973150632
Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm
(For. Domnern Somgiat & Boonma,
Attorneys at Law, Thailand)
Dated. 18 th May, 2015
TRADE MARK CAUTION NOTICE is hereby given that Morinaga Nyugyo Kabushiki Kaisha (also trading as
TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Morinaga Nyugyo Kabushiki
Kaisha (also trading as Morinaga Milk Industry Co., Ltd.), a
company organized under the laws of Japan and having its principal
office at 33-1, Shiba 5-chome, Minato-ku,Tokyo, Japan is the Owner
and Sole Proprietor of the following trademark:-
(Reg: No. IV/2789/2015)
in respect of: - “Powdered milk for babies, infants and children,
Powdered milk for pregnant and nursing women, Powdered milk for
middle-aged people and elderly people, Powdered milk as nutritional
supplements, Dietetic food and substances adapted for medical use,
Food for babies, Nutritional supplements for humans and animals,
Liquid nutritional supplements for humans and animals, Nutritional
additives for use in manufacturing foods, food supplements, beverages,
dairy products and animal foodstuffs, Dietetic food for pregnant and
nursing women, Dietetic beverages for babies, infants and children,
Dietetic beverages for pregnant and nursing women, Dietetic beverages
for middle-aged people and elderly people, Food for infants and
children” Class: 5
“Milk, Milk beverages, Milk products, Flavored milk drinks and
beverages, Peptido milk, Tea with milk, Milk-based beverages
containing tea, Dietetic milk and milk products, Dietetic beverages for
babies, infants and children with milk, Lactic acid drinks, Lactic acid
bacteria drinks, Cream, Whipped cream, Cheese, Butter, Buttercream,
Margarine, Milk powder, Condensed milk, Curd milk, Fermented milk,
Whey, Powdered milk for babies, infants and children for non-medical
purposes, Powdered milk for pregnant and nursing women for non-
medical purposes, Powdered milk for middle-aged people and elderly
people for non-medical, purposes, Powdered milk as food supplements,
Yoghurt, Yoghurt drinks, Yoghurt-based beverage, Soya milk (milk
substitute)” Class: 29
“Carbonated drinks, Non-alcoholic beverages, Isotonic Beverages,
Waters [beverages], Aerated waters [beverages], Fruit juices, Vegetable
juices, Mineral water, Whey beverages, Soybean beverages” Class: 32
Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or
other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law.
U Kyi Win Associates
for Morinaga Nyugyo Kabushiki Kaisha
(also trading as Morinaga Milk Industry Co., Ltd.),
P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon.
Phone: 372416
Dated: 18 th May, 2015

18 World

THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

SEATTLE

2015 1 8 World THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015 SEATTLE ShellNo flotilla participants float near

ShellNo flotilla participants float near the Polar Pioneer oil drilling rig during demonstrations against Royal Dutch Shell on May 16 in Seattle, Washington. Photo: AFP

Activists stage paddle- in over arctic oil drilling

ENVIRONMENTAL activists in Seat- tle paddled out to sea on March 16 to protest a Shell oil rig moored off the coast of the US city that is headed for Arctic drilling, local media reported. Hundreds of kayaks, canoes, sail- boats and a solar-powered barge called “The People’s Platform” cir- cled around Shell’s massive yellow- and -white oil rig moored in the city’s port, The Seattle Times reported. Protesters held signs reading “Paddle in Seattle” and posted flags from their boats calling for “Climate Justice”, condemning Shell’s plans to drill in the Arctic.

The protest follows an announce- ment from President Barack Obama this month allowing Shell to drill in the Arctic, a move that has angered environmentalists. “The tiny boats on the water against the backdrop of the giant

It is a chance to show how

oil rig

much people care,” protester Amy McKendry told the newspaper. The 307-foot (94-metre) Shell oil

rig has been in Seattle port since May 14, according to The Seattle Times.

The rig is the largest part of the 25-vessel fleet Shell Oil has in the

area as it prepares to resume oil exploration in Alaska’s Arctic, the newspapaper added. Mr Obama recently called oil production “important”, while also asking for a transition toward clean- er energy. Environmental groups oppose the drilling in part because of the threat an oil spill would pose to the region full of vulnerable Arctic animals. Shell put its drilling plans for the Alaskan Arctic on hold in 2013 following multiple problems with two exploration rigs.

AFP

k AThmAndu

Red Cross ramps up appeal

THE Red Cross on May 16 ramped up its appeal for aid to disaster-hit Ne- pal, requesting US$93 million in as- sistance after two earthquakes in les

s than three weeks killed nearly 8500

and left thousands homeless. Relief teams have been working for weeks to provide water, food, shelter and medical assistance after the first 7.8-magnitude quake hit on April 25, flattening whole villages and leaving thousands without shelter with just weeks to go until the monsoon rains. “We are still in full emergency mode – the task at hand remains expanding our response while also adapting to meet emerging needs,” said Elhadj As Sy, secretary general of the International Federation of Red

Cross and Red Crescent Societies. “What we are doing, no matter how appreciated it is, it is not yet matching the scale and magnitude of

the problem that we face,” Mr Sy told reporters in Kathmandu. The humanitarian agency revised

its initial request for $35 million af- ter a second, 7.3-magnitude quake struck last week, triggering panic in Kathmandu and devastating remote villages in the country’s mountainous northeastern region. Last week’s quake “exacerbated the situation that we found at the

[with] areas which were

beginning

not really affected becoming more af- fected”, Mr Sy told AFP in an inter-

view.

“These kind of disasters, they leave also many invisible wounds. People are traumatised, people are scared, people are really shocked,” he said. Aid agencies have warned of a race against time to provide shelter and bring relief to victims before the approaching monsoon triggers land- slides and blocks access to quake-hit villages located along the Himalayan nation’s hills and mountains. The Nepalese government, which has faced criticism over the speed of

its response to the disaster, has said it was overwhelmed by the scale of the April 25 earthquake, the deadliest to hit the country in more than 80 years.

AFP

k AT hmAndu

Eight dead in US rescue helicopter

THE Nepalese army announced on

May 16 troops had found the bodies of all eight people from the wreckage of

a US helicopter which crashed while

delivering aid in the quake-devastated country. The UH-1Y Huey was carrying six US Marines and two soldiers from the Nepalese army when it went missing during a relief flight in the moun- tainous northeastern region on the same day that a second quake hit the country. “Nepalese and US troops recovered all eight bodies from the crash site this

morning,” Major General Binoj Basny- at told AFP by telephone. “None of the bodies are recognis-

able,” Mr Basnyat said. Nepalese troops on May 15 spotted the aircraft in a remote forest around 70 kilometres (40 miles) northeast of Kathmandu, three days after it disap- peared from sight. Teams from the US military and the Nepal army were investigating the wreckage to determine the cause of the crash, Mr Basnyat said. Army helicopters and hundreds of US and Nepalese ground troops had

been deployed to scour the mountain- ous region where the chopper disap- peared. Relief teams from around the world have been working for weeks to provide water, food, shelter and medi- cal assistance to Nepal after the first, 7.8-magnitude quake hit on April 25. Nearly 8500 people have now been confirmed dead in the disaster, which destroyed more than half a million homes and left huge numbers of peo- ple without shelter with just weeks to go until the monsoon rains.

AFP

www.mmtimes.com

World 19

PHNOM PENH

‘Naughty’ tycoon deported

CAMBODIA deported on-the-run Russian tycoon Sergei Polonsky yesterday, who officials say has been accused of embezzling tens of mil- lions of dollars in a real estate scam. Mr Polonsky, who is in his 40s, was detained on an island off the southwestern town of Sihanoukville on May 15 for overstaying his visa. “He was deported on Sunday morning back to his country,” Uk Heisela, chief of the investigations unit at the interior ministry’s immi- gration department, told AFP. “He is a naughty man,” he said, adding that Russian officials were escorting him back to his country. Mr Polonsky had lived illegally in Cambodia by over-staying his visa for more than two years and his ac- tivities “affect Cambodian national security,” Uk Heisela said. Eight other Russians have been

arrested and also face deportation, he added. In August 2013 a Russian court ordered Mr Polonsky’s detention af- ter he was charged in absentia for his alleged role in a 5.7 billion rou- ble (US$174 million) swindle which defrauded more than 80 investors. Investigators have accused the businessman of orchestrating the scam linked to the construction of a housing complex in 2007-2008. Mr Polonsky was detained in Cambodia in November 2013 after a request by Russia, but freed by an appeals court in January 2014. Cambodia’s Supreme Court in April 2014 rejected the request by Russia to extradite Mr Polonsky, ruling that the tycoon could not be sent back home because the two countries do not have an extradi- tion treaty.

Mr Polonsky, who denies the ac-

cusations, said at a news conference in Phnom Penh in 2014 that it was

a “big case” involving “a lot of bad

men”. Mr Polonsky still faces a separate trial in Cambodia over allegations that he and two other Russians threatened a boat crew in the king- dom at knifepoint. He was granted provisional re- lease in April 2013 in that case after spending three months in prison in Cambodia, where he has business interests. The outspoken tycoon’s busi- ness was hit hard by the 2007-2008 global financial crisis, forcing him to abandon work on Moscow’s Fed- eration Tower, which he had hoped would become Europe’s tallest building.

AFP

SEOUL

S Korea clears DMZ peace march

SOUTH KOREA has given the go- ahead for a group of women’s rights activists to march from North Korea across the Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) in a call for peace led by American feminist Gloria Steinem. Once dubbed “the scariest place on earth” by former US President Bill Clinton, the DMZ is one of the world’s most heavily militarised fron- tiers, bristling with watchtowers and landmines. Seoul’s Unification Ministry said it would allow the group to cross the heavily fortified border between the two Koreas on May 24. However, the march will not pass through the truce village of Pan- munjom where North and South Ko-

rean soldiers stand in a permanent face-off across the border. “As to the course of entry, we plan to recommend the group uses the Gyeongui road,” the ministry said in a statement texted to reporters. The road crossing on the western part of the border is mainly used by South Koreans accessing the Kae- song joint industrial zone, which lies 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) inside the North. Around 30 women are expected to take part in the crossing after hold- ing a peace symposium and rally in the North Korean capital, Pyongyang. The organisers, WomenCrossD- MZ.org, said they had received per- mission from North Korea last month

to traverse the border. The marchers, who will also in-

clude Nobel peace laureates Leymah Gbowee and Mairead Maguire, hope the event will build momentum for

a permanent peace treaty to replace

the armistice that halted – but tech- nically never ended – the 1950-1953

Korean War. This year marks the 70 th anniver- sary of the division of the Korean peninsula into North and South fol- lowing World War II. The buffer zone stretches for 2km

in both North and South Korea.

Crossings are extremely rare, but there is a recent precedent with five New Zealanders allowed to travel across on motorbikes in 2013. – AFP

allowed to travel across on motorbikes in 2013. – AFP IN PICTURES Photo: AFP Philippine soldiers
allowed to travel across on motorbikes in 2013. – AFP IN PICTURES Photo: AFP Philippine soldiers

IN PICTURES

Photo: AFP

Philippine soldiers display various types of seized improvised explosive devices with related material and “shahada” banners similar to those used by ISIS, at a village in Mohammad Ajul town, Basilan province, in the southern island of Mindanao on May 16, after government troops raided the bomb factory on May 14. Three Muslim militants and a soldier were killed during the government troops’ raid on a bomb factory of an al-Qaeda-linked group, a military official said.

of an al-Qaeda-linked group, a military official said. Russian Sergei Polonsky (centre) is escorted by Cambodian

Russian Sergei Polonsky (centre) is escorted by Cambodian military police officials on an island in Preah Sihanouk province on May 15. Photo: AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION

NOTICE is hereby given that Hankook Tire Worldwide Co., Ltd. a company organized under the laws of Korea and having

its principal office at #647-15, Yoksam-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul, Korea is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following

trademark:-

SMARTEC Hankook TBR Technology

(Reg: No. IV/1644/2015)

in respect of: - “Automobile tires; bicycle tires; casings for pneumatic

tires; covers for tires; motorcycle tires; adhesive rubber patches for repairing inner tubes; inner tubes for bicycles; inner tubes for motorcycles; inner tubes for pneumatic tires; inner tubes for vehicle wheels; inner tubes for vehicle tires; luggage nets for vehicles;

pneumatic tires; repair outfits for inner tubes; rims for vehicle wheels; saddle covers for bicycles; saddle covers for motorcycles; safely belts for vehicle seats; brake segments for vehicles; shock absorbers for vehicles; ski carriers for cars; spikes for tires; studs for tires; tires for vehicle wheels; tires, solid, for vehicle wheels; treads for retreading tires; treads for vehicles [roller belts]; treads for vehicles [tractor type]; tubeless tires for bicycles; tubeless tires for motorcycles; valves for

vehicle tires; vehicle wheel tires” Int’l Class: 12

Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law.

U Kyi Win Associates for Hankook Tire Worldwide Co., Ltd. P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

Dated: 18 th May, 2015

TRADEMARK CAUTIONARY NOTICE

MASSEY FERGUSON CORP, a company incorporated under the laws of United States and having its principal office at 4205, River Green Parkway, Duluth, Georgia 30096-2568, United States of America, is the owner and sole proprietor of the following Trademark:- MF

Myanmar Registration Number. 4/560/1997

Used in respect of:

“Machines, implements and apparatus, all included in Class 7; and all for use in agriculture, harvesting, horticulture, mowing, forestry, earth or materials handling and moving, soil working, timber handling and moving, civil engineering construction, snow shifting, beach cleaning, parts and fittings for all the aforesaid goods Class 12; Tractors and trailers (vehicles); land vehicles for use in agriculture, harvesting, horticulture, forestry, earth or materials handling and moving, soil working, timber handling and moving, snow shifting and civil engineering construction; parts and fitting for all the aforesaid goods”.

Any unauthorised use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent intentions of the above mark will be dealt with according to law.

Tin Ohnmar Tun, Tin Thiri Aung & The Law Chambers

Ph:0973150632

Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm (ForDomnern Somgiat & Boonma, Attorneys at law, Thailand) Dated: 18 th May, 2015

s o r n e g i n t i f r u o y
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the pulse editor: Charlotte rose charlottelola.rose@gmail.com

THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse 21

w w w . m m t i m e s . c o m the

Neng (left) blesses the tattoo of a German tourist.

2 1 Neng (left) blesses the tattoo of a German tourist. Foreigners flock to ancient Thai
Foreigners flock to ancient Thai tattoo masters
Foreigners flock to ancient
Thai tattoo masters

Thai master tattoo artist Arjarn Neng prays in front of a shrine at his studio in Bangkok. Photos: AFP/Nicolas Asfouri.

at his studio in Bangkok. Photos: AFP/Nicolas Asfouri. Neng works on a German tourist. Neng works

Neng works on a German tourist.

Photos: AFP/Nicolas Asfouri. Neng works on a German tourist. Neng works at his Bangkok studio. MARIoN

Neng works at his Bangkok studio.

MARIoN THIbAuT

A German tourist is tattooed at Neng’s studio.

I N a cramped Bangkok room filled with statues of deities and

plumes of incense smoke, a master is at work.

With expert precision Ajarn Neng repeatedly plunges a

razor-sharp needle dipped in black ink into the back of a

disciple, each stab producing a perfectly placed pixel that

forms a traditional Thai tattoo. It is an ancient art carried out by ajarns (masters), steeped in superstition that Thais have prized for centuries. But increasingly it is foreigners beating a path to this Buddhist tattooist’s door. “I’ve been dreaming of getting a tattoo like this for years,” says Silvia Falbo, from Rome, proudly showing five lines of Khmer script Neng recently inked onto her shoulder blade. “I’m attracted to Buddhism and all the spirituality that goes with it. And the design is really beautiful and original,” she adds. Ever since American GIs passed through Bangkok for their R&R during the Vietnam War foreigners have returned home sporting traditional Thai tattoos – known as sak yant. But it was when Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie unveiled a Khmer inscription – traditionally used in the region for Buddhist scripture – on her left shoulder that sak yant hit the mainstream. Now the faces patiently waiting for their turn in front of Neng are just as likely to be from outside Thailand than inside. But foreign enthusiasm for exotic Thai ink is not without its controversies. While tattoos in the west are largely an aesthetic decision, in Thailand they are imbued with both spirituality and superstition. Those who wear sak yant often believe their tattoos genuinely lend them magical powers, bringing good luck or protection from

evil spirits. Some are even convinced that their inking will make them bulletproof. The designs – lines of script, geometric patterns and animal shapes – are also deeply interwoven with Buddhist and animist imagery that some Thais fear Westerners fail to appreciate. Tattoos showing religious deities such as the Buddha or the Hindu god Ganesh – also popular in Thailand – are particularly problematic, especially if they are below the waist. In Thai culture, the head is the most sacred part of the body. The further down the body, the less sacred, and foreigners with religious figures inked on their legs have caused upset. On the main highway into Bangkok from the city’s Suvarnabhumi Airport, huge 50-foot-wide (15-metre) billboards declare, “It’s wrong to use Buddha as a decoration or tattoo.” Some groups want a complete ban on any tattoos of religious figures. “The Buddha was a person who was clean from inside to outside. His mind was free from illusion and all the impurities,” said Manat Chareekote, a spokesperson for the Knowing Buddha Organization. “To tattoo the clean one like Buddha on the body is considered improper and lacks respect.” Sukanya Sujachaya, adviser and former director of The Center of Folklore Research at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, believes foreigners should do more research before opting for such tattoos. “Today it’s about fashion. But this type of tattoo cannot be sold just for their beauty. It also has to be for the belief,” she said.

Thailand is not the only Buddhist country to experience a backlash against foreigners appropriating religious imagery. In April 2014 a British nurse was thrown out of Sri Lanka for sporting a tattoo of Buddha on her arm, despite her insistence she was a devout Buddhist who bore the tattoo as a mark of respect. And in March Myanmar jailed a New Zealand bar manager for using an image of Buddha wearing headphones to advertise a cheap drinks night. But while many foreign tourists have little idea about the spiritual significance attached to religious tattoos, others deny being insensitive and say their inkings are more than a fashion statement. “When I look at my tattoos, it helps me and I think back to what my ajarn told me,” said Logan, an American living in Thailand. “I’ve finally found a perfect ajarn for me. He is really a big brother. He is like a mentor.” When a follower of an ajarn receives a tattoo, they are often told by their master to follow a certain set of rules to improve their life, with the warning added that failure to do so invalidates the power of the tattoo. Among the rules are the first five Buddhist precepts – do not harm living beings, do not steal, do not have inappropriate sexual behaviour, do not lie, and do not consume drugs or intoxicating liquor. Neng says many of those visiting him are thinking beyond the look of tattoos. “Foreigners like the unique beauty of patterns,” he says. “But also, they have learned that believing in the sacred letters of the tattoo might bring them strength.” – AFP

22

the pulse

THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

2 2 the pulse THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015 Future Stars participants pose with trainers.

Future Stars participants pose with trainers. Photo: Facebook

Future Stars shine brightly in self advocacy

Chit Su suwai.chit@gmail.com

t HE men and women concentrate on their tasks. Some are cutting paper, others are folding paper flowers.

These are children’s tasks, but these adults suffer from mental disability. Future Stars is an advocacy group for intellectually disabled adults. Its main objective is to train them in vocational programs so that they can earn money. “Intellectual disabilities are more challenging than physical disabilities,” said Khin Myo Su, the secretary of Future Stars. The group was formed by parents and trainers with 15 members in 2010. Now, there are about 50 members. “This is the first group of its kind in Myanmar. Other groups help them learn, but not to earn, which is where we come in. We parents offer support, but we let them lead

the group,” said Khin Myo Su. The group leader is Min Swe Htet, who is intellectually disabled. “We try hard to be self-reliant and earn money to support ourselves,” he said. The mother of a disabled person, Myint Myint Than, 52, said she always worried about her son, who could do nothing without help. “He is not deaf but he speaks rarely. He can’t react to questions

quickly, and he can’t read or write.

I always worried about how he

would live once his parents pass away,” she said. Her son came to Future Stars three years ago. He has totally changed. “The group taught him how to speak in public and even to sing in public. He is so much more mature

than before. He talks to people now.

I am completely amazed,” she said. Her son, Kaung Htet Naing, 24, is now working for Novotel Hotel as a kitchen helper earning US$250 a month.

Htet Htet Wai is another success story for Future Stars. She competed in the Asian Special Olympics as a runner and won prizes. She also works for Novotel. “She is a grade 9 student in ordinary school, but she can’t read. She doesn’t know colours, can’t tell the time and can’t count money. She arrived at the group two years ago. I am very happy to see how much she has matured,” said her mother, Tin Tin Aye. The group also trains people

with intellectual disabilities to speak out in front of others. “Most of them can’t speak in public. They don’t know their rights and can’t ask for them. We train them to speak out about what they want. This is very important,” said Kaung Htet Naing, who suffers from osteoporosis and is vice president of Future Stars.

Parents with intellectually disabled children can join the group for free. They can contact futurestars22010@gmail.com or call 09420138645.

Artists share techniques and inspiration

NyeiN ChaN May

ARTISTS from both sides of the border came together this week for a special collaboration. The 33 artists, from Myanmar and Thailand, held an art workshop and exhibition yesterday and today at the Yangon Gallery in People’s Square and Park, Yangon. The artists completed about 40 paintings at the art workshop on May 16, then added 30 more for the display. “Last February, 16 Myanmar artists went to Thailand to participate in an art workshop and exhibition in Bangkok, at the invitation of Thai artists. Our experience gave us the idea of holding a similar event in our own country as a way of demonstrating the friendship between our two countries and to expose local artists to international concepts, styles and techniques,” said Mon Thet, one of the exhibitors. The exhibition not only promotes cultural exchanges, but also represents an opportunity to

cultural exchanges, but also represents an opportunity to The Myanmar-Thai art exhibition finishes at the Yangon

The Myanmar-Thai art exhibition finishes at the Yangon Gallery today. Photo:

Aung Myint Ye Zaw

exchange ideas, he added. An artist and a sculptor from Japan were also invited to take part, in addition to the 17 Thai participants.

The paintings on display are not for sale. “I’m very glad I had the chance to interact with Thai artists in this exhibition,” said artist Nay Myo Say.

Thai artists in this exhibition,” said artist Nay Myo Say. s creen s cene Last call

screen scene

this exhibition,” said artist Nay Myo Say. s creen s cene Last call for ‘Mad Men’

Last call for ‘Mad Men’ and Don Draper On Sunday, many an Old Fashioned were raised to Don Draper – or raised in his memory. After seven seasons, eight years and nearly 100 episodes, Mad Men fans finally discovered the fate of the show’s dashing but conflicted anti-hero as the curtain came down on the award-winning retro-cool series. US mainstream and social media have been awash with speculation about the denouement

of the stylish series, which has won 15 Emmy

awards and four Golden Globes over the years. Without giving away any key plot points, Actor Jon Hamm – who plays protagonist Don Draper – said in the lead-up to to the finale that

he hopes the alpha male, whose life is built on

a stolen identity, will finally find peace. Many

wondered if Sunday’s finale would finally resolve the central lie at the root of Draper’s successful but ultimately unfulfilling life. Mad Men will most certainly rank among the top shows in television history and with good reason. Rarely has there been such a perfect melding of character, time period and subject

matter in a one-hour TV drama,” said media analyst Paul Dergarabedian.

one-hour TV drama,” said media analyst Paul Dergarabedian. Actor Jon Hamm poses next to the grey

Actor Jon Hamm poses next to the grey suit Don Draper wore in Mad Men. Photo: AFP/Mandel Ngan

Move over superheroes, video-game movies are going upscale There was a time when a new video game adaptation was enough to make film critics gag, but the big money involved is starting to attract a new level of talent. Video game movies have an ignoble history in Hollywood, dating back to the dark days of the early 1990s when clangers like Super Mario Bros. starring Bob Hoskins and Street Fighter with Jean-Claude Van Damme were stinking up the screen. But the lure of tapping into the world’s estimated 1.8 billion gamers has kept drawing film- makers back for more, and the new projects seem determined to up the quality and match the success of superhero franchises. Among the more promising projects is Splinter Cell, which has been gestating for some ears but is thought to still have actor Tom Hardy attached, fresh from his hailed action turn in Mad Max: Fury Road. Edward Noeltner, president of the Cinema Management Group touting the film at Cannes, said it was always a good idea to tap into existing markets, particularly for smaller independent companies. “It’s difficult to build an audience from scratch unless you’re a big studio who can spend $80 million on production and another $80 million on promotion,” he said.

production and another $80 million on promotion,” he said. Surrealist filmmaker David Lynch announced that he

Surrealist filmmaker David Lynch announced that he will direct the sequel of the cult classic Twin Peaks television series, a month after saying a pay dispute had scuttled his return. Photo: AFP/ Gerard Julien

David Lynch to make ‘Twin Peaks’ return after all Surrealist filmmaker David Lynch announced May 15 that he will direct the sequel of the cult classic Twin Peaks television series, a month after saying a pay dispute had scuttled his return. The US television network Showtime announced in the fall that the series, based on a small-town murder in quirky Twin Peaks, would return as a limited series in 2016, 25 years after the show’s last airing. But in April, Lynch told his 2.4 million Twitter followers that after more than a year of negotiations. “I left because not enough money was offered to do the script the way I felt it needed to be done.” His apparent about-turn was greeted with joy by diehard fans – and at least one star of Twin Peaks. Kyle MacLachlan, who played FBI Agent Dale Cooper in the original series and is reprising his role, tweeted, “Welcome back again!! #TwinPeaks Special Agent Dale Cooper! on #Showtime #damnfinecoffee.”

‘Okely dokeley!’: ‘Simpsons’ voice artist quits Harry Shearer, the Emmy-winning actor who voices pious neighbour Ned Flanders and greedy boss Mr Burns in The Simpsons, said May 14 he is leaving the show – but the show’s manager hopes to change his mind.

Shearer, who plays Homer Simpson’s “okely dokeley” neighbour Flanders and the evil billionaire Burns, tweeted a message from James L Brooks, an executive producer of the hit series, relayed by his lawyer. “Show will go on, Harry will not be part of it, wish him the best.” The hit series’ showrunner, Al Jean, told the New York Times in an email, “Harry Shearer was offered the same deal the rest of the cast accepted, and passed. The show will go on and we wish him well.” He added that the characters voiced by Shearer

– also including also Burns’

obsequious manservant Smithers – will live on. “We do not plan to kill off characters like Burns and Flanders but will recast with the finest voiceover talent available,” he told the newspaper. Shearer has been a part of the Simpsons cast since its debut in 1989. – AFP

of the Simpsons cast since its debut in 1989. – AFP The voice actor behind Flanders,

The voice actor behind Flanders, Burns and Smithers has passed up a new contract with The Simpsons. Image: Fox.

TRADE MARK CAUTION NOTICE is hereby given that MEGMILK SNOW BRAND Co., Ltd a joint-stock
TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that MEGMILK SNOW
BRAND Co., Ltd a joint-stock company duly organized
under the laws of Japan, Manufactures and merchants
of 1-1, Naebo-cho, 6-chome, Higashi-ku, Sapporo,
Japan is the Owner and sole proprietor of the following
trademarks:-
(Reg: No. IV/11050/2011)
(Reg: No. IV/11051/2011)
MEGMILK SNOW BRAND
(Reg: No. IV/11052/2011)
The above three trademarks are in respect of:-
Class 5: “Pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations;
sanitary preparations for medical purposes; dietetic
substances adapted for medical use, food for babies;
plasters, materials for dressings; material for stopping
teeth, dental wax; disinfectants; preparations for
destroying vermin; fungicides, herbicides; food for
babies including powdered milk for babies, infants
and young children, follow-up milk for infants and
young children; growing-up milk for young children
and children; powdered milk for medical treatment of
congenital abnormal syndrome; lacteal flour for babies;
powdered milk for pregnant and lactancy period women;
powdered milk for added vitamins and minerals for
adults and elder men; dietetic substances adapted for
medical use, dietetic beverages adapted for medical
purposes, dietetic food adapted for medical purposes,
dietetic food for preparations adapted for medical
purposes, dietary supplements, food-supplements
not for medical purposes, mineral food supplements,
medicated confectionery; medicated drinks, medical
drinks; medical teas, herb teas for medical purposes,
mineral water for medical purposes; therapeutic diets
intended to prevent gastro-esophageal reflex adapted
for pharmaceutical purposes; dietetic bread adapted
for medical use; royal jelly for medical purposes;
medical herb; vitamin preparations, enteral nutrition;
albuminous preparations for medical purposes;
albuminous milk; milk ferments for pharmaceutical
purposes; milk sugar (lactose); enzymes preparations
for medicinal purposes; enzymes for medicinal
purposes; amino acids for medicinal purposes; protein
for medical and veterinary use, peptide for medical
and veterinary use, whey peptide for medical and
veterinary use; ceramide for medical and veterinary
use, milk ceramide for medical and veterinary use,
sphingomyelin for medical and veterinary use; iron
lactoferrin for medical and veterinary use, microbe
for medical and veterinary use, microorganism for
medical and veterinary use, non-medicated nutrients
being nutritional supplements”
Class 29: “Powdered milk for children; powdered milk
for pregnant and nursing women; powdered milk for
added vitamins and minerals for adults and elder men;
whole milk powder; skimmed milk; condensed milk;
milk beverages; milk-based beverages; fermented
milk; yoghurt; butter, cheese, cheese spread, cream,
milk ceramide (milk products), ceramide (milk
products), sphingomyelin (mild products), iron
lactoferine (milk products), milk and milk products;
artificial cheese (or imitation cheese); margarine and
fat spreads; fat-containing mixtures for bread; fatty
substances for the manufacture of edible fats; non-
diary Cream (Cream made from edible oils and/or
fats); lard for food; chocolate nut butter, peanut butter,
edible oils and fats; fermented soybeans; fermented
bean curd; whey; protein for human consumption;
nutritional consumption in the form of powder,
granule, grain, tablet, liquid, gel, jelly and capsule
made from proein; meat, fish, poultry and games; meat
extracts; meat products; seafood products; preserved,
dried and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies; jams;
compotes; eggs; soups”
Class 30: “Coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca,
sago, artificial coffee; flour and preparations made from
cereals; ices; honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt,
mustard; vinegar, sauces (condiments); spices; iced
coffee; beans; seasonings; spices; aromatic preparations
for food (not from essential oils); rice; husked barley;
husked oats; flour for food; gluten for food; cereal
preparations; Chinese stuffed dumplings; pizza
crust; sandwich; Chinese steamed dumplings; Sushi;
steamed buns stuffed with minced meats; hamburgers;
pizzas; box lunch (being prepared meals); hot dogs;
meat pie; ravioli; confectionery and bread and buns;
instant confectionery mixes; ice cream mixes; sherbet
mixes; yeast powder; Binding agents for ice cream;
meat tenderizers for household purpose; preparations
for stiffening whipped cream; sake lees; chocolate-
based beverages; cocoa-based beverages; coffee-based
beverages; ice cream; tea-based beverages; edible
ices; sherbets; frozen yogurt (confectionery ices); fruit
jellies (confectionery or desserts); puddings (desserts);
seasoned powder for sprinkling on rice: pizza sauce;
nutritional and dietary supplement (other than for
medical purposes)”
Class 32: Beer; Beer wort; Extracts of hops for making
beer; Mineral water [beverages], table waters, Waters
[beverages], aerated water, soda water, preparations
for making aerated water; ginger ale, powders for
effervescing beverages, pastilles for effervescing
beverages, fruit drinks and fruits juices, lemonades,
non-alcoholic fruit nectars, tomato juice [beverage],
vegetable juices [beverages], sherbets [beverages],
syrups for beverages, essences for making beverages,
preparations for making beverages, whey beverages,
isotonic beverages, non-alcoholic beverages, mixed fruit
and vegetable juices”.
Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said
trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt
with according to law.
U Kyi Win Associates
for MEGMILK SNOW BRAND Co., Ltd.
P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon.
Phone: 372416
Dated: 18 th May, 2015
U Kyi Win Associates for MEGMILK SNOW BRAND Co., Ltd. P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone:

24

the pulse

THE MYANMAR TIMES May 18, 2015

DOMESTIC FLIGHT SCHEDULES

Yangon to MandalaY MandalaY to Yangon Yangon to HeHo HeHo to Yangon Flight Days Dep
Yangon to MandalaY
MandalaY to Yangon
Yangon to HeHo
HeHo to Yangon
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Y5 775
Daily
6:00
7:10
Y5 233
Daily
7:50
9:00
YH 917
Daily
6:10
9:15
YJ 891
3,5
9:25
10:35
W9 515
1
6:00
7:25
W9 201
Daily
8:40
10:35
YJ 891
3
6:20
10:35
6T 452
Daily
9:15
10:15
YH 917
Daily
6:10
8:30
YJ 761
5
8:40
10:35
6T 451
Daily
6:30
8:45
YH 918
Daily
9:15
10:25
YJ 891
5
7:00
8:25
7Y 132
2,4,6,7
8:50
10:45
7Y 131
2,4,6,7
6:30
9:20
W9 201
Daily
9:25
10:35
7Y 131
2,4,6,7
6:30
8:35
K7 223
1,3,5
8:55
11:00
K7 222
1,3,5
6:30
9:30
7Y 132
2,4,6,7
9:35
10:45
K7 222
1,3,5
6:30
8:40
YH 918
Daily
9:15
10:25
7Y 131
Daily
7:15
10:05
K7 223
1,3,5
9:45
11:00
6T 805
2,4,6
6:30
7:40
6T 806
2,4,6
10:30
11:40
YJ 891
5
7:00
9:10
YJ 762
1,2,4
15:50
17:00
YJ 201
1,2,4
7:00
8:55
YJ 202
3
11:30
12:55
Y5 649
Daily
10:30
12:45
7Y 242
1,3,5
15:55
18:45
YJ 201
3
7:00
8:25
YJ 202
1,2,4
12:00
13:25
YJ 751
3,5,7
11:00
12:10
K7 225
2,4,6,7
16:00
19:00
W9 201
Daily
7:00
8:25
YJ 761
1,2,4
13:10
17:00
YJ 761
1,2,4
11:00
12:10
YJ 602
6
16:25
17:35
W9201
1
7:00
8:25
YJ 212
5
15:00
16:55
YJ 233
6
11:00
12:10
W9 129
1,3,6
16:55
19:10
8M 6603
4
9:00
10:10
YJ 212
7
15:00
16:25
K7 224
2,4,6,7
14:30
15:45
YJ 601
6
11:00
12:25
YJ 602
6
15:40
17:35
7Y 241
1,3,5
14:30
15:40
YJ 761
1,2,4
11:00
12:55
7Y 242
1,3,5
16:40
18:45
W9 129
1,3,6
15:30
16:40
YJ 211
5,7
11:00
12:25
YJ 234
6
16:50
18:15
Yangon to MYeik
MYeik to Yangon
YH 729
2,4,6
11:00
14:00
K7 225
2,4,6,7
16:50
19:00
YH 737
3,5
11:00
13:10
YH 728
1
17:00
18:25
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
YH 727
1
11:30
13:40
W9 152/W97152
1
17:05
18:30
Y5 325
1,5
6:45
8:15
6T 706
1,3,5
8:25
9:35
YH 737
7
11:30
13:40
Y5 776
Daily
17:10
18:20
K7 319
1,3,5,7
7:00
9:05
Y5 326
1,5
8:35
10:05
W9 251
2,5
11:30
12:55
W9 211
4
17:10
19:15
6T 705
1,3,5
7:00
8:10
7Y 532
2,4,6
15:35
17:40
YJ 151/W9 7151
1
13:00
16:45
YH 738
3,5
17:10
18:35
7Y 241
1,3,5
14:30
16:25
8M 6604
4
17:20
18:30
7Y 531
2,4,6
11:15
13:20
K7 320
1,3,5,7
11:30
13:35
K7 224
2,4,6,7
14:30
16:35
8M 903
1,2,4,5,7
17:20
18:30
Y5 325
2
15:30
17:00
Y5 326
2
17:15
18:45
Y5 234
Daily
15:20
16:30
YH 738
7
17:40
19:05
SO 201
Daily
8:20
10:40
SO 202
Daily
13:20
15:40
W9 211
4
15:30
16:55
YH 730
2,4,6
17:45
19:10
W9 252
2,5
18:15
19:40
Yangon to sittwe
sittwe to Yangon
Yangon to naY pYi taw
naY pYi taw to Yangon
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
K7 422
2,4,6
8:00
9:55
K7 423
2,4,6
10:10
11:30
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
YJ 201
1,2
7:00
7:55
SO 101
Daily
7:00
8:00
7Y 413
1,3,5,7
10:30
12:20
7Y 414
1,3,5,7
12:35
13:55
YJ 201
4
7:00
10:20
YJ 201
1,2
8:10
13:25
W9 309
1,3,6
11:30
12:55
W9 309
1,3,6
13:10
14:55
6T 211
1,3
7:10
8:00
6T 212
1,3
8:15
9:05
6T 611
Daily
11:45
12:55
6T 612
Daily
13:15
14:20
ND 910
1,2,3,4,5
7:15
8:15
ND 9102
1,2,3,4,5
8:35
9:35
Yangon to tHandwe
tHandwe to Yangon
ND 105
1,2,3,4,5
10:45
11:40
ND 104
1,2,3,4,5
9:20
10:15
ND 107
6
11:25
12:20
ND 106
6
10:00
10:55
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
ND 109
1,2,3,4,5
14:55
15:40
YJ 202
4
10:35
13:25
K7 422
2,4,6
8:00
8:55
K7 422
2,4,6
9:10
11:30
ND 9109
1,2,3,4,5
17:00
18:00
ND 108
1,2,3,4,5
13:30
14:25
7Y 413
1,3,5
10:30
11:20
7Y 413
1,3,5
11:35
13:55
ND 111
7
18:25
19:20
YJ 212
5
16:00
16:55
W9 309
1,3,6
11:30
13:50
7Y 413
7
12:05
14:20
SO 102
Daily
18:00
19:00
ND 110
7
17:00
17:55
6T 211
5
18:30
19:20
ND 9110
1,2,3,4,5
18:20
19:20
7Y 413
7
11:00
11:50
W9 309
1,3,6
14:05
14:55
6T 212
5
19:35
20:25
Y5 421
1,3,4,6
15:45
16:40
Y5 422
1,3,4,6
16:55
17:50
Yangon to nYaung u
nYaung u to Yangon
Yangon to dawei
dawei to Yangon
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
YH 917
Daily
6:10
7:45
YH 918
Daily
7:45
10:25
K7 319
1,3,5,7
7:00
8:10
YH 634
2,4,6
12:15
13:25
YJ 891
3
6:20
7:40
YJ 891
3
7:55
10:35
6T 451
Daily
6:30
7:35
7Y 132
2,4,6,7
8:05
10:45
YH 633
2,4,6
7:00
8:25
K7 320
1,3,5,7
12:25
13:35
K7 222
1,3,5
6:30
7:50
K7 223
1,3,5
8:05
11:00
SO 201
Daily
8:20
9:40
6T 708
3,5,7
14:15
15:15
7Y 131
2,4,6,7
6:30
7:50
6T 451
Daily
8:05
10:15
6T 707
3,5,7
10:30
11:30
SO 202
Daily
14:20
15:40
K7 224
2,4,6,7
14:30
17:25
K7 225
2,4,6,7
17:40
19:00
7Y 531
2,4,6
11:15
12:20
7Y 532
2,4,6
16:35
17:40
7Y 241
1,3,5
14:30
17:10
W9 129
1,3,6
17:50
19:10
W9 129
1,3,6
15:30
17:35
7Y 242
1,3,5
17:25
18:45
Yangon to lasHio
lasHio to Yangon
W9 211
4
15:30
17:40
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
W9 129
1
15:30
17:35
YH 729
2,4,6
11:00
13:00
YJ 752
3,5,7
16:10
17:55
Yangon to MYitkYina
MYitkYina to Yangon
YJ 751
3,5,7
11:00
13:15
YH 730
2,4,6
16:45
19:10
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
6T 805
2,4,6
6:30
8:55
6T 806
2,4,6
9:10
11:40
Yangon to putao
putao to Yangon
YH 826
1,3.5
7:00
9:40
YJ 202
3
10:05
12:55
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
Flight
Days
Dep
Arr
YJ 201
3
7:00
9:50
YJ 202
1,2,4
10:35
13:25
YH 826
1,3,5
7:00
10:35
YH 634
7
10:35
13:55
YJ 201
1,2,4
7:00
10:20
YH 827
1,3,5
11:30
13:55
YH 633
7
7:00
10:35
YH 827
1,3,5
10:35
13:55
YJ 233
6
11:00
15:10
YJ 234
6
15:25
18:15
W9 251
2,5
11:30
14:25
W9 252
2,5
16:45
19:40
W9 251
2,5
11:30
15:25
W9 252
2,5
15:45
19:40
Domestic Airlines Air Bagan (W9) Tel: 513322, 513422, 504888. Fax: 515102 Air KBZ (K7) Tel:
Domestic Airlines
Air Bagan (W9)
Tel: 513322, 513422, 504888. Fax: 515102
Air KBZ (K7)
Tel: 372977~80, 533030~39 (airport), 373766
(hotline). Fax: 372983
Asian Wings (YJ)
Tel: 515261~264, 512140, 512473, 512640
Fax: 532333, 516654
Golden Myanmar Airlines (Y5)
Tel: 09400446999, 09400447999
Fax: 8604051
Mann Yadanarpon Airlines (7Y)
Tel: 656969
Fax: 656998, 651020
Yangon Airways (YH)
Tel: 383100, 383107, 700264
Fax: 652 533
FMI Air Charter
Tel: 240363, 240373, 09421146545
APEX Airlines (SO)
Tel:95(1) 533300 ~ 311
Fax : 95 (1) 533312
Air Mandalay (6T)
Tel: (+95-1) 501520, 525488,
Fax: (+95-1) 532275

Airline Codes

SO = APEX Airlines

7Y = Mann Yadanarpon Airlines

K7 = Air KBZ

W9 = Air Bagan

Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines

YH = Yangon Airways

YJ = Asian Wings

6T = AirMandalay

FMI = FMI Air Charter

Subject to change without notice

Day

1 = Monday

2 = Tuesday

3 = Wednesday

4 = Thursday

5 = Friday

6 = Saturday

7 = Sunday

without notice Day 1 = Monday 2 = Tuesday 3 = Wednesday 4 = Thursday 5

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse 25

InternAtIonAl FlIGHt SCHeDUleS

YANGON TO BANGKOK BANGKOK TO YANGON Flights Days Dep Arr Flights Days Dep Arr PG
YANGON TO BANGKOK
BANGKOK TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
PG
706
Daily
6:15
8:30
TG
303
Daily
7:55
8:50
8M
335
Daily
7:40
9:25
PG
701
Daily
8:50
9:40
TG
304
Daily
9:50
11:45
Y5
238
Daily
21:30
22:20
PG
702
Daily
10:30
12:25
8M
336
Daily
10:40
11:25
TG
302
Daily
15:00
16:55
TG
301
Daily
13:05
14:00
PG
708
Daily
15:15
17:10
PG
707
Daily
13:40
14:30
8M
331
Daily
16:30
18:15
PG
703
Daily
16:45
17:35
PG
704
Daily
18:20
20:15
TG
305
Daily
17:50
18:45
Y5
237
Daily
19:00
20:50
8M
332
Daily
19:15
20:00
TG
306
Daily
19:45
21:40
PG
705
Daily
20:15
21:30
YANGON TO DON MUEANG
DON MUEANG TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
DD 4231
Daily
8:00
9:50
DD 4230
Daily
6:20
7:05
FD
252
Daily
8:30
10:15
FD
251
Daily
7:15
8:00
FD 254
Daily
17:30
19:05
FD
253
Daily
16:20
17:00
DD 4239
Daily
21:00
22:45
DD 4238
Daily
19:30
20:15
YANGON TO SINGAPORE
SINGAPORE TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
8M
Y5
TR
231
Daily
8:25
12:50
TR
2822
Daily
7:20
8:45
2233
Daily
9:45
14:15
2823
Daily
9:45
14:25
Y5
SQ
2234
Daily
7:20
8:50
998
Daily
7:55
9:20
SQ
997
Daily
10:35
15:10
3K
581
Daily
8:55
10:25
3K
582
Daily
11:15
15:45
MI
533
2,4,6
11:35
15:00
MI
533
2,4,6
13:45
20:50
8M
232
Daily
13:50
15:15
MI
519
Daily
17:30
22:05
MI
518
Daily
15:15
16:40
3K
584
2,3,5
19:15
23:45
3K 583
2,3,5
17:05
18:35
YANGON TO KUALA LUMPUR
KUALA LUMPUR TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
8M
501
1,2,3,5,6
7:50
11:50
AK
504
Daily
6:55
8:00
AK
505
Daily
8:30
12:50
8M 9505
Daily
10:05
11:15
MH 741
Daily
12:15
16:30
MH
740
Daily
10:05
11:15
8M 9506
Daily
12:15
16:30
8M
502
1,2,3,5,6
12:50
13:50
8M 9508
Daily
15:45
20:05
8M 9507
Daily
13:40
14:50
MH
743
Daily
15:45
20:05
MH
742
Daily
13:40
14:50
AK
503
Daily
19:30
23:45
AK
502
Daily
17:50
19:00
AI
227
1
10:35
13:20
YANGON TO BEIJING
BEIJING TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
CA 906
3,5,7
23:50
05:50+1
CA 905
3,5,7
19:30
22:50
YANGON TO GUANGZHOU
GUANGZHOU TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
8M
CZ
711
2,4,7
8:40
13:15
CZ
3055
3,6
8:40
10:25
3056
3,6
11:25
16:15
CZ
3055
1,5
14:40
16:30
CZ
3056
1,5
17:30
22:15
8M 712
2,4,7
14:15
15:50
YANGON TO TAIPEI
TAIPEI TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
CI 7916
1,2,3,5,6
10:50
16:15
CI 7915
1,2,3,5,6
7:00
9:55
YANGON TO KUNMING
KUNMING TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
CA
416
Daily
12:15
15:55
MU 2011
3
8:25
11:50
MU 2012
3
12:40
18:45
CA
415
Daily
10:45
11:15
MU 2032
1,2,4,5,6,7
15:20
18:40
MU 2031
1,2,4,5,6,7
13:55
14:30
YANGON TO HANOI
HANOI TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
VN 956
1,3,5,6,7
19:10
21:30
VN 957
1,3,5,6,7
16:50
18:10
YANGON TO HO CHI MINH CITY
HO CHI MINH CITY TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
VN 942
2,4,7
14:25
17:15
VN 943
2,4,7
11:50
13:25
YANGON TO DOHA
DOHA TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
AI
701
1,5
14:05
19:50
AI
401
1,5
7:00
13:20
QR
919
1,4,6
8:00
11:10
QR
918
3,5,7
20:40
06:25+1
YANGON TO SEOUL
SEOUL TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
0Z
770
4,7
0:35
9:10
KE
471
Daily
18:45
22:25
KE
472
Daily
23:30
07:50+1
0Z
769
3,6
19:50
23:25
YANGON TO HONG KONG
HONG KONG TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
KA
251
5
1:30
5:55
KA
252
4
22:50
00:30+1
KA
251
1,2,3,4,6,7
1:10
5:45
KA
250
1,2,3,5,6,7
21:45
23:30
YANGON TO TOKYO
TOKYO TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
NH 814
Daily
21:45
06:50+1
NH 813
Daily
11:00
15:40
YANGON TO DHAKA
DHAKA TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
BG
061
1,6
15:35
17:00
BG
060
1,6
12:30
14:55
BG
061
4
13:45
15:10
BG
060
4
10:40
13:05
YANGON TO INCHEON
INCHEON TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
KE
472
Daily
23:30
07:50+1
KE
471
Daily
18:45
22:25
8M 7702
Daily
23:30
07:50+1
8M 7701
Daily
18:45
22:25
8M 7502
4,7
00:35
09:10
8M 7501
3,6
19:50
23:25
W9
607
4,7
14:20
16:10
W9
608
4,7
17:20
18:10
PG
724
1,3,5,6
13:10
15:05
PG
723
1,3,5,6
11:05
12:00
YANGON TO CHIANG MAI
CHIANG MAI TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Y5
251
2,4,6
6:15
8:05
Y5
252
2,4,6
9:25
10:15
7Y
305
1,5
11:00
12:50
7Y
306
1,5
13:45
14:35
YANGON TO GAYA
GAYA TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
8M
601
3,5,6
7:00
8:20
AI
235
2
9:20
12:0
AI
236
2
13:10
15:05
8M
602
3,5,6
9:20
12:30
YANGON TO DELHI
DELHI TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
AI
236
2
13:10
16:30
AI
235
2
9:20
12:20
AI
701
1,5
14:05
19:50
AI
401
1,5
7:00
13:20
YANGON TO KOLKATA
KOLKATA TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
AI
228
1,5
14:05
15:05
AI
227
1,5
10:35
13:20
YANGON TO MUMBAI
MUMBAI TO YANGON
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
AI 773
1,5
14:05
22:35
AI 675
1,5
6:10
13:20
MANDALAY TO BANGKOK
BANGKOK TO MANDALAY
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
PG 710
Daily
14:05
16:30
PG 709
Daily
12:00
13:20
MANDALAY TO SINGAPORE
SINGAPORE TO MANDALAY
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
MI
533
2,6
15:55
20:50
Y5
2234
Daily
7:20
16:30
Y5
2233
1,2,4,5,6
7:50
14:15
MI
533
2,6
11:35
15:00
MANDALAY TO DON MUEANG
DON MUEANG TO MANDALAY
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
FD 245
Daily
12:45
15:00
FD 244
Daily
10:50
12:15
MANDALAY TO KUNMING
KUNMING TO MANDALAY
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
MU 2030
Daily
13:50
16:40
MU 2029
Daily
13:00
12:50
NAY PYI TAW TO BANGKOK
BANGKOK TO NAY PYI TAW
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
Flights
Days
Dep
Arr
PG
722
3
20:15
23:15
PG
721
1,2,3,4,5
17:00
19:00
PG
722
1,2,3,4,5
19:30
22:30
PG
721
3
18:25
19:35
PG
722
1,2,3,4,5
20:15
23:15
PG
721
1,2,3,4,5
17:45
19:45
International Airlines All Nippon Airways (NH) Tel: 255412, 413 Air Asia (FD) Tel: 09254049991~3 Air
International Airlines
All Nippon Airways (NH)
Tel: 255412, 413
Air Asia (FD)
Tel: 09254049991~3
Air Bagan Ltd.(W9)
Tel: 513322, 513422, 504888. Fax: 515102
Air China (CA)
Tel: 666112, 655882
Air India
Tel: 253597~98, 254758, 253601. Fax 248175
Bangkok Airways (PG)
Tel: 255122, 255265. Fax: 255119
Biman Bangladesh Airlines (BG)
Tel: 371867~68. Fax: 371869
Condor (DE)
Tel: 370836~39 (ext: 303)
Dragonair (KA)
Tel: 255323 (ext: 107), 09-401539206
Golden Myanmar Airlines (Y5)
Tel: 09400446999, 09400447999
Fax: 8604051
Malaysia Airlines (MH)
Tel: 387648, 241007 (ext: 120, 121, 122)
Fax: 241124
Myanmar Airways International (8M)
Tel: 255260. Fax: 255305
Nok Airline (DD)
Tel: 255050, 255021. Fax: 255051
Qatar Airways (QR)
Tel: 379845, 379843, 379831. Fax: 379730
Singapore Airlines (SQ) / Silk Air (MI)
Tel: 255287~9. Fax: 255290
Thai Airways (TG)
Tel: 255491~6. Fax: 255223
Tiger Airline (TR)
Tel: 371383, 370836~39 (ext: 303)
Vietnam Airlines (VN)
Tel: 255066, 255088, 255068. Fax: 255086
 

Airline Codes

3K

= Jet Star

8M = Myanmar Airways International

AK = Air Asia

 

BG = Biman Bangladesh Airlines

CA = Air China

 

CI

= China Airlines

CZ