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Mastering

the
Bishop Pair
IM

Jaroslav Srokovsky

GM Ekaterina Borulia
Wit Braslawski

International Chess Enterprises


Seattle, Washington

Cover Image Copyright 1998, 1999 by lntelinvest Co. Ltd.


Copyright 1999 by Intelinvest Co. Ltd.
Copyright 1999 by International Chess Enterprises.
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted
in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy
ing, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without
permission in writing from the publishers.
International Chess Enterprises,' P.O. Box 19457, Seattle, WA 98109
1-800-26-CHESS
http://www.insidechess.com/
Editor: Jonathan Berry
Series Editor: Jonathan Berry
Diagrams: Jonathan Berry's YesWeDoDiagrams
Typeset by Jonathan Berry using Ventura Publisher

Srokovsky, Jaroslav, Borulia, Ekaterina, and Braslawski, Wit


Mastering the Bishop Pair
First printing: September 1999
220 + ii pages
200 game excerprts + 668 chess diagrams
ISBN 1-879479-78-8

Editor's Introduction
This is the third book in Internation
al Chess Enterprises' six-book series
on strategic themes.

will restore precise material balance,


but careful timing will often yield a
bonus, above equality.
The opposing side has resources,
The fi rst two books, Hanging
too.
While lots of pieces remain,
Pawns and Mastering Rook versus
knights
are at least the equal of
Minor Pieces, were introduced by
bishops
in close combat. O ther
the authors, but as editor I have
themes
include
establishing an out
taken on that task for Mastering the
post
for
the
knight,
blockading, and
Bishop Pair.
trading off one of the bishops.
The bishop pair arises when one
This book shows how to take ad
side only retains both bishops. One
vantage
of the bishop pair, and how
patrols the light squares, the other
to
overcome
it.
runs along the dark. The opposing
The carefully-chosen examples,
side most commonly has a bishop and
a knight, but may have two knights 200 of them, reflect real situations
among strong players. The correct
against the bishops.
course
of action does not present it
The bishop pair often confers an
self
readily,
and the solution at each
advantage upon the side possessing
step
will
challenge
the reader, no
it. Nominally, a bishop or a knight is
matter
what
her
or
his strength.
worth three pawns. But adding a
While
the
explanations
are basic, the
bishop to each side, changes some of
analysis
delves
into
critical
variations.
the considerations. First, the bishops
The
reader
will
doubt
that
the cor
cannot get in e ach other's way.
Second, the presence of the bishops rect path has been taken at many un
allows their master more oppor marked junctures, but will have to
tunities to open up the position, thus work out the truth. The examples
taking advantage of the long range were not chosen to be easily ex
powers of those same bishops. In plicable or revealed by a single note.
I am a player of about 2300 FIDE
that sense, possession of the bishop
rating,
and have learned a lot from
pair is a self-fulfilling prophecy; the
bishops are the means and the ends. editing this book. Without spoiling
The opposition is fighting the losing the reader's fun, I have played chess
battle of chess entropy: pieces once for over 30 years knowing that the
bishop pair worked best with reduced
exchanged do not reappear.
A bishop is more likely to be able material, but never before conscious
to capture a knight than the reverse. ly realized that this spoke not just
In the Ruy Lopez opening, after l .e4 about pawns, but about all the pieces.
Can the player rated 1400 learn
e5 2.f'3 c6 3.Ab5, the bishop will
have many chances to capture the c6 from this book? Yes! In the old
knight. The possessor of the bishop Soviet chess literature, the formula
pair frequently takes advantage of for success was work + talent = vic
such a situation. Tu.king the knight tory. But in North America, there is

Mastering the Bishop Pair

an extra element: enviro nment.


Talent may be found in any town or
school, but it is not going to flourish
without the right environment. In
particular, a talented player may rise
to the top, or nearly so, of the group
of players in which she or he regular
ly competes. If that group already
includes very strong players, the
talented player can rise higher before
having to find a new group. The
present series of books provides an
advanced environment for the am
bitious and talented player. The
notes were written by International
Masters as if for each other, not talk
ing down to the reader.
If the talented player can think in
this plane, it will be a long time
b e fore he or she has to find a
stronger group.
The material for the books in this
series is the Chess Academy Tutorial
computer software. The differences
between book and computer deserve
some examination. First, a book is
better because you don't need the
darned computer; a book is portable
and flexible. A book is also easier on
the eyes. On the other hand, a com
puter can show the position at every
move, and it can achieve interactivity
with the reader. Both the book and
the computer have their place.
The material in this book is chal
lenging. An ordinary presentation
w o u l d h ave m aybe o n e or two
diagrams for each example, say 300
diagrams in all. Th follow such a story
line, most of us, even the Experts and
Masters, would have to sit at a table,
moving the wooden pieces while
trying not to lose place on the page,
but that takes away the portability of
the book. Except for less eyestrain,

the player might as well be at a com


puter. In this series, we include more
than twice as many diagrams as is cus
tomary. The reader is invited to use
the diagrams instead of a board, and
to fill in the gaps mentally. This is a
book that can be exploited just as
readily on the subway, or in a quiet
corner of the garden, as in the study.
Each diagram represents a point of
departure. At each diagram, the
reader should pause and consider the
future. In general, the result with be
a striking move, sometimes even bril
liant, or an important strategical mo
ment.
The letter W or B next to the
opening diagram of each example in
dicates who has the move.
I do not claim any order in the
presentation of the material. On the
contrary, order has been spurned.
The material could have been or
ganized into topical chapters with tit
les such as "Endgame: Inducing
Weaknesses". But I noticed that in
the computer tutorial, my eye would
flick up to the heading, and I would
have a big hint as to the solution. But
that is not what happens at the chess
b o ard or i n r e a l l i fe. N o b o dy
whispers in our ear "you should in
d u c e w e a k n e s s e s b e fo r e y o u
simplify" or, o n the contrary, "you
don't have time to induce weak
nesses, he will attack, so simplify
right now". So the examples are in a
moderately random order.
For the benefit of those who like
the hints (either before or after), the
book begins with a graphical index of
themes.
In summary, this book is intended
for ambitious players who want to
learn. The way to do it is to work

Mastering the Bishop Pair

through the examples, considering


the course of action implicit in each
d i a g r a m before c o n s i d e r i n g t h e
material which follows it.

Jonathan Berry
August 1999

Theme Index
*indicates a measure taken against the bishop pair.
The last three themes are endgame only.
The number is the page on which the game starts.

Theme

Middlegame

Endgame

Gain the bishop pair

88, 156, 161 , 167, 173,185

216

Destroy it*

21,23,25, 142, 193,204

20,24,57

Give it away

41,42,43,59,60,61,62, 124, 42, 163,21 1


203

Space Advantage

9,26,36,80

13,75,79,98, 108, 1 1 1 ,
120, 191 ,208,209

Blockade*

33,51 ,52, 109, 1 13, 152,


180,205

18, 19,55,58,82,87,214

Knight outpost*

53, 104, 105, 148, 157

34,50,84, 106, 112

Attack the King

1 1 , 15, 16,40,70,89, 125, 134, 135,l43, l44, 153, 166, 170,


171,174, 178, 188, 192, 194, 195, 196, 197

Neutralize counterplay

17,32, 122, 147, 150, 159, 169

Simplify to Endgame

25,29,86, 123, 158, 175, 177,215

Sacrifice for pair

77, 126, 127, 129, 130, 131, 132, l33,145,217

Crack new diagonals

27,30,37,38,39,44,47,49,63,64,65,66,68,71 ,72,73,75,
137, 141 , 145, 149, 160, 180, 182, 186, 189, 198, l99,200,
201,202

Shift diagonals

69, 1 16, 1 17, 1 18, 1 19, 136, 138, l40, 179, l81

Inducing Weakness

4,7,9, 10,28, 101 , 107, l l5,187,212

Passed Pawn

44,45,47,95,97, 101, 164

Open center

78,84,93,94,96, 1 00, 102, 154, 165,176,l83,l84,212,213

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Boleslavsky
Scherbakov
Moscow 1942

Exchanging bishops (one way to


combat the bishop pair) by 7 . b5
gave better chances for defense.
..

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

.lb3xc4
.le3-c5t
.lc4-g8
.lc5-f2
.lf2-b6
.lg8-b3
g2-g3

15

c2-c4!

b6-b5
<aie7-e8
d8-b7
a7-a6
<ale8-f8
<aif8-e7
h5-g7

White's bishops exert strong pres


sure on Black's queenside. It is espe
cially difficult for Black to neutralize
the dark-square bishop.

a2-a4!

Grabs space on the queenside, where


White plans to induce weaknesses.

1
2
3

gn-d1
.lc4-a2

3.Ab3 !?.

3
4
5
6
7

d2-c4
gdlxd8
a4-a5
.la2-b3

'&>e8-e7
ghs-ds

t7-f6
b7-b6
e6xd8
.lc8-e6

.le6xc4?

Induces more weaknesses.

15
16
17
18
19
20

gal-cl
c4-c5!
.lb3-c4
'&>gl-f2
'&>f2-e3

gas-c8
b5-b4
b7-d8
gc8-a8
d8-e6
e6-d4

f3-f4!
Opens a second front. The more of

Mastering the Bishop Pair

the board that is under dispute,


usually the better for the bishops.

21

Tarrasch

5
Rubinstein
San Sebastian 1912

g7-e6

22

kl-fl

d4-c2t

23

c&>e3-d3

c2-d4

24

f4-f5

g6xf5

25

e4xf5

e6-g7

26

d3-e4

g7-e8

27

g3-g4

d4-c2

28

l!fl-tl

c2-d4

29

g4-g5!

d4-b5

f7-ffi

Black plans to restrict the mobility of


the white knight and exposes weak
nesses in his opponent's camp.

e5-g4

If f'/6 13<.'

2.d7? Ad6 !::. gad8;


ti rsfr
2.4)f'3 Ae3 3.g3 Ac8!. The standard
way to activate a bishop is to transfer
it to a strong diagonal.

30

.lc4xb5

Preventing 30....{)8c7 which liberates


the as-g.

30

a6xb5

31

h2-h4

e7-f7

32

l!t2-d2

rf/f7-e7

33

b2-b3

l!a8-b8

34

a5-a6

l!b8-c8

35

a6-a7

l!c8-a8

36

l!d2-d8

e8-c7

37

.lb6xc7

l!a8xa7

38

gSxf6t

Black resigned.

h6-h5!

The advance of a flank pawn usually


works well when grabbing space
against knights. It weakens the
fewest squares, which lie near the
edge of the board.

3
4
5

g4-t2
.lb3-dl
g2-g3

.lc5-e3
h5-h4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

a7-a5!

5
Intending b4.

J,dl-t3

One virtue of the bishop pair is that a


bishop may frequently be traded to
transform the advantage. White can
not reverse that here with 6.g4 b4
7 ..)xe3 gxe3 + ( weak square g3,
weak square d3).
Very bad is 7.<!'g2 because of
7 ... bxc3 8.bxc3 Ad2 9.c4 dxc4 10.dxc4
c5t 1 1 .AB ge2t 12.f2 h3t -+.

6
7
8
9

fi-g2
b2xc3
c3-c4

b5-b4
b4xc3
J,b7-a6

king.

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

2-g4
h2xg3
gal-cl
gcl-c2
g4-tl
gc2xb2
gdl-d2
tl-h3

h4xg3
J.e3-d4
ge7-b7
g8-t7
gb7-b2!
Ad4xb2
J,b2-d4

1 9.gc2 gd7 (but not 1 9 . . . .l,xf2?


20.<!'xf2 Axd3 21 .gcs = ) 20.gc6 .l,b5
21 .gc8 a4 <!le6 + .

19
20
21

gd2-c2
f4-f5

t7-e6
e6-d6

White has salvaged his pawn, but the


position is opening up, the weak
nesses remain, and Black's bishops
are becoming masters of the situa
t i o n . B e t t e r w a s 9 . g h d l g ab 8
10.gab 1 !. Then after 1 0...gxb 1 ? (bet
ter is 10 ... a4! a3) 1 1 .gxb l Axf2
1 2.<!'xf2 Axd3 13 .gb6 White has
strong counterplay for his pawn.

9
10
11

c4xd5
ghl-dl

ga8-d8
c6xd5

21

gd8-c8!

After the exchange of rooks, the


black king becomes master of the
situation.

22

.lt3-dl

22.gxc8 Axc8 23.g4 ,1e3 ! limits the


mobility of the white knight.

22
23
24
25

.ldlxc2
g3-g4
g2-t3

gcsxc2t
d6-e5
J,d4-e3- +

25 ..)f2 .1xf2 26.<!'xf2 <!'f4 - + .


Black plans to transfer his king to the
center. So he is not averse to trading
rooks to maintain the safety of his

25
26
27
28

J,c2-b3
t3-e2
J,b3-c2

e5-d4
.la6-b7
J,b7-a6
.la6-b5!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

29

a2-a4

29.a3 a4 6. Act .

29
30
31

<&>e2-f3
<&>t3xe3

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

<&>e3-e2
h3-f4
f4-e6
e6xd4t
d4-b5
<&>e2-e3
b5xa3
<&>e3-d4

.Qb5-d7
<&>d4-c3

I f:i
,

&}

bishop pair. But Black's position is


very solid and has no obvious weak
nesses. White needs to weaken his
opponent's position.

f3-f4!

1:!clxc4!

d5-d4t!
<&>c3xc2
.Qd7xa4
4a4-b3
<&>c2-b2
a5-a4
a4-a3
<&>b2xa3
<&>a3-b4

White resigned.

Karpov - Kavalek
Nice 1974

White's position is better because he


e njoys spatial superiority and the

Exchanging a pair o f rooks i s usually


favorable for the player with the

Mastering the Bishop Pair

bishops.

6
7

b3xc4

lk7xc4
e4-cSt

king and the h7-ft. 10...gas 1 1 .gb1


tllf7 12.gb2 ga3t 13.gb3 gxa2 14.cS!
dxc5 15.d6 c4t 16. <ltxc4 exd6 17. ,id5t
tlle 8 1 8.gbst tll e 7 19.gb7t tll d 8
20.gxh7 +- (Karpov)

10

f5xg4

11

.1f3xg4

c&>g8-t7

12

.1g4-e6t

c&>t7-f6

13

4e6-g8

lk5-c7

13 . . . ,ixh6 1 4.gxh6 tllg7 15 .gxh7t


<ltxg8 16.gxe7 +-.

4e3xc5!

A surprise, but White's space ad


vantage works even in a simplified
position with bishops of opposite
colour.

14

,1g8xh7

e7-e6

15

.1h7-g8

e6xd5

16

h6-h7

lk8xc5

8 ... dxc5 9.h6 Ad4 10.gb1 .

h5-h6

4g7-f8

9 ... fxg4 to.Axg4 Af8 l l .Ae6t tllh8


12.fS gas 13.gbl ga3t 14. tlle2 gxa2t
15. tllfl Axh6 16.f6 e:xf6 11.gb8t Af8
( 1 7... tllg7 18.gg8 mate) 18. t +-.

16

.1f8-g7?

More stubborn is 16...gxc4t 17. tlld3


Ag7 18.Axd5 gc5 19.Ab7 .

17

.1g8xd5

,1g7-h8

18

c&>c3-d3

c&>f6-f5

19

c&>d3-e3

20

c&>e3-f3
a2-a4

lk7-e7t
a6-a5

21
10

c&>d3-c3

There was the threat 10 ... gas. It was


better to play 10.gS ! , shutting the
black bishop out of the game and
preparing an attack against the black

22
23
24

.1dS-e4t
'8hl-h6
c&>f3-g4

Black resigned.

'8e7-c7
c&>f5-f6
'8c7-g7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Stein

Averbakh
Riga 1970

13
14
15

Ac6-b7
a2-a4
Ab7-a8

{)d3-b4
{)b5-d6

Black resigned. 15 ... aS 16.Axb4 axb4


17.aS +-.

Stein - Smyslov
Moscow 1972

{) c3-b5!

White invites Black to trade rooks,


after which Black's pawns on the
q ueenside become objects of attack.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

ltblxcl
Adlxcl
{)b5-c3
-el

g3-g4
4g2-c6

{) c3-d5

ltc7xclt
ltc8xcl t
a7-a6
{) e6-c5
ralh8-g8
{)fS-d6
Ag7-t'8

h2-h4!

1
2

h4-h5!

ite2xt3!

{)b8-d7
Ab7xt3

f7-fS

8 .. . b5

9.Aa3 cb7 10.c7 a5 1 1.Axb7


xb7 12.Axf'St 13.xbS +-.

9
g4xf5
10 {) d5xb6 + 11
d3-d4
12 Acl-dl

Exploiting Black's lack of a dark


sq uare bishop, White intends to
weaken the dark squares on the
kingside with a bold thrust of his h-ft.

g6xf5
e5-e4
{) c5-d3
{) d6-b5

White sacrifices a pawn, hoping that


when the game is opened his bishops
will gain still greater force.

d6xe5

10

Mastering the Bishop Pair

g7xh6

hS-h6!

4 ... g6 5.dxe5 xe5 6.f6! +-.

S
6
7
8

9
10

4clxh6
4h6-g7
ghlxh7
4g7xd4

eSxd4
gh8-g8
4) e7-G
c7-cS

g2-g4!
g4xG

cSxd4
e6-eS

10. ..eS 1 1.'le4 dxc3 12.a2! +-.

1 1 'lt3-dS!

White has a strong attack.

11
12
13
14
15
16
17

c3xd4
gal-di
.a.n-g2
'ldS-b7
d4xeS
Clle l-fi

ggS.f8
gas-c8
'ld8-e7
grs.gs
gcsxc4
'le7xeSt
'leS-bS

18

Cllfi-gl !

'ftb5-c6?

better is 18 ... g2t! ? 19.'i\'xg2 5.

19 'lb7xc6
20 gh7-h8! + -

gc4xc6

And White won.

Kotov - Katetov
Moscow 1946

Cllb l-c2

A standard plan is f3 and e4, but


White sees no need to hurry, first
aiming to induce weaknesses on
Black's queenside.

1
2
3
4
s

4) d2xe4
ghl-fi
gdl-bl
2-t3
Cllc2-d2

4)gS-e4
4)f6xe4
4c8-d7
b7-b6
4) e4-gS
t7-G

6...e6 7.e4.

a2-a4!

4)gS-t7

11

Mastering the Bishop Pair

a4-a5

b6-b5

The first goal is achieved. Now White


ne eds to prod the kingside for a
weakness.

9
10
11

l!fi-tl
h3-h4
Ah2-f4

h7-h5
l!e8-e7

weaknesses on the queenside.

16

c&>g8-h7

17

l!bl-gl

l!e7-e8

18

c&>c2-b3

l!e8-c8

19

c&>b3-b4

c6-c5t

A desperate sacrifice!

20

d4xc5

a7-a6

21

e3-e4!

d5xe4

22

t3xe4

White's bishops dominate the fray.

22

11

g7-g6 ?!

l!c8-c6

23

e4x5

24

l!gl-g6

l!c6-f6

Black resigned.

Unnecessarily weakening.

12
13
14
15

g2-g4!
g4xh5
l!tl-g2
l!g2xg8

Cfg8-h7
g6xh5
l!a8-g8

Eingorn - Krasenkow
Metz 1993

In the course of realizing the ad


vantage of two bishops, a rook trade
often neutralizes the opponent's
dynamic possibilities.

15

c&>h7xg8

e5-e6!

White starts an attack against the


king with the powerful support of his
bishops.

1
16

c&>d2-c2

White's king goes to exploit the

t7xe6

1 . ..f5 2.h l !::. g4 with an attack


(Krasenkow).

Mastering the Bishop Pair

12

Better is 7.gct b,. bxc4.

k8xc4

.!b2xg7

'llg8xg7

ite3-e5t

'l/g7-f7

10

f4-G

10.gxdS? Ag7 -+.

2
3

.!e2-g4
.!g4-e6t

e6xd5
c5xe6

3 ... h8 4.Ab2t Ag7 5.Axg7t g7


6.*d4t h6 7.gd3 ! )xd3 8.b6 +
(Krasenkow).

'{te3xb6

d5xc4

10

gd8-d6! =

Black has coordinated his pieces and


he aims to build a fortress.

'{tb6-e3?!

Stronger was 5 . -&hb7 ( b,. * d 5 )


5 . . . )xf4 6.*e4 )d3 7.*e6t h8
8.bxc4 . White must keep Black's
pieces from becoming active.

5
6

.!a3-b2?!

e6-g7

In forcing the attack, White allows


counterplay. He might have kept the
edge with the simple 6.bxc4, e.g. :
6 . . . gxc4 7.*b3 d5 s.gxd5 gxd5
9.c4 e6 10.Axf'8 <iht'8 1 1.*c8 .

6
7

b3xc4

d6-d5

11

gdl-fl

12

G-ffi

13

gnxffi

gc4-clt

14

'llg l-fl

gc1-c6

15

Mxd6

gc6xd6

16

'llfl-e2

b7-b6

17

'lle2-d3

d5-d4

18

tl'e5-e8

h7-h5

19

h2-h3

'l/g8-g7

20

g2-g4

h5xg4

21

h3xg4

ll>g7-g8

Draw.

'llf7-g8
e7xffi

13

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Kramnik

Ulibin
Greece 1992

2 ... iS'f6 3.Axe4 'l#txe5 4.Axb7 'l#txb2


( 4 ...fab8? 5.,1c3) s.gb 1 'l#txa2 6.Axa8
fua8 7.iS'b3 iS'a6 8.0-0 ;;!;;. But now
White's bishops are much stronger
than Black's knights (Kramnik).

3
4
s

e5xd7
0-0
.1b4-a3

c5xd7
a7-a5
gm-es

S tr o n g e r is 5 . . . b 6 , /J. f7 - f 5 ,
strengthening the knight's position
on e4. It is crucial to create support
points for one's knights when fight
ing against bishops.

.1c3-b4!

6
7

b2-b3
.1a3-b2

'l' dl-d4

b7-b6
ga8-d8

After 1 .0-0 xc3 2.fuc3 Ad7 /J. Ac6


Black has no difficulties ( Kramnik).
White decides to preserve his bishop.

.1c8-d7

Useless is l ...iS'f6 2.iS'c2 6c5 3.0-0


AfS ? ! 4.h4! when impossible is
4 .. xg3? in view of 5.ftfxg3 iS'd4t
6.e3 ! iS'xe3t 7.iS'f2 ( Kramnik).
Black should have started fighting
against the bishops immediately:
l...a5 2.,1a3 4c5 3.0-0 Ad7 4.d4
xd4 5 . iS'xd4 A c 6 6.Axc6 bxc6
7.Axc5 dxc5 and, regardless of his
trebled pawns, his counterplay is not
bad. (Kramnik).
.

Inferior is immediate 8.f3 ec5 9.e4


in view of 9... f5 ! 10.exf5 ( 10.iS'dSt
iS'f7 1 1 . iS'xf7t '1Jxf7 12.exf5 ge2)
10... iS'e3t 1 1 . 'l}h l d3 with counter
play (Kramnik).

'l' e7-f6

8 ...ef6 9.gcel ! /J. e2-e4, t'2-f4, g3g4-g5 .


9

'l' d4xf6

An exchange of heavy pieces usually


favors the player who enjoys the ad
vantage of two bishops.
9

t3-e5

e6-c5?!

Bl ack had to risk the complications:

10

gn.dI

d7xf6
h7-h6?

It is better to avoid weaknesses when


playing against two bishops in the

14

Mastering the Bishop Pair

ending especially.

e2-e3
Ciflgl-fi
cflfi -e2

11
12
13

m,1,:t

"J-:t
,
.

v" "v .......


f -

"0

1.

....
... 7,m.

ft
"
R,,
/""%-w

<!> -- I['
<!>
-.rlJ--
. lAj

\!

...
l..
.... . ....
<...

a5xb4
.ic5-a6
4J a6-c5
.l e4-f6

4Jf6-d7
ge8-e7
gd8-e8

14

7- .

g3-g4!

/,

With the idea h2-h4 and g4-g5, seiz


ing space and inducing weaknesses
on Black's kingside.

14
15
16
17

...
h2-h4
Ag2-f3
gdl-dS

ge7-e6
ge6-e7
4J d7-c5
.l c5-a6

17 .. .6 18.,1g2! .

18

a2-a3 !

Restricting the knight is an important


.
element in a fight of bishops agamst
knights. Bad was 18.gh5? ( b,. g4-gS)
in view of 18 ....lb4 19.a3 .lg3t!.

18

...

.i a6-c5

18 ... ec5 19.g5 ! .lxb3 20.ggl with

29

ga7-al!

.i c5-e6

15

Mastering the Bishop Pair

29 . . . f6 30.AdS t .lf7 3 1 .!!agl c&'f8


32J'!h7 .

30

ghl-h4

f7.f6

30 ... h7 3 1 .!!ahl .lef8 32.Ae4 g6


33.Ad5 6. t2-f4-f5 White's bishops
are firing at will, everywhere! (Kram
nik).

31
32

gal-gl
Ac6-d5

32.f4 h3 !.

32
33
34

gh4-h8t
2-f4

34 .. . gh7

35

c&>g8-t7

Black

2
3

Ae3xc5

c6xb4

3.*"c5 d3t 4.!!xd3 *"b2t 5.c&'dl


Axd3 - + .

J..
--

c&>t7-e8
e6-f8
g5-e6

, ,JQJ,
.
....

35.Ag8 +-.

c&>e2-t3

ggl-g6!
Ab2xg7
Ag7xf8

a3xb4

L ..

'7,
-}.

V,"
.

After 35.Axe6 !!xe6 36.!!xg7 the end


ing is hopeless for Black.

35
36
37
38

2.:!'!d2 Axe2 - + ; 2.'lh2 Axc3 3.xc3


e5 with an attack.

f6.f5
e6-c5
ge7-t7

resigned.

Khenkin - Epishin
USSR 1988

7.
"';
"%!
.....

_ . . . . /," '"
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

'l'd5-d2
'&>cl-bl
ii}'d2xb2
gdl-d6
c&>blxb2
c&>b2-al
Ac5-a3
Aa3-cl
gd6xd3

'l'b6-h6t!
b4-d3t
gb8xb2t
d3xb2
Aa6-d3t
gf8.b8t
'l'h6-d2
gb8-b3
itd2-c2

Fo rced i n v i e w o f t h e t h r e a t
12 ...!!bl t.

With c5- and d7-pawns like ripe


grapes to be plucked, Black must
make the most of his dynamic pluses:
concentration of his pieces on the
qu eenside; the insecure position of
the white king at c l ; semi-open b-file.

ga8-b8!!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

16

13
14
15
16
17

:!':!b6-a6t
:!:!a6xa4t
itc2xa4t
ita4-b5t
itb5-d3t!

:!;!d3-d4
:!;!d4-a4
c3xa4
<&'al-bl
.S.cl-b2

l 7 ... 'l!i'xe2? ! 18 J'!cl h5 19.!!c2 with


counterplay.

18
19
20
21
22

itd3xe2
ite2xg2
h7-h6
'{tg2xf3
a7-a5

<&'bl-cl
:!;!hl-dl
:!;!dlxd7
:!;!d7-d2
e4-e5

White resigned.

Steiner, H

Flohr

Hastings 1932-33

-
-r.
.1%

1.
,, ,,Y,11,_
11
111
a{'JJ11'ftvJ
"ifr r T :.

"
" ;,.,,;,.,,
.4J9l-91fAaJ
r
/,
lf.

lf.

ii:

f4-t3 !

Giving Wh ite no res pite, B lack


launches a decisive attack.

6
7
8
9

,1g2xt3
itb5-d3
itd3xd4
a2-c3

itd6-f4
.S.f6xd4!
itf4xt3

9.bxa5 Axd5 10.'l!i'xd5 !!el t-+.

9
10

a5xb4

itd4xb4

m
.
........ mmca>m
II-
W,'.
II
. . im

.t

'11 -L Y..r.

fi.Jf
.EJ1
LJ1
11

.
. "; -
7,,,/, -
,

..

White has striven to exploit the


shortcomings of his opponent's posi
tion. He is ready to advance his b-ft to
start play on the queenside.

h7-h5!

U s i n g t h e d e c e n tr a l i z a t i o n o f
White's queen and the extra pawn on
the kingside, Black commences play
against the king.

2
3

b2-b4
At3-g2

3.bxa5? a3 -+.

3
4
5

h2xg3
g3-g4

h5-h4!

.
10

,1b7xd5!- +

White's pieces are overloaded.

11
12
13

c3xd5
<&'gl-h2
d5-e3

13 . .!Llxb6 g5 - + .

h4xg3
f5-f4

%l00

13
14
15
16

'{tb4xd6
e3-c4
c4-e5

itt3xdl t
:!:!e7-e6

itdl-d6t
:!;!e6xd6
:!;!d6-c6
:!;!c6-c3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
White

e5-d7
g4-g5
d7-f6t
f6-d5
d5-f4t
f4xg6
4'lh2-g.3
calg.3-t3
g6-f4
f4-d3
d3-b2
4'lt3-f4

lk3-b3
t7-f5
Cf}g8-t7
-e6
Clle6-d6
gb3-b4
gb4-g4t
gg4xg5
gg5-gl
ggl-al
<lld 6-d5
4'ld5-d4

resigned.

Flohr - Bannik
Kiev 1954

11

17

h2-h4

White seeks to induce weaknesses on


Black's kingside.

11
12
13

'lc2-dl
'ldl-d7

At8-e7
4'lg8-t8

Even better is 13.h5, /j, g3-g4 and


*d l-hl +-.

13
14
15
16

Ae4-c2
h4-h5
h5xg6

Better is 16.g4.

16
17

White controls a lot of space. The


weakness of Black's a4-ft is very im
portant. White wants to exchange all
the rooks and, h aving tied down
Black's queen to the a4-ft, start play
in the center or on the kingside.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

gal-dl
Ae4-t3
At3-e4
itc5-c2
f2-f4
Cllg l-f2
gelxdl
gdl-d7
gd7xd8
Cllf2 -e2

e7-e6
itb8-c7
Ag7-t8
At8-g7
Ag7-t8
gd8xdl
'lc7-b6
ga8-d8
'lb6xd8
'ld8-a8

g.3-g4

'la8-b8
'lb8-a8
Ae7-d8

h7xg6
Ad8-b6

The differing levels of activity of all


the pieces enable White to mount a
fierce attack against the black king.

18
19

f4-f5
g4xf5

g6xf5
b5-c7

18

Mastering the Bishop Pair

19 ... exfS 20.e6 +-.

25

'ltf6-gSt

g8-f8

26

'lg5-h6t

f8-e7

27

'lh6-d6t

Black resigned. 27 . . . \tle8 28.Ad7t


\tld8 29.Ae6t \tle8 30.itd7t 1/f8
31.'txf? mate.

Vaitonis - Geller
Stockholm 1952

20

Ab2-d4!

The strength of the bishop pair often


lies in the possibility of exchanging
one of them at any appropriate mo
ment. In this case White accepts the
position with oppos ite-coloured
b i s h o p s because the threats to
Black's king will be irresistible ( Flohr
S.).

20
21

Ac2xf5

e6xf5

22.Axb6? a6t.

21
22

White has two bishops, but the light


square one is restricted by his own
pawns. If Black manages to exchange
the dark-square bishops, he will have
a strong knight against a weak
b i s h o p . C o n s i d e r i n g W h i te 's
numerous weaknesses, this should be
quite enough for a win. But Black
begins by strengthening up the posi
tions of his pieces.

'ld7xc7

t7-f5!

Fixing the weak f4 pawn.

23

'lc7-d6t!

23.e6? ! ite8!.

23

-g7

23 ...1/g8 24.e6! ite8 25.exf7t +-.

24

'ld6-f6t

g7-g8

c&>gl-fl

g8-t7

fl-e2

e8-f6

Ag2-f3

Preventing f6-h5.

f6-d7

19

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Smys-:-='-"==--lov
Denker

Moscow 1946

h2-h3

.ld4-b2!

With the idea Ab2-a3-b4

e2-d2

,lb2-a3

,la5-c7

r7-e7

a4-a5

White avoided the exch ange of


bishops, but now his bishop has fallen
into a cage and Black captures the a5
pawn.

d7-f6

8
9

d2-c2

e7-d7

10

,lc7-b6

d7-c8

11

c2-d2

f6-d7

12

.lf3-dl d7xb6- +

The endgame with bis ops of op


posite colour is an easy wm for Black.

13

a5xb6

.la3-b4t

14

d2-cl

c8-b7

15

,ldl-a4

b7xb6

16

,la4-e8

,lb4-el

17

cl-c2

b6-c7

18

.le8-r7

c7-d8

White resigned in view of 19.Ag8


rfie7 20.Axh7? rfifl.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

20

is weaker than his white counterpart;


White's pieces are better centralized;
and he has the initiative.

10
11 gd6-d7t
12 gd7xt7t
13 gd3-d8
14
'l!l'e5-e8
15 'l!l'e8-h8t
16 gd8-d6t
17 'l!l'h8xh6 + 1 8 gd6-dl
19 gl-g2
20 gdl-fit
21
'l!l'h6-ffi
22
'l!l'ffi-f5
gn.a
23
24
'l!l'f5-d3
25
ga.e2
26 'l!l'd3:-e4
27 'l!l'e4-d5t
28
ge2-e6

gnxa
ga.n
grsxn
gn-g7
g6-g5
h7-g6
g6-t7
'l!l'g4-f5
'l!l'f5-c5t
'l!l'c5-e7
t7-g8
'l!l'e7-e8
g5-g4
'l!l'e8-e7
gg7-g5
'l!l'e7-f8
gg5-g7
'l!l'f8-t7

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

gn.ct
.le3-c5!
gclxcS
gal-cl
gl-fi
-el

0-0

.lc8-b7
.le7xc5
grs-d8
g8-f8
gd8-d3
ga8-d8

Unfortunately, Black derives no


benefit from control of the open d
file.

f3-e5

8...gd2 9.g5c2.

9
10
11

tl-f3
gcs-c2
gclxc2

l l ...gd6 12.c4 6. a5.

12
13

e5-d7t
d7-c5

14

e4-e5!

gd3-d4

gd4-d2
gd2xc2
gd8-c8
-e7
gc8-c7

Black resigned.

Muresan

Savereide
Tbilisi 1982

White restricts the black bishop still


further by preventing e6-e5 6. Ab7c8-e6. White has significant ad
vantage in the endgame. Black can
only await events.

.lc1-e3

With the idea grc1, Ac5.


White strives to exchange dark
square bishops, to deprive her op
ponent of the bishop pair and seize
the weakened dark squares.

14
15
16
17
18
19

b2-b4
gc2-d2
gd2-d6
el-d2
d2-c3

.lb7-c8
.lc8-d7
.ld7-e8
gc7-c8
gc8-b8
a7-a5

Now 20. bxa5 gb5 2 1 .b 3 ! gxe5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

22. a6 was winning immediately.

20
21

22
23
24
25
26
27

a2-a3

a3xb4
c3-b2
t3-f4
g2-g4
b2-b3
gd6-dl
h2-h4

Blackburne

a5xb4t
gb8-a8

21

Schwarz
Berlin 1881
B

ga8-a7
ga7-a8
ga8-b8

White strives to create an inroad on


the kingside.

27
28
29

g4-g5
h4-h5
h5-h6

ga7-a8
ga8-a7
4e8-d7
g7xh6
J,d7-c8

30
31

g5xh6

32
33
34

gdl-gl
ggl-g7
c5-e4

35
36

e4-f6
f6xh7

4e2-d3
ga7-a8
ga8-h8

37
38
39

h7-g5
h6-h7

4d3-g6
"1e7-t'8

g5xe6t

"1t'8-e7

40
41
42

e6-g5
gg7-g8t
h7xg8itt

"1e7-t'8
gh8xg8

43
44
45
46
47
48

b3-c4
"1c4-c5
g5-e4
f4-fS
e4-d6
d6-c8

Black resigned.

4c8-a6
4a6-e2

Black's best defense lies in exchang


ing the dark-square bishop; the most
dangerous attacking piece of his op
ponent.

J,d6-e7!

The moves i n the game were


l....\f4t? 2.\hf4! Axf4 3.h5, and
Black resigned.

4f6-e5

After 2.Axe6 fxe6 3.'tg5 Axf6 4.'txf6


follows 4...'td8! and if 5.'txg6t, then
5 ...gg7.

4e7-d6 =

Botvinnik

Smyslov
Moscow l958
B

t'8xg8
4g6-c2
4c2-a4
"1g8-g7
J,a4-c2
4c2-a4
White has a passed pawn on the
queenside while the black pawn at c4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

22

is well blocked. But Black has un


tapped power - his bishops. Now
White threatens to trade one of
them, so prophylaxis is necessary.

d7-b6?!

better is 1 ... gfe8!, to answer 2.Ah6


with 2...,lh8!, preserving the dark
square bishops.

2
3
4
s
6
7

Ae3-h6!
iil'd2xh6
a3-a4
gn-b1
'ith6-e3
t3xe4

10

l(bl-fi

'itd8-d7

10...xd5? 1Ute6t,
or 1 0 . . . Axd 5 ? l l .xd5 xd5
12.'M'e6t.

11
12

'ite3-d4
d5xe6

e7-e6
c7xe6

12 ...'M'xe6 13.f4 *e5 14.gadl .

Ag7xh6
17-ffi
b6-a8
ffi-fS
f5xe4
a8-c7

13

'itd4-g4!

13.c4t d5 with counterplay.

13
14
15
16

e2-d4
gal-dl
ttg4-f4

l(f8-e8
'itd7-g7
e6-c7
ges-eS

17
18
19
20
21
22

d4-c6!
'itf4xc4t
'itc4xc6
'itc6-b6
'itb6-d4
ltfi-el

Ab7xc6
d6-d5
gb8-d8
'itg7-e7
'ite7-d6
l(d8-e8

d4-d5!

White turns his passed pawn into a


connected pair.

8
9

e4xd5

c6xd5
Ac8-b7

9 ... gf5 10.'M'd4,lb7 l l .f4 .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

23

gelxe5

ge8xe5

24
25

b4-b5
'ltd4-a7!

c7-e6

25. e4? gxe4 26.*"e4 'l!tcSt +


-

25

23

d5-d4

26 c3-e4-+
Black resigned in view of 26... 'l!tf8
27.b6 f4 (or 27 ... d8 28.b7 c6
29.'M'b6) 28.b7 ges 29.b8'l!t gxb8
30.gS +-.

Ostojic

hl-gl

grs-ds

s.gael Axd3 6.*"d3 d5 7.exd6 gxd6


8.'{tc3 gad8 +.

Sue tin
Havana 1968

4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

d7-d5
c4xd5
'l'c6xd5
.ld3xe4 'ltd5xe4 +
gn.a
ga8-b8
'l'h3-c3
gd8-d4
.lb2-a3
gd4-c4
'l'c3-d2
h7-h5
gal-dl
'lte4-c6
c2-c3
'ltc6-a4
'ltd2-cl

14
15
16
17
18
19

'ltclxc3
M-fi
.la3xc5
.lc5-f2
g2-g3

.lb7-e4!

Encourages White to trade light


after which Black will
have a good knight against the bad
bishop. Exchanging the opponent's
more active bishop (let him keep the
passive one) is one way to fight the
pair.
sq uare bishops,

2
3

.le2-d3
'ltg3-h3

e7-fS

3.-{tel Axd3 4.cxd3 d6, weak square


d3, d4.

3
4

'ltc7-c6
.lcl-b2

gc4xc3 !
'lta4xdlt
'ltdl-e2
'lte2xa2
a6-a5
a5-a4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

24

20
21
22
23
24
25
26

gn-al
galxbl
!&>gl-g2
c&>g2-gl
At2-el
g3xh4
Aelxc3

gb8-blt
i!l'a2xblt
i!l'bl-b7t
i!l'b7-b3
h5-h4
i!l'b3xc3
f5-e3

White resigned.

Opocensky

5
6
7

Flohr
Prague 1929
B

Aa6xc4

It was better to decline the sacrifice


2.Af4 Ad6 3.Acl, though even in this
case Black is better off. Black would
be able to transfer his bishop to b6
and his knight to e6.

2
3
4
5

7.Ae5 c5 8.f4 c4 9.bxc4t l!xc4 10.gbJ


Ab4 + b,. a7-a5, gc4-c2-a2 (Flohr).

d6-c4!!

Sacrificing a pawn, Black seeks to


strip White of the bishop pair, vacate
the d5 square for his king, and trans
fer the rook to b4, whence it will at
tack the weakened white pawns.

gc4-c3
Af4-e3

.lb4-t8!
gb7-b4

Ae3-f4
gc2xc4
b2-b3

d5xc4
gc7-b7
!&>e6-d5

7
8
9

Ae3xf4
ll>t2-g3?!

9.Ag3 was better.

9
10

gc3-c4

f5-f4!
gb4xd4
At8-b4!

10.ge3 l!xf4! 1 1 .c&>xr4 Ad6t -+.

10
11
12
13
14
15
16

!&>g3-g2
b3xc4t
Af4-b8
t3-f4
Ab8-e5
f4-f5

White resigned.

Ab4-elt
gd4xc4
ll>d5xc4
Ae1xh4
a7-a6
ll>c4-d5
!&>d5xe5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Szily

Polugaevsky

25

tant is that White lacks counterplay.

Bad Liebenstein 1963

6
7
8

ltdl-d3
Cfihl-gl
Cfigl-fi

ID'8-c8
Cfig8-t8

=::;;:;;::;;;:==

4e7-d8!

With the idea *g4.


I n this situation of static ad
vantage, an exchange of queens
favors Black. Bad is l ...c3 2.c3
xe4 3 Jc7 f2t 4. Axf2 *xh3
s.gxb7 /j, e7 .

4J d4-e2

There was already the threat of


2 . c3.
.

8
9

e4-e5

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

4J c3-e4
f4xg5
c2-c3
lth3-h7
4J e4-g5
ltd3-g3
c3-c4
b3xc4

g7-g5!

9.fxg5 hxg5 jj, Ae5, g4 +.

d6xe5
Affi-g7
h6xg5
g5-g4- +
ltc6-c7
4b7-d5
t7-ffi
b5xc4
ltc7xc4

White resigned.

Simagin

Gusev
Moscow l952

2
3

4h4xf6

tl'h5-g4!

3 . xg4 .lxg4 4.gh3 Ab6 +.

3
4
5

lte3xh3
ltfi-dl

'l'g4xh3
4d8xf6
ltc8-c6

Black has the bishop pair and pres


su re along the c-file. But most impor-

Mastering the Bishop Pair

26

Kopylov

Black's bishops are strong; 1...fub2


threatens.

Zaitsev, I

Kuibyshev 1970

b2-b3!

White sacrifices the exchange for a


strong attack on Black's weakened
king.

.ld4xal

Black accepts the exchange sacrifice,


otherwise after 2.gadl /j, e3 White
would have started the attack against
the king without any sacrifice.

1!flxal

itd8-e7

2 ... 'td6 3.gdl /j, e3.

3 ite2xa6
4 1!al-cl

t7-f6

White has more than sufficient com


pensation for the exchange: a pawn
and an attack on the black king.

4
5

g4-e3

1!f8-t7
.ld5-a8

5 ... ga8 6.'te2 /j, h5.

6
7

.lf5-e6
e3-f5t

t7-f5!

Exchanging the e4 pawn, Black ex


tends the scope of his bishops and
strips his opponent of control over
the important central d5 point.

e4xf5

2.f3 deserves attention, and though


White gets a weak e4 pawn, he
retains the outpost d5, which is very
important in a fight against bishops.

2
3
4
5

c3-b5
itdl-13
1!bl-cl

5
6

itt3-e2

grsxrs +
1!f5-d5
'l'd8-d7

ite7-a7 a
g7-h8

7 ...\t>h7 8.'te2 +-.

8 1!c1-c8t
9 ita6xa7
10 1!c8xb8 + 11
1!b8-f8
Black resigned.

h8-h7
1!t7xa7
1!a7xa2

1!d5-f5

6.'te4 Ad5 7.'td3 (7.'tc2 gaf8 8.'tc7


'te6) 7 ...Ax:b2 +.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

6
7

lkl-c7

Ae6xb3
l'd7-e6

8
9

bS-c3
4e3-d4

d6-dS- +
l'e6xe2

10
11
12

c3xe2

e7-eS

.ld4-c3
gc7xt7

grs.n
g8xt7

13
14

gn-e1

dS-d4

Ac3-d2

Ab3xa4

15

e2-g3

Aa4-c6

3
4

-+.

Yunnala 1985

4
s

It looks like White's pieces occupy


active positions, but he cannot derive
any benefit from their placement.
Black, on the other hand, can exploit
the almost imperceptible weakness
of the b3 square and build up pres
sure along the semi-open b-file.

e4-g3

2.g5? xc4! 3:ltxc4 d5 - + .

2
3

ga8-b8
ltd2-d3

ltdl-bl

5.gtd2 b3 6.ge2 Af6.

S
6

e2-e4

4.b3 Axf3 5.Axf3 xb3 6.gb l d4

Inkiov - Gurevich, M

c6-aS! +

l'c7-b6!

Preventing f3-d2 and increasing


pressure along the b-file.

White resigned.

27

l'c2-dl

4b7-a8
a5-b3

d6-dS!

Black has strengthened his position


considerably, now he opens the
game. The dormant bishops are
about to awaken.

7
8

e4xdS
l'dl-e2

8.exd5 c4 +.

e6xdS

Ae7-f6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

28

9
10
11

c4xd5
g<13.dl
4Jg3-e4

c5-c4
.!a8xd5

-
t f"":2

a. . .Y,m
:a:
-. . -.-.Y,m
,,

:lfWfi .
- ;
f"":2
-

'";;1 '%!

-A
_,,.i!i
, . w

WW

"

/, !%."

11
12

...
gdl-el

!\

/,, /,

itb6-e6!

12.xf6t 'M'rl6 6. ges, Ae4 +.

12
13

...
gbl-dl

ite6xg4

13.xf6t gxf6 14.gbdl c5 +.

13

.!d5xe4

The centralized knight at e4 is well


worth one of Black's bishops.
1 3. . .'M'g6! ? + also deserved attention.

14
15
16

gdlxd8t
ite2xe4
gelxe4

gb8xd8
itg4xe4

17
18
19
20
21
22
23

.!ffixb2
a6-a5
<&>g8-h 7
4Jb3-d2
g7-g6
4Jd2xt3
<&>h7-g8

.!g2-fi
ge4xc4
a3-a4
<&>gl-g2
Afi-d3t
gc4 -c7
gc7xf7t

Draw.

Magomedov

Epishin

Daugavpi/s 1989

mm
-.......-.
r.f(fe A
- - --.
lpr.fffe lp
,&ft .-.,&ft&
,, ,7,f.&
f
.:

- ,, ,7,

.&

-41
7,
. w--1'>" },.
.

g
:a:m
-- -- -
.11 "%! -- },"%!
B A;
f"'t ,/,ai"'
"'"' /,
!L
a ""'/,

""'

b2-b4!

It is far from easy for White to realize


his advantage of two bishops, be
cause Black's knight at d5 is strong
and well entrenched. Making the
most of the tactical peculiarities of
the position ( undeveloped black
pieces and a weak eighth rank),
White seizes space on the queenside.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

d5xb4?!

1
Better

2
3

Vasiukov

Kochiev
Beltzy 1981

was l....l\b7 2.b5 gbc8 3.a5 ;;!;;.

,ld4xb6
galxdl

29

gdSxdl t
b4-d5

Necessary, even though a pawn is


Jost.

.lb6xa7

gbS-aS

White has the two bishops and an


extra pawn, but Black still has some
counterplay.

5
6
7
s
9

,lg2xd5
gdlxdS
gdS-d4
Aa7-b6
gd4-e4

e6xd5
.lcS-e6
t7-ffi
ffixeS
gas-es

,lg2-fl !

Not only retaining both bishops, but


also forcing Black to exchange his
active rook. This, limits Black's
dynamic possibilities.

1
2
3

gclxel
,lf4-e5

ge2-el
'fte6xel
'ftel-dl

4
5

'ftd4-e3
'fte3-e2

ffi-eS
'ftdlxe2?!

9 . .Cf;fl 10.aS Cf;f6 1 1 .Ac7 +-.


The attempt to draw with opposite
bishops has faint hope, but in any
case Black will be two pawns down.
.

10
11
12
13
14
15
16

ge4xe5
gesxeSt
a4-a5
t2-f4
f/gl-tl
f/t2-e3
f/e3-d4

Ae6-d7
,ld7xe8
.leS-bS
f/g8-t7
h7-h5
f/t7-e6
g7-g6

16 Cf;d6 17.AcSt <17e6 18.Af'B b,. Cf;c5


...

+-.

17
lS

f/d4-c5
f/c5-c6

B lack resigned.

.lbS-fl

The exchange of the queens deprives


Black of his last hope for counter
play. Better was 5 ... \l!tb3 b,. ,lc6, \l!td5.

6
7

Aflxe2
.le5-f4

t7-ffi
f/g8-t7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

30

8
9
10

h3-h4
c&>gl-fi
4e2-g4t

c&>t7-e6
e8-d6
ffi-fS

Otherwise 21 .d4 6. Axf5.

21

g3xf4

21.\\?xf4!?.

21
22
23
24
25
26

4c2-b3t
f4-f5
c&>e3-f4
d3-d4
d4-d5

c5-d7
c&>t7-f8
4fi-h3
4h3-fi
.an -e2

Black resigned.

Georgiev, Kir.
Hilbner
Wijk aan Zee 1988

11

4g4-dl

a6-a5

After 1 1 ...g6 it is easier for White to


create a remote passed pawn on the
kingside: 12.3, then, after centraliz
ing the king, g3-g4, h4-h5.

12
13

4f4-d2
h4-h5

b7-b6

Fixing the pawn weakness at g7.

13
14
15
16
17

c&>fi-e2
c&>e2-e3
c&>e3-d4
4d2-c3

d6-b7
<f/e6-t7
b7-c5
<f/t7-e6
4d5-g2

18
19
20

c&>d4-e3
t2-f3 + 4dl-c2

c&>e6-t7
4g2-fi
f5-f4t

17 ... ,1b7 18.Ac2 6. d4-e3-f4.

c2-c4!

Wh ite opens the g a m e for the


bishops.
1 . f5 ! ? ftexfS 2.c4 ; 1 . . .ftgxf5
2.ftgxf5 ftexf5 3.exd5 g6 4.dxc6 bxc6
5.,1h6 (Georgiev Kir.).

Mastering the Bishop Pair

'l'bS-cS

a4-a5

31

4:)b6-c8

Mo re stubborn was 1...dxc4 2.dxc4


b6 3 . fS (3 :ixd7 gfd8 4.cS ih6
s.c7 gac8 6.-teS Af6 7.'td6 Ae7
8 .eS Axd6 9 . ft cxd6 ) 3 . . . eS
4.fxg6t+ "1xg6 5.A,f4 gad8 6.'tc2
with an attack.

White has significant advantage


since his very active bishops have tar
gets to attack. Black has no counter
play.

3 . fS!? .

12 ... "1e7 n.ge4t.

2
3

c4xd5
e4xd5

c6xd5

e6xd5

10
11
12

gal-a4
ga4-d4
J,g2xd5t

13 gd4xd5
14 gdS-d7t
15 gd7xb7 + -

J.b4-e7
.!e7-c5
gdSxdS
J,c5xe3
'&'t7-g8
J.e3xf4

4 'l'dl-b3?!
Better was 4.'tf3 ! b6 5.Ae3 d4
6.gacl 'td6 7.Agl gab8 8.5 +-, b.
Ah2. (Georgiev Kir.).

4
5
6

a2-a4
4cl-e3

4:)d7-b6
'l'cS-aS a
ga8-d8

16

h3-h4

White is ready to sacrifice a pawn to


exchange rooks and get a winning
position.

16
17

h7-h6
g4-g5!

If Black is allowed to defend his


bishop with a pawn, he avoids the
exchange of rooks and the result of
the game is oo.

17
18
7
8

'l'b3-b5!
'l'b5xb4

'l'a5-b4
4e7xb4

h4xg5

h6xg5
gf8.f5

Now 19.b4 "1h7 20.gf3 +- would


have led to a winning position. In
stead he played 19.gb4 and Black
managed to draw.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

32

Donaldson, Elena - Suba


New York 1988

f4-e6

c7xd5

7 . . . xe6 8. dxe6 'lc7 9.e7t !f/g7


10.'le6 +-.

Ad3xf5

itd7-c8

Preventing 9.'lb8t and preparing c5c4.

9
10

itb3-c4
itc4-h4

c&>g8-h8

White switches over to the attack


against Black's king, where the two
bishops have a very serious task to
perform.

10

d5-e7

gal-bl !

White has static advantages : the


bishop pair, and Black's pawn struc
ture weaknesses. Black's counterplay
involves play along the open b-file.

1
2

itd3xbl

gbsxbl
itg7-d7

After 2...Axc3 3.,1xc3 'txc3 4.'lb8t


!f/g7 5 . 'lxc7t !f/g8 6.'lc8t !f/g7
7.'lb7t !f/g8 8.Axa6 followed by the
capture of the d6 pawn, Black's posi
tion remains grave.

3
4

Ac4-d3
itbl-b3

4.'lb7!?.

4
5
6

c3-e2
e2-f4

h5-g7
g7-e8
Ad4-e5
e8-f6

11

Ad2-g5!

e7xf5

1 1 ...eg8 12.Axf6t xf6 13.'lh6 'lg8


(13 ... 'ld7 14.'lt'St g8 15.gS +-)
14.IB 'lg7 15.g6t !f/g8 16.Ae6t
+-.

12 Ag5xf6t
13 ith4-g5t
14 . e6-d8t

h8-g8
c&>g8-t7
t7-f8

14...!f/e8 15.'lg8t !fld7 16.'lf7t.

15
Af6xe5
16 itg5-f6t
17 d8-t7 + -

Intending 18.'txfS.
17

18
19
20
21

itf6xf5
itf5-c8t!
itc8xc5t
itc5-d6t

d6xe5
f8-e8

itc8-d7
itd7xt7
e8-e7
e7-f6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

8.b l ! ? bJ. c3, d2.

Bl ack resigned.

Frid stein

8
9

Simagin
Moscow 1950

b2xc3

33

Ab4xc3

Ah5xf3 !

Doubling the pawns, Black intends to


switch the game into blockade mode,
where the bishops can hardly show
their best. Later, Black extends the
strategy to limiting the mobility of
White's bishops.

t7-fS!

Preventing f3-f4-f5 ! and limiting the


white bishops still further.
IO

11

t3-f4
c3-c4

g2xt3

c6-c5!

11

ffi-hS

2
Weak square f4

3
4
s
6
7
8

g7-g6

Ag5-e3
a2-a4
Ac4-d3
'ld2-e2
c&iel-fi
e4-e5

c7-c6
d6-d5
Ae7-b4
'ld8-c7
0-0

Motivated by the perception of


White's mighty pawn center as a col
lection of weaknesses, and bolstered
by precise calculation, Black engages
battle. The knights are already supe
rior to the bishops.

12

c4xd5

12.dxc5 c5 +.

12
13

Ae3-d2

c5xd4

13.dxe6 e5 14.Jlxd4 (14.fxe5 dxe3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

34

15 .itxe3 gae8 with the initiative)


14 ... xd3 15.itxd3 '(tc6 with the initiative.

13
14
15

ite2-t3
Ad2-b4?

31

Afi-c4

g8-g7- +

Black won.

Suba

e6xd5
itc7-c6

Groszpeter
Saint John 1988

White had to play 15.AbS, exchang


ing the dangerous black knight.

a7-a6!

15

White's extra exchange will not be


felt, since there are no open files for
the rooks and Black's knights attack
t h e m a ny pawn w e a k n e s s e s i n
White's camp. In assessing the posi
tion, due attention should be paid to
the white king's unlucky placement.

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

Ab4xf8
ltal-bl
a4-a5
ltbl-dl
fi-g2
g2-h2
Ad3-n
ltdlxd4
c2-c4
ltd4xd5
itt3-e2
e5-e6
'l'e2-t3
h2xhl
c4-c5

lfa8xf8
d7-c5
c5-e4 +
itc6-c5
itc5xa5
ita5-d8!
itd8-h4
h5xf4
f4-e6
e6-g5
e4xtl
g5-e4
tlxhl
'l'h4-ffi
'l'ffixe6

The advantage of the two bishops


and an active rook more than fully
compensate for White's missing
pawn. Two important facets are that
White can play on both flanks and
that Black's knights have no strong
support points.
1

ltbl-b7!

First stage: strengthening the posi


tions of the pieces.

1
2

c8-a7

Aa3-b2

With the idea Axf6, Ah5.

2
3

h2-h4

ffi-e8

White seeks to induce weaknesses.


Another try was 3.Ah5 g6 4.Adl ,
weakening the al -h8 diagonal.

3
4
5

h4-h5
tl-f4

a7-b5
h7-h6

Better was 5.a4 4)bd6 6.gb6 /::,. f4 .


After the next move Black creates
outposts for his knights.

5
6

gl-tl

lta8-c8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

35

( 1 3 .c&>d3!? d 6 14.gb4 f5 with


counterplay) 13 ...a5 =
.

d5-d4!

6 . . . f6 7.g4 xg4t 8.Axg4 gc2t

9.c&>g3 gxb2 10.a4 +-.

13

Adl-b3?!

7.gb6 meets 7 ...c3 8.,1b3 d5 with


counterplay;
Better is 7.c&>f.3 Li gb7-b6 .

7
8

gb7-b6

.le8-f6

After 8.f5 d5 it is still possible to


defend Black's position because his
knights occupy support points in the
center.

8
9
10
11
12

12

gb6xa6
ga6-b6
c&>fl-e2
gb6xb5

.lf6-d5
.ld5-b4
.lb4xd3t
.ld3xb2

gcS-c3

B e t t e r w a s 1 2 . . . c4 ! ? 1 3 J!b 4

gb5-b8t?

1 3 .gb4! d3 ( 1 3 . . . gxg3 1 4.gxd4


weak square b2) 14.gxd4 c5
15.gc4 gxc4 16.Axc4 .

'&>g8-h7

13
14

gb8-d8

.lb2-c4

15

gd8xd4

.lc4-a5

16

gd4-d3

gc3-c5

17

g.l-g4

.la5xb3

18

a2xb3

g7-g5!=

19

h5xg6t

c&'h7xg6

20

b3-b4

gc5-c4

21

gd3-b3

gc4xf4

22

b4-b5

gr4-d4

23

b5-b6

gd4-d8

24

b6-b7

gd8-b8

25

'&>e2-e3

'&>g6-g5

26

gb3-b4

t7-f5

Draw.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

36

Baranov
Konstantinopolsky
co". 1935-36

The cS and dS pawns ensure Black's


advantage in the center and enable
him at any appropriate moment,
having played dS-d4, to exert strong
pressure on the white king with the
Ab7 and ffc6 battery.

'l!tc7-c6!

Intending dS-d4.

2
3
4

f3-d2
gn-el
2-f4

4
5

b2-b3

0-0
gas-es

5
6
7
s

g7-g5!
d5-d4
G-f4
d7xe5

f4xg5
c3-a4
Ag3-h4
d2-f3

Black threatened f4-f.3.

9
10
11
12

g2xf3
gl-2
l!el-gl?

eSxrJt
4e7-dS
l!f8-G!

Better was 12.f(e4, but even then,


after 12 ... ftd7 13.ffe2 ( 13.f(d3 AaS
14.gez ,1c6 +) 13 ... .6\aS 14.ggl f(c6
Black has a great advantage.

t7-G!

S.exf6 Axf6 6.f.3 d4 7.dl (7.e4


.l\d8 + ) 7... eS! 8.dxeS es 9.xeS
Axes 10 . .(beS gxeS 1 1 .f(c4t i&>h8
12.ge2 ffxg2t -+ .

12
13
14
15

'l!te2xe5
2-el
c2-c3

gG-eS!
'l!tc6xf3t
4dS-a5t

Mastering the Bishop Pair

37

i'te6 7.Axf6 gel t 8.h2 \txc4 9.gxc4


g d 7 1 0.,'1.g4! g d 6 1 i . gc8t f7
12.Ah4! hS 13.Af3 gd7 14.Ac6 .

15
16

.lh4-f2

.le3-g5

gelxeS !

gesxeS

'l'b5-c4t

l/g8-g7

ti\'c4-c7t

l/g7-g8

t7-ffi

Cl

,lb7-e4
d4-d3

White resigned.

Polugaevsky - Bilek
Busum 1969

7 ...\txc7 simply loses.

d5-d6 ! !

White sacrifices a pawn and opens


the h 1 -a8 diagonal for his bishop.
1 .b3 meets with 1....lb7 b. 4)d6 and
White will have difficulties in realiz
ing his advantage.

1
2
3

b2-b4
.le2-t3

'ftffixd6
4) a5-b7
'l'd6-b8

After 3 ... ge7, White has a couple of


good lines:
a: 4.,'1.h6 f6 ( 4 ... Ag7 5.AgS f6 6.Ah4
) s.gcdl i'tb8 6.Axb7 gxb7 7.f4
with the initiative;
b: 4.AgS!? f6 s.gxes! gxes 6.\tc4t

,lgSxffi!

geS-elt

l/gl-h2

gelxcl

9 ... \txc7t rn.gxc7 gd6 1 1 .Ac3 .

1 0 .lf3-dSt + Black resigned. 1 0. . .f8 1 1 .Ag7t


c&'e8 12.Af7 mate.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

38

Chelushkina

Arakhamia
Azov 1990

9...e5 with counterplay.

7
s
9
10
11
12
13
14

gbl-b2
g4-g5
gb2-e2
ge2xe4
.!e6-g4
gn-el
'l!ta4-c2
.!cl-e3

a7-a6
ffi-eS
c&>g7-hS
eS-g7
g7-f5
gas-es
t7-dS

White strengthens her position.


Black has no counterplay.
The position is of a closed nature.
White's bishops are passive.

e3-e4!

White sacrifices a pawn to open


diagonals for the bishops.

1
2 .!e2-g4

f5xe4

14
1s
16
17
lS

.!e3-f2
h2-h4
h4-h5
c&>gl-g2

19

,!g4xf5

'l!tc7-a5
gm.n
'lta5-c7
c&>hS-gS
ges-t8

White's bishop seizes the important


h3 -c8 diagonal and ensu res her
domination over the center and on
the kingside.

2
3
4
5

,!g4-e6
'ltdl-a4t
0-0

'ltd7-c7
gS-ffi
c&>eS-t8
c&>t8-g7

The black knight at f5 defends the


kingside perfectly. After i ts ex
change, White's attack becomes ir
resistible.

g2-g4!

IDi8-t8

6 ... h6?! 7.f/c2 /::,. g5. Worse is 7.g5


h5 8.f/c2 hxg5 9.fxg5 (9.f5 f6)

19
20
21
22
23
24

ge4-e3
h5-h6
'ltc2-e2
.!f2-h4
c&>g2-f2

g6xf5
gn.g7
gg7-t7
gm-eS
c&>g8-h8
itc7-d7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

25

ge3-e6!

26

g5-g6!

h7xg6

27

ge6xg6

'l!tc7-d7

28

'l!te2-h5

'l!td7-c7

Black resigned.

39

.Qt2-h4!

Other continuations lead to an open


ing of the position. Now Black has to
close ranks for a while.

4
5
6

...
.1h4xf6
c3-bl

d5-d4
.1e7xf6

6.xb5 Ac6 7.a3 D Aa4 8.b4


(8.a2 Axc2 -+) 8. ..Ae7 9.d2 Axa3
10.bxa3 gc8 l l .gc1 c6 -+.

Mariotti - Furman
Portorou-Ljubljana 1975

d6-d5!

B l ac k o p e n s d i a g o n a l s for h i s
b is hops.

a4xb5

a6xb5

galxaS

gf8xa8

.Qf6-g5
.Qg5-f4!
h7xg6
'l!td7xb5
.Qb7-a6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

40

12
13

galxa6

Black has transformed his advantage


from the bishop pair into a strong
rook on the seventh rank.

14

b5-d6

attack will be dangerous only if Black


manages to join his second bishop to
the effort.

h4xg5

.it3xh5

Affixg5

14.b4 .'1.g3 ts.gaU !d2 +.

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

ga6-al
b2-b4
gal-bl
b4-b5
d6-c4
c4-d2
d2-fl
!fgl-h2
fl-g3
gbl-dl
g3-e4
b5-b6
e4xd2
b6-b7

4f4-g3 !
gc2-d2
gd2xd3
gd3-e3
d4-d3
ge3xe4
ge4-e2
.ig3-f2t
.if2-b6!
ge2-c2
d3-d2
.ib6-a5
gc2-b2
.ia5xd2
.id2-f4t

itd6-h6?!

Better was 3 ...gh8 4.,'1.f3.

.ih5-t3

ith6-ffi

White resigned.

Aronin

Romanovsky
USSR 1945

White wants to create unpleasant


threats to the d5 pawn with 2.f4.

g6-g5!

Striving to change the course of


events, Black sacrifices a pawn for an
attack against White's king. But the

It was necessary to play 5.<&>g2!, refut


ing Black's threats 5 . . . gh8 6.gc7
gh2t 7.h2 'ixf3 8.gl +-.

J.b7-c8!

b2-b3

tta4-a2

Ac8-d7!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

k3xe3
tlxe3
4) e2-f4
4)f4-g2
gel-cl
b3-b4
gcl-dl

,1g5-e3 !
ge7xe3
itffixt3- +
gesxe3
itt3xg.l
,1d7-h3
ge3-e4
ge4-g4

White resigned.

Bareev

Lputian
Kharkov 1985

41

itb2-b4!

Prevents :gcsc7.

geS-c8

Now both rooks get to the seventh.


However, good advice for Black is
hard to come up with. If 4... :gcl t
5 . <li> g 2 'l h 6 t h e n 6 .:gxf7! x f7
7.AxdSt <li>g6 (7 . . . :ge6 s.:ge3 :gc6
9.:gxe6 :gxe6 10.*e4 +-) 8.Ae4t 'ifi>f7
9.:gd7t g8 10.*b3t <li>h8 1 1 .*f7 +-.

itb4xa5

gcsxaS

gd3-e3

gcs-eS

geJ.cJ

g7-g6

Prevents s.:gcc7 :grs 9.Axh5! Axh5


rn.:gxg7t +-.

ges-t'8

8 gc3-c7 + 9

e2-e3

a7-a6

9 ... :gxa3 10.:gxf7 +-.

gc3xb3!

White simplifies, losing the bishop


p air, but seizing the seventh rank.

1
2
3

,1d4xc5
gb3-b7

4) d7xc5
gc7xc5
ita4-a5

10

gc7-d7

ffi.fS

11

gb7-c7

gaS-bS

12

gl-g2

gbs-as

13

a3-a4!

Zugzwang

Zugzwang. Black resigned. 13 ...:gxa4

14.:gxf7 :gxf7 15.Axd5 +-.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

42

Polugaevsky - Kavalek

Lucerne 1982

8
9

Af6xe5t
f5.f6

c&>c7xb7
1-0

Boleslavsky - Tai
Moscow 1957

White's pieces are more active, he


controls more space and the a6-ft is
weak: so he has the advantage.
I

Aa4-c6!

White transforms his bishop pair into


a passed c-ft.

Ad7xc6

t...t&'e7 2.Ab7 +-;


t ...Ac8 2.Axe8t &e8 3.d8t t&'f8
4.f6 'iJc7 D 5.Ah6t t&'e8 6.t7t +-.

d5xc6

d6-d5

2 . . . rf}e7 3 . 'iJ g 7 c7 4 . h 5 e8
5.xf6 6 6.Axf6t tllxf6 7.c7 +-.

c6-c7

4) e8-d6

White is a pawn down, but his strong


pair of bishops shoots through the
entire board.

1
2
3

Ae4xb7!
itg4xdl
itdl-d6

gd8xdl t
ite7xb7

White s u rrendered h i s p a i r o f
bishops, but will regain the pawn, and
can count on positional pluses as
well: his pieces are placed more ac
tively than Black's; the black king has
. no pawn shield and is in danger.

3
4

...

Ae3xc5

c&'g8-t7
h7-h5

4 ... *e7 5.*d5t *e6 6.*b7t rf}g8


7.*b8t +-.

4 4) e6-d8t
5 4)d8-b7
6 '&?h8-g7 + 7 .lg5xf6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

c3-c4!

Smyslov

b3xc4

Reshevsky
Moscow 1948

Wh ite's queen and bishop are active.


White combines the advance of the
c-ft with threats to Black's king. As so
often happens, two weaknesses are
fatal where either one on its own
mi ght be coped with.

5
6

43

b5xc4
i!tb7-blt

Better was 6... e4, joining the bishop

to the defense force.


'l!tbl-b7
7 gl-h2
7 .. . *xa2 8.*f8t c&ie6 9.'le8t c&if5
10.'tc8t.

s
9
10
11
12
13
14

4c5-e3
c4-c5 + 9d6-b6
c5-c6
g2-g3
c6-c7
h2-g2

e5-e4
4f6-e7
9b7-d5
!.e7-d6t
h5-h4!
h4xg3t
i!tdS-dl

Black wants to consolidate with b8d7. How can White use his temporary
development advantage while the b8
knight blocks off the a8 rook?

.!b3xe6!

9g4-h4!

t7xe6

D iv e r t i n g t h e q u e e n fro m t h e
defense o f the d 6 pawn.

15
16
17
lS

9b6xd6!
c7-cS9
9cS-b7t
9b7xe4t

9dlxd6
g3xtl
<l>t7-e6

White gradually transformed his ad


vantage to a win.

2
3
4
5
6
7
S
9

9h4-dSt
.!b6xdS
!.dS-c7
gdlxd6
4c7-b6
gd6xe6
ge6xe5

9e7-d7
9d7xdS
b8-d7
d7-c5
gas-cs
c5-a4
a4xb2
b2-c4

9. . .c3 10.Ad4 weak square g7

10

geS-e6

+-.

c4xb6

Mastering tfie Bishop Pair

44

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

ge6xb6
gb6xb7
h2-h4 + gl-g2
h4-h5
gb7-a7
g3-g4
<l!>g2-g3
<l;>g3-t3
<ll>t3 -e3
tl-t3
<ll> e3-f4
e4-e5
f4-f5
ga7xa2
f5-g6
ga2-a8t
ga8-a7t

gc8xc3
gc3-c2
gc2xa2
a6-a5
a5-a4
h8-g8
a4-a3
ga2-e2
ge2-a2
<l!>g8-t8
ga2-al
a3-a2
<ll>t8-g8
gal-fl
gnxtJ t
<ll>g8-t8
t8-e7

.lt7-e6

e4-c5

.le6xd7

c5xd7

.lc7-d6

Black resigned.

Black resigned.

Karpov

Polugaevsky

Zagoriansky - Stein

Moscow 1974

Moscow 1956

itc4xc5!

The best way to realize the ad


vantage. The passed c-ft, supported
by the two bishops, will bring White
an easy win.

1
2
3
4
5

.lc7xb8
b2xc3
c3-c4
.lb8-c7

d7xc5
.ld2xc3
c5xe4
ffi-d7
g7-g6

ffixe4!

The piece s acrifice rele ases the


power of the bishops and gives White
his choice of unpleasant consequen
ces.

ge2xe4

gelxe4

ge8xe4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

45

White's minor pieces cannot get to


the queenside in time.

13
14
15
16
17
18

3
4

'l'd3-fl

a6-a5
c4xb3
a5-a4
Ab5xa4
c3-c2

d6-d5!

ge4-el

4.cxd5 !'!xd5 !'!xdl -+.

4
5

gel-cl
'llh2-gl
a2xb3
b3xa4
t3-e5
Ag2-t3

d5xc4

5.xc4 Axf3 6.,1xf3 'lihch3t -+.

5
6
7

dl-e3
'llh l-h2

c4-c3
Ag7-d4
18

b4-b3 !

The first move in a finely-calculated


series of hammer-like blows.

19
20
21
22

e5-c4
At3-e2
c4-b2
'llg l-tl

Aa4-c6!
Ac6-b5!
Ab5xe2
!1ld8-dl !

White resigned.

Smyslov - Botvinnik
Moscow 1957

Ad4xe3 !

A typical decision: one of the bishops

giv es itself up for the sake of a


favorable transformation of the ad
v a n t age, in this case to mobilize the
qu ee nside pawn majority.

8
9
10
11
12

gelxe3
ge3-e5
'l'fl-e2
geSxe2
ge2-el

'l'c8-f5
'l'f5-c2
'l'c2xe2
Ac6-b5
c5-c4

t3-d4!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

46

White gets a passed a-ft right away.

1
2 d4xc6
3 !.c5xa7
tl-t3
4

f6xe4
b7xc6
Ag4-f5

16.gdl <&>e8 17.gd4 cS 18.gb4 +-.

11
12
13

a5xb6
<&>el-d2

gb8xb6
ga8xal t
gal-alt

Impossible is 13 ...&hl 14.b7 &h2t


15.Ae2 +-.

.le6-c8
ct/d2-e3
ghl-dl
ga2-b2
.ld3-c4!
ct/g8-g7
!.c8-e6
gdl-d8
17 . . . Ab7 18.gd 7 gxb6 19.gxe7 bi.
14
15
16
17

20.g,d"?t +-.

18
19
20
21

!.c4xe6
gd8-b8
c3-c4
c4-c5

t7xe6
e6-e5
ct/g7-t7
<&>t7-e6

e4-d6

Dangerous is 4 ... xc3 5.Ab6 gd7


6.a4 bi. 7.g4 and AaS.

5
6
7
8
9

a2-a4
!.a7-b6
c4-c5
g2-g4
a4-a5

gd8-a8

0-0

d6-c8
.lf5-e6
c8xb6

There is no other way to stop the a-ft,


which is supported by a pair of
bishops.

10

c5xb6

gf8.b8

22 gb8-dS! + Cutting the black king off from the


passed pawn.

11

.lfi-d3

Better was 1 1 .<&>f2 &b6 12.axb6 &al


13.b7 gbl 14.Aa6 b2t 15.<&>e3 <&>f8

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

h2-h3
<&>e3-d2
<&>d2-d3
<&>d3-c4
<&>c4-b4
ct/b4 -a4
<&>a4-b4
<&>b4- a3
<&>a3-b2
gds-d3
<&>b2-b3

g6-g5
gb2-bl
gbl-bS
gbS-bl
gbl-clt
gc1-blt
gbl-alt
gal-blt
gbl-alt
gal-aS
gas-as
gas-as

Mastering the Bishop Pair

B l ack resigned.

Boleslavsky - Taimanov
Moscow 1952

6
7
8
9

g2-g.1
h2-h3
c4-c5
gcl-c3

47

.!d7-g4
.!g4-f3
d6-e8
g7-g5

9 . . . ,1h5 1 0 . d6 cxd6 1 l .cxd6 gd4


12.gcs f6 13.,1b5 'i\'f8 14.d7 +-.

10
11
12
13

.!f4xg5
.a.n-g2
f!>gl-h2
gcJ-e3

.!f3-dl
ge4-el t
gel-e2
b7-b6

c3-c4!

White enjoys the advantage due to


his two strong bishops. In addition,
B lack has problems dealing with
White's strong d5-ft.

ge8xel

l ...b6 2.f3 gxe1t 3.gxel ges 4.gcl


b, c4-c5.

galxel

ga8-e8

14 d5-d6! + 14
c5xd6
15
15 ...gxe3 16.d7! +-.

16
17

ge3-d3
gd3xd6

c7xd6
e8xd6
.!dl-a4

White won.

Kasparov - Timman
Linares 1993

/,
myw
.
--

. . . . . . . . . . . /...

Jll. .

.. . . . . . . .

.... . . .

gel-cl !

The bishops in cooperation with a


roo k are strong, especially in induc
ing weaknesses (or a passed pawn).

3
4
5

.!f4-e3
.!e3-f4

ge8-e4
ge4-e8
ge8-e4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

48

d4xcS!

White relies on the strength on his


two bishops and opens the game.

b6xcS

ample, after 7.xe4 *d4t (7 ...,\xe4


8.,\xe4 *d4t 9.*e3 b2 10.a7
xe4 l l .gxe4 gd2 12.gg4 ) 8.*e3
*xb2 9.xf6t *xf6 10.*xa7 *c3
1 1 . g c 1 g6 w i t h c o u n te r p l ay
(Kasparov).

7
8
9
10
11
12

'l\'g5-e3
l!el xe3
l!e3-e2
4)c3xe2
Ac2xe4

'll' c4-d4t
'l\'d4xe3t
l!d8-d2
l!d2xe2
4)ffixe4
Ac6xe4

White has a winning endgame.

e3-e4!

dSxe4?!

With this move Black loses the initia


tive because he gives White the
chance to activate the queen. Better
was 2 ... d4 3.eS dxc3 4.gxd8 gxd8
S.exf6 *c4! (S ...gd2? 6.Axh7t 7
7.*g3 el t 8.el cxb2 9.*bl t g6
10.,\el ge2 l l .,\c3 +- (Kasparov))
6.fxg7 gs oo (6 ... gd2? 7 . .\xh7t!
<&>xh7 8.g8*t <&>xg8 9.*g3t <&>h7
10.,\f6 +- (Kasparov).

3 l!dlxd8
4 'l\'tlxcS

4)h7-gS!

Sacrificing a pawn, Black exchanges


his passive knight for White's active
bishop. Bad is 4 . . . gd2 in view of
S.xe4 (Kasparov).

s
6
7

Ah4xg5
'l\'cSxgS
t3xe4

c&igl-tl
g2-g3
-e3
h3-h4
c&ie3-f4
g3-g4

Better is 18.d4!.

18

c&ig8-t8
t8-e7
Ae4-c6
Ac6-d7
c&ie7-d6
17-ffi

l!e8xd8

4.xe4!? Axe4 S.,\xe4 xe4 6.Axd8


xf2 7.gxe6 xh3 t 8.gxh3 fxe6
9.,\e7 c4 1 0.<&>f2 f6 1 1 .,\cS a6
12.<&>e3 dSt 13.<&>d4 f4 14.<&>xc4
( 1 4.h4 d3) 14 ... xh3 1S.b4 gs
16.f4 t"3 17.bS axbSt 18.<&>xbS .

13
14
15
16
17
18

h6xgS
'l\'e6-c4

Denies Black counterplay. For ex-

19

h4-hS? !

1 9 . d 4 ! g S ! ? + 2 0 . h x g S fxg S t
21 .<&>xgS <&>eS 22.fS aS 23.b4 axb4
24.axb4 +- (Kasparov).

19
20
21

4) e2-d4
b2-b4

d6-e7
e7-t7
Ad7-a4

2 1 . . . g6 22.hxg6t <&>xg6 23.bS +


(Kasparov).

22

4)d4-fS

g7-g6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

23
24
25

f5-d6t
d6-c8
c8-d6

rt/r7-g7
a7-a6

49

4.fxg3 'txg3t 5.Ag2 ;


1 . . . c 6 ? ! 2.Axc6! ( a dvan tage
transformation) 2... bxc6 3.Ag5 'f!c7
4.exd6 xd6 5.'f!e2 (Smyslov),
after which White has a great posi
tional advantage.

.!cl-g5

i!l'd8-b6

2 ... 'f!d7 would meet the same reply as


in the game .

25

.la4-dl?

More stubborn is 25...c&>h6.

26 d6-e8t!
27 e8xf6
28
g4-g5t
29
h5-h6t

rt/g7-r7
rt/r7xf6
rt/f6-g7

Black resigned.

Smyslov - Bilek
Sochi 1963

White has the bishop pair, but the


game is of a semi-closed nature.

e4-e5!

St arting a combination to open the


cen ter.

d6-d5

1 .. .a.xe5 2 . .Q.xb7 bh4 3.g3 Axg3


.

c3xd5!

Opening the h l -a8 diagonal.

4
5
6

e6xd5

a4-a5!
i!l'dlxd5t
e5-e6

i!l'b6-a6
gm.n
gnxf3

6..."Bc7 7.'f!d8 'f!b5 8.c4 +-.

7
8

i!l'd5xf3
gn-el

i!l'a6xe6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

50

e6-t7

Forced. Losing are 8 ...*c6 9.a6! bxa6


1 0 .gxe8t *xe8 l l .*xa8 + - or
9 ...d6 1 0.ge6 ,\f8 1 l .gxd6 ,\xd6
12.axb7 +-.
8 ...*c8 9.ge7 c6 10.*f7t 'it>h8
1 1 .gael xe7 12.E!xe7 *d8 13.,\h6
*dl t 14.'it>h2 *d6t 15.g3 +- (Smys
lov).

9
10
11

f3xt7t
gel-e7t
ge7xb7

16
17
lS
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
2S
29

b2-b4!
h4xg5
.Qf4-g3
b4-b5
.Qg3xf4
gdl-d7
gb7xa7
gd7xd6
ga7-d7
a6-a7
gd7xa7
cai>gl-h2
c3-c4
ga7-c7

g6-g5
h6xg5
4J dS-e6
4J e6-f4
g5xf4
4J eS-d6
gas-es
.Qf8xd6
.Qd6-bS
.QbSxa7
geS-elt
gel-bl
gbl-b4

Black resigned.

Kliavins - Ragozin
Riga 1952

c&>gSxt7
c&>t7-f8

Two pawns and the active rook on


the seventh rank ensure White's win
ning advantage.

11
12
13
14
15

c2-c3
a5-a6!
gal-dl
.Qg5-f4

4JbS-c6
cai>f8-gS
.Qg7-f8
h7-h6
4J c6-dS

a m
a
. ..

fft
-
" "
m" "m a r

... . . /,
w,
,, w
il-lil
.B.
,
, . . /.

-
illil
r, /,f31
%Wk

1.

/,

.... . . .

'

r . . . ;7,

The mobility of the white bishops is


restricted. White wants to transfer
his bishop from b2 to e3. But Black
leaves his opponent no chances to
activate the bishops.

.Qg4xf3!

Ceding the bishop pair, but weaken


ing the enemy kingside and getting
the important f4 support point for his
knight instead. 1 . ..*a2! was also
good.

g2xf3

Not 2.tnd3 in view of 2...*a2 - + .

4Jffi-h5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Azmaiparashvili
Yudasin

B lack strives to exploit deficiencies in


his opponent's pawn structure and
c o m m e n c e p i e c e p l ay o n t h e
we akened dark squares.

3
4

Ab2-cl
ite2-el



/.m
,,,. y,1;' /,

... .

. . .

. k
?.

...

Ae7-g5!

Black continues to restrain White's


bishops.

s
6

Acl-d2
Ad2xel

italxelt
.igS-cl- +

Black plans let his king loose on the


weak white pawns on the kingside.
But with this move he traps White's
bishop at el and in effect goes a piece
ahead.

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Ac2-dl
Adl-c2
'lf!gl-fl
Ac2-dl
Adl-c2
Ac2-bl
Abl-c2
c&>fl-gl
Ac2-bl
Abl-c2
c&>gl-fl
-&1fl-e2
Ac2xd3

White resigned.

/(jev 1986

ita8-al

W'
w . , , .,
,,. , .

51

hS-f4
t7-ffi
c;>g8-t7
'IJ!t7-g6
c&>g6-g5
'IJ!gS-h4
c&>h4-h3
h7-h6
h6-hS
f4-d3
'lf!h3xh2
c&>h2-g2
c4xd3t

White is better developed. Black's


bishop pair is not a factor yet because
the bishop on c8 has no moves. But if
Black manages to play a7-a6 and b7b5, he will get sufficient counterplay.

itc3-b4!

Sacrificing a pawn, White tries to


prevent the realization of Black's
plan.

a7-a6?

Black should have declined this


sacrifice, but not necessarily all
sacrifices: 1 . . . d5 ! ? 2.xd5 ? ! exd5
3.Axd5t Ae6 4.Axe6t 'lxe6 5.c7
'l!txc4 6.'l!txc4t xc4 7.xa8 gxa8 + ;
1 ...d5 ! ? 2.cxd5? a6! + ;
1...d5 ! ? 2.a4! ;t .

itb4-d6

eSxc4

2 . . . c6 3.d5! exd5 4.Axd5t gn


5.Axf7t <l1xf7 6.*d5t /:::,. d6 +-.

e3xc4

itb6xbS

Mastering the Bishop Pair

52

11

lJfi-cl

Black is a pawn up, but White is vir


tually a piece up because the bishop
on c8 will not join the play soon.
Moreover, White has time to exploit
the very weak dark squares in Black's
camp.

gc2-c8!

Black resigned.

Bronstein - Petrosian
Amsterdam 1956

a6-a5

Avoiding 5.a4 'lb3 6.ga3.

.kl-cl

ga8-a6

'l'd6-c7

'l!l'b5-b4

a2-a3

'l'b4-b3

gal-cl

a5-a4?

He had to play 8 ... d5 at once.

.lg7xc3!

White plans g2-g4 to seize the initia


tive. Exchanging his King's Indian
bishop for the c3 knight, Black's cal
culation is precise, the exchange is
favorable for him because White will
be unable to activate his bishops.

2
3

b2xc3
a3-a4

d7-f6

In reply to 3.{)f2 follows the un


pleasant 3 ... b5! +.

9 '{tc7-b8! + 10

c4-d2

d7-d5
.lc8-d7

3
4
5
6

h3-tl
c&>gl-hl
gel-gl

c&>g8-h8
gm.gs
'l'd8-e8
'{te8-g6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Just in time. With the position blockaded, bishops have no room.

7
8

'l'dl-d2
g2-g3

53

restricted as it is by the e5 pawn.

.!c8-d7
fa8-e8

With the idea ge8-e7-g7.

9
10
11
12
13

a4-a5
gal-bl
ggl-g2
gbl-gl
h2-h3

ge8-e7
4d7-c8
ge7-g7
{)ffi-e8
h6-h5

White's bishops have remained use


less. Draw.

Yusupov

Gavrikov
Yerevan 1982

tl-f3 !

White opens up lines for his pieces


on the kingside by opening the f-file.
Black's knight at c7 is cut off from
play there.

3
4
5

gnxa
'l!>dl-e2

g4xt3
.a.cs-rs
'td8-d7

Black could not free himself with


5 ... e4 6.gxe4 xd5? 7.xd5 Axal
8.gxf5 ! gxf5 9.'tg4t +-.

ga1-n

4f5-g6

6...Ag4? 7.'te4;
6 ... h6 7.ge4 Ag4 s.gxf8t gxf8
9.gxf8t f8 10.'tf2t g8 1 1.f6t
.
1

{)gS-e4
'te2xt3

gmxt3
<l'g8-h8

8 ...gf8? 9.'txffit ! Axf8 10.f6t +-.

4e2xg4!

f5xg4

Bl ack has two bishops, but a blockad


i ng knight at e4 is far superior to
B l ac k ' s d a r k - s q u a r e b i s h o p ,

Mastering the Bishop Pair

54

9 .!d2-g5!
Joining the bishop to the attack.

4:)c7-e8

26
27

Black resigned.

9 ...gf8 10.\1hf8t! Axf8 1 1 .gnst rt;g7


12.ggst rt;fl 13.gds t-g4 14.h3 toh5
15.gd?t +- and 16.gxc7 (Yusupov).

10
11

h2-h4
h4-h5!

d6-d7
d7-d8tl'
Tseshkovsky
Romani shin
Moscow 1976

h7-h6
.!g6-h7

l l ...,1xe4 12.xe4 hxg5 13.h6! Axh6


14.t'h5 t'h7 15.xg5 +-.

12
13
14

.!g5-e3
.!e3xa7
.!a7-b6

lta8-c8
ltc8-a8
lta8xa3

White has the positional advantage.


All his pieces are placed actively,
while Black's forces are disunited
and undeveloped. One of Black's
bishops is tied to defense of the fl-ft,
while the other's activity is illusory.

15 tl't3-t7 + With the transition to the endgame


endgame, the unlucky position of
Black's bishop at g7 will play a sorry
role.

15
16
17
18
19
20

ltflxt7
ltt7xb7
ltb7-b8
4:) c3xe4
ltb8xe8

20... gxb6 2i.gd8 +-.

21
22
23

lte8-d8
ltd8xd6
ltd6-d7!

Better is 23 ... ggs.

24
25

ltd7xg7t
d5-d6

tl'd 7xt7
lta3-b3
ltb3xb4
J,h7xe4
c&ih8-h7
ltb4xe4

lte4-h4
lth4xh5
c&ih7-g6?
c&ig6xg7
lth5-f5

g2-g3 !

Intending h2-h4, restricting the


mobility of the black bishop at g5.

Cllc 8-b7

l ...c6 2.f4 Ad7 3.e6! fxe6 4.Axg7 .


l ...h5 2.h4 ,1h6 3.{)e7t \\'b7 4.f5
leaves Black almost in Zugzwang.

h2-h4

.!g5-d8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

e5-e6!

White cashes his positional ad


va ntages for the win of kingside
p awns.

3
4

d5-f4

t7xe6
.ld8-e7

55

Leaving Black no counterplay. The


game is decided by the connected
passed pawns which are supported by
White's pieces.

16
17
18
19

h5-f6
g3-g4
b3xc4

19 a3 20.hS.

gd8xd7
gd7-g7
cS-c4
c&>b7-c6

...

,lb2-e5!

.le7-f6

The crushing 6.xe6 forces this ab


ject reply.

6
.le5xf6
7 f4xe6 + 8 c&>gl-h2
9 gdl-d7
10
gnxf6
11
gd7-h7
12 c&>h2-g2
13
e6-f4
14 f4xh5
15
gf6.fl

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

h4-h5
c&>g2-g3
c&>g3-f4
h5-h6
g4-g5!
h6-h7!
g5xf6
f6-t7
c&>f4-g4t
ga.f6t!

ge3-e7
c&>c6-d6
ge7-e5
gg7-g6
c&>d6-e6
gg6xf6t
ge5-h5
c&>e6xt7
c&>t7-g6

White won.

g7xf6
gh8-g8
.le8-h5
ga8-c8
,lh5-g4
h6-h5
gg8-e8
ge8xe3
gc8-d8
.lg4-d7

Karpov - Kasparov
London 1986

1 .lb5xd7!?

16 gh7xd7! + -

White lets his opponent enjoy the


advantage of the two bishops, retain
ing the strong pawn center which
restricts those bishops. The game will
be decided by his ability to hold the
center. And it is far from easy since
he lags in development.

.lc8xd7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

56

e3-e4

Bad is 2.gb1 Af5 3.gxb7 e5 ! 4.Ag3


(4.dxe6 Ae4) 4...,1e4 and Black gets
an excellent position (Kasparov).

2
3

e4-e5

t7-fS

e7-e6

3 ... gac8 is well met by 4.c4! (Worse is


4.c6? ! bxc6 5.d6 exd6 6.exd6 gf6 with
a good position. Black was successful
in destroying Wh ite's center in
Schmidt W. Gross S., Nalechov,
1984) 4 ... gxcs 5.,1e3 gas 6.f4. The
powerful center ensures White his
advantage (Kasparov).
-

4
s
6

dark-square bishop: 6 ... g5! 7.Axg5


Axe5 8.c5 Ag7 ( /::,. 9... e5) 9.f4 h6
10.,1e7 gcb8 1 1 .f3 gb2t 12.gcz
gb4 (Kasparov). Black is all right be
cause he has solved the problem of
the bishops. The bishop at g7 is ac
tive, while the bishop at d7 performs
an important blocking function and is
but a little inferior to White's bishop
on e7. For example: 13.e5 Axe5
14.fxe5 a5.

c3-c4
c5-c6
d5-d6

lU8-c8
b7xc6

h2-h4!

White prevents Black from activat


ing his g7-,l.

7
8

{)gl-h3 !

h7-h6
a7-a5

N o t h i n g w o u l d be c h anged by
8 . . .gcb8 9.f3 gb2t 1 0.gc2 gxc2t
l l .'if}xc2 Aa4t 12.<&>d2 gb8 13.gal
gb2t 14.<&>el and Black stands worse
(Kasparov).

9
10

t2-t3
ghl-el !

a5-a4

After 10.4)f2 g5 1 l.hxg5 hxg5 12.,lh2


f4 13.4)d3 ,le8 14.g3 Ag6 15.gxf4 a3
16.fxg5 a2 it is still possible to fight
(Kasparov).

c6-c5?

Black loses his last chance to free his

10
11
12

{)h3-t2
{)t2-d3

a4-a3
a3-a2

White's strategy, commenced by the


1 .Axd7 move, has succeeded. The

Mastering the Bishop Pair

57

cen ter is well fortified, Black's dark


s q uare bishop takes no part in the
g ame.

12

lfa8-a3

13

kl-al

g6- g5

14

h4xg5

h6xg5

15

Af4xgS

Cfg8-t7

1 5 gbs 16.c;t>e2.
...

16

Ag5-f4

k8-b8

17

gel-cl

Ad7-c6

18

gcl-c3

ga3-a5

19

gc3-c2

gb8-a8

20

d3-cl

2
2
3

Yusupov
Riga 1986

Black strives to make up for the static


deficiency of his position, the back
ward e6-ft, through enhanced activity
of his pieces. Control over the key
e5-square is crucial.

Ad3-b5!

g4-ffi
Cfg8-g7?!

Ac8-d7

Ab5xc6

If 4.f.3 then 4...g4 5.h3 f6 and


White has difficulties with his knight
at g3.
4.gfe l gives nothing, because
there is no way to consolidate the
position further - 5.f.3 is impossible
in view of 5 ... g4 6.h3 xf2.
With 4.,bc6 White prepares itd3e2 b.. h4-f.3-e5.

4
5

'ltdl-d3

Black defends against 4.xg6, but,


considering the further course of the
play, 3 ... gf'7! is stronger.

Black resigned.

Sokolov, A

f3-h4!

Dr ives Black's k n i g h t from g4,


whence it controls the e5 square.

b7xc6

'ltd3-e2

Mastering the Bishop Pair

58

grs.n

Black should risk 5 ... e5, though after


6.dxe5 Axes 7.4)f3 Ad6 8 . .ld4 gae8
9.*d2 Ii 10.Ah6 and 10.4)b5 White
has the advantage (Vitolins ) , or
7 ...Af4 8.Axf4 (8.*e7t? gn 9.Axf6t
g8) 8...4 9.*e5! ? .

6
7
8

flh4-f3
4g5-d2
h2-h3

8 ...4)xf2? 9..le5 +-.

9
10

flf3-e5
d4xe5

h7-h6
flffi-g4
flg4-ffi

4d6xe5
flffi-g8

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

c&>gl-h2
b3-b4
b4xcS
gc4xc5
'fte4xd4
4d2xcl
'l'd4-d2
h3-h4
g2-g3
'ftd2-d3t
'ftd3-d2
h4xg5
'ftd2-d3t
'litd3-d2
'ftd2-d3t
4cl-e3
4e3-f2
f3-f4
Cfh2-gl
'ftd3-fi
'ftfi-b5
'l'b5-e8

'l'b6-b5
grs.cs
gc7xc5
gcsxc5
gc5xcl
'l'b5-b6
g6-g5
'l'b6-c7
Cfg7-g6
c&>g6-g7
c&>g7-g6
h6-h5
c&>g6-g7
Cfg7-g6
c&>g6-g7
a7-a5
'litc7-cl
'ftcl-b2
'l'b2-alt
'ftalxa2
fl d5-e7

Draw.

11

Lasker

b2-b3

Chigorin
Hastings 1895

White should play l l .Ab4! fol


lowed by Ab4-d6, gcl -c3 with the ad
vantage due to the superior activity
of his bishop.

11

'ftc7-b6

Black prevents the blockade.

12
13

4d2-e3
4e3-d2

d5-d4
c6-c5

Black succeeded in activating his


bishop, so the game is even.

14
15
16
17
18
19
20

'fte2-g4
gn.el
flg3-e4
'l'g4xe4
f.2.f3
gcl-c4
gel-cl

4d7-b5
4b5-d3
4d3xe4
gas-rs
flg8-e7
fl e7-d5
gn.c7

The mobility of White's bishops is ,


restricted by the strong blockade ,
knight on e5. White has to liberate :
the e5 point to advance e4-e5.

4f2-h4?

1 .Ad4 ! 4)xd4 (or t . . .ge7 2.Axe S 1

Mastering the Bishop Pair

xe5 3.gdd5) 2.gxd4 (2.cxd4? c3)


2. . ge7 3.gdd5 g6 4.e5.

Kortchnoi - Karpov
Moscow 1971

1
2

Cf/e2-f2

Prevents 2...gg2t.

59

'f!,,c7-g7

'f!,,g7-g6!

Else 3.,l.f6.

'f!,, d2-d5

It is too late now to fight the block


ade knight on e5. Black's rooks have
established proper cooperation and
are invading the white camp.

'f!,,a4-al

Ag7xe5!

Black exchanges the strong bishop


for a knight, thus presenting his op
ponent with the advantage of the
bishop pair. But Black's pieces quick
ly seize active positions, restricting
the poorly coordinated white pieces.

2
3
4

4
s
6
7
8

Ah4-d8
Ablxd3
'f!,,d5xd3
'f!,,bS-tst
Ad8-g5

.> e5-d3t!
c4xd3
'f!,,a l-gl
Cf/t'8-e8
'f!,,g6xg5

.lf4xe5
Ae5-f4
l'c2-a4

t7-ffi!
'f!,,a8-c8

4.\/d2? g5 5.,l.xg5 fxg5 6.\/xgSt \/g6! ;


4.\/d3 b4..

4
5

.lf4-cl

g6-g5

White resigned.

.lg4-e2?!

Black has seized the dominant posi


tion, but White has no visible weak
nesses, so Black should transform his

Mastering the Bishop Pair

60

Taimanov - Suetin

activity into something more stable


with 5 ... b4! 6.3 c2! 7.!'!bl Ah5
8.Ad2 e3 +.

6
7
8
9
10

gn-el
.lg2-fl
gelxfl
.lc1-e3
'lta4-d4

/(jev 1954

d4-d3
.le2xfl
gc8-c2 +
a6-c5

10.t'a3 !'!fc8 1 1 .!'!acl t'b5! +.

10
11

d5xe6

e7-e5
itb6xe6
1

.lg2xc6t!

White voluntarily exchanges his


l ight-squ are b i s h o p fo r B l a c k ' s
knight. Black must compensate fo r
the static weakness o f the c6 and c5
pawns with activity of his pieces.

12

gal-cl?

12.b4 xe4 13.t'xd3 !'!c3 + .

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

b2-b4
gc1xc2
gn-cl
tl-f3
itd4-d3
a2-a4
itd3-d2
f3-f4
b4-b5
itd2-d7
gl-tl
itd7-f5

White resigned.

gf8.c8
c5xe4
d3xc2
b7-b6
e4-d6
gc8-c6
ite6-c4
d6-t7
g5-g4
gc6-c8
h7-h5
'ltc4-c3
gc8-e8

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

'ltdl-a4
gl-f3
.lcl-e3
c3-e4
gal-cl
ita4-c2

b7xc6
itd8-d7
t7-ffi
e7-e5
c7-e6
ga8-b8

.lf8-e7?

Black had an excellent opportunity


to activate his bishops with a pawn
s acrifice: 7 . . . d4 8.Axd4 ftcxd4
9.t'xc6 J.b7 and Black has good

Mastering the Bishop Pair

chances to draw the endgame. After


the next move Black loses a pawn and
finds himself in a deplorable position.

8
9
10

e4xc5
.le3xc5
itc2xc5

4e7xc5
e6xc5
gb8xb2

Exchanging the fianchettoed bishop


for a knight is a common technical
device in such situations. White
presents his opponent with the
bishop p air, but their mobility is
restricted and they have to defend
weak pawns.

11

t3xe5!

l l ...fxe5 12.*"e5t +-.

12 itc5xc6t
13 e5xc6 + 2-t3
14
15
el-2
16 c6-d4
17
gel-al
18 galxa7

itd7-e6
ite6xc6
4c8-h3
0-0

gf'8.e8
gb2xa2
ga2-b2

White won in due course.

Sokolsky - Arulaid
Tallinn 1959

61

b7xc6

d2-c4

t7-f6

itdl-a4

4c8-d7

When the bishops are hemmed in by


their own pawns a player should al
ways consider letting one or two of
them go: 3 ... 0-0 4.*"c6 gb8 5.0-0
gb4 ! ? with compensation for the
material, /;:;. Ac8-b7 deserved such at
tention.

c4-a5

c7-d5

4cl-d2

itd8-b6

a5-c4

itb6-b7

c3-e4

0-0

ita4-a5

itb7-b5

gal-cl

d5-b6

Else 10.a2-a4.

f6-f5

10

b2-b3

11

e4-d6

b6xc4

12

d6xc4

e5-e4

13 ita5-c7!

,lg2xc6t!

Black was unable to counter White's


attack on the queenside. White
quickly realized his advantage. After
13 ...gad8 14.dxe4 fxe4 15.Aa5, White
threatens to win material and can
keep the complications in check, for
example 15 ... e3 16.f4.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

62

Barlov

Pigusov

Sochi 1985
==

4
s

gdl-bl

Ae3-d2?

AeS-a4
gas-cs

4g7xc3 !

Black parts with the bishop pair to


induce weaknesses along the c-file.
Not only the c3-ft, but the squares c4
and c5 provide useful support points
for the knights. White's bishops are
blocked by his own pawns.

2
3

g8 feels shut out of the play. 6 ... b8


( 6 ...c5?! 7.a5 bxa5 8.Axc5 or
6... '8c7 7.a5 bxa5 8.'8al ) 7.a5 bxa5
( 7...xc6 8.axb6 axb6 9.Axb6 f6 + )
8.Axa7 xc6 9 ..Q,b6 a4 10.'Sal e5
1 1.Ad4.

gclxc3
b2xc3

lk7xc3
b7-b6

3 ...'8c8 4.xb7 '8xc3 5 ..Q.xa7

=.

Too passive. Better is 6.Ad4 Axb3


7.'8xb3 f6 8.g5 d7 + .

6
7
s
9
10
11
12
13
14

Aa4xb3
gblxb3
{)g8-fti
g4-g5
{)fti-d7
Ag2-fi
{)d7-c5
gb3-b2
{)c5-e4
e2-e3
{) a6-c5
c3-c4
{) e4xd2
gb2xd2
{) c5-e4
gd2-d4 {) e4xg5- +

Black has won a pawn and gradually


realizes his advantage.

{) a5-b3?

White condemns himself to a passive


defense, though he had an excellent
opportunity to activate his bishops
with a pawn sacrifice: 4.c6! Axc6
5.dxc6 '8c8 6.a4! and the bishops are
reanimated immediately. Moreover,
in the complications Black's knight at

15
16
17
lS
19
20
21
22
23

Cl?gl-g2
h3-h4
h4-h5
h5xg6
.a.n-d3
Ad3-c2
t2-f4
Cl?g2-t3
c&?t3-g2

t7-f5
{)g5-e4
"'f8-g7
h7xg6
{) e4-c5
gcS-hS
gbS-cS
c&?g7-fti
{) c5-b7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

.ic2-a4
4a4-dl
e3-e4
e4xf5
f.5xg6
l!d4-d2
l!d2-b2
l!b2xb6
l!b6-b2
4dl-h5
l!b2-e2
l!e2xe7
l!e7-a7
l!a7-t7t
l!t7-a7
l!a7-a6
l!a6-a5
.ih5-e2
l!a5-a3t
l!a3-a8

a7-a6
l!c8-c5
l!c5-a5
l!a5xa3
'&'f6xg6
b7-c5
'&'g6-f.5
cmsxr4
l!a3-al
a6-a5
a5-a4
a4-a3
c5-e4
'&'f4-e5
Cf/e5-d4
e4-c5
Cf/d4-c3
a3-a2
Cf/c3-b4
c5-a4

63

d5-d4!

Otherwise White would play d4


and move into an excellent position.

f3xd4

3.exf6 Axf6 +.
3.,lxd4 Axt'3 4.exf6 Axf6! 5.,lxf6
"(hf6 +.

3
4

f6-g4

.ie3-gl

White resigned.

Sigurjonsson - Stein
Reykjavik 1972

4
5

d6-d5!

Exploiting the unfavorable position


of White's minor pieces (the knight
at c3 and the bishop at e3), Black
se izes the initiative.

e4-e5

l!fi-cl

g4xh2!

s.h2 Ab4 ! ;
5.xe6 'lxd3 6.!Ucl 'l!th3 ! -+.
After S.gfd l g4 6.f3 Black
gains the positional advantage due to
his strong bishops and the exposed
position of White's king.

5
6

h2-g4

c3-e4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

64

Stein - Kupreichik
Sochi 1970

,!e7xb4!- +

Black has won a pawn and trans


formed his advantage into a win.

'lil'd8-d5

7
8
9
10

e4-g5
g5-t3
d4xb3
t3-d2

11
12
13

gal-bl
a4xb5
d2-e4

.!d5xe4

14

d3xe4

gcs-c4

15
16

g2-g3
c&>hl-g2

gf8-d8

17
18

gel-cl
gc2xc4

,!c3xe5!

19

b3-a5
calg2-t3

gdS-d2t
.!e5-d4
gd2-d3t
gd3xd4
c4-c3
gd4-d2t
gd2-d3t
g4-e3t
e3-f5

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

.!glxd4
calt3-e2
e4-e5
gbl-cl
cale2-t3
c&>t3-g2
c&>g2-2

White resigned.

'lil'd5xb3
.!b7-d5
.!b4-c3
b6-b5
a6xb5

h7-h5

White has the two bishops and a


passed p awn i n the center. But
Black's pieces are more active than
White's (the g2 bishop is blocked),
allowing Black active counterplay.
For example, there is already a threat
of l ...Ax:c3 and b5 ( weak square
d5).

2-t3 !

Sacrificing a pawn, White opens the


position. And in open play, the two
bishops constitute a formidable
force.

b5xc4

,!g7xc3? !

Black falls into the trap. H e has won


a pawn, but his king comes under a
crushing attack. Better was l...exf'3.

gclxc3

gc7xc3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Ab4xc3

4) d6-b5

Ac3-al

tMSxdS

10

65

gf3.d3!

Black resigned.

'ld2-g5!

Stein - Keres

Not so good is 5.'lbb2 .ic3 6.gc1


'1b d 4 t 7 . h l .i ed 5 and Black's
knights are very active.

Moscow 1967

'ldS-cSt

c&'gl-h2

4) e7-d5

f3xe4

4)d5-e3

gn.a

4) e3xg2

1..:xe5 is menacing. How should the


pawn be defended? The evident 1 .f4
restricts the mobility of the bishop at
e3. After 1 .Af4 gad8 Black activates
his forces and prepares the d5-d4
breakthrough.

1
9

'lgS-ffi!

Bl ack's attempts to neutralize the


bi shop pair have failed.

k8-c7

a2-a4!

Inviting Black to capture the pawn at


e5. But after 1 . ..'lbxe5 2.ge 1 'l'd6
3.axb5 axb5 4.gx:a8 gx:a8 5.AxfS the
activity of White's bishops is over
whelming.

4)b7-a5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

66

12 AblxfS! + The combination is based o n the


centralization of his own pieces and
weakness of the opponent's eight
rank.

12

'lil'a4-b5

12 ...gxf5 13.'ld8t;
12 ...e7 13.'lc5.

4e3-f2!

Again sacrifices the pawn. White is


ready to meet 2 ... c4 with 3.b3 !
xe5 4.gel or 4.axb5 axb5 s.gxas
gxas 6.ge1 ( b,. f4) 6.. .f4 7.b4! .

2
3

gn-el

c&>g8-h8 .

White resolved the defense of his e5ft without compromising the position
of his pieces. Now he starts to induce
weaknesses on the queenside.

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

itdl-e2!
c3xb4
Af2xb6
gal-dl
4c2-d3 !
Ad3-bl
ite2-d2!
itd2xd5

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

'lil'd5-d6
'lil'd6xc6
e5-e6
gdl-d7
gd7-b7
gb7-c7
'lil'c6-d7
f3-f4
f4-f5
f5-f6

itb5-b8
grsxrs
ga7-e7
ge7-e8
itb8-c8
itc8-b8
grs-gS
ggS-g6
gg6-g5

Black resigned.

Stein - Sokolsky

ga8-a7
b5-b4
c5xb4
ite6xb6
itb6-c5
itc5-b6
itb6-c6
'lil'c6xa4
a5-c6

Odessa 1960

f3-g5!

Opening the a8-hl diagonal for the


white bishop at g2 and creating
dangerous tactical threats.

M-e8

White threatened 2.Axc5 or 2.b4.

b3-b4

c5-b7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

67

Exch anging the only piece that


defends the king.

11
12

Ag2xd5!

ga7xg7t

.!e5xg7
c&>g8-h8

ga8-d8

3 ..exd5 4.'xdSt C\t>h8 5.f7t g8


6.h6t + h8 7.,1g5! wins.
.

13 gg7-c7! + -

itf5-e5

In view of 14.,1g7t /:::;. f6t.

14

.!h6-f4

ite5-f5

Otherwise White would play 15.f6


and win immediately.

.!d5xc6!

This can hardly be called a sacrifice,


because White gets for his queen a
rook, two strong bishops and two
pawns. Moreover, White's king is
safe and Black's is not. All of White's
pieces occupy active and stable positions, and that is most important
when playing without the queen.

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

geixdl
l!alxa7
Ac6-g2
g5-e4
l!dl-d7
.!e3xh6
l!d7-g7t!

gd8xdl
ge8-b8
b7-d8
h7-h6
itf6-f5
Ag7-e5
\ d8-c6

gb8-d8

15

gc7xc6

16

h2-h4

b6-b5

17

gc6-c7
.!f4-g5

e6-e5
gd8-d7

g.l-g4

itf5xg4

20

gc7-c5

21
22

gc5xe5

itg4-e2
ite2xb2
c&>h8-g8
itb2-clt
gd7-t7

18
19

23
24

4g5-f6t
e4-g5
4g2-fi

25
26
27
28
29

g5xt7
.!f6-g5
l!e5xb5
l!b5-b6
l!b6-f6t

Black resigned.

c&>g8xt7
itclxc3
itc3-al
ital-d4

68

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Wade

Smyslov
Havana 1965

c6-d4!

Black sacrifices a pawn to open the


h8-al diagonal for his bishop and
remove White's dark-square bishop.

2
3

Ae3xd4
ftdlxd4

e5xd4

8
9
10

Ae2-f3
ftc6xa8
l!fixal

10

ftd8-b6!

White's queen is trapped. Black's ac


tive bishops have played an impor
tant part in this splendid combina
tion.

11
12

e4-e5
g2-g3

12.,lxdS Ae6 - + .

Ac3xb2
Ab2xal

12
13
14
15

fta8xf8t
Af3xg4
g3xf4

15
16
17
18
19

c&'gl-g2
l!al-el
l!el-e3
l!e3xg3

d6-d5

Ac8-g4
c&'g8xf8
h5xg4

c7-c6!

Continuing to open up the center.

4
5
6

d5xc6
0-0

ftd4-c4

b7xc6
ffi-d5
d5-f4!

Black's pieces begin to eye the white


king. For example: 7.AB gb8 8.gabl
( 8 . b 3 \t a 5 ) 8 . . . gb6 9.gfd l A a 6
10.\ta4 Ae5 11 .g3 \tf6! + and not
12.gxf4 in view of 12 ... \txf4 (Smys
lov).

itc4xc6?

Ag7xc3

ttb6-b4!- +
ftb4xf4
c&'f8-e8
g4-g3
ftf4xh4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

20
21
22
23

c2-c3
c&>g2-gl
4)g5-h7
4)h7-ffi

c&>e8-e7
'lh4-f4
a7-a5
'lf4xe5

White resigned.

Smyslov - Filip
Vienna 1957

5
6

tl-f4!

t7-f5?

If Black accepts the pawn sacrifice,


the diagonals will be opened for
White's bishops: 1 ...Axc3? ! 2.'lt/xc3
gxe4 3.,ld3 ge3 4.'lt/d2 gbe8 5.b4 /:::,.
Agl and f5.
In reply to the cool l ...'lt/a5 White
prepares an attack on the kingside
with 2.dl , /:::,. f2.

c&>g8-h7

White builds the kingside attack. The


h2-A has supported the attack but
soon will become a force on its own
merits with f4-f5.

7
How should White defend the e4-ft
against 1...,bc3 /:::,. gxe4 ? U3 is too
passive. l .Ad3 m ay be met with
1 ...e5.

.!g4-e6t
h3-h4

69

ge8-g8

g2-g4!

The light-square bishop is superior to


a rook in this position.

7
8
9
10
11

g4-g5
f4-f5
f5xg6t
.!e6xg4

h6-h5
4)ffi-g4
gg8-f8
c&>h7xg6
h5xg4

12

h4-h5t!

c&>g6xh5

Ae2-f3!

Black expected 2.exf5 Axc3 3.fxg6


hf6. But White again invites him to
accept the sacrificial pawn on e4.

2
3
4

'lc2xc3
.!f3-g4

.!g7xc3
f5xe4

Tra n s fe r r i n g t h e b i s h o p to the
strategically i mportant c8-h3
diagonal.

4)h7-ffi

12 ... c;flh7 13.'lt/e3 gbe8 14.gxf8 xffi


1s.gn 'iflg8 t6.g6 +-:

13
14

'lc3-g7
Ah2xlP

g4-IP
c&>h5-g4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

70

15

l!fl-gl

l!f8-h8t

16

4g3-h2t

!fg4-h4

17

l!cl-fl

l!b8-g8

18

l!fl-f4t

!fh4-h5

19

iil'g7-t7t

l!g8-g6

20

iil't7-f.5

Black resigned.

Krogius - Stein
/(jev 1960

4
5
6
7

h2xg3
g3-g4
g2-g3

4)h5-g3t!
iil'd8-g5
h6-h5

Otherwise 7 . hxg4, *h6t.


..

7
8
9

!fhl-g2
Acl-d2?

h5xg4
l!a8-f8

Better is 9.ght preventing 9...*h6,


g6-g5.

Black's pieces are mustered on the


kingside, and the f4 pawn creates ex
cellent preconditions for the attack
against White's king, which is rather
restricted in his movements.

d6-d5!

While not strictly a bishop pair posi


tion, here White must struggle with
his cl-A, which lacks scope. Black
sacrifices a pawn to activate his dark
square bishop, which is soon able to
take a crucial role in the attack.

4)b4xd5

Af8-c5t

c&>gl-hl

4)f6-h5

il'dl-el

9
10
11
12
13

l!fl-hl
g3xf4
l!al-dl
e4-e5

iil'g5-h6!
'th6-g7
e5xf4
g6-g5!

Before Black plays 13 ... gxt'3t g4.

13
14

il'g7xe5

t3xg4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

14
15
16
17

'l'elxe2
'l'e2xt3
ghl-fi

9e5xe2t!
f4-f3t
gnxt3
.le6xg4

Black won.

Stein

e3-e4!

This pawn thrust is reinforced by the


tactical threat 3.gc l .

gc8-a8

2
Parma
Moscow l971

71

e4xd5!

'l'a6-d3

e6xd5

Now the white bishops will show


their worth!

'l'c6-e6

'l'e2-a6!

After White's last move Black's b6


and a5 pawns need protection, while
his control over the c-file hardly mat
ters.

'l'c2-c6

At first sight, l . ..e5 looks good, as


2.Ag3 'lc6 3.gdl e4! ? , or 3.g5 hxg5
4. hxg5 gas 5 .'ld3 e4 both give
c ounterplay. However, White has
2. g5 ! hxg5 3.hxg5 exf4 (3 ... h5 4.g6)
4.gxf6 'lc5? ! 5.'ld3 with a strong at
tack.

g4-g5!

h6xg5

h4xg5

.lf6 -e4

.lg2-h3 !

i>e6-g6

7...'lc6 s.gc1 'lb7 9.gc7! +-.

i>d3xd5

ga8-d8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

72

Rukavina

Larsen
Leningrad 1973

'litd5-e6!

A typical way to realize the ad


van tage of the two bishops, To
destroy the opponent's dynamics is
often accomplished by exchanging
queens, a pair of rooks or other
dangerous pieces.

9
10

!.h3xe6

11

!.e6-c4!

itg6xe6
c&>g8-f8

With a threat Ac7 or Ae3.

11

Black is better developed and he en


j oys the adva n t age of t h e two
bishops.

e4-e3 !

Black sacrifices a pawn to open up


the position and, bringing his heavy
pieces into the game, he starts a
dangerous attack against the king.

2
3

tlxe3
c&>glxfl

3
4
5

!.cl-b2
c4xd5

grsxn t

gd8-e8

1 l ...fd6 12.AdS! .

12
!.f4-e3
13 !.e3xb6 + -

e4xg5

The rest is a purely technical matter.

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

a5-a4
!.b6-c5t
tl-f4
gn-el
a2xb3
!.c4-d5
gelxe8t
f4xg5
!.d5xt7

Black resigned.

c&>f8-g8
g5-e4
a4xb3
g7-g5
e4-f6
f6xe8
c&>g8-g7

e7-e6!
e6xd5

5.xd5 Axb2 6.hb2 xd5 7.cxd5


f!g5 =F .

5
6

gal-dl

itd8-g5

If 6.'it>gl, then 6...,!xg2 7.'it>xg2 ge8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Tseitlin

with the attack, e.g. 8.c&'f.3 Ad4 or


8.\tlt'2 gxe3.

73

Kovacs
Bmo l991

4g7-e5

e3-e4

c&'fi-gl

g2-e3

'l!tg5-g4

9.e3 *f.3 or 9 . . xa2!? 10 ..\xa2 Axb2


-+.
.

'l!tg4-g5

9
9 . . . Ad4?

10.d4! cxd4 l l .xg4 dxc3


2 . h 6 t c&' g 7 1 3 . Axc3 t c&' x h 6
14.Axb4 .
l

10

e3-g2

11

gdl-el? !

'l!tgS-hS

1 l..\a4 Axg2 12.AxeS ( 12.\tlxg2 gt'2t


- + ) 1 2 . . . * xe S 1 3 .c&'xg2 *xe4t
14.\tlgl xa2 15.a2 *e3t 16.c&'hl
!!t'2 -+ .

11
12

4h3xg2
c&'glxg2

gm.at!- +

12
13

c&'g2xtl

'l!th5xh2t

14

'l'tl-fi

'l!th2-h3t

White resigned.

White enjoys- the advantage of the


two bishops, so he strives to open the
game.

f4xe5!

Less good is 1 .f5? ! in view of l ...Ad7


and 2 ... .\d4.

1
2
3

a2-a4
gal-dl!

Intending d3-d4.

c6xe5
a6-a5

3
4

'l!tel-c3

g8-e7
e7-c6

5
6

d3-d4!
e2xd4

c5xd4
'l!td6-b4

6 ...xd4 7.gxd4 +-.

ttc3-al

7.c6? .\xc6 8.xc6 gxdl +.

g7-g5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

74

ltfi-dl !

14
15
16

ltdl-d8!
'lc3xc6t
Ae3xb6

d4xc6!

It is far more important to weaken


the blockade at e5 than to "win"
another bishop, so 8.xe6 fxe6 is not
so good.

8
9
10

'lal-f6
ltdlxd8t

11

'lf6-c3 !

e5xc6
'lb4-e7
'le7xd8

With so many of Black's pieces, not


the least of which is the king, in
danger, our frequent advice to ex
change queens is not appropriate.

11
12

13

e4-e5

<&>c8-b7

'le8xd8
c&>b7-c8

Threatens 1 7.'tb7t '&'d7 1 8.Ac6t


'&'e7 19.AcSt +-.

16

Ae6-f5!

Black intends to play 17 ...1lg6, he also


vacates the e6 square for his king.

17

'lc6-t3 !

Af5-h7

17. ..Ag6 18.'tb7t '&>d7 19.AxaS .

1 8 'lt3-b7t
19 .lb6xa5
20 'lb7-b5t!

<&>c8-d7
ltg8-g6

The second bishop joins the attack.

Drives the king back into the middle.;

1 2 . . . A d 7 1 3 .e 6 ! fxe 6 1 4 .1ld l b.
1 5 .Axc6 and 1 5 .1lxd7; better is
12...f(d7, and perhaps 13.1lt2 b. 1ld2.

20... c6 21.'ld3t.

12

'ld8-e8

20

21
22

<&>d7-e7

4a5-b4t
'lbSxcSt

c7-c5
<&>e7-d7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

23
24
25

'l'cS-bSt
'l'b5-c6t
4g2-e4t

c&>d7-e6
c&>e6-f5

Black resigned, 25 ...CllxeS 26.,'1.c3t.

Tseshkovsky
Timoshchenko

75

a2-a4!

'l'b5xa4

6...'tb4 7.ge4 +-.

7
8
9

gelxeS
4b2xe5
'l'g4-g5

10

4g2-h3? !

gesxeS
g7-g6
'l'a4-a6

USSR 1979

c3-c4!

Sacrificing a pawn, White opens up


the a 1-h8 diagonal for his bishop.

1
2
3

4cl-a3
4a3 b2
-

4a6xc4
ID'8-e8
e6-e5

Black cannot keep his material ad


vantage, e.g. 3 .. .f6 4.'tg4 Aa6 5.c4.

'l'dl-g4

4.Axe5! ?.

4
5

gal-bl

itd8-b8
'l'b8-b5

Black will have difficulties defending


dark squares on his kingside. The
simplest exploitation is 10.h4, b. h4h5.

ga8-f8?

10

Time trouble. After 10 ... cS White


would have nothing better than to
regroup and realize the same plan,
h2-h4-h5.

11

'l' g5-h6

Black resigned.

Miles

Kortchoi
Ti/burg 1985

Mastering the Bishop Pair

76

White enjoys a spatial advantage. He


also has two bishops, which may be
very active in an open position.

1 4cl-e3

19
20
21

a3-a4
c&>b2-c3
b4-b5

22

gd2-a2

41 e7-g6
41 g6-h4
41 d4-e6

White develops a piece and en


courages a move that opens useful
squares for his other bishop.

1
2
tl-t3
3
0-0-0
4
4fl-e2
41
5
c3-b5!?

b7-b6
ghS-dS
4d7-eS
41 ffi-d7

White intends to exchange his knight


for Black's bishop, supposing that the
bishop defends Black's position well.
But in our opinion he should keep
the knight, since exchanges favor the
player with less space and the knight
may be useful for inducing weak
nesses on the queenside.

5
6
7

41 b5-c7
41 c7xeS

t7-ffi
gas-cs
gdSxe8

7 ...d4t 8.bl xe2 9.xg7 /:::,. gd2


+-.

c&>cl-bl

41 d7-bS

8 . . . f8 ! ? 9 . A a 6 gc7 1 0 . g c 1 e5
l l.Ac4! e6 12.Ad5 gec8 13.a3 .

9
10
11
12
13

gdl-cl
ghl-dl
gdlxdS
4e2-b5
a2-a3

e6-e5
geS-dS
gcSxdS
gdS-d6

White begins the second phase: un


m a s k i n g w e a k n e s s e s in t h e
opponent's camp. The broader the
theatre of actio n, the less well
knights are able to cope with all of it
This is an important technical ele
ment in realizing the advantage of
two bishops.

22
23
24
25
26
27

4'/c3-b4
a4-a5
c&>b4xa5
c&>a5-b4
g2-g.l !

2S

4c4xe6!

41 e6-d4
41 h4-g6
b6xa5t
41 g6-f4
c&>c7-b8
41f4-e6

White starts seizing space on the


queenside.

13
14
15
16
17
lS

4b5-c4
b2-b4
c&>bl-b2
gcl-dl
gdl-d2

c&>e7-dS
41 c6-e7
4)bS-c6
41 c6-d4
c&>dS-c7
g7-g5?!

It was better to defend without


weakening.

A profitable exchange is one way of

77

Mastering the Bishop Pair

re alizing the advantage o f two


bishops. The weakness of the a7-ft
allows White the opportunity to
simply into a won rook ending.

28
29 Ae3xd4
30 ga2-a6!
31 b4-c4 + -

gd6xe6
e5xd4
ge6-e7

The rook ending is easily won.

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

c4xd4
d4-dS
d5-e6
e6xf6
f3-f4
e4-e5
ga6-al
e5-e6

ge7-r7
h7-h5
grr-b7
gb7xb5
g5-g4
gbS-b2
b8-b7
gb2xh2

Black resigned.

Ragozin - Noskov
Moscow 1930

grs-e8

4 . . . t'b6t 5 . .B.d4 c 5 6 . .B.xf6 gxf6


7.Axh7t +-;
4 ... d5 5 ..B.xh7t <1Jxh7 6.t'h5t calg8
7 ..B.xg7! +-;
The best defense was 4 . . . e5 ! giving the extra pawn back, Black
joins his bishop at c8 to the defending
force and can offer more stubborn
resistance. For example: 5 . .B.xe5 d5
6.t'h5 (6..B.xh7t? <1Jxh7 7.t'h5t calg8
8.!!h4 f6) 6... h6 7.!!f'3 t'g5; 7 ..B.xg7! ?
c&1xg7 8.!!f'3 t'd6 9.!!afl t'e6 10.!!g3t
<f}h8 1 1..B.g6! +-.
=

e4-e5!

White sacrifices a pawn to activate


his pieces in the most important sec
tor. He gains the bishop pair and an
attack--in which all of White's pieces
take part--against the king.

1
2
3
4

4)d2-e4!
4) e4xf6t
gnxr4

d6xe5
e5xf4
4) d7xf6

5
6
7
8
9
10

gf4xf6!
i!l'dl-g4t
Ab2-a3t
Ad3xh7
Cligl-hl
gal-dl

g7xf6
Clig8-f8
geS-e7
'{!l'd8-b6t
Clif8-e8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

78

Black resigned.

Serawan

Kortchnoi
Montpellier 1985

plicated Black's task, but his position


is advantageous all the same. His
king easily slips into the center and
thence to the wea k queenside.
White's king, stranded by Black's
bishops, is quite helpless.

6
7
8
9
10

In open positions with play on both


flanks, the bishops are strong. More
over, White has an inviting target on
each flank: the b5-ft and the king.

lk8-c5

Forces the exchange of rooks, but


White's weaknesses are more vul
nerable with the rooks present:
l ...:!':k3 1 2.<alg2 Ae5 3.:!':!f3 :!':!c5 +.

2
gn-dl
3
gdl-dS
4 Ab3xd5
5 Ad5-c4 D

h3-h4
c&>h2-h3
c&>h3-g4
g3-hSt
h5-f4

Ae4-bl
c&>h8-g7
c&>g7-ffi
c&>ffi-e7
c&>e7-d6

Exchanging bishop for knight to get


to the queenside immediately would
give White counterplay:
10 ... Axf4? 1 1 .<alxf4 <ald6 . 12.<alg5
<atc5 13.Ag8 = .

11
12
13
14
15
16

f4-d3
c&>g4-h5
c&>hS-gS
c&>gS-fS
c&>rs-gS
c&>gS-fS

16
17

c&>fS-gS

AeS-ffi
Affi-g7
Abl-c2
Ag7-c3
Ac3-g7

Ad4-e5
gcsxdS
b7-b6

5.<alg2? Ad3 6.Ac6 Ac4 -+.

Ag7-f8!

17.<alf6 Ae7t 18.g7 h5 -+.

17
18

Ag6-e4

The exchange of the rooks has com-

d3-f2

Ac2-dl

The fortress is broken. There was no


s alvation in 1 8 . h 5 A f3 1 1 9 . .lf4
( 1 9.Ab3 Ae4 20.Ac4 h6t 2 1 .<atf6
( 2 1 .<alf4 Ad5) 2 1 . ..Ae7t, /:::,. Ag 5)
19 ...<ate5 20..le6 h6t 21.<alg6 Ae4t

Mastering the Bishop Pair

22.c&>t7 Aa3 - + .

18
19
20
21

.lc4-d3
.ld3xh7
Ah7-g8

Cl'd6-c5
.ldl-a4
.la4xb5

41
42

dl-e3t
a2xb3

c&>g5-g4

c&>c2-cl
a4-a3

White resigned.

Blackburne

Lasker
London 1892

21.hS ! ? Ae7t 22.c&>fS Ac4 +.

21
22

79

4f8-e7t
4b5-e2t

The two bishops can get the better of


the passed p awn e asily. White's
knight and bishop are defenseless
against Black's passed pawn.

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38

Cl'g4-f4 c&>c5-d4- +
Cl'f4-g3
b6-b5
.le7-d6t
4g8-t7
a7-a5
Cfg3-g2
h4-h5
.ld6-f4
tl-h3
.lf4-e3
h3-gl
Ae2-dl
'l'd4-c3
gl-f3t
a5-a4
f3-e5
b5-b4
Cl'g2-fi
.ldl-c2
Cl'fi-el
e5-c4
Ae3-f4
c&>c3-b2
c4-b6
.lf4-e5
b6-d5
Ae5-c3
c&>el-e2
At7-g6?!

38
39
40

b4-b3 !
Ac2xg6
'l'b2-c2

d5-e3
e3-dlt

t7-f5!

Grabbing space and restricting piece


mobility (especially knights) are
together an important method in
realizing the bishop pair advantage.
Black does not exchange (xd3), because exchanges are favorable for
the player with less space under his
control.

2
3
4
5
6
7

e4-c3
Cl'cl-bl
e2-f4
.ld3-e2
gdlxd8t
gbl-dl

.lc8-e6
grs-d8
Ae6-t7
e5-c6
ga8xd8

80

Mastering the Bishop Pair

gd8-e8!

The exchange of heavy pieces is, as a


rule, favorable for the player with the
bishops. But sometimes it is expedient to preserve a rook to incubate weaknesses in the opponent's
camp.

8
9
10
11
12
13

4e2-fi
f4-d3
c3-e2
b2-b3
c2-c3
bl-c2

b7-b5!
Ag7-d4
4d4-b6
g8-g7
g7-f6
c6-e7

24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

e2-cl
c2-b2

Using the tactical peculiarities of the


position, Black wins the game. Black
could also realize the advantage by
a6-a5 and b5-b4.

16

d3xb4

16.cxb4 Ad4t 17.Ci\'a3 {)e3 - + .

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

gdl-el
Afixc4
4c4xa6
g2-g3
b2-a3
cl-e2
b4-c2

Flohr

e7-d5

b5-b4!

15

d5-e3
e3-c4t
geSxel- +
gel-gl
ggl-g2t
gg2xh2
gb2-g2
g6-g5

h7-h5
4b6-tl
c7-c5t
At7xb3
c5-c4
Ab3xc2
4c2-dl
Aflxd4
4dlxt3
4t3-e2
ilg2xe2
ge2-a2

White resigned.

With the idea {)e7-d5-e3.

14
15

4a6-d3
a3-b4
a2-a4
b4-b5
a4-a5
Ad3xc4
a5-a6
e2-d4
c3xd4
d4-d5
Ac4xe2
a6-a7

Simagin
Pyamu 1947

d4xc5!

White exploits the undefended state


of e5 to build up a central wedge. The
bishops seize powerful diagonals.

1
2
3
4

e2-e4
e4-e5
.an-d3

e5xf6!

d6xc5
b8-c6
f6-e8
11-rs

If 4 ... h6, then 5.0-0-0 b,. h2-h4, 4::l f3 g5 with the initiative.
White's bishops need elbow-room,
so he opens the position.

5
6

0-0-0

g7xf6
e6-e5

Black has seized the d4 point, but it

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Illescas

does not matter because the attack


against his king decides the game
first.

7
8

g2-g4
!tdl-el

e8-d6

With the idea g4-g5.

8
9

h2-h4 + -

h7-h6
.lc8xg4

Black cannot prevent further open


ing of the position, so he seeks com
p lications.

10
11

!thl-gl
t3-h2

h6-hS
f6-f5

1 1 ...\flhS 12.g4 hxg4 t3.g4 ggs


14 . .l,g6 +- (Flohr).

12
13
14
15
16
17
18

1 8 . .. 2

19
20
21
22
23

tl-t3
t3xg4
9c2-e2
Ac3xeS
9e2xeS
!tgl-0
!telxeS

9e7-g7
f5xg4
!tt8-f4
c6xeS
!tf4-tl
9g7xeS
d6-t7

t9.ggst <&'hS 20.m6 +-.

!teS-e7
h2xfi
!te7-e3
O-g3
g3xhS

Black resigned.

gaxnt
g8-t8
!ta8-d8
!td8-d7

81

Leko
Leon 1993

b2-b4!

Restricting the opponent's knight is a


typical way to realize the advantage
of two bishops.

1
2

!tclxc2

!ta2xc2
cS-a6

2 ... ga1t 3.Afl b3 4.gcst .am 5.Ae3


(Illescas). Black would retain bet
ter chances for defense with 2... .ib3.
For example: 3.Afl h5 4.,1e3 ga4 and
after s.gc7 (5.b5? .ic5 ! ) 5 ... b4
6.gxe7 White still enjoys his ad
vantage, but Black has counterplay.
3 All-el !
Now Black's knight is shut off from
the play for a long time.

3
4

gl-0

.lg7-d4t
h7-hS

Mastering the Bishop Pair

82

Ab5-d7!

The exchange of heavy pieces usually


favors the p l ayer with the two
bishops. The b7-ft becomes immedi
ately vulnerable.

5
6

Black resigned. 22 .....\xb4 23.lifi>c3


.\ a2t 24.lifi>b3 .\cl t 25.lifi>b2.

<llg8-g7
. fa8-b8
6 . . . .\b8 7.Ah3 (7.Ae8 ) 7 .. J;al
k2-c8

8.b5 ! gb l 9.lifi>e2 Aa7 10.b6 gxb6


l l .Ac3t f6 12.Ad4 +- (Illescas).

7
s
9
10
11
12

<llfi -e2
Ael-c3t
h2-h4
lk8xb8
Ad7-c8
Ac3-d2t

Ad4-gl
t7-f6
<llg7-h6
a6xb8
b7-b6
<llh6-g7


A
Y, m
" .. 4
x ra
.
iD iD
:t
iD

, " i
':ik"

,, "

m
m
m

Suba - Smyslov
Las Pa/mas 1982

- . . .

..

.

;, .
. ft .

L
lm
m
m"


a m
.

m
m
a

'm

. . ... .
13 Ad2-e3 !

: r

...

/.

Transforming the advantage into a


winning endgame.

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

<lle2xe3
g2-g4 +
g4xh5
<lle3-d4
t3-f4
Ac8-b7
f4-f5!

20.Ac6? e5t! .

20
21
22

Ab7-c6
Ac6xb5

Aglxe3
<llg7-t7
<llt7-e8
g6xh5
b6-b5
<lle8-t7
<llt7-f8

<llf8-t7
b8-a6

The mobility of White's bishops is


limited and his pawn structure on the
queenside is not resilient enough - so
Black has the positional advantage.
Black employs a typical plan against
the two bishops - he starts by restrict
ing one of them and then he exchan
ges the other, after which he strives
to exploit the weaknesses in his
opponent's camp.

1
2

b7-d8
At3-dl

Mastering the Bishop Pair

12
13
14
15
16
17

83

d3-d4
'ftd2-b2
4e3-cl
'ftb2-c2
'&>hl-gl
'ftc2-tl

a7-a5
4) e6-c7
4)c7-b5
Clie7-f6
4d5-e4
Clif6-t7

But not 17 ...xc3? 18.d5! and White


suddenly gets active.

2
3
4

4a3-cl
'fte3-e2

c6-c5!
Clig8-f8

Passive defense is h o peless for


White. He had to play 4.h3 g2-g4.

4
5
6
7
8

'fte2-c2
4dl-f3
c4xd5
4f3-e2

18
19

4cl-d2
'fttl-h4

4)b5-d6
h7-h6

With the idea Ad3.

20
21

'fth4-h5t
'fth5-g6

Clit7-g8

'ftd7-c6
d6-d5
'ftc6-d7
4t7xd5 +

After the exchange of bishops, White


has nothing to defend his light
squares with.

8
9
10
11

11

4cl-e3
'ftc2-d2
4e2-fi

4)d8-e6
C1lf'S-e7
'ftd7-c6

21

4e4-d5!- +

Drops back to expel the queen, while


perfecting the order of his battery on
the a8-hl diagonal.

c5-c4!

Black's knight and bishop are supe


rior to White's two bishops.

22 4d2-el
23 'ftg6-g3
24 'ftg3-h4
25
.lel-tl
26 'fth4-d8
27 'ftd8xb6
28 'ftb6xa5
29 4fixe2??

4d5-t7
'ftc6-e4
Clig8-h7
4t7-d5
4)d6-b5
4)b5xc3
4)c3-e2t

29.c&>hl c3.

29

...

'fte4xg2tmate

Mastering the Bishop Pair

84

Smorodsky

10

Romanovsky

c&>gl-h2

Moscow 1927

The position is of a closed nature.


Black's bishop at e4 is dangerous lo
cally, but he sorely needs to open
lines for the other.

1
2
3
4

g2-g3
g3xf4
.lc5-b4

4... ,13 5.g2.

5
6
7

h2-h3
Cfgl-h2
gd2-2

e6-e5!
e5xf4
gcs-as
h5-h4
gn.g7
g4xh3

The attack against the king is more


dangerous than the advance of the
passed a-ft.

11
a5-a6
12
a6-a7
13 c&>h2xh3 a
14
ga-h2

gg3xe3!
ge3-el
.lh6xf4
c&>rT-g6

White resigned.
15.Cit>xh4 meets 1 5 . . . ge3 16 . .Q.e7
Ag3t.

Sakharov - Simagin
Leningrad 1960

c&>g8-rT

Black's bishops, supported by the


rooks, have acquired tremendous
power.

8
9

gn.g1
Cl>h2xgl

The position is equal. Though White


has the two bishops, the one on g2 is
placed passively and it will take much
time to activate it; White lags in
development already.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

f2-f4?

White neeeded to to transfer the


knight from c3 to a more active posi
tion: 1 .dl cs 2.e3 g6 3.c4 ;;!;; .

1
2
3

f4-f5
<&>gl-h2

..

? .. .
. /.
.

f6-d7
gf8.d8

. . . . . . :

..

ft

{
R
a

?'"''] ' "- -

. . . . . . . v.

:,,
....... ;

b7-b5!

White has deprived Black of the e6


square, a springboard for the occupa
tion of the d4 outpost. So Black
begins to fight for the c4-square.

4
5
6
7

h3-h4
b2-b3
.lcl-e3
gal-fl

15
16
17

gd3xd4
ge2-el
.lcl-g5

17 ... xa3 ! ?.

18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

f5xg6
.lt3-e2
,lg5xf6
4e2-d3
gel-dl
gdl-fl
c2xd3
g3-g4
<&>h3xg4
h4-h5
<&>g4xh5
gn.dt
<&>h5-g4
c;g4-f3
<&>t3-g4
c;g4-h5

85

c5xd4
gb8-c8
g7-g6
t7xg6
<&>g8-t7
.le7xf6
<&>t7-e7
c4-b2
b2xd3
.lf6-g7
h5xg4t
,lg7-h6
g6xh5t
4h6-f4
gc8-d8
gd8-c8
<&>e7-f6
gc8-c2

d7-b6
a6-c5
a7-a5
c5-d7

Preventing the shot f5-f6.

8
9

.le3-cl
b3-b4

a5-a4
b6-c4

Protected squares for the knights are


im portant in the battle against
bishops. Black's position is better.

10
11

gn.a
<&>h2-h3

Preventing 12.g3-g4.

12

g13.<13

d7-f6
h7-h5!
ga8-b8

1 2 . gd4?! 13.gxd4 exd4 14.eS! .


..

13
14

J.g2-f3 gd8-d4! +
c3-bl

14.gxd4 exd4 15.eS g4!.

14

c6-c5

gel-cl !- +

33
Weak square b 1.

34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

gdlxcl
<&>h5-g4
<l>g4-h4
c;h4-g4
<&>g4-g3
c;g3-f3
<&>t3-e2
bl-d2

White resigned.

4f4xcl
<&>f6-g6
.lcl-e3
.le3-g5
<l>g6-h5
.lg5-f4!
c&>h5-g4
.lf4xd2

Mastering the Bishop Pair

86

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

'ftd4-a4
'fta4-b3
e4xt3
<&>gl-fi
'ftb3-a3
.lb2xa3
Aa3-c5
e5-c6

t7-f5
'ftc7-c8
'ftc8-cSt
.la8-d5
'ftc5xa3
e6xt3
d6-c8

Kasparov - Gligoric
Lucerne ol 1982

15

<&>g8-t7

After 1 5 . . . Axc6 16.bxc6 Black's


knights are helpless against the
passed pawn supported by the two
bishops.

1
2
3
4

gn.ct
galxcl
gclxc8t
t3-e5

gc8xclt
ga8-c8
b6xc8
c8-d6

Better is 4 ...b6, which not only oc


cupies a supported point, but also
shields the a7 pawn.

t2-t3

White seizes space and restricts


Black's pieces.

5
6
7

e3-e4
b4-b5

"J/e7-c7
.ld5-a8
f6-e8? !

With the idea f5.


Not a brilliant idea. Black only
creates additional weaknesses in his
camp. Regrouping with d6-c8-b6
was worthwhile.

16 c6xa7 + 1 7 .lc5xa7
18 .la7-d4
19
<&>fl-fl
20
<&>t2-e3
21
g2-g.1
22 <&>e3-d3
23 <&>d3-c3
24 <&>c3-b4
25
h2xg.1
26
.ld4-t2
27
t3-f4
g.1xf4
28
29 <&>b4-c5
30
At2-d4
31 Ad4xg7
32 Ae2-g4t
33 Ag4xh3

c8xa7
<&>t7-e6
g7-g6
e8-d6
g6-g5
d6-c4t
c4-d6
fS-f4
f4xg.1
h7-h5
d6-f5
g5xf4
f5-g7
Ad5-g2
h5-h4
h4-h3
<&>e6-e7
.lg2xh3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

34

<l?c5-b6

4
5

B lack resigned.

Kasparian - Botvinnik
Moscow 1931

White's two bishops are restricted


and present no real danger. Black
plans to exploit White's pawn weak
nesses on the queenside, combining
it with prophylaxis to prevent play in
the center. After l...f6 bad is 2.c5 in
view of 2 ... Ab3! 3.!!d2 a5 +, b. a5-a4,
ga8-a5.
The actual moves were:

c6-c5? !

m,,,,
,.,/. Bi 11
:.t
v :.t
._

r_
a#.-
- :.t
L
-:t-"

m"ifm:fm "m
--aft m
ft"f.
A

'"

.,./. . . . . .
.

/.

/.

f4xe5
J1e3-g5t

87

ffixe5
<l?e7-e8

5 . . . f6 6.!!d5 <ale6 7.,1xf6 gxf6


8.!!xc5;
5 ...<alf7 6.,1e2! .

h2-h3?!

Better is 6.!!d6! , preventing Ae6 and


f6. Later it would be possible to
play 7.,1d3 b. Ac2-a4.

6
7

...
gd2-d6

J1g4-e6
<l?e8-f7

Now Black has time to consolidate


his position.

8
9

J1fl-e2
J1g5xffi ? !

9.,1d3 !!ad8

=.

d7-ffi
g7xffi

9 ... <alxf6? 10.,1g4.

10

J1e2-g4

.....

- - A-
2

f3-f4!

White activates his bishops.

J1e6-g4

2 ...f6 3.fxe5 fxe5 4.Ag5t oo .

l!dl-d2

f7.ffi

10

ga8-e8!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

88

1 0 . . . Axg4? 1 1 . hxg4 'l;e7 gds b6


13.gS ! .

11

lthl-dl

Employing an ingenious defense,


Black succeeds in making the posi
tion level. White overestimates his
position. He should play 1 1.Axe6 = .

11
12

h3xg4

4e6xg4
lth8-g8! +

It has turned out that White has


more weaknesses than Black.

13
14
15
16

ltdl-fi
ltd6-d7t
ltd7-d6
gnxmt
16.gdxf6t 'l;g7 + .
16

27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34

Tai - Shabalov

lte8-e6
lte6-e7
ltg8xg4!

Yunna/a 1985

Cllt7-e8

ltd6-d5?

ltffi-5
4'>cl-c2
lt5xe5
4'>c2-d3
4'>d3-d2
l!d5xe5t
lte5-d5
ltd5-d7
ltd7xa7

h2-h3

White strives to gain the bishop pair.


Black cannot prevent e4-e5, after
which the two bishops gain tremen
dous strength.

He h a d to p l ay 1 7 . g de 6 gxg2
18.gxe7t 'l;xe7 19.gh6 with counter
play.

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

h4-h3
4&>g6-g5
4&>g5-g4
h3-h2
4&>g4-h3
l!g3-gl
4'>h3xh2
ltgl-el

White resigned.

17

lta7-b7
ltb7xb6t
ltb6-bl
4'>d2-c2
ltbl-hl
a3-a4
lthlxhlt
'&'c2-d3

b7-b6
l!g4xe4
lte4-g4!
ltg4xg2t
ltg2-g3t
lte7xe5
Clle8-t7
4&>t7-g6!
h7-h5
h5-h4

4g4-h5

t...Axf.3 2.Axf.3 es 3.Ag5 !:::. .id5.

2
3
4
5

g3-g4
4)t3-e5
4c1-e3
4) e5xg6

Ah5-g6
l!f8-d8
--b6-b4

5.a3 'l!tb3 6.h4 a4! ! 7.xa4 (7.h5


xc3 8.bxc3 Axe4 9.g5 Axg2 10.gxf6
Axf6) 7 ... 'l!txa4 8.f.3 Ad6 9.gxd6 gxd6
10.hS gc2 with compensation for the
material.

5
6

e4-e5

h7xg6
4)ffi-e8

6 ... .ifd7 7.gd4 !:::. gadl .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

16
17
18
19
20
21
22

b2-b4
Ae3-c5t
f2-f4!
.!c5-f2
l!dl-d4
l!d4-d6
l!d6xe6

22.Ac6?! *c2.

22
23
24
25

c3-b5!

In realizing the advantage of the two

bishops, the exchange of queens


(7.*b5) is usually helpful, but in this
p osition the black queen is misplaced
and may be attacked.

7
8

b5-d4

.!f2xb6!
l!e6xe8
.!g2-d5t

89

tl'a5-a4
f8-g8
b7-b6
l!c7-f7
c4xa3
l!f7xf4
l!f4-f8
a3-c4
l!f8xe8

Black resigned. 25 . . . \flh7 26.*h4


mate.

Tseshkovsky - Grigorian
Yerevan 1980

a7-a6

With the idea a3, b4.

8
9

c5-a4
l!c8-c7
9 .. d7 10.a3 *a5 ll .c6 .
10
a2-a3
tl'b4-a5
l!dl-d2

White enjoys the advantage. His


p i eces are better c o o r d i n a t e d :
Black's queen i s misplaced, Black's
rooks are underdeveloped; White's
b i s h o p s , acting a l o n g adj a c e n t
diagonals, are clearly superior to
their black counterparts. The e5
pawn suggests a white attack on the
kingside.

11 tl'e2-dl + With the idea b4.

11
12
13
14
15

d4xe6
l!d2xd8
tl'dlxd8
l!al-dl

a4-b6 a
f7xe6
.!e7xd8
ciig8-f8
b6-c4

a4-b6!

White brings the last misplaced piece


into play.

1
2

gl-hl

l!a8-d8
d5xb6

Gives White the opportunity to gain

Mastering the Bishop Pair

90

the bishop pair. And the bishops will


be strong, controlling all the board.
2 ...,1c5 is better, though after 3.c4
'f!c7 4.Ae4 Axd4 (4 ... g6 5.4)d6! Axd6
6.exd6 hd6 7.Af6 !::. 'f!h4 ) 5.fu:d4
g6 (there was a threat of Axh7t)
6.d6 White has pressure on the
kingside.

3
4
5
6

,1f3xb7
'Itel-el
.1b7-e4
'lte2-f2

22
23
24
25

gnxnt
.1b6-e3t
4e3xg5t
'lte6-f6t

Black resigned.

Englisch - Steinitz
London 1883

b6-d5
d5-c7
g7-g6
'lta5-b5

gdl-d3

White's attack is irresistible. Black


cannot defend the fl point.

c7-e8

g7-h6
4e7-g5
h6xg5

b7-b6!

Played to restrict the opponent's


pieces (the knight especially) after
c7-c5. Seizing space is essential in
realizing the advantage of the two
bishops.

h2-h3

7...'8d7 8.'8f3 Ag5 9.Ac5 !::. Ad3, 'Bxfl.

8
gdJ.f3
9 .1e4-d3
10 ,1d4-b6
1 1 g13xn + 12 gnxrst
13
'ltf2-e2
14
gn-dl
15
b2-b3
16 .1d3-c4
17
g2-g4
18
'lte2-e4
19
gdl-fi
20
'lte4-c6
21
'ltc6xe6

e8-g7
'ltb5-d5
gd8-b8
g7-f5
gb8xm
g8-g7
'ltd5xa2
4e7-g5
grs-es
f5-h6
h6-t7
4gS-e7
ge8.f8
'lta2xc2

,1g4-e6?!

Better is 2 ...Ac8 and if 3.d4 then


3 ... a6 4.'8fdl Ab7 !::. c5.

gn-d1

Better is 3.4)d4!, fighting for support

Mastering the Bishop Pair

points for e knight, a typi al way to


fi ght the bishops. Then if 3 ..Ad5
then 4.4)b5; or 3 .Ac4 4.gfdl 4)c6;
or 3 ... Ad7 4.a4! 4)b5.
.

..

3
4
5
6

Ae3-g5
4g5-f4
tl-t3

c7-c5
t7-f6
c&>g8-t7
g6-g5!

With the idea h7-h6 and f6-f5. Black


seizes space also on the kingside.

7
8
9
10
11

gdlxd8
Af4-e3
gal-el
t3-f4
g2-g3

11
12
13
14
15

4)b3-cl
a2-a3
c&>gl-tl
Ae3xf4

ge8xd8
h7-h6
f6.fS
4g7-f6

a7-a5!
a5-a4
4e6-c4
g5xf4

15

91

Af6-g5!

Exchanging one of the bishops, Black


transposes to an advantageous end
ing where his pieces are far the more
active. The difference in activity be
tween the bishop and the knight is
especially great. Transforming the
advantage of the two bishops is an
important way to realize it.

16

Af4xg5

h6xg5

17

c&>tl-e3

c&>t7-f6

18

h3-h4

After this move Black forces his way


into a winning endgame. ( weak
square h4)

18

g5xh4

19

g3xh4

gd8-e8t

20

c&>e3-tl

ge8xel

21

c&>tlxel

<&'f6-e5

22

4)cl-e2

Ac4xe2

23

c&>elxe2

c&>e5-f4

24

c3-c4

c&>f4-g4

25

c&>e2-e3

fS-f4t

26

c&>e3-e4

f4-t3

27

c&>e4-e3

c&>g4-g3

White resigned.

92

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Miles - Li Zunian

11

Lucerne 1985

White's plan is standard for such


situations: to excha nge major pieces,
seize space (f3, e4), transfer the king
to the center and induce weaknesses
on the kingside. The advanced bS-ft
facilitates the plan's last stage. So it is
better to avoid pawn weaknesses in a
fight against the two bishops.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

gdlxdSt
gn-c1
f3-d2
gclxcSt
d2-b3
f2-f3
b3xc5
e3-e4
!.f4-e3
Ae2-dl

gasxd8
gds-cs
c5-e4
!.b7xc8
f6-d7
e4-c5
d7xc5
ti-f6
c5-b3
b3-a5


.1. a


i
:t
:t m m :a: - "
m

.. . r.

r. .
, .J

ft '
r
.

.8.

. .

m
.f. . .
m
m
.L }.
.
.

}.

b2-b3 !

Knights must be denied squares sup


ported by pawns. That is another
reason to regard each pawn advance
with trepidation.

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Ae3-b6
c&>gl-f2
c&>f2-e3
c&>e3-d3
Ab6-c5t
c&>d3-c3
h2-h4
a3-a4

e645
a5-c6
Ac8-e6
c&>g8-ti
c&>ti-e7
c&>e7-d7
g7-g6
Ae6-ti
Ati-e6

19 ... bxa4 20.bxa4 rf;c7 2l.Ae2 rf;b7


22.Ac4 and the white king breaks
into the enemy camp.

- - - :t

.;j . .

.
ra
.

"
.
i
"'

J.i :t
mra. j
"- .
;m
:lf m %.r
... m
m m
m, ,,

mf

'

.:
JiJ!J'

- mA
20

Adl-c2!

20.axbS axbS 21 .Ae2 b4! + 22.Axb4


Axb3! = ;
20.Ae2 .!Li a5.

20

f6-f5

20... rf;c7 21.axbS axbS 22.Ad3 .!Li aS


23.Ae7 fS 24.exfS exfS 25.Ac2 6.
h4-h5-h6.

a4xb5
21
22 Ac2-d3 + f3xe4
23
24
.1c5xb4
25
.1d3-c4
26
.1b4-e7

a6xb5
f5xe4
b5-b4t
c6-d4
c&>d7-c6
!.e6xc4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

27
28
29
30
31

c3xc4
b3-b4
b4-b5t
4e7-b4
c4-d5

93

4J d4-e2
4J e2-g3
c6-d7
4Jg3xe4
4J e4-ffit

3 1 ...2 32.b6 e4 33.Ad6 e3 34.b7 e2


35.b8'M' el'M' 36.'M'c7t ctfe8 37.'M'c8t
f7 38.'M'f8 mate.

32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

d5xe5
e5-f4
f4-g5
.G.b4-el
.G.el-tl
g5-ffi
ffi-f7
f7-g8
g8-h7
h4-h5
g2-g3
h7xh6

4Jffi-g4t
4Jg4-h6
4Jh6-f5
d7-d6
d6-d5
d5-d6
d6-d7
h7-h6
g6-g5
g5-g4
4Jf5-d6

Black resigned.

Sosonko - Karpov
The Netherlands 1979

f7-f5!

Tactics induce White to trade the e5ft, whose disappearance leaves more
elbow room for Black's bishops.

e5xffi

g3-g4

g7xffi

White's a2 pawn is hopelessly weak.


Black's task is to reach this pawn with
his light-square bishop. For this pur
pose he has to demolish White's d3
Ae4 fortress. But he has no reason to
hurry, because the advantage of the
two bishops is enduring. So Black
strengthens his position gradually,
preparing f6-f5.

g8-f8

b2-b3

f8-e7

g2-g3

e7-d6

g3-f4

The attempt to transfer the knight to


e3 was doomed: 9. e l f5 10.gxf5
gxf5 l l .Ad3 Ac5 12.c2 e5 -+ .

.G.b7-c8!

Battle rages on both flanks, the cen


ter is open. Consequently, Black
decides to retain the bishops.

2
3
4

4g2-e4
4Jcl-d3
gl-g2

4b6-d4
a6-a5

4c8-d7

Black is waiting for White to exhaust


his useful moves; when this happens,
White must withdraw his king.

10
11

h2-h3
t2-t3

4d7-b5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

94

important way to realize the ad


vantage of the two bishops.

11
12
13
14

!il>f4-
g4xf5
Ae4-b7

Ab5-d7
f6.f.5
e6xf5
Ad7-bS

The Black bishops are triumphant.

15
16

{)d3-el
Ad4-c3
{) el-c2 Ab5-d3- +

Black won in a few moves.

Miles - Portisch
Buenos Aires 1978

g2-

t7-f6!

{) e4-d6

{)d6-c4

Ad3-g6

4.xb7 gbs s.gd7 .a.es 6.ge7 gxb7


-+

4
s

Ae3-d4
!il>hl-g2

Ag6-e8

The bishop transfers to the strong


diagonal.

eS:xf6

gal-cl

Ae8-c6t

Clig2-fi

Ad4-cS

!il>fi-e2

g7xf6

9.as Af.3 + .
Black enjoys the advantage because
of his strong bishops which control all
the board. White's knights lack sup
port points (the d6 point is easily liq
uidated after f7-f6), so they are help
less against Black's bishops.

{)-e4

Ac5-e3

Weakening White's position consid


erably after g2-g3 in response. The
inducement of new weaknesses is an

9
10

a7-a6
{)c.'4-d2

10. a5 .1g2.

10
11

{) c3-e4

12
13
14

{) e4-c3
} d2-f3
}f3-el

!il>g8-t7
AcS-d4
!&>t7-e7
Ad4-a7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

20
21

c3-e4
e4-c5

95

.lf4-b8
gg8-c8

White res i g n e d . 22.xb7 gxc2


23.xc2 Ag6 24. aS Axc2 25.c6t
d6 26.xb8 Ae4t 27.t'2 Ab7 - + .

Larsen - Chandler
Naestved 1985

14

gdsxdl

This is a typical way - the exchange of


major pieces usually enables the
p l ayer who has the b i s h o p s to
eliminate counterplay (dynamics).
But for the time being Black presr
ves his second rook, 6. to create
weaknesses in the enemy camp.

15
16

gclxdl
'fe2-t3

4c6-e8
grs.gs

White has the advantage of the two


bishops, but his dark-square bishop is
restricted by Black's pawn wedge.

ghl-fl !

Intending t'2-f4, opening the center


and activating the bishops.

c7-e6

Preventing the opening of the cen


ter, Black is forced to leave his weak
a6 pawn without protection.

W h i te tries to d e fe n d w i t h o u t
weakening his position, but h e loses
a p aw n . The s ame fat e b efal ls
17.gd3? Ag6 18.gd2 ( 18.e4 gc8!
1 9 . b 3 g c 1 2 0 . g 2 f5 6. A h 5 )
1 8... AhSt 6. Ae3.

17
18
19

.le8-h5t
4a7-e3
4e3xf4- +

4g2-b7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

96

This enables White to get a passed


pawn which is very dangerous with
the two bishops present. More stub
born was 2 . . . a5, which might be
replied with 3.c3, restricting the
knight (an important method of
fighting the knights) and preparing
the 'i\?c2-b3-c4 maneuver.

J,b7xa6

4 .

b2-b3
14
15
16
17
18

b4xc5!
l!fl-bl
l!bl-b7
Ae3xf4
l!al-el

d6xc5
l!f6-f8
l!f8-a8
e5xf4

Black resigned. 1 8 . . . Af8 19.gxa7


a7 20.ges +-.

Balashov

Kortchnoi
USSR 1969

Aa6-b7!

5.Ac4? c4! 6.bxc4 gfa8 oo .


White does not try to defend the
g5 pawn. The passed h7 pawn is not
dangerous, but the passed a-ft, sup
ported by the two bishops (the
second bishop comes into play after
c3, b4), rapidly gains strength . .

l!h4-b4

Ab7-d5

.ri e6xg5

c2-c3

l!b4-b6

8 cl-c2 + 9

l!dl-al

l!f8-f6
l!b6-a6

10

a4-a5

.rig5-h3

11

Ad5-c4

l!a6-a8

12

a5-a6

l!a8-a7

13

b3-b4

.rih3-f4

The only way for Black to activate


the bishop pair is to break up the
center by t7-f6. If the g7 pawn were
at g6, the position would be equal.

1
2

.ri e4-d2

l!b8-f8!

White cannot prevent Black from im


plementing his plan.

2
3

l!dl-fl

t7-f6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

12
13
14

c&>fi-g2
l!d2-e2
.lc3-e5

97

e5-e4- +
d6-d5

4e7-d8!

Transfer to a useful diagonal is one of


the ways to activate the bishops.

4
5
6
7
8
9

l!fi-tl
d2-fi
l!tl-d2
4c3xe5
Cf/e3-e2
4e5-c3

4d8-c7
4c7-b6
ffixeS
l!t8-t7
d7-d6

9.Axd6 Ac4t 10.c&>el Axfl 1 1 .c;xfl


gd7.

9
10

Cf/el-el

4d5-c4t

14

.1b6-c7!

The bishop trade accentuates the


weakness of White's queenside.

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

4e5xc7
<&>g2-fi
c2-c3
l!e2-c2
Cf/fi-e2
Cf/e2-e3
Cf/e3xe4
b2xc3
g3-g4
l!c2-g2

l!t7xc7
l!c7-b7
Cf/c6-b5
Cf/b5-c4
l!b7-b3
d5-d4t
d4xc3
l!b3xa3
h5xg4
l!a3-b3 !

White resigned.

Gelfand - Kharitonov
USSR 1989

4c4xfi !

10

Transformation into an advantage of


a different kind is one of the ways to
realize the advantage of the two
bishops. Now Black's pawn center
gets into motion.

11

c&ielxfi

e6-e5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

98

The main threat to Black is the b5


pawn, so he should attack it as soon
as possible.

.flb4-d3?

After this move White has enough


time to consolidate his pieces and
defend all his weaknesses. Better is
1 . ..a5 ! 2.bxa6 xa6 3.Ae3 (3.gd l
c5) 3 ... c5 4.gxas gxas 5.d2 gb8
=

.!c1-e3!

.fl d3xb2

ga4-a2

.flb2-c4

4 !.e3xa7
5 !.a7xb8

ID'8-b8

The passed b5 pawn and the two


bishops ensure White's great ad
vantage.

gasxa2
.flc4-b6

5
6

14

c&>g7-ffi?

Loses quickly, but also after 14 ... fxe6


1 5 .gc?t <;g8 ( 1 5 . . . <;f6 16.4 + -;
15 ... h6 16.f7t <ll h5 17.gc4 +-)
16.gb7 d6 17.gbst <;g7 18.b6 the
ending is won for White.

15
16
17
18
19

.fl e5-g4t
gcS-e8t
4)g4-e3t
ge8-d8t
gdS-dSt

4f;xe6
<&'e6-d5
<&'d5-d4
c&>d4-c5

Black resigned.

Granda

Miles
Zagreb

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

!.b8-c7!
!,c7xd6
gc1-c8t
!.d6xf8
!,g2-fi
.flt3xe5
!.fi-c4
!.c4xe6

1987

.flb6-d7
.flffixe4
!.g7-f8
.fl d7xf8
<&'g8-g7
.flf8-e6
ga2-b2

W h i t e enj oys the b i s h o p p a i r .


Though the bishops are restricted,
Black cannot prevent a pawn storm
on the kingside, opening lines for the
bishops and unveiling attackable targets.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

99

a2-a3!

Restricting the knights is an impor


tant way to realize the advantage of
the two bishops.

1
2

f2-f4
<&>gl-f2

<&>g8-f8
<&>f8-e8

11

e7-e6

We a k e n s t h e f7 - ft , b u t W h i te
threatened 12.e6! fxe6 13.fxg6 hxg6
14.hS +-.

gd8xdl ? !

Not the best decision. Th e rook ex


change usually favors the player with
the bishops, because it decreases his
opponent's dynamic possibilities.
Black ought to try to organize his
counterplay with the rooks present:
3 . . .gdc8! ? 4.gac 1 (4.Afl c7)
4... c7 6. a5-a4. I f White himself
plays a3-a4 then c7-a6-b4.

4
5
6

galxdl
gdlxd8t
g3-g4

ga8-d8
c&>e8xd8

White follows the principle: "Play


where you have an advantage." He
starts playing on the kingside, where
he has pawn superiority.

6
7
8

9
10
11

h2-h4
c&>f2-e3
,1g2-t3
b3xa4
f4-fS

a6-c7
a7-a5
Ab7-c6
a5-a4
Ac6xa4

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

c&>e3-f4
c&>f4-g5
c&>g5-h6
h4-h5
g4xh5
At3-e2
c&>h6-g5
h5-h6
Ab2-c1
Ae2-h5
c&>g5-f6
e4xfS
Ac1-f4

c&>d8-e7
c&>e7-f8
c&>f8-g8
g6xh5
c5-c4
Aa4-b3
c7-b5
c4-c3
b5-d4
Ab3- c4
e6xfS
d4-b3
b3-c5

24 ... c2 would meet the same reply as


in the game.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 00

26
27

The bishops are triumphant. Black


resigned.

Byrne, R

Keres

Deprives the bishop of the important


e5 square. If 5 ...Jla5 then 6.Ae5 es
tablishes cooperation between the
pieces.

6
7

Moscow 1955

Black is a pawn up. The first order of


business is to neutralize counterplay
on the queenside by blocking the
passed a- and b- pawns, and then
realize the pawn superiority on the
kingside.

t7-ffi!

<l/g8-h8

.lhS-t7t
<l/ffi-e7

.lf4-d6
.ld6-f4

.lb6-aS
.lf3-e4!

Black transfers his bishop to d3, then


when White's bishop sits on f4, plays
Aa5-b4. White falls into Zugzwang.
As it turns out, nothing can prevent
the implementation of this plan. The
bishop has to watch over the g3
point, and if White's king moves to
the queenside, then the transfer of
the bishop to c7 and advance of the
h-ft decide the game (Keres).

8
9

.lf4-d6
.ld6-f4

.le4-d3

.lffi-d8!

Keeps an eye on the pawns and


threatens to pin the knight.

2
3

c3-dS
dS-c3

3 ... Aa5 4.e3.

<l/d2-e3
<l/e3-d2

.ld3-e4
.le4-f3

.ld8-b6t

Aa5-b4!

Zugzwang

White's bishop has to abandon the


h2-b8 diagonal and Black realizes his
pawn superiority by setting up a
passed pawn.

10
11
12
13
14

.lf4-e3
g3xh4
h4-hS
hS-h6
.le3-tl

14.h7 f4 - + .

14
IS

.ltl-gl

hS-h4!- +
g4-g3
g3-g2
ffi-f5
f5-f4
.lb4-aS

Mastering the Bishop Pair

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

.lgl-h2
h6-h7
<l/d2-e2
,lh2xgl
c3-d5
d5xf4
f4-d3
<l/e2xd3
<l/d3-c2
<&>c2-b3
<l/b3-c2

.la5-b6
.ld3xh7
g2-gl'lt
.lb6xgl
,lgl-d4
c4-c3
.lh7xd3t
<l/b7-b6
<l/b6-a5
,ld4-e5
<&>a5xa4

White resigned.

Kotov - Florian
Moscow 1949

1 01

.lb3-d5

Mission accomplished. The knight


must retreat, and it has no support
points.

5
6

f5-d4!

d3-c5
e6xd4

White threatened 7 . .lc6 or 7.xe6.

7 ltd2xd4
8 gdl-bl
9 ltbl-b3 + -

ltd8-b8
c5-d3

Black's position is lost, although his


next move hastens the process.

9
10
11

ltb3xd3
.le3-f4!

ltd7-c7
.la6xd3

Black resigned.

Gheorghiu
Black's defense is founded on the ac
tive d3-, which has the c5 support
point.

Olafsson, F
Athens 1969

.lb3-a4!

Knocking out the support o f the c5


point - the b6 pawn.

b6-b5

i . ..gc7 meets with the unpleasant


2.gd2 b. gad 1 .

2
3
4

.la4-b3
ltdl-d2
ltal-dl

h5-f4
4)f4-e6
b5-b4

The closed nature of the position and

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 02

Flohr

the black knight's support point at c4


enable Black to present stubborn
resistance, White's mobile pawn cen
ter and the two strong bishops not
withstanding.

Veltmander
Tartu 1950

g2-g4!

l .e4? was bad because of 1...5 ! and


Black gets a strong central outpost at
d5 for his knight.

t7-f5?!

A serious weakening. It is better to


avoid weakening in the fight against
two bishops. Better was 1...f6 b,. 2.e4
c4!, moving the king towards the
center, and playing e6-e5 later on. In
the game White exploits the weaken
ing of Black's kingside.

2
3
4
5
6

h2-h3
c&>gl-tl
4e2-d3
4c3-el !
c&>tl-g2

Better was 6... g6!?.

4d3-c2

c&>g8-t7
4b7 -d5
4d5 -b7
4b7 -d5
.ld5-c4?!
4c4-d5

1
2

{)d4-f5!
dlxdS

e6xf5
d7-c5

2 ... '{tc2 3.'(txd7 '(txb2 4.'ltxe7 'ltxe2


5.'(txa7 .

3 4e2-c4

White has the bishop pair. The cen


ter is open, so the bishops are espe
cially active .

3
4

._d5xe6
4.'{tf3 ! ? .
4
5
!lfi-dl
6 !Idlxd8t

-.c8-e6

{) c5xe6
!lt8-d8
4e7xd8

White has willingly transposed to the


endgame, where his advantage is
c l e a r . The two b i s h o ps e n s u re
centralization of the king, which is a
decisive factor in such situations.

8
9
10

g4xf5!
4el-g3
c&>g2-tl
10 ... g6 1 1 .e4 .
11
4c2xf5
12
.lf5-c8
White won.

e6xf5
d6-c4
c4-d2
4d5xt3

7
8
9
10

c&>gl-fi
g2-g3
c&>fi-e2
c&>e2-d3

4d8-c7
g7-g6
4c7-d6
{) e6-c7

It seems that B l ack h a s built a


fortress, White's king cannot break
through the d5 and b5 squares. How
ever, White can advance the queen
side pawns, and after Black reacts,
the bishops make inroads. (Flohr) .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 03

28...dS 29..1,d7 +-.

29

11
12

a2-a4
.!b2-f6

g8-f8
a7-a6

At a6 the pawn is attacked by the


light-square bishop, and the knight is
tied to its defense. If the pawn had
not been moved, White would play
c3, and after b3-b4-b5 then a4-a5
Black must give way (Flohr).

13
14
15

d3-c2
.!c4-fi
.a.n-g2

f8-e8
e8-d7
h7-h5

In such positions it is better to avoid


pawn movement and weakening of
the pawn chain. Now it is easier for
White to destroy the chain, creating
targets for the light-square bishop on
the kingside as well. (Flohr.)

16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

c2-d3
.!f6-d4
.!g2-b7
b3xa4
e3-e4
c;d3xe4
.!d4-b6
c;e4-d5

.!d6-b4
b6-b5
b5xa4
.!b4-el
f5xe4t
.!el-b4
c7-e6

23 ..1,xa6? c5t 24..1,xcS Axc5

23
24
25
26
27
28

c;d5-e5
h2-h4
c;e5-e4
e4-t3
.!b7-c8t

.!b6-a5

=.

e6-c7t
.!b4-e7
t7-f6t
.!e7-d6
c;d7-e6
c;e6-t7

g6-g5

29

This hastens defeat. Against passive


defense, the winning plan is to put
the king at c4 and exchange dark
square bishops. As a result the light
square bishop would be far superior
to the black knight, especially con
sidering the weakness of the a6 pawn
and the placement of B lack's
kingside pawns o n light squares. This
puts in relief the main advantage of
the bishop pair: at a critical moment
one of them may be exchanged, leav
ing only the more useful one (Flohr)

30
31

t3-e4
g3xh4 + -

g5xh4

Now Black has to defend his two


pawn weaknesses at h5 and a6.

31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

.!a5-b6
.!b6-d4
.!c8-d7
.!d4-b6
.!b6-a5
.!d7-c8
f2-f4
.!c8-h3
f4-f5t
.!h3-fi
.!a5-el

t7-g6
c7-a8
a8-c7
.!d6-b4
.!b4-d6
g6-g7
g7-g6
g6-g7
g7-g6
c;g6-t7
t7-e7
.!d6-e5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 04

43
44
45
46
47

.an-e2
4elb4t
c&>e4-d5
4b4a3
4e2xh5

47 ...xfS 48.Ag4 +-.

48
49
50
51

4h5-e2
c&>d5-e4
.la3-c5
c&>e4-d5

.tlc7-e8
.tl e8-d6t
a6-a5
c&>e7-d7
.tl d6-c8

If 6.e2 then 6 ... xc5 7:*c2 gxd4


8.xd4 Axd4t 9.c&1h l c&1 h 7 with
counterplay.

.tlc8-b6t
c&>d7-e8
.tlb6-c8

Black resigned.

Portisch - Smyslov
Portorou 1971

b7-b5!

Black defends his outpost at c4.


7.cxb6 meets 7... dxb6, weak square
d5.

At first glance, White's position is


more pleasant. If pawns are ex
changed at e4, the bishops will be a
formidable force; 1...e6 meets with
2.e5 h5 3.f4 when White has a clear
spatial superiority.

1
2

b3xc4

d5xc4!
.tl d7-b6

Penetrating with his knight to c4,


Black gets sufficient counterplay.

c4-c5

If 3.d5 then 3 ... fd7 and Black's


second knight gets a post in the cen
ter!

3
4
5
6

4b2-cl
lfal-bl
d4-d5

.tlb6-c4
ga8-d8
.tlffi-d7

d5xc6

'ld3-c2

.tl d7xc5
a7-a6

White's pawn center is broken up,


the c6 pawn is weak and his bishops
are not dangerous, while Black's
knights have active positions in the
center. Black has won the battle of
knights against bishops, gaining positional advantage.

t3-f4

4g7xc3

10

'lc2xc3

.tlc5xe4

11

4g2xe4

f5xe4

12

a2-a4

'lt7-d5

13

a4xb5

a6xb5

14

.!cl-b2

grs.a;

15

.!b2-al

'ld5-c5t

16

c&>gl-hl

'lc5xc6

17

gbl-dl

e4-e3t

18

c&>hl-gl

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 05

4.b5 Ac6 5.f3 Axb5 6.Axb5 d6


7.Axd6 'lhd6 Black stands better.

Ad7-c6

Black's pieces have occupied strong


central positions.

Ac4-d3

With 6. e5, White threatens to


regain the e4-square.

18
19
20
21
22
23
24

gdlxd2
i!tc3-b3
i!tb3-c3
gn.d1
c&>gl-hl
f4xe5

gd8-d2
e3xd2
gfl).d6
e7-e5
i!tc6-cSt
i!tc5-e3
gd6-d3

White resigned.

Gligori6 - Smyslov
Amsterdam 1971

s
6
7
8
9
10

gn.d1
Ad3-e2
gdlxd8
gal-cl
4e2-d3

t7-f5!
ga8-d8
i!te7-ffi
gf8xd8
h7-h6
g8-h8

Black's advantage is clear, his pieces


are more active.

11

t3-el

Intending f3.

Ab4xc3! ?

Black willingly lets his opponent


enjoy the bishop pair. He gets instead
t he e4 central point, whence his
knight will put most unpleasant pres
s ure on White's position.

2
3
4

b2xc3
4g3-h2
d4-t3

ffi-e4
c6-c5

11
12

Ad3xe4

c5-c4!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

106

Forced, otherwise 12 ...gd2.

12
13

c2-e2

f5xe4
b7-b5

Black has transformed the dynamic


advantage of active pieces into a
static positional advantage. Black
controls much space, including the
d-file. He can work against the weak
ness of the c3 pawn and has an out
post at d3. Gradually Smyslov trans
formed his advantage into a win.

3
4
s
6

Af3-e2
'il>g.l-f3
Atl-d4
Ae2-b5

Ac3-d2
c&'h6-h7
f7-h6
Ad2-el

7
8
9
10
11

h4-h5!
Ab5-e8
Ae8-d7
Ad7-e6
Ad4-b6

g6xh5
h5-h4
'&>h7-g6
h6-f7
Ael-b4

Shereshevsky - Yuferov
Minsk 1971

If Black marks time with f6-g6-f6,


White wins by shifting his king to c6.

12

Despite the reduced n umber of


pawns, Black's position is not safe.
White has an interesting plan: to
weaken f5 with the pawn sacrifice h4h5, then tie down Black's pieces to
the defense of the pawn and transfer
the king to c6 ( weak square d6).
Black's only defense was to trans
fer the knight to the support point c5:
l...t7-d8, b. d8-b7-c5, whence the
knight can control important central
points and play an active part in the
defense.
In the game he preferred:

1
2

.lg2-f3

With the idea h4-h5.

'l>h7-g7?
'&>g7-h6

Ab6-tl

13 Ae6-c8!
14 Atlxh4 + 15
Ah4-tl
16
'&>f3-e2
17
Ac8-e6
18
Ail-el
19
Ael-c3

t7-d8

Ab4-c3
Ac3-ffi
d8-f7
f7-h6
'l>g6-h5
Affi-e7
'l>h5-g6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

20
21
22
23
24
25
26

4&>e2-d3
.lc3-b4
4&>d3-c4
.lb4-c3
'li>c4-b5
.lc3-d2
'li>b5-c6

.le7-h4
,lh4-e7
4&>g6-h5
,le7-h4
.lh4-g3
4&>h5-h4

10

.le2-fi

11

h2-h4!

1 07

c7-b5

Black resigned.

Flohr

Botvinnik
Moscow 1933

B
Starting to induce weaknesses on the
kingside.

11
12
13

.lfi-h3
f3-f4

b5-c7
c7-e8

With the idea 14.Axd7 and 15.fxe5.


Now Black should play 1 ... a4 !::,.
2... b7-b5 and then a4-b6-c4, setting
up a support point for his knight.
However, what actually happened
was:

1
2

g2-g3?!

c5-d7? !

White failed to exploit Black's error.


Better was 2.a4, preventing b7-b5.

2
3

4&>d2-c2

d7-b6
b6-d7?

Again he had to play 3 .. a4 !::,. b5.


.

4
5

a3-a4!
a4-a5

d7-b6

Seizing space is a typical way to realize the advantage of the two bishops.

5
6
7
8
9

.le3-cl
.lc1-b2
4&>c2-d2
c&>d2-e3

b6-d7
4&>c7-d8
f6-e8
e8-c7
4&>d8-e7

13
14

t7-f6
.lh3-f5

Inducing one more weakness.

14
15

.lf5-h3

g7-g6
h7-h6!

To meet 16.fS with 16... g5.

16
17

.lb2-cl
f4xe5

e8-g7
d6xe5

17...xe5 18.,lc8 +-;


or 17 ... ftfxe5 18.<&'f'3 h5 19.Ag5t
+-.

18
19
20
21
22
23
24

4&>e3-f3
.lc1-e3
.le3-h6
g3-g4
,lh3xg4
,lh6-e3
c&>f3-e2

h6-h5
4&>e7-d6
g7-e8
h5xg4t
e8-c7
c7-b5
b5-c7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 08

25

c&>e2-d3 !

ffi-fS

Janowski - Caro
Vienna 1898

25 ...bS 26.Ae6 '1/e7 27.AcSt xc5


28.bxcS 6. Ac8 +-.
Now the bishops spring into ac
tion.

26
e4xf5
27 4g4xf5 + -

g6xf5

The passed h 4 pawn and Black's


weak queenside ensure White's win.

27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

4e3-d2
c&>d3-c4
4f5-g6
c&>c4-d3
Ag6-e4t
4d2-g5
4e4-t3
4g5-d2!

c7xd5
d7-ffi
c&>d6-c6
b7-b5t
d5-e7
e7-d5
ffi-h5
h5-g3

35.hS? xh5 ! 6. 36 . . . xb4t with


counterplay.

35
36
37
38

4t3-g4
4g4-c8
4d2-el !

No hurry!

38
39
40
41

c&>d3-d4
4c8-f5
4el-d2

Black resigned.

c&>c6-d6
d5-ffi
c&>d6-c6

e5-e4t
g3-h5
c&>c6-d6

White plans to seize space and


restrict Black's knights. But this plan
has to be implemented accurately,
without haste, to prevent Black's
knights from creating support points.

4e3-d4

l .Ac2 ! ? f5 ( 1 . . .gfe8 2.S,xa7 gxa7


3.gxe4 ).

1
2

4a4-c2

e4-c5

2.S,xc5! ? dxc5 3.g3 6. h3-h4-h5.

2
3
4

b2-b4
4c2-a4

M-e8
c5-d7

4.'1/fl allows 4...gxel t s.gxe1 a5 6.a3


axb4 7.axb4 de5 8.c5 ga2 with
counterplay.

e8xelt

Mastering the Bishop Pair

S
6

galxel
.la4-c2

d7-e5

6 . c5 allows the unpleasant 6... a5.

20

e2-d3

1 09

e7-d6

And White could have won easily


with

21
f2-f4
22
f4xeSt
23
.lc8-b7
24 .lb7-c6 + -

t7-ffi
ffixeS
d6-c5

Instead he played 21.g2-g4 but still


eventually won.

Nimzowitsch - Levenfish
Karlsbad 1911

6
6 . . . xc4

a7-a5!

7.Axg6 fxg6 8.ge7 .

b4-b5

ga8-e8?

Better is 7 . . . b6, securing the c5


square for the knights.

gl-fi

geS-c8?!

8 . . . b6? !

9.Axg6 fxg6 10.Axe5 (10.f4


gf8) 10 ... dxe5 1 1 .';t>e2 .

c4-c5!

White grabs space and eliminates a


weakness.

9
c5-c6
10
11
.lc2-f5
12 .ld4xe5! + -

g8-f8
b7-b6
gc8-b8

A typical way to realize the ad


vantage of the two bishops is to ex
change one of them in order to trans
form the advantage favorably.

g6xe5

12

12 ... dxe5 13.d6!.

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

gelxeS!
.lf5-d7
d5-d6
c6-c7
c7-c8'ltt
,ld7xc8
-e2

g7-g6
d6xe5
c7xd6
gb8-a8
gasxc8
f8-e7
d6-d5

Black strives to break up White's


pawn center, but the attack is prema
ture since his pieces are not ready to
support the effort.

.lb5xc6!

White gives away his bishop, but he


dilutes Black's piece pressure in the
center. Knights are not inferior to
bishops in closed positions, some
times they are even stronger.

1
2

b7xc6
eSxffi

White plays to occupy the central e5


square with his knight.

2
3
4
s

t3-e5
d4xc5
.lcl-gS

g8xffi
.lf8-d6
.ld6xc5
'ltb6-d8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

110

square e5).

14

c4xd5

White wins a pawn. The strong


centralized knight on e5 plays the
main role in this combination .

.11d7-c8

14
14 ... exd5 15 ..ixd7! +-.

J1g5xffi

The knight may have fought for the


e5 point later. White exchanges at
once so that Black cannot arrange to
recapture with the g7-ft.

6
7 itdl-h5t!

itd8xffi

It is useful to provoke g7-g6.

7
8
9
10
11
12
13

ith5-e2
bl-d2
J:fal-el
Cf/gl-hl
tl-f4
c3-c4

g7-g6
J:fa8-d8

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

d2-e4
d5xe6
ite2-a6
1;lel-dl
b2-b3
1;'tdlxd4
ita6-a5
1;'tfi-dl
h2-h3
1;'tdlxd4

itffi-g7
.11c8xe6
c&>g8-h8
.11e6-g8
1;'td8-d4
c5xd4
1;le8-c8
1;'tc8-c2
itg7-b7
.11f8-c5

25

ita5-d8

.11c5-e7

0-0

ID'8-e8
.11c5-d6
c6-c5

25 ...Axd4 26.'l!txd4 *g7 27 . .id6! b,.


.le8 +-.

13

.11 d 6-f8?

A t a c t i c a l overs i g h t . B e s t was
13 ...,lxe5, but White keeps his advantage: 1 4.fxe5 *e7 15.gf6 !'!f8
16.!'!efl ( b.. 16...gxf6 17.exf6 weak

26
27
28
29
30

itd8-d7
1;ld4-d3
e5-t7t
itd7xt7
lld3-d7

Black resigned.

itb7-a6
.11 e7-f8
.11g8xt7
llc2-c8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

111

Richter - Tarrasch
Nuremberg 1896

f6-fS? !

Imprecise. He missed the prophylac


tic move 9... gg6.
Black enjoys the advantage in the
endgame because of his two bishops
and spatial superiority. White must
create protected squares for his
knights. The best move to reach this
goal is 1 . a4 ! , taking over the c4
square.

h7-hS!

el-g.l?!

10

gel-eS

4t8-d6

Here White had an opportunity to


get the outpost at e4 for his knight
with 1 1 .gdS ! gg6 ( 1 t . . .gc6?
1 2 .xcS ! ) 1 2 . g 4 ! Fo r exa m p l e :
12...gf6 (12 ...fthxg4 13.fxg4) 13.gxfS
,1c6 14. gxd6 gxd6 1 5 .xcS and
White gets good compensation for
the exchange. 15 ..,1xf3 is no good
because of 16.xf'3 gxcs 17.gSt
g8 18.e4 ges 19.f6t +-.
.

Seizing space is one way to realize


the advantage of the two bishops.

tl-t3

gel-el

.lg4-d7

Again, stronger was 3.a4.

b7-bS!

Black strives to seize space and


restrict his opponent's knights .

gal-el

.le7-f8

g.l-e4

gh8-g8

d2-b3

gd8-c8

e4-d2

.lt8-d6

d2-e4

4d6-f8

e4-d2

11

ges-el

White leaves himself without


counterplay. Black gradually advan
ces his pawns on both flanks, and his
space advantage magnifies the weak
nesses in White's position.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

112

11
12
13
14
15
16
17

kS-aS
gaS-bS
h5-h4
ggs-g6
.Qd7-e6
gbS-aS

.ib3-a5
.i a5-b3
ctlgl-hl
ctlhl-gl
ge2-t2
ga.e2?

He had to play 17.4J a5.

17
lS
19
20
21
22
23

.id2-bl
.ib3-d2
.id2-fl
ctlgl-hl
b2xc3
.ifl-e3

The two bishops cannot be con


quered through passivity. He should
have sought dyn a m i c defensive
resources immediately with 3.Af5.

a7-a5!
a5-a4
c5-c4
gas-cs
c4-c3
d4xc3
b5-b4

After a few moves White resigned.

Michel - Tartakower
Marienbad 1925

3
4
5
6
7
s
9

.Qe2-d3
ctlfl-e2
h3xg4
.if3-h2
.ih2-f3
gdl-fl

geS-e4!
ge4.f4
g5-g4
h5xg4
g4-g3
d5-d4
b5-b4

Black has achieved quite a lot. He


has seized space and his pieces are
active. If he transfers his bishop to
e3, his rook to the h-file and his king
to the center, White's situation will
be grave.

.
- ' W'Mtl
10

B l ack has the two bishops, but


White's pawns are placed better, and
there are no weaknesses in his posi
tion. Moreover, Black's light-square
bishop is restricted. The simplest way
to draw the game lay in the creation
of a support point for the knight l .c3 b,. 4Jd4. But White chose to play
l .4J e2-gl -f3, though the knight's
position at f3 is unstable.

1
2
3

.! e2-gl

.igl-f3
.ld3-e2

g6-g5!?
h7-h5

.if3-d2 !

gf4-h4

..... . .

-,
.

,
,
,
:
iD,-iD:-

;-wB

.
"if"

''ft'
,

- 11

/,

,_

-, , , , , , ,

"

.i d2-f3?

The last drawing chance was to sur-

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Karpov

r e n d e r the exc h a ng e : 1 1 . F! f3
1 l . . .Axf3 t ( l l . . .Ae5 12.ms Ab8
t3.f3 F!h2 14.c&1fl White is O.K.)
1 2 .c&1xf3 A e 5 1 3 .A e 4 ! F! f4 t ( o r
13 . . .f6 14.c&1e2 Af4 15.f3) 14.c&1e2
F!f2t 15.d3 and White's position is
tough to crack.
Having missed this opportunity,
White loses quickly:

11
12

c&>e2-d2?!

113

Taimanov
Moscow 1983

gh4-h8

J,d3xf5!

Exchanging bishop for knight, White


gains reliable control over the central
dark squares.

1
2

d2-t3

e6xf5
gc8xc2

2 ... d4 3.Axd4 'l'b5 4.g5 h6 5.c4! 'l'c6


6.e6! . (Karpov)

12
13
14
15
16
17
18

t3xh2
gn-h1
Ad3-n
c&>d2-dl
c&>dl-d2
c&>d2-dl

gh8-h2!- +
g3xh2
J,f6-e5
J,c6-e4
c&>g7-f6
c&>f6-g5
c&>g5-g4

J,b2-d4

Blocking the pawn on d5, White cuts


the bishop on b7 out of the game for
a long time.

'itb6-c6

3 ...,1c5 4.g5! .

'ith3-h4

e5-e6!

gd8-e8

White resigned.

White sacrifices another pawn, to


free the strong central square e5 for

Mastering the Bishop Pair

114

the knight.

f7xe6

.[\f3-e5

'l!tc6-c7

.[\ e5xg6

4f8-g7

7 ... hxg6? 8.'lh8t +-.

.[\g6-e5

'l!th4-g3

'l!tc7-e7

9.t'el ! ? b. gfl -f3-g3.

ge8-c8

9
10

gn-el

gc8-c7
The l a s t c h a nce was the pawn
s a crifice 16 . . . d4 ! For exam p l e :
17.xd4 Ae4 18.g4 ggs 19.gS h6
20.gh 1 gg6 21 .gl gg3 22.gh2 gg4
with counterplay.

17

.[\ e6-d4

Now White realizes his advantage


without much trouble.

17

11

.[\ e5-f3 !

Exchanging the dark-square bishops


leaves White with a strong knight
a g a i n s t a p as s ive b i s h o p , s t i l l
restricted by its own pawns.

11

c&>g8-h8

12

Ad4xg7t

13

.[\f3-d4

'l!te7xg7

White has been constantly watchful


to prevent Black from activating his
bishop at b7 by the sacrifice d5-d4.

13

'l!tg7xg3

gb3-b6

18 .[\d4xf5 + -

gc8-f8

19

.[\f5-d4

grs-g8

20

gel-e7

gg8-g7

21

gdl-el

gb6-h6t

22

c&>h2-gl

gh6-g6

23

f4-f5

gg6-b6

24

ge7-e6!

gb6xe6

25

f5xe6

gg7-g8

26

e6-e7

gg8-e8

27

.[\ d4-f5

Ab7-c6

28

.[\f5-d6

ge8-g8

29

e7-e8'l!t

4c6xe8
gg8xg3

14

h2xg3

30

.[\ d6xe8

15

.[\ d4xe6

31

.[\ e8-f6

16

c&>hl-h2

Black resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Stein

115

Averbakh
Riga 1970

9
White's bishops exert strong pres
sure on Black's queenside.
White plans to induce then attack
weaknesses on the queenside. Black
lacks an active plan of counterplay
(playing on the kingside can only
produce new weaknesses i n his
camp). Black's only stronghold is the
d4 point. If White drives the knight
out of there (e2-e3), Black will get
counterplay against the weakened
pawn on d3.

1
2
3
4
s
6

gn..c1
<l/gl-fl
gal-bl
b2-b4
gb1xb4
gb4-bl

4e3-d2

ctl e7-

f5\

It is not too late to play 7 ... Af8.

e2-e3

After the rook exchange Black is


hard pressed to defend the queen
side pawns.

9
10
11
12
13
14
15

gblxcl
.ld2xcl
ctlb5-c3
c&>fl -e2
g3-g4
.lg2-c6

gc7xclt
gcsxclt
a7-a6
ctl e6-c5
c&>h8-g8
ctlf5-d6
.lg7-t8

ctl c6-d4
c7-c5
b7-b6
c5xb4
gb8-c8
gd7-c7?

This rook is best kept at d7 for


d e fe n s e of the q u e e n side and,
maybe, for an attack on the d3 pawn
later on. Better was 6...Af8 /::,. ef5,
Aa3.
With the idea e3.

ctlc3-b5!

d4-e6

White's pieces dominate the light


squares. Black's queenside is impos
sible to defend.

16

t7-f5

16 ... bS 17.Ab2 Ag7 18.Aa3 db7


19.4)c7 +-.

17
g4xf5
18 ctl d5xb6 + -

g6xf5
e5-e4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

116

19
20
21
22
23

d3-d4
Acl-d2
.lc6-b7
a2-a4
.lb7-a8

4J c5-d3
4J d6-b5
4J d3-b4
4Jb5-d6
time

Black resigned. 23 ... aS 24.Ab4 axb4


25.aS.

Stein

Petrosian
Moscow 1961

itd2-d l !

Intending 7.l!xt/! l!xf7 8.l!xt/


9.\'tf3t <l>e8 1 0.Axe6 \'tc7 1 1 .Ad6
\'tb7 12 ..'1,xdS +- (Stein).

gb8-h6?!

He had to play 6... b4, bringing the


b i s h o p into the defense. After
7.Axb4 White no longer threatens
l!xt/.

,la3-cl

,lg4xe6!

gh6-h7

Black resigned.

Chigorin - Falk
Moscow 1899

a3-a4!

With a pawn sacrifice White transfers


his dark-square bishop to the impor
tant a3-f8 diagonal.

,ld7xa4

It was better for Black to decline the


sacrifice by moving his king out of the
center. After 1 ...0-0 2.ga 1 grcs
3.Aa3 'ld8 /:::,. Ae8 and 'ld7 Black
offer sames resistance.

gbl-al

b7-b5?

Cuts the bishop out of the game. Bet


.ter is 2....'1,b5 3.,1a3 (3.l!xa7? Aa6)
3 ...'ld7 4.gt'3 /:::,. gan .

.lcl-a3

ite7-d7

Better is 3 .. :{td8 4.gt'2 gb7 S.gafl a5


/:::,. 6.\'tdl b4!.

4
s

go.a
ga1-n

gb8-b7
'{td7-d8

5 ... \'tc8 6.\'tg5! +-;


5 ...f8 6.l!xf7 \'txf7 7.l!xf7 l!xf7
8.Axf8 +- (Stein).

White controls the open h-file, so he


has the advantage. But his bishops
are rather passive.

c2-c3 !

Intending Adl -b3.

1
2

c&>f8-e8
.lt3-dl

4J d7-f8

2 ... <l>d8 3.Ab3 \'tg7 4.Ae3 c6 5.,1e6


with the attack.

,ldl-b3

itg8-g7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Golombek

117

Steiner, H
Stockholm 1952

J,d2-cl

Intending ghs, *h2.

4
s
6
7
8

ghl-hS
'lb2-t2
J,cl-e3
'lt2-h2

c7-c6
ga8-d8
{) e7-c8
b6-b5
b7-b6?

With this weakening Black simplifies


White's task.

9
10
11

J,b3-e6!
J,e3xb6
f5xe6

{)c8-e7
{)f8xe6
{) e7-g6

Black enjoys great advantage be


cause his pieces are far more active
than White's.

J,e8-b5 !- +

White's position is hopeless because


of the passive bishop at b2.

a2-a3

J,b5-d3

'lc2-d2

J,c7-d6

a3xb4

a5xb4

'ld2-g2

'le6-h6

'lg2-t2

gb7-h8!

With the idea gf8.

12

ghS-h7!

White's bishop is superior to Black's


rook.

12
13

ith2-h5

'lg7-g8

There is no defense against l h8


*xh8 15.g6t <i\'f'8 16.*7 mate, . so
'
Black resigned.

gel-el

gb8-f8

'lt2-g2

b4-b3

J,b2-cl

grs-cs

10

'lg2-t2

gc8-c2

White resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

118

Suetin

Bondarevsky
Kharkov 1963

10
11
t

Ad3-c4!

The bishop is passive at d3, being


locked in by its own pawn at e4.
White sacrifices the pawn and trans
fers the bishop to the crucial a2-g8
diagonal.

Ac4-d5

ge8xe7
ll'g7-f'8

l l . ..ge8 12.Axf7t! 'txf7 13.gxg6t


'&>f8 14.Ac5t Ae7 15.gf6 +-.

12

gd6xg6t

Black resigned.

Stein

Filip
Moscow 1967

t\'e5xe4

1
2

gelxe7
gf6xd6

ll'e4-e5

2...'txh4! ? 3.gxf?! gxf7 4.Ax:e6 gcf8


5.'{tg2 /:). gh1 +-.

3 t\'e2-t3
White's bishops dominate the board.
Black has no counterplay. He hud
dles in passive defense along the first
three ranks.

gc8-e8

3 ... 'ltg7 4.Agl D. gdel , 'tg4.

4
s

gdl-el
iil't3-g4

9e5-g7
Ae7-d8

5 ...c7 6.,tc6 D. Ad4 +-.

6
7
s
9

Ae3-gl
c&>bl-a2
gn.f6
ll'g4-c4

ge8-e7
gf'8.e8
h7-h5
e6-c7?

More stubborn is 9 ...'\t>h7.

Black's king is in an insecure posi


tion, which enables White to exert
strong pressure on it.
t

Ag2-e4!

Transferring the light-square bishop


onto the strong diagonal.

1
2
3
4

Ae4-bt
iil'g4-e4
Acl-b2

t\'d8-e8
c4-e5
gf'8-h8
gat-a8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Smyslov

119

Reshevsky
Zurich 1953

Ab2xeS!

A typical method. White cedes the

advantage of the two bishops, but he


gets another advantage instead.
Black's knight at e5 was a staunch
d e fe nder of his king, and now
White's attack in the presence of op
posite coloured bishops is impossible
to resist.

s
6
7
8

Affixes
gas-al
AeS-f6
gb8-h6?

gn-cl
gcl-c7
gb3-t3

White has the advantage of the two


bishops, but they are restricted by
their own, and enemy, pawns.

Ab2-cl !

Tr a ns ferring t h e b i s h o p to e 3 ,
whence i t will support White's ac
tions on the queenside (a3, b4).

1
2
3
4

gn..dl
'f!e3-f2
Acl-e3

ge2-c2!

'f!e7-c7
c&>g8-h7
hS-f6
f6-hS

More stubborn is 8 . . gf8 or 8. :{!tf7.


.

9
10
11
12

gaxf6!
'{te4xbl
'{tbl-e4
'l'e4-d4t

Black resigned.

galxblt
c&>g7xf6
'{te8-t7

With the idea a2-a3, b3-b4.

t7-G

Black complicates matters, forcing


White to play with utmost accuracy.
However, the freeing attempt back
fires, because Black's king is weak

Mastering the Bishop Pair

120

and opening the position favors the


bishops.

e4xf5

g6xf5

22
23
24
25
26
27
28

d5xe6
e6-e7t
J,g2-d5t
.1d5-c6t
e7-e8tl't
J,c6xe8t
J.e8-g6

{)b7-d6
c&>f8-t7
c&>t7-e8
c&>e8-t7
{)d6xe8
c&>t7-ffi

Black resigned.

Anand

Karpov
Brussels 1991

g3-g4!

7 ... fxg4 8.'M'h4 +-.

8
9
10
11
12

J.e3xf4
tl'f2-h4t
g4:xf5
c4xd5
gc2-d2

{)h5-f4
e5xf4
c&>h7-g8
d6-d5
tl'c7-e5
gd8-d6
White threatens to activate his pieces
with c4!.

{)g6-e5

Preventing c2-c4.

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

gd2-d4
c&>gl-hl
tl'h4xf4
gd4xf4
gf4-g4
gg4-g6
gg6-e6
t3-f4
gdl-el

'l'e5-e3t
ge8-e5
tl'e3xf4
ge5-e2
c&>g8-f8
{)c5-b7
ge2xa2
ga2-b2
gd6xe6

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

{)d3xe5t
{)d4-e2
{) e2-c3
gcl-dl
h3xg4
J.f2-e3
J.e3-cl
4c1-b2

ffixe5
h7-h5!
J.d7-e6
h5xg4
gh8-d8
c&>t7-g6
gd8-d7

Black has the advantage because of


his two bishops and the weakness of
the f3 pawn. 9.gh l allows 9... gf7
10.gh3 e4 l l .fxe4 gn 12.exd5 Axg4
13.gd3 Af4 14. a2 .U5 + and the g5
pawn becomes very dangerous.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

d5-d4

The consolidation of Black's position


is complete. Now he can start to at
tack weaknesses. The knight will not
long stay at e4.

10

c3-e4

gd7-t7

11

.lb2-cl

.lc7-d8

12

gdl-hl

12.c3 13.cxd4 Axg4 b. gb3t;


12.m1 Ad5 13.{)d2 Ae7 b. Ab4.

gnx13

12

18
19

4cl-b2

121

e5-e4!
'llt7-g6

Black also wins with 19 ....l,g6 20.gds


e3 21 .Axd4 e2 or 20.ght gd6 2t .gd1
e3 ! 22.gxd4 e2 23.gf4t e6! 24. .l,c3
gdtt.

20
21
22
23
24
25
26

gh5-hl
ghl-dl
c2xd3
4b2-e5
.le5-d4
gdl-el
"1bl-b2

gf6.d6
d4-d3
e4-e3 !
gd6-e6
e3-e2
.!Gxd3t

Now the e5 pawn is set in motion and

it ought to decide the game .


13

ghl-h8

14

e4xf6

.ld8-f6

14.gbs Ad5 t5.{)d2 gt2 t6.gxb6 e4


17.gd6 e3 18.gxd5 e2 -+.

14
15

goxf6
gh8-d8
26

1 s.gbs Axg4.

.le6xg4

15
16

gd8-g8t

'llg6-t7

17

ggSxg5

.lg4-G

18

gg5-h5

.ld3-G?

Black throws the advantage away. He


could win with the simple 26... fS
27.c3 e4 28.gh t gh6! 29.ggt
gd6 ! 30.gg4t f3 3 1 .ggt Axb5 !
32.axbS gxd4 33. d4 \f;f'2 etc. or
28.Af'2 f'3 29.Axb6 gxb6 30.d3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

122

gd6t 3 1 .c;l;>c4 gd l 32.gxe2 c;l;>xe2


33.b6 gbl 34.c;l;>c5 gb4 or 28.Agl gd6
29.Ah2 gd4 30.Agl fua4 31 .,1xb6
Axb5 etc.

27

.ld4xb6!

28

gelxe2

29

c&'b2-c3

30

c&'c3-c4

31

c&'c4-c5

32

b5-b6

33 ge2-a2

b3-c5!

Exchanging Black's active knight.

Stein - Portisch
Moscow 1967

2
3
4

a4xc5
b5-c7
c7-e6

gesxcS
gcs-es

4 ... -)d5 s.gd 1 ! .

5
6

J,f4-h6
'ftfi-e2

'{td7-d6

White has successfully neutralized


Black's counterplay. With the follow
ing moves he continues to strengthen
the position of his pieces.

6
7
gal-el
8
'fte2-g4
9 itg4-c4

White has the advantage in statics:


the two bishops in the open position
and the weak e7 pawn. Assessment
of the position depends on whether
or not White will be able to attenuate
his opponent's dynamics.

White sacrifices a pawn.


The hope of holding on to the pawn
is illusory: 1...-)xb2 2.-)c5! 'l!tc8 3.'l!te2
b6 4.'l!txb2 bxc5 5.fuc5 .

- "-8.-..
B
,,
2 ,,, r/. ' /,
,
,,.. . . ...-. /,m

.lcl-f4!

e6-g7
J.G-d3
,ld3-G

......

,,

;
:
. . . . .

itd6xe5?!

Black cannot hold on, he has no


counterplay. White can strengthen
his position still further.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

10
l!elxeS
11
Ag2-n
12 l!e5xe7! + Th e rest is technique:

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

'ltc4xfi
l!e7xt7
c&>glxfi
Ah6-e3
c&>fi-e2
c&>e2-d3
c&>d3-e4
h2-h3
Ae3-c5.
Ac5-f8

l!d8-dlt
Af5-h3

123

seizes the g-file, thus transforming


the advantage of the two bishops.

5
6
7

l!dlxfit
Ah3xfi
c&>g8xt7
g7-f5
a7-a6
h7-h5
b7-b5
c&>f7-e6
a6-a5
a5-a4

b3-d2
l!hl-fi

e7-e6
f7-f5

With the idea g4. Black resigned.

Bondarevsky
Boleslavsky
Moscow 1945

l!a8-a6? !

Black fai ls to use the main ad


vantages of his position. After 7 .. b6!
8.c4 .ll. g5 9.g2 .ll, a6 10.b3 gac8
l l . h4 Af6 the bishop pair exerts
strong pressure.
.

8
9
10
11

h4-g2
h3-h4
d2-c4
b2-b3

c&>h8-g8
l!a6-b6
l!b6-c6

White intends 2.xh4, b. 0-0, f5.

'{tb6-g6!

Black forces an ending; he destroys


his opponent's dynamics while enjoy
ing the static advantage: two bishops
in t h e o p e n p o s i t i o n p l u s the
protected passed pawn in the center.

2
3
4
5

t3xh4
'ltd3xe4
g2-g4
h2-h3

'{tg6xe4t
d5xe4
c&>g8-h8

After 5.fS .ll.xf5 6.gxf5 gg8 Black

11

b7-b6

Despite the loss of tempo, Black


adopts the indicated plan of play.

12

gn.a

12.gxfS exf5 13.f4 .ll, a6 14.dS .ll.xc4!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

124

1s.gg 1 t 'f;f7 16.dxc6 Axf4 17.bxc4


gcs + .

12
13
14
15
16

J,c8-a6
lk6-d6
J,h6-g7
l!f8-c8

c4-e5
g4-g5
c2-c3
e5-c4

1 6 . g c l i s m i s t a ke n in view of
16... gxd4.

16
17

4a6xc4
l!c8xc4

b3xc4

And Black realized his material ad


vantage.

Smyslov

Tai

Yugoslavia 1959

e5-e4!

The only counterplay. Otherwise


1.gb1 /J. d2, g4, h4, g5, ,lg4. Seizing
space is typical in the battle of
bishops against knights.

7
8
9
10
11

d3xe4
b3-d2
J,f3-dl
c&>gl-fi
J,e3-d4

12

J,d4xc5

l!c8xc4
l!c4-c2
l!c2-c3
d7-c5
l!c3-d3

White has a static advantage - the


two bishops and the possibility to
play on the queenside. But Black's
active queen makes counterplay pos
sible (dynamics). For example, l ...e4
threatens.

'ltdl-d3 !

Exchanging the most active Black


piece, White destroys his dynamics.

1
2
3

gn.c1
c2xd3

l!f8-c8
'ltb5xd3
g7-g6

3 ... c5 4.xc5 dxc5 5.d6!.

4
5
6

l!cl-c3
b2xc3
c3-c4

l!c8xc3
l!a8-c8

Exchanging a bishop for a knight is


one way to realize the advantage of
the bishop pair.

12

d6xc5

If 12 ...gxd2 13.,le3 gb2 14.gcl , then


not 14... xe4 in view of 15.gcst 'l;g7
16.,ld4t +-.

13

Clltl - e2

l!d3xd2t

13 ...gd4 14.f'3 and White's pawns are

Mastering the Bishop Pair

very dangerous.

14
15

r&>e2xd2
r&>c12-c2

ffixe4t
e4-d6

Reich er

125

Boleslavsky
Bucharest 1953

t 5 . xf2 16..!0 f5 17.gbl .


.le7-ffi
1 6 .ldl-e2
..

17 gal-bl
lS r&>c2-b3
19 .le2-d3
20
f2-f4
21
gbl-fl
22
f4-f5
23
f5xg6
24
gn.al
25
gal-a2
h2-h4
26
27
g2-g4
2S
h4-h5
29
ga2-al
30 gal-bl
31
g4xh5 .
32 .ld3xc4
33 ghl-fl + 34
gn.ffi
35 .lc4-e2t
36
gfl)xt7
37
gn-e7
3S ,le2-d3
39 '&'b3-b4
a5xb6
40
41 ,ld3xa6
42
ge7-e6
43
r&>b4-c5
44 .la6-d3
45 .ld3-g6
46
ge6-eS
47
r&>c5-c6
4S geS-e4t
49 .lg6-h7
50
.lh7-f5
51
.lf5-g4
Bl ack resigned.

r&>gS-f8
r&>t8-e7
r&>e7-d7
.lffi-d4
.ld4-e3
.le3-d2
h7xg6
r&>d7-e7
.ld2-b4
r&>e7-ffi
.lb4-el
r&>ffi-g5
.lel-d2
g6xh5
c5-c4t
r&>g5-h6
r&>h6xh5
d6-e4
r&>h5-g5
.ld2-e3
r&>g5-f4
e4-d6
b7-b6
,le3xb6
.lb6-d4
.ld4-e5
d6-rT
.le5-b2
rT-gS
,lb2-a3t
g5-t3
r&>f4-g5
r&>g5-h6
r&>h6-g5

.le2-c4? !

1.0-0 ! ?.

1
2

h2-h4

,lc8-e6

White refuses to castle and leaves his


king in the center. But the fight
against the bishop pair is no joke!

2
3

g2-g4? !

.lg5-h6
.lh6-f4

White hopes to get the upper hand


using the splendid position of his
knight at d5. Black strives to set up
counterplay on the kingside.

4
5

'ldl-e2
c2-c3

gas-cs

The exchange of the d5 for the


f4-.! is bad for White because it gives
Black a superb post at e5 for his .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

126

4)c6-e7!

Boleslavsky - Tai
Moscow 1957

The knight intensifies the pressure


against White's blockading knight at
d5.

gal-dl

Also after 6.xe7t f/xe7 7.Axe6 fxe6


Black has the advantage.

6
7

4) e7-g6!
h4-h5

7.g5 allows the strong 7 ... h5! ( 6.


Ag4) 8.gxh6 Axh6 6. 4)xh4 or 4)f4.

7
8

Ac4-d3

4)g6-h4
tl'd8-g5 +

Black's pieces have mounted strong


pressure on the kingside.

10
11

t:z-f3
;>el-0

Af4-g3t

4) e3-d5!

A pawn sacrifice which opens up a


battery for White's bishops. The
pressure is difficult to withstand be
cause of the offs ide position of
Black's knight on a5.

1
2
3
4

e4xd5
gSxffi
Acl-h6

s
6
7
8

Ac2-e4!
tl'g3-f3
gal-dl
Ah6-e3 !

Ae6xd5
tl'c6xd5
Ae7xffi
grs.es

ti-fS!
gbl-gl

1 l .ftgxf5 Axd5 12.exd5 4)xf5 13.Axf5


gxf5 14.gd3 e4 15.f/xe4 gem 6. ge5 !

+.

11
12
13
14
15
16

gglxg3
r&>O-g2
gdlxd3
gd3xd5
gg3xf3

White resigned.

4)h4xf3
f5xe4
e4xd3
Ae6xd5
tl'g5-h4!
tl'h4xg4t

tl'd5-e6
tl'e6-e7
Af6-g7

The bishops at e4 and e3 are occupy


the best possible position, attacking
both flanks and the center simul
taneously. Of course, if the black

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Szabo - Boleslavsky

knight were active, such a position


could never have arisen!

127

Budapest 1950

ges-f8

i!l'f3-h3

h8-g8

10

i!l'h3-g4

,lg7-f6

11

gdlxd8

gf8xd8

12

gel-dl

a5-b7

With his last move White has drawn


b a c k h i s k n i g h t to g l a n d h e
threatens now to win a pawn. Black is
developed somewhat better and he
tries to use this advantage to estab
lish counterplay.

b8-d7!

l ...4:)f4? 2 ..a,f3 ( /:,. g2-g3) 2 ... g5 3.g3


4:)g6 4.Ag4! .

13

Ae4xb7!

Once again, a common way to realize


the advantage of two bishops is ex
changing one of them for a favorable
transformation of the position.

13

2
3
4

,le2xh5
i!l'dlxhS
gl-f3

g6xh5
d7-c5

gdsxdlt

14

i!l'g4xdl

i!l'e7xb7

15

i!l'dl-d6!

g8-t7

16

Ae3xc5

The precarious position of Black's


king, White's active pieces and the
chance to create a strong passed c-ft
ensure White 's great advantage.
Boleslavsky gradually transformed it
to a win.

t7-f5!

Striving to activate the pieces. Worse


is 4... 4:)d3t 5.e2 4:)xcl t 6.!!axcl f5
in view of 7.4:)g5! h6 8.4:)e6! . A
typical way of fighting the two
bishops is to exchange one of them.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

128

0-0

f5-f4

If 5 ... f:xe4 then 6.g5 .US 7:*e2 /:,.


gxe4 and White's position is defen
sible. In this variation we see one
more way to fight the two bishops:
the creation of s u p p o r t poi nts
(squares protected by pawns and not
attackable by the opponent's pawns;
the central ones are especially impor
tant) for the knights. With his move
B l ac k has s e ized sp ace o n the
kingside and prepares an attack
against the white king. The semi
o p e n g-file and the absence of
White's light-square bishop make
this attack more dangerous.

b2-b4

4cl-b2?!

c5-d7

"tt d8-e7
f3-g5?

d7-ffi
"tt h 5-h4

9.f/d l <i)g4! 1 0.<i)f3 (or 1 0. e6?


Axe6 1 1 .dxe6 f/h4 12.h3 3 ! ) 1 0...h8
with the initiative.

2.tJ
gn.ct
c3-dl

g4-e3
c&>g8-h7
4g7-ffi

1s
16
17

'l'th4-2
dlxe3
'tt 2xe3

grs-gs!
f4xe3
4ffi-g5

The second pawn sacrifice allows the


dark-square bishop to join the fray.

"tt e3-e2

,1g5xd2

A typical way to realize the ad


vantage of the two bishops is to ex
change one of them to transform the
position favorably.

19

'le2xd2

h7-h6

9
10

12
13
14

18

Better is 8.d2 /:,. f/e2.

ffi-g4!?

The second bishop joins the attack.

Better is 7.g5 f6 8.*h4 h6 9.e6!


,b:e6 10.dxe6 f/e7 1 1 .f/h3.

11

Still better was 1 1 ...h7! 12.3 h5


13.f/f2 Af6 14.e2 gg8 15.hl f/e7
/:,. Ah4 and <i)g3t.

g5-f3

10.<i)e6 Axe6 1 1 .dxe6 f/xe6 12.<i)d5


gt7 13.xf6t fuf6 14.gac1 3! +.

10
11

"tt e7-f7
f3-d2

Black threatened 1 1 ...<i)h5 /:,. ,lf6.

19

Ac8-h3 !

Mastering the Bishop Pair

20

g2-g3

'ltt7xt3

>:kl-c3
c4-c5
'ltd2-c2

'ltf3xe4
gg8-g7
'lte4xc2

+ with the initiative

21
22
23

129

b5xa6

The ending is won for Black because


h i s pieces are more active and
White's d5 pawn is weak.

24
25
26
27
28
29

>:k3xc2
gel.fl
gnxt7t
c5xd6
gal-el
Ab2-cl

ga8-f8
gg7-t7
gf8xt7
c7xd6
g17.f3
ga.d3

Black won in a few moves.

Stein

Karpov
Riga 1970

gasxa6?!

I t would be bette r to bring the


bishops into action: 4 ...,lc5 5.f3
( 5 .gft ,lb5 6. e2 ,lxe2; 5 . h l
b2; 5_ge2 .lb5) 5. . .*g6! ( /J. *g3)
6.e2 ( /J. 6 ... ,lxh3 7.f4) 6 ... dxe4 +.
After the text move Black's advantage becomes minimal.

5
6
7
8

galxa6
Ac2-bl
g3-e2
e2-f4!

'{tf6xa6
d5-d4!
d4-d3

a5-c6!

Black sacrifices a pawn for the two


bisho ps, which are very strong in an
o pen position. Black's activity in
creases rapidly.

2
3

.id4xf6
a4xb5

'ltd8xf6

The strength of the bishop pair


shows in the variation 3.exd5 b4
4. :gxe8 gxe8 5 . axb5 ,lxb5 6.gb t
li'lxd5 7.,lb3 *xf2t 8.<&>xf2 ,lc5t
9.<aff3 ge3t 10.'&>g4 ,ld7t 1 1 .'&'h4
.i\e7t 12.'&>h5 f4 mate.

c6-b4!

At8-d6?

After 8 ... ,lb5 the passed d-ft, sup


ported by the two bishops, ensures
Black's advantage because the extra
b-ft cannot influence the course of
events.

f4xd3 !

b4xd3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

130

10
11

Ablxd3
.tld2-t3 !

1 1 ..:a6 12.e5 ! .

12
13

'ldlxd3
l!el-dl

'la6xd3
Ad7-bS
AbSxd3

The game was later drawn.

Khasin - Stein
Tallinn 1965

B
6
7
8

l!dl-el
l!fl-tl

Else 8 ... b4 9.dl d2.

8
9
10

c&>g8-h8!

As a compensation for the exchange


Black gets an extra pawn, the ad
vantage of the two bishops, the
strong knight at e5 and the weakened
position of White's king.
If 1 . . .gfe8 ? , then 2 . A h 5 'fte7
3.6! 'f!xf6 4.gg1 t <;ih8 5.Ag5 'ftg7
6.Ah4 'fth6 7.'f!e3 ! +-.

2
3
4

Ah6xf8
l!al-dl
At3-g2

With the idea c4.

s
6

'ld4-tl
'ltl-h4

.tl c3-e2
.tl e2-g3

t7-fS! +
.tl eS-c4
.tl c4xb2
.tlb2-c4
Ag7-d4

The dark-square bishop, having lain


in ambush for so long, enters the
play.

11
12

ga.e2
.tlg3xe4

fSxe4

12.Axe4 e5! /J. f.3 and gg4.

12
13

.tl e4-gS

'lc7-g7

More stubborn was 13.g3 ! .


==.ii

l!a8xf8
gt8-d8
Af6-g7

l!d8-g8

White overestimates his position. He


ought to prevent Black from activat
ing his pieces. He must, in particular,
control the f7 point, tieing down the
black knight. For example: 6.gd2 ( /J.
gfdl or dl in case of b5-b4). If that
were not bad enough, 6.'f!h4 is a tac
tical inaccuracy.

13
14
15
16

4g2xb7
'lh4-e4
'le4xe6

Ad4-e3!
Ae3xgS
d6-dS
'lg7xb7

131

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Black won.

move, 6.fl ,1d7, White's position


remains difficult.

Eliskases - Stein
Mar del Plata 1966

B l a c k h a s a clear advantage i n
development a n d White's king i s
stuck i n the center. Black must act
resolutely because his advantage is
temporary.

1
2
3

.le3xd4
c3-e2

c6-d4!
c5xd4

5
6
7

'l'd3-fi
gl-e2

.le6-f5!
.lf5xe4!

7.fxe4 xe4 6. g3t and 6. 'la5t.

7
8
9

f4-d5
c4xd5

.le4-b7
.lb7xd5
f6xd5

White soon gave up.

Polugaevsky
Boleslavsky

3.'l,txd4? xe4!.

Riga 1958

3
4
5

it d2xd3
e2-f4?!

d4-d3 !
b6-b5

After 5.d4 'la5t Black's bishops


enter the game energetically: 6.'ld2
'lxd2t 7.\11xd2 xe4 +. Or 6.'lc3
'16'xc3 7.gxc3 xe4. After the best

.lg7-e5 !

Black sacrifices the exchange or a


piece (in the event of 2.h4 6. h4-h5)
to keep the advantage of the two
bishops, the dark square one being
especially strong. If White accepts

Mastering the Bishop Pair

132

Akopian, Gaguik
Boleslavsky

the exchange s a crifice, Black's


queenside attack becomes irresis
tible: 2.Axf8 xf8 3.'th6t g8 4.h4
.ib7 5.h5 gc8 6.Ad3 d5 ! 7.gdfl Ag7
8.'te3 dxe4 9.hxg6 fthxg6 10.Axe4
'te5 ! -+ (Boleslavsky).

h2-h4

!.c8-b7

h4-h5

grs.cs

h5xg6

h7xg6

Moscow 1965

Thus White's attack comes to an end.

9d2-e2

Black threatened 5 ...Axe4 or 5 ... a4.

b6-a4

5
6

b3-d4

a4-c5

6... 'tc5 ! ? 7.j\e3 Axe4.

!.fl-g2

e2-c4

9c7-a5

Black is a pawn up, but White's


pieces aim squarely at Black's king
fortress.

1
2

9e5-f4
!.d4-e3

2
c5-a4? !

Black wins with 8... Ac6! ( /j. Ab5), for


example: 9.a3 bxa3 10.xa3 gab8
1 l .Ad2 'tb6 12.j\c3 a4 1 3 . 'tb3
xc3 14.c3 Aa4.

9c4-d3

a4-c5

10

9d3-c4

c5-a4

Draw.

9f4-c7!

Black declines the repetition, having


decided to surrender the exchange.

3
4

!.e3-h6
!.h6xf8

g7-g6
!.e7xf8

For the exchange, Black has a pawn,


the bishop pair, and potential con
nected passed pawns in the center.
And it is far from easy for White's
rooks to find something to do.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

133

With the support of the bishops


Black's pawns have become for
midable. They will soon demolish the
pawn cover of White's king.

.ld3-e2

White's defensive plan is not the


best. The top priority was to prevent
the advance of Black's pawns: 5.e2
6. get , and then <)c3-e4-g5 is pos
sible, having in mind counterplay on
the kingside.

5
6
7
8
9

'ldl-fi
!'tal-el
,le2-dl
!'tg3-e3

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

!'tel-dl
!'tdlxd8
'lfi-el
!'te2-d2
a2-cl
!'td2-e2
!'te2-d2
,lc2-dl
!'td2-d8

'ld6-c7
'l'c7xd8
'ld8-d4
'ld4-e5
f5-f4
e8-d6
d6-f5
g8-h7

e6-e5
.lf8-g7
!'ta8-d8
h7-h5

f4-f3!

25
White resigned.

Evseev

Flohr
Moscow 1949

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

a2-a4
b2-b3
c3-a2
h2-h3
!'te3-e2
c2-c4
.ldl-c2

e5-e4!
'l'c7-b6
'lb6-b4
'l'b4-d2
ffi-e8
'l'd2-d6
a6-a5
t7-f5! +

d7xe5!

i...ge8?! 2.Ae3 a6 3.fS (Panov -

Mastering the Bishop Pair

134

Flohr, USSR,1934).

d4xe5

2
3
4
S

,1d3xh7t
ite2xg4
c&'gl-hl

f6-g4!
c&'g8xh7
itd8-d4t
fa8-c8

Black has the bishop pair; the b7-A is


especially active. Black dominates
the center, White has difficulties
developing the cl-A. Compensation
for the gambit is plain to see.

9
10
10
11
12

Biel 1985

g3-h5?

itg4-h3

g7-g6

7.f6t Axf6 8.exf6 gc2 - + .

7
8

itd4-d3!
lk2xg2
!Ig2xh2t

Van der Wiel


Polugaevsky

..

B l ack easily parries White's un


prepared attack. Better was 6.'l!te2
'l!tc4! 7.'l!tf2 'l!td3 + .

6
7

itg3xd3
f6-g4

k8-c2!

White resigned.

,,,.
:t
...

ite3-g3

10.'litxd4 gxg2 - + .

L w.:

ith3-e3

9.'l!tb3 gb4 10.,1e3 gch8 1 1 .,1gl Ac5!


-+.

hS-f6t

lU'8-h8
ct/h7-g7

White holds the center and uses it as


cover for an attack against the king.
First he needs to regroup: to free the
third rank for the rook and transfer
the bishop to c2.

Ae3-t2

!Id8-b8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

2
3

b2-b3
a2-a4!

a6-a5

It's important to strip the opponent


on the queenside.

of counterplay

3 . . . *b7

f6-e8

4.ge1 ga6 5.gce3 gb6 6.Adl

bi itd3, Ah4, Ac2.

4
5

,.c2-d3
!Ifl-el

!Ia8-a6
!Ia6-b6

13
14

135

d6xe5
e8-f6

f4-f5!
d2-h6

14 ... f6 15.fxg6 *g7 16.*h5 +-.

15 J.tl-h4 + 16
f5xg6
17 h6-g5
18
gh3-IP
19 g5xe7
20
h2xlP

!Ic8-c7
t7xg6
!Ic7-d7
f6-e4
e4x1Pt

Black resigned.

Martinovic - Timman
Amsterdam 1985

6
7
8

4f3-dl !
4dl-c2
,.d3-e2

,.c7-b7
e8-f6
f6-e8?!

9.Axe4 Axe4 10.he4 he4


1 1 .gxe4 gxb3 12.gxb3 gxb3 13.f5 e5
1 4.ge l ! Cll f8 ( 1 4 . . . gb4 15.gd l )
15.ga l ! bi Ael .

8 . . . xe4

9
10
11
12

!Ic3-IP

.. e2-d2

e4-e5
!IIP-h3

h7-e7
!Ib6-a6
!Ib8-c8
g7-g6

The position is open, which favors


the player with two bishops. The
main drawback of White's position is
the placement of his king.

d8-d6! +

Preventing White's castling. Now the


white king has to remain in the cen
ter where it comes under attack.

caiel-e2

2.g3 gds 6. t/c6 -+.

2
3

!Ihl-dl

!If8-d8
.d6-c6

With the idea 4... gxd2t.

4c4-b3

4.Ad3 hg2 5.Ae4 t/h3 + (5 ... hb2?


6.ghl ).

4
5

d2-e4

b7-b6

White has huge difficulties defend-

Mastering the Bishop Pair

136

Simagin

ing his kingside. Bad is 5."1fl because


of 5 ... Axh2.

5
6

c&>e2-el

Petrosian
Moscow l956

.lc8-a6t
g8-g7

Intending f5.

f2-f4

There is no other defense agaii:ist f7f5, but the position opens still fur
ther, to Black's advantage.

7
8

g4xt3
g2xt3
Black is in danger because the light
squares near the king are difficult to
protect. How can White take ad
vantage of this situation? The actual
moves in the game were:

1 ..Q,e4!

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

t7-f5!
c&>g7-h8
'tc2-g2t
gasxd8
gdlxd8t
gcl-dl
gd8-e8
'tc6-b5
.lb3-d5
c3-c4
'lb5-b4t
{) e4-d2 ,le5-g7- +
e3-e4

15."1f2 *c3 +
-

1
2
3

,ld2-a5?!

bxa6 2.*d3 *b6 3 ..Q.g2 +-.

White has wasted time and now


Black gets dangerous counterplay
because of his extra pawn at d3.

!.c2-a4

15

iil'b4-d6

With the idea c6.

16
17
18
19
20

b7-b6
{)g4-e5
d4-d3

,la5-d2
'lt3-g2

'tg2-g3
'tg3-h4
,ld5-t7
c&>el-f2
,lt7-h5

White lost on time.

f5-f4
c7-c6
geS-d8
gd8-f8
'td6-d3

..... . . ;R?

"

. . ..

.. . . . . . . .

...

. .

':&m
.
?

- I'.

4d6-c5?

1
Black had a good opportunity to l

seize the initiative: 4 ... b5! 5 . .Q,xb5


'l!tb6 and if now 6. .Q,a5 then 6 ...'h:b5

J
]

Mastering the Bishop Pair

137

7.,!xd8 itxa6 with compensation for


th e material, or 5.Aa5 *c6 6.*xc6
( 6 Axd8 f3 t b,. bxa4) 6 . . . 4:)xc6
7 .,!xd8 bxa4 +.
.

5
6
7
s
9
10

gel-cl
b2-b4
Aa4-b3
Ad2-f4
'f/g2-c6
tl'c6-e4

'f/c7-f'1
Ac5-d4
'f/f'1-e7
b6-b5
'f/e7-d7
Ad4-b6

19
20
21
22
23
24
25

tl'g8-a8!
gc2-d2t
Af4-e3
tl'a8-e8t
g3-g4t
tl'e8-a8t
gd2xd4t

c7-d6
Ac5-d4
'l>d6-e6
'l>e6-f5
'l>t'S-e4
gd7-d5

Black resigned.

Kasparov

Hjartarson
Belfort 1988

1 1 gcl-dl
Winning the passed d3 pawn. White
aims to deprive his opponent of
counterplay. There are a lot of weak
nesses in Black's position, so the
realization of the advantage of the
two bishops will be simple.

11
12
13
14
15

gdlxd3
Ab3-f'1
Af'1xh5
tl'e4-h7!

gd8-e8
tl'd7-c8
geS-e7
'f/c8-c4

1 5 . .J3 ! ?.

15
16
17
18

gd3-d2
tl'h7-g8
gd2-c2t

'l>b8-c7
tl'c4xb4
ge7-d7
Ab6-c5

e2-e4!

The decision to liquidate an isolated


d-ft is not commonplace, but White
opens an important diagonal for the
light-square bishop. The two bishops
will exert strong pressure on Black's
queenside.

1
2

4) c3xe4

d5xe4
4)f6xe4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

138

2 . . . d5 3.\\td6 ! . A queen trade is


usually good in realizing the bishop
pair, e.g. : 3 ... gxc l (else 4.gxc8 b.
\\txe7 and d6) 4.gxcl \\txd6 5 . .ixd6
gbs 6.4 g6 7.g4 .

k8xcl
i!te7-d6
b7-b6
5 ... \\tb8 6.\\tf3 b5 7.b4 b. \\tc6 .
i!td6-b8
6
gc1-c6
t7-ffi
7
i!te3-c3
Ae6-f5
b2-b4
8
<&>g8-h7
9
h2-h3
'l'b8-d8
10 Ad4-e3
11
'l'c3-d4
4J d7-e5
3
4
5

i!tf4xe4
gdlxcl
i!te4-e3

The two white bishops, acting along


adjacent diagonals, are very strong.
Black's position is grave.

12 gc6xb6 + -

'l'd8-c8

12 . . . \\txd4 13 .Axd4 Axh3 1 4.AxeS


Axg2 15.<alxg2 gxes 16.gxa6 +-.

13

<&>gl-h2

geS-d8

14
15

4g2-e4t

Af5xh3 !

15.Axh3 f3t 16.!f/g2 .!el t =

15
16
17

i!tc5xc8
Ae3-c5

18

Ae4-bl?

<&>h7-g8
Ah3xc8
ffi-f5

It i s wrong to l e av e the h 1 - a8
diagonal. Better is 18.AaB .

18
19 Abl-a2t
20 gb6-d6 =
2 1 <&>h2-g2
22
2.f3
23
Aa2-e6
24 <&>g2-gl

gd8-dl
'l>g8-h7
4J e5-g4t
Ac8-b7t
gdl-cl
gcl-c2t

Draw.

Campora - Popovic
Bor 1985

14

i!td4-c5?

Strong was 1 4.gd6 gxd6 1 5.\\txd6


\\tc2 16.Ad4 ( 16.\\txa6 is dangerous
because of 16. . . Ae4 with counter
play) 16 ... \\te2 ( 16 ... .id3 17.\\te7 +-)
17.\\tdS! Ac2 18.a4 and then not
18 ...Axa4 in view of 19.Ae4t g6 o
20 .\\tb7t !f/h8 2 1 .\\tbBt + - !f/g7
22.\\tc7t !flh8 (22 . . . .if7 23 .\\te7)
23.\\tdSt b. \\te7 +-.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Ae7-d8!

Black enjoys significant static ad


vantage because of his two bishops
and pawn center. B lack's central
pawns significantly restrict White's
minor pieces. By playing 1 . . .Ad8,
Black tries to improve the position of
his dark-square bishop by moving it
to the strategically important gl -a7
d i a go n a l . B l a c k a l s o p re p a re s
2 ..ga8-a5, driving White's queen out
of the kingside.

139

9
'le2-c4
10 bl-al a
11
gdl-bl

'la8-b7
ltg8-b8

11

'lb7-a7

2
3
4
s

c2-c4
lklxc3
'lhS-e2
ghl-dl

b4xc3
gas-as
Ad8-b6

Now Black activates his pieces and


creates targets to attack in the enemy
camp.

Ab6-cS

With the iea 'l'e8-b8-b6 and gg8-b8.

14.Afl oo .

12
13
14
15
16
17

'lc4-d3
c2-a3
a3-c2
{) c2-a3
{) a3-c2
'ld3-d2

ltaS-bS
ltbS-b4
ltb4-bS
ltbS-b4
ltb4-b7

f4-5?!

This en ables Black to drive the


knight at d4 out of the important
central point, while the weakness of
the d5 square is difficult to exploit.

6
7
8

ll ... gb5?! 12.b4! axb3 13.gcxb3 'l;g7

d4-c2
Ah3-g2

e6-eS
Ad7-c6
'le8-a8 +

Black has increased his pressure in


the center significantly, as a result of
e rroneous 6.f5?!.

17
18

ltc3-d3

18.'l'h6? gxb2! -+.

18
19
20
21

'la7-aS!
'l'aSxd2
h8-g7
ltb7-a7!
g7-f8 +

Mastering the Bishop Pair

140

Utasi - Sax

21 ...hS!?.

22

Shirak 1985

b2-b4

Better is 22.!!d3.

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

!k3xb3
!!blxb3
c2-e3
.Qg2xe4
e3-d5
h2-h3
d5-c7

a4xb3
l!b8xb3
!!a7-a4- +
Ac6xe4
!!a4xe4
<&>f8-g7
!!e4-d4
White has seized space in the center
and on the kingside, he is preparing
an attack against Black's king.

1 Ag2-fl !

White prepares to transfer his bishop


to the b l -h7 diagonal, whence it will
exert pressure on the kingside and
support the pawn advance e3-e4 as
well.

29
h3-h4
30
31 <&>al-bl D
c7-e8
32
33 e8xffit
34 ffixh7
35 h7-g5
36
g5-f7
37 f7-h6t
38 h6-g4
39 g4-h2
h4-h5
40
41
h2-fl
White resigned.

<&>g7-h6!
e5-e4!
<&>h6-h5
<&>h5-g4
<&>g4xf5
d6-d5
f7-ffi
!!d4-c4
<&>f5-e6
ffi-f5
d5-d4
d4-d3
!!c4-c2!

1
2
3
4

Afl-d3
Ad3-bl
Ab2-cl

a3-a4!

b5-d6
b6-b5
d6-c4
b5-b4

It is better to abstain from opening


the position on the queenside be
cause White is weaker there.

!!a8-a7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

16
17
18
19

g3-h5!
h5-f4
gh2-b2
gb2-b8

141

g7-g6
dl-e3
g6-g5

19 ... gxf4 20.h5 +-.


Black resigned.

Kupreichik

Gurgenidze
Belgrade 1988

h2-h4!

6.e4?! dxe4 7.xe4 d5 +.

'td8-d6

6 ... h7 1.gh2 f8 8.g5 ! hxg5 9.hxg5


'lbxg5 10.l}f2 g6 l l .e4 b. gel-bl with
an attack.

ga.g2
7 ... h7 8.f5 .
8
g4-g5!
9 Aclxb2
1

b4-b3

b3-b2
ge8xe3

t3-h4!

tl-f4!

g7-g6

9 . .. xb2

10.'lc2 +-;
9...h7 10.'ld3 f8 1 1 .,'1.cl b. e4.

10

g5xf6

1 1 gelxe3 + 12 ge3-e8t
13 .lbl-h7t
14
ge8xf8
15
gg2-h2

c4xb2

b2xdl
'td6-f8
c&>g8xh7
4c8-h3
4h3-e6

The true reason for the previous


move. White plays to open diagonals
for the bishops. Not 2.,'1.xe4? fxe4
3.'/bxe4 g5 b. d4 + , of course.

2
3
4
5

h4-t3
gal-cl
d2-d3

ga8-c8
gc8-c7
e4-ffi
h7-h6?!

This only weakens the pawn struc-

Mastering the Bishop Pair

142

ture near the king. Unlucky is 5 ... e4? !


in an attempt to create the outpost
for the knight at e4, as 6.d2 exd3
7.'txd3 a5 (otherwise e3-e4) 8:(!td4
( /::,. gfel, e3-e4) and White keeps his
advantage. M o r e s tubborn was
5 ... ges.

Uhlmann

Botvinnik
Munich 1958

b6xa5!

Black gets the supported b6-square,


whence the knight blocks the b-file
and attacks the weak c4-ft.

6
7

4)t3-h4!
e3-e4

Cfg8-h7
f5xe4

gn.al?

White feels no danger. Better was


2.e4! ? f4 3.e5 dxe5 4.Axh7t h8
5.Ae4 with counterplay.

2
3

galxaS

4) d7-b6

3.f3 Aa6 + .

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

f4-f5!
4)h4xf5
'l'c2-d2
4g2xe4
d3-d4!
d4-d5
4)f5xh6
gc1xn

Black resigned.

g6xf5
'l'e7-e6
4)ffi-g8
Cfh7-h8
4)c6-e7
'l'e6-d7
gmxnt

.1b7-e4! !

Black employs a n important method


of fighting the two bishops: exchanging the more active one, which here
also plays an important role in the
defense of the weak c4 pawn.
B ad is 3 . . . .ixc4 ? 4.Axc4 "l!txa5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

5. Axe6t /J. gxb7 .

4
5

.ld3xe4
'ltc2-b3

f5xe4

143

6 ... ,1xe2 7.gxcs Axfl 8.Axg7 mate.

5.e4 4)xc4 6.e6t 'l!'/t/ - + .

5
6
7
8
9

4)b6xc4
'ftb3xc4 'ltc7xa5- +
'ftc4xe6t
!fg8-h8
gb2-a2
'lta5-c7
'lte6xe4
'ltc7-r7

White resigned.

Simagin - Zagoriansky
Lvov 1951

gclxc4!

7.Axc4 gxc4 8.Axe5 gxcl 9.'l!'/xct


dxe5 /J. 4)b7 oo .

7
8

.le2xc4

4) a5xc4
gc8xc4

8 ...4)xc4 9.gt/ gs 10.Axg7t gxg7


1 1.xg7 +-.

9 .ld4xe5
10 'ltfixc4 + 11
4)h5-f6
1

d4-d5!

White's pawn structure is very weak,


but he counts on the dynamic chan
ces of attacking Black's king. The last
move prepares a transfer of the
bishop onto the important a1 -h8
diagonal. At the same time the
bishop b7 and knight a5 are excluded
from the game.

1
2

.la3-b2!

d6xe5
g7-g6
gg8-f8

1 1 ...gxfS 12.4)xg8 'l;xg8 13.d6t 'l!'ft/


14.'l!'/c8t +-.

4) e4-g5
.lb7-a6

2 . . . xe3t 3.'l;h t ( /J. 'l!'lh4, 4)h5)


3 . . . 4) f7 4 . 4) e 6 4) e5 s . g c 3 h 6

( 5. . .'l!'/e4 6.gf4 +-) 6.gh3 'l!'lg6 7.gg3


.
.la6xc4
3 .lb2-d4
ge8-g8
4
4)f4-h5
)g5-r7
gnxrs
s
4)rT-e5
6 itel-fi !

12

d5-d6!

ite7-d8

12 ... d6 13.4)e4 'l!'/dl t 14.gft +-.

13
14

'ltc4-h4
grs.n

Black resigned.

grs.n

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 44

Simagin

Gusev
Moscow l952

White's pieces a re very active.


White's bishops, supported by the
queen, exert tremendous pressure on
the position of the black king. White
starts a tactical melee.

Ad3-c4

gbI-dl

b3-b4

4.*c3 ! ? *e4t 5.r&1al *e7 6.h4 /j. h4h5-h6 .

Ac5xb4

4 . . . ,1b6 s.gn *xe3 6.*xe3 Axe3


1.gd1 /j. gd7 .

ith5-t3

s itd3-d4! + White's pressure on g7 decides the


game.

Ab6-c5

2 ... ge7 3.,1f6! ,1c7 (3 ... gxf6 4.gxf6


with the initiative) 4.*d4 *e4t
5.e4 fue4 6.gd7 .

itd6-d3

3 ... ge7 4.,1xg8 <hg8 5.*c4t +-.

itt3-e4t

itd4xe4

Gxe4

gdI-d7

4)g8-e7

4c4-e6

b7-b5

h3-h4!

There is no defense against the h4h5-h6 advance, so Black resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

146

White is a pawn up and his passed b5


p awn is d a n g e r o u s . S o B l a c k 's
bishops need to be very active.

t7-f5!

It's natural that Black wants to open


the game. Trading queens gives noth
ing l ...'tb6 2.ga 1 ! .

10

c&>gl-fi !

10.rf/h2? 'te3 1 1 .dS 'tg3t /:::,. f3 - + ;


10.rf/hl f3 1 1 .d5 'tf'2 12.'tfl 'tc2!
(12 .. :a2 13.gd l fxg2t 14.'txg2 'tb3
1 5 .'tfl with counterplay) 13.gxf3
,! e 5 1 4 . 't g l ( 1 4 . f4 't e 4 t - + )
14...,!d7 with the initiative /:::,. gas.

10

e4-e5!

White cannot prevent the opening of


the game, but he tries to derive max
imum benefit from it. Bad is 2.exf5
Axf5 3.f)g3 Ad3 4.ge1 rflf7 + ( t::,.
xb2). Black's bishops are strong.

h7-h6

2
3

Ag5-h4

d6xe5

3 . . . 'tb6 4.ga l ! '1]f8 5.'txb6 f)xb6


6.exd6 exd6 7.ga7 ;;!;; .

f4-f3

10... 'te3 1 1 .dS.

11

g2-g3?

After 1 1 .f)dS ! fxg2t 12.rf/xg2 ,!b7


1 3 . rf/ f l ! W h i te h a s s u ffi c i e n t
counterplay.

11
12

'lb6-e3- +
c3-dl

12.dS 'td2 13.f)f4 g5 -+.

'ta7xc5

c4xb2

12

l!fi-bl

b2-d3

13

c&>fi-tl

4c8-e6

'tc5-c4

d3xf4

14

'tc4-d3

l!e8-a8

e2xf4

e5xf4

15

d6-d7

2Ja8-a2t

d5-d6t

c&>g8-h7

16

2Jbl-b2

lta2xb2t

4h4xe7

'ld8-b6t

17

dlxb2

'le3-e5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

147

3.exd6 'tgSt 4.'i\?bl 'txf"S + ;


3.f6 gxf6 4.'tg4t AgSt 5.'i\?bl f5
6.'tg3 C\\' h7 7.h4 (7.gxd6 'tc7 8.Ae2
Ae7 /1 gg8 +) 7 ...Ae7 8.exd6 Af6 + .

'ld8-gSt

3
4

17
18
19
20
21

'lgSxeS

Black wants to exchange queens be


cause with he reduced material his
static advantage of the bishop pair
will dwarf whatever dynamic pos
sibilities White's pieces have.

.le6xd7!
,ld7xb5
'le5-c7
.lg7-d4t
'lc7-aSt

.le7-a3
'ld3xt3
b2-dl
Cftl-el

'llc l-bl

'lil'e2-g4

White resigned.

Horvath, T

Dorfman
Lvov 1984

'leS-gS

5 ... Af6? 6.exf7t gxt7 7.Ad3 ;t .


White's threats appear irresistible.
For example : l . . .d5 2.'tg3 AgSt
3.1\\'b l /1 h4 ;
1 ...'tc7 2.fx:e6 fx:e6 3.exd6 +-;
1 . . .0-0 2.f6 gxf6 3 .'tg3 t 'i\?h8
4.exd6 +-.
But Black's bishops tackle the matter easily:

1
2
3

'lel-e2
f5xe6

.le7-h

0-0

.lfl-e2

6.exf7t gxt7 7.'te6 'te5 8.'lxd6 'txd6


9.gxd6 gaf8 + .

'lg5xg4

6
7

.le2xg4

.lb7xg2

ghl-gl

.lg2-b7

gdlxd6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

148

20

.ld7xa4?
20.<1Jxa4 gn + .
20

gel-h l !

White cannot salvage his h-ft.

9
10

.lh4-tl!
e6xt7t

10.gfl fxe6 1 1.Axe6t h8 b. Ac5 + .

10
11
12

ggl-dl
gd6-d7

lU'8xt7
Atl-c5
gas-es +

The ending is in Black's favor be


cause the position is open, and when
play is carried on both flanks, the two
bishops are superior to a knight and
a bishop. Now Black plans to ex
change rooks and create a passed
pawn on the kingside.

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

a2-a3
b2-b4
gdl-d3
.lg4xd7
c&>bl-b2
c&>b2-b3
a3-a4

g7-g6
.lc5-f8
!U7xd7
geS-elt
h6-h5
g6-g5
b5xa4t

21
22
23
24
25
26
27

h2-h3
gd3-g3
c&>b3-b2
gg3xg5t
gg5-c5
.la4-c6
Ac6-b7

.lb7-c8
Ac8-e6t
ghlxh3
.lf8-g7- +
h5-h4
Ag7-d4
gh3xc3

28.gxc3 h3 29.Axa6 Ad5.


White resigned.

Kasparov - Ivanchuk
Moscow 1988

One way to combat the bishop pair is


to established a protected square for
a knight. The knight at e4 restricts
White's bishops effectively. White
aims right at it.

g3-g4!

'l'd8-e7

1 . ..fxg4 2 . .le5! xe5 3.Axe4 <lg6


4.Axg6 hxg6 5.'lxg6 Ae6 (5 ... gf8
6.Ah6 gxft t 7.gxft 'f!e7 8.Axg7
'lxg7 9.'le8t +-) 6.gbs! ( b. ghS)
Ad5 7.Ah6 ge7 8.Ag5 +-.

g4xfS

Mastering the Bishop Pair

149

Andersson - Marovic
Banja Luka 1978

.fl e4-d6

2 . . . ,1xf5 3.4Jg5 ! g6 4.4Jxe4 Axe4


s ..a.xe4 e4 6.'M'xe4 gxe4 7.fub7
4Je7 8.fuc7 4Jf5 9.fuc4 fue2 10.a4
.

3
4
5

.flt3-g5!
Ag2-d5t
'ltc2xe2

'lte7xe2
g8-h8
gesxe2

b2-b4

bite delays gaining the bishop pair,


first prying open the queenside.

.fl c5-d7

t
,

a -
i(W,,,, ,,, /.1

J, i
f,
y

...
...

,.,.f

i
:.

JfJ

.
""' '--
" w

L ,?,
,-

.
,, . . . . /,.

.
..;

JN
.''/.
-_
,'@. '
.!.!.
" f.f.

!!
.e.

.e.

.!.!.

6 Acl-f4 + -

.fl c6-d8

6 ... ,a.xf5 7.,1xd6 Axb l 8.4Jf7t 'it1g8


9 .4Jd8t \tlh8 10.ms mate.

7
8
9
10
11

Af4xd6
gbl-el
gnxel
geI-e7
fS.ffi

Black resigned.

c7xd6
ge2xel
Ac8-d7
,1d7-C6

e2-e3 !

White wants to pin the bishop at e6


along the e-file. Opening the game
favors the p l ayer with the two
bishops.

2
3

...
gn.e1

d4xe3
h7-h6

3 ... exf2t 4.'M'xf2 gf6 5.b5 (5.Ad5 ! ?


).

4 .flg5xe6
5
gelxe3
b4-b5
6
b5xc6
7
8 ge3-d3

'lte7xe6
'lte6-f7
gas-cs
b7xc6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

150

With such an open position Black's


queenside pawns make ready targets.

8
9

gd3-d6

4Jd7-e5
grs-es

Black resigned.

Benjamin - Razuvaev
Dortmund 1985

9...c4 10.c4 4Jxc4 1 1 .fug6 +-.

.
..
....

' "
. -1 -
..
. ." l .

:
"VJJ ifm' ,
: - -f;;

"

'0
'

!1.

10

";% ''11

:iWb,

.!f4xe5

Transforming the advantage of the


two bishops. Now White wins a pawn
and gets fine chances to attack
Black's king with the bishops of op
posite colours.

10
1 1 gd6xc6
12
gc6xc8
13 .!g2-d5
14
gdl-el
15 'l!l'c2-a4

15.Jc7 16.e8;
15 ... a6 16.Ab7.

16
gel-e6
17 'l!l'a4-a6
18 i!l'a6-a3
19 i!l'a3-b2t
20 'l!l'b2-e5 + 2 1 i!l'e5xh8t
22 ge6xg6
23 gg6xh6t
24
gb6-e6
25 ,!d5xe6
26 ,1e6-d7
27 <algl-g2

,!g7xe5
<alg8-g7
gesxc8
i!l'f7-e7
i!l'e7-d6
,!e5-d4

i!l'd6-d8
.!d4-b6
gc8-c7
<alg7-h7
i!l'd8-h8
<alh7xh8
gc7-e7
<alh8-g7
ge7xe6
<alg7-f6
,1b6-c5

White is better developed and looks


forward to an attack against Black's
king. However, in parrying White's
threats, Black will open the center
for his bishop pair.

e6xd5

1 . . .ftcxd5 2 .A b 5 t 1;e7 3 . e5 fxe5


4.4Jxe5 f6 5.b4t d6 6.d6t 1;xd6
7.4Jf7t 1;e7 8.4Jxh8 Ah6 with com
p e n s a t i o n for t h e m a t e r i a l
(Razuvaev).

2
3
4
5
6

i!l'd8-d6

0-0-0

e4xd5
.!fl-b5
<alcl-bl
g2-g3

0-0-0

c6-c5
gh8-g8
.!b7xd5

11
--"
.
i-"%!,.
"' "%!, ';c-;
- - 1

; lf''"" . . . '

//,

,..

=" },'

;;
-- . fti },
11'.!!f

'@2

11'80

'f - "".Er

Mastering the Bishop Pair

151

c&ibl-al?

Better is 7.Ac4! Ae4t 8.Cifla2 't}Jc7


(8 . ..'l!txd l ? 9.fudl fudl 10.'l!txf6 Ag7
1 t .'l!txf7 Abl t 12.c&?b3 gf8 13.'t}Je6t
\flb8 14.e5 +-) 9.'[hf6 (9.gxd8t
xd8 10.Axf7 gg7 1 1 .Ae6t Ciflc7
1 2.ge1 f5 +) 9 ...fudl 10.fudl Ag7
t 1 .'t}Jxf7 'l!txf7 12.Axf7 Axt'3 13.gd3 D
A e 4 1 4 . g e 3 g f8 1 5 . A e 6 t Ciflc7
16.fue4 :!'.!xf2 +.

7
8

.lf8-g7
itc3-c2

11
12

.lg7-h6

'ltf4-f5

1 2. 't}J a 4 Axf3 1 3 .'t}Jxa7 gxd 3 - +


(Razuvaev).

12

f6-f5! +

Sacrificing a pawn, Black opens the


important h8-al diagonal.

itc2xf5t

10

'ltf5-f4

itd6-e6

1 0.Aa6t <t;c7 1 1 .'t}Jf4t 't}Jd6 12.'t}Jf5


f6 + . The exchange of queens
usually favors the player with two
b i s h o p s , s i nc e i t decreases his
opponent's dynamic possibilities.

.ld5-b7

10
11

.lb5-d3

'lte6xf5

13

.ld3xf5t

c&ic8-c7

14

gdlxd8

gg8xd8

15

.lf5-g4

t7-f5

16

.lg4-h5

gd8-d3

17

f3-e5

gd3xa3t

18

b2xa3

.lb7xhl- +

19

e5-f3

.lh6-g7t

20

c&ial-bl

4g7-f6

21

c&ibl-cl

b6-b5

22

h2-h4

h7-h6

23

c&>c2-d3

a7-a5

24

c&>d3-e2

a5-a4

25

4h5-g6

4f6-b2

26

,lg6xf5

.lb2xa3

White resigned .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 52

Ilyin-Zhenevsky
Ragozin
Leningrad 1929-30

4b7xf3 !

5 ... gac8 6.g5.

White enjoys the advantage of the


two bishops. He need only complete
his development for the bishops to
show their strength. But Black is first
to use his dynamic advantage, supe
rior development.

b7-b5!

With a pawn sacrifice, Black ac


celerates the development of his
queenside.

f3xe4

4c8-b7

e4-e5

4)gl-f3

41 f6-d5

4 . * d 2 f6 5 . exf6 7x f6 6 . f3
(6.0-0-0 e4 f2) 6...e4 7.*d l
( 7 .*e2 f4; 7.*c l f4) 7 . . . *f4
8.*e2 *g4 + with the initiative.

4) d5xc3

4
5

'{te2-d3

ga8-c8

7
8
9

0-0

gal-el
'lf3-h5

4)d7-b6
a7-a5

9.*g4 bd5 10.gf3 a4 1 l .,'1.xd5 xd5


12.gg3 g6 13.c3 *e7 - + .

9
10
11
12

gn.f4
gf4-h4
gel-e3

'l'c7-d7!
a5-a4
h7-h6

12.gg4 axb3 13.6 *"d4t - + .

2.*"b5 a5 3.*c4 *b6 with compensa


tion for the material.

'l'd3xf3

Black has regained the pawn and


c r e a ted exce l l e n t c o u n te r p l ay .
White's bishops are harmless and he
has chronic weaknesses in his camp.

12
13
14

ge3-g3
Ab2xc3

a4xb3
t7-f5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

k8xc3?

14

Furman

gg3xc3

16

'lh5-dl?

Kha sin
Moscow 1958

14 ... cflh8! 15.cxb3 f4 16.gd3 gxc3 - + .

15

1 53

b3-b2

16.gb3 c4 b. gf8-a8-a3 + .

16

b6-c4

1 6 . . . b 4 ! 1 7 . axb4 ( 1 7 . g b 3 b x a 3
18.gxa3 c4 - + ) 17...gas - + .

17

gc3-b3

'ld7-e7

White has a strong setup in the cen


ter, therefore he can start advancing
on the kingside.

18

g2-g4!

d4xe5

d7xe5

gh4-h3?

1 8.gf4 ! gas 1 9.*b l d2 = ; o r


18. . .ih:a3 19.gxa3 xa3 20.gfl b l *
21 .bl xbl 22.gxb1 gcs = .

18

'le7-g5 !

19

gh3-t3

20

h2-h4

c4-d2

20.gg3 xb3 ! 21 .gxgs cl - + .

d2xt3t

20
21

gb3xt3

'lg5-cl

22

go.n

'l'c1-e3t

23

gn.a

b5-b4

24

a3-a4

grs-d8

25

'ldl-bl

gd8xd4

White resigned.

d5-d4!

A counter in the center is the right


response to a flank attack.
2 ...*d7 3.gxf5 ,1xf5 4.,!xf5 gxf5
5.e4 +-;
2 ... g6 3.gxf5 gxf5 4.gg2t with the
initiative.

ga2-g2

Mastering the Bishop Pair

154

d4xc3

Better was 3 ... dxe3. Then 4.gxf5 Axf5


5.Axf5 gxf5 6.'lg4 'IIB. 7.,1xe3 is im
possible due to 7 ... c4 8.Acl xe5
- + . Worthless is 6.gxg7t ? c&>xg7
7.'lg4t c&>h8 8.'lxf5 'lg8! + 9.'lg5
(9.c&>hl 'ld5t - + ) 9 ... 'lf7 10.'lf6t
f6 1 1 .exf6 c4 + .
But White retains some advantage
after 3 ... dxe3 4.,1xe3 'ld7 (4...c4
5.Acl b. gxf5) 5.gxf5 Axf5 6.Axf5
5 7.'ld5t c&>h8 s.gdl -

4
5
6

g4xf5
J.d3xf5
itdl-g4!

f4-f5

e5-e6

e3-e4
M-dl

a5-c4
itd8-f8

11

J.c1-g5

12

e4-e5

c4xa3
c3-c2

13

ltdl-fi

h7-h6

14

f5-f6

c2-clit

15

J,g5xcl

a3-b5

16

e6-e7

ltb7xe7

17

f6xe7

itf8xe7

18

e5-e6

lta8-f8

19

ltfixf8t

ite7xf8

20

J,clxh6

Black resigned.

Timoshchenko
Khalifman
USSR 1987

.!e6xf5
U8xf5
ltf5-t7

The central pawn roller destroys


everything in its way.

7
8

9
10

-&'g8-h8
M-b7

White is a pawn up, but that is insig


nificant in the evaluation of the posi
tion. Black's bishops and king exploit
the unfortunate positions of White's
king, and knight at f3. By pinning this
knight, Black can even try to win.

1
2
3

c&'tl-g2
J.b3-dl

J,d6-c5t
J,d7-c6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

a5-a4!

Black nails down a second weakness


far away from the n knight: the a2
pawn. Erroneous is 3 ... g4? 4.a4!
when the d 1 bishop can defend the
a4 pawn and the knight at f.3 simul
taneously, allowing White to escape
from danger, e.g. 4 ... Ae3 5.h5 ! ? cflxh5
(5 ...Axg5 6.f2 = ) 6.g3 =
.

h4-h5

White cannot just watch the events


passively, for example 4.Ae2 a3 -+
weak square a2 and there is no
defense against Ac6-d5.

4
s

g5-g6

a4-a3

An attempt to get counterplay.

1 55

.lc6-d5!

6 . . . Ad4 7.calfl ! ! Axf.3 8.Axf.3 xn


9.el e4 10.d2 f5 1 1 .c2 cflxg6
12.bl = It is impossible to drive
the white king out of b 1 .
.

c&>g2-fi

More stubborn is 7.h2 Axa2 8.d2


,le6 9.Ab3 a2 10.Axa2 Axa2 - + . The
resulting position is theoretically
won.

7
8
9
10
11
12

41 t3-el
.ldl-e2
41 el-c2
41 c2-al
.le2-dl

12
13
14
15

.ldl-b3
41 alxb3
c&'fi-e2

,ld5xa2
.la2-c4t
a3-a2
.lc4-b3
.lb3-d5

h7xg6

5 ... h6? 6.g7 Ad5 7.Ab3 Axb3 8.axb3


a2 9.g8f/ alf/ 10.f/g3t e4 1 1 .f/g6t
ds 12.f/d3t Ad4 13.f/xd4t f/xd4
14.xd4 cflxd4 15.calf.3 +-.

h5xg6

.lc5-d4- +
.ld5xb3
c&>f4-e4
c&>e4-d5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

156

16
17

c&'e2-d3
c&'d3-c2

.ld4-g7
c&'d5-c4

Wh ite has no useful move. 18. aSt


<&> b 4 19.b3 <&>a3 Zugzwang.

Polugaevsky - Ivkov
Yugoslavia 1972

fJa3-d3 !

Preparing e3-e4.

.lc8-b7

6
7
White's bishop at g2 and queen at b3
exert strong pressure on Black's
queenside, so it is difficult to develop
the bishop at c8. White needs to
transform his temporary activity
(dynamics) into a stable material or
positional advantage (statics).

4) eS-d3 !

Now Black cannot save his important


dark-square bishop.

ga8-b8

1...Aa7 2.Ad2 gbs 3.gacl .

.lcl-d2

b7-b6

2 . . b 5 3 .A a5 bxc4 4. Axc7 gxb3


5. xc5 .

e3-e4

f/a7-a8

7 . . . d4 8.b4 or 8.Ac7 ! gbc8


(8 ... Axe4 9.Axb8 +-) 9.Ab6 *b8
10.b4 +-.

gn-e t

9 .la5-c7 + -

4)f5-d4
.lb7-c6

10

.4,c7xb8

ge8xb8

11

gal-cl

.lc6xa4

12

e4-e5

4)ffi-d5

13

c4-d6

'l'a8-a7

14

'l'd3-c4

f/a7-d7

15

fJc4xcS

d4-b3

16

fJc5-c8t

fJd7-d8

17

'l'c8xb8

fJd8xb8

18

gct-c8t

f/b8xc8

19

d6xc8

3 4) d3xc5
4 fJb3-a3

b6xc5

White has the advantage of the two


bishops and targets to attack on the
queenside. Black has no compensa
tion for his positional concessions.

4
5

.ld2-a5

fJc7-a7
gd8-e8

Black resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Furman - Bannik
Leningrad 1957

White enjoys the advantage because


he has the two bishops in an open
p o s i ti o n . He also h a s a strong
centralized knight on d5 and Black's
pawn on c7 is weak. The pride of
Black's defense is the knight on d4,
but its centralized position is un
stable.

*dl-d2

a7-a5

i ...ges 2.gfel '/hd6 3.b4 f5 4.c5 .

gn-el

d4-f5

Black has no useful moves. 2 .. '/hd7


fa i l s to 3 . g e 4 . W h i te c a n
strengthen his position with gad l ,
'/hf4.
.

3
4

2:1al-dl
.lg2-h3

*d8-c8
t7-ffi

White threatened 5.axg7 6. '/hf4 .

157

gei-e7!

grs.n

ge7xt7

g8xt7

*d2-f4

c6-e5

4h3xf5

A typical method of realizing the advantage of the two bishops is to transform the advantage.

g6xf5

8
9

.lb2xe5

10 *f4-h4
11

*h4-h5t

ffixe5
*c8-d7
t7-f8

12 d5-b6 + - *d7xdlt
13

*h5xdl

c7xb6

14

*dl-d6t

f8-g8

15

*d6xb6

lfa8-e8

16

*b6xb7

f5-f4

17

c4-c5

e5-e4

18

g3xf4

e4-e3

19

tlxe3

ge8xe3

20

c5-c6

.lg7-d4

21

gl-g2

geJ.e2t

22

c&>g2-f3

ge2-e3t

23

f3-g4

Black resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

158

Cebalo - Hort
San Bernardino 1987

s.gdt c4 6.Axc4 gxc4

=.

d2-c4

5 ... .rib3 6.gcz a l 1.gd2 Axc3 8.bxc3


gxc3 9.Axa5 weak square b7.

4b6-d4!

6.,1xc4 gxc4

=.

Ad4-f2! !

U !tc2? ! gxd4 2.gxd4 b3 3.Axb3


lbd4 =F .

c5xb3

Avoiding the queen trade would only


worsen the position: l ...*c7 2.*c2 b.
.riaz.

2
3
4

4f2xb6
gdlxd2
4c4-b5

gd8-d2t
b3xd2
grs-cs

The skirmish resulted in a position


which may be favorable for White
because of the two bishops and
weakness of the a5 pawn. But Black
also has his strong point - counter
play along the c-file. How can White
neutralize Black's counterplay?

c4-d6

6 ... xb2 7.e2 gxcl s . .rixc l .rid t


9. a2 .

7
8

4b5-e2
e4-e5

8 ... c4 9.a2 .

10

4e2-b5

ffi-d7
d6-e8

d7-b8

f3-f4

White seizes space in the center and


continues his strategy of restricting
Black's knights. White's attention
finally comes round to the weak a5
pawn.

10

c&>g8-f8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 1 Ad4-b6
12
c&'g2-t3
13 4Jc3-a2
14 4J a2xcl
15 4J cl-b3
16 Ab6xa5
17 4Jb3xa5 + 18 4J a5xb7
19
c&'t3xf4
20
c&'f4-g5
21 Ab5xe8
22 4Jb7-c5
a4-a5
23
24
a5-a6
25
b2-b4

4
5
6
7
8

t7-f6
c&'f8-t7
2:k8xcl
c&'t7-e7
4Jb8-d7
Ab4xa5
f6xe5
e5xf4
e6-e5t
4J d7-f6
c&'e7xe8
c&'e8-e7
c&'e7-d6
4Jf6-e8
c&'d6-d5

Ac4-n
gclxc7
gal-cl
gclxc7
4J d2-c4

159

Ab7-d5
gcsxc7
4J d7-t8
1ite7xc7
4Jt8-e6

Black resigned.

Botvinnik - Furman

.am
m m

.1d5xc4

USSR 1961

m
-,,ri
-- -"
;-
i
i.l

"1Mrr

' ,/, -- - f /,-

Black must part with his bishop due


to the weakness of the d6 pawn.
w

--{:},

.
>
%

&

7,
"%
-},

J .&
..

fr-0.,l
, t
--%'111
6%'11
f

6
-!> B-'1
t

!t..J
8

- - la

"m /,
y,

"-

b4-b5

Preparing to transfer the bishop from


b2 to the more active a3-f8 diagonal.

1
2

1itdl-a4

2:fa8-c8

White strives to use the strategic


power of his bishops, so he is going to
eliminate Black's counterplay by ex
changing major pieces.

2
3

3.'1f1xa7?? ga8 +
-

!k8-c7

gn-c1
.

gm-cs

10

1itb4xc4

After the exchange of queens Black


loses his last hope of counterplay.
Less good is 10..bc4 d5 1 1 .Ae2 c2
with counterplay.

10
11
12

Aflxc4
.1c4-a2

1itc7xc4
d6-d5

Now White has the position he


wanted. His bishops are much more
active than Black's knights, which
have to protect the weaknesses in
their camp. It is very important that
White's bishops make the activation
of his king possible.

12

c&'g8-t8

The attempt to exchange queenside


pawns j ust makes matters worse:
12 . . . .) c 7 ? ! 1 3 . a4 a6 1 4 . a5 ! .)d7
14.bxa6 bxa5 15.,1c3 +-.

13
14

a3-a4
Ab2-a3t

c&'t8-e7

The bishop transfers to the more ac


tive diagonal.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 60

rf/e7-d7

14

23

J,f4xd6!

The right moment to transform the


advantage.

23
24
25
26
27

'l;>h4-g5
h2-h3
'll>g5-h6
J,a2-b3

rf/e6xd6
'l;>d6-e6
d7-ffi
ffi-h5

27.1Jxb.7 4:)f4 with counterplay.

15
16

tl-t3
Aa3-f8

. 27
28

rf/h6xh7

28
29
30
31
32

J,b3xd5
'l!>h7-g7
h3xg4t
J,d5-e6t

h5-g3

e6-c7
g7-g6?

The defense should not create weak


nesses, e.g. 16... 4:) e6. Now White's
king can get to the kingside via the
dark squares.

17
18
19

rf/gl-tl
'l!>tl-g3
J.f8-h6

rf/d7-e6
ffi-d7

Intending A h6-f4 to exploit the


weakness of the a7 pawn.

19

f7.f5

19 ... a6 20.Af4 +-.

20
J.h6-f4
21 'l;>g3-h4 +

c7-e8

The white king's march decides the


game.

21
22

t3xe4

e8-d6
f5xe4

rf/e6-f5
g6-g5
g5-g4
rflf5xg4

Black resigned.

Portisch - Timman
Montpellier 1985

Mastering the Bishop Pair

t3-f4!

S a crificing a pawn, White opens the


most important al -h8 diagonal.

ffi-e4
If Black closes the position ( l ...e4),
1

will lose counterplay and White


will be able to consolidate his position on both flanks: f)d2-bl -c3, 'if2d2, h3, ctl f2, ggl etc.
he

2
3
4

4 . .. .flxf4

d2xe4
itf2-g3
e3xf4

5.'ic3 'ie5
7 . Axe5 .

.lb2-cl

5 .. . m7 6.Axe4 .

16
17
18
19

ith4-f4
ID7-f8t
itf4xf8t
.lc4-g8t

1 61

g6-g5
ge8xf8
f/h8-h7

Black resigned.

Petrosian

Botvinnik
Voronovo 1952

fSxe4
e5xf4
grsxr4

6.'ixe5 dxe5

gf4-h4

Black goes after the bishop pair.

1
2

a2-a3

2 ...'ixb2? 3.a4 +-.

3
4
5

gdl-dS!

e4-e3

6 ... ,1xd5 7.cxd5 !J. Acl -g5 +-.

7
8

.lclxe3
.le3-g5!

gh4xc4
ite7-d7

9.gd2 xg5 1 0.'ixg5 /:J.


1 1 .'ixdS and l l .Ab3 +-.

8 . . . 'i g 7

9 gds-d2
10
.lc2-b3
11 .lb3xc4t
12 itg3-h4 + 13
gd2-f2

1 3 .. . dS

e6xg5
g5-e4
f/g8-h8
gd8-e8
itd7-g7

14.gxe4 dxe4 15.'if6t 'ig7

1 6.xg7t<tlxg7 17.m7t +-.

14
15

gf2.f7
f/gl-hl

itg7-d4t
h7-h5

.lg5-h4
.lh4-g3
h2xg3

itd8-b6
h7-h6

g7-g5
h5xg3
.lf8-g7

Black has the advantage of the two


bishops. In compensation, White has
the semi-open h-file, but it is almost
useless because the h5 square is
hardly accessible to his knight.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 62

.lfl-d3

Letelier - Botvinnik, Tel Aviv 1964


went 6.gc1 'll f8 ! (Surprisingly, this is
the best position for the black king.
The rook at h8 must be kept on the
h-file.) 7.b4 (This is too sharp, the
queenside is weakened) 7... g4 8.flgl
( 6 g1 -e2-f4) 8 ... a5 (Black strives to
open the position to use the strength
of his bishops) 9. a4 f/d8 10.b5 .ie7
1 1 .Ad3 ( 1 1 .f/xg4! ? e5 + ) 11 ...e5 !
(Continuing the strategy o f opening
play and activating the bishops)
12.dxe5 Axe5 (Black continues the
dark-square strategy that he started
by capturing White's dark-square
bishop.) 1 3 . e 2 f/d6 14.'ll f l h5

15.f/b3 b6 16.gd1 Ab7 17. .if4 gh6!


(Bringing the rooks into the game)
18.'l/gl ( 18.xh5 ( 18.gxhs? Axf4 + ) 18 . . . d4 1 9.exd4 Axd4 20.'ll g l ?
AxfZt 21.'llxf2 f/d4t 22.'llfl f)d5 -+)
1 8 . . . gcs 1 9 . A e 2 ( 1 9 . .ixh5 d 4 !
20.exd4 Axd4 21.f4 gxhl t 22.'l/xhl
Axf2 - + ) 19 ... d4! (Opening the posi
tion and improving the mobilty of his
pieces) 20.exd4 Axf4 21.gxf4 f/xf4 -+
22.f/e3 f/xe3 23.fxe3 gc2 24.Afl .if5
2s.ge1 g3 26.gh2 xfl 27.'llxf l
gf6t White resigned.

c&>e8-f8!

10

ii)h2-fl

g5-g4

Restricting White's pieces and block


ing his pawns. The weakening of the
f4 square is unimportant

11

ii)fi-d.2

itb6-d8

Preventing c3-a4-c5 and preparing


h6-h5. The loss of time does not mat
ter because the position is closed,
though it is possible to open it with
e6-e5 at any appropriate moment.

It is difficult to find a better place for


Black's king. The main drawback of
such moves in general is that the rook
on the h-file has difficulty entering
the game, but in this position the
rook at h8 is very active.

ii)f3-h2

h6-h5

Preventing 8.f/h5 and at the same


time restricting the white knight to
h2.

.lla l-cl

ii) c3-b5

.lc8-d7

11

e6-e5!

A crucial move. It activates Black's ;


bishops.

12
13
14
15
16

t\'dl-b3
ii)b5xd4
e3xd4
c&>el-dl
.llc l-c7

e5xd4
ii)c6xd4
tl'd8-e7t
.lg7xd4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

t6.t'xb7? Aa4t - + .

16
17
18

1!hl-el
1!c7xb7

163

seems his chances are better .

.!d4-b6
i!l'e7-d6

1
2
3

c5xb6
b6-b7

b7-b6!!
1!c8xcl

Perhaps Black has miscalculated,


how can he stop the b7 pawn?

18
19

.!d3-b5

1!h8-h6!
.!d7-e6

Keeping his very useful defender of


the light squares.

20
21
22
23

24

25
26

tl-f4
g4xt3
1!a8-c8
4) d2xf3
4)f3-e5 i!l'd6-c5- +
1!b7xt7t
c&>f8-g8
1!t7-t3
i!l'cS-cl t
1!c8-c2t
c&>dl-e2
i!l'cl-d2
c&>e2-fi

3
4
5
6
7

b7-b8'1'
.!b5xc6
c&>b4-a5
.!c6xd5

4) e6-d8!
4)d8-c6t
1!cl-blt
1!blxb8

The combination resulted in dynamic


equilibrium. Black won the exchange
for his pawn, but the activity of
White's bishops more than fully
m a k e s up fo r h i s i n s i g n i fi c a n t
material loss.

White resigned. 27.Ae2 i!td4 -+.

Alekhine - Keres
Bad Nauheim 1936

White's position is more active and it

7
8
9

,!d5-c4
g2-g4

c&>e7-d6
c&>d6-c7
.!e8-c6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 64

10
11
12
13
14

g4-g5
f2-f4
h4xg5
f4-f5
Ac4-e6

'8'/c7-b7
f6xg5
gbs-es
.Qc6-e4

14.f6 gxf6 15. gxf6 gf8 16.f7 Ag6


17 ..Q.c5 l!xf7 =

pawn, which is supported by his king


and two bishops. Black's a5 and b4
pawns are weak, it is hard to defend
them.

d5-d6t

.!c4-b5t!

'8'/e7-d7

2.Axf7?! .)f6 and Black's pieces are


actjve again.

ge8-f8!

14

Simplifying to bishops of opposite


colour is the easiest way to equalize
the game.
14 ... g6? 15.f6! l!xe6 16.f7 +-.

15

'8'/d7-d8

.Qd4xg7

grsxrs = t

Draw.

'8'/c5-b6!

With the idea 4.,ll.xe8 Ci\?xe8 5.1;c7 +-

Smyslov - Evans
Helsinki 1952

3
4

.i e8-f6
.Qf4-g5!

A good example of the advantageous


transformation. When the bishop is
exc h a nged fo r t h e k n i g h t , t h e
kingside pawns will b e worthless.

For the time being Black is two


pawns up, but White has the ad
vantage because of his passed d5

.Qt3-d5

'8'/b6xa5

b4-b3

'8'/a5-b4

.!d5-e6

.Qb5-a4!

'8'/d8-c8

.Qg5xf6!

g7xf6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

27
28
29
30

1 65

g3xf4
f/b6-c6
f/c6-d6
f/d6-e6

ffi-f5
t7-ffi
ct/b8xb7

Black resigned.

Sloka

Nikolaevsky
Bojarka 1986

B
9

d6-d7t!

9.Axb3 would throw the advantage


away 9...\tld7 10.Axe6t fxe6 1 1 .\tlcS
e5 12.b4 e4 13.bS e3 14.b6 e2 15.b7
el'li!' 16.b8'li!' =
.

f/c8-d8

9 ...Axd7 10.Axd7t \tlxd7 l l .\tlxb3 +-

10

4a4-b5

f/d8-c7

10 ... AdS 1 1 .\tlcS Af3 12.\tld6 Ag4


13.Ac4 Adl 14.Axf7 h6 15.,1e6 Ac2
16.AdS Adl 17.\tle6 Ac2 18.Ac6 +-.

11
Ab5-c6
12 4c6-a4
13
c&>b4-c5
14 4a4xb3
15 4b3-d5 + -

f/c7-d8
f/d8-c7
Ae6xd7
4d7-e6

The passed b-ft ensures an easy win


for White.

15
16
17

b2-b4
b4-b5

f/c7-d7
f/d7-c7
4e6xd5

l 7...d7 18.b6 \tlc8 19.\tld6 +-.

18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

ct/c5xd5
f/d5-c4
ct/c4-c5
b5-b6t
f/c5-b5
h2-h4
f/b5-c6
b6-b7t
f/c6-b6

f/c7-b6
f/b6-b7
f/b7-c7
f/c7-b7
h7-h5
f/b7-b8
f/b8-c8
f/c8-b8
f5-f4

The bishop on b5 is shut out of the


game, so Black can consolidate his
position in the center and on the
kingside.

1
2

e4xf5?

t7-f5!

He had to keep the position closed


with 2.h3 f4 3.ge2 gdl t 4.gel gd3
+.

g6xf5 +

Now Black's bishops burst into ac


tion.

g2-g4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 66

3
4
5

ge3-el
t3xe5

G-f4!
Ae6xg4
Ag4-h3

Nezhmetdinov - Szabo
Bucharest 1954

White has problems with his king.

6
7

t2-t3
Ab5-d7

gd6-e6

7.d3 .ll d4t 8.<alhl ge3 9.gxe3 fxe3


-+.

7
8
9
10
11

ge6xe5
Ah3xd7
gelxeS
Ad7xa4
ges-e4
Aa4-b3
ge4-e6
ge6xb6 Ab3xc4- +

The passed c-ft, supported by the two


bishops, decides the game in Black's
favor.

White's advantage is evident, but not


easy to realize because the position is
blocked. White needs to open the
game to get at Black's weakened king
position.

gal-bl!

Before starting the crucial opening


of the center, White diverts Black's
rook away from e8.

gb2-b8

1...gxb 1 ? 2.gxb 1 ;
t ...geb8 2.gxb2 gxb2 3.4 .

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

gb6-c6
c&>gl-g2
gc6xh6
gh6-d6
gd6-c6
h2-h4
h4-h5
h5-h6
gc6-c7t
h6-h7

White resigned.

Ag7-d4 t
Ac4-d3
c5-c4
Ad4-e3
c&>g8-t7
c&>t7-e7
Ae3-d2
c4-c3
c&>e7-d6
Ad3xh7

gblxbS

gesxb8

t2-f4!

gb8-d8

3 . . . exf4 ? 4 . e 5 ! dxe5 5 . d 6 ! .ll d 8


6:hg6t +-.

4
5

f4xe5
itd3-g.1

d6xe5
ita5-c7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 67

With the open center they will en


sure a stable advantage.

b6-a4

l ...,1e7 2.a5! .

2
3

b3xc5
.ld3-c2

a4xc5
e6-e5

O n 3 . . 0 - 0 4 . e 5 f/c7 5 . ,1 f4
White's advantage is clear. After the
next move the f5 point is weakened.
.

4
5

ltfi-dl
.lcl-gS

'ld8-e7
d7-f6

.lgSxffi!

The right moment to transform the


advantage.

6
7
8

d5-d6!
'lg3xg6t

.le7xffi
ltd8xd6
g8-f8

8. Ag7 9.Axf7tf8 10.Ae6 +-.


9 'ltg6xh5
.lf6-g7
ltd6-f6
10
ltel-bl
11
gl-hl
<&>t8-g8
ltf6-h6
12 .lc4-d5 + lth6-f6
13 'lth5-g4
'ltc7-d6
14 ltbl-b7
15 hl-h2
..

Black resigned.

Naumkin

Yanovsky
Moscow 1986

6 f3-h4!
7 h4-f5!

.lb7-c8

The weakness of the f5 square forces


Black to exchange his light-square
bishop for a knight, after which
White gets the upper hand in the
center.

7
8
9
10
11
12

.lc8xf5

e4xf5
ltdl-dS
ltal-dl
'lte2-d2
ltd5-d6

0-0

c5-d7
ltt8-d8
lta8-a7

White aims to transform his enor


mous positional advantage into a
material one, so he turns his atten
tion to the black queenside pawns.

d2-b3 !

White strives to get the two bishops.

12
13
.lc2-b3
14 .l g5 -e3 + -

'gd8-c8
h7-h6
lta7-c7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 68

Citron

14 ...c5? 15.;ad8t +-.

Botvinnik
Munich 1958

15

gd6xa6

d7-c5

16

.le3xc5

ite7xc5

17

itd2-e2

e5-e4

18

ga6-aS

itcSxtS

19

gasxbS

gc7-cS

20

gbSxcS

itfSxcS

21

h2-h3

gc8-e8

22

ite2-c4

itc5-a7

23

itc4-d4

ita7-as

24

.lb3-c4

itaS-gS

25

itd4-e3

itgS-hS

26

gdl-d4

geS-eS

27

a3-a4

geS-gS

28

ite3-b3

ith5-g6?

This mistake hastens Black's defeat.

29

4c4xt7t!

29...'ftxf7 30.;ad8t e8 31.;axest +-.


Black resigned.

Black's bishops are more active than


White's knights which have no support points. Black plays to restrict the
white knights.

g6-g5!

Depriving White's knights of the f4


square.

2
3
4

a2-a4
bl-d2
4) d2-t3

.lbS-e8
.lf8-d6
g8-f8

Black places his king into the center,


planning the exchange of queens.

d3-b2

It is dangerous for the white king to


go to the center, he may be attacked
there.

s
6
7

b2-d3
d3-b2

-e7
e7-d8
itb7-c7

8
9

itc3xc7t
gl-fi

d8xc7
b6-bS

Exchanging queens favors Black be- ;


cause his king gets the opportunity to .
penetrate the enemy camp on the
queenside.

Preparing the passage for the black


king to march to the queenside.

10
11

t3-el
el-d3

Ad6-a3

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 69

position in the center. B lack is


threatening to develop his initiative
on the kingside.

'ftdl-el !

Establishing control over the e1 -h4


diagonal. The subtle point is that
1...g4 2.h4 Af6 meets 3.f4, eliminat
ing Black's activity. That would not
work after 1. e2.

1
11

e6-e5!

Still further play to restrict White's


k n ights.

12
13

.lb2-dl
b3xa4

.i d7-f8

1 ...h4 2.g4 blocks the position, for if


2 ... h3 3.gxh3 gxh3 4.g2 gh8 s.gh 1
.

b5xa4
e5-e4

13 ... .Q.xa4? 14.c3 Ac6 15.dxe5.

14
15
16

.l d3-b2
c&ifi-el
c&iel-fi

.1e8-h5
.1a3-b4t
c&ic7-b6

Black's strategy is proven: White's


pieces are completely paralyzed.

17

f2.f3

White resigned.

Psakhis - Zilberstein
USSR 1982

g3-g4!

Carrying on the strategy to restrict


the black bishops.

Bl ack has the bishop pair, but the

Position is closed, so it is not easy to


use t h em efficiently, especially when

ac cou nt is taken of White's solid

Ac8-d7

4 ... hxg4 5.h2 g3 6.fxg3 !::.. g4 .

5
6
7

'ftel-e2
.it3-h2
.lh2xg4

h5xg4
.1h6-g7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 70

Weak square d5.

16
17
18
19

l!a8-d8
l!h8-h7
'l/c6-b7

l!al-el
i)g4-e3
i) e3xd5

Black resigned.

Botvinnik - Szilagyi
Amsterdam 1966

t7-f5

Black tries to activate his pieces, but


he only creates new weaknesses.
Also in vain was 7 ... c5 8.clxc5 '{hc5
9. .{)b3 f/e7 10.d4 .

8
9
10
11

e5xf6
i) d2-b3
i)b3-c5
i)c5xd7

J,g7xf6
a7-a5
b7-b6
c&>e8xd7

The situation has changed. Now the


most important factor is the black
king's unfortunate position.

White has the advantage due to his


two bishops which have seized space
on the queenside. White dominates
the light squares, most obviously c4
and d5.

J.cl-gS!

t .d6 'lhd6 2.Ac4 .


1 ..{) e3 .{)f6.

t7-ffi

Weakens the light squares still fur(


ther, but 1...'{hg5 2.xd6 c4 3.Cl'g
.{)f6 4.c8 gdz 5.f/ct +- is bad.

2
J.g5-e3
3 J,e2xc4t

12

fl-f4!

Tuking advantage of his greater ac


tivity.

12
13
f4-f5
14
l!fixfS
15 J,d3xe2
16 J.e2-t3 + -

c&>d7-c6
e6xf5
ite7xe2
J.ffi-g7

i) d6xc4

The bishop gets to the important a2 .


g8 diagonal where it exerts stron
pressure on Black's position.

3
4
s
6
7

a4-a5
l!fi-dl
'ltc2-a2
l!alxdl

c&>g8-h8
J.b6-c7
i) d7-f8
l!d8xdl t

The exchange of rooks favors Whi

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Spas sky

because it weakens the black king


further still.

1 71

Hilbner
Munich 1979

gcS-d8

gdlxd8

a5-a6

10

Cl1gl-g2

.lc7xd8
b7-b6

1 0.*e2 e6 1 1 .*g4 c7 12.*c8 +-.

10
11

ite7-d7
ital-el

fs-g6
White has a strong pawn center and
spatial superiority. The knight at f5
provides him with an excellent op
portunity to attack.

tl-f4!

Opening the game usually favors the


player with two bishops.

itd8-c7

l ... d6 2.fxe5 dxe5 3.dxc6 ;


l ...f6 2.fxe5 fxe5 3.0-0 f6 4.Ag5
.

12 Ac4-b3 + The bishop and the queen combine


for a decisive attack against the king
along the light squares;

f4xe5

2
3
4
5

Ac1-f4!
gal-cl

d5-d6!

0-0

itc7xe5
t7-fti
'l' e5xc3
itc3-a3

g6-e7

12
13

ite2-c4

h7-h6

14

itc4-t7

c&>h8-h7

15

.lb3-c4

itd7-d6

16

h3-h4

itd6-dl

17

itt7-e8

fti-f5

18

e4xf5

e7xf5

19

Ac4-g8t

h7-h8

Black resigned.

Shutting the queen out of the game.

a5-b7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 72

Black's pieces are stuck on the


queenside, but nevertheless they are
trying to help their king.

4Jf5-e7t

e4-e5!

g8-h8

Bringing the bishops into action.

f6xe5

8
9

.Qf4xe5

4J e8-f6

9 ... 'M'cSt 10.'7lhl exd6 1 1 .'M'hS! +-;


9 . . . ex d 6 1 0 . A x g 7 t !
l l .'M'g4t "7h8 12.'M'd4t +-.

'7txg7

b: 1 1 . . .gf7 12.Axf6 gxf6 13.gxf6


'M'xc l t 1 4 . g f l 'M' g S 1 S . 'M' f3 'M' f6
16.g6! + "7g8 17.'M'h3 'M'd4t 18.'7thl
f7 20.'M'h8t xh8 21 .e7 mate.

11

4Jf6-g4?

There was salvation in 1 1 ...xh7!


12.'M'd4 Ml t 13.Ml e8! 14.gf7
'M'cl t 1 S.'7lf2 'M'c2t 16.'7tg3 ef6
17.Axf6 xf6 18.M6 gxf6 19.'M'xf6t
"7 h 7 2 0 . 'M' f7 t '7l h 8 2 1 . 'M' f6 t =
(21 .g6? + 'M'xg6 22.'M'xg6 gg8! -+ ).

12

t2-d4!

a3-e3t? !

More stubborn is 12 ...gxfl t 13.Ml


'M'cS ! 14.'M'xcS bxcS 1S.,1xd6 "7xh7
16.gf4! h6 17.gh4! ms 18.AcS! dS
19.dS! ms 20.b4 gxcs 21 .xa6
gas 22.b4 .

10

.Qd3xh7!

4Jb7xd6!

10..."7xh7 1 Uc3 'M'cSt 12."7hl +-;


10... xh7 l l .Axg7t '7txg7 12.'M'g4t
+ -.

13
14
1s
16

d4xe3
lklxfl
gn.f3
.Qh7-g6!

grsxnt
4Jg4xe3
d6-c8

16 ... xe7 17.Af7! .!3fS 18.gh3t h6


19.gxh6 mate.
Black resigned.

1 73

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Botvinnik

Tai
Moscow 1961

the static advantage.

6
7
8
9
10

itg4-e2
ite2-g4
itg4-e2
e3-e4

itfS-c2
itc2-fS
itfS-c2
itc2-fS

White restricts the black queen, the


weakness of the f4 point does not
matter.

1
2
3

4)gS-e6!
d5xe6
e6xd7

t7xe6
Cfg8-h8
itd8xd7

10
11
12
13
14
15

gal-di
ite2-g4
g2-g3
itg4-h5
ith5-e2

16

4)dS-e3 !

itfS-d7
ga8-d8
itd7-e8
4)g8-h6
4)h6-g8
4)g6-e7

White has gained the bishop pair.


With no counterpart, White's lightsquare bishop will develop strong
pressure. Black's pawn structure has
deteriorated; he has three pawn islands.

4
5

0-0

4) c3-d5

itd7-fS

The exchange of knights works into


White's plans because it increases his
control over the light squares in the
center.

4)f6-g8

Preparing the transfer of the knight


to a strong position at g4.

16
17

4) e3-g4!

4)g8-h6
4)h6xg4? !

better is 17 ...tthS.

18

f.

18
19
20

"

Y..
6 itdl-g4
. . .. . . .

. . . . . . .

h3xg4

With the h-file open, Black's king is


in for serious trouble.

The ending favors White since he has

Cl/gl-g2
.lc4-d5!

4) e7-c6
,ld6-e7

Preventing the exchange of rooks,


needed to attack the black king.

20

4) c6-d4

An attempt to muddle things.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 74

21

Ab2xd4

The bishops of opposite colour make


White's attack still stronger.

21
22 Ad5-c4 + -

eSxd4

f4xeS

2.'td2 ! ? 'tg7 3.Axd6 e4 4.dxe4 fxe4


5.el Ac3 - + .

2
3

t8/h2-hl

AffixeSt

Intending Ac4-d3, f2-f4, :!;fl -h l , e4e5.

22
23
24
25
26
27
2s
29
30

b4-bS
tl-f4
gdlxd3
Ac4xd3
e4-eS
gn-h1
'lte2-e4
Ad3-c4

c7-cS
Ae7-ffi
d4-d3
gd8xd3
Affi-d4
g7-g6
t8/h8-g7
b7-b6

30 ... 'te7 31 .gS ( b. 'tc6) 31...c8 32.fS


gxf5 33.gx:h7t \ti>xh7 34.*h4t 'l;g7
35.'th6 mate.
Black resigned.

Ljubojevi

Kasparov
Linares 1991

Black has a dangerous initiative: his


pieces are surely aimed at the white
king's position. Opening of the posi
tion favors Black because he has the
two bishops.

e7-e5!

Black brings in his queen and dark


square bishop to strengthen the at
tack.

i!}' d7-b7? !

Better is 3 ...'tg7! ( b. 'th6) 4.'tf2 'th6


5.'tb6 Ab7 6.gx:es dxe5 7.'tc5t \ti>b8
8.e5t \ti>a8 -+ (Kasparov).

d3-d4

gg6xg2??

This is a miscalculation. It is not too


late to play 4 ... 'tg7! 5.'tc3 \ti>b7 6.fxe5
gx:g2 -+.

S
6
7

ge2xg2
t8/hlxg2
t8/g2-hl

gg8xg2
i!}' b7-g7t
Ae5-f4

8 'ltel-e6t?!
A win might be achieved with 8.'tc3
b. gl .

Ac6-d7

1 75

Mastering the Bishop Pair

9 tl'e6-d5
10 '{tdS-aSt?!
Better is to.get +-.

10

11

tl'g7-g3

Sveshnikov - Vera

c&>cS-c7

Sochi 1985

gn-el?

l l .*a7t d8 12.*b8t e7 13.gett


i&'f7 14.*b7 +-.

11
12
13
14
15

White resigned.

c&>hl-gl
c&>gl-fi
4&?fi-e2
tl'aS-a7t

'{tg3xh3t
tl'h3-g3t
tl'g3-h3t
,1d7-c6!
'&>c7-c8

White plans to seize space on the


queenside after the pawn advane
c3 -c4-c5 , having transferred his
bishop to d6 beforehand.

1
2

Ac4-b3
c3-c4

gas-cs
'{tdS-f6

2 ... b6 3.Aa3 ges 4.,lc5 d7 5 . .Q.d6


b6 6.c5 d7 (6...d5 7 ..Q.a4) 7.f3
Ac6 (7 ....Q.g6 8.Aa4 ) 8.f4 ( !::,. f5 )
8 ...Ae4 9.get Ag6 to.*f3 .

3
4

J.cl-a3
gn-el !

gm-dS

White forcefully activates his rook


and offers Black the withdrawal of
his bishop to a less active position.

16

4
5

gel-fi??

An error due to time trouble. It was

necess ary to play 16.d2 *g4t


17. d3 *g3t and draw the game.

16
17
lS
19

c&>e2-el
c&>el-dl
{)f3-el

tl'h3-g2t!
Af4-g3t
tl'g2xfl t
.lg3xel

gal-dl

tl'f6-g6
h7-h6

Exchanging the queens is in White's


favor because he has the advantage
in statics, e.g. 5 ..."(hg3 6.fthxg3 Af5
7 . .Q.e7 ge8 8 . .Q.d6 b6 9.c5 d5
10.ges c3 l t .gde1 b5 12.d5 .

6
7

f2-f3
h2xg3

tl'g6xg3
J.e4-g6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 76

Balashov - Petrosian
USSR 1973

d4-d5!

Opening the game usually favors the


player with two bishops.

e6xd5

8
9

.a.a3-e7

d5xc4

9 . ge8 10.Aa4 "iJ;xe7 l l .gxe7 4Jb6


12.cxd5 4Jxa4 13."iJ;xb7 .
.

10

,a.b3xc4

1 1 .a.e7xd8 + -

Fk8xc4
d7-c5

12

gdl-cl

b7-b5

13

gclxc4

b5xc4

14

gel-e8t

g8-h7

15

,a.d8-a5

.a.g6-bl

16

ges-cs

c5-e6

17

a2-a3

,a.bl-d3

18

.a.as-c3

h6-h5

19

a3-a4

h5-h4

20

g3xh4

e6-f4

21

.1c3-d2

f4-d5

22

a4-a5

Black resigned.

d5-b6?

The centralized knight at d5 which


restricts White's bishops is Black's
main stronghold. With his last move
Black decentralizes the knight, com
mitting a serious error.
Black ought to seek counterplay
with L.gb8. But then 2.a5! (2.gc6 a5
3.Axa5 ga8) 2 . . . gb5 (on 2 . . . gb2
3.g4c2 the exchange of rooks is also
in White's favor) 3.Axd5 ! (3.gc6
Ab4) 3 ..."iJ;xd5 4.Ael /:,. gc6, weak
square a6 White preserves the ad
vantage.

2
3

gc4-c7
gc7xc8

.a.e7-a3
grsxc8

3 ...4Jxc8 4.gc6 +-.

gclxc8t

b6xc8

.a.'f1lt
,
,

,,ft A
v/ /,
- g

m. . . . ,. /,F' T /,
m
,,,,,

Mastering the Bishop Pair

s .lg2-b7 + N o w the difference between the


k nigh ts at d5 and c8 is striking.

S
6
7
8
9
10

a4-a5
.lb7xa6
.la6-b7
a5-a6
.ld2-a5

4) c8-b6
4)b6-d5
.la3-c5
4) dS-c7
g8-t'8

2
3

4)d4-f5
l(elxeS

1 77

,.d6xe5
.le7-t'8

Of course not 3 ...Af6 4.gxest gxes


5.d6 = .

4
S
6

ltfi-el
l(elxeS
.lb3-dl

lte8xe5
c5-c4

Better is 6.Ac2.

The passed p awn with the two


hishops is very dangerous.

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

.lb7-c6
.lc6-a4
e2-e3
gl-fi
.la5-c3
c&'fi-e2
e2-d3

4) c7-b5
4)bS-a7
t'8-e7
e7-d6
4) a7-c6
g7-g6
d6-c7
4) c6-b4t

1 7 b6 18.Axc6 c6 19. .Q,d4 +-.

...

18 d3-c4 + -

g7-g6!

Driving the knight out of its active


position.

Black lost o n time.

Klinger - Anand

4)f5-d4

7. e7t g7 8.xd5 (8.Af3 f6)


8....Q,d6 - + .

Vilnius 1986

7
8
9

lte5-e7
l(e7-b7

.lt'8-g7
g8-t'8

9.ge3 b4, begins to induce weak


nesses on the queenside.

Black enjoys the advantage because

of his two bishops in an open posi


tion. Additional factors which favor

the bishops are the play and as


symetrical pawn structures on both

flanks.

c6-c5

Ag7xd4!

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 78

Transforming the advantage of the


two bishops.

10
11

gas-es

c3xd4
<l/gl-fl

[J

geS-e4- +

12

.ldl-c2

ge4xd4

13

<I/fl-el

gd4-h4

14

h2-h3

d5-d4

15

f2-t3

gh4-h5

16

gb7-a7

b5-b4

17

ga7xa6

d4-d3

lS

.lc2-a4

ghS-eSt

19

<l/el-dl

ges-e2

20

ga6-aSt

<l/f8-g7

White resigned.

Speelman - Seirawan
Saint John 1988

e4-e3?

This mistake hastens defeat. But


Black's position would be hardly
defendable, even after 2... Ah7 3J!g3
calh8 4.e6 gf6 s.gg6! Axg6 6.*h6t
calg8 7.hxg6 xe6 8.5! d4 9.Ac4
dxc3 10.gxf6 *"f6 1 l .Axe6t *xe6
12.*h7t calffi 13.g7t +- (Seirawan).

itd2xe3

tS-f4

gnxr4

.lg6-e4

A desperate attempt to counterat


tack, but White has material ad
vantage as well as the attack.

e5-e6

Opening the game still further. Win


ning with s.gf6 +- was straightfqr
ward.

f4-tS!

White's pieces are aimed at Black's


kingside. White opens files for his
pieces and prevents the blockade
possible after careless l .gxh5? Ah7 /:::,.
f5.

1
2

e6xtS
g4xh5

g7-tS

gf4xtS

grsxtS

ite3-h6

g5.gst

gh3-g3

ggSxg3t

h2xg3

ite7-h7

10
11

ith6-f6

gas-es

.lc3-e5

geS-e7

12
13

itf6-g5t
.le5-d6

c&'g8-f8

Black resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Short

Timman
Reykjavik 1987

1 79

needed to improve the king's posi


tion with 3 ... b6 /::;. <!'b7.

4
5
6

'l'elxh4
4h3-g4
!lbl-el

{)t7-g5
'l'd7-g7

Increasing pressure along the e-file.

b7-b6

The attempt to exploit White's king


position doesn't work: 6... hS 7.5
g h 8 8. gxe6 gxe6 9.gxe6 xe6
10.,1xe6t +-.

'l'h4-h5

Else 7 ... hS.


White has the advantage due to his
pressure on the e6 pawn on the e-file.

7
8

t3-f4

'l'g7-d7
{)g5-e4

9
10
11

!le2xe4!
d4-d5 + 'l'h5-e5

d5xe4
{) c6-d8
!lf6-f5

12

d5xe6!

4cl-f4!

White transfers his dark-squ are


b i s h o p to the i m p o r t a n t h2-b8
diagonal, where it exerts strong pres
sure on the king's position and in
creases control over the eS point.
White threatens gf2-e2, ,1f4-h2,
el -g3, gbl-el.

g7-g5

Trying to complicate the game. Mis


taken is i...gxf4? in view of 2.,1xe6
+ -.

lU2-e2!

!ld8-e8

4f4-h2

g5xh4?!

2 . . gxf4? 3.gxe6 +-.


.

This worsens the pawn structure. He

12.,1xf5? exfS 13.d4 ggs + .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

180

12
13
14
15

'ltd7-d2
grs-ds
'fc8-c7

'f!l'e5xe4
e6-e7t
f4-f5t

Black resigned.

2 ....if5 3.gdel gad8 4. .Q,d5! .lc4


5 . .Q.xc4 gxd2 6.e7 gxb2 7 . .idl !
gc2 8 . .Q,b3 +- (Yusupov) .

3
4

Yusupov - Torre
Leningrad 1987

5
1

d5-d6!

Exploiting the disharmony in Black's


position, White opens the diagonal
fo r his bishop and prevents the
blocking of the d-ft. For example,
after l .Aa2 .ld6 2.gdel f6 Black has
splendid counterplay.

Sorin - Vera
Bayamo 1988

e8xd6

2 .lc4-a2! + Black cannot avoid material loss.

2...gad8?! 3 . .ld5! +-.

Af4xe5!

5 ...*"e5 6.gfel *f5 7 ..ie7t +-.


Black resigned.

c5-c4

f6-h5!

White's queen is a poor blockader,


though it is not easy to prove. Black
accepts pawn weaknesses in his
camp, getting instead the advantage
of the two bishops. His activity in
creases sharply. White faces difficult
tasks: to block the passed b-ft with his
queen and to parry dangerous threats

Mastering the Bishop Pair

along the al -h8 diagonal.

Nikoli

,!e2xh5

181

Sh ort
Belgrade 1987

2 .fa3 xg3 3.hxg3 a6 4:ib l b4


5.,1xa6 Axa6 6.gxa6 bxc3 7.b3 t'c8
-+ (Vera ) .

2
3

g6xh5
4)c3-e2

White sacrifices exchange in the


hope of getting a chance to attack.
After 3.ga3 a6 material loss is inevitable, e.g. 4.t'xd6 t'xd6 5.,1xd6 b4
6.,1xb8 bxa3 -+ ( Vera ) .

3
4
5
6
7

4g3-f4
gnxal
gal-a3
h2-h3

h5-h4
,!g7xal
'ld8-f6
4c8-d7
gb8-a8

White has no compensation for the


lost exchange. The material advantage decides the game in Black's
favor.

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

tl-f3
'lb4xa3
c&>gl-h2
4) d2-fi
e4-e5
'ta3xc5
'tc5-c7
4)fi-d2
4) e2xf4
'tc7-a7
c&>h2-gl
'la7xf7t
4)d2-fi
d5-d6
g2-g4
d6-d7

White resigned.

gasxa3
c&>g8-h7
ge8-g8
gg8-b8
d6xe5
e5xf4
gb8-d8
,!d7-tS
gd8-c8
'tf6-e5
'te5xf4
c&>h7-h8
'l'f4-g5
,!t5xh3
,!h3xh
gc8-d8

,!e3-cl !

The bishop shifts to the strong b2-h8


diagonal, removing the the l ... xt'3t
threat. From b2 the bishop will exert
strong pressure on the center, which
in combination with the pressure
along the d-file ensures White's ad
vantage.

1
2
'lc3xf6
3 ,!cl-b2

4) e5-d7
grsxf6
e6-e5

Forced, the d5 point is getting


weakened.

4)f4-d5

f3-f4

gf6-t7

Striving to open the position to the


bishops' benefit.

e5-e4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

182

Lobron - Ostoji6

.1.g2-h3!

Wiesbaden 1987

Intending 7.Axf5.

6
7

d5-e3

gas-es
geS-fS

7 ... g6 8.g4! +-.

s
9

gdl-d6
gn.d1

a6-c7
c7-eS

Black has mounted intense pressure


on White's queenside, his knight at
c4 is especially active, but his bishops
are dormant. Assessment of the posi
tion depends on whether Black will
be able to activate his bishops.

10 gd6xc6! + The exchange sacrifice is temporary,


but the damage to Black's pawns is
permanent.

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
lS
19
20
21
22
23

.1.h3xf5
.Qf5-e6
.1.b2-e5
gdl-d6
Ae6xt7
gd6xc6
f4xe5
a3-a4
a4-a5
a5-a6
e3-d5
gc6-b6
d5xe3

Black resigned.

b7xc6
eS-f6
gfS.bS
gbs-es
c&>gS-fS
c&>f8xt7
d7xe5
gesxe5
f6-d7
ges-es
ges-as
d7-e5
e4-e3

f6-f5!

Black chooses the positional but


phantom pawn sacrifice. It enables
him to activate both bishops and
eliminate the important e4-pawn.

'g3-el

2.exf5 Ac6! (Making the most of the


rook's unfortunate position, Black
rushes to attack the king) 3.gd3
(3.gf2 4Je3 - + ) 3 ... gg8! - + .

2
3

f5xe4

c3xe4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

h7-h6

Depriving the knight at e4 of the im


p ortant g5 square and restricting
White's pieces.

4
5

c2-c3
e4-d2

17
18

lU3-g3
b3xd2

7."Bx.g7 e4! - + .

7
8
9

10

f4xe5
l!bl-dl

d2-t3

t7-f5 +
e6-e5

Balashov

.1h5xe8
l!dl-dS
t3-d4
l!g3-g6
g2xt3

15
16

l!g6-e6

USSR 1991

'fil'b6-d8
d6xe5
'fi}'d8-e7

.1d7-e8!

l!t'8xe8
e5-e4
f5-f4
f4-t3

15.f5 'tt7! 16.!!gd6 fxg2t 17.'l/xg2

e3 ! - + .

Pigusov

c4xd2

Black breaks the rule that an ex


change of bishops does not favor the
p layer with the pair. But every rule
has its exceptions! After the trade,
White's problem is how difficult it is
to resist the advance of Black's pawns
in the center.

11
12
13
14
15

l!e8xe6
t3-fl

White resigned.

The pawn center, supported by the


black pieces, ensures an enduring
p ositional advantage for Black.

6
7

l!d5-d6
d4xe6

183

e4xt3- +
._e7-r7

White has the positional advantage


due to his two active bishops which
can shoot through the center and the
enemy queenside. Black's knight is
misplaced at d6, so he is unable to
mount pressure with his rooks along
the d-file and attack the weak d3
pawn. Moreover, the knight has no
good protected square to operate
from.

l!bl-cl

1...!!bc8 2.!!c5! b. !!fcl .

l!cl -cs

Affi-gS

Black prevents White from doubling


his rooks on the c-file. He intends to
attack the b4 pawn, but the white
bishop at t'2 will be dominate the cru
cial al -h8 diagonal.

3
4
5

h2-h4
.1f2-d4t
l!c5-d5

.1g5-d2
c&>g7-h6
l!t7-d7

5 ... ,1xb4? 6.!!bl Aa3 7.!b3 +-.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 84

AI ekh in e

Sultanbieft'

-=--=---:-:--=--

Folkestone 1933

Ag2-t3 !

Black's bishop has left the kingside


unprotected; White prepares to sub
ject the lonesome king to attack.

)lb8-d8

6 . . . Axb4 ? 7.g4! fxg4 8.Axg4 gf7


( 8 . . . gdd8 9.Ab6 + -) 9.gb 1 Aa3
rn.gb3 +-.

4d4-b6!

)ld8-e8

4b6-c5

)le8-d8

)lfl-cl !

Transposition into the ending favors


White. Less good is Uhc6 bxc6
2.mc.l Ad7 /::,. geb8, with counterplay
against the b3 pawn.

1
2
3

)lclxc2
)lal-cl

itc6xc2
)le8-c8
b7-b6

White has the positional advantage


because his bishops are more active
than Black's bishop and knight.

4
5
6

b3-b4
tl-t3
)lclxc2

b6xa5
)lc8xc2
t7-f5!

Ingenious, but not good enough.

g3-g4!

f5xg4

10

At3xg4

d6-f5

11

)ld5xd7

1 1 . . . gxd1 12.Af'8t +-.


Black resigned.

b4xa5!

7.fxe4 ftfxe4 8.Aa6 axb4 ;;!;; .

e4-g5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

Ab2-d4!

185

Alekhine - Fine
Kemeri 1937

White's bishops exert strong pres


su re on Black's queenside, where the
a 7 pawn is doomed and Black has no
counterplay.

a7-a6

8
9

h2-h4

4)g5-t7

10

k2-c6

oi)t7-d8

White has the advantage because of


the weakness of the d6 square.

1
2
3
4

d4xc5!
b2-b4
b4-b5
oi) c4-d6t!

At8xc5
Ac5-e7
oi) c6-b8

Black will have difficulties to neutral


ize the pressure of White's pieces on
the dark squares.

11

k6-d6!

White's rook is more active than


Black's, so White avoids exchanging
rooks.

<&>g8-t7

11
12

Ad3xa6

f5-f4

13

Ad4-c3

.fa8-a7

14

Ac3-b4

oi)d8-b7

15

gd6-b6

oi)b7-d8

16

Aa6-d3

.!e6-d7

17

a5-a6

Ad7-c6

18

Ad3-f5

ga7-a8

19

e5-e6t

Bl ack resigned.

4
s Af4xd6
6 Ad6-c7

Ae7xd6
4)ffi-e4

White has the advantage because of


his two bishops in a position with an
open center.

oi)b8-d7

4)f3-d4!

White envisages f'2-f3 and e2-e4 to

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 86

seize space in the center and restrict


Black's bishop.

7
s
9

t2-t3
,lc7-a5

d7-b6
b6-d5
e4-f6

9 . . . d 6 1 0 . e 4 e 3 1 1 . A b 4 e5
12.Axd6 exd4 13.Ad3 ! xg2t 14.'1;>f2
e3 15.AeS (Alekhine).

10
11
12
13
14
15

d4-c2
e2-e4
c&>el-d2 !
c2-e3
a3-a4
.a.n-d3

.lcS-d7
gas-cs
d5-b6
0-0

grs.ds

22 .ld3-f5!
23 c&>d2-c3 ! + 24
a5xb6
25 .lb4xc5!

gcS-dS
b7-b6
a7xb6

White transforms the bishop pair


into a passed pawn.

25
26
27
2S

b5-b6
.lf5-d7!
gal-aSt

b6xc5
eS-d6
gdsxd7

Black resigned.

Alekhine - Euwe
The Netherlands 1938

15

e6-e5?

After this weakening of the d5 and f5


squares, the game is lost for Black.
The only chance lay in 15 ... Ae8 fol
lowed by fd7 if possible. White's
tactics in this case should be: ex
change a pair of bishops, withdraw
the bishop from the a5 square and
push the knight from b6 out to a pas
sive position. (Alekhine).

16
17
lS
19
20
21

gbl-cl
gc1xcS
.la5-b4
a4-a5
e3-d5
e4xd5

,ld7-e6
gdsxcS
f6-eS
b6-d7
.le6xd5
d7-c5

White's pieces are placed far more


actively than Black's. In order to ac
tivate his bishops White has to open
the position.

h5-h6!

Forcing capture with the g7 pawn.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

N ow White's dark-square bishop will

be the master of the e5-h8 diagonal.

g7xh6

i ...gxh6? 2.a4! a7 3.'lb6 +-.

Ag3-e5

!l/g8-g7

B lack will have to pay dearly to get


rid of the pin.

13
14
15
16
17
18

r&>g2-fi
c&>fi-g2
Ae5-g3
At3xd5
l'a3xa4
h2-h4

187

'ltg6-blt
'ltbl-g6t
{)f6xd5
e6xd5
h6-h5

Black resigned.

Verlinsky - Alekhine
Petersburg 1909

a3-a4!

b5xa4

White has ceded the bishop pair to


gain a pawn majority on the kingside.
On the other side, a passed pawn
would enhance the value of Black's
bishop pair, but his doubled pawns
make that possibility more remote.

c3-c4!

Opening the center, White activates


his pieces to the utmost.

4
{)c8-e7
{) e7xd5
c4xd5
5
gh8-c8
6 r&>gl-hl
r&>g7-h7
7 gbl-gl tt
gc8-g8
8 'ltc5-a3 + ggsxgl t
9
e3-e4
10 r&>hlxgl
'ltd7-b5
'ltbSxbl t
11
e4xd5
'ltbl-g6t
12 r&>gl-g2

c5-c4!

Clears away the queenside pawns,


opens diagonals for the bishops, and
establishes a pawn majority after the
recapture of the c4 pawn.

2
3
4
5

b3xc4
c2-c3
{)bl-d2
f2-t3

s
6

a2-a4

Ad7-a4
0-0-0

Aa4-c2

5.0-0 f6 6.g3 Ad6 + .

At8-c5
{)g8-f6

At insignificant material cost, Black


e x e r t s s t r o n g p r e s s u re o n t h e
enemy's position.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

188

12
13

4cl-a3

Better was 7.d4 .1xd4 8.cxd4 gxd4


9.Ab2 + , returning the extra pawn,
but also depriving Black of the ad
vantage of the two bishops and get
ting some chances to draw the game.

4c5-e3!

7
Ostracizing the knight.

d2-fl

4e3-a7

a4-a5

gd8-d3

10

c4-c5

d7xc5!
e2-d4

1 3 .xc2 xe4 t + 1 4 . <&> e l g d l t


15.gxd 1 Af2t 16.<&>fl gxd 1 t -+ .

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

4c2-b3
f2-e2
gd3xc3
4a3-b2 gc3xe3t!- +
e2xe3
c5-e6
gal-a3
e6xd4
e3-f4
4a7-c5
ghl-al
d4-e2t
.!b3-e6t
f4-g4

White resigned.

N ezhmetdinov - Aronin
Saratov 1953

Trying to shut the a7 bishop out of


the game. But with the poor coor
dination of White's pieces this ad
venture has slim chances of success.

10
11

gh8-d8
el-f.2

l t .Ab4 gd 1t 12.gxd1 gxd1t 13.<&>f2


4)d7 14.fg3 gxh l 15.xh l 4)xc5
16.Axc5 Axc5t 17.d4 b6 18.axb6
cxb6 + (Alekhine).

11
12

ffi-d7
fl-e3

Black has carelessly weakened his


king. Can White exploit that?

d3-d4!

c5xd4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

ita6-e2!

White's queen shifts to the kingside


make the most of the weakness of
Black's king.

to

h7-h6

2 . . * e 7 3 . * h 5 dxc3 4.Ae4 cxb2


5.Axg5! +- Axg5 6.7t f8 7.*h8
mate.
.

ite2-hS

gSxf4
gd8-h8
ite7-d7

10 ...AxS 1 1 .eSt e5 12.AxeSt


+-.

11

ges-e2

gh8-h7?

itd7-e7

c3xd4

aS-c4

b2-b3

c4-d6

d4-dS!

.lclxf4
gelxeS

12 ...d6 13.*g4t h8 14.c8t +-.


Black resigned.

4 . . . gh8 5.cxd4 gxh4 6.d5 e5 7.ge4

8
9
10

This mistake hastens Black's defeat.

12

..

h3-h4

t2-f4! + -

The decisive blow. Black cannot


resist the onslaught.

c&>g8-g7

3 .Ag7 4.cxd4 .

1 89

+-.

e6-eS

Black strives to close the position.

.lf4xd6

N ezhmetdinov - Sakharov
USSR 1957

Black's last move is f7-f5. He strives


.to block the position and thus restrict
the white bishops. White's ambition
must be the opening of the game and

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 90

activating his bishops.

e4xd5!

e6xd5

9
10 J,d2-c3

f5xe4

Black can barely defend the d5 pawn.

10

12

Ac3-e5
gcl-c6

ga8-d8
'ltd7-t7

White's pressure increases with the


threat of 13.4)g4 b. 4)g4-h6t + -.

12

c7-e6

Black sacrifices a pawn to complicate


the game.

13

c2-c4!

Opens the position, and attacks


Black's pawn center.

2
3
4
5

d3xc4
c4xd5
dl-e3

b5xc4
e8-f6
c6xd5

The attack produced an isolated d5


pawn which comes under strong
pressure.

5
6
7
8

gn.d1
J,cl-d2
gal-cl

J,g2xe4!

f6-e4
'ltd8-d7
J,e7-c5
J.c5-b6

Advantageous transformation, Black


cannot play 9 ... ftdxe4? in view of
10.Ab4 + -.

e3xd5

e6-d4

Better was 13 ...gxd5 14.gxd5 4)xf4


15.gxf4 'ixd5 16.gd6 'ixa2 ( 16 .. :c5
17.t'g2 gn 18.ge6! t'c8 19.5 'ixe6
20.xe6 grz 21 .b4 ) 17.'lbg4 gf7
18.Axg7! gxg7 19.'lbcBt <l/f7 zo.gd7t
+-. White keeps his advantage, but
he would face more difficult tasks
than in the game.

14
15

gdlxd4
gc6-c7

J,b6xd4
J,d4xe5

15 ... 'lbxd5 16.gxg7t h8 17.gxh7t


7 18.'lbh5t <l/g8 19.'lbg6 mate.

16
17
18

gc7xt7
'lte2xe4
f4xe5

19

h3-h4 + -

grsxn
gn.d7
gd7xd5

The queen together with the passed


pawn (soon to be pawns) quietly ex
ercises her dominion over the rooks.

19

gdS-d7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

'l'e4-c4t
c&>h2-h3
c&>h3-g4
'l'c4-c5t
h4-h5
'l'cS-dS
a2-a4
b2-b4
b4-b5

1 91

c&>g8-t8
gd8-e8
gd7-t7
c&>t8-g8
h7-h6
c&>g8-t8
ge8-e7
ge7-e8

Black resigned.

Muhutdinov
Nezhmetdinov
USSR 1954

Black has the advantage of the two


bishops. Black has seized space on
the queenside and also restricted
White's pieces on the kingside.

1
2

a4-a3 ! +

Black extends the influence of his


strong bishop at e5. The pawn is bait
to get White to open up the game.

b2xa3? !

White will have serious trouble


defending the king. More reliable is
4.b3, keeping the position closed.

4
5
6
7
8
9
10

gdl-d3
4)dS-e3
gd3xa3
ga3-b3
c2-c4
c&>bl-c2

b4xa3
c7-c6
c&>c8-c7
gd8-b8t
4h5-t7
4e5-d4
ge8-d8

How can White find a useful move?

4t7-h5!

4h2xe5

If 2.f3 xf3 ! 3.xf3 Axf3 4.gxf3


( 4.Axd6 Axd l 5.Axc7 1!xd5 ! - + )
4. Axh2 + ; 2.1!c1 c4 3.e3 Ac5 4.
Axe5 fxe5 s.c4 Axt2 6.1!f1 Axgl + .
..

4d6xe5

B lack now h as b i s h o p s a ga in s t
knights. Black's pieces dominate the
center. That, combined with his spa
tial superiority on both flanks, gives
hi m enduring positional pressure.

t2-t3

11
12
13
14

gb3xb8
c&>c2-d3
4) e3-c2
4)gl-e2

gdsxb8
gb8-a8
,4d4-e5
g7-g5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 92

15
16
17
18

a2-a4
c&>d3-e3
c&>e3-tl
c2-e3

lta8-d8t
!.t7xc4
ltd8d2
!.e5-d4!

3 ... 4)d7 4.f5! .

4
S

d4-e3
ltal-dl

ltt8-d8

Zugzwang. White resigned.

N ezhmetdinov - Tai
Moscow 1957

e6-e5?

Black ought to consolidate his posi


tion with 5 ...4)e7 6. '{Wc6; but now his
cente r is too weak and White's
bishops are even more active.
Statically, the position favors Black
because of White's pawn weaknesses
on the queenside. But the dynamic
possibilities-due to the activity and
fine coordination of his pieces-give
White the better chances in the
game. White's pressure along the
dark squares is especially unpleasant
because Black has no dark-square A.

1
2

t3xe5
ifl'dl-d4

d7xe5
t7-ffi

6
7

tl-f4!

e5-c6

ffixeS
Ac8-b7

7 . . . d 4 8 . A c 4 t <il? h 8 9 . '{W g 5 A e 6
10.Axe6 dxc3 1 1 .AdS h6 12.'{We3 .

8
9

e3-g3
gn.a

ltd8-d7

With the idea 10.Axc6 'txc6 1 1.'txe5


'{Wxc5 12.'{We6t +-.

10
3

f4xe5
!.e2-b5

lta8-e8

h2-h3

Stressing Black's helplessness. He


has no useful moves.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

10

Ab7-a8

1 0 ... d4

l l .,'1.c4t <&>h8 12.gdfl 'l!tc8


n.gf7 !!xf7 14.!!xtl ggs 1s.,a.d2 .

11
12
13

Ab5-a4
c&>gl-hl
U'.2-fS

Aa8-b7
.!b7-a8

1 93

The best way to neutralize the ad


vantage of the two bishops in this
case is to exchange dark-square
bishops to get counterplay along the
dark squares.
Therefore l . . .*d6! 2.e4 ,'1.c5 !
3.exd5 exd5 =
.

1
2
3
4
5
6

gdlxcl
c&>gl-g2
b2-b3
gctxc3
ii)'bl-d3

gcsxct
gd8-c8
gc8-c4
gc4-c3
.!b4xc3

After exchange of the rooks it is dif


ficult for Black to prevent the e2-e4
advance, which leads to the activa
tion of White's bishops.

13

e5-e4

13 ... d4 14.,'1.b3t <&>h8 15.gdfl 'ld8


16.gf7 !!xf7 17.!!xf? ggs 18.Ad2 e4
19.,'1.gS 'l!te8 20.gc1 gra 21 .Af6! +-.

14
15
16
17
18
19

'l!tg.1xc7
grsxd5
gd5-d7
,!a4-b3t
.!b3xe6t
!.c3xg7t

6
7

e2-e4!

f4-f5!

ii)'d7-c6
b5-b4

gd7xc7
e4-e3
e3-e2
ge8-e6
c&>g8-f8

Black resigned.

Spassky

Xu Jun
Dubai 1986

Continuing the strategy to open the


diagonals for the bishops.

8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

f5xe6
e4-e5! + At2xd4
'l!td3xd4
'l!td4-c5
Af3-e4
g.1-g4
c&>g2-f3

d5-d4
'l!tc6-d6
'l!td6xe6
!.c3xd4
e7-f5
f5-e7
g7-g6
c&>g8-t7
c&>t7-g7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 94

17
18
19

'l?t3-e3
'{tc5-d6
e5xd6

a3xb4
c3xb4

Gligoric
Baden 1980

7
1!f2-a2
8 .tle3xd4
9 'i!tdl-al
10 1!a2 a7 + -

'i!td6-c6
e5xd4
1!e8-e7
'{tc6-c2t

11
12
13
14
15

'i!tc2xd3
4)d8-c6
'&?b8-b7
4) c6-b8
mate

The pressure along the f-file and the


advantage of the two bishops ensure
White's stable advantage. But Black
has built a reliable defense on the
kingside.

a2-a3 !

White prepares to open the game on


the queenside where Black's king is
situated.

1
2
3

c2-c3
'{thS-dl

b2-b4!

c5xb4
4) e6-d4

6 . 'hb4 7.a2 b;. 'tal +-.

Black resigned.

Spassky

5
6

'&?g7-r7
'i!te6xd6

'&?h2-hl
I!fi-cl
1!a7-a8t
1!a8xh8
Ah3-c8t

Tai - Grigorian
Yerevan 1982

a7-a5
'i!te7-d6
1!f8-e8

a5xb4

Black's minor pieces are significantly


restricted by White's d4 and dS
pawns. Using his superior activity,
White starts an attack against the
king.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

itdl-h5!

.lc8-d7

1 ....fld7?! 2.Ag5 gxe1 t 3.gxel '(itf8


4.Ae7 '(!te8 s.ge3 +-.

.lg2-e4!

g7-g6

2... h6 3.Axh6 gxh6 4.6 with an


attack +-.

ith5-h6

9
10

gal-cl
'fth4-d8!

11

'&'gl-fi !

J.d2-g5!
ith6-h4

itc3-e5
g6x5

1 -0. l l .. . .ld7 12.'(itxa8 f8 13.ge l


AbSt 14.<&>g2 el 15. mate.

Sigurjonsson - Kortchnoi
Wijk aan Zee 1980

Now White mounts intense pressure


along the weakened dark squares.

3
4
5

1 95

itd8-f6
itf6xd4
itd4-g7

5 . . . 'l/g7 6.gad l '(!tb2 7.Ad3 a6


8.gxe8 Axe8 9.,1xa6 gxa6 10.Ah6t
<&>g8 1 1.'(!te7 +-.

J.g5-h6

itg7-h8

1
2
3
4

ite4xe5
'fte5-d5t
c4xd5

ffi-5 ! !
gm-es
'ftd8xd5
ge8-e2 +

Black has more than enough com


pensation for the pawn: a rook on the
seventh rank and the strong passed
d-ft, all supported by his bishops.

J.e4-5 ! !

ith8-c3

7 . . . ,1b5 8.gxe8t Axe8 9.ge l a6


to.'(!te7 Ab5 1 1 .Ad3! +-.

gelxe8t

.ld7xe8

.lb2-cl

s .gfd l ,1d7 6. a4 gc8 7.gacl d3t


8.<&>hl gc2 - + .

d4-d3t

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 96

6
7
s

!f/gl-hl
d2-t3
gn-dI

b7-b5
.Qc8-b7

h2-h3

t:r

wJw m L.J
a
mial :t m_
"' "m :t m_1 m. "0 m

:t
:t m

m
c . 7.
m
.t

" ''%"'
.% /,;;a
ft

"
%,
'"'
'

.
/,
ft "h - t-

}'

"

m /,J *-
3

8
9
10
11

gdlxd3
g2xt3
!f/hl-g2

.Qb7xd5- +
.1d5xt3
ge2-el t
gel-gl t

White resigned. 12.'i?]h3 'i?lfl /::,. ghS


mate.

Seirawan - Beliavsky
Brnssels 1988

...

g5-g4

After opening of the h-file th attack


is irresistible. Not so good is 3 ... h4
4.,1h2 g4 5.4Je5! 4Jxe5 6..Q.xeS g.g8
?.hxg4 .1xg4 8.f3 Ah3 9.gf2 co (M1k
halchishin ).

4
5

h3xg4
t3-e5

h5xg4

5.4Jh2 4Jf6! 6.4Jc5 ,1xc5 7.dxc5 .le4


8.4Jxg4 'M'g5 ::;: .

5
6
7

...
4g3xe5
4e5-g3

d7xe5
t7-ffi
!f/e8-t7

--m
aa
m

....

iw.f
-%
; ww

', . , . , 7,
.
" :t".
l ,,

- m m:tm

g7-g5! !

Black's position i n the center. is very


solid so his flank attack is well
foun d ed. The attack gains force
through the buffeting of White's
bishop and knight at f3 by pawn
thrusts.

.1f4-g3

h7-h5

. - r

..
" /,r?-,a -
"%,
ft t,4

/.r,

gn-eI? !

More stubborn i s 8.f3 gx f3 9.'M'xf3


'M'g8 + .

8
9

gh8-h5- +
...
'ftdl-d2

9.'i?lfl 'M'aS -+.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

9
10

AfS-e4
c&>gl-fi

6
10

.!e4-f3!
Moulton

7
8

Browne

l!dlxcl
.!d3-fi

'l'gSxcl t
Ae7-g5

Including the bishop in the attack.

USA 1991

9
10

4) e5-c4
ti'g.l-h4

11

ti'h4-tl

Ag5-f4
g7-g5

oi)d5:xf4!

With a knight sacrifice B l ack


demolishes the white king's pawn
cover. Black's queen, supported by
two powerfu l bishops, cre ates a
strong attack against the white king.

g.l:xf4
ti'e2-d2

Intending a7-a6.

4
5
6

l!c8-cl !

It is helpful to exchange rooks be


cause the rook at dl plays an impor
tant part in the defense.

White resigned.

2
3

1 97

lklxc8t
ti'd2-tl
ti'tl-g.l

t)'h6:xf4
'l'f4-h4

lfa8xc8
ti'h4-g5t

l l:h6? 'te3t 12.xe3 Axe3 mate.

11
12

oi)b5-a3

.ib7-d5
ti'cl-dl +

White is a piece up, but Black's


pieces are dominant.

13
14
15
16

oi) c4-e5
oi) e5-d3
ti'tl-f6
h2-h4

Centralization

ti'dlxa4
Af4-d6
h7-h6
ti'a4-dl !

Mastering the Bishop Pair

1 98

17

) d3-t2

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

,G.d6-h2t!
glxh2 'iil' d lxfl- +
'iil' fl -e2t
)f2-e4
'iil' e2-h5
) e4-t2
'iil' h5xh4t
) a3-b5
'iil' h4-el
)t2-h3
'iil' e l-hlt
'iil' f6 -t2
f7.f5
h2-g3
f5-f4t
4Jb5-d6
'iil' h l-dlt
g3-g4

e4-e5!

d5-d6!

White resigned.

Henley - Seirawan
Indonesia 1983

5.'lbc5 a6 + and Black has time to


consolidate his position.

4J c7-e6?!

Better was 5 ... Axd6 6.Ag5 ! xg5


7.Axa8 Ae5 s.gd7 .

6
7
8

,lg2xa8
gdl-fl
'tc4-d5

ghSxaS
'tf6-d8
,le5xd6

8 . . . A d 4 9 . A f4 .:lxf4 1 0.gxf4 f5
t l .gxd4! ! cxd4 12.get +-.

b2-b3

,ld6-t8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

10
11

!.cl-b2t
'itd5-b7

<&>g7-g8

More precise is t U :fel ! +-.

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

fal-dl
'itb7-d7
'itd7xe8
.lb2xd4
!!dlxd4
!!d4-d7
!!d7xf7
!!f7-c7
!!fl -dl
!!dl -d8t
!!c7-b7
!!b7-b8
!!d8xf8
<&>hl-g2
!!f8-fl

'itd8-e8
fa8-b8
4:) e6-d4
!!b8xe8
c5xd4
!!e8-e3
!!e3xb3
!.f8-c5
!!b3-c3
a7-a6
!.c5-f8
b4-b3
<&>g8-g7
!!c3-clt
b3-b2

Black resigned.

Adorjan - Hulak
Toluca 1982

Black's kingside is weakened, but


White must act resolutely because
his d6 pawn is doomed.

e4-e5 ! !

4:)g6xe5

1 ...ticxe5 2.tixd4 '{ffxd6 3.tib5 'M'd3


4.tic7 gb8 5.,!.e3 '{ffxdl 6.gfxdl b6
7.h3 b,. f4.

4:)b3-c5

itd8xd6

1 99

Mastering the Bishop Pair

200

6 . . . ,le6 7.gxc5 ! *xc5 8.Ae4 gf7


9.Ah6 +-.
6 . . . gxf6 7.AdSt Ae6 (7 . . . *xd5
8.*e8t 1Jg7 9.Ah6t 1Jxh6 10.gx6t
1Jg5 1 1 .*f8 +-) 8.gxf6 d5 9.Ah6
1Jh8 10.*g5 *d7 t t .gxcs ggs 12.gf8
gxf8 13.Axf8 d3 14.*f6t 1Jg8 15.Ah6
*d4t 16.*t"2 +- (Adorjan).

7
8

.ld2-h6
,lg2-e4

c5-e6
e6-t8

'l'hS-gSt

10

'l'g5-g7t

1
2

b7-b5
c3-dl

2.itl abl b4 3.itla4 Ad7 4.b6 Axb2


5.xa8 Axa1 6.itlb6 AbS - + .

8 ... Ad7 9.Axh7t gxh7 10.*g6t 1Jh8


1 1 . A g 7 t itl x g 7 1 2 . fx g 7 t gxg7
13.d6 +-.

pawn with the activity of his bishops


and his play against the knight at a3,
which will not join the game soon.

4'ig8-h8

Ac8-b7

tl-13

b8-d7

c2-c3

d7-c5

l!al-cl

It is not easy for White to complete


his development, e.g. 5.Ae2 Ag5
6.0-0 gd2! + .

Black resigned.

Morey - Adorjan

New York 1987

.lffi-h4t

Black wants to weaken and then


break down White's pawn center,
further liberating his bishops.

dl-tl

6.g3 Ag5 1.gc2 f5 -+.

6
7

t7-f5!
g2-g3

.lh4-e7

7 . . . Ag5 8.gcz fxe4 9 . fxe4 xe4


10.,lg2 itlxt"2 1 1 .1}xt"2 =
.

8
Black compensates for the missing

b2-b4

8.Ag2 fxe4 9.fxe4 itl a4 + .

Mastering the Bishop Pair

201

13

8
9

b4xc5

f5xe4 ! !

9.fxe4 xe4 10.Ag2 xf2 l l .Axb7


d3t -+.

9
10

a3-c2

e4xt3

1 0.d3 f2t 1 l .xf2 AxcS - + .

10

.le7xc5

The piece sacrifice has activated


Black's pieces significantly.

11

.an-h3

e6-e5

14

c2-e3

lta8-d8

15

c3-c4

,lb7-e4

16

.lh3-f5

,le4xf5

17

e3xf5

b5xc4

18

f5-e7t

g8-t8

19

e7-c6

1:'td8-d5

20

h2-h4

21

c6-b4

ltd5-d6

22

1:'thl-h3

e4-e3

23

ltcl-el

1:'td2-dl

24

b4-c2

t3-f2- +

Black won i n a few moves.

Sokolov, I

1
Cl/elxf2
-n

.lcSxflt
ltd8-d2t

1 3.c&>et ge2t 14.c&>fl eS - + ;


13.c&>e3 ge2t 14.f4 ge4t lS.c&>gS
h6 t 16.c&>hS gc8 - + .

Kortchnoi
Novi Sad 1990

1 l .d4 Aa3 12.gd 1 es 13.c2 Ab2


-+ ;
l l .h4 gac8 12.gh2 Ad6 - + .

11
12
13

e5-e4

d4-d5!

Presenting Black with an unpleasant


dilemma. Black has either to close
the position 1 . ..eS and. sink into
hopeless passivity, or to open the
game, activating White's bishops.

e6xd5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

202

creases.

1!al-dl!

d5-d4

2 . . . dxc4 3.!!d4 'l!tg5 4.'{!txc4t h8


5.'l!txc7 +-.

3
4
5
6
7

1!dlxd4
.lfl-e2
gd4-g4
.le2-dl
0-0

'lith4-h5
9h5-g6
9g6-blt
b8-c6
9bl-f5

10
11
h2-h4
12 9d2-e2
13
t2-f4!
14 .lc2xf5 +
15 'lite2xg4
16 .lb2xg7
1 7 'litg4xd7
1 8 ,lg7-c3t
19
f4-f5
20
f5-f6
21
gn.f4
22
<l/gl-tl
23
h4-h5

c6-e5
d7-d6
f6-f5
e5-g4
1!f8xf5
1!f5-f7
9e8-d7
1!f7xd7
<l/g8-f8
1!a8-e8
Ab7-e4
.le4-g6
<l/f8-f7

Black resigned in view of the varia


tion 23 ... AxhS 24.gg7t e6 25.ge4t
f5 26.gxe8 Axe8 27.gxd7 Axd7
28.f7.

Andersson - Adorjan
Wijk aan Zee 1984

gg4-g3

More logical would be 8.e4 'l!te6 9.f4,


seizing space in the center and
preparing to open the game. Impos
sible is 9 ... 'l!txe4? 10.Ac2 '{!te6 1 1 .'l!th3
g6 1 2 . Axg6 hxg6 1 3 .gxg6t f7
14.6t +-.

8
9 9c3-d2
10 .ldl-c2

9f5-e5
9e5-e8

Note that when the bishops act along


adjacent diagonals their strength in-

0-0 ! !

The other moves give White a clear


advantage 1 . . . exd5 2.Ab5t d 7
(2 ... c6 3.'l!te2t f8 4.Axc6 Axc6
5.0-0 ) 3.'l!te2t '{!te7 4.Axd7t d7
5.e5t .

d5xe6

f7xe6

For his sacrificed pawn Black leads in


development and has two act ive
bishops that bear upon the center.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

b8-c6
c&>g8-h8

203

Browne - Benjamin
USA 1985

0-0

S.dS Aa6! 6.*a4 (6.h4 Axc3t 7.bxc3


as 8.*c2 *d6 9.gh3 gae8 10.gS
g6 1 1.ge3 Ac4! 12.tlt gxn 13.Axtf
gxe3 t 14 . fxe3 *f6 + ) 6 . . . Axc3t
7.bxc3 as 8.0-0-0 Ae2 9.gd2
Axf3 10.gxf3 b S ! 1 1 .*b4 c4 +
(Andersson).

5
6

t3xd4

c6xd4
Af6xd4

White pins his hopes on the attacking


team queen + knight.

Aa6-e2 ! !

1...fS? 2.b3 b3 3.exfS with counter


play.

gdl-d2

2.b3 *a6 3.Afl Axfl 4.gx1 a3 + .

Ae2xg4 +

The transformation of the advantage


is that Black bass exchanged White's
most dangerous piece.

3
4

h3xg4
'{tf4-e3

Ag7-e5
c5-c4

The pawn superiority on the queen


side and his strong dark-square
bishop ensure Black's advantage.

s
6

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Dr aw.

Ae6-d5!
Ad5xb7
Ab7xa8
Aa8-e4
gnxdl
a3-a4
gdlxd8t

Ad4xc3
Ac3xb2
Ab2xal
'ftd8xdl
Aal-f6
gf8.d8

ge1 -cl
gd2-c2

gca.cs

Mastering the Bishop Pair

204

6
7
8
9
10

1lc2xc4
flxe3
1lc4xc5
1!cl-bl

ita4-b3
itb3xe3
.le5xb2
b6xc5

10.gc2 .11, e5 l l .f2 gb8 -+.

10
11
12
13
14
15

1lbl-al
1!alxa7
<&igl-fl
.lg2-fi
.lfi-d3

.lb2xa3
.la3-b2
.lb2-e5
c5-c4
c4-c3
1!e8-b8- +

The passed c-ft, supported by the


rook and the bi s hop , p r o m p tly
decides the game in Black's favor.

16
17
18

1!a7-a2
1!a2xb2
g4-g5

1lb8-b2t
c3xb2

White ran out of time, but his posi


tion is hopeless in any case. 18 ... f6
19.gxf6 fl -+. Black transfers his
king to c3 and then sets up a passed
h-ft. White cannot fight the two
passed pawns simultaneously.

Karpov

Kortchnoi
London 1984

2
2

3
4

1!elxe3
itbl-el !

itb6-c5

White's pieces have perfect coor


dination. They threaten both the
weak f5 pawn and Black's king
(whose weakness becomes apparent
after the exchange of the light
square bishops).

.lg7-d4

4 ....11,xc4 5.bxc4 hc4 6Je8t gxe8


7.he8 'l'g8 8.'l'd7 weak square b7,
f5.

1le3-e2
b3xc4

.lg8xc4

.ld3-c4!

Exchanging light-square bishops to


increase the pressure over light
squares.

d4xe3

2....11,xc4 3.bxc4 gxc4 4.5 .

5
6

'(tel-bl !

Aiming at the weak f5 pawn.

1lt'8-c8

1!c8-g8

6...hc4 7.gest gxes 8.he8t g7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

9.e6t 'it>f6 10.xd4 d4? l l .'lh8t


+-.

7
8

-.el-cl
ct-c2

ng8-c8
.\d4-g7

p r o p e r c o o r d i n a t i o n . W h i te 's
bishops have no outposts. Black ex
ploits these drawbacks adroitly.

8 c4 9.gest gxes 10.c4 +-.


9 --c2-d3

205

ffi-fS!

...

The best way to make use of the


disharmony of white pieces is to open
the center.

With the idea 10.itd7 +-.

9
10 ._d3xf5 + 11
ne2-e7
12 CZ>gl-g2
13
-.rsxg4

14

itc5-d4
._d4xc4
nc8-d8
--c4-b3
nd8-g8

b3-c2

e4xf5

4e3-d2

.rig6-e5

.\t3-e2

f4xg3

.\d2-g5

ite7-f7

nh1-g1

4c8xf5

c2-dl

gg8-e8
e5xf4- +

.rir4-g6t

Black resigned.

Knaak

Vaganian
Sochi l980

The position is blocked, so it is not


for White's bishops to display
much activity. White's pieces lack

easy

.\f5-g4

gglxg3

.ri eSxc4

10

4e2xg4

.ri c4xb2

11

.\g4-e6

itf7-f2

12

dl-t3

ne8-t8

13

.t3 xtl

nmxa

White resigned.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

206

Lerner - Aseev
Lvov 1984

4 Clld l-c2
White has safeguarded his kingside
by advancing his pawns there, leaving
Black's bishop restricted by the
strong pawns at b5 and e4. White
quietly consolidates his position.

4
5
6

Cllc2-b3
b5-b6

e8-c7
a7-a6
c7-b5

f2-f4!

Driving the knight to a passive posi


tion. Less good is l .e4? ! in view of
l...gfc8 = and knight at e5 gets an
excellent post at c4.

e5-g6

l ...eg4 2.'i?lel h3 .

e3-e4

gm-cs

2 ... a6 3.e5! (3.bxa6?! Ac6 oo ) 3 ... d5


4.xd5 exd5 5.bxa6 .

7 Ae2xb5!
Favourable transformation of the ad
vantage of the two bishops.

7
8
9
10
11

ga1xa8
gbt-dl
Acl-e3
g4-g5

a6xb5
gcsxa8
Ad7-c6
g6-f8

g2-g4!

The more natural 3.,B.e3 would have


thrown the advantage away: 3 ... a6
4.bxa6 bxa6 s.gxa6 gxa6 6.Axa6 :!:!a8
7.,B.d3 :!;al t 8.bl Ac6 =
.

f6-e8

3 ... h6 4.,B.e3 a6 5.g5 hxg5 6.fxg5 e8


7.bxa6 .

11

f7-f6

ll ... d7 12.d5! 'i?lf'8 13.b4! +-.

12

g5xf6

g7xf6

Mastering the Bishop Pair

13

-&>b3-b4

14

e4-e5

-&>g8-t7

15

.[) c3xb5

.[)f8.g6

16

.[)b5-a7

Ac6-e4

17

gdl-d7t

-&>t7-g8

18

.[) a7-b5

gas-al

19

.[)b5-d6

lfal-el

lO

Ae3-dl

gel-el

ll

-&>b4-c3

.[)g6-h4

ll

.[) d6xb7

l3

.[)b7-c5

207

ffi.fS

.[)h4-t3

t3-f4

Better was 3.h3! h5 4.f4 .

3
4

Ahl-cl

4.,1d4 ! ? ge4 5.,1d3 !.

Black resigned.

Psakhis - Dvoirys
Kharkov 1985

4
s
6

Afld3
a2-a4

gb8-e8

.[)g6-e7
g7-g6

White has implemented his plan, he


has rather restricted Black, so it is
easy to understand Black's desire to
get some counterplay.

h7-h5?!

This creates weaknesses in Black's


camp, but it gives him some hope of
counterplay.

7
g4xh5
8 Ad3-e2
9 Acl-bl
10
-l>g3-f2

White has some spatial superiority.


He wants to restrict Black's knights
to the utmost, giving them no for
tified support points.

b3-b4!

.[)c5-d7

l ... a4 2.Ad4 weak square a4.


l

-&>f2-g3

Intending h7-h5.

geS-h8

g6xh5
ge8-h8
.[) e7-fSt
ga8-e8

Mastering the Bishop Pair

208

11

gdl-d3?!

White should have exchanged a pair


o f r o o k s to ove r c o m e B l a c k ' s
counterplay. 1 u;e1 Li A f'3 .

11
12

gd3-h3

d7-f8

h5-h4?

12

Missing an excellent opportunity for


salvatio n : 1 2 . . . g6 1 3 .Ac l d4
14.Axh5 g,di5 ! 15.gxhs b3 16.gb l
xcl 17.gh7t ( 17.gxc l ? xf4 -+)
l 7 ...'iftg8 18.gxc7 xf4 with counter
play.

13 .1e2-d3
14
a4-a5
15 .1b2-cl
16 Acl-d2
17
b4xa5
18 gal-bl
19 ,1d3-e2
20 gh3-b3 + -

Weak square b7.

20

27

a5xb6
gb3xb6
gb6-b7
gbl-b3
gb7xb3
gb3-b7
c&?tlxe2

f4-f5!
c&?e2-d3
,1d2-f4
c&?d3-e4
.1f4-h6
c&?e4-f5
gb7-e7
c&?f5-g6

c&?t7-g8
e7xf5
ge8-d8
f5-g7
g7-e8
gd8-c8
e8-c7

Black resigned.

Polugaevsky - Uhlmann
Amsterdam 1980

gh8-h5
f8-g6
ge8-a8
b6xa5?!
g6-e7
ga8-a7
gb5-h8
b7-b6

20 ... gbs 21 .AhSt 'iftg7 22.Ac3 +-.

21
22
23
24
25
26

28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

c7xb6
h4-h3
ga7-a3
ga3xb3
f5-d4
d4xe2
gh8-e8

Black's position is solid though


cramped. White has more space
which he aims to consolidate, choos
ing his moment to open the position,
when his bishop pair will exploit the
newly-weakened pawns.

a4-a5!

Seizing space and preventing the

Mastering the Bishop Pair

pawn advance a6-a5.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

JU4-d2
g2-g3
c&>gl-g2
tl-f4
c3-dl
c&>g2-t3

h7-h5
ffi-e8
Ag7-d4
e8-g7
g7-G
G-h6

209

21
22
23

h3xg4
h4xg6
g6-h4

Gxg4
c&>ffi-g7
c&>g7-f8

24
25
26
27
28

Ac2-ffi
Affi-c8
h4-G
Ael-d2
Gxd4

d7-ffi
t7-d8
ffi-h5
Aal-d4

White has consolidated his position


on the kingside and now threatens
8.g4.

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

4c2-d3
dl-e3
e3-c2
c&>t3-e3
c2-el
c&>e3-t3
el-g2

t7-G
c&>e7-d8
c&>d8-e7
4d4-b2
d7-ffi
Ab2-d4t
.4.d4-b2

Black has no counterplay, so White


need not hurry.

14
15
16
17
18
19

g2-h4
c&>t3 -e3
4d3-c2
c&>e3-e2
4d2-el

Black resigned.

ffi-d7
c&>e7-ffi
h6-t7
4b2-al
Aal-b2
Ab2-al

Uhlmann - Gligori6
Hastings 1970-71

This position is similar to that in the


Po l u g a evs ky - U h l m a n n g a m e ,
Amsterdam 1980.

20

g3-g4! + -

Demolishing Black's defensive bas


tions.

20

h5xg4

a4-a5!

White fixes the queenside, 6. to at


tack it later on. Next is to seize space
on the kingside and then start induc
ing weaknesses in the enemy's camp.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

21 0

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

4f4-d2
Cflgl-fi
b2-b3
4dl-c2
c3-e2
f2-f3
Cflfi-f2
e2-c3
Cflf2-e2
f3-f4
4c2-d3

ffi-e8
h7-h5
4g7-d4
e8-g7
g7-e8
4d4-b2
e8-g7
4b2-ffi
4ffi-d4t
t7-fS
g7-e8
4d4xc3

Black exchanges his bishop for the


knight in hope to build a fortress and
draw the game.

13
14
15
16

17

4d2xc3
4c3-el
Cfle2-e3
4d3-c2

e8-ffi
Cfle7-t7
Cl/t7-e7
Cfle7-t7

b3-b4!

It is difficult to break Black's defense


on the kingside, so White acts to
divert his forces to the other wing.

17
18
19

4elxb4
Cfle3-d4

c5xb4
d7-c5
ffi-d7

Black has fortified the cS square, but


at a cost.

20

4c2-dl !

Cflt7-e7

21

g2-g4!

White opens the second front.

21
22
23

h3xg4
Cfld4-e3

h5xg4
Cfle7-ffi
b7-b6

23 ...cflf7 24.gxfS gxf5 25.AhSt cfle7


26.,1g6 'it>f6 27.Ah7 ,ie4 28.Aa3 +-.

24

g4xfS

25

4b4xcS!

g6xfS

As so often happens, the bishop is


able to exchange itself for a knight at
a crucial moment. .

25

d7xc5

25 ...ftbxcS 26.Aa4 ,ib8 27.cflf'3 cflg6


28.cflg3 cflh5 29.Ae8t cflh6 30.cflh4
+-.

26
27
28
29

a5xb6
4dl-c2
Cfle3-d2!
4c2xfS

a6-a5
Cflffi-e7
c&>e7-d8
c5-a4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37

b6-b7
.a.rs-cs
f4-fS
d2-c2
c2-b3
b3-a4
fS-ffi
Cl/a4xa5

211

d8-c7
a4-c5
c5-e4t
Cl/c7-b8
e4-d2t
d2xc4
c4-e5

Black resigned.

Boleslavsky

Bal en do
Minsk 1971

4
5
6
7
8

geJ.bJ
gb3xb5
Af4-g5
h2-h4
gg2-gl

b6-b5
gh3xf3
gd8-g8
ga.aJ

With the idea 9.gel .

AclxfS! !

8
9
10

gb5-b6
gb6xa6

11
12
13
14
15
16

ggl-fi
gnxr4t
.lg5-e7
d2-c3
Ae7xd6
c3-b3

fS-f4
gaJ.a6
Ac8xa6

g6xfS

White's position is better because:


The unlucky position of the black
king makes it a target;
B i s h o p s o f o p p o s i te c o l o u r
strengthen the attack;
Weakness of the d6 pawn ties
down the rook at d8.

gb3-e3

With the idea 3.gge2.

2
3

b7-b6
a5xb6

3.gge2 gd7 4.ges Aa6.

a7xb6

Black resigned.

gg8-b8
-g8
gb8-b4
gb4-bl
gbl-clt

Mastering the Bishop Pair

212

Uhlmann

Andersson
Skopje 1972

6
Black's knights are placed passively.
White, exploiting this fact, starts
playing on the queenside.

1
2

b3-b4!
c3-a4

c5xb4
g8-ffi

c4-c5!

ffi-d7

6 . . . .lxd5 7.c6! xb6 8.cxb7 .ld7


9.,1a4 +-.

7
c5-c6!
8
b6-b7!
9 4c2-a4 + 1 0 4a4xe8
n
Ab4xd6

b7xc6
c6xd5
d7-b8
4&>f8xe8

Black resigned.

Gulko - Vasiukov
Moscow 1983

a4-b6!

3.Axb4 .ld7.

4e7-d8?!

Black ought to struggle for the cS


point: 3 ... b3 ! 4.,1xb3 e4 5.,1b4 cs
6.c8! .

4
5

4d2xb4
a5xb6

4d8xb6
4&>g7-f8

5 . d7 6.,1a4 ef6 7.,1xd6 xb6


..

8.,1b3 .

The center is open, so White's


bishops are superior to Black's
k n i g h t s , w h i c h lack p r o te c t e d
squares. Black also has difficulties
defending his a7 pawn.

lfal-dl!

The exchange o f a pair o f rooks min


i m i z e s B l a c k 's c h a n c e s to g e t
counterplay.

Mastering the Bishop Pair

gd7xdl

2 gnxdl

.ri c7-b5

J.g2-fl

a7-a6

gdl-d5

ge8-b8

gl-g2

.ri e4-f6

gd5-dl

.rif6-e4

gdl-d5

.ri e4-f6

gd5-c5

.rif6-e4

gcS-c4

15

213

c4-c5!

15.gxa6? gc8 16.ga7 .ie5

15
16
17
18
19
20
21

gc6-c8t
c5-c6 + Aa5xb6
g2-t3
t3-e4
e4-d5

=.

gb8-b5
g8-h7
.rid7-b6
gb5xb6
a6-a5
a5-a4

Black resigned.

Ljubojevic - Smyslov
London 1984

gb8-e8

9 . . .ibd6? 1 0.gb4! gxb4 l l .Axb4


.ib5 12.c;>f.3 .flf6 13.Ac4 +-. Black
has to avoid an exchange of rooks.
.

10

Afl-d3

.ri e4-f6

11

gc4-c5

geS-b8

12

Ad3-c4

.rib5-a3

13

gc5-c6

.ri a3xc4

14

b3xc4

Transformation of the advantage.


Now the passed c-ft is unstoppable.

14
1 4 . . . gas

.rif6-d7

1 5.gc7 c;>f8 16.c;>f3 c;>e8


17.e3 .

The center is open, so the two


bishops and the better pawn struc
ture ensure White's advantage.

gl-fl

White is preparing to centralize his


king.

At8-g7

Mastering the Bishop Pair

214

gal-el

gesxelt

;nxel

;>g8-t8

"1el-e2

"1t8-e7

1le2-d3

.lg7- d4

f2-f4

6.3 ! ?.

h7-h5

17

b5-b6!

d6-b7

B l ack res i g n e d . 1 8 . ,1xb7 xb7


19.bxa7 'l;xa7 20.c4 Ae3 21 .'l;bS
Af'2 22.Ab6t 'l;b7 23.AxcS +-.

Gelfand - Seirawan
Ti/burg 1990

a2-a4!

Preparing 8.,1c7 or 8.b4. Bad is


7.,1c7?! bS 8.,1b8 c3 = .

7
8

"1e7-d7
b3-b4

Using the unstable position of the


black bishop, White achieves pawn
superiority on the queenside .

.ld4-f2

b4-b5

10

.la5-c3

.lf2-g3

11

.lc3xffi

.lg3xf4

12

.1ffi-c3

g6-g5

13

.lc3-el

'1ld7-c7

14

,1el-a5t

"1c7-b8

15

.1a5-d8

g5-g4

16

h3xg4

h5xg4

t7-ffi

There is material equality, but Black


has to play carefully to avoid worsening his position .

g6-g5 ! !

l . ..,1g3 ? 2.'l;g2 Axh4 3.,1e5 /j,


Ab8;
1 ...f6? ! 2.,1e4 f7 3.h5 gxh5 4.gxh5
.

h4xg5

Mastering the Bishop Pair

g7-g6! =

Now the bishop at f3, being restricted


by his own and enemy pawns, can
play no active part in the game. With
the blockade pawn sacrifice Black
has built an impregnable fortress.

3
4

c&'hl-g2
At3-e2

c&'g8-f8
c&'f8-e7

c&'g2-t3

e8-c7

215

e3-e4!

White restricts the bishop at g7 and


prevents advance e5-e4.

3
4
5
6

b2-b3
0-0

e4xf5

Ac8-e6
<lld 8-e8
gh8-f8
g6xf5

6... {)xf5 7.e4 d6 8.2c3 .

Nogueiras - Browne
Linares 1993
Z"""il

-
....
..
;
&

w. . . . . . . v.
. ......

J.
.....

tl-f4!

e5-e4

Blocking the position favors the


player without the bishop pair. The
passive bishop at e6 is a constant
headache for Black.

Ag2xc6t!

b7xc6

itdlxd8t

c&'e8xd8

Black's pawns are weak, a static


weakness, and his pair of bishops
have little scope.

s
9
10
11
12
13
14

gn-d1
Acl-e3
h2-h3
c&'gl-tl
e2-d4
c3-a4
d4-e2

a7-a6
h6-g8
h7-h5
Ae6-d7
Ag7-f8
h5-h4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

21 6

15

gdl-gl

g8-f6

28
29
30
31
32
33

Cfel-e2
Cfe2xe3
c5xe6
eS-d3
e3-d4
d4-c3

h5xf4t
f4-e6
Cfe7xe6
gbl-h3t
gb3-h4t

Black resigned.

Ljubojevic - Karpov
Amsterdam 1988

16

Ae3-c5!

Removing the dark-square bishops


allows White's knights to gain a
foothold on the dark squares.

16

gf7.h7

16....lg7 17.gxh4 .

17
18
19

Ac5xf8
a4-c5
gal-dl

e8xf8
Ad7-c8
f8-e7

c4-e3 ! !

This striking move forces a favorable


ending.

1
2

,1g2xc6

Ad5xb3
h7-h6

2...gcs 3 ..lb5 h6 4.ga3 .lc2 5.e4 .

gal-a3

The bishop is trapped and must give


itself up for a knight.

3
4 ga3xb3

20
21
22

g.lxh4!
e2-d4
d4xc6

e7-f7
gh7xh4
gb4xh3

22 ... gxf4t 23.<i\>e2 gb4 24.eSt <i\>e8


25.gg6 <i\>e7 26.gg7t <i\>e8 27.c6 +-.

23
24

25

26
27

c6-e5t
ggl-g7
gg7-g8t
gdl-d8
f2-el

f7-e8
f6-h5
e8-e7
e4-e3t
gb3-hl t

h6xg5

The bishop pair is strong in this posi


tion with the center open, the knight
at d7 is vulnerable, so White has the
advantage.

4
5
6

gl-g2
Ac6-b5

7 ... e4 8.d4 +-.

7
8

h2-h3
..lb2-c3

,1g7-f8
ge8-e6
g8-g7
Af8-e7

Defending the b4 pawn frees the

Mastering the Bishop Pair

rook for action on the a-file.

8
9
10

gb3-a3
ga3-a8

Ae7-d6
Ad6-b8
ge6-e7

will be even.

1
2
3
4
5

c4-c5!
e4-d6t
c5xd6
gn-elt
'ldl-d4

21 7

b6-d5
Ae7xd6
'ltc7xd6
Clie8-f8
h7-h5

With the pawn sacrifice, White has


deprived his opponent of the chance
to castle. As a result, the cooperation
of Black's pieces is destroyed for a
long time; the rook at h8 will not be
able to join the game soon. Black
pins his hopes of defense on the
centralized knight at d5.

11

Ac3-d2!

Intending 4")g4.

11
12
13
14
15

d3-d4 +
gas-c8
Ad2-c3
Ab5-c6

e5-e4
Ab8-c7
d7-f8
f8-h7

a2-a4!

Establishing control over the a3-f8


diagonal with the bishop and prepar
ing the b3-b4-b5 advance, which will
weaken the knight at d5.

6
7

Ab2-a3

Clif8-g8
iil'd6-d8

7 . . .'d7 8.ge7 tlc8 9.Axd5 Axd5


10.gael +-.

Black's pieces are bound hand and


foot.

15
16

b4-b5

h7-f8

With the idea Ab4 Black resigned.

Vogt - Bagirov
Riga 1981

Aa3-c5!

b7-b6?!

Better was 8 ... a6. After Black's move


the push b3-b4-b5 gains in strength.

9
10
11
12

If Black gets to castle, the position

Ac5-a3
l!al-dl
b3-b4
'ld4-d3

Intending b5; 12.bS?! c5.

12

l!a8-c8
gc8-c7
'ld8-c8
d5-f4

Mastering the Bishop Pair

218

Player I ndex
1 99, 200, 202
Adorjan
1 32
Akopian, Gaguik
Alekhine
1 63, 1 84, 1 85, 1 86, 1 87
1 20 , 1 77
Anand

Andersson

1 49, 202, 2 1 2

Arakhamia
Aronin
Arulaid

38
40 , 1 88

Aseev
Averbakh
Azmaiparashvili
Bagirov
Balashov

14

4t3-e4

h5-h4

1 4 . . . eS 1 5 ."M-d8t Ae8 16.f4 f7


17.Ag6 +-.

15
16

4a3-cl
4e4-f5

c6-c5
itc8-b7

Balendo
Bannik
Baranov
Bareev
Barlov
Bel iavsky
Benjamin
Bilek
Blackburne
Boleslavsky
Bondarevsky
Botvinnik
B ronstein
Browne
Byrne, R

17 S.cl -f4! + -

lk7-c6

18

'(td6-d3

c5-c4

19

itd3-e4

4&>g8-h7

20

gdl-d7

ghs-es

21

gd7xb7

ge8xe4

22

,1f5xe4

Black resigned.

gc6-e6

Campora
Caro
Cebalo
Chandler
Chelushkina
Chigorin
Citron
Denker
Donaldson, E
Dorfman
Dvoirys
Eingorn
Eliskases
Engl isch
Epishin
Euwe
Evans

61
206
9, 1 1 5
51
21 7
96, 1 76, 1 83
21 1
1 7, 1 57
36
41
62
1 96
1 50, 203
37, 49
2 1 , 79
4, 42, 47, 1 23, 1 25,
1 26, 1 27, 1 3 1 , 1 32, 2 1 1
1 1 8, 1 23
2 1 , 45, 87, 1 07, 1 42,

1 59, 1 61 , 1 68, 1 70 , 1 73
52
1 97, 203, 2 1 5
1 00
1 38
1 08
1 58
95
38
58, 1 1 6
1 68
19
32
1 47
207
11
1 31
90
1 5, 28
1 86
1 64

Mastering the Bishop Pair


Evseev

1 33

Fal k
Filip
Fine
Flohr
Florian
Fridstein
Furman

1 16
69, 1 1 8
1 85
1 6, 1 7, 24, 80 , 1 02 , 1 07, 1 33
101
33
39, 1 53, 1 57, 1 59

Gavrikov
Gelfand
Geller
Georgiev, Kir.
G heor iu
Gl igori
Golombek
G randa
G rigorian
Groszpeter
Gulko
Gurevich, M
G u rgenidze
Gusev

53
97, 2 1 4
18

30
101
86, 1 05, 1 94, 209
117
98
89, 1 94
34
21 2
27
1 41
25, 1 44

Henley
Hertneck
Hjartarson
Hort
Horvath, T
H u bner
H ulak

1 98
1 45
1 37
1 58
1 47
30, 1 45, 1 7 1
1 99

Illescas
llyin-Zhenevsky

81
1 52

l n kiov
lvanchuk
lvkov

1 48
1 56

Janowski
Karpov
Kasparian
Kasparov
Katetov
Kavalek
Ke res
Khal ifman
Kharitonov
Khasin
Khenkin
Kliavins
Klinger
Knaak

27

1 08
7, 44, 55, 59, 93, 1 1 3,
1 20, 1 29, 204, 2 1 6
87
47, 55, 86, 1 37, 1 48, 1 74
10
7, 42
65, 1 00, 1 63
1 54
97
1 30, 1 53
15
50
1 77
205

21 9

29
Kochiev
36
Konstantinopolsky
26
Kopylov
Kortchnoi 59, 75, 78, 96, 1 95, 20 1 , 204
1 0, 1 0 1
Kotov
73
Kovacs
13
Kramnik
11
Krasenkow
70
Krogius
64, 1 4 1
Kupreichik

Larsen
Lasker
Leko
Lerner
Levenfish
Li Zunian
Ljubojevii
Lobron
Lputian
Magomedov
Mariotti
Marovii
Martinovic
M ichel
Miles
Moulton
Muhutdinov
M u resan
M u rey

72, 95
58, 79
81
206
1 09
92
1 74, 2 1 3, 2 1 6
1 82
41
28
39
1 49
1 35
1 12
75, 92, 94, 98
1 97
1 91
20
200

1 67
Naumkin
Nezhmetd inov 1 66, 1 88, 1 89, 1 9 1 , 1 92
1 65
Nikolaevsky
1 81
Nikolii
1 09
N imzowitsch
215
Nogueiras
77
Noskov

Olafsson, F
Opocensky
Ostojil
Parma
Petrosian
Pigusov
Plaskett
Pol ugaevsky
Popovii
. Portisch
Psakhis
Ragozin

101
24
23, 1 82
71
52, 1 1 6, 1 36, 1 61 , 1 76
62, 1 83
1 45
25, 37, 42, 44, 1 3 1 ,
1 34, 1 56, 208
1 38
94, 1 04, 1 22, 1 60
1 69, 207
50, 77, 1 52

Mastering the Bishop Pair

220
Razuvaev

1 50

Tseshkovsky

Reicher

1 25

U hl mann

Reshevsky

43, 1 1 9
111

Richter
Roman ishin
Romanovsky
Rubi nstein
Rukavina
Sakharov
Savereide
Sax
Scherbakov
Schwarz
Seirawan

54
40, 84
5
72
84, 1 89
20
1 40
4
21
78, 1 78, 1 96, 1 98, 2 1 4

S habalov
Shereshevsky
Short

88
1 06
1 79, 1 8 1

Sigurjonsson
Simagin

63, 1 95

25, 33, 80 , 84, 1 36, 1 43, 1 44

Sloka
Smorodsky

1 65
84
9, 1 9, 2 1 , 43, 45, 49, 68,

S myslov
69, 82, 1 04, 1 05, 1 1 9, 1 24, 1 64, 2 1 3

Sokolov, A
Sokolov, I

57
20 1

Sokolsky

6 1 , 66
1 00

Sn
Sosonko

93
1 71 , 1 93, 1 94

Spassky
Speelman
Stein

1 78
9, 44, 63, 64, 65, 66, 70, 7 1 ,

1 1 5, 1 1 6, 1 1 8, 1 22 , 1 29, 1 30 , 1 3 1

Steiner, H
Steinitz
S uba

90
32, 34, 82
23, 60, 1 1 8

Suetin
Sultanbieff
Sveshnikov
Szabo

1 84
1 75
1 27, 1 66

Szilagyi

1 70

Szily

25

Taimanov
Tai

1 6, 1 1 7

47, 60 , 1 1 3

42, 88, 1 24, 1 26, 1 73, 1 92, 1 94

Tarrasch
Tartakower
Timman
Timoshchenko
Torre
Tseitl i n

5, 1 1 1
1 12
47, 1 35, 1 60, 1 79
75 , 1 54
1 80
73

Ulibin
U nzicker
Utasi
Vaganian
Vaitonis
Van der Wiel
Vasiukov
Veltmander
Vera
Verlinsky
Vogt
Wade

54, 75 , 89
1 42, 208, 209, 2 1 2
13
1 45
1 40
205
18
1 34
29, 2 1 2
1 02
1 75 , 1 00
1 87
21 7
68

Xu Jun

1 93

Yanovsky
Yudasin

1 67
51

Yuferov
Yusupov
Zagoriansky

Zaitsev, I
Zilberstein

1 06
53, 57, 1 80
44, 1 43
26
1 69

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The Bishop Pair


A bishop is worth three pawns, the same as a knight. But what about two bishops
versus bishop and knight or versus two knights? The whole is greater than the sum
of the parts. Frequently the bishop pair is an advantage, sometimes decisive.
Discover and master the secrets of the bishop pair, and how to combat it.

The Authors
International Master Jaroslav Srokovsky (born 1 96 1 ) has a rating of 2450.
Grandmaster Ekaterina Borulia has a FIDE rating of 2362.
Expert Wit Braslawski (born 1 964) is the head of Intelivest Co. Ltd and the
author of Chess Academy software. www.chessacademy.de

I SBN 1 -8 794 79-78-8