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BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY

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HOLLIS DANN MUSIC COURSE

MANUAL FOR TEACHERS


MUSICAL DICTATION

STUDY

OP TONE AND

RHYTHM

BOOK ONE
HOLLIS DANN,

Mus. D.

DIRECTOR OF MUSIC, STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA


FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF MUSIC, CORNELL UNIVERSITY

i/7^2AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY


NEW

YORK.

CINCINNATI

CHICAGO

Copyright, 1912

BY

HOLLIS DANN
Entered at Stationers' Hall, London
Musical Dictation

Manual

for Teachers,

E-P

Book One

PREFACE
This Manual
for

is

use in public schools, the course

work

individual

The seven

work

years* course

equally useful for class

is

is

entirely practical

for

The

if

is

only one feature of the

activity prescribed in the following pages will give the

The

is

helpless in the

attempt

aural recognition of the scale tones combined in simple

phrases, together with the development of the sense of rhythm,

precede

all

may

properly qualified to begin the

pupil a " tonal vocabulary " without which he


to read.

al-

normal and high school

Special classes in normal, high or private schools

complete the course in one year

or

instrumental music.

planned especially for the grades,

In the grades, tone and rhythm

in music.

subject.

is

of the private teacher of vocal or

though the work


classes.

While primarily intended

for the use of teachers.

attempts to read the tone language.

chiefly the recognition of symbols.

must

Primary reading

is

These symbols, whether they be

those of music or of the mother tongue, represent a part of the vocab-

ulary which the reader already has and can use orally.
to teach a child to read music before

expression, is

The attempt

he can recognize the simplest

on a par with the attempt

oral

to read English before he can

think or speak the language.

As soon

as the pupil gains a reasonable facility in oral expression

through rote singing, he has a basis for the acquirement

working knowledge
It is vitally

of tone

of a definite

and rhythm.

important that the rote singing

shall also establish the

habit of using the light, flutelike head tone which

is

at once the

charm

PREFACE
and the safeguard

of children's singing.

cation in teaching singing to children

is

The most important

qualifi-

the ability to get and maintain

this musical tone quality.

series of

Music Writing Books to be used by the

pupil,

accompany

the Manual, beginning with the third year.

Part I of the Manual contains the material for the


Part II contains the material for the fourth,

fifth,

first

three grades.

sixth

and seventh

grades.

Hollis
Cornell University,
Ithaca.

New

York, February

i,

ipu

Dann

MUSICAL DICTATION
INTRODUCTION
The study

of tone

cludes ear training

and rhythm,

and eye

both tonal and rhythmic,


dictation.

is

also called musical dictation, in-

The

training.

subject matter of music,

learned most readily and effectively through

Therefore, this subject

is

of first importance.

Language study properly begins with

oral

Children

expression.

gain wonderful facility in oral expression of the mother tongue solely

by

imitation.

With favorable opportunity, a

child of six years has

learned to use the speaking voice freely and easily and possesses a large

vocabulary which he employs with intelligent discrimination.

Because of the mastery of oral expression, gained entirely by imitation, children learn to

read in a marvelously short time, often reading

several books during the first school year.

reading

is

to learn to recognize the

The problem

in

primary

symbols representing words already

known.

large majority of the children

of age,

imitative oral training

means

first step,

is

of

little, if

music

is

at

all.

learned through the ear,

vitally essential in the study of music.

therefore,

is

to acquire facility in oral expression

by

of rote singing.

Through the singing


i.

enter school at five or six years

have used the tone language very

Inasmuch as the subject matter

The

who

The use

of rote songs, the pupil learns:

of the singing voice, selecting

from the unnumbered,

varying tones used in speech, a certain few definite and sustained tones

known

as the scale.

INTRODUCTION
2.

The

exclusive use of these sustained tones

combined with varying

meters and rhythms, forming melodies.


3.

The

application of words to the melodies.

4.

The

practical use of this

oral expression of

new

material in songs, resulting in free

words and music.

All these things are possible through the singing of songs


tion, just as it is entirely practical

and not unusual

by

imita-

for a child of six

years to learn to speak the mother tongue, or a foreign language, correctly,

even fluently, with no training aside from that which

from constantly imitating those who speak the language

With

children in the

first

grade, not less than two

is

received

correctly.

months should be

devoted entirely to rote singing and to the elimination of monotones.

The Latin
scale songs

syllables should

and

be introduced as an additional stanza

to

carefully taught to each pupil.

Supplementing

this

purely imitative training, the preparation for

music reading involves the gaining

of

a definite conception of the

scale tones, enabling the learner to think in the tone language.

here that the work in dictation begins.

It is

FIRST YEAR NOVEMBER


The

Manual

pitch of the exercises in this

is

adapted to classes

of

Every teacher should be provided with

children in the primary grades.

a chromatic pitch pipe which should be used whenever an exercise or

song

is to

be sung.

The compass and

pitch of the material through-

out this Manual have been very carefully considered.

The teacher
pitch too high,

or supervisor
is

who

considers the compass too wide or the

urged to give the matter careful study and investiga-

tion before lowering the pitch.

pitch of the material

is

With young pupils the compass and

one of the most important factors in maintain-

ing acceptable tone quality.

Intolerable tonal conditions are sure to

where children are allowed to sing constantly with the lower

prevail

Irreparable injury

voice.

is

inflicted

upon

children's voices in

systems of schools, by supervisors and teachers


tivate the pernicious

who

many

ignorantly cul-

and almost incurable tone quality so common

in

any good teacher

of

the public schools.

Yet

it is

reading

who

entirely possible
is

and practicable

for

not tone deaf, to learn to teach singing successfully and

to preserve the naturally beautiful quality of children's voices.

Since

the methods of training adult voices are not applicable to children's


voices, the ordinary vocal teacher

is

not a safe guide in this matter.

Only the successful and expert teacher

of children is qualified to train

teachers in this, the most important and most difficult side of public
school music teaching.

Teachers are urged to

make

every effort to learn

how

preserve the beautiful, flutelike tone peculiar to children.


3

to acquire

The

and

approxi-

MUSICAL DICTATION

mate compass during the

first

year, should be

sharp, fifth line of the treble clef ttra

not sing the higher tones, she should learn to do

can learn to produce a

light,

thin tone in

should never use any other quality

when

flat, first line, to

If

the teacher can-

from

so.

Every contralto

the upper register, and

singing for children.

For

normal and high school classes which include basses and tenors and
voices that are changing

and unsettled, a lower pitch

will

be found

and the keys should be changed accordingly.

preferable,

Constant care should be exercised to secure a proper position of the

body and an

easy, natural

and

flexible use of the

lower jaw, tongue and

lips.

The

been introduced as an additional stanza of a scale song.

scale has

When

the class can sing the scale easily and rapidly, the following

exercises should be thoroughly learned.

much

the same

manner

as a rote song

is

They should be presented in


taught.
The mastery of these

scale exercises will result in the automatic

The importance

The

of this step

can hardly be overestimated.

sequential character of the exercises will soon be evident to the

singers,

who

will

quickly learn to complete the series without assistance.

The tempo, while moderate


until the exercises
series

use of the syllable names.

at

first,

should be gradually quickened

can be sung rapidly and

freely.

Eventually the

should be sung by the pupils individually.

Scale Studies

Do

sees
=&
L^
t?4

*-*-

&:

^m
SH3^E

FIRST YEAR

"fa

DECEMBER
Oral Dictation
Providing the preceding work has been properly done, the class

will

readily recognize groups of tones sung to a neutral syllable or played

upon the piano.

Each group should be sung as one phrase,

in a

moderately rapid

tempo, always with light head tones.

Every teacher, whether soprano or

contralto, tenor or bass, should

acquire an easy and free use of the upper tones

when

singing for chil-

dren, always avoiding loud, harsh, or strident tones.


infinitely

more

than precept in

effective

this

matter.

Example

No

is

class of

children will produce beautiful tones while under the influence of bad

tone production on the part of the teacher.

This

is

Hence

equally true of the speaking voice.

it is

important

that the teacher should cultivate a mellow, musical, pleasant speaking


voice, avoiding the shrill, high-pitched, rasping voice so often heard
in the school

room.

The

quality of the speaking voice vitally affects

the singing voice, and vice versa.

The teacher should not


Oral tonal dictation

is

sing with the class.

conducted in the following manner:

After sounding the key tone, the teacher sings a group of tones to
neutral syllable, thus:

$EEEE^EE5EE^EEZZEEe=EEE$
Loo

The

loo

loo

loo

loo

class responds with the syllables:


6

loo

loo

DECEMBER

-o

tm

s?-

s:

Z2L

ii
//

or

do

Individual recitation should be a regular feature of the daily


in dictation, just as

it is

work

in the reading class.

Individual recognition of the material given below will enable the


class:
i.

To

discriminate between an ascending and a descending group

of scale tones.
2.

To

recognize do re do and do

ti

Each pupil should master these two

The

may

be taken

do.

points.

This

is

very important.

in the order here given.

Later,

they should be given without reference to this order, the more

difficult

exercises

first

ones daily.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


x

Do
-&-

-^

.<zt.

22:

-2.

-&-

:A

jCZ*

-&-

22~

-&-

.&

-<S>-

<2.

~ey

10

11
jZ.

Jg

12

SZI

-<S

^
EZ

13

s:

221

,14
s^

^-

Z><7

-22.

<Sh

S>

MUSICAL DICTATION

15 -Do
--

17

16

^>

_2.
isz:

18

zsz:

19
r^>
^~
*

rz>

Jf

\>l/

K-l

20

.04
->ru~^
f^W
VMJ

c?

C?

*j

ST

,^
-rS"

-s-

Z><7

Vtfy

/T

22

21
^

^ ^
'

ti

'

&*

ngg
^p""^

<^--^>

<g -<s-

-^ -^ "<S>^?<^
<S>

<--,i

24

jK-Sft-^
/T\
yvty

f*

g^>

S7

^5

<s>

h^~
i
i

E3

>

=>

<=

s
II
II

JANUARY
Meter and Rhythm
Through the singing

of songs, the class has

familiar with different kinds of


It is

now time

become unconsciously

measure and with simple rhythms.

to learn to recognize

two and three part measure.

Experienced teachers have found that some physical manifestation


of the beat

is

essential

if

movement be

that the

the best results are to be obtained.

To

uniform.

hand on the

It

is

best

secure uniformity, each pupil

desk, with the third, fourth

and

places

the right

fingers

curved under as for penmanship, indicating the beat by an easy,

vertical

movement

of the index finger, the

pressure of the finger upon the desk.

if

will

be saved and progress

the teacher makes sure that each pupil marks the meter

correctly,

and that daily practice

formed.

The proper

of a

Pupils should not be allowed

Time

beat with the entire hand or arm.

accelerated

end of the finger touching

Accented beats are indicated by a greater

the desk at each beat.

to

fifth

is

idea of accent

motor rather than

of a

given until the habit of beating


is

one of impulse rather than force;

hammer.

Beating and counting by twos and threes,


ing the meter.

While the

is

class is

is

one

way

to begin

mark-

marking the tempo, the teacher sings

a few measures of a simple melody, and the pupils try to discover the
meter.

The accent should be

The

rather strongly marked.

class

may

beat while singing a stanza of a rote song, trying, meanwhile, to discover the meter.

Oral Tonal Dictation


The teacher
by

sings the exercise with loo or coo

singing with the syllables.

The words

"

and the

Up

or

class responds

down? " printed

MUSICAL DICTATION

10

remind the teacher to ask

over the exercises, are to

Many

children are unable at

this question.

first

to discriminate between ascending

by the

teacher, directs the pupil to repeat

and descending groups.


" again " spoken

The word
the exercise.

This

sented by the

first

is

way

the simplest

and

of singing the interval repre-

Hence, by singing

last tones.

of tones twice, the singing of larger intervals

is

all

such groups

begun.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


Up, or down?
Again

Up, or down?
1

Do

3
~

_2.

-<&-

How many
s>

g?

tones?

*Z>

Z2I

f^>~

W5

\\^t
V \)

1^=*-

ry

z?

?^}

& c

/T\.

<&

7*>

rj -> E3

/T\

22"

/T\

io

O
LA
JT

V hJ

.^

.^

"g7

-r?^-. -&-

-S?-

11

/TV

s>

-.

cLi*

f(

^z>

^r
~s
-

<Sp

ru

tz*>

/rs

^^

"?-

2^

&>

C^

13

12
/TV

-<s>

I*
15

4%
F^

14
~^7-<s>-

16

IS2:

is:

is:

17
gy

122=^:

18

tt=EZS

g^>" -<^-

22:
.s?_

-&rr-*Z3r.

-G>

19
Z2I

i^zzs^>-

ie:

is:

sz

22:
-<s>

is:

-<s>-

22:

JANUARY

II

Slowly

21 Do

Do

?<>

rf#=

*z^2:

-^~

-<S'

22

1<

JZ21

:^z:

122:
is^:

23
_p

?y

24
^_

-^

gg

(^^

25

22:

s^:

3ZEZ

26

SZ

&

-g?

I2I
"g^~

-s-

231

T5L

251

28 Slowly

P^

>

r^

-2L

^>-

-3-

1SZZ.

^ ^=^s?

-s>-

is?:

-<&-

s?

s?

s?

s>

~g-

FEBRUARY
Music Reading

To

place a melody before a pupil and expect

before he has a clear notion of the scale tones,

him
is

no

to sing
less

it

at sight

unreasonable

than to expect him to read a sentence in the mother tongue without

The aim

knowing the words employed.

of the preceding steps

been to gain a definite knowledge of the scale tones.

now begin.
The vital matter in elementary reading is

Eye

training

has

may

the power to get the thought

from the representation.

The reader must

actually hear the tones

silent singing before

he

is

and sense the rhythm by

permitted to sing aloud.

Individual recita-

tion is quite as essential to success in learning to read


in learning to read

music as

it is

any other language.

Sight singing under the direction of a skillful teacher,

is

quite as

educative, quite as beneficial from the standpoint of mental discipline,


as

is

any other subject

in the

mands mathematical accuracy

primary curriculum.
of

Sight singing de-

thought and instantaneous trans-

formation of thought into oral expression.

The reading

at sight of words

and music demands the simultaneous

interpretation of two languages.

It

is

obviously wise, with young

children at least, to confine the sight reading to one language at a time


until

power

is

gained to get the thought from both representations

simultaneously.

That words are necessary


fallacious

theory.

in order to sustain interest in music,

is

Real and lasting interest in music can best be


12

FEBRUARY

13

aroused and sustained by gaining the power to think tone and sense

rhythm and meter.

to " get the thought " in a

The power

phrase from the representation and to give

with the ability to write what

The

and enthusiasm.

teacher

who cannot

or does not interest pupils

most important

Music with words

is

Words

particular.

any mysterious power

are not music, neither have they

is

oral expression, together

heard, are sources of genuine interest

is

in these vital elements, fails in a

reading of music.

it

musical

to assist in the

not always inspired;

neither

music without words necessarily dry or uninteresting.


Teachers

who attempt

to teach beginners to read the

together, only develop " guessers "

words too soon, the pupil


tones, for

thinking,

same

it is

is

the syllable

and "

two languages

By

followers. "

introducing

deprived of the opportunity to think the

name

that assists the beginner in his tone

and the beginner cannot think words and

syllables

at

the

time.

Written Tonal Dictation


The teacher should be provided with a good
acters

No

staff liner.

All char-

and symbols should be named by the teacher as she draws them.

further drill

upon symbols

is

necessary or desirable.

After the staff and clef have been drawn, the teacher sings the major
scale

from

descending, using a neutral syllable.

singing the syllable names.

The teacher

The

class responds,

places the notes

upon the

blackboard, then sings the scale while pointing to the notes.


j2"
-<S

<S>

23"

fa

mi

re

2-j
;

Do

The

class

ti

la

sol

do

then sings as the teacher points.

After drawing the staff and clef again, the teacher sounds
line)
loo.

(fifth

on the pitch pipe, and sings the scale descending, to the syllable

The

class responds, singing the syllables.

As the

flat is

placed on

MUSICAL DICTATION

!4

the third

the teacher says, " This

line,

the third line of the

do

staff,

is

on the

is

when

flat;

fifth line.

the

The

flat is

scale

on

now

is

written this way:"

>=^zz=^

7-3

-<S?

Z?0

/#

//

-<s>-

~ZZL

mi

fa

sol

-21

do

re

Again the teacher sings and points to the notes, and again the

In the same manner, other groups of tones

sings as the teacher points.

are sung

and written,
g

Do

The

for

example:

^_^-

-&-

la

do

ti

next step

is

ti

to

class

Do

have the pupil

S?

?zr

ti

la

sol

_^=Z^
la

do

ti

The teacher draws the

write.

and places the do thus:

staff

The teacher

sings do

do and asks, "

ti

Who

will write? "

Each

pupil

should learn to write the simple scale groups which he recognizes

and

The

sings.

notes should be

and the chalk held nearly

flat

agreeable, squeaking noise so

No key

made

quickly with a free

arm motion,

against the board, thus avoiding the dis-

common

with blackboard writing.

should be used exclusively.

Various keys should be em-

ployed, the teacher always placing the do.

Material for Written Tonal Dictation

The

teacher sings with the syllable

names and then

the syllable

Do

l
rJ2:

$-

-> ^
<S<

the pupil responds, singing

writes the exercise on the blackboard.

2
r->

loo,

-&

-&>

E2-_=^ZZ22=^:

-^

^-

~Sr

FEBRUARY
6

-&T--

*5>


r->

<S>- ~22L

-fi>-

-<s>-

*E5~-

15

7
g?

-fi?.

ZZ

(^

**2
<s>-

<*zt

-fi>-

1S2I

-fi>-

1221

-fi?-

<^1
-fi>-

12

11

iP

1
W

-fi?-

10

Do

22~

22:

32:

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


The teacher

sings

The

with a neutral syllable.

pupil responds,

singing the syllable names.

\^

Do
-fi>>-

r?~

s? fi>

fir

C*

-fir

fi>-

2
lr

f b

5?

fiv

T\"

'

-<S?

/r\

?v

KJ

CJ

&>

--^-,

_JS_ <^

^^

j-D

cs

6
32:

-?--?

>*

fi?-

8
221

9 __.

~* s>
sz

-fi?

-fir-

g^"
-fi>-

3?:

10

__-

sz-^===^

j^fir-^-^^

'

32:

22:

^i=^=fi^

-^

^ &^&^

jqr

MUSICAL DICTA TION

i6

12

'^

g,

<g-=sg

22Z

g^L

-<&

ps

14

13

-^sr

*"^
<?=?-

-g

16

15

gg gg

(^

f^,

,^

g^j-

2521

18

17

^~

ZJ

=-:

s?~

ISZ^22I
<S)_22_ (S

ggc-'gg

p
,

-<S>

tg

'

rj

<S>

gy-

221
<S>-

19

Me20

-<S>-

cj

rj

zj

g^

g^>

gzi

-p-<S>-

3g

22:

=E?E^E=E1E^ ^use^jsl

gsisrea

^zz^ j

MARCH
Written Metric Dictation
The teacher should remember:
i.

That the rhythmic sense

is

quite as essential as tone perception

in music reading.
2.

That many pupils are

just as deficient in the ability to appreciate

meter and rhythm as the monotones are in the power to match tones.
3.

That regular and systematic practice

necessary to awaken and

is

develop the sense of rhythm.

The uncertainty with which


commonly
ness

the problems of meter and

are

presented, naturally and inevitably results in a like indefinite-

and weakness on the part

The

of the pupil.

expression,

the time that bothers me," reveals the usual condition


of music.

rhythm

Since the problems of meter and

is

a teacher

is

readers

rhythm are few and comis"

entirely unnecessary

who

presents this side of

paratively simple, this unfortunate condition

and disappears wherever there

among

"It

the subject clearly and definitely.

The rhythmic
the music class.

sense

is

be developed in various ways outside of

Marching, dancing, and various games are quite as

awakening a

effective as singing in
It

may

assumed that the

class has

and three part measure, and


This oral training
of

is

feeling for

now

rhythm.

had daily practice

in beating

two

in recognizing the

meter of simple songs.

to be supplemented

by the representation

meter and rhythm.

The

following phrases are to be placed

bars or meter signature.


17

upon the blackboard without

MUSICAL DICTATION

18

Before singing the phrase, the teacher asks the class to try and find
the kind of measure as they beat;

measure

is

that

is,

to discover whether

" in twos " or " in threes " and which tones are strong.

then sings the melody to the syllable

loo,

and the

class

the

She

responds,

singing the syllable names.

pupil volunteers to indicate the accented beat with a dash, thus:


HS'-

-<S>-

-G2-

The bars

-<S>-

are then placed, including the double bar at the end; also

the upper figure (2) in the meter signature.


It is a trite rule of teaching that the pupil should not

The habitual breaking

he can readily discover for himself.


rule

is

be told what
of this

poor teaching, destructive alike to interest and attention.

this written dictation, for example, the skillful teacher will

lead

In
the

pupil to discover several things, besides the kind of measure, viz.


1.

The

place

2.

The

significance .and use of the double bar.

3.

The meaning

When

and use

of the bar.

of the

upper figure in the measure signature.


is

complete, some one will volunteer to sing,

sing,

always after opportunity has been given

the representation

or the whole class

may

to " get the thought "

by

silent singing.

Material for Written Metric Dictation


Note.

It will

be observed that

this

written metric dictation

in-

cludes oral tonal dictation, the pupil recognizing and singing the tones

before he represents the accent and meter.

Do

JtS 1ST

2.

o
I5I

.^az

-e- -vzz:-

tr

$m

Z2=P
fc=:

MARCH

*9

Do

-&&-

25:

-g

<s>

-<&

<s

-^

4=

ijf..

-<6^

he

-<S2-

EBaEEE

^=22Z

<s>-

c*-

f-

-<r=*-

^=t=t
g^

hS-

L6-

fe

25^^Zp

if- ^ r:

:s?:

3Lffte

-<s-g -s?:
,

^ Q

g*L

9
'git

^f

41
2

ts~

i^EE^

1-

-*-&
-?=*

2f=f:

P^

5>-

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


Heretofore the

first

of each

group of tones has been

By

d<?.

listening

to the group as a whole, the pupil will learn to recognize the first tone

when

it is

other than do.

The

class should

sound do before the teacher

sings.

Mi

Sol

Sol
<&-

6-1

gy
-TTZT.

~3Z?1

*zr

T2T

-<5>-\

12_

b Mi

jSol
:t?_^_
-JZ21

J
si

-&

gy

22:

221

SZL

~S>-

^
-<&-

122:

-<s>

-<&-

.<^r

10

A?/
'SZL

-G

-<s>-

"

S?'

-@

S>-

g?

C?"

-^-

MUSICAL DICTATION-

2b

13

12

Do

-&*

321

Sol
-&-

rszrzzs:

s>-

~ZZ-

ZCZ

22.

16

17
:z^

ft

La

-&

&

15

\*Do

18

^s

is:

ss:

-<s>-

-<&-

-g?"

J//

r*

ft

><&

rzzz.

.
32:

19

Mi

8^

:*ft^

-p

_22_

20

32:

-g^-

>-

-<s>-

32:

-<s>-

cv,/

oft it
Vftji "

32:

tf
"
irh
Xs\)

%J

&

c?

C**
^

2S?

Material for Written Tonal Dictation

The

teacher should draw the

the note representing do.

should

be

staff,

place the

After the writing

sung, the pupil

first

clef,

key signature, and

completed, the groups

is

having opportunity

" get

to

the

thought " before he sings aloud.


32:

32:

2Z

32"

-s>

^-

-&-

-&-

"&=&=*&.

ii
w

32:

.g,

g^

6
-<&-

-^7'

32:

-s-

32:

i&-

32:

32:

*^=

-i&-

32iz:

32:

MARCH

2r

11

10

gg

ft


g?

g?-

-<&-

-<&-

"-2Z:

-<s>

&J

<&-

-^

13

12
-*=>

cj

^I4W4 ^

'&

:?:

-?-

-s>-

15

14
-s>

*-

s:

-s

-S-

^>

l-s>

-(S
-s>-

122:

16

s>-

-g^

^ _^^

<S>-

APRIL
Oral Tonal Dictation
The

teacher should sing with a neutral syllable and the pupil respond,

singing the syllable names.

on as practiced
1

Individual recitation should be

carried

in the reading class.

Do

isa:

-<^^>'121

9
'Z2

-<^-

<r?-

"?zr

~:c2i

m=

&

-s>

-21

12

ii

10
cj

szzz

zz2i

*3
u

-<s*-

sz:

-<S>-

<^~

22:

iss:

-2_

sz

:z^:

-^

i2s:z_~
d>-

14 J//

.&/

jZZ.

-21

'121

-O-

16

15

l=

-<S>-

f2-

1ZS.

-2~.

-21

xJ

"C?"

-^>?z?-

-<&-

-&?-

yjDo
TSl

<S>

JP-3

:EZ

18

-^- T

1^=22:
=r

221

-<s>-

122:

-<5-

20

19

-?-

5=

!*:

_^_s.^_^.

^2:
22

1221

SE^B

APRIL

Oral Metric Dictation


(

Combined with Oral Tonal Dictation )

The phrases should be sung by

the teacher to a neutral syllable and

The

with a strong accent, the pupils listening and beating.

marking the tempo, respond by singing with the

still

pupils

syllables

and

Individual and class recitation should be

trying to discern the meter.


alternately employed.

Do

eS

&d=t

-c2-

7Z)r

t=

^-

-<S>

-<S>

^-=fe

Zfc

te==t

-<z*d- -&-

^2Z

rJ

*=>

zs:

1"

^2

r-

hz=i
SI
-<s>-

-2-

-<s-

^z^:

r-LrrgllZ

-2-

-<5-

-(^2-

<S-

z>_

SB
9

-s>-

-2 ^-

^-^

O- cs:
-

-&>-

=i

^2-

-2

*S

zg=>-^-

21

P^S

-<c?-

-<s-

4^-^-<

Z22ZI

t7

Material for Written Tonal Dictation

To be

written on the blackboard

and sung the

by the pupil

tones.

\E>o

1221

22=1=22

3
-o- 221

-O

-<S>-

21

Z2Z

~^

7^>
ISC -O-

-<s>-

ZZ

after he has recognized

-C3-

Mi
-^

cz>-

'izr

o B

MUSICAL DICTATION

24

Do
-^

t&-

->-

&

^~ ^~

? .SW
^?-

-<^

-<S

10

11

Aft
L/

1
(v\
vm;

'

-<s-

S2I

'

j-n

faiK*

XE3

1
1

^D

2^

CJ

-^-

MAY
Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The

teacher sings to the syllable

The

loo.

pupils respond, singing

the syllable names.

Do

^2

4
r? _ ISj

^Z=gCT_Z2Z=-^

^2=11-22

^ ^

<g_

iP

22

sr

-<S>-

*4
,

<#

-s>

-<s>-

sz

22:

22:

p^y

^ g?y

-<-

-<s>-

-<s-

22:

-<s-

22:

22:

22:

gg gg

sr

17

Rtf:
18

eS>-

15

16

gl

-<S-

-<S

<s>-

^
sz:

<

13

<^-

-<s

22:

221

12
-<s?-

22.

10
-<&

-<-

11

22:

-<s>-

<s>-

-<s>

9 Sol

a a

_.

22=l:Z22

IZZ22"

-<S-

22:

--

<*3"

22:

1=22

22:

22

19

z>*
22:
-<ap

2s

a a
-<s>

<s>-

gS ~

2.

22:

g>

20
Quickly
HiEZZS:

til

22: 1-

-;-=> s>-

-^-

22:

-^g^
*5

221

22:

MUSICAL DICTATION

26

Material for Written Tonal Dictation

To be

and sung the


1

by the pupil

written on the blackboard

32

22:

<s>

<&I

&-

-*

221

11
r

V7V
to*

-^EME^

^
is:

rtt-

-<s>-

jey

-<s>-<s>-

7 .&/
-<&-

"g^
-<s>-

9
1221 -g>

-e>-

g? &

H
{2:

/*3

e^

'C

-<S<-

ZZ

-<S-

-<S>-

22 <g

13
~sr

<r^>

<TLJ

-( n^fi

-<s>-

10

12

32:

<s> -

22:

-<s>-

a
-<S>-

-^_
-<s^-

5
-& I2Z

he has recognized

tones.

Do

fr

after

'

-<S>-

<s

-<S>-

Oral Metric Dictation


The

teacher should sing the following songs with a marked, swinging

rhythm, taking care

The

to avoid indicating the accent.

beat and listen carefully, trying to discern the meter.

month, each of the excerpts, and other familiar songs

in

class will

During the

two and three

part measure, should be employed in this way.

AMERICA

t
My

country,

HOW CAN

'tis

of thee, Sweet land of

lib

er

ty,

Of thee

sing.

m^
How

F=F

LEAVE THEE

Vt

SEE

-*-

can

leave thee

How

can

from thee part

Thou

on

ly

MAY

27

F^

*-

ray heart,

hast

Sis

be

ter,

ly

bound

to thine,

No

oth-er

hast

this

soul

mine

of

*=rf

Nl

V
So close -

Thou

lieve.

'fr

can

I love, Save

a-

thee

lone.

STAR-SPANGLED BANNER
3,

*a=c^

czfizfe

=^

:4=*

Oh

a
m

can you

say,

proud

we

ly

hailed

YANKEE DOODLE

2.

#^

r d-b

Good-

ma

in t*

in',

:>

<*

went down

saw

cop

And there we saw

the

Yan

*+
Mind

*
C
^

lit -

tie cart,

Doo

*'

J
mu

die,

sic

keep

it

and

the step,

gleam

last

ing

i*

It

long

with

Cap

as

log

'n

of

>-n

'

1
'

as

has-ty pud

load for

fa-ther's cat

-din',
-

tie.

^^

up,

Yan

fd

,^J

And

*^ "1
IS
P*
s

*
*
f
* J
^_l

3=F

kee

the

gun Large

L*

men and boys, As thick

to

it

(^

^
b^
^-~
LL

Hi
^

>:

per

so

camp,

What

light,

1* #
* tv

t?

to

+
^

They tied

ly

=*

twi-light's

-pie;

-W-

there

rir

Father and

And

the

at

-Jte*!*--*
#==^* ~
-e
1.

by the dawn's ear

see

=t
:s2i

with

kee Doo

*
the girls

die

dan -dy,

p -f
be

han

dy.

MUSICAL DICTATION

28

DIXIE

^^

=11

wish

was

ob

de land

in

for -got- ten, Look a

not

way,

cot

^m

a -way,

look

am

Old times dar

ton,

* SEE

-.+

ds

Dix-ie

look a -way,

land.

JOHN BROWN HAD A LITTLE INDIAN


n#

J
*

Brown

John

fc?

lit

i*
[j

lit

In

tie

dian,

John

Brown

ise:

John Brown had

dian,

-i*

^
In

tie

C
P

had

$=&

=
had

'

fl

tf

IE

=T

ft

XVihr*}i^
(n^

lit

-tie

In

dian,

rfj^^^=a^
One

lit

tie

In

dian

One
Ten

boy.

lit -

tie,

two

lit

tie,

lit -

tie,

nine

lit

tie,

fe

.-

%
three
eight

lit
lit

tie

In

tie

^
In

U
six
five

lit

lit

dians,
dians,

Four
Seven

=fc

lit

lit

tie,

five

tie,

six

lit

tie,

lit

tie,

tie

In

dians,

tie

In

dians,

Seven
Four

lit
lit

tie,

eight

tie,

three

lit

tie,

lit

tie,

sE

&

nine

lit

tie

In

dians,

two

lit

tie

In

dians,

Ten
One

fc-

lit

tie

In

dian

boys.

lit

tie

In

dian

boy.

11

7082

JUNE
Oral Tonal Dictation
The

pupil sings, using the syllable names, after recognizing the tones

sung by the teacher to a neutral


1~SL

1231

221

EffilJ?"

syllable.

-&>~

221

?-

b=

ffl.

22:

-&-

-^

-ffl.

-*z?i

-&

-&-

JZ21

3
:zb

ZZ

tS-

_
.za:

22:

-<s-

"
zz

<s

i^r

is?:

be

3=221

-s>

-tS'-

7
b

_^

sz

-^

<^>-

Effie

g^

"g^>

^;~

-^-

<rs

:zb

zi

=fez:b--5:

zza:

s?-

-*s

22

fe= ^2_5__2

=.
-<S

11

iPs
~b

10

g^

<g

r*
c?

<^<S'

_<^5

-49

<s>

<s-

^=,

& <s-

-<^

/TN

<S?_

-S

^
<s>~

13

sr

22:

<S

14

it

izz

22:

<&-

12

-<S

22:

22:
29

-^-

(S-

MUSICAL DICTATION

3o

15

Z^^ZIZ _^2.

1321

-r^=2-

7^

P =t

^21

ts

s>-

16

^SB
zf2 &-

H2L

-&-

&

-s-

-<s>-

j=\
^=kz
-<&

:z?~

-&-

Written Tonal Dictation


The

teacher should draw the

staff,

place the

clef,

key signature, and

After the pupils have completed the writing,

the note representing do.

the groups should be sung, the pupil

having opportunity to " get

first

the thought " before he sings aloud.

zz>

1221 -&>-

<=

h^
V
rtfv

-<s>

v-y

C*d

\sLr

_u

s^

<s

g?

'

,s-

ii
*

IS!

_2.

<^

<s>

zzs?

22:

6
2

-&- y

^
^2l

10

<o>

<&

z=?

-<s>-

-s-

22:

-<s-

11

sfc
-<5-

-<s>-

22:

-fi?-

12

-<^-

3E <&

13
-<s-

122:

-s^

g?:^2i

14

15

2Z

-&-

1^

16

^szsz:

22=^^

125:
<^:

:2Z

22:

~s?~~

S2I

II

SECOND YEAR
INTRODUCTION
The

teacher should not forget that this tone and

only one side of the work in primary music.


of songs

the training in music

one-sided and mechanical.

is

is

The development which

comes from the singing

is

rhythm study

vitally important.

Without

this,

Only through the

proper singing of suitable songs will a love and appreciation of the beautiful in

music be awakened and cultivated.

that the rhythmic and tonal sense

is

It is also

lightful in

deteriorate.

first

production be acquired

year in school, and that the head" tone which

children's singing, shall be preserved

To

of song

quickened and developed.

It is all-important that correct habits of tone

during the

by means

so de-

is

and not allowed

attain this vitally important result, the teacher

maintain the same standard in

all

the singing.

The tone

to

must

quality

should be just as good for the singing of the dictation and sight reading

The teacher must have the

material as for the rote songs.


discriminate between good

and bad tone production, and the

eliminate bad tonal conditions.

Any

successful teacher

tone deaf, has the capacity to learn to do


training under

That before maturity,

like,

head voice, common to

That the

but

singing to children should know,

i.

2.

this,

it

who

skill
is

to

not

requires special

an expert, and cannot be gained from reading only.

who teach
moment forget:
All

ability to

and never

for

one

children should sing with the light, fluteall

normal children.

thick, heavy, lower voice should be used sparingly or

be avoided altogether.
31

MUSICAL DICTATION

32

3.

That music teaching

throaty, unmusical

than good and


4.

That

it is

is

in the public schools

and unpleasant tone

is

where a harsh,

tolerated, does

strident,

more harm

a positive menace to the voices of children.

who attempts

the solemn duty of every teacher

singing to children, to prepare herself to give safe

and

to teach

intelligent in-

struction.
5.

That

in the

matter of tone production, example

precept, and, therefore, the quality of tone used


in the singing class

and throughout the day,

producing good or bad


6.

That owing

is

is

stronger than

by the

teacher, both

an important factor

in

results.

to its technical character, vocal music in the schools

requires skillful supervision, without which

make any attempt

to teach the subject.

it is

extremely unwise to

SEPTEMBER
The

following material in oral

nature of a review, and

is

and written tonal

dictation

is

in the

intended to overcome the inertia resulting

from the long vacation.

The

teacher sings with the syllable

ing the Latin syllables.

the syllable names.

The

loo.

pupil responds, sing-

(Never allow the pupil to answer by speaking

It is the tone, not the

name, that

is

most im-

portant.)

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


l
-s>-

-^>-

22==

5
r-=sT

2&Zr-& Q- -s> |-<s>-

-&-

~Z2L

1221
^

<S-

IZ2:

8
zfc

-<S>-

1221 -<S>

-O122:

10

9
22"

-<s>-

-<s-

122:

<s-

11

c?

-a>-

122:

g>

g?

12

^ |-g>
13
zfc

122:

p.^zzzs:

ZZ

g> g^

jS?:

14
<-s>

15

i-s>

-^

1221

s?-

-s>

fip-

16
1221

221
-fia?-

3E

-<s-

-^
33

221

--

zz:

-<s>-

-?

MUSICAL DICTATION

34

18
SSL

22

^
rNVb

'

221

2S

<s>-

2Z

23
c^>

~~7

19

22ZZIZS2I

-^ <S C2^7C^-

rD

rZi
^_

rZ'

r^

<^>

' 1?

-s>- -Gh-

-<s-

24

-cr -P

dk^-fr

<s^ s><s>

r2

-^-J

<>
^

1521

<S>

2.

<s>

*&-

28

-^

The

--

Z2I

27

&

26
22

25

rD

<s-

22.

22:

more intimate knowledge

<S-

221

-*-

of the scale should

now be

acquired.

pupil should gain the power to sing the scale, or any part of the

scale,

with a frequent change in the pitch of

do.

In giving Series A, on the following page, the teacher sounds do (E


fourth space), and directs the pupils to sing do
the last tone.

sing do

syllable
ti

While the

la

ti

la sol fa,

and

While they sustain the fa, she directs them to

tone do and to sing do re mi fa

The

ti

flat,

to hold
call

the

sol.

now changed to do (E flat) and the class directed to


The last tone should be the same pitch as the first.
do.
is

class holds the last tone, the teacher

test tfe-pitcfr;

(The representation

is

for the teacher only.)

sounds

flat

again to

SEPTEMBER

35

A:

Series
Teacher.

" Sing do,

ti,

la, sol,

Sing, do,

fa.

-<^>-

&2

221 -O-

Sing

sol.

They

ti,

la,

ti,

do."

f9\

J2$-/7N

-<^-

22:

22

TT U CJ ?2L

BE

Pupils must be led to think the scale from the


sing.

do,

Call this tone Do.

Call this tone Do.

blJZr

mi, fa,

re,

new

22;

-<s>-

pitch before they

soon realize that the solution depends entirely on the

will

from the new starting place, and that the most

power to think the

scale

important point

the relation of the tones to each other.

is

In the same manner as above, the teacher will direct and the class
will

sing as follows:

B:

Series

(By direction as

do

in Series A.)

la

sol

22=TO

do

do

-rzr

/7\

e?-

22:

&>

fa

do

do

sol

ON

g?

~rZ>

*3r

~<^&T^&

(By

Series C:

*-*--

/7\

i -?z??z?- -&>-

direction, as in Series

mi

sol

-&&- 221

'izrimi

and

22:

~rz>-

la

7^

la
f7S

Series

(By

mi

te

J 2:

-p

22:

direction, as in Series A,

2211

22:

sol

B and

221

C.)

do

sol

1^221 22:

22!

CJ _I2:

mi

Ir

II

B.)

/7\

-j^-h^r-^^i

22

fczzzsz

s?

22:

^_22-zzi{pi2

3E

22:

22:

MUSICAL DICTATION

36

and

This,
orally

first,

all

other problems in ear training, should be presented

This oral work should be followed by

as before directed.

singing from the representation, the teacher directing with a pointer,

using the scale written on the chart or blackboard with the different
signatures; thus:

JZ2.

gy

gr

v=&

~2L

221

~?2L

-<s>-

-z?-

&*

ry- -&-

-gr

,&-

'^P'

32!

iz?~

ISZI

9i

-<^>-

~Z21221

S2L

SL

~rz>-

-<^>-

-iS-

S21

sz3:

-^>-

(^
as

-^

<s>-

-^

s?"25-

~^>"

-gzr

-r?

>^-

-r^^- 31
-S-

The

22:

-<s>-

material given orally in Series A, B,

:i

C and D, may

be sung from

these different representations of the scale, the teacher using a pointer

and changing from one key

and changing the

to another, the class sustaining the tone

syllable as before.

Blackboard Writing
There

will

be found some pupils in the class

on the blackboard.
will this
ing.

The time

month be devoted

The

who do not

write well

usually given to written tonal dictation

to the

teacher should insist:

improvement

of the

blackboard writ-

SEPTEMBER
That the chalk be held

i.

and the

first,

37

between the thumb on the one

lightly

side,

second and third fingers on the other, and almost

against the blackboard.

flat

(This will eliminate the disagreeable, squeak-

ing noise.)

That the

2.

free

notes, clef, signatures, bars, etc., be

made with a

rapid,

arm movement.
That the hand does not

3.

Much

valuable time can be saved during the present and subsequent

by giving

years

rest against the blackboard.

sufficient attention to the

and

writing, to insure rapid, easy

legible

mechanical side of blackboard


work.

The teacher should stimulate and encourage the


write his name,

and

all

pupil's ambition to

written lessons, neatly and legibly.

It is highly

important that the teacher's work on the blackboard shall be worthy


of imitation.

It will surely

ried, scribbled, illegible

most unfortunate and

is

be imitated whether good or bad.

Hur-

blackboard writing by either teacher or pupil,


ill-advised.

After drawing a staff the entire length of the blackboard, send as

many

pupils at the desks to

work with pen

Practice drawing the


f

work comfortably, and

pupils to the board as can

another

down

clef,

or pencil,

beginning with a

stroke (2)

/l

and paper.

down

was

placed on the second line to locate the pitch

g,

effort to

make

it

more ornamental.

stroke, thus:

(1)

calling attention to the end-

ing on the second line, stating that the clef

and engravers have gradually changed

direct the

it

originally a letter

and that the

to its present

printers

form

in the

few minutes' rapid practice by

the entire class will result in marked improvement.


Practice
is

always

making the sharp,


FjJ!

on the top

line

clearly stating the fact that the first

RS== and that the

one

others are placed

MUSICAL DICTATION

38

by counting down

four,

and up

of the preceding one, thus:

five,

each sharp a

flat

eS!=

on the third

ing up four and

down

line,

flat.

The

and

lr5==B

first

one

is

always

and the others are located by countis:

five,

thus:

M&==.

Practice placing the meter signature, each figure


rzHjj

to the right

a&=EE

In like manner, practice making the

little

Notes,

rests,

neatly, as a writing lesson.

the writing and drawing.

filling

two

spaces,

bars, etc., should be written rapidly

All of this

Improvement

work co-ordinates with

in neatness

and

legibility of

the music writing and in the freedom and facility of movement, will be
equally helpful to the written lessons in arithmetic

and language.

OCTOBER
Larger Intervals
(

It is

Skips

assumed that the pupil can now hear the

When

audibly singing the scale.


(thinks) the tones.

Or,

if

he sees the representation, he hears

the teacher sounds do and asks

the scale or a scale exercise silently, the thought

he repeated to himself a

scale tones without

line of

is

him

to sing

as definite as though

a familiar poem.

Therefore, the pupil can " read music," can " get the thought from

the representation/

just as definitely (and surely) as he can read a

He

sentence in the mother tongue, but with the same limitations.

cannot and

is

not asked to read sentences containing

sound and meaning of which he does not know.


not be asked to read melodies containing

sound and swing

of

which are unknown

In each language, the sight reading

As

in

Primary Reading, a mastery

of the scale carries

with

it

Rhythmic problems are


problems

is

Likewise, he should

intervals or rhythms, the

limited to the vocabulary.

sounds of the vowels and con-

new words,

so in music, a mastery

the power to recognize and sing

new

intervals.

to be deferred until the solution of the tonal

advanced.

The main problem now is the mastery of larger intervals


The pupil should be led to think of these as the scale with one
tones omitted.
ti

and

the

to him.
is

of the

sonants gives the power to pronounce

new

new words,

For example, r&=^=^=

la omitted.

correct the mistake

If

a pupil

fails to

[|

is

or

more

simply eSeeEiEzIEEE^b with

sing do sol correctly, he should

by thinking the intervening


39

(skips).

tones.

MUSICAL DICTATION

40

The eye

now be used

will

to aid the pupil;

first,

to learn to think the

intervening tones; second, to acquire the habit of thinking of the skips


as a part of the scale with one or

The material
i.

for interval

more tones omitted.

study should be used as follows

Place several of the exercises on the blackboard.

teacher points to the notes, half of the class sing


sing only

2.

The

silently.

(Each

do both ways alternately.)

class sing the tones represented

sing the tones represented


3.

the tones, and half

all

from the large notes, singing the others

division should

While the

by the

by the

large notes, firmly,

and

smaller notes, softly.

Sing the tones represented by the large notes and think the tones

represented

by the small

4.

Two

5.

Individual singing

pupils (instead of the entire class) sing as directed above.

The teacher
pupil

notes.

will

by

the pupil as the teacher (or a pupil) points.

gradually quicken the

movement

more rapidly and

able to think the intervening tones

is

of the pointer as the


surely.

Material for Interval Study

To be
\

copied on the blackboard.

Slowly and steadily

Czfcl?

^EES

/rv

^-E

=22
6

_
:^::^i

~
^-^: u

/Ts

+-,

rt\

i2=^=:

2ZI

/C\

122:

'^pcpi

IS?_-

/TS

<S>

(S>

&

_
'rj

jpi

Z2Z22I

^g L *-g?-sr-g?-

g^-g?*-g^-

__

EE
7

rs\
-

-9

d~

r*

cj

^2ZZ^?I

:S2ZZ22I

~SL

&

S>

6 <&

8
-JSZL

T2 nez--T=2I

*Z \

OCTOBER

41

(Point to each note)


9

iw

ft

sr

5P

S?

g^

T&-

?'

~CP

'ST

iC

"^

&-

-<S>

c?

122:

1521

11

10
/T\

-&-&-&-

cz?

<

oo

d ^ r^ e?
1Z^ZS2I

/=VA-

j&&
-&&&-?
&--?&

-g^-^-gS^-

>

13

12

F^y
#~

4M

I22=22."I22:

g7~g"

22

/^

gr

g^

-<&-

k^

?
p; j ^z=*-^fig
zzr
7T2~

&-&-

g^^-ggzg^

-<s>-

zgp-sr

SCg2IgZS2=S

s
t?

^s^ ggr:SggZS^

/7\

2222TC2S?: <&-\

20

19
g^>

f^>

rj

SZ

p 2^ s?

-g

21

m -"j-^r-^^

22
rj

"C?
-<^-

'C?-

**-r>
221 *

7S

7z>

-<s>-

-<s>

23

SE

ez^:

1221

18

=gPMi=

Ip

*"*-

/TV

/^

16

122;

"b

i-*:

?---,

17

?T3 7-77
IS?"
22

-^-3
gjSJ
-g>

-#

/TN
<"

-?--?

14
-*

15

cr

e?

<&

<s*
-<S>

<S-

24

g^ *37

#-

-J^zn^z

RJ RJ-fig-

-fzr
\%

^-^-^zsz.

/^

-&-

MUSICAL DICTATION

42
25

26

B ^ U=^=f=^~^-J
/TN

22: ^

/*\

& <&-

-<s^

-<s>

27
-g?

<&

5 Z
g

-i <g g7

^.

22;

"^^
?\

^-gr-^-^-^-1

'

28

^sr

/TN

-*

g?

* g?

tg'

gg

22 -^g-^-g?

-g?'

22~^ II

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The

teacher

with

sings

the

syllable

00.

The

pupil

responds,

singing the syllable names.

*
r

221

-<s>-

-s>-

22:

22ZIII22=Z22:

-<S><S>

41
s==

^-j
ST

r22

~g?~

~s?~

t-J^Ufr-Hsr
ff

-?

<&-

22=221

-S>

-S?-

-s>-

-s>-

-5>-

22IZZ22r

-<s>-

122:

<SJ

^=^=^

1-^

isz:

10

22:

^2.

^sr

-<s>-

**-.
gs

-<s>

^"z=gs:

.-s>

IS!

12

11
5

.(2:

c^

^^2.

"

"

^:

1221

hstt!

7ry

,j"

j<y
<s-

tu

"
2

^
-^

g.-z^gz

OCTOBER
13
H
aK*K

14

S2

& ^ ^

f)

-Yfh-^-b

43

^>

=^

'S'

^>

-e c^

<s>

c*s

&>

*4'
1

15

16

s>

r=

-g>

g^

g-

&\-&

~^

^21

-s>-

Written Tonal Dictation


The

now place the


do.
The staff,

pupil should

note representing

and the

clef

and the key

clef

and key signatures should be

signature,

placed at the top of the blackboard and remain throughout the year

view of the school, thus:

in full

Do

is

22:

is

Do

is

Do

1S2-

Bb

Eb

is Z><?

Ab

is Z><?

is

Do

ste

ffi

~JZ2L

Do

-dS-

IZZ

is

122:

~c?-

(S>

If there is

is

F isZ>0

Do

no available blackboard space, place the above on heavy

manilla paper and hang on the wall.

The teacher should avoid speaking

of " the scales."

The

pupils

know but one scale (not nine), which may begin on any line or space of
" The scale from D," or " the scale from B flat," is the corthe staff.
rect expression to use.

Exercises for Written Dictation

To be used

staff is

as follows:

drawn on

indicated, thus:

Bb

all

available blackboard space, with various keys

AC

E{?

^= ^
1

-etc.

MUSICAL DICTATION

44

and places the key

pupil occupies each space at the board

After the teacher sings the exercise with a neutral

ture indicated.

each writes.

syllable,

signa-

After writing, a pupil

asked to sing the exercise

is

he has written.
Drilling

on signatures, or

letters

terms and signs as she uses them, the pupil


signatures and

all

apart from their prac-

staff,

Provided the teacher constantly names

unwise.

tical application, is

on the

will learn the letters

all

and

other signs used in musical notation, as he learns

words, by using them in their proper connection.


pupil has a motive

and

Furthermore, the

learning that for which he finds

interest in

practical use.

Written Tonal Dictation


The
i.

material given below should be used as follows:

pupil recognizes and sings the group of tones sung

by the

teacher to a neutral syllable.


2.

The

pupil places the key signature and writes the exercise on the

blackboard.
3.

After several groups have been written, a pupil sings them, always

after opportunity

is

given to " get the thought " silently.

Material for Written Tonal Dictation


2

J
zz L

(( T\

r?

<Z2

3
e?

c~>

'

J-

*'

e?

1
1

c?

\
1

5^ LA

m
P

5
-

-&<s-

7Z>-

\\V
tf-

g?
C_>

rlS

zz>
2=?

r$

(L*f

<^>

-*

OCTOBER

45

8
&

Zj

~<~Z=k=*-

fZ,

-JSL

m
m
10

-&-

7Z2L

-&-

-&-

zsz:

-&-

127:

^'
-&-

~Z2L

12

11
ZS2I

122I

-<-s?-

-2L

-tS

-<s>-

14

13

&r

"C7

^^~

-?r3

ZZ

i^:

15

IE:

-<^>-

I2I

22:

-<s?-

Metric Dictation
Each

measure signature (measure

figure of the

The upper

entirely independent of the other.


of beats in the measure.

The lower

sign) has a

figure

meaning

shows the number

figure indicates the kind of note

that has one beat.

The
i.

material

is

to be used as follows:

Place one or more of the melodies upon the blackboard, without

bars or measure signature.


2.

Sing the melody to a neutral syllable while the pupils beat and

try to discover the kind of measure.


3.

A pupil

indicates the accent

by placing a dash under the accented

and indicate with the chalk,

may count each measure audibly,


how many beats each note and rest is to

The bars

drawn and the measure signature placed,

note.

While doing

receive.

this the pupil

are then

the pupil again counting.


4.

Use the melody

for sight reading.

MUSICAL DICTATTON

46

Material for Metric Dictation

*2:

23

"S7

-<S>

-F

-eg-

r-

*s

-s>-

<s-

-<s>-

s>-

2Z

22gl2St -<s>-

->-

-<^-

gr~l

-g>

>^

**

P?

-<s>-

-<s-

2Z -

&r \&

d&zr

22:
:s2:

ts^-

is.

-<S>

r=?

:s2=z^i

^=2=^

c?-

s&

gg

^*A2=3d=c^
<s?

"S*-

eat

C2 C?

&

-<S^r

IST

NOVEMBER
importance that children sing " in tune."

It is of the greatest

stant " flatting " the pitch results in the habit of


If the class

the scale tones.

most important duty

remove the cause

wrong thinking

and teacher

is

and

to discover

and

" Keeping the pitch "

of the difficulty.

of

first

does not stay to the pitch, the

of the supervisor

Con-

is

entirely

practicable in school singing, provided certain essential conditions are

maintained

The

i.

use of the light, flutelike " head " tone

common

to all normal

children.
2.

Constant use of a chromatic pitch pipe.

3.

Prompt

correction of false intonation (singing " out of

tune

"),

and, therefore, avoidance of the habit of thinking the wrong pitch.

Oral Dictation
...

The use

and

of the following series

intended to

to the teacher whether or not the singing

noticed that the last tone


Series

No.

(l)

is

is

just

It will

(2>

(3)

While the pupils

pitch pipe

mi and hold the


.

_.

Ixolo!

T"^TN

ft\

last

and

(5)

.-

47

nTT"

tone until you are directed to

:....-

says:

the. tone, she says:

" Call: tWs: tpjae do^

be

first.

sing again."

(2)

in tune.

(4)

" Sing do re

is

clear to the class

an octave above or below the

1.

The teacher sounds E on the


:(i)

make

::J:.ic;

tdt

MUSICAL DICTATION

48

(3)

Sing do re mi.

(4)

Call this tone do.

(5)

Sing do re mi.

(6)

Call this tone do.

While

9'

this last tone (E) is held, the teacher

sounds

on the pitch

pipe.
If

the pupils are below the pitch

it is

clearly evident to all that do re

mi

has been falsely sung.


Series

No.

2.

To be given in the same manner as No.


Mi

**
#*

iW

1.

Do

Mi

fer

125:

JZZi

-<s>-

221

"521

IS2I

Z>0

Do
*^"

IP

"^?~

/TV

"27

Z2Z

-S-

Series

No. 3

Do
Mi
352!

E#
I

/TN
-<s>-

fcg: -g^

Z2"

Zfc

i*//

;s

/Cn

^?-TSr

-&-

iSP-

/TN

leg:

/TN

2521

-^-&-

-e=r

Interval Studies
See directions on page 40.

Go

slowly at

first,

and remember that the all-important object

is

to

cause the pupil to think (sing silently) the intervening tones indicated

by the small
is

of vital

notes.

Although the thinking of these intervening tones

importance and

all difficult,

is

the key to

all

true progress,

it is

not at

provided the teacher conducts the exercise properly.

NOVEMBER
Take a

slow, steady

tempo

at

Later, the pupil will be able to

first.

sing the intervals

more

tempo and point

to the large notes only.

rapidly.

49

Finally, the teacher will take a quicker

Certain tones of the scale are closely related and strongly influenced

by adjacent

tones.

their relation

is

For example,

ti

do are almost " welded together,"

Ti very strongly leads to do.

so close.

Likewise, fa

has a strong tendency leading to mi.

The

pupil should be led to think of the two related tones as one idea.

Interval Studies

To be

copied on the blackboard.

Sing aloud the tones represented by the large notes.

by the small

(think) the tones represented


1

b k

if \ 9
V- )

EJ

C?

ft
...

c- y

zz?

~Z5i

/T\

-,

Cs

I
I

fr^

f7\

notes.

/T\

K
l.u

--2-^- T-0-*-

-^

Sing silently

Z?

^~
"^

? i-g^

^=^=^=^^=^=
c~

at

-&-

&

^E^zzz^^E^
10

"2^1

-*Z?'

._cs_^

^^E^

-&

22=^:

&

:^-|
*

<&-i-

+~Cj

12

ll
(Si-<s>-

13

=Z&

>

-&-

ftf* -*>* *i^V**'e*i

w
m

^=s: ^=2z

-p-*-

-&-

14
--=

22:

-<s-

:z^:

22;

n&

^r

27

g ^

MUSICAL DICTATION

50

Sequential Scale Studies

The
pleted

following series of tone groups are sequential

by the pupil

and should be comtwo groups,

after the teacher has called for one or

as indicated.

Each pupil should

the syllable names, singing each group as

breathe between groups.

Teacher: " Sing do

"Sing, do

<^2

i2

one thought, pausing to

Ti do are closely associated in each group.


Sing do

do.

ti

Sing, do

ti do.

ti

la

Sing, do

<s>-

ds:

Z3 r~?
Z
^-g^>.

ti

do.

}y

ti

la sol ti do."

22=|IZZ2:

22=1122: <s-

<

32

-<s>-

2Z ZZ

22Z1

zz

:s2i

:ez

-&&-

22

>

-<&
-5>-

S>-

22

^_

22:

B:

"Sing,

*/<?

1
zfe

tS

la sol

ti

Teacher

Sing do

do.

ti

la ti do.

ti

m^.

Series

freely with

A:

Series

Teacher

and

learn to sing both series rapidly

do,

//'

do re

ti do,

do re

mi

ti

do.''''

-r->&r-*-& 221

C2~

-&

"-(S>

221

iS>

"C?" -<s-

221

-<S-

"22:

~c -^-

6
22:

22:

22

-ts

-CT-&

<S>

22:

-<s>-

22:
-T^r

^S>-^2-

-^ "

f^2
<

"

22:

-<S-

22:

-<S<-

22-^-^-

c^^-

NOVEMBER

51

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The teacher

sings with

The

a neutral syllable.

pupil responds,

singing the syllable names.

5lfA 22:

Ua

-&

S3

70

es*-

221
-

ZE-

sn

"^

IS:

7TT
~ZZr

-<s

-<s>-

22

<^ -O-

22:

r^-

-<s>-

221

^pzz^izzz22ZZZ2?zzzs:

22:

4ft

-<s>

te

<-

_^2

22:

-<-

-<^

22:

o-

22:

-<&-

:^2i

10
-s>

->

<s>-

2Z

22Z

-O-

-d2I

22:

-<&-

12

11
-<s>-

c2-

22ZZZ^ZZZS

221

-O-

Written Tonal Dictation


See directions for Written Tonal Dictation for October, page 43.
Pupils at the blackboard will place the clef and key signature as
indicated

by the

letter placed

above each space.

Material for Written Dictation


2

i:

22: -o-

<

^<^-

22:

22:

-<&-

22:

MUSICAL DICTATION

52

za

22:
-<s- "2^"

221

^a:

22:

-<s-

^-^-^ 2^:

10

*
22222:

2y ^J?-? ^ 221
3

s>-

-<s>

rS.

12

11
1_Z

22:

_^_

-<:

-^^

>

<

dS>-

^j

g?

i^I

g^~

-<s-

22:

14

13
-<^
-<*1,

'^

2.

222222:

gz

16

15 <&-<s-

-<s>-

u^

22:

22:

-^-

22:

17
-<^-

-<?-

=y&

22:

Metric Dictation
Only whole and

half notes

and the corresponding

been employed in the representation.


the use of the quarter note at the

much

first

multiplicity of note values until

during the

and

is
is

first

it

is

is

far

vital objection to

inas-

principally a matter of

com-

is

obviously best to defer the

has developed somewhat,

the pupil

year and part of the second.

also the logical unit of note values,

The

have thus

However,

Inasmuch as the whole

simpler to make, encourages freedom of

representations.

no

representation.

as the appreciation of note values

parison and therefore of judgment,

note

There

rests

it is

movement
employed

half note logically follows,

in writing,

in the first

and the two furnish

NOVEMBER
sufficient variety of

No

difficulty

less it

53

notes for the simple rhythms so far employed.

whatever

will

be found with the new representations un-

be in the mind of the teacher.

Studies in

Rhythm

Introduction of the Quarter Note and Quarter Rest

Introduce the quarter note in the following manner:


circles

Draw

three

on the blackboard, dividing the second into two, and the third

into four equal parts, thus:

Lead the pupils

to designate the first a whole circle; each of the parts

in the second, a half circle;

Place in the

first,

and each

in the third, a quarter circle.

a whole note, in the second, two half notes, and in

the third, four quarter notes,' thus:

Counting one for each quarter, lead the pupils to discover how

many

counts should be given to the half and to the whole note.

Let the pupils beat four part measure and sing to


while the teacher points
^

No.

1.

etc.

first

to circle

No.

loo
3,

at the pitch

then to No.

2,

MUSICAL DICTATION

54

In the same manner illustrate the relative values of the different

rests,

thus:

Suggest that the whole rest

so

is

heavy

that the quarter rest looks like a .figure

By representing
ing

first

the rests

sinks below the line,

and

reversed.

both notes and rests as illustrated above, and point-

to the notes

may

it

be fixed

and then

to the rests, the comparative value of

also.

Beat and sing aloud

for the notes;

beat and count silently for the

rests.

At
will

different times during the

month, the material

for

Rhythm

study

be placed on the blackboard and used as follows:

The

teacher sounds the key tone and directs the pupils to beat and

sing the measure to which she points, using the syllable loo,

Do

peating the measure until she points to another.


this until the pupil

and

re-

not discontinue

can go from a measure to any other without breaking

the rhythm.

This
N

is

a simple and effective

value of notes and

rests.

cised to keep a pure "

If

way

to fix in the

the pitch indicated

head " tone, the practice

the tone quality as well as to

fix

used and care

will

is

exer-

tend to improve

the note and rest values.

Studies in

There are two beats

is

mind the measure

Rhythm

in a measure.

quarter note has one beat.

NOVEMBER

zv2=*

?z

5:

tm

Loo

55

loo

loo

fe^

-- ^a:

etc.

11

f*

*11*

2-

^^2-

?=*=
t=t=i

X-(*

f-*-f

f*11

it

-2

Written Metric Dictation


The
i.

material given below should be used as follows:

Place upon the blackboard without bars or measure signature.

(This should be done before the music period.)


2.

cern

Sing with a neutral syllable, while the pupils beat and try to dis-

accent by any
3.

(The teacher should be careful not to indicate the

the meter.

movement

of the

hand

or body.)

Direct a pupil to place a dash under the accented part of the

measure and then place the bars and measure signature.


4.

Use the completed melodies

silently,

for individual

and

class singing, first

then aloud.

Material for Written Metric Dictation

&

-&-

i=r-i

;ia

-4

Bi

32:

SkL

AnW^

3
22:

&
p

2 bEE

MUSICAL DICTATION

56

k
m
He =pfeg
#
I

There

is

m.

0'

-s-

boat

up - on

fe^
32

2=

fS>

sea

p
It

-<s-

?=
]

ife

nev - er stops for you

-s>-

and me.

DECEMBER
The

supervisor or principal will provide a blank book in which the

records suggested below

Make
leave

list

room

of the

may

names

be entered and kept for future reference.

of the pupils in the class.

After each

name

for three columns, thus:

Names

John Doe

In tune?

O.K.

(?)

(3)

Oral Tonal

Written Tonal

Dictation

Dictation

Oct. Nos.
3> 4, 5> 6

Richard Roe

Flats the pitch

During the month, instead

Oct.

of doing

I, 2,
>

I, 2

Nov. Nos. 3,
6, 7 and 9

Oct.

1, 2,

5,

advanced work, make a record

of

each pupil's standing, based upon three tests:

November Oral

Dictation, page 48.

1.

Singing alone Series No. 2 of

2.

Singing alone five or more oral dictation exercises selected from

the October or
3.

November

Series,

pages 42 and 51.

Singing and writing five written dictation exercises selected from

the October or

November

Series,

pages 44 and 51.

JANUARY
The

The

relational effect.

the pupils

tone

is

in the

and individuality

significance

if

easily kept in mind.

If

the tone above

mind with the key tone

(do),

(re), is

closely associated

then the two sounds, re do, are as

key tone alone.

or under the note indicates a slight accent.

slur suggests the

Much

its

For example, the key

they are led to think correctly.

The dash over

due to

following tone groups will not be difficult for

easily recognized as the

The

of each scale tone is

two tones

to be "

welded " together.

of the material for oral tonal dictation

is

The

sequential.

teacher should encourage the pupil to form the habit of completing the

For example, the groups from

sequence without direction.

to

inclusive,

from 8 to 14

and

two groups are sung, may be completed by the pupil without

after

inclusive,

from 20 to 26

inclusive, are sequential

help from the teacher.

Oral tonal dictation

In directing No.

1,

" Sing do re do."

may be

sung by direction instead of by imitation.

the teacher sounds do on the pitch pipe and saysr

In giving No.

2,

" Sing do

ti

re

do"

Sequential Scale Studies


It is

These studies are intended to

matic use of the scale tones.

Their use

pupil can sing familiar melodies

by

pupil.

important that each singing pupil shall learn to sing these groups

rapidly and freely.

that

is,

until

He

the tones of

series, re

the pupil. Auto-

be continued until the

syllable without the representation;

familiar tunes are

then really knows the

In the following

will

give,

readily

known

to the

scale.

do are " welded " together as one thought.


58

JANUARY
Series

59

A:
-&

122"
1221

<S-

Z22:

Vfti*

H
322
tfk

^
e^
<3

!~

/S

-<s>-

-(S-

'"v

s^j

5-,

r^vj ^
->
1

-T3

^>

r-2

^^ rn
&>

8
^2.

^2:

I2Z

^i&-

122: S-

-<S>-

'ft-

~Tn
'

C^

Series

\j

-<s>-

vl

<^

gg

'

c*>

<s^

&

?2

gg

22

22

&

-^ ^

"22"

t/

22

s?

CJ

122"
"22"

.22:

122:

'22'

"22"

"22*

^-22^

<p

&^

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The

teacher sings to the syllable Z00; the pupil responds, singing the

syllable names,

ni
L

l)

S-

^ ^

1221

^S>-

*&

-<S>-

Z22I

2Z

-iS 1

-<s>-

^ ^
|

!_ c?

"22

:^2_

U2 Q

-2?

g>-

~g?~

1221
1221

-<S>-

221

122:

22"

-^

MUSICAL DICTATION

6o

10

-&

irzs:

22:

sz
12
-Gh-

G*

-G-

1221

-<S*

22:

^2:

-<s-

Perhaps the best way to determine the pupil's knowledge


tones

is

the syllabizing of familiar tunes, without the representation.

assumed that the pupils know the tune America.

It is

of the scale

Do

to sing the syllables.

Allow

all

to try

not be satisfied with the results until each

singing pupil can syllabize the tune.


learn the syllables to the tune

Some

by repeated

of the pupils will

singing.

This

is

have to

also valu-

able scale study at this stage.

*
4:

Do
P-H*

*=*

do

re

St

etc.

ti

*=W

22:

Written Tonal Dictation


The

teacher draws the staff on the blackboard (a staff liner

indispensable),
Wfo

*-^-^"

and

g^

Jl .

pupil responds

have been written, another pupil

i.

2.

exercise

By
By

almost

after sounding the do, sings with a neutral syllable,

by

singing the syllables and

writing the group of notes on the blackboard.

The

is

may

is

called

upon

After several groups

to sing the entire series.

be varied in different ways:

several pupils writing at one time in different keys.

the entire class singing the different groups of tones.

JANUARY

By

3.

61

the pupil or the class singing while closing the eyes or looking

The

away from the board.

last is

a most excellent method, compel-

ling the pupil to " think the tones " before singing.

34

Material for Written Tonal Dictation

zz

2
\~~^>

-&-

TTi

7TT.

S5

7*5

<S>

7^2
"

(S-

ISi.

22:

6
jZl

^ZJ^.

<s>-

& ^ ^_^z

^2

=:
;tt

<s-

-G-

<S'-

-o <s>-

-S>-

& <Sd&a

12

11

22

-<s-

^"

Sjr

"C^

14

13

-<S>

'C

C?"

75*

za

7^"

nS?-

7^~~gZ
T'S'

15
-fr

^r
S-

7^2:

-<s
-<s>-

1?:

fi?

10

3:
-<=?-

SC

C^

16

77

^-

-<s-

-(S>-

-<s^

-s?-

17

EE

77

-<s-

-&-

18

-o

<s-

-<s>

za
<s-

77:
-<s>-

-<s>-

-o- 22:

Written Metric Dictation


Before the lesson begins, one or two

of.

the following melodies should

be placed upon the blackboard, without bars or measure signature.

The

teacher will sing with a neutral syllable and with strong accent,

MUSICAL DICTATION

62

the pupils listening and beating.

pupil places a dash under the ac-

cented note, afterward placing the bars and the upper figure of the

measure signature.

To do

number

the pupil must discover the

this,

of beats in each

measure and the beat with which the exercise begins.

He must

know the measure value of each note and rest employed.


The pupil should form the habit of counting each measure
and places the

locates the accent

may be audible.
When the representation
sing, after

is

as he

For the present the counting

bars.

complete, a pupil or the entire class

having sung the melody

also

may

silently.

Material for Written Metric Dictation


x:

m-r

'

-c2-

g^

-P

S>

-<^>-

-<&

(After No. 2

-&-

-<-

m^EE^=

zz

for c?

fe^
rHif rt

"**

-&-

-&-

&-&-1S.

Mri*

-=

how

^>

& ^?

>

cj

rz>

-J&

:& r? r?
I"
-

-<<3>

-&

2"

ht

l-

d:

-&

C2

<

will explain

c?

_r_

pa fT

-C2~
1_.

sp

-2-

:u

completed and sung, the teacher

is

then substitute e?

<S>-

-<S>

-<-

:szzz^-

>-

&-

:p^T

V=J
<s>-

22:

-<S>-

:sz

-<s>-

?-

1221

1=;

<-

zSl^IISLZ^
-s~s*-

JANUARY

63

*W

3r

:=mL

r-0-

-s>-

mh

&>-

Sol

cr

gg

rfAFF

1221

~^s^

22ZZZ

t
r^

i
^

-&-

-<-

T,(ZZ-

=t

5>

j^-

-S>-

{=

si

II

FEBRUARY
Interval Studies

The

pupil's success in the singing of intervals

To

to think (sing silently) the scale tones.

the

main object

The

of the tonal dictation.

depends upon

gain this power has been


teacher should

and enthusiasm, the greatest impetus to progress

is

make

Without

that the pupils are interested in gaining this power.

The

his ability

sure

interest

lacking.

following material should be used as follows:

After placing

several groups of notes on the blackboard, the teacher directs the pupils
to sing aloud as she points to the large notes,

and to sing

silently as she

points to the small notes.


If

the pupil or class

sented

by the small

fails,

notes.

allow one pupil only to sing the tones repre-

Gradually quicken the tempo (speed) until

intervals can be sung without pointing to the small notes.

Interval Studies
A1

-Q-

^~^~'
t

&

TD

<

^'^i^,

T^&

r=^g^_^_z:|=z: sEEES &-

,
*

:b~^-&
^=^_^
& -& r-g>-^_^-^_-__tf-^
5
-fr

=J
e^

_l0

^y

<g-

&

'

64

&

_ --_^_-___^-^-

_
<s>

~Z2L

FEBRUARY

65

6
_*rv_
-
ir\>r>-*~

,.

"f

e^*-

_<S>_ -5

#
-*O?

<^

-<s>-

-&*8

si

r-^rr.

jE

-<s

-">-

\j~~x)

tf

'

'C^

#
p

A^\>-

*\s

-j

^~

-^

_^J2

<

-j
'

C"

%j

10

iS?-

BE

--^

-#-^-

^;.

-*^

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


The teacher

sings

with

the

syllable

loo.

The

respond,

pupils

singing the syllable names.

The mastery

of the intervals in these

groups

use of the Reveille as a song to be learned

Should the pupils find

may copy

by

will

be hastened by the

syllable.

difficulty in recognizing the tones, the teacher

the groups on the blackboard and point to the small notes

which she has inserted to represent the omitted scale tone.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


1

-^>-

-rs>

=/
rO

4
yf

g?

_*&
-s*

_-

*"^

l(i\

<s>-

r*2'

s>

vL'

&
^
cs

'g

--

?'

Z2:

Z2:

zs:

MUSICAL DICTA TION

66

10

-<*-

-<s>-

-iS>-

-s>-

Z2T

&-

-eS>

22:

14

13

12

11
-h-

zz:

-<^-

-<-S>-

<&-

-<*-

Z2:

Interest the children in the Reveille, one of the United States

Army

Bugle Call, U.

Bugle
bugle

by

Calls,

they should do

The teacher
slowly, at
this

first.

it

or

two concerning the use

soon commit this one, and

will

of the

desirable that

it is

so.

the melody with loo, a

will sing

little

pupils will respond, singing "

The

Bugle Call until the

Retain

Army, "The Reveille"

them a story

telling

They

calls.

S.

can sing

class

it

by

at a time
syllable."

and
Use

through rapidly from memory.

as a song to be sung, with the syllable names.

Bugle Call, U.
:=^:

S.

Army, "The Reveille"

-iv

=at

-iv

*-

*--0\

^~ *

iw

0-

EE
"f

l""l

FlNE

-F

-*

:zfc

*-

+-:

t$

W- -*

* Ff

1^

r*

*"

p,,

tfc

"fr

Da
Ed

Capo
II

FEBRUARY
Studies in

67

Rhythm

Four Part Measure

Presumably the

Have a

several rote songs in four part measure.

part of the class sing the song while the other part beat and

count by fours.
with the

knows

class

Call attention to the

two accents, a strong accent

beat and a slight accent with the third beat.

first

teacher will sing the following melodies while the class beat and

The

count by fours.

MUSIC IN THE AIR


JUL
-A

There's

mu

s*
v v J=F

-<5r

r-

in

sic

+the

Whenthe

air

in -f ant

1251

t
faint

HOW CAN

c-fci2

V-

blush

its

0*-

-0-

is

On

seen

morn

is

F=t
-z=^-

nigh,

=z2:
:

i]

the bright and laugh-ing

sky.

LEAVE THEE

:i

-&-_

'21
I

How

And

can

leave

thee

How

-I

can

from thee

part

m
?

ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT


=t

bMiz4:
Sleep,

my

love,

1
and peace

at

tend thee,

All through the night.

Written Metric Dictation


The material on the
1.

following page should be used as follows:

Place one of the melodies upon the blackboard, without bars or

measure signature.

MUSICAL DICTATION

68

Sing (or play) the melody with a marked accent while the pupils

2.

beat and try to find

(a)

the kind of measure (whether

(b) the location of the first

part);

two or three

it is

accented tone (whether the melody

begins with the accented or the unaccented part of the measure).


3.

Direct a pupil to

mark

the accent with a dash, place the bars,

not omitting the double bar at the end, and place also the measure
nature.
of the

Every pupil should be

led to see clearly that the upper figure

measure signature indicates the number of beats in the measure,

while the lower figure indicates the note having one beat.
it is

At

this stage,

well to require the pupil to " think aloud " as he locates the accent,

places the bars


will

sig-

and measure signature.

In

measure, for example, he

count "one, two, three," as he places the dash, and again as the bars

are drawn.

As the

figure 3 is placed, the pupil says, "

beats in a measure,'' and as the 4

is

made,

There are three

"A quarter note has one beat."

Both teacher and pupil should be able to "

talk

and chalk " simulta-

neously.
4.

After the melody

is

complete, use

it

as a reading lesson.

Material for Metric Dictation

^BZ_^.

1*=^:

gs

hjr-t

1-

-^-

FEBRUARY

69

5a

U*^
After 5a

is

i*

i*

>-

*=

-^-

completed, represent 5b by erasing every other bar in 5a;

and lead the pupils

to see the necessity for the

change in the measure

signature.
5b

-m

3=

:1:

~M=3t

<s>-

it

-&-

6a

After 6a

is

-I

-i

<s>

i * =a-*-
1

:=*=
gn 4 P *
*

completed, represent 6b by erasing every other bar and

changing the measure signature.


6b

ru_J

jigr3=E=*=T

:*z^
H

t=F

wmsm

MARCH
Oral Tonal Dictation
the class

If

is

inclined to fall

from the pitch, begin the oral dictation

each day with one of the series (A, B,


the Manual.

Singing

e,

all

for example, with the teeth closed, is evidence

jaw and tongue so that the mouth opens


While the

absolutely essential to safe singing.

and

rounded on
rigid,

00,

while singing

Any

and mobile.

soft

freely

lips

and

easily

is

should always be

made hard

or

disfiguring of the face

The principle

a sure sign of wrong conditions.

is

Relaxation

results.

they should never be puckered or

but always kept

of

vowel sounds with the

very bad conditions and produces equally bad

of the

on page 50

or D). given

See that every pupil sings

teeth apart.
of

of relaxa-

tion should be constantly applied to keep the muscles of the jaw, tongue

and

face, free

and unrestrained.

a mistake

If

is

made

in the intervals in using the

material given

below, the teacher should ask the pupil to think the omitted tones;

does not correct the mistake,

this

interval

and the intervening

let

him

sing aloud the tones of the

tones.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


3

y ^ g>

~^y

-?5>

^ ^ ^6

1^--^-^-^

t>

<o

i>

-&-**

-&<s-

-&-

7
=

v ^ ^

^_

,
c*>

=^=
=* -^

70

[if

-,
z?

^-

^r

&

MARCH
10

-f~*

-O

71

11

9->-

-<&-

i
$

13

12

&*
6

zz:

szry

122:

14

ZZI

-<&-

221

15

P_fr

S2I

~g?

g?"

2Z

2Z

--

17

16
122:

-<

'22

<s-

221
-<5>-

-s-

19

18

^P

-&&-

-o-

~- <=^^

-&-

I22T

20

21

E#
I

e*>

T?rz.

_
rj

22

__

ts-

"22

-JZZZ^.

23

TZr7Z?

-^> rj

221

24

ZZ

22:

122:

"!^

1221

<S""

-<S>

(S-

26

25
-is-

122:

-^

1221
1221

\-&-

27
^-?
-&

&7r->e*
7Z>-t=*
T2

Z2ZE^Z2S=^Z22I

'^~^~^

&>
~0> -& "^ O
Z ^2 ^ -7Zr-^-7^-f=*rz?

22

~^

22 ^,_JT2 <^- 22

28
it?

St

-^-^2-*s? 22
<s- 2^

'

-<s>

^ &cs &

Nos. 27 and 28 should be sung daily until the pupil can sing them
freely

and rapidly from memory.

MUSICAL DICTATION

7*

Written Tonal Dictation


The problem
question of

of writing

how

make

to

music

the

is

a mechanical one.

sharps, flats

clefs,

If

the pupil

understand

essential that the teacher shall clearly

simply a

and notes, and knowing

where to place the notes representing the tones.


is

It is

fails, it

why he

fails.

Before attempting to write, the pupil has recognized and sung the tones
In order to write correctly, the pupil must be able:

to be represented.

To draw

i.

To
To
To

3.

4.

(if

necessary, copying from the clefs

and signa-

always in sight in the room).

tures,
2.

the clef

place the key signature (copied


locate the do (from the copy

necessary).

necessary).

place the notes of the exercise.

Each pupil must

The

skips.

if

if

that this

learn to think the omitted tones as he represents

teacher should patiently assist the slow pupil, remembering


the quickest and most effective

is

method

of teaching sight

reading.

The
step

must

pupil

is

first

know

to learn to recognize

the tones

when he hears them.

them when he sees the

The next
In

representation.

order to be of practical use, the recognition must be instantaneous.

Hence the necessity

of long

and varied practice

and

in writing

singing.

Material for Written Tonal Dictation


/TV

S>-

-<S>

-<s>

-<S>-

cj*
:?

?"

<^-

"C C"

-<s>

<^-

!"

-<S>

"<S>-

*=

-&-

-&-

-<S> sr

e*2^

22IZSL3

^? <s

>-

^ &

*L

'Z2-Z2L

-<S>-

2^7-

^g? ^

-?Z?

8
-^S

-&

JZ>

c*c.

gr

r?-&zz
;
_

-2=^=221

MARCH
10

73

11

&

~G?

~g

<^-

-<S

r^s

T b

V -J

Z2I

-^>-

221

13

12
o
v,

HP
-tj

32:

22ZZIZZ22I

f~2

s?

e*>

rj

>

^_-

O'

14
L/rU,.

15
^-.

=fr

C-/

^>

^ ~

16
^;

rC*

'^
'-*'

17

b^:

g>

x"

18
122:

-<&-

221

-<S-

22:

:<2:

"2"

"C?"

Material for Written Metric Dictation

One

of the following melodies should be placed

on the blackboard,

without bars or measure signature, before the class

is

called.

The

teacher sings the melody, using a neutral syllable, while the pupils

beat and endeavor to discover the meter.

pupil

is

called

upon to

place a dash under the accented part of the measure and then to place
the bars and the measure signature, counting the measure as he writes,

and explaining the meaning


melody may then be used

of

the figures as he places them.

for sight reading.

s
/7\

<

-^

gg

-<S'-

32-

-&>-

The

MUSICAL DICTATION

74

mi

Efe~3z
4rS
(

Each pupil should

syllabize No. 5

-m

2=1

Explain "

*.

-*

fete

Da Capo "

-x

,|

-rr

,^_-

^r-

^.

See

F=fc=^

-&

?=

*-

*-

t=X

."

4=

from the beginning

),

-*

w.

Fine
*-

z:

3=1

Da

Capo
11

"

Fine "

the end

).

APRIL
Oral Tonal Dictation
The

teacher sings with a neutral syllable.

The

pupils respond, sing-

ing the syllable names.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

rft

-<s>-

-<&

-&-

-<s-<s>-

22:

-<s>-

rsr

-<s>

-<s

-~r?-

-<s-

f^~

22:

-<s^

-<s>-

-^?-

-<s>-

22:

-^-

22

22:

2:

-<s>

22ZZZZZZZ22I

22:
-<s-<S>

<^-

-<s>-

-<s>

-<s>-

10

^Z22I 221

o-

22Z22I

^y

-e

<C? -

221

11

i #=22=22=^= ^

<g

12

22:

-<S>

-7^r^r

^ -&>
^

^"

>

14

13

ESE

ej

22:

^P-

J^~2?

^
<&-

221

221
-tS>-

16

15

22

-<S-

-<^-

22.

_^"

75

C^

C^

z^r

MUSICAL DICTATION

76

18

17

5fc

-<Z*

^ ^

S-

-&-

G>-

<ZJ

20

19

-^r

<S>-

-&

<S-

teacher sings the group of tones using a neutral syllable.

The

-&-

2?"

"c

Written Tonal Dictation


The

pupils respond, singing the syllable names, then write, each with a different signature.

Material for Written Tonal Dictation


2

z:

^H g^-

tS?-

J Jtff

^
*
_,

7Z?
~z?

3Z

<S>

t->
T~
2

&-

221

f?

-i prb-*?

^^
^

&

e*>

<z?

j^~

"

z?

~z?

^ C C
<=^

s*

C^

dg

& ^ ^^

S5

ZS

7? -\ f

V. \)

r?

10

Ok
r l"

.
l

"

''

c--*

=* ey

~-t

if ^
Iv y

s-

^ c-'

y^ <s> ^ <g

<^>

jJ|isz

-<s-

i^z

16

15

<&

221

7221221
<S>-

<*^

22:
<s>

14

<^>

13

12

11

<&

-5

22:
<s>-

-s

22:
<s

^>-

<^<s-

APRIL

77

Introduction to the Eighth Note and Eighth Rest


Represent quarter and eighth notes and rests on the blackboard thus

Lead the pupil

The value

i.

and vice

note,
2.

An

3.

Eighth Notes

Quarter Rests

Quarter Notes

to discover:

of

two eighth notes

equal to the value of one quarter

is

versa,

eighth rest looks like a figure

quarter rest has two forms

reversed, or

Eighth Rests

made

is

as follows

7.

either looks like the figure 7

it

'

Place the following measures on the board.

Call attention to the

Sound the pitch

fact that the eighth note has one beat.

of do (always

using chromatic pitch pipe or piano and never guessing at the pitch).
Direct the class to beat and sing with
until the teacher points to another.

until the pupil

loo,

Do

and repeat each measure

this for a

few moments daily

can go from one measure to another without a mistake.

Rhythm Studies

measure value one


_ es
_ &')<=> <&

dot placed after a note increases


fc

&
fi=tpi

Loo,

ep

PZZ3C

w-

loo,

loo,

half.

'

acz^:

^^~-

M
fr

^_^ ^

etc.

LSI

I2I

is

its

:s2

=*

-*-*-*-- **-?"

f*

I*-*-

r"3

^? -^tt-T/O

fc* _

----

-p^r

HS3Z

SSSE
r

:^2ZZ2T

r~r

zzs:

MUSICAL DICTATION

78

Things for the pupil to find out for himself from these measures:
i.

We now

2.

Nos. 3 and 4 sound just like

3.

Nos.

4.

When

have three ways

and 6 sound

of representing

just like

and

1, 2,

rhythms.

2.

and

4.

an eighth note has a beat, the speed

may

be just as slow

as though a half note had one beat, and vice versa.

Metric Dictation
1.

Place on the blackboard, one or more of the following melodies,

preferably before the class


2.

is

called.

Sing with a neutral syllable while the pupils beat and try to dis-

cern the meter and the accent.


light "
3.

head "

(The teacher should always sing with a

tone.)

Direct a pupil to indicate the accent and place the bars and meas-

ure signature.

For the present, allow the pupil to count aloud and point to the notes

and

drawn.

As he makes the upper

" There are

he says, "
4.

he places the dash, and to count again as the bars are

rests as

measure signature he says,

beats in a measure,' while making the lower figure

figure of the
'

note has one beat."

Use the melodies

for individual or class reading.

Material for Written Metric Dictation


Sol

fes
I^ME^E

:|ya^E|lz:

tS-

-2_

tr=

t=t
^

'&-&-

-<s>-I

:zz:

r-

=t
22:

^5
5ZZA-CA-

ft-*T? "TZIk S5

fc&:

^-^

3 p^ 5=FF
U=fet

APRIL

M^f^0^

&

-&--

g^^

Three blind mice

Three blind mice

6
If2_

32:

2^1

C*

feSEffi^ f=t

rffe

IA

-<s>

1=F

79

<s>-

s&

See

^
t

^a

F=t

=t===j
=33=32:

-<s>-

_j._
tzJzzzztt:

them

22:

:s?-*-*g

run

See

atz-

them

run

?2I
-c^~

~-

h<s>

m
'

e^-

-<S>"

!S3l

=a

-g^-

MAY
In June, tests

will'

These records are


visor,

be given to each pupil and the results recorded.

for the use of the superintendent, principal, super-

and teacher,

in

making the yearly report and

upon

in deciding

promotions.

During May, especial attention should be given to pupils who are in


need of assistance in any of the* problems of tone and rhythm.
individual recitation in music

is

knows the stand-

any other study.

ing of each in
If

know

a daily practice, the teacher will

the strength or weakness of each pupil as fully as she

If

the principal of the school favors the plan, the music period

may be

placed last either morning or afternoon, once each week, and the pupils

who

are strong in music, excused.

This plan gives the teacher an

opportunity to assist the weak students.


teacher

may

If this is

not practicable, the

allow the strong students to read or prepare some other

lesson while she helps the

weaker

pupils.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


If necessary, direct
if

possible, aloud

if

that the omitted tones of the scale be sung (silently

necessary).
3

1
-GJ
-<S>

-^

eg TD &^

^p

- i^j>

^^

^-^-

-&-

3?J

-i-

-&>-

=fifcfc
<s

19

rr^9

to

<?
<s>-

C?

<& -&-

TZi ;gp-

MAY

jg

& cj

>

10

.s

-<s

<&-

g^~

'-Sl

<^-

~ZZ.

-&-

22:

^5

-<S?

-^-

15

14

o &

<s>-

~Z2L -(-

-<^-

^2_|Z22I

17
fcz

^
^^^^^
1^2

22:

-<&-

XT

I2I

-<&-

-<&-

fr

ISZ
-<S-

zzz.

16
J^Z22I

__

12

:s:
-<s>-

13
\>

11

~1?:

:&

b-&-

8l

^2

^==^-^-^-^^^

^~22

.5,.

18

12=3:

zz

:^s: -<s^

22:

Z2:

_2__

The Italian Hymn printed below should be syllabized


manner as the tune America was sung in January.

To be sung with

the syllable

C:S2

-g

m
I*

names by each
=t

w-

^-=

TZ*-

O-

P-

y
^
t=i=

^=j

=fc

f*

dh

same

in the

pupil.

C7"

j
i*

i.

*-

Written Tonal Dictation


Use the material as

follows:

i.

A number of pupils

2.

draw the

clef

The

teacher sings to syllable

loo.

3.

The

pupils respond, singing the syllables, then write.

4.

The

several groups are sung

and place the key

by one

signature.

or all of the pupils.

MUSIC A L DIC TA TION

82

Material for Written Dictation


"Z?

*=*

221

-<S>

^ ^

c=-fc g_^L-^

-&-

IS2I

^5

'

^^LZZLY~^P

<S>-

22:

11

-<^G>>-

-<S>-

-<-S>-

10
-

-<s>-

g? Z2I
rJ&- 122

<s>-^-

IZZ

-^>-

Z2I

-<S>-

~S?~

13

12
-<s>-

22:

-&& 2Z22
^ ^<^

22:

-<"S>-

1221

22:

-?s?

-<s>-

<s>-

-<s-

15

14

<^-

'^

<

~^

16
-^>-

-<&-

*
~C?~~C7~

<^'

"C

l2_^_
"C^

"2?"

<^

Rhythm Studies
Place one of the four series of three exercises on the blackboard,
directions
Series

on page 77

0-

~x

Ztf<?,

Z90,

/<?<?,

4=e=:

SiM

5
a
^

May Rhythm

Studies.

A:

-0

mat

for using

See

TS

*z

w.

CS

<

(=-

*..

^*

etc.

2-

^zzzjr

es

=t

>*3

/*3

Ig~~

dL

-"22

-=f=z

10
~

3-

MAY
Series

83

B:

-=1

=1

(^?

=*-

ft *

Zjil

=1

^aa=t

"2

=*-

g2-

-* s *- 22 P

X g-

Series C:

fXz

22.

fe

Effifc

u=g:

r=?

II

#a
"FT9"
2

\^22!

r~

z^-\
i

"

>*""}
2-*

p-2

.41

/"->

(Z^

<T2
ez^

1
1

1
1

=5

=q

LS8:

^~

1-~y

4=4

Material for Written Metric Dictation


Use the material as
i.

follows:

Place one or more of the melodies on the board, without bars or

measure signature.
2.

Sing or play the melody with a marked accent while the pupils

beat and discern the kind of meter.


3.

Direct a pupil to

mark

the accent, and place the bars and meas-

ure signature.
4.

Use the melody

for reading.

Do

fcftEE

H*

22

2Z

C"

-5^-

b<92f2

-&>-

-rz>

g^

&/

SE53^

1.

WT TSi

22

25

MUSICAL DICTATION

$4

E2fa=
"2 o
v-

~SZT-

zst

-\-<s>

^4 r^=^:^-H -ff
1-

-&&-*

Hi

r -*- *f
k-j

iS^

122:

^2 ^*-

~zzr.

*

*- *=

F-t

-1

-^Sfc

-J

-<s>-

* *
T~
;

fc

^=fl
ft

i=fcsp=|v :=*

#~

=m^ r^g"
-^=^
j*zfe

v,-^-

jtt

11

tr'

C:

^?

^S

--

3f8-^=2:

22:

:2

When

rfk

=t

was down be-

>

g-

-^

me,

To

dig

side the

sea,

US.

2-

.sz

T^"

-ca.

iszzzz^:

gr

r*

-^

s-

\e?

>

122

ez

g?

<s>-

t
sand-y

the

To

shore,

dig the sand -y

-^-

the

ip^

-*

fc

Far

32

wood- en spoon they gave to

In

^r-r

bel

fry

-tS>-

swing

ing,

Sil

ver

bells

are

ring

.*L=_=^

-ZZL

r:

=fc

and

near,

Sweet and

clear,

Ring,

bells,

ring.

shore.

-S-

ing,

JUNE
During June, instead

and rhythm study


will

will

of doing

advanced work, the time given to tone

be devoted to individual

tests, of

which a record

be kept for the use of the supervisor and for use in making the

teacher's yearly music report.


If possible,

names

use the same book used in December.

Make

list

of

After each name, leave room for three

of the pupils in the class.

columns, thus:

Names

Oral Tonal

Written Tonal

Written Metric

Dictation

Dictation

Dictation

John Doe
Richard Roe

During the month, make a record

upon
i.

Recognizing and singing of

five exercises in

Oral Tonal Dictation

March, April or May.

Recognizing and writing of four exercises in Written Tonal Dicta-

tion selected from


3.

each pupil's standing, based

three tests:

selected from material for


2.

of

March, April or May.

Completing three exercises

material for March, April or

in

May.

85

Metric Dictation selected from

THIRD YEAR

SEPTEMBER
Progress in tone thinking depends very materially upon the mastery

The

of the scale.

automatic.
is

singing of the scale with the syllables

Without

this mastery, the progress of the

hindered just as the student of arithmetic

half

knows the multiplication

be automatic.

pensable

excellent progress

In order that the pupils


scale, a

be of practical value, must

table, which, to

is

may

Nearly

all

Such a
is

indis-

made.

to be

acquire this practical mastery of the

thorough review of the scale exercises of the

years, follows.

effort.

invaluable to the music student, and

of the scale

is

music student

handicapped who only

The numbers must come without mental

knowledge
if

is

must become

first

and second

after the teacher

the series are sequential;

has called for one or two groups, the pupils should complete the series

without further directions.

Every pupil should

strive to learn to sing these tone

groups correctly

with a quick tempo, with good tone and without falling from the pitch.

The pupil should be

led to think of each group as a

This review

whole and not as

satisfactory

until every

singing pupil has sung the different series alone as freely

and rapidly

individual tones.

will

not

be

as possible.

The

teacher should

make but few motions

and those only on the accented

tones.

It is

in leading this singing,

a serious mistake to

make

No class can sing freely and rapidly

a motion of the hand for each tone.


with such leading.
86

SEPTEMBER-

'

87

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


Teacher: " Sing do

do"

ti

Sing do

do.

la

ti

ti

la sol la

ti

A:

sk=^=^=^

3E=^

.< ^

7*=^
f-

<

-*-*^=^=*
h

F^^^# *

^d

tea

do"

re

i=^=i

fc

5SgS=35a*

~
Teacher: " Sing d#

=*

-F

i^^|SSS_,

Sing do re mi re do.

cfo.

Sing do re

mi fa mi

etc.

10

12

11

=3

Effilrf

d
w + S

-\

-K

14_
1
1

3i=w1

1-

-**~^+-Tt-

13

ti

etc.

Series

re

Sing do

do.

1-

.III"

-*mr

P5^

16

Series

d-

w + d

B
/T\

sffi
rffct>w

-*

fr-*

3=t*:

ttEEE*

rV=at

:*

i^il

MUSICAL DICTATION

88

Teacher: " Sing do re mi fa mi.

Call the tone

do"

See Second

etc.

Year, page 47.


Series C:
Test with pitch pipe
3 *\

1*,

--j&m

frrir- rl
VfrV
1

*-rv

W-

Do
Series

mi

mi

do

^3

i~i

do

J l ^=t=P+^

TT

d * d

E:

^=S Jin

ML
Series

mi

do

D:

WtirkW f + m+

Series

r -#&

To be

^a

directed,

i^

i
1

ni

same as

^-1 Th
3^*
#r
n u
a*

Series

-n

i*r

pf

C)
Test with pitch pipe

*r*

51*
24-U--

M^

#Z*

#*/

Rhythm Studies
All

To

problems in the study of tone and rhythm are

presented orally.

ask a pupil to recognize symbols before he knows what the symbols

represent,

is

poor teaching.

pupil's sense of

by

first

During the

first

and second

years,

the

rhythm has been continually stimulated and developed

singing rote songs, perceiving the

rhythm

of melodies,

and complet-

ing the representation of their measure and rhythm.

Before proceeding to introduce

new problems, a review

of the

rhythms

SEPTEMBER
employed during the

first

two

years,

is

89

The

desirable.

scale will be

used to represent the different rhythms.

The teacher

will represent the scale

on the blackboard, thus:

la

&2

-2l

Loo,

ho,

:t=F
&- st

and sing

beat,

11

the do on the pitch pipe, directs the class to

to the syllable

The hand should

beating.

-&-

etc.

The teacher sounds

1.

&-

=?=

is:

-?zr

Uniformity

loo.

on the desk

rest lightly

is

desirable in

in the

the

same position

taken for penmanship, with the wrist level and the third, fourth, and
fifth fingers

curved under.

The

the index finger.

down

The beating should be done

until just before the next beat,

Each beat

beats.

is

down

finger is pressed

for the strong beat, held

and raised

downward motion

entirely with

slightly

between the

of the finger, with a pressure

on the accented beat stronger than on the unaccented beats.

The

2.

teacher, or a pupil, changes the half notes to quarter notes,

the whole note to a half note, the lower figure of the measure signature

and again

to 4,

The

exercise

directs the class to sing.

now appears

thus:

lb
-^-

3^5
The

3.

teacher asks

for

still

another representation,

changes the notes and the signature, and

The melody now appears

it is

:t=

Some one

again sung.

thus:

lc

==

H*-

to

LBJ?S

No

questions should be asked previous to the singing.

MUSICAL DICTATION

90

One

means

of the surest

and wasting time,

tion

The

singing.

of destroying interest, cultivating

inatten-

the habit of asking questions preceding the

is

pupil answers

all

questions

by

The proper

his singing.

time to ask questions concerning the material,

is

when mistakes

are

made.
Suppose, in singing No.

In

i,

probability some other pupil will correct the mistake.

all

the teacher asks, "

kind of a note has one beat? "

What

tone be sung? "

second tone? "

"

Suppose the melody


losing the necessary
to feel this

"

Pupil:

With the

first

first

"

Teacher:

beat."

The

With the second beat."


sung without the proper accent, thereby

is

rhythmic swing, the teacher should lead the pupil

rhythmic motion and then to see the measure as a musician

The

it.

"

Pupil:
Pupil:

If not,

Teacher: " With what beat should the

half note has one beat."

sees

a pupil gives two beats to each half note.

sight of the

measure should cause the pupil to

feel

the

swing of the rhythm, just as looking at the notes should cause him to
think the tones.
If

the pupil

his sense of

fails

to get the rhythmic swing of the melody,

rhythm

is

weak and undeveloped.

needs to be strengthened by exercise.

Dancing

avail.

is

it is

This rhythmic sense

No amount

of questioning will

one of the most effective means to this end.

ing songs of a strongly rhythmic nature, marching, etc., are

A physical
ulate

Sing-,

all helpful.

manifestation such as beating with the hand, helps to stim-

and develop the sense

of

rhythm.

The teacher should remember


less in

because

that the non-rhythmic child is as help-

music as the monotone, and quite as much in need of individual

attention.

Material for the Study of Rhythm


Only two measures
on the blackboard.

of

each of the following rhythms should be placed

The

pupil will see that every measure has the

same

SEPTEMBER
rhythm and that the singing
upper

is

91

on the

to continue until the accent falls

do.

68

^Ite^g

rw=^.

8^t

_?_(_!

--

W=+

+-*-

.(

+-

5*=^:

etc.

-**

m^tr-

*&=?

$a

etc.

Wz&

S^EE^EE^
6

$8

etc.

&
j

4*
e,c

Ife^e^IeIe^

I-

etc. -

0-

SeI

etc.

8
<S>-r

?t*=f

-* *-

5*

etc.

etc.

5z4:

10

11

i^E
E4
The

first

F==?zzat
t

tone of No. 8

is

etc.

-vr-tH-f

=#8^-=^=

sung with the

In No. n, the accent would never

fall

first,

~r*
etc.

=t*

&

"

second and third beats.

on the upper do;

discover this fact for themselves, after singing a while.

let

the pupils

OCTOBER
Introduction of Fi

A new

tone

is

to be introduced.

This,

and

other

all

new

tones, will

be learned by comparison with scale tones already known.


culty should be found in mastering the

the

new combination

new

tone.

It will

No

diffi-

be seen that

sounds exactly the same as certain scale

of tones

tones already known.

The

teacher sings the following to the syllable

The

pupils respond, singing the syllable names.

The

effect of sol fa sol in

No.

3,

should be

loo.

made prominent by

repeti-

tion.

iw

122"

The

-<S>-

^Z

1221

teacher asks the children to

listen carefully,

and then

^=

sz =i

12I

sings:

Loo

Most

of the pupils will

promptly

loo

tone)

teacher reminds
is sol.

first

answer, singing:

- (fob

either

^
Sol

by hearing
-Z2L

fr&

fi

\
sol

92

ti

do

tone (and therefore the third

it

at

loo y

and

calls for

who have previously


home or at school, will

Usually one or more pupils

new tone

Z2I

Again she sings No. 4 to the syllable

volunteers to sing.

learned the

them that the

\7Z?~

loo

2Z

sing:

Do

The

2Z

122:

OCTOBER

The

teacher will ask the pupil to sing solfi sol again, and ask the class

what other group


singing do

The

93

ti

sounds just

of tones

do or fa mi fa.

tone, not the syllable

They

like this one.

(Never allow the answer

name,

is

will

to

be spoken.

most important.)

Daily comparison should be made of the two groups, do


solfi

sol,

ti

do and

sung on the same pitch thus:


-<s-

ZZL

ti

do

Bo
.

answer,

This practice

is all

that

is

ms=^
Sol

necessary to

as the seven tones of the scale.

~ZZ-

sol

fi

make

the

new tone

as familiar

(Do not represent the tone or say

anything about the sharp.)

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The teacher
The

will sing using the syllable loo.

pupils respond, singing the syllable names.

In groups 22 to 30, the pupils will be surprised at the peculiar effect


of la.

upon

The

teacher should encourage the natural tendency to dwell

la as the final tone of these groups.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


3 Like do,

ti,

do

#=

4 Like

do,

ti,

do, re, do 5

Like

do, re, do,

ti,

^ ^ ^^JEg=j-^-^^l ^ &-

^-^ ^ ^-.^-^-Ep

&Z3Sr\

MUSICAL DICTATION

94
10

11
g?-

22

;m

22

-&-

22

A?/

13

12

i^>

_1_4
/^\

lh-C*!-^=^Z2.
&>-

^>:

^'ha

15

s!?*= ^-^
/'

ja
19

g>

g^>

S> 2~~^
g->

/*

^-^ ^ g

16

g?~

<S>

-g^

22:

^^

2z:

18

=SZ=g^=g:
22

/a

//

22:
-<s-

/7N

S2

22:

~tz>-<^'rz>z^rT2
<s-

22:

22;

20
/TN

sib

:^ ^=j^

-<S?-

21

-<&-

221

-s-

-<S-

23

22
^T\

ib
===2: 22
-<s ^- <s*

-<^

<s>-

22: i9-

22:

222^=22

25

i^E
26
,-fr

g>

22
&^&7Z>-

/*
-<s>-

-&

&

\-^Z?

&

^ ^ &

sr

23

27

^=2=^:

29

-<^-

-<^- 2^2:

-^>-

30

a &=E^EE^EE*2Ez?2EEi=

22

2Z

--

22:

-&-

11

Written Dictation
The age and advancement
lesson

of the pupils

make

the individual written

indispensable for the remainder of the course.

Each

pupil

OCTOBER

95

should be provided with Music Writing Book

Number One.

The

fol-

lowing suggestions are made for the use of the Writing Book:

Let

i.

be known that the book

it

to be used the entire year, in-

is

spected often by the teacher, occasionally, and at the end of the year

by the
will

supervisor,

and that the pupiPs standing

music for the year

be partly basecl upon the written work in the Writing Book.


Unless there are objections from the standpoint of penmanship,

2.

use a soft pencil and eraser.

work

to be

Some

done with pen and

One written

3.

the

in

same day

lesson each

of each week.

school authorities require

all

written

ink.

week
Pupils

sufficient, preferably

is

who have a

written lesson need no other written work.

given on

high standing in this

Pupils

who

fail

should

do extra written work during the week.

The blank pages

4.

are intended for extra practice

and

for necessary

rewriting of lessons.

The

pupil should be encouraged to take pride in this permanent

record.

No

feature in the study of music

benefit to the pupil.

may

It is the best sort of individual recitation.

writing in the books, each pupil in the class

The constant use

of clefs,

rests, scales, etc., is

be made of greater

is

reciting individually.

key signatures and measure signatures, notes,

the quickest and most effective

working knowledge of the subject matter of music.


symbols apart from their practical use,
It is

and

When

is

way

of gaining a

Drilling on these

deadening and ineffective.

hoped, therefore, that every teacher will realize the importance

desirability of the regular written recitation in music.

The teacher should be systematic

in

conducting these lessons.

gin promptly, give out the material distinctly

and

clearly,

Be-

and sing or

play the melody a limited number of times.

No

school exercise in

any subject

demands concentration, and accuracy

is

of

better mental discipline.

It

thought and action, without

MUSTCAL DICTATION

96

which neither child nor adult can write correctly the music he hears.

The

first

in writing

lesson

is

a mechanical one intended to give the pupil facility

under new conditions.

Before writing Lesson III the teacher should write the Latin syllables

on the board with the phonetic marks, thus

The

do, re, mi,

fa

sol, la, ti, do.

pupils should be thoroughly familiar with the following:

In pronouncing the syllables, a always has the sound of a in ah

always has the sound of e in see

always has the sound of a in say.

The

pupil should not be asked to write

Therefore,

mastered,

any

if

it

2.

3.

recognize.

of the material for written dictation has not

should be

first

Failure in the written


i.

what he cannot

given as material for oral dictation.

work can be traced

The pupil may not

been

to one of three causes

recognize the tones.

He may know the tones and not be


He may be inattentive or careless.

able to represent them.

In order effectually to help the pupil, the teacher must

know

the cause

of his failure.

LESSON

(Music Writing Book)

The primary

object of this lesson

is

ing the symbols used in music writing.

to give the pupil practice in

The teacher should

writing with pencil or pen on a comparatively small staff

is

mak-

realize that

quite differ-

ent from blackboard writing.

The

position of body, arms, hand,

book and pen, should be

with the correct practice in the penmanship

class,

with which this work

should fully correlate, to the advantage of both subjects.


of

hand and arm,

writing.

so essential in penmanship,

is

identical

The freedom

equally essential in music

OCTOBER

The
ing

all

teacher's attention

is

habit of

(See

The constant use

I.)

nam-

called to the necessity of constantly

symbols as they are used.

Book, Lesson

97

naming each symbol,

is

list

at

bottom

of

page in Writing
with the

of the symbols, together

the quickest and surest

way

to master

musical terms.

The teacher should


the key signature
are placed first

grees on the

is

call

attention to the fact that the

always Fp

down

(fifth line),

sharp in

first

and that additional sharps

four degrees (lines and spaces), then up five de-

staff.

LESSON

II

(Music Writing Book)


Directions to the pupil are found above each exercise.

One

of the

subjects,

is

telligently.

most important duties

of the teacher in this

to teach children to read,

Pupils in

all

and

They have not been taught


dictation

is

ing powers.

work

to listen, carefully

and

oral

and written

in-

to listen or to read properly

When

effectively.

skillfully

directions.

and therefore

conducted, musical

one of the best means of developing the reading and

other

all

grades are constantly failing because they

lack the power to grasp the meaning of

lack the power to

and

listen-

the problems absolutely requires

clear perception of

The

suc-

cessful teacher cultivates the habit of careful attention to written

and

alertness, close attention,

oral directions,

and accurate and rapid thinking.

on the part of pupils.

In order to succeed with these written lessons, the pupil must read,

understand, and follow the printed directions.


to

do

in

every subject.

tions,

this is gaining a

power which

Insist, then,

before the writing begins.

is

on a

Do

The

pupil

who

learns

essential not only in music,

but

clear understanding of the direc-

not do the thinking for the pupil,

thus making him a mere machine, and robbing the activity of

its

edu-

MUSICAL DICTATION

98
cative element.

may

that he

The

directions are placed in the pupil's

himself determine what to do.

fully, disaster will

come

to his

If

are simple, the directions plain.

Both the teacher

of the failure.

Failure

in order

he does not read care-

work immediately.

and the pupil should perceive the cause

book

The problems

very often caused by the

is

inability or neglect to read intelligently.

The

teacher should remind the pupils that each figure of the measure

signature

When

fills

two

(Call attention to the printed signature.)

spaces.

there are sharps in the key signature, do

or space) above the last sharp.


ture, do is

When 'there

always the next to the

the next degree (line

is

are flats in the key signa-

last flat.

LESSON

III

(Music Writing Book)

The

teacher sings, using the syllable

ing the syllable names, and then write.

tones while writing.

hum

It

is

The

loo.

The

pupils respond, sing-

pupils should think the

highly important that no one shall sing or

audibly during the writing.

^z:

BE

-e=>

r*>

-<s>-

Directions for the remainder of

Book.

Lesson III are given in the Writing

After No. 9 has been completed,

let it

be used for reading.

upright dash below a syllable name, thus, (do

similar

upper

do.

mark above

),

signifies the

the syllable name, thus,

(do*),

An

lower do.

signifies

the

OCTOBER

99

LESSON IV
(Music Writing Book)

The

The

teacher will sing each exercise distinctly three times.

pupils will think the tones, sing aloud, then write.

"~^"
iz:

U==^

s?

1221

22:

i^z:

-<^-

Z2I

*
EM
E^:

Z2I

':

-S>-

1221

Before singing No.


the

tempo

122:

zz

22:

12I

-<^-

1221

with a neutral syllable, the teacher will indicate

(speed) while the class beats.

exercise three times, with

marked

The teacher

will

sing

the

accent, after which the pupils will

place a dash under each accented note, place the bars and the measure
signature.

When

it is

completed, have the pupils sing the melody.

NOVEMBER
TWO SOUNDS

INTRODUCTION OF

The

teacher places the following on the blackboard,

and sounds do on the pitch


accent
first

on the upper

falls

Pupils: "

tone? "

tone?"

"

Pupils:

" Beat

Teacher:

Teacher: "

When

beat."

Teacher:

beat."

The

watch

The

pipe.

class beats

She then asks: "

do.

With -the

first

beat."

and

When

and

listen,

The

do you sing the


"

Teacher:

The second

and then

did I sing the


"

me when

tell

I sing the first

teacher then beats and sings: p^pSj =S==S=z


first

tone? "

The second tone?

"

Pupils:
Pupils:

"

With the

" After

the

first
first

teacher will repeat. this several times, asking the pupils

carefully.

The teacher then beats and


rb

sings,

=&S|

etc.

continuing until the accent

and

sings until the

With the second beat."

and second tones."

to

TO ONE BEAT

falls

on the upper

do, the pupils

beating

listening.

Some

of the pupils will double the

thinking only one sound to the beat.


that every pupil

is

tempo

The

(beat twice as fast), thus

teacher should

able to beat correctly while she

asks the pupils to beat and sing.


?pp

is

make

sure

singing, before she

NO VEMBER
The
is

attention of the pupil should be called to the fact that the beat

with the

The

IOI

first

tone and that he sings the second tone after the beat.

pupil should be taught to think of the beat as an impulse repre-

The

sented by the motion of the hand or of the conductor's baton.


is

idea

similar to the heart beat, the speed of the pulse corresponding to the

tempo

of the music.

Neither does the conductor nor

There are no half-beats of the heart.

the pupil beat half-beats.


half beats.

any

If there is

tone has one, two or more beats, never

be caused by the

difficulty here it will

teacher confusing the idea of the beat with the measure value of notes

and

rests.

Material for Metric Dictation

Two Sounds
The

class will

beat and sing the following with

continuing until the accent

watch the beating

Beat

to a

carefully,

falls

on the upper

do.

the syllable

loo,

The teacher should

and make sure that each pupil

is

thinking

two sounds to one beat.


2^

3#=

3%

$2
z4:

etc.

4-

o_

- etc.
H

etc.

etc.

etc.

&

F=

etc.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


/T\
-<s>-

-&-

g^. ..S~

MUSICAL DICTATION

102

3
<S>-

;P

15L

^~&gr

-<^>-

-<S>

-2-s>

<S-

o-

-<s-

-&

<^-

iZZ.

jjl

-5>

&-

-<s>-

<^

S>-

-.s>-

-<S"

ifcz=:

O-

:9

.21

-<s>-

10

<?->

22:

g>

-<S>-

22:

12

11

-12

122

-<s-

?2~

"

122:

22
r^

g?

22:

:22

is:

22:

14

13
-<s>-

:sr

-es>-

-s>-

_si

-<s>-

-^

221

-<^>-

-<S>-

16

15
-<^>ifi?-

_<22I

"^

_2_

7TZ

1221

-<s>-

1221

-<^-<s>-

13

17

fe:
JDtZBZ

-^
=g== s?

-^-

Introduction of

The presentation

of these

(See page 92.)

fi.

ffjt

_~22I

The

new

Z)z, i/,

tones

is

C^ fey

name

for the

by changing the

last

teacher will sing each group, using a neutral

names.

The pupils

Let them discover

chromatic tone just above the scale tone,

sound to

ee.

is

found

Call attention to the one already

known, fa, fi, then begin: Teacher: "Do,"

Pupils: " Di;"

Teacher:

Teacher:

Re,"

Pupils:

" Ri;"

Teacher:

"Fa,"

Pupils:

" Fi;"

"Sol?*

Pupils:

"Si;"

Teacher:

" La,"

Pupils:

"LI"

11

-?22"

similar to the introduction of

be at a loss to find names for the new tone.

that the

122:

67 and L/

syllable, the pupils will respond, singing the syllable


will

-f^|g

NO VEMBER
'

Bring out the fact that each of these

The teacher should


as

What

these?

continually ask:

others? "

new groups sound like do ti do.


" What tones sound the same

Never

etc.

12

I03

allow the answer

be

to

spoken.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


~^~

321

Do

ti

vz?i

di

re

do,

mi

re,

5=221
sol

The

f'S?-

fi

-&-

1221

this fact.

ti

and

12T

rz

#z/,

-<S-

si

la,

do.

ti

is

221

mi

fa

fa,

ZSZL

*=*

la

sol,

5^-

pupils will notice that there

or between

-<^>-

I2I

j^

-<^-

122:

li

do

ti,

do.

ti

no new tone between mi and fa,

The teacher should frequently

call

attention to

It will be useful in future lessons.

After a few days, the pupils will combine the foregoing into the following sequential exercise with very

little

assistance.

It

the pupil to do everything he can for himself.

is

always best for

Thereby he gains

strength.

Sequential Exercise.

^m

d&=3L

G:

Series
dt

at

=fr

I*

^f^

?>==*:

IN

tiF-

F=fc

=fe

first

**

This exercise should be sung daily until learned.


the

term, each singing pupil should sing

freely as possible.

Care should be taken with

a tendency to sing

la instead of

li.

it

Before the end of

alone as rapidly and

ti li ti.

There

is

usually

MUSICAL DICTATION

I04

LESSON V
(Writing Book)
Full directions for the pupil will be found in the Writing Book.

After completing No.

mi

dictating

la

5,

use

it

mi a few times

subsequent lesson,

for reading at a

to assist the pupils in the third

first

measure

after the repeat.

LESSON VI
(Writing Book)

The teacher
three

will sing

times, using

tones but

make no

each of the following, clearly and distinctly,

the syllable

The

pupils should

think

the

audible sound, either before or during the writing.


2

__v

loo.

|f

*>

jr

f(\\

tu

'

v-ly

^
^^

^~
'-

r^>
-J
~C?

%J

-g>

&>-

g?
^-^2z^:iz^r-g?
^>^
I
_ &
~ gg
^ s-^
^
ds- -^*^ ^
1

^ ^

LJ^Z

-& =
<s>-

<^

Directions for Nos.' 9 and 10 are in the Writing Book.

WESSON

VII

(Writing Book)

The sharp
teacher

will

helps the staff to indicate the


sing

with the syllable

loo.

new tones, ri and ft.


The pupils should

carefully, then write:


2

5P

3
22:

321

S^ft g

:^

The
listen

NOVEMBER

eAI

& sr

-^

ez

'7zr

I05

t?-

TZ$r=
22==5^Z==3S.
Tzr

321

SZ

'^Z?

~1Z?L

LESSON

JBL

-<5>-

*^
II

VIII

(Writing Book)
Sing with syllable

loo.

Pupils do not sing audibly.


2

^ZZ\^^

~&-

~ZZL

-s>-

-&

^&-

ZSZ

-~z?~

-<^>-

-49-

ZZ
"C?"

:c2

mw

L2_~

zs:

122 -&-

~Z2L

CJ

7Z?~

'Z2~?z?-

-g?

-JZ2L

'Z21

szzz

-^-iS*-^s:
^r-G,^2-

9
ZSIZ

^^^-^-^-"^=^1

DECEMBER
Six-Part Measure

The teacher
the

will sing the following excerpt

and only a

first,

having asked the

Many

ure.

Lead the
with the

with a strong accent on

on the fourth beat

slight accent

class to try to discover the

number

of the measure,

of beats in a

meas-

think there are three beats in a measure.

will

class to perceive that there are six beats, a strong accent

first,

and a

of the similarity

slight accent

with the fourth beat.

Remind them

which they found between two two-part, and one four-

part measure, and point out the same likeness here between two three-

part and one six-part measure.

zjvzzjvniszzj-.^i:
&-

#
.

While the teacher sings the melody again, the


six to the

The

-=)-?

_l-i*.

class beats

and counts

measure.

teacher will use the following excerpt in the same way, singing

with a slow, swinging rhythm:


*=;

&

=$

~9

Undoubtedly the
While some

<3-

class

knows

s==fc

dS
"9

several rote songs in six-part measure.

of the pupils sing the song, the others

may

beat and count

the six-part measure.

Place the following melody on the blackboard and have the pupils
sing

it

with the syllables.

^ft=*=*=^

d
I

106

fa

*
1

-f

DECEMBER
The
bars,

I07

teacher, or a pupil, will erase the

change the upper figure

in the

first,

third, fifth

measure signature to

and seventh
6,

and

indi-

cate the accents, thus:

-^iV 8-

W=*

One group
and beats

'*'-

fc

t^=^=^=F

of pupils sings

six to

*^=fc=iv
* *

'Mz~m:.

and

-9

Another group

beats.

*~

-<?

of pupils counts

the measure.

Place the following rhythms on the blackboard, one at a time, and


direct that the pupils continue to beat

on the upper
1

sing until the accent falls

do.

r*^
+-*

**

*^Saz

a
i=t

etc.

rs

etc.

:=]:

+-*-+

ft

and

m>>-

etc.

^^hFP^

*-

^-

etc.

JH*-*r
h^B-M w

1
^&==s
*5^*
-d-

etc.

& ^-3-3-4^-3-^-

-=3-^-^-3-^-

etc.

a=s
8

&

f5*^

S^

SS

etc.

8:

etc.

Jmt

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


Both the teacher and the pupil should think and sing these tones as
groups, not as individual tones.

them

freely

and not slowly,

The
'

F
E

striving to lead the pupil to grasp the group

The teacher

as one thought.

Therefore, the teacher should sing

(or

a pupil) sings with a neutral syllable.

pupils respond, singing the syllable names.

g?

<g-

'2Z2L

-JZ21

CS

5^

4r

22:

MUSICa L DICTATION

io8

-<S>

221

4_

22~

Eli

^^-^p-

221

-<S-

-<s>-

zz -<s>- 22!

-tS c-* <^-

-<S>-

32:

^=22z2=3s=fc

22."

221

221

22:

'g^~ H^

s?

22:

<s>2T.Z=22=^=22

& %ZZ-

22.

10

9
=3CT=

/7N

g?"

/<*

^-^^l^=ftc? "fc^

22:

11

12
"g^

ZJt

22:

rrv

gy

-<s-

<S^=22=E=Z^

22ZII22

-<S>-

~g?"

:=c=22:

22:

22:

22:

-<s>-

22:

16
-<^-

:22zg^=22:

22=&

-<s>-

g2

.^
H

gz:

^
m -s>

-<s-

cs

22:

-<^-

22
_

g>

~~
g^

Z=2~

g2~

20

19
4 *

tr

-__

(^^

22:
-^-

22:
i^

(^^

2__

~e*>

sz

<^

S?

2-

22:

22

21

IP

^z

-<s-

18

17

:2=
22:

<s>-

-c?

15

rsz:

14

13

rffel

22"

:c2

22:

22=1221

22

22"

22=Z^=Z22=Z^:

22:

-<^-

'g?~

DECEMBER

IO9

24

/ts

25

/rs

-^

1221

l~Z?~
r^

g^

2SZZ.-^I

28

27

32=: Tg?~

i^zkz: o-c-

"23?"

^EEE^E=
Cr

Three and Four Sounds to One Beat


The teacher sounds

and asks the pupils

cfo,

to beat

and

The

listen.

teacher beats and sings the following, keeping the six counts in the

measure perfectly even.

5S

m^-'

4"

E3::

The teacher then asks the


sings again.

"With

Pupils:

tones?"

and

The

S~^S

TT1
3tMUi^

pupils to beat

teacher then asks: "

the

first

Pupils: " After the

first

liS^fe

d=3

did I sing the

"The

The

beat."

The teacher should watch

beat.

(-

and count by

When

Teacher:

beat."

carefully

etc.

she
"
tone?

sixes, as
first

second and third

pupils should then sing

and

see that each pupil

beats only two to the measure.

Again the pupils beat and

The

following.

eight

listen while the teacher beats

and

sings the

tones should be perfectly even, with no break

between the groups.

By

calling attention to her beating

and

singing,

etc.

and

to their own, the

teacher will lead the pupils to see that there are four sounds to each
beat, that the first tone

The

the beat.

accent

One

falls

or

is

sung with the beat and the other three after

class should then beat

on the upper

and

sing,

continuing until the

do.

two minutes daily practice on the following should

the ability to feel and sing two, three,

and four sounds

result in

to the beat.

MUSICAL DICTATION

no
The most important

feature of this practice

is

that the pupil shall feel

the rhythm as he looks at the representation, before beginning to sing.

The teacher

places two measures of one of the following on the board,

sounds do, indicates the tempo while the class begins beating, and then
directs the class to sing,

The

three eighth notes here sung to one beat

have the same measure valuers two eighths when the figure 3
with them.

3r

The group thus used

U-U4&=?

Loo

etc.

etc.

Loo

"1""i

Each

of the three

with the others.

used

called a triplet.

is

loo ho, etc.

Loo ho ho ho,

is

loo loo, loo loo ho, etc.

etc.

t~^~'

~~,h

EnB3
!~

'

'

etc.

rhythms

The use

is

more

of loo

clearly understood

when compared

makes the singing a valuable vocal

drill.

LESSON

IX

DECEMBER

(Writing Book)
Sing each group as one thought, distinctly, and with marked rhythm,
as indicated

by the dash.

Always use a neutral

syllable in giving dicta-

In this lesson, allow the pupils to sing the syllable

tion.

names before

writing.
2

3
-&t-

-s-

-<s>-

CJ

ZZ2Z_I

1^2

-r?

221 ST

*G>-

"C

2Z^2Z

-<S>-

$=^= 9

zj

^ &
-^J

^>

-*^-

It

-^p^. -&*=>~

DECEMBER

III

8
22:

-&-

-&- jzr

-&-

-<s-<s>-

&&-

"C?~

-&-

-&-

-&II

LESSON X
(Writing Book)

The

teacher sings; the pupils write.


2

1
:

g2~

OTte

-&&-

22

-?*?&>

&-

-s>-

-s>-

22"

-s>-

6
g^ g^

35

_.EJ&

-<S>-

32"^ SZIS2

e^-ZST

zz:

i^

32:

22:

-S>-

32:

22==32=^===:

r~=

32

^&- 7Z>-&-r?- &>-

LESSON

XI

(Writing Book)
All the exercises in this lesson are sequential

and are known by the

pupils.

The

teacher will sing each rapidly with a neutral syllable, twice.

The

pupils will then write,

mm^^?=
fer-g^

-<s>-

-2-

22:

-<S>-

p2

-<s

c^-

J
<z?

32:

-s>-

F=!===1:
~^

-4
<rj

-*rz)

=t
-s>

g*-

-e-

ii

Whole notes

12=32:

22=32:

^y
-<s>-

32=32:

32:

'2'
-<S>

32:

MUSICAL DICTATION

112

Whole notes

lH
m

'^21

-<s>-

-<&-

-&-

~&L

izz.

i^:

-<&-

-<?-

Whole notes

-<&-

-^

22:

Z2I

-&-

22:

-<s>-

122:

-^

&-

<S>

Whole notes
'Z2Z
122:

-&-Gh

I2I

-&-

-&-

LESSON

Z2I

J5L

-&<S>

2
**

&-

XII

(Writing Book)

The

teacher should sing each group distinctly and with a free swing-

ing rhythm, three times.

The

pupils should not sing audibly.

Teach the

attention and perfect silence are essential.


syllable

names before giving

-<s>

this lesson.

spelling of the

(See Writing Book.)

nz,

^^~^=^

122:

&

$=

-&-

Close

-&-

~Z2L

Z21

e=$pz=e=&.

6
221

-&-

g
IZ

<s>-

z?

-&

g^"
-<s>-

'^~^~

JANUARY
Individual tests and assisting the slower pupils, will be the special

work

for this

The

No new

month.

problems

will

be taken up.

tactful teacher will be able to enlist the services of

one or more

strong pupils in helping the slower ones, to the great advantage of both.

pupil unusually strong in music, will,

given an opportunity, volun-

if
t

teer to assist another pupil designated

can be given outside of

class hours.

by the

The

teacher.

This assistance

pupils will greatly enjoy

" playing school " and surprisingly good results will follow,
is

tactfully

The

if

the plan

managed.

teacher will

make

list

of the pupils, at the left of several

blank

columns, in a book supplied by the superintendent or the supervisor.

This book should be approximately seven inches by eight and one-half


inches.

pages

By cutting away the margin over the names, the


may be used for the June report without rewriting

The columns should be arranged


Names

John Bright
Robert Burns

and

the names.

as follows:

Sequential Exercises, Series A,


B, D, E and G

A, B,

succeeding

Writing

Remarks

Book

90

Cannot sing

Evidently has adenoids


Needs medical attention

Mary Smith
John Stout

All O.K.

Series

95

only

Enjoys playing teacher

From another town


Never had music before
Improving rapidly

"3

MUSICAL DICTATION

H4
Pupils

who

written work

quickly complete the individual singing tests and whose


good, should be excused from the music class a part of

is

the time this month, in order that more attention

One

slower pupils.

who

of several plans

be given to the

be followed with the pupils

are to be excused from the music class.

i.

They may be allowed

2.

They may

3.

They may

music period

is

to prepare other lessons.

assist slower pupils.

occasionally be allowed to go

home

early (when the

the last recitation in the forenoon or afternoon).

They may be allowed

4.

may

may

fair trial will

to read

an approved book.

convince the teacher that these individual tests and

systematic plans to aid the slower pupils will produce excellent results.

The many
They

will

beneficial effects of this

work need not be enumerated

be evident when the scheme

is

fairly tried.

here.

FEBRUARY
Study of Do, Mi and Sol

The names

of the scale tones

have been learned and a certain

has been gained in the singing of the scale and parts of the

knows the

pupil

intervals.

It is

facility

scale.

The

whole and has begun the study of larger

scale as a

important now to know the character of each tone of

the scale and to learn to appreciate the effect of each tone resulting from
its

relation to others.

Every tone has a physical

When
there

effect

due to

its pitch,

loudness,

quality.

several tones are closely associated, as are the tones of the scale,

another effect caused by the relation of the tones to each other,

is

which

is

called a

mental or relational

Each tone

effect.

distinct relational characteristics, the perception of

to the pupil, giving


scale

and

than

The

is

him a

clearer

and more

which

definite

is

invaluable

knowledge

of the

otherwise possible.

teacher should not attempt to teach the mental effects of the

scale tones until they are a reality in her


this or

of the scale has

any other

statement that do

text,
is

own mind.

To

accept from

without careful thought and appreciation, the

a firm, strong, controlling tone; that sol

grand, trumpetlike tone; that

mi

is

is

a bright,

a calm, steady, peaceful tone, and

then proceed to try to lead pupils to perceive these characteristics,

would be worse than

useless.

The

teacher should study simple melodies

and

satisfy herself that these relational characteristics really exist.

will

soon discover that, without changing the pitch, the loudness, or the

quality of a given tone,


or restless

it

may

be made to sound firm and

and dependent, simply by making

scale.

"5

it

She

self-reliant

a different tone of the

MUSICAL DICTATION

n6
The

close association of

two

colors, blue

and green,

for example, does

not change the physical qualities of either, yet the change in the mental

from

effect resulting

The

their close association

real

is

and unmistakable.

bold, strong, self-reliant tones of the scale are do,

mi and

sol.

Notice the effect of these three tones in the opening of the Gloria in

Mozart's Twelfth Mass.

:?4

g^
The

"Lights

vl5

<=-

-Q-

I22~

321

firm, solid character of these three tones

The

calls.

f*

is

evident in

Out"

Salute the

-^>

yj-yr

jMub:

lU.

=t

:2i

Notice the firm and self-reliant effect of do, in


given above.

we

In a way,

Its firmness

do.

will refer to

Guard "

/T\

SEE

upon

trumpet

all

following are examples:

u
-

all

three examples

all

the other tcnes of the scale are dependent

and strength are dominant

do and think of

it

as the " firm

traits.

Therefore,

and strong " tone

of the

scale.

The

first

presentation to the class of the characteristics of each scale

tone should be

made

as grapnic

teacher must have clearly in


the

and

first

The

mind the mental

effect of the tone.

For

presentation, she should choose a time

attentive, as

inite.

possible.

and interesting as

it is

most important that the

The piano may be used

to great

when
first

the class

is

alert

impression be def-

advantage in assisting the pupil

FEBRUARY
to perceive the

harmonic

work

at

effects of the different tones,

any one

in playing

lesson.

Study of

The teacher asks

and

Only two or three minutes should be spent with

the bugle calls, etc.


this

117

Do

the pupils to listen and then

tone do seems to be; whether

it is

firm

and

her what sort of a

tell

weak and

solid, or

restless,

She sounds do and then sings the following phrase, using the

etc.

syllable

names and bringing out

33E

clearly the character of do.

:i

>:b

The teacher then

sings the following phrase


/T\

^BSJE
The

firm, solid effect of do

-f=-

may

be well illustrated by singing the

phrase and stopping just before the last tone.


irresistible

and strong character


to the teacher

who

is

The

sign.

to the right,

sign

Numerous ways

of

making the firm

and

The manual

do.

sign for do

may now
is

be em-

indicated

She sings do and at the same

arm

closes the

in front

hand

and

slightly

firmly, thus:

pupils imitate the teacher's pattern

raising the

themselves

sufficiently interested to collect characteristic

teacher explains that each tone of the scale

time extends her right

The

pupils will have an

of do clear to the pupils will suggest

examples of the use of

by a hand

The

impulse to sing the do, thus completing the phrase and reach-

ing a comfortable stopping place.

ployed.

:P

arm

for the

^^

-i jj

lff'B|.l\

and sing as she makes the

upper do and lowering

it

for the lower do.

MUSICAL DICTATION

n8

Study of Sol

The

following day, sol

may

be presented

bold, brilliant, trumpet-like effect

Many

is

in a similar

is

"

m4

Shall

a good illustration:

+=w-

The trump

and

firm, bright

The Trumpet

Sol

*i

The

characteristic of this scale tone.

striking examples can be easily found.

Sound," from Handel's Messiah,

manner.

-C2-

solid qualities of

4-

sound.

shall

et

-C2-

both do and

shown

sol are

in

the next two excerpts:


Sol
r-ftfe*

3: -*-+- g^T-

The trump -et

shall

:*zfc*:

^-*

The trump

sound,

et

Now

to

Hence we will

The

-<S>

tt=
shall

II

sound.
-<s>-

Heav'n our prayer as

call it "

Do

-<s-

cend

ing,

God

speed the

characteristics of sol are seen to be brilliancy

tone."

'#=2

The

*^-

right.

and grandeur.

the bright and grand

teacher sings sol with a bright

and cheerful quality and at the same time


extends the right
right,

arm

to the front

and

opening the hand with the thumb

upwards, thus:

The

pupils imitate the teacher, singing as they

make

the hand signs

for the following groups of tones:


3

:z2i

-&-

s:

TdzrrzF.

^>
-

-dS*-

-(& s>-

iS-

is

:szi_s-_s
-<s> <s>-

FEBRUARY

kn

fS>

<s>

&

<S>-

-&-

119

Do
j&.
.&.

fT2~-

<*2~.

-&

-tZi-

<S>-

The teacher

S3

7^^-

" Sing the firm

tone/'

etc.,

22

-1

will also dictate as follows,

signs:

and strong

tone.

<S-

without using the manual


Sing the bright and grand

always encouraging the pupils to think of the character of

each tone as they

When

~&.

is:

zz -&

sing.

the pupils are thoroughly familiar with the tones do and sol

and can sing them readily from the description or from the manual
the exercises should be placed on the blackboard, the pupils

signs,

singing and following the pointer.

As

Study of

Mi

soon' as the pupils can sing do

and

manual

signs

The

readily,

both from the

and from the blackboard, the teacher should present the

Mi

next tone, mi.


family.

sol

is

the quiet, sweet, peaceful

member

of the tone

teacher will sing the following melodies, asking the pupils

to notice the effect produced

by the tone mi.

Quietly
I

3W\
*m
fc

pi
s>-

-<Sh

-s>-

:i -&-

-<s-

-<s>

~Z-IZL

i m%-&-

&

22

-&-

~Z2.

#*=

MUSICAL DICTATION'

120

She

will sing the three tones, do,

mi and

sol,

giving each

arm

to the front

sign for mi, which

is

and

/T\

right, she sings, r

made with

^E^221

the open t

peculiar

Then extending

atmosphere and dwelling especially upon the mi.


right

its

the

n making the

Do

palm downAs

^^^j^^^^r

MMh

before, the pupils will imitate the teacher in

they are familiar with

The

of the

syllables.

The

manual

firmness of the do, the brilliancy of the

sol,

mi should be constantly kept

and the
in

mind.

teacher should practice making the manual signs before a mirror,

until she

can change from one to another quickly, easily and accurately.


2

I Sol

-&-

-<^~

-&-<s>-<s>-

by the teacher

responding by singing the

signs, the pupils

calm, peaceful character of the

0*

sign, until

it.

following groups of scale tones will be indicated

by means

The

making the

-<s>-

-&-

-&-

-<&-

-<s>-<s>-

-<s>-<s>-

Do

So!

J /1T
XT

AlLZ_
_

6
iz:
122:
-<s-

&-

I2I

2Z

~ZZL

-O

<^-

8
-ZZL

-S>

*s-<S>-

-<s>

&-

-<S>

-&-

5-

10

n-c^-

r^

>^>

~&-

&

r^

g^

r^j

=
-<S

<S^

FEBRUARY
Whenever the

I2 i

pupils are able to sing these tone groups readily from

the manual signs, they should be placed on the blackboard and sung

hand of the teacher or one

again, the pupils following the pointer in the

of the pupils.

Attention should be called to the following facts:


i.

do

is
2.

is

When
on a

do

is

on a space, mi and

on spaces and the other

sol are also

line.

When

do

is

on a

line,

mi and

sol are also

on

lines

and the other do

on a space.

Introduction of Two-part Singing

many

For

reasons

best to defer two-part singing until the pupil

it is

has formed safe vocal habits and

with comparative

is

able to read

No normal

facility.

and

sing one-part music

child should

be allowed, much

less required, to sing the lower part exclusively, although all should

learn to sing a second part.

The

consume but a moment

practice suggested below should

after its first presentation,

sought

is

and should be

to give the pupil the

another tone at the same time.

power to sing one tone and


This

not be underestimated or neglected.

is

The

No

object

listen to

new problem which should


entire singing experience of

the pupil has been along the line of matching tones.


to refrain

The

entirely oral.

daily,

Now

he

is

asked

from matching tones.

difficulty

whatever

follow directions

and

is

will

be found, provided the teacher

willing to go slowly

for the ear of the pupil to

and allow

become accustomed

to the

new

able to

is

sufficient

time

effects.

After separating the class into two divisions, equal in numbers and
singing ability, the teacher sounds do,

Sing

sol

fa mi.

fa mi and hold

Division

mi"

sing

and

and hold

says:
sol;

" Sing do
division

mi

sol.

sing sol

MUSICAL DICTATION

122

" Sing do

mi

Sing sol

sol

fa

Sing and hold

mi.

1221

IZi

2-

2^"

"Sing j^//

>'i

The singing should not be

loud.

Both

sol.

^z

(S>-

#*/." **

divisions will at first find

some

difficulty in sustaining the tone.

After singing No. 3 several times, change parts, division


sol

fa mi and division

On

holding

sol.

This

singing

sufficient for the first time.

is

succeeding days, take up one of the following each day, in the

same manner.
Oral directions are to be given to each division before the singing
begins, as in

No.

3.

Slowly

pffi?

zz

1221
-2-

-2_

m=t
I/-**

-1

~Z2~

8
1

1*52+

-2_

10

SEES
P
r

11

-J

J231
22.

Introduction of Te

The
loo

teacher sounds d# and sings the following, using the syllable

fk &b z

Most

1^2:

of the class

promptly

sing:

^=^

-Tfc frfr

11
.?/

The teacher

y<z

wi

agrees that the tones sound like sol fa

the class that the

The

-<s>-

first

tone

teacher sings again.

is

do and the last


If

mi but reminds

is la.

no one knows the new tone, she sings

FEBRUARY
and the pupils

the syllables,

sound

sol

$=22:
/kb b

Frequent comparison of

that

is

yiz

can sing the new combination


then the teacher will

know

'<s>-

do

//

la

te

Whenever the pupil

tone.

before having heard the sol fa

first,

new tone

the

st=6

and

I2I

new

necessary to master the

what tones

teacher asks

fa mi.

-<s>-

j^/

is all

The

imitate.

and the pupils sing

like these,

123

tni,

mastered; not before.

is

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


Study
2
Like

Like

[M

fa mi

sol

Do

sol la sol fa
-S-

?_

la

Do

mi

Like

22=6

IS2I

do

la

'^5>-

12I

te

Te

of

re

te

Do

sol fa

mi fa mi

la

te

la

te

4
Like mi fa mi

as

czfizfe

22:

Z#

!<S>-

:2i

la

te

Like sol la

zz

IW

Z>#

Like sol la

ti

o-

Do

la sol fa

122

w*

r*

s>-

22=6&do

re

Do

re

mi

22=6,'<S>-

:22:

do

la

te

8
Like mi fa mi re do

22=6,'<^fe

d<?

r<?

sol la sol fa

1221

-2l-

do

te

mi

--

Like

sol fa sol

I2I

:22:

la

La

)&h
-<s>-

te

la

1^2

fa

sol

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

"

i
-9-

Review
2
-<s>-

<s-

22:

221

22

<^>-\-&

&-

^^gr

-<s>-

122
r

&>-\-

Z2I

r^
&IS

:^

g?

^?

-s -|-s>- IT2I

22:

<^

-^

_^2I

^ ^ bg?-

Z7

22:

II

MUSICAL DICTATION

124

iW

O Cfer

-^- i&-

-S>- 221

10

O- g

g? 223^=22:
^l

11

^ ^

22:

IS

C?

<

g?-

g krjO

-<s>.

S^z^E:

-S-

12
-7^t=>7Z>- -&-

13

1^=2222^
Z2I

-- -tS-

O-

-<S>-

-S>-

14
-9-<S>-

"g7
22:

222g>

<^-

-g>

rfdt

>

15 2fc
-

-
-s>-

-ts 1

c?

-e>-

22:

^21

22:

16
221

"^

-S-

-^-

?2~

-<s>-

22:

LESSON

222

-&>-

22:

-<s>-

"C ii
-

XIII

(Writing Book)
Directions are in the Writing Book.
the habit of

naming

all

cultivate

terms as she uses them, including the names of

the staff degrees (lines and spaces).

used to designate upper and lower

*-*-

The teacher should

In No. 5 the sign

(')

and

(,)

is

letters.

5
22:
CI

E'

-s>-

Di

22:
Bi

22: -&22: -&-

C A

22ZZ*=*ZZ2
-&>-

EG

LESSON XIV
(Writing Book)
Directions are in the Writing Book.

Use No.

2 for

reading.

D'

MARCH
The Minor Scale
So far nothing has been said about the minor
pupils have

become

and written

dictation.

familiar with the effect of the minor through oral

Exactly the same tones are used in the minor

as in the major scale.

and

recognize

For the present

two

sing

although the

scale,

scales, the

sufficient for the pupil to

it is

major

and the minor

(do) scale,

(la)

scale.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The

teacher should always sing the oral dictation material with a

and the pupils respond, singing the

neutral syllable,

^-^^

ig

II

&- 22
-<s>-

Iw

^g

syllable names.

g^-

&>|-tS>

~zz. -<s-

22" -&- 1221

-g? ^-

<& V-(S>

<s>-

g;

g>-

22:

tS?-

22:

~Z2L

-tS>-

mP

-<s-

22~s?~

&*

-<s> <s- zzz.

22:

22

0> d2

11

s?

22:

r^
;

;^
1

^-^22= =g

14
g^

SS

g^_g
!

^ g? -

g*

22:
22:

22:

22:

'^~P'

22: -<s^

12
22:

-<s-

ggft^u gg

15
gy-l

^ 7=r\-rz>

Material for the Study of

it

-<2> <S>-

-g?~gy -2_2.

Z)o,

221

-<S^

22:

A/7 and Sol

3
22:

oI2S

22

g>

22:

22:

22:

22:

MUSICAL DICTATION

126

Teacher: " Sing the firm, strong tone.

(i)

Sing the bright, grand

(Raising the hand to indicate the upper

tone."

steady tone,"

The

" Sing the calm,

sol.)

etc.

pupils sing the tones described, using the syllable

names and

holding each tone until directed to sing the next.

Teacher: " Sing the firm, strong tone.

(2)

(Making the manual

tone."

Sing the bright, grand


" Sing the calm,

sign for upper sol.)

peaceful tone," etc.

Material for the Study of Ti


These two tones are there-

Ti has a strong tendency leading to do.

The

fore almost tied together.

following series are

all

The

sequential.

pupil will complete the series after the teacher sings two or three groups.

A:

Series

ft:
-Gh

-G- -Gh

"Z>-

~G~ -G\

&

-G-

JZZ-

c?^

-Gh

~ZZ?-

-G- 221
~G~

%-h
1221

-&-

4Sh

"S7

-G>

~G~

z=z^r=-z?=^
-G>-

*-G

I2T

"G'

8
221 -GISZ -G-G-G- 221
22" -G>-

Series

*
4

221 -G-

-G

-?Z>-

-G- 221
22" -G-

221

22: -G-

22=ir22

22: -G-

-G221

22ZZI22

221

22~ 122

-&-

221

r22I

-G-

-&T

-r-G-

221

-G>-

-JZZT.

MARCH

127

6
Sg=g
=*fcl

<s>_

-<&-

ie:

ZZ

TSL -&-

2Z

'zz^^r-^-

-<&- 1221

-<&-

2^?Z3

zy

11

Series C:

S*-^

ic?j

zz:

3f

icz:

-<s>-

3=2:

-'^'

22:

-<s- ic?:

-<s>-

-s?-

^ ^

c -^

122_~

^> g?

122:

^"^

o~^

122:

-<&-

c^f

C"

Study of 77

The mental

effect of

The teacher asks


or not the

ti

now be

will

evident.

the pupils to notice while she sings, and see whether

melody

is

She suggests that they

complete.

tones which appear to be necessary.

The teacher then

may add any

sings the follow-

ing with the syllable names:

Do

3=1=

t%

II
Do

Many
is

in the class will be impelled to sing

=
g?

jjp

1 1

After this

repeated, the teacher does the same, with the following:


mi

3S

Sh

Several questions are


"

Where does

"

Do and

Why

not?

Ti

firm, solid

is

" What

r-%=^
-ts;

ti

ti

now

in order,

li^pE
such as the following:

seem to lead?

are very

much

and

alike, are

restful, is it

sort of a tone is ti? " etc.

they not?

not?

II

MUSICAL DICTATION

128

The teacher
a

will

have led the pupils to see that

restless, piercing tone, strongly

The

teacher will

sung she

will

make

ti is

leading to do.

then sing do

ti

do; as

the following sign for

is

ti

thus:

ti,

following this immediately with the sign for do.

Material for Practice with Manual Signs or Oral Direction


122:

-o-

-*&>-

g? r^i
cr (&

The

who plays
harmony and a

little skill in

tensify the effects caused

example,
reposeful.

is

restless,

by changes

do in the chord of

in

"cr

II

^3*-

flat

modulation, can materially

When

in scale relation.

major, the effect

Let the player retain the

dominant seventh
a

zzj*

I2I

the piano and has even an elementary knowl-

teacher

edge of

---<s>-

-<s>-

and

is

and

chord of the

Instantly the sound of

major.

A, for

satisfactory

strike the

in-

ti

produces

unsatisfying feeling coupled with a strong desire to go at once

to the do (B flat).

The

supervisor will graphically illustrate these tone colorings, to the

great advantage of

all

concerned.

Without a

clear

notion of the

characteristic qualities of each scale tone, the pupil will be seriously

handicapped in the further study

of music.

LESSON XV
(Writing Book)

The

pupils should sing the scales after they are written.

should give the pitch of do only.

themselves in Nos.

2,

4 and

6.

The

The

teacher

pupils should find the pitch for

MA RCH

I29

LESSON XVI
(Writing Book)
Speak

of the

major scale from F, the minor scale from D,

pupils should sing the entire lesson after

it is

The

etc.

completed.

LESSON XVII
(Writing Book)

The

teacher will sing each group with a neutral syllable not more

In this lesson, allow the pupils to respond, singing

than three times.


the syllable names.

fAk- -&-

-&-

-&- -o-

1221

vS>-?"

p^i|i|=^=^=^:

JSL

I2I
~G?~

122:

&-*n&ijtez

-<s>-

-<s-

~c
Sol

~&-

-<^-

-<s>
-<s>-

^
cz: &

'ZZL

jfcf*

7
I2I

\i

^_i-^_
^3S=Z2

221

t^-

8
=fcfc

-^-<s>-

-<s>-

/SN

-s>-

7Z?1

-<s>-

I2I

1221

-<S>-

'Z2i -<S>-

~2ZZL

LESSON XVIII
(Writing Book)

The

pupil will place the notes indicated

signature.
(fee'-na)

Da Capo

and measure
Fine

means "the end."

beginning.
1,

syllables

(da ka'-po) means " from the beginning."

In the singing, see that the repeat

No.

by the

Have

is

made

before going back to the

the class sing in three divisions, one division singing

another singing No.

2,

and the

third,

No.

3.

APRIL
Study of Re
Each

should complete the series after

series is sequential; the pupil

two or three groups have been sung or called for by the teacher.
courage the pupils to

re.

A:

Series
-g>

the r in singing

roll

En-

221

t-

&>

22~ -&-

^__^_^.

Z2

1221

Z2

<s>-

iz

-&-

L22I

Z2I

'121

-&-

STZSZ
&>1221 -e- "22"

Series

-&>-

1221

-<&-

-(S -

XT

22:
1221

"22"

-&-

221

#=^=32:

-&-

, a*

wt~
g^^-^-^- L ^-^-^-^-^-2^-

122:

-S>-

-S>- "22"

'Z^l

-r?*=?"22" -&-

"22"

"22"

-s>-

:22I

"22" -S>- 122:

22:

5-

-t^--

"22"

1221
"22"

Series C:
:i22z:

-<&-s>-

1221

-&-

122:

^Z2L

_<V-

-S>-

122ZZ: S

-s>-

^2-

"22"

22".ZZ

"22"

bz^zhz:

-^-

-<s-

Z2I

221

zz
122:

;-

-<S2-

130

E3

APRIL

131

Series

~Z21 *^>

-&- I2Z

^&-r?-^
TZ?

-^p

aP

g?

^5

~Z?~

c?

"C

ZZZ

"2?"

pr

tfS*

~C2~ -S?-

I
W

'?' -S>- IB2I

cr--

"C~

Study of Re

221

1221

1Z?~

lss:

-*S>-

"BT^

7?'

"^^ i

(Continued)

After the foregoing, the pupils will see that the effect of re
different

from that produced by

ticed that re
of
is

ti,

moves naturally

with more

mi and

by

its

use in street

following, first with the syllable

The

will

teacher will sing the

(rolling the r in re),

with the words:

re

Do
:2:

>-*
Dai

ly

pa

pers,

dai

ly

pa

pers.

re

Sol

gm

^=wBuy

:=S
-

my

soles,

^^P^
buy

have no-

rousing character of re

The

cries.

names

They

sol.

quite

Re has the moving quality

to do or mi.

vigor and strength.

life,

well illustrated

do,

is

my

live

soles.

and then

MUSICAL DICTATION

132

made

After having

clear that re

ful tone, the teacher will sing

do

re,

is

a rousing, hope-

and make the sign

for re thus:

Material for the Study of Do, Mi,

To be

and Re

Sol, Ti,

given by the teacher by means of the manual signs.

The hand

should be raised for the high tones and lowered for the low tones.
1

32

jg

i& 22:

22:

&^

<

-^

-&

32: ^^

-&-

22: i-

SS5
i

-<s>-

22

-^?"

g?

| -(S'

22

-<s>-

-<s- 22:

22: -ts

=T

9
22:

-^ 221

221

^ 2Z

22:

tzt

12
221

"Z^"

Z><?

11

10

~Z?-

6
-&-

=7^r

-&-

-<S>-

Do

221

-&-

-O-

-&-

~^Z_Tzr

221

221
-<S^ 22:

14

13
22:

-^ :

221

(The study

221

of /a

221

and

i9-

/a will

22ZZZ72

221

22:

1221

-i9-

"g?-

be introduced at the beginning of the

fourth year.)

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The two-part
signs.

exercises should be given

(Seepage 121.)

by

direction, or with

manual

APRIL

ZZ

*=

-<&-

22:

133

-^=2=l=^_^

-<s-

221

3:

^=32ZZfe

-<s>-

:^2i

&

-c

"S?"

_^:

-<s>-<s>-

6
g>

/ v>

22;

<

^ff
olt

(&)

^= ^

^-

*z

^-^7<S^

#= Q

<S>- rj

-<S-

--=
-w
L

<s

-^ 5"
ij

'

j^d
>

H
12

11
eS>-

Z2~

2Z=S

-?-

7fVb
fi#L_

j-^d

/!3

c-^

10
<sl_<s>

122:

C*>

i?^2

-<S- !?_

ZZ

ie:

^^
^^

e^=-i
1

j-<s>-

-^

-(S>-

&/

13

J-

-2-

14
j

i^te
2zt

a
-<-S>-

r^

/TS

:g=l=22=z_<^-

/T\

^5:

-<s>-

J.

"!^-

-^2.

15

:=2:

/^

^=z^z
-<s>

t~

/rv

s=

<s-

(Give Nos. 12, 13, and 14 by oral direction only.)

LESSON XIX
(Writing Book)

Show on
of them as

the blackboard the short lines as used in No.

scales,

major and minor; not eighteen.

Speak

Have the pupils


The pupils now know two

"line below, second line below,"

sing both scales after they are written.

2.

etc..

MUSICAL DICTATION

J 34

LESSON XX
(Writing Book)

The
The
it

teacher will sing or play Nos.

and

pupils beat

with a marked accent.

After No. 3

then write.

listen,

and

is

completed, use

for sight reading, beating six to the measure.

m2z==

^2:

:s

i^z

sz

-<s-

22:

7Zt

S2t

-&-

-s>-

2^

The

pupils

LESSON XXI
(Writing Book)

The

teacher will sing the

should beat and sing No.

-<&-<s>

Iey

four groups distinctly.

first

5 after

completing

-<s>-<S>-

-.S*

1&

it.

-<s>-

22:

22:

-<s>-

22:

-<s>-

-<^-

-<s-<s>-

-<s>-

^^

-^~

32:

-s2^>'

2^

-<s>-

LESSON XXII
(Writing Book)
This lesson

is

simply one of note 'and rest values.

not familiar with each character,

named.

The

let

every one be pointed out and

pupil should form the habit of counting the measure as

he marks the accent with a dash under the note.


the syllable

If the pupils are

loo, after

completing the exercise.

Beat, and sing with

MAY
Material for Oral Tonal Dictation
2

p:

-^

<s>

fctt

:e

&-toT3*&fi=z

-?-

^2=^

g-^-g^L
-<S^

221

^-

:22:

"22ZZ^Z

22:

-fi&-

221
221

-<s>-

-*&-

g^~

;*b

<Z?

-t^ -

6
~rb

r
sz
^

&-*-n>

8
2^~ |~2^

221

221

tS>-

22

-<S>-

"C?"

% ^
^1**=

g
*

10

22 -^

22.

22:

g?-

22

12

11

^1=^^=22:

22:

22;

14

g^^s
The two-part

J3Z><?

:^2

-<s^

-o- 22:

SZ^=22=22

22:

15

22:

16

-s>-

22:

22 <&

-<S>-

221

22:

22: -&- &-

22:

22:

-&22:

22

exercises are to

<m~

-r^>

"22"

be given by oral direction as before, or

with the manual signs (both hands at once).


l

So

5i rrfzzz
j

2
-^-

22^^

4:

pESs:

rs^:
22:

k
J3S

J
22bzr=j
j-^jbr^Z3^zz^==j=gg
!=: -<^
-s^
p -(S^I

135

s
*

xso-

1
i

-t-

=F=n

MUSICAL DICTATION

136

Material for Tone Study

The pupils

will find

no

with the following intervals, provided

difficulty

the individual tones have been properly taught and the

The teacher

are given correctly.


indicate

them by the manual

will describe

signs, or point to

manual

signs

each tone to be sung,


the notes on the black-

board.
2

1 ,

-^Mg$P

* Do

g*~

i9221

^>H-'S

g
8

fa
-

2?"

e-'

9
l-S

10

>

&
L_^ =g=g=sEt

ffig^

o-

g^

Z>*

-<s>-

&<S>

-S?

11

^~
^~

~
^

^
^1~
"
^

i-<s>

LESSON

-<&

^ zzzzzz^
"^

g^

T^-

XXIII

(Writing Book)
After listening to the teacher, allow the class to sing the syllables
before writing Nos.

attention to the

1,

and

new symbols.

3.

Before singing No.

4,

name and

call

MAY
mf stands

and means moderately

for

mezzo forte (met-zo

"

crescendo (cre-shen'-do) and signifies a gradual increase

"

cres

*37

f or-ta)

loud.

in power,

sforzando (sfor-tsan'-do) and means with sudden force.

sf

P
PP

t(

"

piano (pe-a'-no) and means

"

pianissimo (pe'-an-is'-se-mo) and means very

S2I

~r?-

122:

-<^-

1221

soft.

L22I

'zz:

-JZ2L

isz:

-<s>-

'Z2L

soft.

--

~Z2L

3
-&-

-<S>-

~Z2L

-&-

7ZZL

-<s>-

JZ2L

LESSON XXIV
(Writing Book)
Before the pupils write this lesson, review the following:
i.

F$

is

always the

placed alternately
2.

After the

first

down

first flat,

in the signature;

four degrees or

each one

is

up

the remaining sharps are

five degrees.

alternately

up four or down

five

degrees.

No. 8 should be sung, after

it is

completed.

LESSON XXV
(Writing Book)
Cultivate the habit of silent singing.

Before the pupils sing No.

beat and sing


feel the

it

through

silently.

rhythm before beginning

begins after the beat.

with the syllable names, they should

The

pupil should hear the tones

to sing audibly.

and

Notice that the song

MUSICAL DICTATION

'38

LESSON XXVI
(Writing Book)

Any

interval

from one tone to another which leaves out one or more

Do

scale tones is called a skip.

Nos.

2, 3, 4,

and

5,

the pupil

to

makes

mi

his

the last measure are already written.

teacher chooses, the pupils


writing

them

in the book.

may

is

a skip; re

own melody.

No

is

" skipped."

The

first

In

note and

skips are allowed.

If

the

submit their compositions to her before

JUNE
June

will

be devoted to reports of individual recitations, to giving

needed assistance to the slower pupils, and to the


(No.

XXVII).

The

written lessons during the year give constant

opportunity for the teacher to


pupil.

It is

know

the strength and weakness of each

assumed that individual singing

from that

differ materially

that in January and June a record

The

practiced in the music

is

of other

made

new problems

written recitations, and that no

is

Therefore, the January and June

class just as it is in the reading class.

work does not

Written Lesson

last

months, excepting

of each pupil's oral

are presented.

material for the individual tests in Oral Tonal Dictation

selected

from the material given

Names

in February,

Oral Tonal Dictation


(5 exercises)

Mary Smith

Sang 10

John Bright

Sang

John Stout

Feb. Exs.

exs.

5 exs.

O.K.

O.K.

1, 2,

Robert Burns

may be

March, April or May.

Remarks

Written
Lessons

95

90

60

40
theory

work

Improving

fast

Has had adenoids


removed.
better.

tones
139

and

Voice

Can match

MUSICAL DICTATION

140

LESSON XXVII
(Writing Book)

The

pupils will be intensely interested in

making melodies.

that they think (hear) the melody before writing.


well to

have the melodies written

first

If there is time, it is

on the practice page and submitted

to the teacher, before they are written on the lesson page.

who

desire to

do

so,

may

Insist

Children

be allowed to write additional melodies on

the practice pages.

Number One may be

written in several ways; for example:

W&

::

u
m
*-^J.

w=t
-r^&

.J.

jj:

following, for example,

it is

is

J.

at*

following are

some

'

isg

-jm-&

&

not best to repeat the same tone.

The

monotonous:

F#iyp

The

t &-

'xs

Sfe

*-*+
In so short a melody

4b$

4
of the

forms No. 3

-^

P=t=

^fe^^g

&-

may

II

take

L <s*

WtS4:

L e>-

*
PP?

*-<&-r

4=t

J^S

*=m

JUNE

W j ^

[_3gZ

jfli fl

PP

It is

I
j

gS'-y-J

Sp

S=
*-r

3:

*-*

"

first

e
1

4I

fSK

*-x-l

I4--

* *-

not to be expected that the

in the tone language will

-T

za

-*-*-|-l etc

attempts at original composition

be in perfect form.

They. will compare favor-

ably, however, with the first compositions in English.

The purpose is

to lead the pupil to think

and

to express his thoughts,

even though the thoughts are crude and the expression faulty.

BOOK ONE
INDEX
Page

Blackboard writing

Manual Signs
117,
Marking the tempo
Four part
Measure

36

Changing the pitch of


Chromatic pitch pipe
Chromatic tones
Introduction of Fi

Do

.35, 47,

and Li. .102

Sequential study of

103

Introduction of Te

122

Clef
of the child voice

9
67

Six part

.92
Si,

120, 128, 132

88
3

Introduction of Di, Ri,

Compass

Pace

106

Three part

19

Two

18

Part

Music Reading
Mental Effects of scale tones

12

Do- Mi-Sol

115

37

Ti

126

Re

130

Dictation

Quarter note

Metric-Oral

9, 26,

Written

18, 45, 55, 61, 62, 67, 73,

Rests

78,83

Tonal-Oral

Quarter

6, 10, 15, 22,

25, 29,33,42,

8o 93>
101,107,123,125,133,137

59> 6 5> 7> 7S>

53

101, 109

>

54

Half

54

Eighth

Written .... 13, 20, 23, 26, 30, 43, 44,


51, 61, 72, 76, 81

Eighth Note

54, 77

Whole

77

Review, semi-annual

.57, 85, 113, 139

Rhythm
Sense

77

9
of,

how developed

17,

90

Studies 54, 67, 77, 82, 88, 90, 101, 107


.

Flat

14

Individual
Intervals

recitation

skips

Studies

Introduction

Second Year
Latin Syllables

Use and importance

39
40, 48, 64

First
.

Rote Songs

Year

Scale

2,

96

M3

31

4
4, 50, 58, 87

Minor, Introduction of Normal.

31

1,

Major

Sequential study of

of

125

Sharp

37

Singing in tune

47

INDEX

144

Pagb

Key

3 S t 43

Meter
Staff

38

.'

Liner

13

Staff degrees

124

Names

Syllabizing

Symbols,

3,6, 31

Three and Four Tones

Two

to

one Beat. .109

Part Singing (preparation for) 121,

14

Syllable

Pagb

Tone

Signature

how

learned

.4, 13,

86

60, 66, 74, 79,

84

13, 97

Two Tones

to

one Beat

Introduction of

Writing Book.

100
.95, 104,

133. *3 8

no,

124, 128,

HOLLIS DANN MUSIC COURSE

MANUAL FOR TEACHERS


MUSICAL DICTATION STUDY OF TONE AND RHYTHM

BOOK

TWO

HOLLIS DANN,

Mus. D.

PROFESSOR OF MUSIC, AND HEAD OF DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC


AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY

AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY


NEW YORK

CINCINNATI

CHICAGO

Copyright, 1913,

BY

HOLLIS DANN
Copyright, 1913, in Great Britain

Musical Dictation

Manual

for Teachers,

Book Two

MUSICAL DICTATION
BOOK TWO
INTRODUCTION
This book
in the public

Manual for teachers and is intended primarily for use


The course begins with the first and ends with
schools.

is

the seventh grade.

When

used in schools where

first

grade music

Rote Singing only, the course outlined in the Manual would


begin with the second and end with the eighth grade.
The Manual is in two parts:
consists of

Book One contains


of tone

the material for the

first

three years in the study

and rhythm.

Book Two contains

the material for the fourth,

years in the study of tone and rhythm.

fifth,

Book Two

sixth

and seventh

also contains sup-

plementary material for Advanced Dictation.

Music Writing Books


Beginning with the third year, each pupil should be provided with a
Music Writing Book in which to write the lessons outlined in the Manual.

Third year pupils use Music Writing Book No. I.


Fourth year pupils use Music Writing Book No. II.

Music Writing Book No. III.


Sixth and Seventh year pupils use the Music Writing Tablet.

Fifth year pupils use

The

following general suggestions are offered concerning the use of

the Manual:

Look over the material for the entire month and begin all features
of the work early in the month.
2. Keep all activities progressing throughout the month.
3. Have a plan for each lesson; work rapidly, and avoid wasting
time by useless questions.
i.

INTR OD UC TION

Absolute Pitch

Many

any given pitch if


given a fair opportunity. The capacity for acquiring this power should
be fostered and developed rather than stunted and neglected. To
children will acquire the ability to recognize

develop this invaluable feature of a musical education, certain conditions are necessary:
i.

it is

The

Therefore,

essential that the piano, the pitch pipe, the violin, etc., shall agree

in pitch,
2.

pupil should continually hear the correct pitch.

both in the home and in the school.

which the pupil sings should be sung at the pitch in


written, or, if sung in a different key, the pupil should know

All music

which

it is

the change.

who

Parents and teachers

may

are able to approximate these conditions

cultivate the sense of absolute pitch in children with surprising

results

by

testing a given pitch daily:

f#=^=

or

jpEgE for example.

The Pure Scale


Ability to think

and

to sing the pure scale as played

the violin, for example,


able to the pupil

who

is

is

by an

the best possible scale training and

to

make a

serious study of music.

artist
is

on

invalu-

This,

how-

ever, can be acquired only with the constant assistance of expert teachers,

and

is

obviously beyond the possibility of attainment in the public

schools.

Singing in
Singing out of tune
tions.

is

Tune

evidence of wrong physical and mental condi-

Good tone production and

correct intonation are evidences of

normal conditions.

and practicable for classes in the public schools


Nothing less should be accepted by the
the pitch.

It is entirely feasible

to sing true to

supervisor or the teacher.

INTROD UC TION
Because

low standard which prevails, faulty intonation

of the

accepted in

many communities

is

as a necessary evil in school singing.

The fault is not with the children. Their false intonation is evidence
of wrong physical and mental conditions, and is the inevitable result of
and poor or inadequate supervision.
create and maintain normal vocal conditions

careless, inefficient teaching,

The

ability to

is

the

and most important qualification of the supervisor of music.


These conditions include:
Proper position of body and head, and flexibility of the lower jaw,
i.
tongue, and facial muscles.
2.
Deep breathing, secured by correct position and by use of simple
first

breathing exercises.
3.

The use

of the "thin,

head" voice, and the avoidance

of the lower

"thick" quality.

With

these habits formed, the singing voice

is

used quite as easily as

the speaking voice.

Correct intonation demands correct thinking as well as normal physical habits.

Certain other conditions are, therefore, essential:

Every teacher must use a chromatic pitch pipe, thereby detecting


and correcting any tendency to "flat" or "sharp" the pitch. Constant singing out of tune
"flatting the pitch," for example
causes
the singer to think the wrong pitch; he then sings out of tune because
he thinks out of tune.
1.

2.

If

a piano

is

used,

by

it

should be kept in tune, else the ear

and unmusical

is

con-

good piano is most


desirable in the schoolroom.
Incidentally, the piano may be used in
place of the pitch pipe for taking and testing the pitch.
3. The songs and exercises used by children in the lower grades must
be in the proper compass and favorable to good tone production. The
stantly misguided

false

tones.

use of unsuitable material encourages and develops bad vocal conditions

and consequently

Children
clear,

who

results in faulty intonation.

sing properly sing in tune, freely

and

easily,

with

light,

mellow, flutelike tone which increases in breadth and volume as

the children develop physically.

INTRO D L/C TION

The Use of Syllable Names


The

syllable

of the tonal

names

are indispensable to the pupil in gaining a mastery

By

problems in music.

their use the pupil

is

aided in iden-

and differentiating each tone.


The primary object of all instruction in sight singing is to teach the
pupil to hear the tones and sense the rhythm of a melody as he looks at
The pupil has many problems demanding instant solution
the music.
Accent, rhythm, tones, all require recognition,
in reading a melody.
quickly followed by expression. The recognition and interpretation
of musical symbols demand quick and accurate thought followed by
action, which must be equally accurate and rapid.
All the power of concentration which the pupil possesses must be
employed in reading music.
The reading of words and music demands the recognition and interpretation of two entirely different sets of symbols simultaneously.
This is beyond the power of the majority of children during the first
two or three years in school, and their attempt to interpret two languages
at once makes concentration on the tone language impossible, deprives
them of the help of the syllable names, discourages the slower pupils,
and places upon young children a task which most adult beginners are
tifying

unable to accomplish.
ciple

and attack one

language at a time

is

It is better to follow a vital pedagogical prin-

The

difficulty at a time.

obviously enough for

little

interpretation of one
children.

The Abuse of Syllable Names


While the Latin syllables are

vitally essential in mastering the tonal

problems, they are only a means to this end.

upper grades to the exclusion

of words,

is

Their constant use in the

a serious error.

When

pupil has formed the habit of hearing the tones and feeling the
as he looks at the symbols,

tone and rhythm, he

names.

is

and has had

sufficient practice in

the

rhythm

combining

ready to begin reading without the syllable

INTRODUCTION

Time

is

too soon.

wasted and progress retarded, however,


individual singing

If

be, the teacher will

know when

is

if

this is

constantly practiced, as

the class

is

attempted
it

should

ready to begin the reading

words and music together.


The Music Readers, both the regular text book and the supplementary
material, should furnish a large amount of music especially adapted for
An abundance of suitable material, not too difficult, is a
this practice.

of

necessity.

Before the pupil reaches the High School, he should be able to read
at sight,

words and music, with

facility.

Correlation of Reading and Singing


Oral reading and singing are very closely related.
either, seriously interfere

Poor

results in

with progress in the other; excellence in one,

improvement in the other. The right sort of singing makes speech more musical and more flexible; gives the voice a
wider compass and greater sustaining and carrying power; develops
the rhythmic and melodic sense; stimulates emotional expression; and,
greatly accelerates

in

many

other ways, increases the pupiPs capacity for oral expression

in speech.

The

course in Reading in the public schools should give to children

not only the ability to read and understand, but should equip them to

speak the English language clearly, distinctly and naturally.

Mum-

accompanied by distorted misuse of


vowels and consonants, makes the teaching of singing tenfold more
bling, inarticulate, nasal speech,

difficult.

alike

is

absolutely

American children are to speak the English language acceptIndistinct and inaccurate pronunciation and enunciation are
fatal to acceptable reading and speaking, and to good singing.

essential

ably.

thorough, systematic course in Phonetics

if

To teach the

correct use of the English language in speech is primarily

the function of the course in Reading.

INTK OD UC TION

To teach

the correct use of the singing voice, and the reading and

interpretation of the tone language, is the function of the course in

Music.

In the upper grades the pupil must read and interpret both

languages simultaneously.

Good

oral reading is the greatest possible help to school singing;

and teacher should assist in every


possible way in bringing about the correlation of Music and Oral Reading from the first grade through the High School.
therefore, the music supervisor

FOURTH YEAR
SEPTEMBER
Tone Production

The study

of

vowels and consonants, breathing, position,

applied to children's singing,

is

etc.,

vitally essential for every teacher

as

who

attempts to teach children to sing. This most important side of school


music teaching is not included in this Manual, for obvious reasons.

few suggestions only, are offered concerning the use of neutral


syllables which shall hereafter be used a part of the time, in the place of
the Latin syllables, do,

mi, etc.

re,

Great care should be taken in the choice and use of vowels. The oo
sound is an excellent means of forming the "head" tone habit. However, the habitual use of oo

The vowel

o as in

on

is

is

apt to develop a "hooty" tone.

favorable to good tone.

This sound

is

between

and a as in father.
The teeth must be apart, and the muscles of the tongue, lips and face,
The mouth must be
flexible and soft, in the singing of all vowels.
opened easily and naturally. An unnatural or distorted expression of
the face while singing is conclusive evidence of bad tonal conditions.
A stiff, forced condition of the open mouth may be quite as bad as the
One of the worst and most common errors is the neglect
closed teeth.
The lips and teeth
to open the back part of the throat and mouth.
may be wide open while the tongue and soft palate completely close the
a as in

all

throat.

No

direct appeal should ever be

throat."

wrong

to the child

Such instructions cause an unnatural

conditions.

the tones.

made

The

effort

"open the
and develop

to

singer should feel the sensation of gently lifting

Sometimes the art

of

yawning

tion of lifting the tone:


7

will help to give this sensa-

MUSICAL DICTATION

The

teacher should be very sensitive to tone quality, never forgetting

that the only tone quality which

is

acceptable in children's singing

mellow and pleasant. Under the skillful teacher, this tone


onant and beautiful, never harsh and unmelodious.

is

is

also res-

Review of Sequential Studies


The

by the

following scale studies are to be sung

pupil individually, in the order given.

The

and by each

class

pupils should be encouraged

to sing the entire series without assistance, after the teacher 'gives the

The

directions for the first group.

teacher will soon find

it

unnecessary

even to suggest the order in which the studies are to be sung. It is


important that these studies be sung rapidly, and with freedom and
facility; otherwise, the

automatic use of the syllables

(For further directions, see Dictation Manual,

The

will

not be gained.

Book One, page

pupils should take breath after each group as indicated

86.)

by the

breath marks.

Teacher: Sing do re do.

Sing do re

mi

Sing do re mi fa mi re

re do.

do, etc.

A:

Series

#3=5:

l=^-*-*
^--0--^

'

=Y^-b===p=1

rb

^- W.^M.

B====^==1=h

^.

*^^^-+-9.

p0.

=E?i"^__,^i bzt_
)

j j j


3z
j

jg^h
*-*-+-

1.

=j

FOURTH YEAR SEPTEMBER

^tS=*Tj-"5^
-^"*^2^
w "
^-fr-g^5=5-*
Series

-I

^3

(i

&

.^

15

?E3

&-

F^Q-

^-lTT r "1
1

^is
^=MZZ^-pl

LJ^

!*=T=W\

1-

g:

?^-f-^i**r^

D
^^^^

L2

=:t

C:

p4=^

Series

&=

+-*-*

&u=t

Series

'^*^3

B
-A

2:

^-^-

1**^,****^ -B-m-*-

"*

**^^T

*"

5=
Series

E:

M
-*

zb

iP

fc-j?

*
1

|#-

*-

r*

=::*:

L-,1

5=*E

*==lpt

*:

Pt==^^

&T

MUSICAL DICTATION

10

Review of the Mental Effects of Do, Mi, Sol, Ti and Re


Every expert

He

effects of the scale tones.

he

keen appreciation of the relational


senses the harmonic effects of the melody;

in .sight singing has a

the modulation and knows in what key and

feels

This harmonic sense

is

mode he

is

singing.

good sight reading and may be


Harmony; it may also be acquired by the

essential to

acquired by the study of

proper study of the scale tones, without the study of Harmony.


If

the teacher will play the chords indicated and listen carefully, three

from hearing the upper


pitch, volume,
tone C, although the three physical elements of the tone
remain unchanged.
and quality

radically different impressions will be received

/C\

/TN

J J ljgdflfl ttd-

dlK SEK 4

g^m&

ff

After hearing No.

C in No.

i,

like

do but like

3,

that the next tone must be mi.

tional (mental) effects of the scale tones

The

teacher

is

ti,

4 m -<&)!

JpL.

JL

(9

m~

and there

The

impulse to sing the next scale tone above.


ing No.

eA

Jt.

is

is

an

(JZ2.

cs>

the thought rests on the same tone (do).

no longer sounds

2,

The

irresistible

listener feels after hear-

Appreciation of these relavitally essential.

strongly urged to study the scale tones until the in-

dividual characteristics of each tone are

known and

felt.

The manual

signs should not be presented until the mental effect of the tone is
clearly felt.

The

signs are only one

means

of recalling the relational

and they should not be used at all unless preceded by a graphic description and clear appreciation of the effect of
the scale tone represented.
(See Dictation Manual, Book One,
effect of the scale tones,

pages

1 1

5-132.)

FOURTH YEARSEPTEMBER

II

Material for Review of Do, Mi, Sol, Ti and Re

To be

given by direction;

Do

s e p
221

of the

manual

~^
^ I2Z

te

Sing the firm and strong tone,

by means

the bright tone, etc., or


1

e.g.,

signs.

221

221
-<^-

221

-<s>-

221

221

22:

-g?<s>-

e-

Z?0

Sing

22:

22:

22:

6
Z2I

iife^l

-s>-

221

--

22:

-<s-

-<^-

-<s-

Z>0

8
~g2"

-<^>-

22:

221

I22I

g?

.^.
-<S>

^^-

221

"5^?~

~-<^-

10

11

12

-<-<-

-^

-<S>-

22:
22:

s>-

-<&-

^ 22:
^j

-<^>

(g-

"22"

Material for Rhythmic Review

The
for the

following should be copied on the blackboard before the time

music lesson:

la
-

-M

& -*=

k=

(
^ ^ *
i*
4= J-.-L-.E_.-===&
*

^zzpczpzzp:

The

""

S
h

'

1*

r-

:&=-_=_

teacher, or pupil, indicates the tempo, points to a measure,

directs that the class beat

measure

is

indicated.

and

and

sing the measure, repeating until another

This practice should be continued from day

to,

MUSICAL DICTATION

12

day

The

until the pupils can sing

any and

moved

pointer should be

new measure
previous measure. The exercise

be varied as follows:

i.

Have one

2.

Change the beat-note, thus:

pupil sing the entire sixteen measures.

-P2=

jr

tCV\

:^e
1

1
i

>*

t.

*^

"*

"**

v/...

3.

these measures correctly.

quickly, indicating the

slightly before the completion of the

may

all of

v"

Have

..'

r
'

fz

>*

-1

(*?

4-

m m
LJ-

v>

-^J

-1

three pupils, or three sections of the class, sing from each

representation simultaneously.

Erase every other bar, change the 3 to 6 in the measure signature,


and use the exercise again as six-part measure. (|, I, and |).
4.

5.

Instead of singing, speak the rhythms to a neutral syllable.

rhythms may then be represented without the


pf p
6.

thus

J
la, /a, la,

Visualization.

The

The

*
||

la.

teacher proposes a musical game, as follows:

leader describes one measure

the pupil will try to prove that he

and understands it by beating and


four measures like the one described.
sees

staff,

(The

singing, with the syllable loo,

FOURTH YEAR SEPTEMBER

13

naming the key (C major), the kind of measure (4), and sounding the key tone (C), the leader says:
I see two quarter notes on the third space.
A pupil beats and sings No. 1 with the syllable loo, thus:
After

m
i2

Leader:

I see

Loo,

loo,

loo, etc.

a half note.

pupil beats and sings No.

=^^=^

2,

etc.

=^=E=

jfS=Z

Only one or two minutes should be spent with the "game"


first

time

Series

it is

^Zl

%=rSeries

played.

2345 67

A:

*-

l^W-

-*-*-?=: -fLt^r *-*-

g_- #

B
2

after the

tiS^^^I^Sl^^^^l
Later in the month use the same material in a different way.

Place

the measure on the board and require the pupils to beat and sing four

measures, as before.

Oral Review of Three and Four Tones to One Beat


The

teacher sounds the key tone and directs the pupils to beat and

sing the scale descending, singing each scale tone as

are tones to one beat.

many

times as there

MUSICAL DICTATION

14

Teacher: One tone to each beat.


Pupils
fcs

\lWA
Teacher:

Two

t=f

tones to each beat.

Pupils

-*
5fe
IMz^k:
#

W-

&

-pr

EE=^=H

Teacher: Three tones to each beat.


Pupils:

F F # #

^f^^Ff?

S^
^^i

3*=*

Teacher: Four tones to each beat.


Pupils

Teacher: In each measure there are four tones to the

first

beat, and

one tone to the second beat.


Pupils

g!i^
3

-F-P P

F=^

Teacher:

One tone

to the first beat,

etc.^fl

'A

and three tones

to the second

beat.

Pupils
i?jo_F

"

F * P-P

r rii^^fl

Avoid, for the present, combining two and three, or three and four

tones to a beat in the same measure.

made with

All other combinations

great advantage to the pupils.

may

be

FOURTH YEARSEPTEMBER

15

Oral Tonal Dictation


Fa
associate fa with mi
Study

Lead the pupils

to

of

to think of the

two tones as

linked together.

The

The

following studies are sequential.

pupils should continue

unaided after the teacher has called for two or three groups, thus
Sing mi, fa,

Sing mi, fa, mi.

/V b
T\r

Sing mi, fa,

sol, la,

fa, mi.

**-3

CJ

*-*

e*>

fa, mi.

sol,

c-i

B*

Xs\)

S3

CJ

<!V

<^n

^L

i)

221

Is

-<s>-

IS2

g2=
-<S-

ZZ=SC^S2ZXgg.Z^ZSg^S2 32

22:

-<s>-

22:

-o

-^^_

22zzz^z

22:

221

ZZZSqEZZ:
Q 22:

g>

ZZZ

cr

"^7~

i9-

S?

P5

-<&-

22:

22"

22=^=22:

Many

-s>-

&

CJ

i&-

SZ22l tZZ gg g*

singers think the intervals

too narrow.

i?e

g-_

6/(7

gJ

to re,

mi

to fa,

and fa are consequently sung below the

22:

S^2i i

i^?

si

t^^

-oL &>-

from

27

<

and

re to ja

pitch.

Lead

the pupil to think these intervals wider.

Fa has a

strong tendency toward mi.

thoughtful pupil.
Sing, or play

Fa has other

from the

This

is

already evident to the

distinctive qualities.

original, the following excerpts.

desolate character of fa in this excerpt from

The Messiah.

Notice

t'ha

MUSICAL DICTATION

16

Slow

U. V A

-A^.w *_
p
J

f1
*

man

sor

of

fc
p

~m

and

rows

fa
P

->_ -0-P
is

^1

ac- quaint

fa
was

is

with

ed,

re

grief.

fa

spis

ed

ject

w^
-

ed.

fa in this excerpt fr-om The Elijah, where the


graphically used to inspire a feeling of awe.

Notice the
phrase

de

$=
He

W-

effect of

fa
:fe
:2:

fa

fa

ife
hold

-&-

-<S>-

Be

/V\

God, the

Lord,

pass

eth

by.

In the same chorus, Mendelssohn repeatedly uses the following


phrase, picturing the mystery of the coming of the

Lord

in the "

still

small voice.''
fa

BftSi2

eJ

<=*

On

fa

->zt

ward came

-&-

<s>-

Lord.

the

Notice the constant repetition of fa in depicting the desolation of


Elijah.
Elijah

&*=:
Night

fa

fall

)?*=?*

3
-

eth

round

me,

-=1

from me,

Lord

fa

fa

ii

far

fa

fa

fa

-K

Hide

=fc

not

face,

i
thou

fa

r
thy

Be

F
O

Lord, from

fa

me.

not

FOURTH YEAR SEPTEMBER


As fa is sung in the next phrase,
teacher makes the manual sign, thus:
The teacher will now have the class
the following, using the manual signs to

17

the

sing
indi-

cate the tones:

Slowly

'

0M

re

P#

*l:

g 32

-g?

Zto

Slowly

fa

I*

--

-<s>-

am

yiz

^y#

w/

fa

si
mi

Material for Tonal Study

To be

given by direction (describing the tones), or with the manual

signs

-2

2__

__

22:

2
-<S-

8
zz:

g^Jl

-<s>-

-<S>-

C7-

"C

22:

Z?0

-Z2T-&-

izz

122:

I
w

22:

1
P

=^=
22:

:z2:

8
-<S-

-&- 22:

22:

-?5~

221

-<S>-

221

.*=_

^-

-&tS>-

Z2:

zz -^-

"27

<S>-

I
P

<S>-

at

-<S-

22:

-&-

-*s>-

zzzjbz&zX

~&r

izr

10

-b

zs:

-&-<s>-

22:

zr

<^-

-9

"C~

12

11

J2z

fe:

=3W&
221

22:

zz

1221

Z2I

22:

:^2i

MUSICAL DICTATION'

jg

The mental (relational) effects of the scale tones are clearly felt only
when the tones are played or sung slowly, and when unaffected by harmonic changes.

LESSONS

AND

II

(Writing Book)

be provided with Music Writing Book No. II.


Lessons I and II in the writing book are devoted entirely to copying
symbols. Facility in the mechanical part of writing music is essential.
The placing of signatures, making of notes, rests, bars, etc., must become more or less automatic before the pupil can concentrate his attenAfter the first lesson has
tion on the rhythmic and tonal problems.
been written, the teacher will know which pupils need additional blackboard practice in making these symbols.
Unless objections are made from the standpoint of penmanship, the
pupil should use a soft pencil and eraser.

Each

pupil should

LESSON

III

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

OCTOBER
The Dotted Beat-Note

No

whatever should be found with this rhythm. There is


really no new rhythmic problem involved.
Any pupil or class that has
mastered the rhythmic problems of the third year, will sing the exercises
suggested below without assistance.
The teacher places the following exercise on the blackboard, sounds
the key tone, and asks the class to beat and sing:
difficulty

^=
^m=*^^^
i
fa

hiifr-f-i*

Teacher:
Pupils

When

*5S3
*-*

W*r

:jtur

ffi

did you sing the

With the

first

first

&

~w=m

tone?

beat.

(As the class answers, the teacher draws an arrow under the

first

note.)

Teacher:
Pupils

When

did you sing the second tone?

With the second

(Teacher draws arrow under second

beat.

note.)

Teacher:
Pupils

The
the

The

third tone?

After the second beat.

class sings the exercise again, after

first

two notes

in each measure.

*-*
i

*+:

which the teacher

The

exercise

-*+*=* :#

1
*9

ties

together

now appears

thus:

=fr

*^+i iifr-re
E

MUSICAL DICTATION

20

The

class again sings the exercise, beating firmly.

The

teacher then

asks:

When

did you sing the

first

tone?

With the first and second


Teacher: The second tone?
Pupils:

Pupils:

beats.

After the second beat.

Teacher:

Is there

way

another

to represent the quarter

and eighth

notes that are tied together?


Pupils:

The

Yes, a dotted quarter note equals a quarter and an eighth.

teacher

now

fcs

following representations are

thus:

afcjL

The

substitutes J. for J

known

to the pupils, having

been

in use since the second year.

* 3:

Ept

i^c:

%=&

I2Z

3:
8:

21

EE

LESSON IV
(Writing Book)

To be

given at the

first

lesson following the presentation of the dotted

beat note, the pupils singing from the writing book instead of from the
blackboard, and each writing in the book as directed.

Writing Book.)

(See Lesson IV,

LESSON V
(Writing Book)

The rhythm

as given in Lesson

IV

is

now

represented with two-two

measure, thus:

i^S i
i

^=^=^:

&-*

=t=t

i rt

:22i

Gtrw-*-

This lesson should be presented in the same manner as Lesson IV.

Each pupil

No

writes in the //riting

blackboard work

is

book and

necessary.

sings

from the writing book.

FOURTH YEAR OCTOBER

21

LESSON VI
(Writing Book)

The rhythm presented

in Lessons

V is now represented in two-

IV and

eight measure, thus:

fcs

*^

8:
I

The

~r

+-

*=^=^

lesson should be presented in the

and V, the pupils

first

same manner

as Lessons

IV

singing from the writing book, then writing as

directed.

and all other rhythmic problems without


difficulty, provided the teacher and pupil think clearly and correctly.
The several systems of time names and the numerous devices for overcoming the supposed difficulties in the study of rhythm are not only
unnecessary, but are a real hindrance. They make. complex what is

The

pupil will master this

simple; they befog rather than clarify thought; they center the attention

on an arbitrary name

for the rhythm, rather than

upon the rhythm

itself.

Part Singing
(Triads)

The

teacher forms the class into three divisions,

A,B

and C.

After

sounding do in the key of A, the teacher directs the class to sing as


follows

Teacher: Division A, sing do, mi,


Pupils sing:

<T\

-s?

22:
*~

Teacher: Division B, sing do, mi,


Pupils sing:

*i

sol, do.

~JZ

~&Z-

221

sol,

ISZ

mi.

MUSICAL DICTATION

22

Teacher: Division C, sing do, mi,

Pupils sing:

sol, sol.

fe^

After each division has again sung as directed,

all

three sing together,

thus:
/t\

gfe

35

SX|:|

repeating several times.

Teacher

pupil:

Teacher:
Pupil:

How many

heard three tones.

What

tones did you hear?

heard do, mi and

Teacher: Sing do,

Now

tones did you hear?

sing the

first,

re,

mi, fa,

and

third

Class sings:

sol.

Teacher sounds the lower

sol

Now

sing the

first,

the third,

sol.

fifth tones.

1221

zz

1221

and says: Sing sol,


and the fifth tones.

rf&i
!

Class sings:

In the same manner, fa,

-&-

-&-

la, ti, do, re.

-&-

sol, la, ti, do,

are sung

and then the second

and fourth tones omitted.


Teacher: Sing do,

re,

How many
Pupils

mi, fa,

sol,

again.

tones did you sing?

Five.

Teacher: Sing the

first,

Pupils sing, do, mi,

sol.

the third and the fifth tones again.

FOURTH YEAR OCTOBER


Note:

The

significance of the prefix

What

Teacher:

tri

should be

23

made known,

e.g.

a tricycle?

is

Pupils: A riding machine (cycle) with three wheels.


Teacher: Why is the French flag called the tricolor?

Because

Pupils:

What

Teacher:

Pupils: Tri

it

has three colors.

does

means

tri

mean?

three.

These three tones sounded together are called a triad.


Any scale tone and the third and fifth scale tones above it, form a triad.
A triad takes the name of the tone on which it is built, either the syllable
name or the letter name, (e.g., Do triad, or C triad.)
The teacher sounds do in the key of C and directs the class as follows:
Teacher:

(C triad).

Sing the tones of the do triad

Sing the tones of the re triad (D triad),

Chord

is

another

name

for triad.

etc.

These triads are called

common

chords.

Metric Dictation

The

pupils are

now ready

and represent tones and


attention must be centered upon the

to recognize, sing

rhythms simultaneously. At first,


rhythm. The melodies must, therefore, be very simple.
The material which follows is in C major and in two-four measure,
each melody is four measures long, there is only one sound to a beat,
and the only skips are those of the Do triad.

The

teacher (or a pupil) will play the melody, or sing to a neutral

syllable,

being careful to give

all

to indicate the accent clearly.

before singing or writing.

This

notes and rests their exact values, and

The
is

pupils should visualize the

important.

After singing the melody, the pupil writes


placing the clef and measure signatures.

same melody at the same time.

melody

it

on the blackboard,

Several pupils

may

first

write the

MUSICAL DICTATION

Material for Written Metric Dictation

m
EffiiE^J
m

+.

c~ 2

-9r -<*

1SL

-f g* h-

SS

k-

-j

=-ffcjM-|

*=Zjt

\*

**-4

#-

10

-2^

2:

Sl
54:

-<S-

cf:z=h=zd-t=+=tt:

4-1-

73-

+-

12

11
1

2=*

-S>-

14

13

-2-

2:

H9M:

i&-

l<f)l

16

15

2E?

lL

q=

-9E

18

17

*=t

^_

3P.

g^^B%

20

19

Ip:

4-

--f^
E^L^_E

>j4 *

F*

ii,

i=X=t

9
,

*-

hrr-

L_

2=*

mt
lfii#

i^z

3:

FOURTH YEAR OCTOBER

25

24

1;

About the middle of the month, after the melodies have been sung
and placed upon the blackboard, the entire class will write Nos. 1,2,5, 6,
Only
10, ii-, 15, 21 and 24 on page 6 of the writing book (Lesson VII).
those who do not write these correctly need additional work in metric

Some

dictation for the remainder of the month.

hundred per cent

in the test

of those

who

get one

might "play teacher' and help the weaker


'

pupils.

LESSON

VII

(Writing Book)
Play, or sing to a neutral syllable, Nos.

from the foregoing material

1, 2, 5, 6,

10, 11, 15, 21

and 24

for metric dictation.

The Minor Scale


The
sol,

teacher sounds

fa, mi, re, do,

The

ti,

fourth space, and says:

This

is la.

Sing

la,

la.

pupils sing:

-&>-<s>-

(The pupil is accustomed to think do when the pitch is sounded.


Now he is asked to think la instead cf do.)
This scale should be sung daily, descending and ascending, until
there

is

no

difficulty in

beginning with

la instead of

with do.

Place the major scale on the blackboard, thus:


Major Scale from

-r~>-

-.-

I2Z

MUSICAL DICTATION

26

The

pupils sing the scale.

The

teacher adds two notes, and points

The two

minor scale from D.

while the pupils sing the

scales then

appear thus:
Major Scale from

Do^

IZZ

s>-

.La.

zz -&

ST"

Minor Scale from

Continue, one at each lesson, until nine different representations of


the two scales have been shown, as follows:
Major Scale from

Do

_2_ -&-

i
m

11=1111;

Major Scale from

Do

^^

P^

La

Ie==1
<o
*-**

-"

>N-

Minor Scale from

Major Scale from

Do^.
T

if

:Z^:

I2Z i9221

Minor Scale from B

Major Scale from

O-

|g & ZZ i^- SSL &-

:#

Z3 g>

:Za:

Minor Scale from Fa

Major Scale from

-p.

^Z -&- zz -^-

:Za:
Minor Scale from

Major Scale from

Za

E7

^^S5^= ^

B17

Minor Scale from

Major Scale from AI?

:Z<2i

^^^&
_ ^> ^
Minor Scale from

-^

^ o ^

C-*

<S>

^
JT3

6t

^^:

Minor Scale from

Co

^-^-^1^

Major Scale from C

z*

^7"

Z><?^

Minor Scale from C

Zk,

/?
^

zz

Minor Scale from

Major Scale from

}
-iS>-

FOURTH YEAR OCTOBER


The

pupil

minor.

He

now knows two

27

scales (not eighteen), the major

and the

has learned that the same tones form both scales.

difference (to him)

is

that the major scale begins and ends with do,

while the minor begins and ends with

each key signature, two scales


scale ancl the

minor

The

He

la.

may be

has also learned that with

represented, the major (do)

(la) scale.

Sequential Scale Studies


(Minor Mode)

The

following sequential studies should be used as were the corre-

sponding studies in the major


Series A, B,

Series

S5^J^"

Series

Pupils will soon learn to sing

without assistance or directions.

in order,

A:

La

C and

scale.

* * J * ' w

J.

J ^-j-^jr^-^i ' *

m in sTxm

1^=^

-%E&

MUSICAL DICTATION

28

Series

C:

rf*m

=ft

3E

3BeE

Series

b
-^

iK

!ftir-

fefeg
^F^r

fcfe

?=f

:s

Sequential Study of Si-La

The

first

two or three groups are

to be sung

by

the pupil should continue, without assistance.

direction, after

Link

si

and

which

la together

as one thought:

*S
~gy

ZSII

tS>-

22:

^fo^g=g^-^Slp2

&
i*s-

-<s>-

:^z

:S^=^

=f^^

^-gg?

-<&-

"^^

:^2:

22:

z ?
liE

221

-<^-

i9-

22:

Z2=^&
&-

^=^=gz=F^-

221 125

iH

-<^-

-<s-

"S2:

1221

:te=22i

:22:

t^?

-t&-

NOVEMBER
Introduction of Le, Se,

Me

and Ra

The pupil knows la te la. He also knows that these tones sound like
mi fa mi. (See Dictation Manual, Book One, page 123.) The teacher
calls attention to the fact that the tone just below ti is named te, and
(The final sound is changed to
that the tone just below la is named le.
The pupils will find the names of the next two new tones.
a.)
Teacher I will name the scale tone and you may name the new tone
:

just below.

Teacher
Pupils

Ti.

Te.

Teacher:
Pupils

Le.

Teacher

La.

Sol.

Pupils: Se.

Teacher: Mi.
Pupils:

Me.

Teacher: Re.

Most of the pupils will answer re.


The teacher points out that all
these new tones end with the sound of a, but as re already ends with this
sound, another must be used for flat Uvo. The name of flat two is ra.
The teacher will again name the scale tones, and the pupils the new tones,
as above.

The
la le;

pupils should
sol se;

The

mi me;

now name
re ra;

the tones in groups of two, thus:

te;

pausing an instant after each group.

teacher sings the following groups, using the syllable names;

the pupils respond, also singing the syllables.

teacher asks:
singing

Ti

What

mi ja mi

(or

tones sound like these?


ti

do

ti,

etc).
29

After each group, the

The

pupils respond

by

MUSICAL DICTATION

3<>

zz

:\te2i

Do

rd

^<S>--^p-

me

re

do,

:tez

-<s>-

1221

le

sol,

la

sol

re,

-&-

2z

-&-

mi

fa

mi,

12I

fa

-&-

~SZL

ti

do

la.

te

W^

~Z.

se

fa,

-&-

~ZZL

ti,

do

There will be a decided tendency to sing all the intervals in these


groups too narrow. This fault may be overcome by asking the pupils
to think the upper tone higher.
Continue this activity from day to day, until the entire series can be
sung freely and in tune, and until it is clear to the class that there is no
tone between mi and fa, or between ti and do.
The teacher's ear should be very sensitive to the correct singing of

Even

these half steps.

the half steps

The

the class ends the series on the correct pitch,

if

may have been

flat of

the pitch.

following sequential study should be learned and sung

pupil, in connection with

Sing slowly at

chromatic

Series

first.

major

series

may

by each

and E.

be used in the descending

scale.)

(Major)

zzzt

introduction of these tones

should be shown.
learned.

A, B, C,

(Fi instead of se

m
The

sung

Each

Series

:&*=

-<s>-

t
is

Z22I

?=:

:p

entirely oral.

No

should be sung daily until

representation

it is

thoroughly

individually before the close of the term.

Each

series

and F,
should be sung

singing pupil should sing Series A, B, C, D,

rapidly as one recitation, without assistance from the teacher.

FOURTH YEARNOVEMBER

31

The Study of La
In the major
is,

scale, the

tendency of

la is to progress

major

therefore, one of the active tones of the

istic effects of la

scale.

downward; it
The character-

when

are best illustrated in the minor scale

la ceases to

be active and becomes the "home tone."

La

is

peculiarly expressive in the minor mode, where its emotional

character

is

when

evident even to the casual listener,

the tones are sus-

Before attempting to individualize this scale tone for a class

tained.

of pupils, the teacher should

the presentation

is

thoroughly sense

sufficiently clear

and

its relational effect.

If

effective, the pupils will dis-

cover and describe the sad, mournful character of

without sugges-

la,

from the teacher other than the singing of the characteristic exThe manual sign should not be presented until the character
cerpts.
If a piano is available, the accomof la is strongly felt by the pupil.
paniment will be found most helpful. The teacher first sings the melodies with the syllable names, asking the class to listen especially to la.
tion

Slowly

Old Welsh Choral

&-

-&-

-Gh

/T\

1EM

-o-

rr\

-&

0-

/T\

=t
:^r

-jzt

s>-

From

=^

tc=l
&->-

5^

&

/T\

$&=F
fc*
Your

-m-

>

an hour,Now by Death's cold hand strick-en

From
Slowly

Daughter of Jairus," Stainer

tf-

Sweet,ten-der flower, Born for

"

"

Handel

Judas Maccabaeus,"

P
:

t
he

ro

is

no more,

p-

Your

fa

ther

is

'^m
1

no

-<
1-

\..
1

I-

more.

MUSICAL DTCTATION

X2

The

teacher should find no difficulty in leading the pupils to give their

impressions of the effect of

The

teacher

now

giving emphasis to

sings the following, slowly, with the syllable names,


la.

[2:

Z#
last

do

ti

f?\

2S:

?=

LC2I

ti

la

do

la

manual

the

tone,

S7\

/T\

2: =t
JZt

With the

la.

sign for la

is

given, thus:

The

now be

should

last exercise

given by oral de-

and again with the manual

scription of the tones,


signs.

The

depressing effect of la

relaxed, drooping

when

manual

giving the

The study

attitude

of

by the
arm -and hand

intensified

is

the

sign.

be followed, in subsequent lessons, by the

of la should

singing of the la triad, the class singing

by

direction in three divisions:

All

8= 1
r

gW

dzzzzzJ:

~2~

~-mvrc-

~gs>-

>

"C^

:c?:

Djt

I>iv-

B
A

1
j

La

The assignment
division

may

of parts should

be changed frequently, so that each

sing all parts.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

The
The
1

teacher (or a pupil) plays, or sings with a neutral syllable.


pupils respond, singing the syllable names.

Do
I2I

Sfc

te

~Z21

-&-

-Z.

1221 -G>-

-&-

-^ZL
-J^L

-<S>-

-&-

g.

'jy~^"

1221
1221

-&>-&-

&

>

gy g>

FOURTH YEARNOVEMBER
9

r^__ Z

is

9E

33

is 22=2:^ SI usth^zs

isi

is:

s:
-s>-

t>

10

12

11

s:

S^SZ^~S

SI

is:

zz

i^-^-s

14

13
-tr-=rr
^-

=^ggg:

is:

#*

-&&&

-(S*

"tj^

~=s~

IZsliiaE^

-<S>-

IS

-<^

s
<s>-

-^-

Rhythm

tonal material in the following rhythmic studies consists solely

of the descending

s:

and ascending

scale,

without repeated notes, thus:

is:

SI

-&-

122:

-s>-

s:

ISI

Each exercise is to be continued until the accent


Each measure has the same rhythm.

-<s>-

-^

-<s>-

Studies in

SE

:8^

16

,15

The

<^>(S'-

falls

on the upper

_,

do.

neutral syllable should be used instead of the syllable names.

The teacher

places two measures of an exercise on the board, sounds

key tone, and indicates the tempo.


No further directions should be necessary.
No time should be wasted asking questions; if the pupil sings the
exercise correctly, he thereby answers all pertinent questions.
Questions are in order when mistakes are made.

'the

-^hrb-h?
Kj) "4-

-0
* 0-*
=5=
hs

Ffr -> -*
1

0-

N
'

h =*

1*-

-*

1*fe

-f

-0

zl

T^=
m

K- h


~m *
s

#-A

V i^

->-

-v

-^

=5= P -4

-1

MUSICAL DICTATION

34

^^^^fe^^^g^^^

g-T-T-i*

SE

sl3
iS

-etc.-

zfa

*+-

65*

ff^S

-*-

-etc.-

-#
-

-etc

s53
e
l3

=
-etc.

czfizfe

-etc.

as *1
or

q- g--f-^--

*-3-x-s- -e

9
i

yr

"

17

c.=| j^fcfr

-fchW

*=F
10

^^^^^3^

The

-etc.H

fe*
S^^^^ESEg

pupil should feel the

vidual singing

is

rhythm before beginning

-etc-

to sing.

Indi-

essential before completion of these studies.

Material for Metric Dictation


For directions see page

23.

In singing or playing the melodies, particular stress must be placed

on the accent, so that the "swing"

The
The

of the

rhythm may be

clearly

felt.

teacher plays, or sings with a neutral syllable.


pupils respond, singing the syllable

on the blackboard, or

names and writing the melody

in the writing book.

FOURTH YEAR NOVEMBER

and commonplace, allowing the pupils


concentrate on the combination of tone and rhythm.

The melodies
to

35

are very simple

mr

-&w

i^g

JW

<&-

3*-

FW^-i^

->-

&-+-

fca

::M:

as

2-

ss

-^-

*-

T
ss^

*3

5SG>T 5^1

b-vPi

tes

:^3

HSSQZ

^=^

-*-*-

3t

*-*-

5fafcJzM

^XX #-^

-*-*-

10

Ml\j M

-&-

-&-

-Ly

^i ag

12

11

-go
:fa wzxzw.
5-b 7i
i

jHH- d=i
00L ^~r

^5*
fc

00-

14

13

fa

s8

_*.

z:

--*-.*-

--

-*-*-

1
PES

-s-s-

fa

-*-*-

-j-

-g- 3H

-3S-*

18

17

^fest*
fa

-0^-*?^

0^szrr^

00^-&-i

20

19

ffi

r-3-s-|

16

15
frfeS-p-*-*-

^S^^4

ii|Ei

gg

F^-

-^

4:

-e^-r

H-

g>

'

MUSICAL DICTATION

36

22

21
p-fctoi:

24

23

rferJT^

Sr

-<&-

rs^

-&-

-<s-

&-r

26

25
z

U4 j
^

C=

*jr

g>

-&-

{-

-e>

tfa

&=fc=i
28

27

E&eH
i

I-

t=

=P

P^P

G?

30

29
zfca

i8fe
31

-^
1=

?=

R*

X *

?=

32

=t

J==

During the third week

tofc

'-=P

-*-*-

E^z^ggz-,

5fejEd

month's work, the entire class


write Nos. 5, 6, 13, 14, 19, and 23 on page 7 of the writing book.
Further work on these melodies should be confined to those who
of this

g
will

fail

to pass this test.

LESSON

VIII

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON IX

12

(Writing Book)

Play, or sing with a neutral syllable.


"T~J-

*z>

ii
W-

^'

7^L

^-^-^-^
-<S

'zznzz. <&-'

21
-

G>

&-

FOURTH YEAR NOVEMBER

iP

zzzzz^ze:

:^l

6
221

221

&r i&-

-fi?-

"C &-T2T

^^r?-

&-

10

8
'g?

37

-&

^^ZJ

f:

-G>-

-G>-

-&-

Zs~Z2-

> gy
'

LESSON X
(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable, Nos.

5, 6, 13,

Metric Dictation for November (pages 35 and 36).

LESSON

XI

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

14, 19

and 23

of

DECEMBER
Tonal Dictation
Review

of

Mental Effects

the study of the scale tones has been properly conducted, the pupils

If

now

fully realize

That the

i.

active tones of the major scale are

which has a tendency to progress either upward or downward,


fa and la, which have a tendency to progress downward, and
t% which has a strong tendency to progress upward.
re,

That the inactive tones of the major scale are do, mi and sol, and
that la becomes an inactive tone in the minor scale.
The pupils should sing the tone groups from a description of the
tones given by the teacher, or from the manual signs.
2.

'S>

.
-^

^~g
_
^^2

jg

_^-_.

& Z?

.^-.

r^

^~T~

-g3

~7Z>

^ sz

^ i

^S5'
-i&-<S>-

-CT-^-

~"

-<s>-

22:

"^2:

^~

5
'S?~

^ g?
-c

^~ ^Z?-^
&-7Z?
^>M2^^ ~^

S==^
Z2
^
<S>

Z=?

izr-fS

&

<^

Oral Tonal Dictation


Study

The intermediate

tones, di,

of

Chromatic Tones

ri, fi, si, li, te, le, se,

me, and rd are called

chromatic tones.
Di, ri,fi,

si

and

li

are easily learned, provided each

with the scale tone just above; like


38

ti

do.

is

linked in thought

FOURTH YEAR DECEMBER


The mastery

of

we and

te, le, se,

rd

is

not

39

difficult,

provided the habit

has been formed of thinking each tone joined to the next scale tone below; like fa mi.
If

the pupil

knows the

interval from each scale tone to every other,

the chromatic tones present no

taught, will sing

thinks

^^\

fJq:-

if

^Js
likewise,

as surely, for his habit

is

if

The

new problems.

he knows

he knows

rl^^l,
j

p.

pupil, properly

because he habitually

he

pm=^

will sing

to think fg =g=^ z==

The object of the following studies is


Most pupils sing from do to re, from

to fix this habit of thought.


re to /a,

and from mi

to fa too

narrow.

The

The

studies are sequential.

two or three groups.

after the teacher has called for

The

pupils should complete the series

pitch should be tested after each series.

Series

A:

Study

of

Ti

LXdZ

r^

<2 <S>

r=}

CJ

<2

<s>-

O'

321

-S

IW
IB

<^-

22:

.?2:

-<S<-

22:

-~-u-

-<-

"S^-

22:

:?2:

22:

-<^-

-<^-

-S>-S>-

22:

r~s^ ^^=szz^ zg ^=g

'7T?-

-<S>-

22:

22: <^-

Series

<C

22 -S>-

=i

r=rt_

ii

Study

of

-<^>-<S>-

22:

-S>-

-<&-

22:

3E

^z

-&^r

Fi

zz
:

8^=? z 3Z

-<s>-

"221

;iss

MUSICAL DICTATION

40

3=g==q^

$=
"sr

Series

<?

<-

fe^-^22=2^n
<s-

:22i

"S^"

-s^

~^-

gy

s>-s-

2Z

<^-

22:

Study

C:

221

=
O- 32: -is- 5^ ?
::

ST

22"

of

a^

g>-

ZZ
"

-<s>-

F^

\ <Sr-f?

igB

-^-Cr

Fa

A-E-g?

to

Ill

^-^r-\-^r

2Z

-^

~^

<s22Z=!r^=22

~~?

:c?~

"^7"

frfr-

-<S^

-<-

^^

zz

-rS--

22:
-<S>-

3=

"ST

22:

-<s-

^n g?

22."

F#&&grsaz^:

-<S>-

22:

221

g,

-<s>

gfe-ESEEjE

-<S>-

221

-5>-

]3Z

-O- 221

.22:

"C?"

Series

Study

of

=$
F=#^-
^gzgg^
z

=s*

"^^ 22:

22:

:22:

k^-s?=F^-

-<s-

-&-

Te

22Z^

->&-

22:

=r ?- 22.

-^

~ZZ1Z~Z2L

-&-

g=s

22:

zz

22: i9-

>^- 22:

22:
-<S>-

a=s
ffiS ^ <&-

-G>-

^2Z=^=

b^r-z?-\-?z?-

/S'

sz

:&^

*-

dp-

22_ ^ c"

FOURTH YEAR DECEMBER

4'

Material for Metric Dictation


See page

23.

The pupils should be encouraged to think and sing melodies of their


own making, following the general plan suggested by the melodies
which are here given.

m2-s

m
w

?-

T?

-1
~^?-

:^2i

I2I

:<z

&L

-&

=t=P

-S>-

^Z^
-^-t~?z.

w^2>~

*=tr

:2:

25t:

LWiM

gJ

|
i

10

^_^_^Z3+

ls

<5>-

12

11

-^3 g^

13

:g^

ip a

IS =i=
=

^J ~P^

22ZZ^I

is:

-<s>-

-s^

:s2i

14

S?^>-g^ g^

:s2:

gj

&^r

<g- 1^-Y

&>-\

-e>-

7^

=2:

s:

tt

I^ZZ^Z

gs

"c

MUSICAL DICTATION"

42

22

21

3fe
n

^z-

-C2-

2^:

Z5t

T5

122:

22

&&-

22:

24

23
Z2=2I

2222
For the

The

:a_

test at the

$3

"221

~esr -S>-

TSt^SSt

~r?

- 2:s2:

middle of the month, give Nos.

entire class will write these

on page 12

i, 2, 9,

of the writing

10, 13, 14.

book (Lesson

XIV).
Special attention should be given to those

who

fail,

as in October

and

November.

LESSON

XII

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON

XIII

(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable.

Pupils write.
2
1221

Z22I
-&>-

-& 22:

Z22I

3=

122

^=221

"r^-r-i
<^-

g^

1221

5jfsz

-^ -c- -^

Ip

^^

-^-^-^r

g? eZ-TZr V^-Trzr

22Z^
9^

2>I

22:

-<^-

C?"

-^

122:
-<s>-

221

^3f^

8
22:

2Z

22

221

221

221
-S-

-<^-

FOURTH YEARDECEMBER

43

LESSON XIV
(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable, Nos.

i,

2,

9,

10, 13

and 14

of

Metric Dictation for December, on page 41.

Teachers who prefer the writing book to the blackboard

may have

the entire twenty-four exercises on pages 41 and 42 written in the writing

book instead

on the blackboard.

of

The practice pages

afford plenty

of space for the extra lessons.

The

writing

book gives every pupil practice

writing each exercise, thus affording

work otherwise

many

in

times the

recognizing and

amount

of written

possible.

The Minor Scale


(Normal Form)

The form
is

which the pupils are already familiar


called normal to distinguish it from other forms of the minor scale.
The teacher will sound the key tone E, and the pupils will sing the
of the

minor

scale with

normal minor.

^=^=^=^E^-Z

~rz>-

-&-

^_^_^ ^=^=^
-<S-

In order that the ascending minor scale might have a more distinctive
ending, -modern theorists introduced a chromatic alteration, using si

instead of

major

sol.

From fa

scale.

scale tones. eS
v)

Use
this

The ascending
to si

is

scale ends

three

eSEz=eJ like ti do of the


half-steps, a new distance between

e==3
fa

si

of the following material should

new

with

make

the pupils familiar with

scale interval.

Material for Practice

To be sung from
Lead the pupils

the blackboard.
to link si la together, as one thought.

are inclined to sing fa below the pitch

when it follows si in

Most

pupils

the descending

MUSICAL DICTATION

44

therefore, especial attention should be given to fa in descending.

scale;

At the question mark the pitch should be


2

-& sz -<s>- 2Z

tested.

^g-^-^^g^

1221

gS^pg^rafer^fe:
rrs

t&- :^z

-g=3

-gy

1221

3^ .^- -f^-

2^
122:

-s>-

No. 8

is

daily until

the

Harmonic form

it is

22: ^-gg-

of the

minor

"S^-

-<S-

1:1

This should be sung

scale.

thoroughly learned,

Triads
Arrange the

The

class in three divisions as

was done

in October.

teacher assigns the parts and directs the class to sing the seven

triads in the order of the scale tones, ascending.

They may now be sung

as one exercise, thus:


/7N
/T\

s4

Slowly

S7\

/TN

3m

Z:

=fcr=i

<st

22"

ts

-m-

/Ov

/T\

The

-O

:s?z

-<^-r

^
-^

:p

itd* sn
^

singing of the triads should be repeated daily until the pupils

have no
quality.
is

a tone in tune while listening to the


Careful attention should be given to tone

difficulty in sustaining

other tones of the triad.

which

rz

-<2g-s
&-r

Only flexible, mellow tone


harmonious and pleasant.

will

blend and produce a result

JANUARY
The work for January

which a record
is kept; two written tests (Writing Lessons XV and XVI), the results
of which are also recorded; and special work with the slower pupils
who need assistance.
Each teacher should have a blank book not less than seven and a half
by nine inches, presumably provided by the Supervisor of Music or
This book, labeled, "Music, (Central) School, Room
the Principal.
(6)," may be used not only for the records of the semiannual review,
consists of individual singing, of

but also for the supervisor's notes, made during his

visits to the

room

throughout the year.

assumed that individual singing is regularly practiced in the


recitation in music as it is in reading.
In January and June, however, the results of the individual singing
and writing are recorded, and form- the basis of the pupil's term mark
Those pupils who are fully up to grade may be excused from
in music.
music a part of the time during the month, in order that the slower
pupils may receive extra help from the teacher.
The pupils who are
It

is

strongest in music often delight in "playing teacher'


ones, a feature which,
to the "teacher"

when properly managed,

and the slower

is

'

with the slower

of great benefit

both

pupils.

LESSON XV
(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable, Nos. 21, 22, 27, 28, 31

Metric Dictation for November, on page


45

36.

and 32

of

MUSICAL DICTATION

46

LESSON XVI
(Writing Book)

n,

Play, or sing with a neutral syllable, Nos.

the Metric Dictation for

The
ruled

class roll should

and designated as

December on pages

Smith

John Bright

John Stout

Robert Burns

of

41 and 42.

follows:

Major
Series A, B, C,

E, and

May

ana 24

be copied into the blank book, and columns

Sequential Studies,

Names

12, 21, 22, 23

D,

Two
Written
Lessons

O.K.

98

O.K.

90

65

and C

5o

Series A, B, C,

Series A, B,

Remarks

Knows

everything

Voice improving

FEBRUARY
Sequential Studies of Chromatic Tones
See directions on page 38.
Series

Ri

E:

Mi

E=j=
He
#
i?

32 32

a^

5te 32Z^

-fi?-

-<^

32

<S-

-<S

32 5^Z32

~g?

5<S-

<S>

-gyg>-

32

132

-^-

32

32

|g

-<s-

TP"

^2=^ 32

-Z21

^-

r^~

1^?

y^~?~ 32Z^I 32

*5
gy^-i^
Series

32X32

gy

-<S>-

-^-3^^ 32
~27

<S*

32

Si

La

1^=^=1^=5= 32

gg

|^-=

_u

32: c/ -a gi fo

i
B

fc

3E

32

^P'

32

-<&-

ib

-<S-

32

fc^=
-o-

32 "^22

l^=F

:^2

32ZVS^=? ZZZ3Z

11^32132

-<S>-

32

1^32132
47

--

-<S>-

32

32

-^>-

32

-e>- ~S7"

-S>-

^=22

<
32

-<s s?- 1

:fe^zz32

-&-*t^

C*

-^-

C^

S==

MUSICAL DICTATION

48

*=>

E#$

25"

Gh

-2~ ~2~

$=

Di

G:

Series

fe

"Zy

'7Z2L

'^T"

Z2:

Ss^

-ZD&-

^ g

fag?

-y

32:

i2i

fi trb

&

&-r?-^-i&-^

-^ 11

-^tt

zzs:

cr

GJ -^

g^==

rj

1^2:

c^ ?
ej

*<^ *T

-<s>-

~
^

i*

c*>

g>

r.

22

:s=?:

12I

-<s>c>-

Original Melodies
(Oral)

Until

now

the pupil has been gaining facility in thinking, reading and

writing the tone language

The

others.

by means

ability to think, read

of musical material originated

and write

in a

language presupposes

the capacity for original ideas, and the ability to express them.
erly directed, pupils will progress

by

Prop-

quite as rapidly in musical as in

English Composition, and will keenly enjoy expressing their

own

musical

ideas.

The

teacher will draw two staves on the blackboard, place the signa-

and suggest the number

tures,

of measures, as follows:
za:
-or-

-or

Si

The teacher suggests:


i. That the tunes are
measures long.

-&

to be in

two or three part measure, and four

FOURTH YEAR FEBRUARY


2.

3.
4.

49

That the only tone in the last measure shall be do (upper or


That the tune shall begin with do, mi, or sol.
That there shall be no skips.

much

Experience proves that the pupils will succeed

under these restrictions than when allowed


skips,

The

rhythms and kinds

lower).

better at

first

freedom concerning

full

of measure.

teacher shall encourage the pupils to think and sing these "

little

tunes," insisting that each shall sing the tune mentally before singing
aloud.

Simple melodies

may

be sung by the teacher to stimulate and guide

the pupils; for example:

prfcter-e~*- d

yfi--ii=

*H

-f-:

L*

^2-.

fP^-

=4=1

fa
-1

K=e.

-*

-^-

yil
p?4

0-

is

J?g J.
^%z
=at
1

:^-zzat

*-

&

^-

li

^=3t

-*

y?Si

-J

10

fe

sS:

11

sp

^e=^

?2=

12

T^

7Zt

-<s>

14

13

F=t

w=^
t=p

^=jr L &

15

Hi

16

=E5
-&-

-SiP

=a

-^-

MUSICAL DICTATION

17

HE

18

19

^i

fc=t

>

m9j-

F=t

-&~r

20

*!

21

Si --*

fa

Sffi^

3*

4:

-*-*-

*-*zjt

-S>-

-<s>

^=m
*

22

=b

9-

*>-

24

23

HE

xr

B:

-*-*->

Whenever a good melody


board, or on page 31

The

*-*-

-f

.or

sung,

is

it

&

may be

izt

V-

written upon the black-

32 of the "composer's" writing book.

possibilities in this original

melody work are limited only by the

equipment and skill of the teacher.


and properly directed, stimulates

The

creative faculty,

interest

and

when aroused

accelerates progress in

every feature of school music.

Oral Tonal Dictation


The

following tonal groups are based on the triads.

The

teacher

group of tones or sing with a neutral syllable.


The pupils respond, singing the syllable names.
Each group should be sung or played with a strong rhythmic swing,
not too slowly. The pupils should think of the group as a whole, not
(or a pupil) will play the

from tone to tone.


1
5- fr

__

&

-&-

-&-

jZZ.
122:

7^

mi

L-fc

3^

Zl

2SE
^2:
~c?-

5
:sz
Z2I

IS.

-2-

-<s>-

Sfc:

2
:z

iS-^pr^

122:

-&-

<&-

122:

-<S-

t^-

FOURTH YEARFEBRUARY

it

fffr<g-

-<^>-

zz: ~^~:

-<s>-

C"

t ft
3y
*i

2:

25:

_^=r^

2.

-<s>-

zz

^a^-

6V?/

c>

oft

^2:

-<s>-

o-

g a

10

11

isz

^\)

=0^

12
^_
^

If?

S^ss r ~-*z

<-~S

->

sr>

^ ^ ^

r^>

/-=>

~-s
~-

>wSt"*

<zs

<LS

^~

sr>

"
c*>

14

13
-<s>-<s>-

-*^>-

-<S>-

221

-<s^-

jfZt

C7-

-O-

C*L

15

-^

-eS>-

fS

O^

16

J:

zsz:

-<S>-

IP

g? r^

^~I22ZZZ1Z22:
-_2_^.

-&-<S>-

<>

_<^I

221

-<S>-

2;
ZZ?"

-<si-<s>-

18

17 Do
2Z1

j^ZZZ.

ZI2Z

-C^2.

1S2ZZZZ~SZ.

-<S>-

-<S-

<s>-

-S>-

Metric Dictation

An
is

and rhythm study


which includes both oral and written

increasing proportion of the time given to tone

now devoted

to metric dictation,

and rhythmic elements.


The writing should be done in the writing books instead of on the
blackboard. Pupils who fail in this written work should be given individual help. Those who write the melodies correctly, demonstrate their
mastery of both the tonal and rhythmic problems involved and may be
allowed to do work in other subjects while the teacher works with those
practice with the tonal

who need

help.

In order to

must know the


recognize the tones, and

assist the pupil effectively, the teacher

may have failed to


therefore needs oral dictation.
He may have failed to understand the
rhythm, and needs practice with simpler rhythms. He may lack facility
cause of failure.

The

pupil

MUSICAL DICTATION

*a

in the use of notes, rests

symbols. is necessary.

and signatures;

He may

if

so, practice in

the use of these

be confused in trying to recognize tones

and rhythms simultaneously, and

is,

need of practice with

therefore, in

the very simplest metric phrases such as were given in October and

November.

The

following phrases are to be played, or sung with a neutral syllable,

Some

the pupils writing in the writing books.

parts of familiar songs.

Encourage the pupils

of the melodies are


to

syllabize familiar

tunes from memory.

LESSON XVII
(Writing Book)

LESSON XVIII
(Writing Book)

Ep

w&

h J

-#

h ->

&rf=*=
SB
<*

+.

fcfc

P=^:

h-tz=t^

>**-

rrrRTH YEARFEBRUARY

53

LESSON XIX
(Writing Book)
2

ifc:
^5:

d33EEI3SS35

w-r+

-m

-S

bo;

:3:

^^

g^^B

6
s

:l

^E^

fMn=:^l

te *

bz

LESSON XX
(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable.

The

pupils respond

&-

iS>

by

singing the syllable

I2Z
Z2=22=^_._^.

cs

-S>

names and then

E^

22Z

~Z2L

-&>-

.rzs.

-2-

16

15
-&-

zsz:

fZ.

2Z

c?-

14

12

11

zz
-<s>-

>2
-^zr.

10

^^5-

^Tj

<^-

8
zzz

writing.

zzz.

^>

^o
Z2I

3J

MARCH
Oral Tonal Dictation

make

Familiarity with triads will tend to

the following material easily

understood.

While singing or playing these tonal groups, the teacher should keep
in

mind the

is

simply the tones of a familiar triad.

triads, frequently calling attention to the fact that the

#
Vfc

7ZZ-

*=&$L
1221

-&-

&

<^~

iS^

S^2I

&-

122:

group

-&-

-&-

-<5*

-& zgszi ~^

-&-

-& -&-

<s-

-&-

&- ^ZJ~C^

~Z2i

g?~

_-

-(S>-

&& ^^=^

&
s=sz

l2.

122:

Z2I

-<s>-

2Z

-<^-

1221
-s>-

fc

22:

-<^-

-&-

^2:

I2Z

zsz:

-<s>-

~^z

10
I2Z

!::

isz

sz

aa

12
ji

~Er *T Ll

fn\

ff
tf

2^2:

2Z

11

fljl

r^

-T5

-(^2.

_^

i2z

r^_

g2

_g2

._

"

13
__

._

^
/2

-^1/

^>

rO

2
rC

14

:fe

^ "C

-<&-

^*5

___

<Zi

^Z>

<<3

^5

-/S>

54

-s>-

16

15

^3

r^3

-<s>-

^
r^<s-

-&-

Z2I

gg^. dg

Z2I

FOURTH YEAR MARCH

55

LESSON XXI
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.
After the lesson

is

written, have the pupils sing from their writing

books.

Metric Dictation

The aim
rhythm.

is

to fix the attention of the pupil

upon the measure and the

Consequently, the problems of signatures, intervals,

are largely eliminated.

The

pupil needs and should have

much

etc.,

practice

This, toand writing simple four-measure melodies.


gether with practice in thinking, singing and writing original melodies,
will enable him to see what he hears and hear what he sees.
The first flat in the key signature is on the third line.
To place the remaining flats, count up four and down five.
The flat next to the last is on the staff degree representing do.
When the first measure is not full, the first and last together form
one full measure.
Each phrase is just four measures long.
The teacher should play the melody or sing with a neutral syllable.
The accent and rhythmic "swing" should be strong and unmistakable.
in recognizing

The

following phrases are to be played, or sung with a neutral syllable,

the pupils writing in the writing book.

LESSON XXII
(Writing Book)
2

3SE

MUSICAL DICTATION

56

LESSON

XXIII

(Writing Book)
2

&s
^5Eg

*5

9_-2:

tr

te
4
s*

Z22I

--

sfe

?Z

~Z2l

^S-S-

'--

F?=

=fa=

1===

z=k

f-^

-<zt

iis

2Z

y-

-U

1-

i
Z3E_,

SIZ

LESSON XXIV
(Writing Book)

&m
-P-fr

V F

s
a=^
zte
&2

-.?-

m Sf

S3=^ IDE

te

y-h
-LI

gffi^f?

-<s>-

B
2

S*

:?2=

z^zi

22

Original Melodies
(Oral)

Directions:
i.

2.

3.
4.

Each melody shall be four measures long.


Each melody shall begin with do, mi or sol.
The last measure shall have but one tone, do (upper or lower).
The tone just before the last do shall be one of the tones of the

triad of sol {sol,

ti

or re).

FOURTH YEARMARCH

57

may

be skips of one or two scale tones, as in the triads.


The melodies shall be in either three or four-part measure.

There

5.

6.

It is essential that the

rhythmic " swing.''


should be

much

melodies shall be sung or played with a strong

The accent on

the

first

beat in four-part measure

stronger than the accent on the third beat, in order that

may

the difference between two and four-part measure

The teacher should name the key and


and the

last

place the

be clearly

staff,

felt.

the signatures

measure on the blackboard, thus:

mp^

*
-<s^

Stt.

iSlzS-cr

This

will

materially help the pupil to visualize his melody.

another lesson, illustrate the incomplete

first

and

last

fe 3
^t

At

measures, thus:

dl^or:^

^Zor-

fe^

The
sung.

Whenever an

may

original

approved by the teacher, the


the writing book on page 31 or 32.

melody

is

be allowed to place it in
encouraged to do so, many children

pupil
If

pupils should be encouraged to write the melodies after they are

will write melodies outside the

music period and submit them to the teacher, completing the pages of
original melodies by the end of the school year.

Sequential Studies
See directions on pages 38 and 39.
If necessary, review the study of /a, page 15.
The usual tendency to sing fa mi too narrow,

encouraging the pupil to think the fa higher.

may

be overcome by

MUSICAL DICTATION

58

H:

Series

Le

1 Sol

tfaP^nl
r5*
2ZII22!

&S-^221

22 1221 122-iS* 221


b? r^> 1t
^> *Z&
22-^*^
ZttTZP^+zsr
22 22 e^-^P^

mI

,%-g

-<&
fr-22-^-_
22:

=221

-<&-

22:

isz

2Z iS>-

-<s-

K=S2=fca

22: i&-

22

;^=^;
22
1Z22I^^22Z=I22

ao

=^=R
122
^ZZ22ZZ3^22IZ

?^- ZZZIZS

f2Z ^ 22: -

-<S>-

122:

22: =22_^_
Z5

-<S>-

-T^T-^G- 22:

'<&22=^=22

-<s>-

fcs-

ZZ

221

122:

"22"

:sz
r^

"^~

r^*^~

i2P

22=122 O-

22:

<s>-

22:

22:

c^

22:

>^- 22:

22=^==H
22"

22:

22:

-<s>-

-&

22:

cr

ita

22: -&>-B<S>- 22:

2?

gj

22:

-<S>

:sz

22:

-Gh

22=R
^^P^

22:

-<s>-

P^22: :22=^=1^^2=1^=^

tes

-<s^

g^?~

C22: 22:

<s>-

-<s>-

-<^?

fcS

22:

Series J:

ip

.22

Me

Re

IW 6==

.22: <s>-

=6^=

-&- 22:

"22"

Series I:
1

fcS 321

^^S^-

&

^22.
22-

'

2^

^ Q

fcS>-

22:

22:

-<s>-

22:
-<s>-

22:

*&-

^^-g-^22:

"2?"

APRIL
Metric Dictation
(Two tones

Do

represented by the next

is

to the beat)

staff

degree above the last sharp.

The first sharp is on the fifth line.


To place the remaining sharps, count down four, then up
The teacher will play, or sing with a neutral syllable;
beat and

listen,

then write in the writing book.

tention of the pupils

may

Much

all in

book.

The
it,

In order that the at-

the sequences are obvious, and the

one kind of measure.

practice with simple material

facility in recognizing

The

the pupils

be centered upon the rhythm, these scale

exercises are exceedingly simple;

melodies are

five, etc.

is

and writing rhythmic phrases.

following lessons are to be written

Each phrase

is

necessary to give the pupil

by each pupil

in the writing

played or sung while the pupils beat and

listen.

teacher should lead the pupils to visualize the melody before writing

and

to recognize the different

rhythms and the number

of beats in a

measure.

LESSON XXV
(Writing Book)

s
=3
4 J

m *

MUSICAL DICTATION

6o

LESSON XXVI
(Writing Book)

5i8^E

3=*

tM=
i

mm^mms^^^^^m
5

UP|EE

*-*-+

&

4z^z

.__

**=*-I*3*

LESSON XXVII
(Writing Book)
2

fmE^i-

-*=*-

"X

rr-P

ggg

?=
*

SPg^g -^feg

Urn

#te

si^p^^g^

life

K5BS

*
SlS^SIlg^li
LESSON XXVIII
(Writing Book)

Full directions are in the writing book.

from

his

own copy

of the music.

The

pupil enjoys

si

FOURTH YEAR APR TL

<5l

Original Melodies

The most valuable


original melodies

The

is

be gained from these

result to

with

first efforts

the training of the pupil to think tone and rhythm.

and feel the rhythms is of vital importance; the quality of the melody is a secondary consideration.
The suggestions made for February and March should be followed,
and the work continued along the same lines.
ability to think the tones

Oral Tonal Dictation


The

The

following shall be played, or sung with a neutral syllable.

pupils respond, singing the syllables names.

fe=^

I2Z

K=f
'A

m^^^

d r

\^-&*

w m
j

~&0-

ta>

-f^2

^=p

-f2.

=*

-o

-* M

*.

fe

+WT
10

l-

feS *m
OTr
f

&

11

wUZ*:

*=<&&*$

t=t

12
fcp

IdffiEM:

14

15
ar_fe

?:

*=

16
1221

jt<

tP

*f

MUSICAL DICTATION

62

18

17

^sn
19
fch*

4=

Do
I

=#

fl

r*

=E

20

^F^-J^

P"

r*

-d

wt

c^

gt

MAY
Metric Dictation

The melodies

are to be used as follows:

For oral metric dictation.

i.

The

teacher plays, or sings with a neutral syllable, one phrase at a

time; the pupils respond, beating, and singing the syllable names.

The teacher

places the staff,

clef,

signatures and bars on the black-

board, thus:

2:

Do
This

will help the pupils to visualize the

For metric dictation.


The melody is given out as in No.

melody.

2.

i,

the pupils writing in the writing

book.
3.

For the study


a.

The

of note values.

pupils write the

melody

in three-four measure, using the

copy already written for reference.


b. The melody is written in three-eight measure.
4. Each pupil sings the melody from his own copy, a portion of the
class singing from each representation.
Pupils who find difficulty with any one of the three representations
should be given extra lessons in note values.
lb

$3

zzezzz

~JZZ.

-&-

~Z2L S- -ZZi

]&-&-

SZ.

it

Z2I

isz

3Z -&-

~Z2L
~1ZZ

I22Z

If

Z?

c?

-<S>-

22:

221

I2

is:
63

-g?

Gh t&

YJZ2L

MUSICAL DICTATION'

64

2b

g^^

mp^

--s>-

22;

-<s>

t
<s>

^2-

z2:

-<s>-

-p

-<-

-^

-<s>-

-&-

-s>-

:2i

LESSON XXIX
(Writing Book)

The teacher
at a time.

has

six

will

play or sing the foregoing melodies, four measures

melody
placed only at the end of the

Before beginning, the teacher states that the

phrases and that a double bar


After the lesson

last phrase.

is

is

written in

the writing book,

teacher places the melodies on the blackboard.


his

and

own

copy.

XXXI

Lesson

XXIX

must be

first

Each pupil

the

corrects

correct before Lessons

XXX

are written.

LESSON XXX
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON XXXI
(Writing Book)
Directions are given in the writing book.

LESSON XXXII
(Writing Book)
be written and copied into
the writing book any time during the month, as the teacher directs.
The pupils should be allowed to choose the key and the kind of
Six original four-measure melodies are to

measure.

FOURTH YEARMAY

65

Oral Tonal Dictation


The
The

ability to

remember a long phrase may be acquired by

practice.

singing of sequential exercises helps to develop facility in singing

long phrases.

The more musical

children should

now be

able to syllabize familiar

tunes.

Many

The

of the following melodies are parts of familiar tunes.

pupils should be given the privilege of completing the tune.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation

To be sung

or played rapidly, as one phrase.

by

Pupils respond

sing-

ing the syllable names.


2

h
i-M

3^
ES^fi

22

mm&&5m&m?mm

&

N h N
I

gl^^g
p
*&

V-

[,

U =*=

rfiEEp=g
Az=M

~JZL

1*=*

F*==^

\?-=f^

zst.

mICJLf CJU
m=h

zst

PP

^>

IT= F

it?

gr

=*
=J

MUSICAL DICTATION

66

F=*tt

m.

fc^
fcri

a=*

10

*F=t
gg

...

11

isfc=p=^

&

sl

=*
*=Zl

12

it

*-*-

52S
Q

1^
15

:*-ar

-&

14

13

afczrt:

u%

i=t

16

La

18

17
-^-

-&-

-S-

19

s ^B

IEE
a
20

S^

:_*.

a=S=p
Eg B

-^ g d

-i

*.

i/

^^d

if
Gh-r

Original Melodies
(Oral)

Pupils

who have done

the oral dictation for the

in four-measure phrases.

now becomes an

first

three years, think

This development of the sense: of rhythm

invaluable help in making four-measure melodies.

FOURTH YEARMAY
The

67

must mentally sing and visualize the melody before singThe problem of visualization is simplified by limiting the
ing aloud.
melodies to one key for the present, and by placing the staff, signature,
bars, etc., on the blackboard, as suggested on page 63 where full direcpupils

tions are given.

numerous examples of four-measure


melodies in the music reader. Melodies approved by the teacher may
be copied as a part of Lesson XXXII in the writing book, at any time
during the month.

Both teacher and pupil

will find

JUNE
Directions for conducting the June test are the same as for January.

See page 45.


overestimated.

The
1.

The importance

of this

semiannual test can hardly be

material for the June test consists of:

Singing of sequential chromatic studies.


a.

b.

Two selected from series B, E, F and


Any two from series D, H, I and J.

G.

2.

Singing of four exercises selected from the music reader.

3.

Two

written lessons

(Lessons

XXXIII and XXXIV,

writing

book).

Name

Sequential Studies
(Chromatic)

68

Two
Written
Lessons

Four Exercises,
Music Reader

FOURTH YEARJUNE

69

LESSON XXXIII
(Writing Book)

The

name

teacher will

(speed),

the key, the beat note, indicate the

and play, or sing with a neutral

tempo

syllable.

33E
>3zzp^*z$*= * tt^#If*

^m

=t

::2:

&
6

rfl

?a
*t

<s-^

q gj

C^Gf-zj-

-&-JZt

&-T

LESSON XXXIV
(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable.
2

:fr

-&-

122:

-^

S2

Z2

~^"

l^-^2?^ a
e
.

i9

Z22I

<?

c^

zz^^
(^

E#
life <^-

ISZ

"^ ^z:

^=Z=^=Z

221
iS>-

22:

-<s>-

-<&-

Q>

-<S>-

8
-<s-

I1

^^

-^z=^E^E^l

2Z
-

^>

<

Z
22
22:

r^I

^r

FIFTH YEAR

SEPTEMBER
Sequential Scale Studies
(Minor Mode)

The

results usually obtained in the

minor mode are

less satisfactory

than in the major. This is due to a lack of familiarity with the minor
scale rather than to any inherent difficulty in the minor mode.
A
second scale, like a second language, is more easily mastered than the
first.

The

following sequential studies in the minor

mode correspond

to the

major studies already learned. The major series A, B, C, D, E, and F,


which were studied in the fourth year, are now to be reviewed.
The minor mode will be easily mastered if the major studies have been
thoroughly learned. There is no new material; simply a new atmosphere.

After one or two groups have been sung

by the

teacher, the pupil

should complete the series without further direction.

By

the end of the

dividually

all of

first half

year each singing pupil should sing

the studies in the order given, without direction, freely

and with a rapid tempo.


Sequential Studies
(Minor Mode)
Series

A:

in-

FIFTH YEAR SEPTEMBER

^^
^gF^^y^s^
^

Series

&*=*"
p r

^^.k

71

m-0-^i-r^-W-^-*

B J = 84
.

r-

^-r=^

#a m -t d

'

=f

**a*
I:

:^rjz*:

Series C:

Series

84

ti si

la^

?&&*&&

-Pfi:ti:

:S^
Series

&

^f

mi si ti la

E:

5
*ltef

j ^il-J.jJl^fe P

jf

^g

*i

4=^d: p

-I

-p

L-

IT

_!T_^1

*0 .p

y/

Series F:
3:

4E34

gSSSgiagggSEga^SS

fcJ.r^ + 4>jc
i

te^ztpzz^zt:

SEg^f^
"">

'J.i>

rrf-t =i
g>i
r

MUSICAL DICTATION

72

Inversion of Triads

The tone on which the triad is built (from which


The third tone above the root, is the third.
The fifth tone above the root, is the fifth.

When

the third

it

grows),

the lowest tone, thus

is

the root.

is

the do

it is

triad, first inversion.

When

the fifth

is

the lowest tone, thus:

is

the do

second inversion.

triad,

The

teacher will illustrate these three forms of the triad on the black-

board, making clear that in the


tone,

it

and that

The

first

inversion the third

in the second inversion the fifth

is

is

the lowest

the lowest tone.

teacher sounds the key tone and directs as follows;

Sing the tones of the do triad.


Pupils sing:

ES===i

Teacher: Sing the tones of the do triad,


Pupils sing:

first

inversion.

[W

Teacher: Sing the tones of the do triad, second inversion.


Pupils sing:

pfejj=

g=

Next time the tones

of the sol

and fa

triads should be

sung in

like

manner, thus:

72L

Teacher:

Sing the tones of the

version; fa triad;

The

class

no

follows

Re

Ti

Sol

find

2Z

7Z2L
122:

^-

-fe

may

first

inversion;

La

Fa
sol triad;

first

inversion;

Do
second in-

second inversion.

again sing in three divisions, A, B, and C, and should

difficulty in singing the three different

forms of the

triad, as

FIFTH YEAR SEPTEMBER

71

Do Triad
Slowly

ist

2nd Inversion

Inversion

:*==j^

3H

-&-

Mi

Do

Sol

Sol Triad

it

<3>-7

iS-'

&/

71

ifo

Fa Triad
4-

:<=^e

=S5d

3:

-<s>

-&-

Do

Whenever the

class

is

able to sing these triads correctly

by

direction,

they should then sing from the representation.

The

pupils should notice that the do>

sol,

and fa

triads

sound

alike.

Metric Dictation

The

staff, clef,

key and measure signatures, and bars, should be placed

on the blackboard thus

Hli

The

pupils are asked to visualize, beat and sing twice, mentally, a

measure which the teacher describes.


Teacher: I see a measure containing a quarter and two eighth notes

on the third

The

line.

pupils then beat,

and sing aloud

fcs

Mt
Sol

sol

sol

sol

sol

sol

MUSICAL DICTATION

74

When

Teacher:

the

is

first

tone sung?

With the first beat.


Teacher: The second tone?
Pupils: With the second beat.
Teacher: The third tone?
Pupils:

After the second beat.

Pupils:

Teacher: I see the same measure with a

connecting the

tie

first

two

notes.

SS!4^-*~*=~-t=^
This measure

is

sung

sing the

first

With the first and second


Teacher: The second tone?
Pupils

beats.

following measures are then described

fca
r r h j
fcPtf i

r*h

After each

rhythm

jm

i-

tp

'

tone?

After the second beat.

Pupils:

The

II

then aloud as before.

silently,

When do you

Teacher:

:=:

and sung
j

pupil, or the class, then beats

same way

njj Jrrn n j
i

sung, someone represents

is

in the

and

it

on the blackboard.

sings the entire eight measures.

Later in the month, the following should be described, visualized,

sung and written, in the same way.

-<s>

2:

$=*

<s>

-#

ii
-&>-

<s>-

<s>

<s>-

dt

LJ_4_
-H--s>-r

,-_

-&-

=fc

^m

FIFTH YEARSEPTEMBER

Each

pupil should be provided with

75

Music Writing Book, Number

Three.

LESSONS

AND

II

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.
Facility in writing

Lessons

and

II are

well,

is

gained only

devoted entirely to this practice.

by

practice.

Before the

on the practice pages, pupils who do not do the


or are too slow, should be given blackboard practice copying

exercises are rewritten

work

musical symbols

simple exercises.

OCTOBER
Review of Chromatic Tones
Di,

ri, fi, si

and

lead strongly to

The
The

it,

li

are each linked with the scale tone just above

just as

ti

and

leads to do.

pupil has been taught to think the chromatic tones in this way.
following studies are to be used for oral review.

Number one

should be placed on the blackboard to assist the pupil in visualization

and to show that the basis of the studies is the descending scale, one of
the tones of which forms the first part of every measure.
The pupil should beat as he sings, and be reminded, if necessary, that
the first tone in the measure is sung with the first and second beats,
the second tone after the second beat, the third tone with the third
beat.

The

names the chromatic tone to be


sounds the key tone, and proceeds as follows:
teacher

Teacher: Sing do,

sol,fi, sol,

holding the

studied, fi for example,

first sol

as I indicate.

f^The

pupil should find no difficulty in singing the sequential studies,

provided he has acquired the habit of "linking' the chromatic tone with
'

the scale tone above or below.

Should the studies prove

difficult,

have

one section of the class sing the descending scale only, while the other
section sings the exercise as written, thus:

^S
*-

* -S5E
X X-

&
f X -f-F-g
t
76

st

Z2L

FIFTH YEAR OCTOBER

77

Sequential Studies
Study
ST\

-S^-sr-

of Ti

~W=-

~j~

w-^*

'

Fi

|s^^^^eSe

"hi

h-1

i!
1

*-Vri

-0-*\

!-

Ri

(&^r

ff^

Fi7-=vH

*4H=t=^3p.H

nr-l-F=i=H

Si

^S^ ^^g^^gfe
fe

agan

Li

g^^|iggES^3^1^5if5ggsH
Di
6
/^T\

-<s>-

*a

-^7-A-

pjriwv HfV.&ru U?

d
-^^T-f^-

r^-N-

==*=)

j|4*^fJ^^^ i

Inversion of Triads
Before singing the triads of

/a, re,

and mi, the tones should be sung

in -succession in the different positions, as follows:

Teacher: Sing the tones of the

la triad.

MUSICAL DICTATION

78

Pupils
ils sing:

g|

2Z

32:

Z#
Teacher: The

inversion.

first

33

Pupils sing: Fgg ^

-<&-

Z><?

Teacher: The second inversion.


-as-

-&-

Pupils sing:

9
Mi

After repeating several times, the tones of the re and

be sung in

like

mi

triads should

manner, as follows

Re Triad

-<s>-

-g?~

-7Z7-

~g?"

321

Re

La

Fa

Mi
$

Triad

fc

-<S>-

Z2I

321

Mi
The

zz

JZ2L

-<^-

-^

11

Ti

Sol

three divisions of the class should

now

sing the triads, as follows

La Triad
1 st

5*
5zfe

TZtrr- FifthII--J

2nd Inversion

Inversion

-|

-(SH-j-Root

S>

Koot

>
Third

Third

g^

^-Root

_-.

-^

Mi

Do

La

m
r

Re Triad
1st

Inversion

2nd Inversion
t

gj

P
J?*

R**
Fifth

^ T
^TThird |~p

22* nnh
Third"

/5i

Za

Third
Root

rv^

Firth~-|

FIFTH YEAR OCTOBER

Mi
1st

79

Triad
2nd Inversion

Inversion

-i

II
H

l-gJ-r-Bopt-^ j

*>

1%

R.o

Th ird

(0

<S
<^
^

|-

'
.

Third

i-^hoo.
hoot
.

>

11

77

5b/

Each

division should be given opportunity to sing all parts.

Note. The triad of mi is unsatisfactory and


names in the inversions of this triad.

is

not

much

used.

All will notice the unnatural and

awkward use

of the

syllable

The

teacher should constantly use the terms: Triad, Chord, Interval,

The

The Fifth, First Inversion, Second Inversion, etc.


These terms will then become a useful part of the pupil's vocabulary.
The la, re and mi triads sound alike. After one of the triads has been
Root,

Third,

What

sung, the teacher asks:

The

pupils respond

by

other triad sounds like this?

singing one of the other

After a similar question, the third triad


:

is

two

triads.

sung.

Original Melodies

Thinking, visualizing and singing original four-measure melodies was

begun

in the fourth year.

The value

of this activity to the pupil lies

in his acquiring the ability to think tones

and rhythms

i.e.,

to sing

whether the melodies are


good or bad, or whether he has produced ten or a hundred, if only he
has become conscious of' melody in his mind and can give expression to
mentally.

It matters

comparatively

little

his thought.

The primary

object of melody invention in the public schools, there-

fore, is to establish the

habit of thinking music.

Technical

skill is

not

required or expected either of the teacher or pupil.

few general suggestions are offered for the guidance of the teacher.
Any series of single tones is a melody.

melody which follows the

line of the

major

scale (without skips) is

called diatonic.
If skips are

included they must be used chord-wise;

must follow the

line of

some good chord.

that

is,

they

MUSICAL DICTATION

So

Careful adherence to the following limitations and directions

is

essential
i.

2.

3.

Each melody shall be four measures long; any major key.


The first tone, do, mi or sol; the last tone do, on an accented beat.
The tone just before the last do must be one of the tones of the

triad of sol

(sol, ti

or

re).

4.

Repeated tones are allowed;

6.

Skips should be used sparingly.

7.

Ti should progress to do, fa to mi, and la to

narrow melodies which use only


three or four tones, or return often to the same tone, are to be avoided.
Melodies must follow the line of the major scale (diatonic), or
5.
(The triad of mi is not a "good chord.")
follow the line of a good chord.

is

sol,

unless the

melody

progressing scale-wise in the opposite direction.

The

staff,

with signature, bars,

final

measure,

etc.,

represented on the

blackboard, will help the pupil to visualize his melody.

2
:or:

-Gh

-r

Opportunity to think and sing original melodies should be given the


When an especially good melody is sung,
pupil throughout the year.
the teacher will allow the pupil to write

it

on one

of the last

two pages

book which are reserved for original melodies.


The teacher should have the pupils understand that an original melody
Encourage the
in order whenever oral tonal dictation is given.

of the writing

is

pupils to sing original melodies for the class, as problems in oral tonal

an excellent plan and does much to develop mental


The teacher will be surprised and desinging and melody invention.
lighted with the pupils' efforts in this direction, once the plan is fairly
dictation.

This

is

tried.

The June examination

in

cent for an acceptable page of

maximum

twenty per
original melodies, which have been

music allows a

of

approved by the teacher and copied into the book during the year.
(Page 31 or 32 of writing book.)

FIFTH YEAR OCTOBER

large

number

of four-measure melodies will

the Manual, and in the supplement.


as models.

The

best

to study (sing or play)

way

to

The

become

8l

be found throughout

teacher will find these helpful

intelligent concerning

melody

is

good melodies.

Metric Dictation
and Written)

(Oral

The following material should be used in two ways:


i.
As oral dictation.
The teacher plays, or sings with a neutral syllable while the

pupils

beat and listen and attempt to visualize the phrase.


In this and similar lessons, encourage the pupils to invent and sing

four-measure melodies as material for oral dictation.


sings to a neutral syllable, the class

The

responds, singing the

leader
syllable

names.

The

staff,

key and measure signatures, bars,

etc.,

should be placed on

the blackboard to assist the visualization.

As written metric dictation.


The teacher plays, or sings with a neutral syllable, while the pupils
beat and listen, as in the oral dictation. Instead of singing, the pupils
2.

write in the writing books.

LESSON

III

(Writing Book)
CZJt

MX

s>

TZ

te

mEmz
te=*

J-&-

t
4

'

o 5^1

^
jsdt

MUSICAL DICTATION

82

LESSON IV
(Writing Book)
.

9-&*a

2:

>-

rfa

*&*e.

-s>-

3^

-&

F-+

liii^

sa^^s
LESSON V
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON VI
(Writing Book)

The

teacher

the accent of

names the key, the beat-note, indicates the tempo (not


the number of beats in the measure), and plays, or sings

with a neutral syllable.


1

E3^L
!fc3
s
g|5jB
:

ta
S33E=g
***

jujjij

^^

7Z.

f=i=i

^^E^
fa

-^-

1ST.

J:

^-122:

t=P
-2-

3^
a

-T*g

p~

rs?:

p=t

zz

St

*=

Steps and Half Steps

The
/i

and

pupils
"

(to.

know

that there

is

no tone between mi and fa or between

FIFTH YEAR-OCTOBER

83

The distance from mi to fa and from ti to do is a half-step.


Lead the class to see that the distance between all the other
two half-steps.
The pianoforte keyboard

the scale

tones of

is

is

useful in illustrating the steps

and

half-

steps.

The material should be used as


The teacher sings No. i-a and
;

follows:

What

asks:

is

the distance between

do and di?
Pupils:

half-step.

The teacher then


tween do and
Pupils:

sings

No. i-b, and asks: What

is

the distance be-

re ?

step (or

two

half -steps).

In the same manner complete the

scale.

4a

3
I

f^

l-^_ftg

4b
-<&-

JZ2L

-<^-

6b
-ts-

-tS>-

I!

At another

lesson, place the exercises

on the board as they are sung,

representing the chromatic tones with colored chalk, preferably blue


or red.

name

(These tones were originally represented in colors, hence the

''chromatic")

Intervals

The difference in pitch between any two tones is called an interval.


Each line and space of the staff is a staff degree.
The teacher will place the staff on the blackboard, showing the staff
degrees, thus:
Staff Degrees
Spare aboTe
"Fourth ! pace"
^Ttalrd (pace
^8cond 8pace_
7Firt sptca ~

Bp*o below

-Fifth line

Fourtii

line-

-Third line
-Seion.l line-Firt line

MUSICAL DICTATION

a4

Intervals are

From
From
From

named from

do to re
do to

of staff degrees included.

a Second; two staff degrees are included.

is

do to mi

number

the

is

a Third; three

sol is

a Fifth; five

means eight.)
The number names
(Octo

An

staff

degrees are included.

degrees are included.

staff

octave includes eight

of intervals extend

staff degrees.

from one to

nine.

Place the following on the blackboard (without the names of the


tervals),

and have the pupils give the number name


A

\J
-J

-X

second

1
1

h*frtS>

<=2

third

fourth

fifth

sixth

in-

of each interval.

An

seventh

octave

ninth

""^

"

c~>

r^

11

&

<**s

11

<S>

11

&

\<s>

LI

NOVEMBER
Building the Major Scale

The

now has

pupil

all

the information necessary to enable

him

to

build the major scale from a given pitch.

with the representation on the blackboard,

brief review is desirable,

thus:
-&"

^-^

CDEF

Do
Teacher

What

Pupils:

Teacher

Pupils:

Teacher

Two

do

ti

re to

mi ?

to fa ?

half-step (and so

on throughout the

scale).

points are to be emphasized.

First:

The
makes

la

step.

Pupils:

ABC

sol

the distance from do to re ?

From mi

fa

step.

From

is

mi

re

ii

The

half-steps are e to

representation of the scale

and b to c.
from C, and a view

of the

key board;

this fact perfectly plain.

The

mi

and ti to do.
The singing or playing of the intermediate tones between do and re,
re and mi, etc., and the absence of any tone between mi and /a, and ti
and do, makes this point clear to the pupil.
The teacher now proceeds' "to build the scale from G. The clef and
staff are again drawn, the syllables and letters placed under the staff,
and the do represented on the second line, thus:
Second

half-steps in the scale are

Do

to fa,

ABCDEFG

re

mi

fa

sol

la

ti

do

g6

MUSICAL DICTATION'

Teacher

What

Pupils:

Teacher

the distance from do to re ?

step.

From G

Pupils:

is

to

A?

therefore,

step;

belongs to the major scale from G.

Questions and answers are continued in this

Here the teacher asks

Pupils:

Teacher

Pupils:

from G.
Teacher

Ti

Pupils:

If

ti

the distance from la to

the distance from

is

the answer

therefore,

ti

is

ti

reached.

to

does not belong to the major scale

higher or lower than

a half-step higher than F.

What

Teacher:

is

half-step;

Is

is

until

step.

What

What

way

pitch

is

a half step higher than F?

G is given, the

teacher will lead the pupils to see that

two half-steps above F. If the answer G flat is given, the fact should
be brought out that if G flat were used, two scale tones would be represented on the same staff degree, G flat for ti, and G for do. The scale
always includes the seven letters, and no letter is ever omitted or repeated. The pupils now see that ti is F sharp
and that F is not in
the scale from G.
is

sharp enables the

higher.

(The teacher

"Rases" a tone.
it is

No

staff

will

degree to represent a tone a half-step

avoid giving the impression that the sharp

symbol can

raise a tone.

sharp

is

not

raised;

another tone.)

The

scale

now appears on

122:

the blackboard thus:

&

-&-

<^-

-<Q-

GABCDEFflG

Do

re

mi

fa

sol

la

ti

do

Tetrachords

The

teacher will sing either

jj=5^=ggj
Do

re

tral syllable, after asking the pupils to

mi fa

or

e^^^^^^B
Sol
*J

la

ti

with a neu-

do

respond by singing the syllables.

FIFTH YEARNOVEMBER
rb%

If the pupils sing

r-ft

35=^^=31
tX Do

87

re

the teacher says, I was thinking E fer^--^

mifa

./
*)

Sol la

ti

do

The

Soon the pupils will see that the two parts of the scale are alike.

two parts should now be shown and compared, thus:


Step Step

Step Step

$
A series of four
a tetrachord.

and a half-step, is called


composed of two tetrachords which

scale tones including two steps

The major

scale

is

are alike.

The

teacher gives the pitch and says:

Sing the upper tetrachord.

Sing the lower tetrachord.

Sing the upper tetrachord descending, etc.

Familiarity with tetrachords will be of practical use later.

Sequential Studies
See directions, page

76.

Fa

Te
-^IZff_^_

Ze
S>-

/T\

r$=S*=22

:r^-

* ^^+m-^w^^^^^^-^^is--\

i-H

Me
/TV

;fai

<S>^~-<5>-

Bfe^^i^s^pg^^s
i?a

/TN

-^P^*^7

-I

S=-=-J

k_-K_JJ

>-T

r=S~l

Se*

=^-J

*r^

'

^^

'* J

MUSICAL DICTA T/OAr

gg

Major and Minor Triads


The
78,

teacher asks the pupils to sing the la triad from

as

on page

then the do triad from D.

Teacher:
Pupils:

Do

these two triads sound alike?

No.

Teacher:

How

are they different?

and one like the minor scale.


The teacher agrees and says that the do, fa and sol triads are major
triads, the re, mi and la triads are minor triads.
The teacher then sounds C and says: Sing each of the three major
triads from this pitch.
The pupils sing the triads and inversions as represented on page 73,
each from the pitch C.
Teacher: Sing the minor triads.
The pupils sing the minor triads and inversions in the same way.
When the three major and the three minor triads are clearly underPupils

One sounds

like the

stood, the teacher asks

by the

if

there

major

is

scale

another

triad.

The

class, in three divisions, as before.

tion to the unstable, restless character cf

The

pupils will appreciate this

when they

all

The

triad of

ti is

sung

teacher will call atten-

three tcnes in this triad.

sing the triad.

All will

have

a strong impulse to sing the next scale tone above or below.


The teacher should explain what the pupils already feel:
1.

That the

triad of

ti is

weak because

all

unsettled, causing the triad to be restless


2.

That the

steps,

triad

and two whole

is

weak because

it is

three tones are restless and

and

unsettled.

so narrow.

steps, while the others

It

has two half-

have three whole steps and

only one half-step.

The

skillful

teacher will allow the pupils themselves to discover thb

difference.

The

Diminished

triad.

teacher then

tells

the class that this

is

called the

Study of Rhythms
(Four tones to the beat)
Different
studied.

rhythms involving four tones

to the beat are

now

to be

FIFTH YEAR NOVEMBER

89

The two measures should be placed on the blackboard. It is essential


to real progress in the study of rhythm that the pupils sense the rhythm
before beginning to sing.

This

is

as necessary as hearing (thinking)

the tones before singing.

At least two measures of each exercise should be sung silently,


with the pupils beating, before any attempt is made to sing audibly.
This should become a habit with both teacher and pupils its importance
;

cannot be over-estimated.

Each
upper

be continued until the accent

falls

on the

do.

Nos.

The

scale exercise should

to 7-b,

pupil will

and Nos. 1 i-a and 1 i-b involve four sounds to the beat.
find no difficulty with these rhythms if the feeling for

four sounds to the beat has been developed during the fourth year, as

and the pupil is able


beat smoothly and evenly.
suggested,

Numbers 8-a

to think

and sing four sounds

to the

two tones to the beat and are in


the nature of a review. Nos. 9-a to 10-b are new rhythms involving
two tones to the beat and should be thoroughly practiced.

The rhythms
trasted.

to 9-b each involve

SIHIIH

an d

^4^^

=11

should be alternated and con-

MUSICAL DICTATION

90

7b

w3

8:
letc:

8b

-*+ * g

-1-17 -7T-+

# * *

izetc.

8c

i^ *

ao

letc.n

:etc.~

E4=E

9a

4==

9b

^ *--

&

::eic:

==E

10b

__

-P

(*-

Hetc.Z

e^;

10:

Eg

P+

:*

*_ p

-*-

letc.n

*--

jff5=P- =*: EE

:etc~

Metric Dictation

LESSON

VII

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON

VIII

(Writing Book)

may

be used first for oral


Original melodies sung by the pupils should always form a
dictation.
(See page 79.)
part of the material for oral dictation.
All of the material for written dictation

The teacher

will

name

the key (D major) and the beat note, indicate

the tempo (not the accent), sound the key tone, and play, or sing with a

neutral syllable.

FIFTH YEAR NOVEMBER

The

pupils will beat

and

91

listen, try to visualize

the melody, and re-

spond by singing (aloud) with the syllable names.

The

class will then write in the writing books.

?z*t

;^=^3:

-ib

-=-

=E

m~~&

:5fi2ntz

S3

Tt

TSt

ffie^

-*-=-*-

LESSON

IX

(Writing Book)
See Lesson VIII for directions.

fa
e
===*
*&

fa

^z=*:

53EE5

Si

-<&-

iff 5

-3

*^I

'

^r
*'JJ

jqE-n.irr^jt
-a-^S. d=d4:g=l^
^-n^^g
1^,4
-mm
.m -m--\
mm.

1
A_

*tt
j

i-f44>

1_J

LESSON X
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

A curved line

joining notes calling for different pitches is called a slur.

DECEMBER
Oral Tonal Dictation
(Metric)

Each phrase should be played,


curacy of pitch

is

kept in tune.

The

out of tune

is

or sung with a neutral syllable.

absolutely necessary.

If

a piano

is

used

it

Ac-

should be

use, for school purposes, of a piano that is

badly

most unwise.

Each phrase should be given out


and a decided rhythmic swing.

2^=i

-:|

as one thought, with a firm accent

=t==S=nd
&

ESE

Ip

:2T

:S2"-

JW*=3

t=

1K
8

=E t3

4*5^r~ ^:

*fc
10

11
=fc

*=**-!=?

55
fes
ESEsqp^
1
i

w^

14

ta=

^=^

3d?c

r~* ~i

r?M

16

15

S^=ar
<

13

12

fen

3?

-=

92

r->

^ ag

=2=

FIFTH YEARDECEMBER

93

18

17

*=

^=*#*

20

19

?M

^tJXjy^*

ij.

'

'

Building the Scale

The pupils sing in review the two tetrachords of the major scale.
The teacher represents the major scale from C and from G on the board,
indicating the tetrachords, thus:
-2.

zzz.
I2ZI

221

"C

Lead the pupils to discover:


i. That the upper tetrachord

of the scale

from

C becomes

the lower

tetrachord of the scale from G.


2.

Why

the sharp

is

placed on the

fifth line.

That there is no F in the scale from G. The staff degrees (first


space and fifth line) which represented F, now represent F sharp.
The teacher now suggests that the upper tetrachord of the scale from
3.

be taken as the

The

first

part of the scale from D.

pupils see that the scale

is

already half completed.

m1

*
Do

re

mi

fa

F#

Questions and answers as given on page 85

not in the major scale from D, but that C%

is.

make
The

clear that

it

scale

53=
r+

Do

re

mi

fa

sol

la

ti

do

is

now appears

thus:

MUSICAL DICTATION*

94

Next time begin with A, using the upper tetrachord of the scale from
D for the lower tetrachord of the scale from A, and complete as before.
In like manner the pupils begin with E and complete the scale.
i

Written Metric Dictation

The teacher names

the key and the beat note, indicates the tempo

and plays one phrase, or sings with a neutral syllable.


The pupils beat and listen, then write in the writing books. Each
section should be given out not more than three times.
The pupils should hear (think) the tones and feel the rhythm, but in
no case hum or sing aloud. During the writing no noise of any kind
should be tolerated and no questions allowed.
If the class

be used

cannot write the melodies successfully, the material

and some of the phrases placed on the


they are recognized and sung.
oral dictation

first for

blackboard after

Each melody
stand that No.

may

is

By

in eight sections.

i-a the class should under-

more than one part; the signatures are


not repeated nor a double bar used between the several parts.
i

consists of

LESSON

XI

(Writing Book)
lb

E3CT
Effi^S

*l m

.M-J-d.

&&-

d d d *

-s>

If

ab=J-y

is?

m
sg

-?z}-

o
W3FEE=5

?=*-

ih

q=t

-&-

:js

~zz:.

FIFTH YEAR DECEMBER

LESSON

95

XII

(Writing Book)|
J.

lb

ms=^

Goss

Id

=?c=^

*
s
E^-

je=

t=t

-<s>-

lh

lf

=P=9=

-<&-

afc

LESSON

XIII

(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

-&-

3^

JANUARY
In January and June the results of the individual singing and writing
are recorded and form the basis of the pupil's term mark in Music.

Those pupils who are up

to grade

may

be excused from music a part

of the time, in order that the slower pupils

the teacher.

The

is

who

receive extra help from

are strongest in music often delight in

with the slower ones, a feature which, when properly


of great benefit both to the " teacher" and the slower

"playing teacher'

managed,

pupils

may

'

pupils.

LESSON XIV
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON XV
(Writing Book)

The

teacher will

(not the accent or

name the key,


number of beats

the beat-note, indicate the tempo


in the measure), then play, or sing

with a neutral syllable.

e|H&fff JTlsm

-<s>~

ill

90-^

\~m-m-

&

FIFTH YEARJANUARY

The
ruled

class roll

should be copied into the blank book, and columns

and designated as

Name

97

follows:

Written Lessons

XIV

and

XV

Four

Sequential

Exercises

Chromatic Studies
One from page 77
One from page 87

Music
Reader
Page and
No.

FEBRUARY
Building the Scale

The teacher

places the following on the blackboard

build the major scale from

g
A
F
ti

to

to la

from F

is
is
.

FEDCBAGF

Do

la

ti

a half-step; therefore,

a step; from

From

From

do

re

do to

ti is

a half-step; from

belongs to the scale from F.


therefore,

a step; from

belongs to the scale from F.

mi

fa

sol

D is a step;

to

la to sol is

half -step; therefore,

will

descending.

pupil volunteers and proceeds:

and asks who

From

sol to

to

fa

is

D belongs to the scale


is

a step; therefore,

a step; from

does not belong to the scale from F.

the teacher leads the pupil to see that the simplest

tone a half-step below

is

to use a

flat.

From

way

flat is

(If

to

is

C
a

necessary,

to represent the

a character which

helps the staff degree to represent a tone a half-step lower.)

The next

pupil builds the scale from

'<&-

The major

scale

IZ

-G>-

zzz$&-

Do

ti

la

sol

Bb

from F

is

now

fa
Eb

flat,

proceeding as before.

II

"TZT

mi

re

do.

Bt?

placed on the board and the teacher

asks a pupil to indicate the half-steps and tetrachords, thus:

-<s>-

Z2I -Gh
32=6^=221
98

-zz.

FIFTH YEAR FEBRUARY

99

The teacher or a pupil adds the lower tetrachord


The two scales now appear thus:
flat.
-&-

igfa
One

1221

-&-

^2=^<S>-

=S

~JSL

section of the class

now

As they

the syllable names.

completes the scale from

<^-

of the scale

from

"217-

from F descending, with


the other section begins and

sings the scale

sing the

flat,

thus:

flat,

Do

mi
The

=1S~s2 -&-

"ZZ^Z-

Do

pupils should

now

^=$*Gh

'^~.,
b"z^"

see:

That the lower tetrachord of the scale from C becomes the upper
tetrachord of the scale from F; the lower tetrachord of the scale from
F becomes the upper tetrachord of the scale from B flat, etc.
That the new tone "in flats" is always /a.
2.
3. That the new tone becomes do in the next scale.
At a subsequent lesson take the lower tetrachord of the scale from B
flat (an octave higher), and proceed as before, with the scale from E flat
and A flat, thus
i

iW

zz

-&-

^^rte:

The Sharp,
Without the help

and A,
keyboard

"^

~~fe?

Flat, and

frgr

frcrS=

Natural

and notes can represent


To represent the tone between

of other symbols, the staff

only the tones A, B, C, D, E,

-&-

F and

G.

for example, the use of a sharp or a flat is required.


of the piano.)

(See the

MUSICAL DICTATION

IOO

The sharp

enables a staff degree to represent a tone a half -step higher

SEgjjiEJl; the flat enables a staff degree to represent a tone a half-step

i=r

lower
(Note

Skillful questioning

by the teacher will enable the

limitations of the stafl, the effect of the sharp


is

not "raised" to produce

sharp,

and

and that

pupils to discover for themselves the

and like facts. Pupils will perceive that the G


not "lowered" to produce A flat, but that a new

flat,
is

There are many reasons why it is much better to lead the pupil to discover such
than tell him. The latter method, although easier for the teacher and more
generally practiced, hardly deserves to be called teaching. Interest, memory, attention
all are
stimulated by leading the pupil to think and decide for himself.)
tone

is

represented.

facts for himself rather

The teacher draws a


tone, sings or plays sol
sol si la

Some

and

staff
le sol,

and clef on the blackboard, sounds the key


and asks who will write. Sol le sol, la si la,

la le sol are correctly written, thus:

of the pupils will use a sharp

when a

flat is

required and vice

versa, thus:
(Incorrectly written)

iw

'^

When

8
-

tezzzjte

[_:

&>-

fe>

^=fe-==te

fag^

and the
(Compare

correctly represented, the chromatic tone

which follows, usually appear


4 with 5, 6, 7 and 8.)

like

ti

do, ox fa mi,

scale tone
i, 2,

and

LESSON XVI
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.
After the lesson

tone

first,

is

written the intervals should be sung, the lower

then the tone represented directly above.

FIFTH YEAR FEBRUARY

IOI

LESSON XVII
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

This lesson

Make
i.

is

a review.

clear:

That two

major

scales, the

(do)

and the minor

(la),

may be

repre-

sented with each key signature.


2.

That the tones

normal minor

of the

scale

and the major

scale are

identical.

Metric Dictation
One

or two days before Lesson

XVIII is

written, the

ing as described on pages 12 and 13 should

game

of visualiz-

be practiced with the

material for Lesson XVIII.

LESSON XVIII
(Writing Book)

The

teacher will

name

the key, the beat-note, indicate the

(not the accent),

and play, or sing

fefe^

-P-?

Ik3 rJ

IZ

:^2^^:

r?-

tempo

to a neutral syllable.

ib

b"8 1

-<s-

&>

fg

:fe

g?

-2-gM:p

&

^=X
1J*ZL

?2^::

-<&-<s>-

fc

f2:S

-<^-

SHr

--&&-

t=*

m
W^

4S-

LESSON XIX
(Writing Book)

For directions see Lesson XVIII.

-<s>-

<s>

251

-&-

MUSICAL DICTATION

X02

&k2^1

-<s>-

JZt

zb
^=^=^

S=F

^2^=f
a

<^-r

r=^
2=b==t=^rfr

s^
=t

^*

^i=j=^
^^ s^-

-<s>-

-<s>-

scat*

~
v-'-(Si

*=*=

g=
* S<
*

MARCH
Oral Tonal Dictation
The

following material introduces to the pupil the Melodic form of the

The

by constant comparison of the upper tetrachord of the major scale (sol la ti do) with mi ji si la, will lead the pupils
The pupils will also learn the new
to see that the two groups are alike.
group by this constant comparison.
The teacher will sound the key tone (D) and proceed as follows:
minor

scale.

teacher,

Sing the lower tetrachord of the major scale ascending.

The upper tetrachord.


The teacher now sings No.
asks:

What

A pupil

with the syllable names (mifi

3,

sings
-<s>-

1ZZL

Sol

la

do

ti

The two groups should be constantly compared


thoroughly learned.

ing the syllable

No. 12

and

other tones sound like these?

m
is

si la),

is

until the

Always require the answer

names does not

to

between the

be sung (speak-

give the proper answer).

sequential, consisting of the descending

scale with si la

new group

Harmonic minor

scale tones.

Material for Oral Tonal Dictation


2 sol

122:

-?

&f

m{

ji

-<^>-

~ZZL

I2Z

mi

sol
1221

-es-

;&=22:

Ji

\&-

~**-

103

si
I22Z

la

la

-&-

St

l<i

MUSICAL DICTATION

104

fa

^=T|=!g=fe2=fr

fefr>

-J^L

sol

la

liif^SI
:

-G>-

P"

-<S>-

c>

-<&-

-<^

ta=ff=^ta=ftt

/tf

^t*
;=8*

>

**

**=

IW

8*

:$F
/#

//

dfo

r<?

14

13
-<^-

=3fcr

sr- =^=_

^ ^

IQ

-<s-

2Z
16

15
<s>-

g>

-<S-

18

17

-&-

S3

&

"C?~

"C?~

^_:^

221

-<s>-

20

19
#<^l

jt=

2^

7-

-<S>-

1221

Sequential (Harmonic Minor Scale).

12

<J

11

10

-/f*

mi

<^

?T3~
<-^

1
1

^-^^~<s

^J
1

21
i2:

Note.

No.

21

is

the Melodic minor scale.

The descending Melodic

The

is

Do not name

-^

this scale until it is

-<s>-

"C~

II

thoroughly learned.

the same as the Normal.

four scales should be sung successively from a given pitch, in

logical order;

i.e.,

Major, Normal Minor, Harmonic Minor, Melodic

Minor, without direction or suggestion from the teacher.

FIFTH YEAR MARCH

Sing the four scales ascending and descending from this

Teacher:
pitch.

I05

The

(Sounds the key tone.)

pupils sing the four scales in

(See page 115.)

succession.

Syncopation
Sometimes the rhythm is so changed that the accent falls on a part
Such a change in rhythm is called
of the measure not usually accented.
syncopation.

The syncopated rhythm is an entirely new and disturbing experience


The accent has always been with the beat; now the
for the pupil.
accent is between the beats. Necessarily the pupil's sense of rhythm
receives a rude shock; pupils with the strongest sense of rhythm are
And yet this rhythm is not unknown to most
the most disturbed.
So called "rag time"

children.

form

The

of syncopation.

is

simply an exaggerated and cheapened

pupils will enjoy beating

familiar "rag time" melody.

and singing some

This will bring syncopation consciously

within the child's experience and help him to master this

new rhythmic

problem.

While singing the following exercises

it is

that the pupils shall beat vigorously.

tinued until the accent

Singing a tone after

of the greatest

Each

importance

exercise should be con-

upon the upper do as shown in No. i-a.


the beat and also with the next beat, is the new
falls

problem.

Material for the Study of Syncopation


la

To be
J0-0.

placed on the blackboard

~W
H
'

**

1*

i*

*_A

:=*=jHrz:

=*]v

1L -j

-m

-r-r-r-^
-.

MUSICAL DICTATION

io6

Add

lb

No.

tie in

^=*=*=*=*
4=S* g- W
-h-

id

Erase

&3.
4 ~V

\?

Add

lc

another

s*

fr*

No.
-*
1

-i

fa*

le

thus:

i,

Substitute

i2*>_

01

t*'

No.

tie in

last tie in

=gI*-

thus:

i,

i,

S3

fr*fr-

for

thus:

J*J} thus:

a:

Sfcfcl
4

&L
4-^ T

J*

>t

-2-

LESSON XX
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON XXI
(Writing Book)

The

teacher will play, or sing with a neutral syllable.

If

key tone in mind, the teacher


to sing the do before the next group is given out.

find difficulty in keeping the


class

I22ZIZ

Z2I

a8

y
((\

*=

-&-

==35:
8

__z:

K\)
;

^
-

^
u

O" *"<^"

-Gf-

bsz.

17

"*

"^"

c^

-=*-^

21

-&-

c^

b-o
i*->

'

c-i

15

19
-&-

-Gh

?&- ~GT

-<s>-

ask the

10

14

18
-Z7-$f21

e^^ r^

may

zz

-<S*-

9
l/^>

13
'-&-

-<s>-

16

I
*#=

12

11

*=

the pupils

-S^Sl

izzr

20
-^=$zz.

zsz:

FIFTH YEAR MARCH

107

LESSON XXII
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON

XXIII

(Writing Book)

names the key and the beat-note, indicates the tempo,


sounds the do, and plays, or sings with a neutral syllable. The pupils
beat, listen and visualize, then write.

The

i9

teacher

mt^
2

2:

-S>-

:v2:

b#fc#*

lEfc

St

2=^z

t=t
*-

^t *

-^

-s<-s-

she

c^-

E23E

f3

W=*=E

1
P

-s>-

s*:

cr

^S

APRIL
The Use of the Sharp, Flat and Natural
The pupils know that ti in the scale from D, is CS and that mi is Ftt.
Lead the pupils to see that the simplest way to represent a tone a halfstep below Ctt or FfJ

The

effect of

is

to

remove the sharp, thus representing C or

a sharp or a

flat

until another tone is represented.

F.

continues through one measure, or

natural

(tj)

cancels the sharp or

flat.

LESSON XXIV
(Writing Book)

To be

played, or sung with a neutral syllable.


6

jPfc <g

fc^I=^
>

'-fe-

I2I

-g^ P g?

^t

22! ipt <^>-*-&>-9^- -?

10
'&
~7Zr

11

g^7- -^-Sf*'1^-

14

LESSON XXV
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON XXVI
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

"><S>-

12
-CZ7-

&

e;

~C?"

&

FIFTH YEAR APRIL

109

LESSON XXVII
(Writing Book)
Play, or sing with a neutral syllable.
1

mp

La

-s> s>

s>-

"g7~ g?~~g?~

g^

-s

>

g^-g:

T^"

SC^=2Z

fr=g=

-s>-

-<&-

^-^--^_^-_
-<S>-

"

-^

"22"

"C

-&-

221

"g^"

fc2z=gg

*=*

-S>-

>3E*=g^^i

g^

22

c^

ez

-<s>

"Z?-

s>

<s>-

II

MAY
The Use of the
The

sharp, flat

and

Sharp, the Flat, and the Natural

natural,

when used

to represent chromatic tones,

are called accidentals.

The

teacher should

now

generalize concerning the use of accidentals,

as follows:

Teacher

I will give the pitch of

a tone

you may give the pitch

tone a half-step higher, represented on the

Teacher:

Pupil:

degree.

staff

on the blackboard).

sharp).

flat.

natural.

Teacher:

Pupil:

sharp (teacher represents

Teacher:
Pupil:

(representing

same

of the

sharp.

double sharp,

etc.

Now you may name

Teacher:

the tone a half -step lower, represented

on the same staff degree.


Teacher G.
:

Pupils:

Teacher:
Pupils

sharp.

G.

Teacher:

Pupils:
If

flat.

flat.

double

flat, etc.

a pupil suggests placing a sharp before

teacher will show


gether.

natural

A
is

how

confusing the sharp and

sharp and a

much

flat are

flat,

flat

for example, the

would be

never used together;

if

used to-

the use of the

simpler and plainer.

LESSON XXVIII
(Writing Book)
Before writing this lesson, the pupils should again build the major
scale

from

flat

(blackboard),

naming the tones forming the


no

scale

FIFTH YEARMAY

(E

flat

F, G,

flat,

flat,

C, D).

know

quires that the pupils shall

III

Intelligent use of accidentals re-

the pitch of the scale tones.

Each tone group should be played,

or sung with a neutral syllable.

iH -&?&-

3=

7^Tti^~ZZL-

8
-<&-*
F^?^

10

ZZ

s:21

-&-

-<s>-

ZSlfteZ:

11

~=E>W<

-JZZV-^ZZZL

12

g" -&-&

tez -&-

14

13
fc

IS ^32#2Z -<& -pfc sr^ g^-

#21^

<^-*7*sr^
21

1=

-<S-

II

LESSON XXIX
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

This lesson reviews the syncopation exercises

first

presented in March,

and gives each pupil the opportunity to write the material which the
teacher placed on the blackboard. The beating and singing should be
practiced at each stage, as before.

LESSON XXX
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON XXXI
(Writing Book)

The
if

material for written dictation

may

be used

first for

oral dictation

desired.

The teacher names the key (C minor) and

the beat note, and indicates

the tempo.

Before beginning the lesson the class should sing the har-

monic minor

scale.

aloud before writing.

In this lesson the children

may

sing each

melody

MUSICAL DICTATION

112

m^
fcs

S^

U-Hir wvtr 2^=^

&-m\ ir*+ ^w=^-

rta

-^s^

:*3=*:

l^g^^
53

fcjfc re-

gfe^
4^

l*zt?^-

ta=

w*- W:

^P
W

JUNE
The usual

oral

and written

work

tests constitute the

in Dictation for

(See page 96.)

June.

The

individual tests consist of:

1.

Two

2.

The

written lessons (Lessons

XXXII

singing of five exercises selected

and XXXIII).
by the teacher from the Music

Reader.
3.

The

singing of four scales from E, ascending

and descending, as

follows
\
1

Major
*

fak*ti ~%

&-

<s>-

Z2_

Normal Minor

^g,

^^? &" "

-<s>

=.

<^,

"

r?

r-j

f-z

Harmonic Minor

^ ^

g?

^Jfy^
^
^ *~ 12=22=^
ff

^=

gg

g g

s>-

U*

(S>.

fc^^ig^ gggfes^i==B
4.

Melodic Minor

After the key tone


in this

sounded the pupils should sing the four


order, without assistance or suggestion from the teacher.
is

i*3

scales

H4

MUSICAL DICTATION

The

class roll should

be copied into the music note book and columns

designated as follows:

Names

Original

Melodies
Writing Book
Pages 31, 32

Written
Lessons

XXXII

Singing of
Five Exs.

and

Singing of

Music Reader

Four Scales
from E

(25%)

(25%)

XXXIII,

(Maximum
Allowance
of

20%)

(30%)

The grades of each pupil should be recorded and taken as the semiannual mark in Music. The advantages of these individual tests and
records, both to the pupils and to the teacher, can only be known and
appreciated after a fair

trial.

LESSON XXXII
(Writing Book)
See directions in the writing book.

LESSON XXXIII
(Writing Book)

The
and

teacher will

name

the key and the beat note, indicate the tempo,

play, or sing with aieutral syllable.

WS

?rb

?if
5Bfi

& ^M
it

=^

mi

-J-

m2zcJ &
No.

5 is

\~5EZZl

I
=*i

not to be played or sung.

2=a gaacs>- C22I

-&

tsr

See directions in the writing book.

-&-r

SIXTH YEAR

SEPTEMBER
Review of Scales
The major

scale

and the three forms

of the

minor

scale,

from

flat,

to be sung as follows:
Major

EK?

-#
m-

r*

^=V
*=&

&=*

fc=fcc=te:

Do

^m

Minor (Normal Form)

-I

*-*

ss
&^
\

-\-&

-*

jggp

Za

Minor (Harmonic Form)

J3?

tes

:=:
z#
Minor (Melodic Form)

Sgg^g^

^^g==Pfe>^
W V7V-T*
-*

|,

*=qv

1-

Za

Review or Triads
Class in three divisions (See page 72).

major (Do) triad

$4
D

-Sl:

g^E
g

*k-

:g
-&-

minor (Za) triad

-si-

s 1

MUSICAL DICTATION

n6

Review of Chromatic Tones


(Major Mode)
Linking the chromatic tone with the scale tone next above or below,
like ti-do ox fa-mi.

The

studies are sequential;

the pupil should complete the exercise

and i-b on the blackboard.

after the teacher has placed i-a


ib

la

ka

n
i?

i*
-i

^g

t&m
>
H

r^i T

iSipepll

2b

S
4=js=!^

SS
fc*Z&

y ^

^f-W

=*

tu-^-^
s
ps

*Tr

:^p

^~zy

r^-H*f-i>f

J-9+-

mi

-z2i

4b

Hw:

:fat

fcfc

jw*

-<s-

I
1

22

1.

J5* JTLJ g

-s>r<f

rtfc

^s

do

re

-m-

fa
j

Sh

-0

Wfe

i&

sol

-p g

^ JO

3b

/*

we

$*

SIXTH YEARSEPTEMBER

mI

1SL

ft^^

*5

117

-*<-

T=Z

la

5a

1=

EfEgF^

do

ti

5b
:

=i3*
-F

^ 3

la

ti

sol

3e

^=JFi

23:

/*

sin
|EEE=i

5
r*

gg

</<?

6b

6a
zfc

WP te

zf^zdzafciadt
r*

3tJ=^

2^:

/#/

111 w^

.$<?/

F=g=P

tS>-

p$*-fdfc-f

/a

The
The

V^~

//

g^

afc

teacher plays, or sings with a neutral syllable.


pupils write (Music Writing Tablet).

^J^

fai~=?

:&

U*-

'

|o=jZ_^I^I

*=^

*5=P
-8
>

:8

ZJS

:*=

t=^

zSEdfei

* W

^ZZfc

-TJ^

fr

tft

a
^zfc

7EZ=5_^

=J-=-

ffi=5=
U4

so:

iv

r*

JK

1*

-=-=*-

MUSICAL DICTATION

u8
7

XT

Do

=fr5=
mtt=~
si i=*
fcfe **-*-

8:

10

^fc*-

m^

t=s=s

tat

*"-*

35

iti

11a

rw

*a

'

lib

f^l/J.->l
J
^_u w
i

may

=i*=F

*-k-

*-^
4-4-

be used for two written lessons, to be given any


time during the month. The exercises may be used first for oral dictaThis material

tion.

OCTOBER
Kinds of Measure

The

teacher places the following on the blackboard:

Pointing to the

pupil

Two

2,

the teacher asks:

of

measure?

part measure.

Teacher: Yes, do you

What kind

know another name

for this

kind of measure?

Duple (double) measure.


Pointing successively to the 3 and 4, the terms triple measure and
quadruple measure are given.
The teacher places the following on the blackboard and asks the class
pupil:

to sing

it:

ff

The teacher

.,#

J.

*.

suggests that sometimes

such a tune very

fast,

and asks the

again, indicating a very rapid tempo.

only to the measure.

it is

-I-

ft

|3--fc

necessary to sing or play

class to beat

Most

and sing the

exercise

of the pupils will beat

once

After their attention has been called to the "one-

beat measure" the teacher asks:


Pupils:

How many

eighth notes to one beat?

Three.

What kind

Teacher:

of a note has the

same measure value as the

three eighths?
Pupils:

Teacher:
Pupils:
third, fifth

dotted quarter.

How many

measures in this exercise?

As the pupils answer, the teacher erases the


and seventh bars and changes the measure signature.
Eight.

"9

first,

MUSICAL DICTATION

120

The

class

now

sings the exercise again with the rapid tempo, after the

beats have been indicated, thus:

Teacher:
Pupils

The

How many

beats in the measure

now?

Two.

teacher points out that each measure

now

consists of

two

three-

eight measures.

What kind of measure is this?


Some one may answer, Sextuple measure

Teacher:

or six-eight measure, both

which are correct.


There being two beats in the measure the pupils will readily see that
it is duple measure, and that there are two three-eight measures in
each of the new measures.
Two simple measures are joined in one.
The teacher places a list of simple words on the blackboard, thus:
box, hat, cloth, table, bell, door, etc., and then rewrites them as comof

pound words, using the hyphen (hat-box, table-cloth, door-bell, etc.).


The teacher then asks: What kind of a word? Why is it called a
compound word? etc.
The class should now be led to see the reason for calling this compound
duple measure;

duple because there are two beats in the measure,

compound because each measure consists of two simple measures.


At a subsequent lesson the following should be placed on the blackboard

Duple Measure

m
m

Triple Measure

8==t

it
P*

Compound Duple

Quadruple Measure

Compound

Triple

sHEI
I

Compound Quadruple

4.

SIXTH YEAR-OCTOBER

121

now beats, as the teacher points, counting six, nine and


twelve for the compound measures. The tempo, as indicated by the
beating, should be the same for all these measures. The counting,
therefore, will be three times as fast in the compound measure where
The

class

there are three counts to each beat.

Rhythm Studies
The following material should be used in two ways:
i.
The teacher places two measures on the blackboard; the
beat,

and sing the descending


*hs

1*

-
(
P
hs
P-

measures, thus:

scale, eight

0-

0-

:~07

-*-

#
s-

*-

=^

--#

+*_

=(E

->

=5^
The

-0

pupils

pupil should feel the

fc-

#-

-0

>
->

-^

-*

-t-d

rhythm (including the accent) when he

looks at the measure, and before he sings aloud.

Therefore, the pupil

should beat and mentally sing two measures before singing aloud.
2.

The

teacher plays or sings two measures; the pupils write.

rfcs

*P* ~g
h

:etc.:z

Erase

0J0-.

$>

bg U U k

:etc.~

i^g^

tie

for J* ^N

?^

fag11

:2
I

;etc

^*-

*=*:

JEZ31

Add

id Substitute

last tie

^i?S -k-ty- bi=bL

2b

ties

lc

Add

lb

i.

2c

bd

-*

letc.

Substitute J* for
"^

-s^ft

*1

J5

lizzetc:

^ CXT

MUSICAL DICTATION

122

2d Tie third
-\) >
}

ties

~*++

Add

2f

and fourth notes


J

2e
I

(Think four tones to the beat)

^^ISetc

L<=M

* *
y2fE|=^=^zz^j

>

2 g Substitute
-~

z-va^-y

J* for
*=*,

^.-=^=^p^rn
etcc

s=s=2:

t^~

WIV

_ -r-

J5

* for

Substitute

^^ ^

''

Material for Written Dictation


Study
This material

may

of

be used

first for oral dictation.

singing the entire melody, play or sing in sections of

After playing or

two or four measures.


Henry Carey

lb

'

mm-H^

-Pm-

f=F=t

:i

If

&> f=f

*=F

le

^s; Q

^=F

W=F
F.

2b

2a
A.

(?)

Id

lc

SlLCHER

3a

=tq
-<S>-

jZ=+l

3b

*===

-<s>

*-

-w

:&:

3d

3c

fe^ss
#

-3EE

m *-

--?z=W-

li-J

-*
I

SIXTH YEAR OCTOBER

m^

123

4b

3=^
-=-*-*

1=?
+ m

:^rr.

t=ct

4d

ip

-i

P=fc

t-rr -#J*1

^nzM^gt

5d

prr T-i
=#tT~
-^*^-^J

E
^=-kf

5c

^i=Pi -&

+-+-

5f

~z=>

[-

*B

N
P
m*-wH*

p-_^

y
m
y
.

'

afcat

^-g-

-wt-w

sz

6b

fct

*.

5h

-<^-

6:

5S

i^B^

wczat

5e

_l_
X ^ "
1

=*

ztzzst

--

-&

m.

5b

5a

w -#
^_i
^ *

-r^TT

NOVEMBER
The Accent

in

Compound Measure

There are two three-part measures in each compound duple measure,


consequently, there are two accents in the measure. When the two
simple measures are joined, the second loses a part of its accent, just as
the word bell has a secondary accent when it becomes a part of the compound word door-bell. The stronger (primary) accent falls on the first
For the same reason, a primary and two secondary accents are
part.
found in compound triple measure. In compound quadruple measure,
the primary and secondary accents fall on the first and third beats
respectively as in simple quadruple measure, while the second and
fourth beats have a weaker accent.
It is clear then that the main accents in compound measure remain
the same as in the corresponding simple measure.

This multiplicity of

accents, together with the rapid succession of pulsations, gives the ani-

mated, exhilarating

Much

effect peculiar to

compound measure.

intelligent practice is required to fully sense the

compound measure.

rhythm

in

Appreciation of the three degrees of accent, for

example, requires a well developed sense of rhythm.

The

idea of accent should be presented to the pupil as an impelling

force from within, not a

blow from without.

Accent

is

an impulse, not a

blow; a motor, not a hammer.

and grace is essential in the development of the feeling for rhythm, and the body must respond to and viHence, in stimulating and developing the
brate with the rhythm.
rhythmic sense, bodily movements, such as dancing, are more effective
certain element of delicacy

than counting or beating.


1

Rhythmic

exercises should be practiced regularly until the pupils feel

the swing of the three pulsations to the beat in the


1*4

compound measure,

SIXTH YEAR NOVEMBER

12$

and are able to keep the count even and the tempo steady, when changing
from one kind of measure to any other.
After the first presentation only the measure signatures are needed
on the blackboard

for practice, thus:

a
8:

a
1
P

Compound measures

:ti:

8:

it

(six,

i
:&

nine and twelve-part), have three counts

(one three-part measure) to each beat, and the beat note

note

(J.

or

is

a dotted

J.).

Three even tones to the beat, therefore, are characteristic of compound measure, while two and four even tones to the beat are distinctive
of simple (two, three and four-part) measure.

Oral Tonal Dictation


Sequential Studies of Chromatic Tones
(Minor Mode)
La

si fi

g^^^jffigiii
tiforFWf-

35^

m^^

it

^SI

fc|q=E^ZE5d2l2!

EEEE3EESEE

^lJ.^JlJ,JJll^

sg^^mgm

Za

!*-

^ji
=&r<

^b^

ifcfeat:

3b

Eg i
-e>

MUSICAL DICTATION

126

Material for Written Dictation


y-fr-frJI and

Study of

g||=

Sing or play the entire melody while the pupils beat and

Then

listen.

give out the melody in sections of two or four measures.


la

Giuseppe Verdi

lb

==+

it

Gascon Carol

m
*-*

srf=*

*P

-m~*-P~

-4-t^-t

*=m

-b*

v-

^ F
I

-i

:^T~N-^

1-

b-i

Folk Song

M=^=t^=^

igL-*r-+

1*-*-

flf"

Folk Song

*=*:
9

-0

tit

^s^-^-^
S
ff

-#

>

j=

=*:

g
^b*

Lg=fe*

ii

Johannes Brahms

tefe*
ii

^=tZ=t2=K

V-tr-^v
i
;*

i*-

mmm?
S
^p^

=fr

^=rt

5tp;

SIXTH YEAR NOVEMBER

127
Folk Song

!*=&
XTmmr

&ssm

Folk Song

-N

n,

fe^E

*-

$^

e=
Edvard Grieg

Melody Writing
Pupils are

now ready

to write melodies as they invent them, provided

they have practiced thinking, visualizing and singing original melodies


as outlined in the fifth year.
tally before it is written.

The melody should always be sung men-

(See directions, page 79.)

Written Lesson
Six original four-measure melodies:

No. 1.
No. 2.
No. 3.
No. 4.
No. 5.
No. 6.
These

In
In

In
In
In
In

G
G

major, three-four measure.

D
D

major, three-eight measure.

B
B

flat

major, two-four measure.

flat

major, two-two measure.

major, three-two measure.


major, six-eight measure.

melodies

teacher directs.

may

be written any time during the month, as the

DECEMBER
The Triplet
The pupil has learned that three even tones to the beat are peculiar
Sometimes the composer desires to use this
to compound measure.
rhythm in a simple measure. This is done by using a section of a compound measure (one three-part measure).
The figure three indicates that the group of three notes or rests has
the measure value of two such notes or rests. The group is called a
triplet.

composer to write in compound


measure without changing the measure signature, just as the sharp,
flat and natural make it possible to write in a different key without
changing the key signature.

The use

The a

of

of the triplet enables the

each of the following numbers should be placed upon the

blackboard and sung by the

class.

The

teacher will then call for vol-

unteers to represent the exercise in another kind of measure.


representations should then be sung together.

The two

SIXTH YEARDECEMBER

129

3a

SPS
fcE

* k

3b
;2:

ga^^F^^^s^p

S*3

si

^ fe^

(V3

IV

f:

m E

4a

PS
t

-#

-*-

TTX

--

4b

tes^

(i

-*=*

:^Z3t

5a

'*=*-

>3

.^

U^y

-^

^t-

:=*:

-3-

a-

5b

i=p

-0-

Material for Written Dictation

fei3
:4

i=^s

E*fe
I

French Song

abzM:

-P=^

jp

-*-> 5:

S^ 1

-53z

'*+-

French Song

^m

ggs^gg^

^^

-<s>-

feU:

-Pr*-*-* k k
.

p^

kU*

Russian

MUSICAL DICTATION

i3o

g g^

^Eztzszztes:

-jrc#s=^=^

fo-^^zz-^r

-^. :sz

ps^

-<s>

-<-

^>

P?g-

P<^-

-S>

221

5<s>-

ie:

Nos. 5 and 6 are problems in transposition and are not to be played


or sung.
5 No.

gSE
b

4 transposed into

-<&-

EP

fl^

fc 2

<s>-gfr^ ^
No. 4 transposed into

major (To be written with No. 4 as a guide)

lite

1221

g?

zz

-&-

g^

-<s>-

bs^-

^<^-

z^d^zzzzzte:

-&-

(To be written with No. 4 as a guide)

major

'Z2L

~ZSL

-<s>

7sr

^- \ ^^- %^-

s^
%

^%~z?~

'

-<S>-

JpZZZ^Zg^I

^=^^r-^-|g:

-*&-

isz

js:

"2^"

(&-

i^z

is

^>=$ZZ=^=$^L

1Z2L

Written Lesson
Review

scale building,

page

85.

Write the major scale descending, from C, G, D, A,

B, with-

Indicate the half-steps and tetrachords with the slur,

out signature.

and place the

E and

letter

name under each

note, thus:

i^^^^^in^^^s
B

eIfBF
3

A G

F^~E

"C

F#

D. C B
^^)f-2_i^ZL ^
E

D C#

G# F#

Cjf

A G| FK ?

Ajf

Djj.

F#

G# F|

C#

E^D#

A G
^_
B

Cjf

SIXTH YEAR DECEMBER

131

en
tt>

a>

p-<

n
o
r+
o

hj

p
>
n
H
o
l-H

C/3

P
erg

CD

M
Cn>
to

H
>

MUSICAL DICTATION

132

Practice Staff

The blank
This

staff

staff

may be

with wide heavy lines and wide spaces


placed on the blackboard,

board or heavy paper.

most

is

useful.

painted on

or, better still,

Referring to the illustration shown on page

131 the teacher will notice:


1.

That the tones

of the scale

may

be represented by the

lines

and

spaces of the middle section.

That the chromatic tones di, ri, fi si and li, may be represented
by the lines and spaces to the right.
3. That the chromatic tones te, le, se, me and ra may be represented
by the lines and spaces to the left.
2.

This
clefs

staff

may

and keys

in

one pointer; for

be profitably used in

many ways:

for practice in

both major and minor modes; for one-part singing with


two or three-part singing with two or three pointers;

for all sorts of interval practice including chromatics,

in

all

modulation and rapid changes of key and mode.

of the practice staff are only limited

and

for practice

The

possibilities

by the capacity and

skill of

the

teacher and pupil.

In using the practice

staff

the teacher

names the key,

major, for

example, sounds the key tone, and points while the class or pupil sings:

Teacher points to the second space, middle section. (Class sings do.)
Teacher points to the second space, right hand section. (Class sings
di.)

Teacher points to the third


Teacher points to the third

Any

line,

middle section.

line, left

hand

(Class sings re.)

section.

of the material for oral dictation given in the

used with the practice

(Class sings ra.)

manual may be

staff.

Clear and rapid thinking and considerable practice are required to

pointer

if

the series

hold

it

Many

become expert in the use of the


given opportunity. The leader must have a clear notion of
of tones which are to be sung, move the pointer quickly and

use the pointer skillfully.

on the

line or space until

pupils

ready to indicate the next tone.

JANUARY
The Duplet
The use

of

two even tones to the beat

as useful, although not so

common,

in

compound measure

is

quite

as the use of three even tones to the

beat (triplet) in simple measure.

The duplet

is

indicated

measure just as the


simple measure.

by the

figure 2

triplet is indicated

The duplet

when used

by the

figure 3

in a

compound

when used

in a

allows the composer to represent two

even tones to the beat without changing the measure signature. The 2
indicates that the group of two notes or rests has the measure value of
three such notes or rests.

Directions for using the following material will be found in paragraph


four,

page 128.

lb

Ute
u

-^

* ~i~~3

*-^j

-*+133

-m-

m-

MUSICAL DICTATION

134

m
3a

S=

*-

3b

^M
&=&

*-0-

$***

zc

jz=*i

;ifii

^Q=4

wt

-^-

4b

=58

8:

-&-*

ll

Written Lesson

A pupil

will

copy the following melody on the blackboard:

fa

51

=E

&-

-^-

fcf
The

-<s>-

122:

pupils write the

r?

:s2:

_^_W^J

M
gJ

22:

=F==t=

melody

i9-

-g^~

^=jt
t

gg

&

-<s>

French Carol

in three different

*=*
22

rt

-<^-

ways from the black-

board copy.
i.

In two-four measure, thus:

P?1e^

4p
i^E

-<&-

*=

=S=P=

J=*

<&

SIXTH YEARJANUARY

135

In two-eight measure, thus:

2.

sir*

tea

JS
:&#*

-H:

egg

fo> U

In

^-

dyV^^z^zqs^^:

^=^
n

3.

^=^=^

*^&

5gg

major, two-two measure,' thus

=^a

->

E3B2z=d=d=z*

_-_2-

is
22:

:s

zr=:
-e>-

-<s-

dp-

122:

22z

tat

3f

-<S>-

-<s>-

L <s>-

Changing a melody from one key to another

The

S
Ussi
t=*

is

called transposing.

teacher will lead the pupils to think the scale tones while trans-

posing the melody.

Material for the Study of Chromatic Tones

The

teacher

names the key, sounds the key

The

tone.

class sings as

the teacher (or pupil) points to the Practice Staff.

The teacher

from do to a
tone just above or below the

will notice that the skip in

chromatic tone, followed by the scale

every case

is

chromatic tone.

The purpose
1.

2.

To
To

of the practice is twofold:

link the chromatic tone with the scale tone.

review and perfect the singing of these intervals.

IP

~Zj-

*a

221

"JBL

221

IS?

22:

^Z^Z-

?7

*z

-6P-

-J2L

&-

MUSICAL DICTATION

36

'

1221

1221

P<S>-^r

-C?

igSL-g^-lg
5

fl

^,

<^

rz>-

g>

CT^-

^
22:

g=7

^2:

-g^:^-

1
P^c-^s^gr^-^^g

1?cr

KZ

-s>-

22:

^2:

frg-^-

)^
22:

O &

IPS=fcs2
-ZZL

*
-<s>

fcZ

221

!22I

<&'g?-

*G>-

tf

9=EEe

3=

-kg?

izz

^^

^2:
isz:

-Jks- -5_ ifez:

h g^

\^~

\&-

-3-

P'

HE

22:

ifes

-&-^v/S>-

:&

:fez=zfc

^a ^r:s2i

fej^

zj

te

szg

11

FEBRUARY
Study of Rhythms

The

material

is

to be used for written dictation.

If

the class

is

able

and write these rhythms, the teacher plays or sings two


measures and the pupils write. (Music Tablet.)
If the class fails to recognize the rhythms, the two measures are placed
on the blackboard. The pupils beat, and sing the two measures mentally, after which a pupil, or the class, sings aloud, continuing at least
throughout the descending and ascending scale.
to recognize

If

Two

the singing

is

inaccurate or indistinct, the thinking

not

clear.

of the

meas-

is

or three questions are then in order:

In No.

i,

for example, the teacher asks:

ure do you sing the

first

With the

Pupils:

With what part

tone?

first

and second

beats.

(The teacher places two

arrows under the half note.)

The second tone?


With the third beat.

Teacher:
Pupils:

The

activity

may

be varied by the teacher describing the measure

on the blackboard; for example:


Teacher: Each measure contains a half note and two eighths.

instead of writing

The

it

pupils visualize, sing mentally, then sing aloud at a signal from

the teacher.
It is

important that the pupils think four tones in rhythms involving

four tones to the beat; for example:

MUSICAL DICTATION

138

p 2J>

>

- -d

m.

etc.

J*

# Z.

(*

fr-ietc.

!*fc=^

r~3

-*

letc.

fc=d

-*

letc.

0-

*^

-*.*-

-*+

retc.z

-^us8

^^

letc;

lietc.

ii

p^^

^SSi^^^^S
33C

=^r*

?^lSd

=C5

^^*h

13

12

^Ugl

TmS *
-

14

HS^

r,F

\PbT

*^

Li

bs

15

17

fc-l

IP *i^=^
1 *
EaaEjg^

20

19

18
=*-*-

16

:etc.z

=*

-3-hr^*
^-tVi

Chords

The

pupil

is

common chords (triads) and their incommon chord consists of the root, the

familiar with the

He knows that
and the fifth. When

versions.

the

third

another tone, the seventh

called the chord of the seventh.

chord of

sol,

The seventh

is

the tone fa being added to the triad of

is

added,

it is

then

most used with the


sol,

thus

eSIIs-

SIXTH YEAR FEBRUARY

teacher forms the class into four divisions and directs each

The

division to sing
as follows:

The
The

*39

and hold one

All begin together

of the tones.

and sing

three upper tones in the chord are active, restless tones.

pupils

who

Those singing

The tendency

sing fa will wish to sing

after the fa.

h&ve a still stronger desire to sing do after the ti.


these two tones has been thoroughly understood by

ti

of

mi

will

the pupils since the fourth year.

Some

of the pupils singing re will

prefer to sing mi.

Either

is

wish to sing lower do, others

Re leads both ways.

correct.

will

be a decided difference of opinion among the pupils singSome will be contented to hold sol. Others will have an iming sol.
All three
Still others will wish to sing lower do.
pulse to sing upper do.

There

will

ways are allowable.


The class will sing the chord

of the seventh again

next tones at a signal from the teacher, thus:

The

(fo

and change to the

J
by the

pupils should sing the chord of the seventh of sol followed

chord of do, frequently, until each singing pupil has a clear notion of the

change (resolution).

Written Lesson
The teacher names the key and

asks for volunteers to write on the

blackboard the chord of the seventh of


mi.

This

;&-<

is

done

in F, G,

flat,

A,

sol (sol,
flat

ti,

re,

fa), followed

and C major,

by

do,

as follows

ESI

After the writing


will sing the

is

completed, the class

(in

four divisions as before)

chords as written, the two lower divisions changing to do,

the upper division to mi, and the division singing re going either to mi
or dO) as they choose*

MUSICAL DICTATION

140

Contrasting Major and Minor Intervals

The

material printed below should be used for both oral and written

dictation.

The a and

groups contrast the major and minor.

No. 15 represents

the minor scale ascending and descending from do.

Thinking, singing

and writing the minor

from do

scale

is

good practice, and

part of the preparation for the study of


la

mi

-<s>-

CS

2b
)&-

l_2

rJ

-V

221

'Z2L

22:

-<s>-

122

Like la

do

mi do

1221

3b

Si*

:tez:

zz

~&ZL

fesz^:

>i^
-ZJ-v^TZ?

gj

4,

"g^-

221

-S

221

^g^"
-&

221

221

221

22:

22:

-<-

22=22:

<s>:22ZZ^r22

^
-^ to

22: "g^-

b^

22:

22:

13a

-<S>-

=te

--

22:

fe

22:

-r^-

12

fe~=22:

22
22:

-<^-

Z2

-<^>-

-<s-

14

13b
i9- is:

22ZZZHZ22

22:

<

221

9b
22:

11

Eg

-<S>-

22:

""

-<^-

321
22:

9a

10

=**

-^
T~^

?^

7b

8b

8c

221

6-

221

-<s>-

22:

6b

la

5b

22:

Ip

>3L

22:

4b
-s>

essential

Harmony.

lb

221

an

is

-s>-

^ri?22

-<S>-

122

-22.

^2=^

'<S>-

& 22ZZS^ztez:

?z=&

22:

15

fii22Z

to

g>-

fe"=3?
J2^

-<&-

=^3=2=5^- zz
I^=tol

-S>-

22:
.

-.

'*.*

MARCH
Written Lesson
Write the chromatic scale ascending and descending from

flat,

and place the

letter

names under the

D and

from

notes, thus

Chromatic Scale

"?

tic?

Djf

E#

aqcz

-&-

:~b

<s
'

-&>-

&

Eb

ss

-<s>-

Eb

& ^

fez-

Ffl

GS

Af

frgr

--

Ab

cb

Ab
-<s>-

Bb

Bbb

zsz

Ab

'ZS.

B|

C#

*S>

Eb

-z?-

^=ftg

2^:

Eb

-<s>-

F#

Bb

-Wds>-

-<s>-

I22ZZGS?
If

=|g

zszzrcz
&

-<s>-

isz:

Bb

F#

:fc

Db

ft

=fe?

c#

fc=

~Z2L

C#

:bc?j

Gb

Fb

-<s>-

Eb

Material for Written Dictation


(Three-eight and Six-eight Measure)

Every compound duple measure which the pupil writes must consist
of two simple three-part measures.
If this is made clear to the pupil

much unnecessary trouble with later lessons will be avoided.


The teacher names the key and measure signatures, and plays or sings
the three-eight measure exercise. The pupils write. They are then
directed to write the same in compound duple measure.
Before giving
out Nos.

5,

and

the teacher

names the kind

duple).
141

of

measure (compound

MUSICAL DICTATION

142

Ate
8=

?=*z^

g -j ^JI jz^

lb

fe
m

r r *

1-

-*-r^*"
H

ft

41s-rt-*
+f-1*

ft

-I

^-

:*zzz3t

z=n

f-

^^1

=6

P-

-3=f4

^t~W~W

2b

#
ft

Sfc -**-

3a

tfrnrr
tJ

TL .1

r i ^

-a_5?_

s-n-^1

3b

-^ek

* ^->

U^

Ufcr-a
8-^

gg

M, i

5*=5=5

4a

))

--

fcc:-

.,

-f*-

Ni ^

~W^ri
h=J

H~

-d

4b

^
0#

<f))

fta

it5^z^^_f_^_^=
*->8

W-i,

^i*^

~*

~0

i^^ZZJt

fe=]v
-*-r

SIXTH YEAR MARCH

H3

*&
m^Esi

1
J
W *

lb*
sm

dri

7*

^g

'

j
* \-

-* -

a.

Written Lesson
Write the major scale descending, without signature, from F,

flat,

flat,

flat,

and G flat. Indicate the half-steps and the


and place the letter name under each note,

flat

tetrachords with the slur


thus:

Bb
TZ.

mW-

-<s-

22=s&-

1SL
~2Z2L

Eb
czfizfes:

Eb

EDC

Bb

A G

zz=6^=

D C

Bb

^
Ab

-<&-

=&

fcS-

~12=&-

Bb

A G

Eb Db C

Eb

D C

Bb

LZzi222.~
<S>-

Eb

Ab

Bb

Ab

cb

Db

5'&-

I
p

Ab
-<-

EE^=b^-^-
-

^E^Oi
*

Db C

Bb

Ab Gb

'

fep

Eb

fr

itezzfc

g^

Db

Gb

Eb Db cb Bb Ab Gb

APRIL
Material for Written Dictation

The

teacher

names the key and the kind

of

measure before playing

or singing the melody.

The

pupils should beat

and

listen carefully, trying to visualize the

melody before writing.


The whole melody should be played or sung once or twice, then given
out in sections of two or four me'asures, depending upon the length and
difficulty.

Review Syncopation, page

&

105.
Rossini

szc

?
--*--*

s^

P=^

--&--&-

70-y

z^^mm

at*

Wm. Sterndale Bennett


ftpo-*
f

ra

*=*

*=?=$

Mendelssohn

n&
r

3*

-i

* m-

*^++?
rrvi

t=t=fc: 4

W^LZ^i *Z3t

*ink 1

Mendelssohn

Mm^^m^i^^

r3

F^yt

*=i
i

:^B
*-+-

SIXTH YEARAPRIL

145

Old Tune

Eggs

Jq^-C-^

J.

:*-=

Tt

Original Melodies
See directions, page 79.
Write six original four-measure melodies as follows:

No. 1.
No. 2.
No. 3.
No. 4.
No. 5.
No. 6.
(To be

In

G
A

major, four- two measure.

In

major, three-eight measure.

In

E
E
A

In

In
In

major, four-four measure.

flat

major, six-eight measure.

flat

major, six-eight measure.

flat

major, three-four measure.

written any time during the

month

as the teacher directs.)

Written Lesson
from D, ascending and descending, using whole
Indicate the half-steps and tetrachords with the slur and place
notes.
the letter name under each note, thus
Write

five scales

Major

it
-?-

<s-

zz

F#

-<s>-

~ZZL

-&-

1&-

c#

121 i&z^r

<s

22:

-<S?

-^r

Normal Minor

-&-

221

1
P^

D E

122:

-<s>-

122:

221

-<S-

1221

Bb

Z2I

^s>-

"2^"

Harmonic Minor

122:

c~

#=

"S?

-<S-<S-

Bb C#

"C?"

MUSICAL DICTATION

146

Melpdic M^inor

-g'

-P

-?<S>-

2Z

||S^

(SJcz=&&

-t&

"cz;

-&-

DEFG ABC#DDCBl?AG

-2L

FE

22:

-<s>-

(No tetrachords)

Chromatic Scale

&

-<S>-

fe<

22:

zJPzz^zfe ^

^--^g^==g=j^:

{7^-

~-S2=t|sr

~2^

MAY
Material for Written Dictation

The teacher

will

name

the key and the measure signature, and sing or

play the entire melody while the pupils beat and

The melody

listen.

should then be given in sections of two or four measures, depending

upon the length and

difficulty.

The

pupils write.

(Music Tablet.)
Nursery

J^^^-

K*t

re:

iS-+0-

>-*-g

Rhyme

* 4==~

+V-^ ll
>

Anton Rubinstein

&
\

^^"-^:

rnl

iff}* J*

^zjtijzzw.^

:=t

Vz-JzE^l

-zzt

;eeb=-3^5e

ie:

Schubert

tt=i
SEteS
Beethoven

4
2:

*fcE2

5J=*

**==:

jr
^iS

~brz^r

U7

lfc=
at=it

r==b=i

iiM
L

MUSICAL DICTATION

148

fl

Beethoven

fei

*=fc:

E^

I
4

Mozart

+3

-(*

m~^

^*-

<*-

B3

S=

r*

rt

'

"Big Ben"

:s

S3H:

:s2zl

JUNE
Material for Written Dictation

The melodies may be used first for oral dictation. The teacher will
name the key and measure signatures. The class will beat and listen
while the teacher plays or sings the entire melody.

The melody should then be given out

in sections of

two or four

measures as the pupils write.


Joseph Barnby

Im

zafcj:

Old English
=fr

*-

-^

8E

^==F
Mendelssohn

BE

+*

?=+

Wt

* *

Folk Song

i=

-<s-

%
*E=
IP*

-<s>

-<s?

w-

tS>

-&-

*
Folk Song

&=

0~

jfcafc

-fe-fc
149

ps

1* I*

MUSICAL DICTATION

i5o

C3~JTj

*===^

Rewrite No.

==

zfcx

i=E
8.

Hopkins

A.

J.

i*^:

fc

+-

7 in

Compound Duple Measure

7 in

the key of

ft

&
Rewrite No.

9.

sharp minor

n%A
10

11

55

d2s

33fc^

:#*=

12

fe

-<s>

w^

*=t
f

v-r

13
c=fcfc
> -* -

ETl

r :=
E=C==
F=f:

14
:fal

*-g'-v-

^B 4-4-

3E3

^r

15

-&'

II

Written Lessons
The teacher

May

material for

The

pupils will

pose No.

on the blackboard melodies Nos. 1 and 2 of the.


Written Dictation, page 147.
write melody No. 1 in three-four measure and trans-

will place

2 into

major, two-four measure.

SIXTH YEARJUNE

j^j

Original Melodies
See directions, page 79.
The pupils will write six original four-measure melodies, as follows:

No.

1.

No.

2.

major, two-four measure, using fi once.


In G major, three-four measure, using the triplet once or

In

twice.

No. 3. In

No.
No.

4.

In

5.

In

E
E

major, six-eight measure.


flat

major, two-four measure, using syncopation.

major, three-eight measure, using two tones to the beat

(occasionally).

No.

6.

In

flat

major, four-two measure.

SEVENTH YEAR
SEPTEMBER
Review of Scales
The

five scales

should be sung by the pupil in logical order as

printed below, without assistance or direction from the teacher.


Minor (Normal Form)

Major

--ha-*

-i-*

Minor

Harmonic Form

^^

SP

Minor (Melodic Form)

rf

gp^lJJBJM

35
3t

Chromatic

f9

Hil^igB

Review of Major Chords


The key tone is called the tonic.
The fifth tone of the scale is called the dominant.
The fourth tone of the scale is called the subdominant.*
Before naming this tone the teacher should make clear the meaning
and use of the prefix sub. Two or three minutes spent with a list of
words such as sub-way, sub-cellar, sub-marine, sub-normal, sub-soil,
sub-editor, sub-bass, etc., will accentuate the meaning of the prefix so
that the pupils will never forget the name of the tone just under the
dominant.
*

Re

is

called the supertonic;

mi, the mediant;


152

la,

the superdominant ;

ti,

the leading tone.

SE VENTH YEA RSEP TEMBER

When

singing the triads, the

Form

the class into four divisions.

first

and second

153

divisions hold the root.

(See page

139.)

The

teacher

sounds the key tone (tonic) and directs as follows:


(1)

Sing the tonic chord;

(2)

Sing the subdominant chord;

(3)

Sing the dominant chord;

(4)

Sing the dominant seventh chord followed by the root and third

of the tonic chord.

Do
dominant and subdominant will become a part of
the pupil's vocabulary, if frequently used by the teacher.

The terms

tonic,

The Tonic Chord and

its Inversions
1:

i=fc
-<s>-

q= :s:

7SL

-<s>-

r4-U

&

-(=

R^F=
=s=

*F

The Dominant Seventh Chord and

5f
its

II

Resolution

-&-

Rhythm Studies
(Two Measure Rhythms)

The
The

teacher will place the two measures on the blackboard.


pupils will beat

and sing the two measures

aloud with a neutral syllable, continuing until

and then sing


the accent falls on the
silently,

MUSICAL DICTATION

154

upper

do.

(The completion of the exercise

desirable.)

Unless the pupil senses the rhythm as he looks at the notes

and

sings mentally, he

will

enable the teacher to

rect

thought from the representation.

The

not always necessary or

is

activity

may be

not reading the music.

is

know whether

or not the pupil gets the cor-

by monotoning

varied

Individual recitation

or "clapping" the exercises

instead of singing them.

-j*^
Ji Sg r ffr
Q=

:etc.

HE

M-t:

etc :
-

=f

3=J*
MLZ2JL

;etc
:i

&&=*
9 vm

etc
3= y?f

sisE^fe*S5

^P:etc._

^^

10

-P5F:etc

etc.;
:

-ftgrir
qt- L-j rj

EEfe^E^E^El

::etc;

15

17

16.

* *

letcz

^i
4=t=^:

ri

jsu

**

etc.~

:etc:

*EE

20

19

18

*^
** Jli
atijzzzz*

-^^ztietc.

Et

:etc.zl

23

22

l!^^S^&
a2=t^

=3Q>-

^F

14

13

21

12

li

rfci

154

etc.z

^jpletau

:etc:

OCTOBER
Clefs

The

staff originally consisted of

eleven lines and was called the Great

Staff.

The

clef

determines the pitch

the staff degrees.

of*

There are three clefs; the G clef, the F


clefs appear on the great staff, thus:

clef

and the C

clef.

The

to

n
The

great staff

is

-c

divided into so-called " voice staves " of five lines

each.

The

clef (originally the letter

treble staff),

makes the second

placed on the second line of the

line represent the pitch

G.

This

staff

uses the five upper lines of the great staff, thus:


Treble Staff

(b)

1
P=^
f=^=m
The F clef (originally the letter F placed on the fourth line of the bass
staff), makes the fourth line represent the pitch F.
The bass staff uses
the five lower lines of the great

staff,

thus:

Bass Staff

sEl
155

i 5

MUSICAL DICTATION

The G and F clefs are the only


The C clef was formerly used

clefs

now used

for vocal music.

in vocal music.

It

now used

is

certain orchestral instruments, the Viola, Violoncello, Alto

Trombone,

for

and Tenor

etc.

Any five lines of the great staff which include the middle line (C),
may be used with the C clef. When the middle five lines are used, the
The middle C line is the third line of the
staff is called the alto staff.
alto staff.

(</)

nP
/5

Alto Staff

Ifh
X\)

r
^

^
"7
r

{<)-

__c

JL

(,

(j

\taf^-'

This

staff is

now used

for the Viola, Alto

Trombone,

formerly used for the alto part in choral music,

When

the third, fourth,

are used, the staff

is

(3}

^-_ c

f^\*
IP/*

was

also.

sixth

great staff becomes the fourth line of the tenor

-f

It

and seventh lines of the great staff


The middle C line of the
the tenor staff.

fifth,

called

etc.

staff.

Tenor

Staff

F"

i,

^W^

The

tenor staff

is

used for the Viola, Violoncello, Bassoon,

tenor part in choral music was formerly written on the tenor

The pupil will see from these illustrations:


That every line of the great staff represents a
i.

etc.

The

staff.

certain pitch which

never changes.

That clefs never move nor change the pitch of any staff degree.
3. That the treble staff (with its added lines) is used to represent the
pitch of the highest tones in music, and that the bass staff is used to
2.

represent the lowest tones.


4.

That any

five lines of the great staff

line representing C,

may

be used with the

which include the middle


clef.

When

comparatively

SEVENTH YEAR OCTOBER

i57

high tones are to be represented the upper lines are used as in the alto

When

staff (d).

lower tones are to be represented the lower lines are

used as in the tenor

That there

5.

soprano

no such thing as the soprano clef, alto clef, tenor


clef is used with the alto staff, tenor staff, mezzo

is

The C

etc.

clef,

staff (e).

staff, etc.

Whoever

must read from the

uses orchestral scores

soprano, and mezzo soprano staves.


clef is therefore essential to

tenor,

alto,

clear understanding of the

the conductor.

The Bass Staff


Girls, as well as boys,

Much

valuable time

is

should practice reading from the bass

saved

if

boy acquires

the

facility in

There

staff.

reading from

no objection to the
pupil with unchanged voice (soprano or alto) reading from the bass
staff, provided he realizes that the representation is an octave below the
the bass staff before the voice changes.

pitch which he

is

is

singing.

between the tones


and those represented on the bass staff,

clear understanding of the difference in the pitch

represented on the treble staff

should result from the

first

use of the bass

staff.

and the G and F


blackboard, and represent the major scale from C, thus:

The teacher

will place the great staff

.2-

-&-

~S?"

^_

on the

122:

~ZZL

t&2

-G>-

clefs

Middle

-2_

"^r

Beginning with the third space

)-

zz
-Gh

-g?

^"

jZl.

(treble staff), the pupils will follow

the pointer and sing the scale descending, continuing on the bass staff
until they

can sing no further.

begin at middle

unchanged' voice.
staff,

or below.

The boy whose

voice has changed

must

(singing upper do), thus agreeing in pitch with the

He

will

Middle

continue singing to the second space C, bass


is

one of the upper tones of the man's voice.

MUSICAL DICTATION

If

a piano

is

available play the four octaves, allowing the pupils to

them that basses sing as low


the four octaves), and that sopranos

sing the tones within their compass.

as

m ==

(the lowest tone of

sing the highest tone

Tell

and even

i,

Continue the practice with the great

higher.

relative pitch of the tones represented.

from the bass

staff,

the pupils realize the

staff until

All the pupils

may

then sing

understanding that they are singing an octave above

the representation.

Written Dictation
(Bass Staff)

The

pupils should clearly understand that the

treble staff

and the added

line

above the bass

added

below the
represent the same

staff

line

pitch (middle C).


If

a piano

sented.

If

is

available the exercise should be played at the pitch repre-

sung by a soprano or contralto, pupils should be reminded

frequently that the singing


i

_2_

zz

-<S>-

is

an octave above the representation.

S^
-&-

1ZS.

zz

jS3.
JZ2-

-<^-

-<s*-

rzj.

-s?-

1221

^^:

122:

(S-

-<s>

m.

Z2=g^=ZZ2S

>2.

-<S>-

-CS-

-Z-

-<5>-

Z22I

221

-&>

&- *=*

8
-<s>-

^2:
-<-

2Z

221

10

^5

^2.

21

a. ^2.

Z2.

ZZ

SEVENTH YEAR OCTOBER


12

11

vm

-Zu.

jcn-

:sz

13

J& 4

-*S-

14

*
r

F-<^!=^
i:::

0.

_4_j

/^"N
1

cJ

to

VfJ-Z

^' "+
1

16

1*

iff

17

-P--

:^

#-

:s2:

18

J i
-^-i

15

/v
ly-'*
V^>

*59

-s?-

12:

9
Hearing Two Parts

trained and musically educated listener

is

able to hear several melo-

dies at once.

The

following exercises should be used

first for

oral dictation.

The

teacher forms the class into two divisions, and plays distinctly and
slowly.

The

pupils listen, then sing the

two

parts.

Each

division

should be given opportunity to sing both parts.

The

material should then be written.

write (Music Tablet).

The

teacher plays, the pupils

MUSICAL DICTATION

i6o
14

13

a ifei

IP

is:

15

7=1

!T^

rrrf^rr
17

pi

- 22:
-<^-

-i-

ZZ
* r m z&

-S>-

I^3X&19

18

-@-

16

20
.JZJCJ

f^rr

:=

I2Z

TFff

21

22

22

"-g>

-&-

3C
s>

'

<^

-<S^

NOVEMBER
Melodies

phrase usually consists of four measures.

(Pupils

who have

followed the material given in this course have long

formed the habit of thinking " phrase-wise.")


The four-measure melody usually closes with the key tone, on an
accented beat, immediately following one of the tones of the triad of
sol.
This ending is a perfect cadence.
since

(The original melodies throughout the fifth and sixth years, and also most of the material for oral
and written dictation, end with the perfect cadence. Pupils are already familiar with this ending;
it is

now named.)

A
A

melody may follow the major


melody may follow the skips
mi is not a " good chord.")

scale (step-wise).
of

any good chord.

(The chord

of

After a wide skip (greater than a third), or series of skips (along a

good chord), the melody should turn and progress in the opposite
Ti should progress to do; fa to mi and la to sol, unless the
direction.
melody is progressing scale-wise in the opposite direction.
An eight-measure melody consists of two four-measure phrases and
is called

The

a period.

first

phrase in the eight-measure melody

is

called the antecedent;

the second, the consequent.

The second phrase ends with a


forms in which the
perfect cadence,

first

may

phrase

There are many


Any ending which is not a

perfect cadence.

may

end.

be called a half cadence, or imperfect cadence.

Regularly, the half cadence ends on one of the tones of the triad of sol

and on an accented beat, but the


tone of the scale and on any beat

first

phrase

may end on

of the measure.
161

almost any

The content

of the

MUSICAL DTCTATTON

62

second phrase (consequent)

is

very often a repetition of most of the

This

is

called imitation.

phrase (antecedent).

The

imitation of a group of tones on other scale steps above or below

the original tones,


of

first

called a sequence.

is

This

is

an interesting method

melody invention.

The

way

Place one of

and hear good melodies.


the examples on the blackboard and lead the pupils to

recognize and

name

best

to learn

its

about melodies

is

to see

several features, thus:

i.

Sing the

2.

Sing the second phrase.

3.

Point out the

4.

Which part

phrase.

first

full

cadence.

of the

melody progresses along the

scale line,

i.e.,

without skips?

melody progresses with a series of skips along a


chord line, i.e., with the tones of some chord?
6. Which way do the restless tones ti fa, la and re progress?

Which part

5.

of the

second phrase like the

7.

Is the

8.

Is there repetition or imitation in the

9.

Is the imitation tonal or is it rhythmic, or

10.

first?

Does the melody contain a sequence?

melody?
both?

If so, is it

a scale sequence

or a chord sequence?

What

melody that makes the different parts sound


like parts of the same melody, i.e., what is there that makes for unity?
12. What is in the melody that gives it variety?
11

is

there in the

H. R. Bishop

dz5=&
Azmtt
:

W^ =K
:-te*-

Mozart

mh*.*
-bt

ifct

* ~

^^g^
Schubert

jjrfegj

tm

k
u>

lEiEf,

=rft

SEVENTH YEAR NOVEMBER

163

>

N
* ++V1E+-2X*.
p-^- L
!*

V
+*-+-"*

-*=*

r
Lady John Scott

ft

fife

3B

r^^w

=*

^-^5^-*-

S=C5:

a^*-

*-

f^-^9

A.

-&-

Nicholas Alexeievich Titov

"

1*

-pn

t#

#-,

pr

"O-

-4*

^^^[=-i-r-<s>-

U*

*-I*

Jm~J
_^L

'

3b
k J w

-fa:

sfe

^S^=E
fa

sa

(*-

:<^z

Beethoven

S*

-t

'

>

^.

.*.

t=F

*-**

->.
|

i*

-4*

4=

f*-

es,-

I=P=F='

*^

w-

Mendelssohn

^^

S===1

-?-

-<*

-#

l-

""*--

"""

h
D
K> u
1

^/TV
J

>-

m
r

'K

1*
j

-**

Tyrolese Folk Song

s
M" -#
f^FF=^=
ns
W-g>4 P^-J t
b*E=
pr

fe*

-;

3=P53

#--

J-

-Jjjr

ES

-4F

>

fe

J
-1^
H
4F~

-^
|

221

MUSICAL DICTATION

164

Beethoven,^

9 Slowly
"

n#
Ma
_^m.

is

is.

fc-

V--

^-IJi
*

jf

-*

*~^

m
J ->
-

=^i=^ 0->

R ^

W-

-0

1*=

azzi;

fr-

Beethoven

feEfej

*=S*:
-V-r

IP

*=i
Schumann

*%
-H

The

M
'

pupils should

^F^
now be

g=r^&^-ii =fl

able to understand

and appreciate the

phrasing of the simple music used in the public schools.

The

on page 162 should be adapted and


applied to the song material found in the Music Readers.
line of questioning suggested

Irregular Phrases

phrase

may

be two or three measures, or even eight measures in

The two phrases in a period may differ as to the number of


measures. The text in vocal music often requires phrases of unequal

length.

Two-measure phrases in four-part and


very common, and can hardly be called irregular.

length.

measure are
Following are a few

six-part

examples of phrases other than four measures in length:

SEVENTH YEARNOVEMBER

I6 5

Three measure phrases


2-

4fa=

:|

I3

+-+*^Zi&&

-&-:

Two-measure phrases

fmmm

IW-

C.

M. von

Weber

*-<S>-

z2:

+-**=?}

1*=^

~g>-

Old French Carol


Second phrase, four measures

First phrase, five measures

wm

:^zzp:

SzSt-

tm=^
%j
First phrase,

yfB
E*q
}== *

two measures

-*

-+*-

-s>-

Old Carol

Second phrase, three measures

-^-

zsz:

Brahms

Six-measure phrases

%=zfc==i:
:S:

*
"^

fc*

-^^pc

S^
*

i^^=fc
K

-h=

=^z:
*-

Knowledge and appreciation


intelligent singing;

>*-

&
- ^IB

of the phrase is absolutely essential to

consequently, the habit of singing " phrase- wise'

'

utmost importance. The pupils should find the phrase in the


melody, whether or not it is set to words, and form the habit of taking
breath between phrases. A good reader of music, like a good reader of
English, reads a phrase at a time.
The habit of looking ahead is vital
to good music reading.
is

of the

MUSICAL DICTATION^

66

Studying the structure of melodies, finding and observing the phrase,


and learning to read and sing " phrase-wise, " will take the place of

melody invention and melody writing during the present year.

Material for Oral and Written Dictation

To be used
i.

The

as follows:

teacher places exercise a on the blackboard; the pupils sing

with the syllable names.


of tones

The

sounds

like this

The

teacher then asks:

What

other group

group?

pupils respond, singing exercise

b,

which the teacher or a pupil

then places on the blackboard.


Attention should be called to several facts:

becomes the scale tone ti in b.


The chromatic tone^z in
The chromatic tone te in a, becomes the scale tone fa in b.
2.
3. The a exercises represented in C major are really in G major and
F major; therefore the tone groups sound more natural when sung in
i.

<z

the b form.
lb

/
122:

Z2ZI

*z

122:

//

i9-

7ZL
~ZZL

ti

-^r

jS.

$=*

W-

~cr

'Tzr

4a

*s

-&

-<-

~Z2L

'7^r

6a

-<&-

221

5b

"C?

xf

22:

57

SEVENTH YEARNOVEMBER

167

6b

6:

iw

-?-

7a

1
P

-<S>-

-&-

"C^

7b

/*

32=&

gw

*?

-<S>-

$=Z2Z

gy

'<g

/*

-<&-

8;

8b

/*

-<s>-

:^2i

221

^2;

/a
-<s-

:c?:

-<s-

-<s^

9b

9a

zz=fc

(S--

Ip

^=22=

/^

-<s>-

221

-s>-

><>

:^e:

-<s?-

3Z=&<^-

221

i^z: -<s>:^2i -s>-<S>-

-<&-

i^z:

122:

Written Dictation
(Two

Parts)

See directions page 159.


2

Lr
1

F fe
=^=g=^bE2E

^:

-^

r r-J
1

-<S>-

ifest
W^:

4-^L

t=te

j2:

-<^-

10

^2_
-Pmm+ 1%

;s

^
12

11
I

I
I

212^=^

14

13
-<^:s2i

j^t

S3 r?
s
rT T-r^-'
rr

DECEMBER
Modulation
The

from one key into another is called modulation.


Place No. i of the following series on the blackboard; the class will
The two lower divisions should sing the root of
sing in four divisions.
the triad in the first measure.
See page 139.
transition

mi
rs\

-&r
-*-

*5h

-#*-

-*- -w- -m-

/7\

2
J.

_c
-s-

1 J&,
-

do

N/T\

/TN

,-j
sr;

(S>-, -*N=^^&-

-T\

^
*S^

jj

5 Si
7

/5S

:!2jr
fcfi

rr

*^si
^^^w^w

#
rf

feSM

i r

^
f-^r^f
i=fa

fc-tnJufcr
-<^-

fe&

X^g:
168

SEVENTH YEARDECEMBER

169

/Ts

S7\

^r

?l 4 +-&+-+

12

~Chs>

^^<sH

rr-rr

-#n=^^

r~i

TT

After the singing, question the class as follows:


1.

In what key

is

2.

In what key

is

3.

What

4.

Te becomes what tone of

5.

What

first

tone helps most to

(Te.)

-<s>-

Sol

If

make the change of key?


the new scale?
(Fa.)

other tones sound like the tones in the second measure?

Answer:

6.

measure?

(C major.)
the second measure?
(F major.)
the

ti

fa

re

the signature at the beginning were one

flat,

how would you

sing the exercise?

Pupils sing:

**

-<s-

3
\

-ts>-

Sol

7.

What chord

Answer:

Chord

is

in the second

measure?

of the seventh of sol (or

Lead the pupils to see:


1. That the tonic (do)

in the first key,

is

dominant seventh chord).


the dominant

(sol) in

the

next key.
2.

scale

That the tones

in the scale

from C, excepting the B

flat.

from F are the same as those

in the

MUSICAL DICTATION

170

3.

That when we include

te

(B

flat) in

the key of C,

we

are really

singing in the key of F.


4.

That we get

of the

new

into the

new key through

the dominant seventh chord

key.

That the seventh chord of do in the second measure, is really the


dominant seventh chord of the next key (F).
Do not attempt to teach all this in one or two lessons.
After the pupils have seen Nos. 1 and 2 represented, they w ill sing
5.

the exercises (which are


sentation.

Therefore,

all alike

it

will

excepting in pitch), without the repre-

not be found necessary to place

on the blackboard.
The answers to most of the questions suggested

all

the

exercises

without

difficulty,

if

their attention

is

will

come

to the pupils

called to the facts with

which they

no new theory or new material involved.


In No. 7, the representation in the third measure changes in the upper
part from E flat to D sharp, and in the lower part from C flat to B.
E flat and D sharp have the same pitch, and C flat and B have the same
pitch.
A change of representation without a change of pitch is called
an enharmonic change. No. 7 should be shown on the blackboard.
The teacher will notice that No. 1 is in C major, and that No. 12 is
If the entire series, 1 to 12 inclusive, can be sung conin C major.
are already familiar.

There

is

tinuously, as one exercise, true to the pitch, the ability of the class to
sing in tune will

have been

clearly demonstrated.

Written Lesson
The
and

class will write the

major

scale descending

from C, G, D, A, E,

on the bass staff, using whole notes, placing the letter (pitch)
name under each note, and indicating the half steps with the slur.
Blackboard practice in making the F clef and placing the key signaThe first sharp is Fjj,
tures on the bass staff should precede the lesson.
the same as on the treble staff. The remaining sharps appear in the
signature in the same order as on the treble staff; i.e., down a fourth
and up a fifth.
FJ|

SE VENTH YEAR DECEMBER


-2

<S-

is:

"IZZ22I

-& zz-

z^c: _^2.

5*
SWOT

<^

sat:

F#

A G|

.,-==>.

Fjj

1*

Djf

&

^2:

^:

C} B

ji-J-a-^.
:sz

#1
E

-&-

GF#EDCBAG

-&>-

-<s?-

-Et=&=23L

CBAGFEDC
D C# B

r^z

<2ji.

171

A G#

C# B

F# E

A# G# F# E D# C# B

01

-<^-

^z
D|

E#

F&

<^-

_Q.

1221

Cjf

"C

G$

A{(

F|

Written Dictation
The

teacher will play the exercise

if

a piano

available.

is

sung by a soprano or contralto, the pupils should clearly understand


that the singing is an octave above the representation.
If

^
J&

-&EJ

r^>

fiV

3
/Y

rz?

>^3

^>

r-^

SI

^\

^a

r-J**

r?

-p

-^

-^-

_^^

IS2ZZ2:

^ ^

f^

r^

<*=

^?

22:

-^-

<<>

10

s lY
L>

-^

-'

<z>

4J

>^->

-&'

-2
^^

r?

s>

^-^

<<p

"-2

^~-

""

^'
'

s*

<&

**

MUSICAL DICTATION

172

12

11

&
== & &
(m\*

J&

ta

-&-

sz
^-'

^^

13
\)<r>

r?

S3

15
J&SL

1-^

c?

ii<s-

-<s>-

3*

/T3

"^"
i

22

-<S>

^
s^

^zzfe

122:

18

17
-<s>-

^T2

16

-s>-

.iL
!

14

&^2

<^

^
zz

20

19

22

7^>

-O-

ISL

2=^ si

22

21

tt

E *=F

#'-*

:^2i

Jir

-^

t=

:^2=P

22=*:

24 -

23

^3

i*-}

#-

BS

-^-^-

P6

JANUARY
Modulation

how closely related the scale is to the scale of


subdominant, and how music modulates into the subdominant key

The
the

pupils have seen

and the dominant seventh chord. See page 168.


The scale from the dominant (sol) has an equally close relation. Place
No. i of the following series on the blackboard. The class will sing in
In the first two measures, the first and second divisions
four divisions.
through the use of

will sing the

te

lower tone.

After singing No.

several times, the teacher will,

by

questioning,

lead the class to see:

That the scale from the dominant has only one new tone (Fit).
That the new tone isfi in the scale from C, but becomes ti in the
2.
scale from the dominant.
3. That the entrance to the new key is through the "gateway" fi,
used in the dominant seventh chord of the new key.
As in the modulation to the subdominant key, the modulation to the
dominant continues through the "circle" of keys, and returns to C
i.

major.
Singing the entire series and ending true to the pitch

is

a splendid

demonstration of the ability of the class to think and sing in tune.

No.

again contains the enharmonic change.

(See page 170.)

The attention of the class should be called to the connection of chords


by means of a tone or tones common to both chords. In No. 1, for

G) connects with the subdominant chord


(F A C) by means of the C which is in both chords, while the following
subdominant chord (F A C) has two tones (A C) which are also in the
dominant seventh chord of the new key (D Ftt A C).
example, the tonic chord (C

MUSICAL DICTATION

174

Allow the pupils to change the syllable names whenever they feel the
change of key. Some will change syllables in the third measure.

mi

_Uk4
s
test

i-

w^iw
i

V7

IV

do

ass

ff=?

-s>-

sp-

IV

i^l

-v

l
,

^4.

-e>-

=T-f
i^:

^^|

^r

2Z
S

tvr

IV

fc

41

<S>-

=35
jS=

Us^

r
v

=fc

1ft
-<s>-

V7

IV

P^=^
-

tf

mtm

:i

-jsl

:fi*^l

3=

r
IV

V'

rAfa^^^^

ft

V7

IV
-

iigi

ey '-(=

felteid?

<%--

HEfS

g:

V7

IV
8

CT3

-F

:<fc

&a
--mm^^sf-

:J:

:se
IV

V7

SEVENTH YEARJANUARY

175

K2E2

it*

&L

SSL
=5<

-&-

V7

IV
10

LUJ^ S

4sJ:

fe^^E

^*^

^r-

fe

f
v7

IV
11

is^f-

UJ^4
*^*^J

IV

22:

->s-

v7

Written Lesson
If

necessary, the writing of scales without signature should be reviewed

before this lesson

The

is

given.

teacher will call attention to the chord-wise structure of the

melody
First measure, tonic chord.

Second measure, subdominant chord.


Third measure, dominant seventh chord.
The teacher (or a pupil) will write on the blackboard the scale and
exercises marked " blackboard copy."
The pupil will sing the scale
and exercise and then transpose and write as follows:
1. Transpose into C major and write without key signature.
2. Transpose into D major and write without key signature.
3. Transpose into E major and write without key signature.

MUSICAL DICTATION

176

Blackboard Copy
Db M ajor

-te>

^ E 1^^=!

&F=&'-

ipc

iBEffi

\h

SEt>*-

Written Lesson
1 C Major

"?~

g>

g:

=
::

1221

I
EfS
2 D Major

Effi

"22"

-O-

60

<*-

ZZ

iEEiE

-<S>-

*=

-&
*fc

*=^:

=#*=^E5

:3

-tS-

3 E Major

IP^=ff=2=tHEE^

-<S>-

#=:

^:^-

22:

1==*

=*

se*
fe=F

Written Lesson

flat,

notes, indicate half-steps with the slur,

and

Write the major scale descending from F,

and

flat.

Use whole

flat,

name under each note.


knows that the F clef makes the

flat,

flat,

place the letter (pitch)

The

pupil

fourth line represent F.

SEVENTH YEARJANUARY
The

flats

staff;

i.e.,

-<s>

tZ^21 -&-

fifth.

W.-*

I2I "<S>

FEDC

Bb

-<Z2.

A G

-&g?-

fcfe

Eb

-^=

^m

77

appear in the signature in the same order as on the treble


B flat first, followed by the remaining flats placed alternately

up a fourth and down a

Eta

D C

Bb Ab

^^

Db C

^r
F

Bb

-*S- 122:

G F

Eb

g^^

_X^p-g>--^:

Bb Ab Gb F Eb Db

-^-=zz=^-

A G

-<s>-

^2:

-&-

-?zz_

Eb

Bb

-<^-

-<&-

Ab

~ZZi

G F

:s r <&- p -

Eb Db C Bb Ab

^^^=i=g
Gb F Eb Db cb Bb Ab Gb

FEBRUARY
Written Lesson
The

teacher (or a pupil) will place on the blackboard the scale and
exercise marked " Blackboard Copy."
i.

Write the scale and exercise in

2.

Write the scale and exercise in

3.

Write the scale and exercise

B major

without key signature.

A flat major without key signature.


in A major without key signature.

Blackboard Copy
Bb Maj or

<z?

"S3L

fe~=^

\K?-

-9t^~W

bwr

Written Lesson
\ B Major

ST
2 Ay

*=Sfct=z

-t^-

gg^l^gSgsl

Maj'

-J?^^-

gg-g7-fesZZ

:4rz
Zjg+-^QW

=-w

g^rf^te=

i^rp

:|T

b=

3 A Major

iP= zjw&

-Z-^rr?-

-?z?

-& JM

r^

a- J

!4r^d:

V7

IV

Material for Written Dictation


Albert G. Methfessel
33:

:-f

~is-

178

=fc

SEVENTH YEARFEBRUARY

*=t=fr *=

mP

.=**=(= =u *
^

4=->

:ff=l

^=f=PC

* ==*=
*

+ + *

*"1

179

lu

i_

1*-

1^

m
-v-==

^- -U ^-^_-*rl
1

-4

<r

F.W. Berner
98=;

*-*^

rf*
'

t-}-&-fr^

&ee

-<?-

JZt

&
f=Ff

fe^iS
F^Fr
S=J

-<^-

.C^L

rgt

^ \-m&^&
^_

rr

-<&-

10
-<s>-

IS2

r^

7g=

-<&-<^-

22:

L tS^-

14

13
g?

I2Z

r
~~

^~fe='

*-*

12

-^

1-

g^~

d^ -ay-^m

H-i

i_L
-g^

11

53==S

$=t*H^===S

SSEE^

:s2:

-<&

<s-

p^^rTnf

2dI

MARCH
Written Lesson

The
The

following melody should be copied on the blackboard.


pupils will write the

"The Happy Farmer"

ES3
P
M:

melody on the

treble staff.

Schumann
P-m.

^S

Sol

^-H*-

S
The melody should appear on

the treble

staff,

thus:

M=

frf~

-=^4

3t

~~S

^jL

*^L

^^-^r

Sol

H
This

is

the entire melody of Schumann's "

for the piano.

lead

them

Happy Farmer,"

written

After the pupils have written the melody and sung

it,

twenty measure melody is all


The other thirteen measures are rep-

to see that the material for this

contained in seven measures.


etitions.

Material for Written Dictation


Frederic Chopin

^
1

80

SEVENTH YEARMARCH

181

Mozart

t^^^E^-

^^>
*+-+

Mozart

^m

SE
S3

*S=R
^- S ** ^3E

-mm-

ss
Sg

**

-<S>-

*-"n d
EFEE?EEK3
*=*^$L

ft

cpc

fel^l

-^ -x- :sz:

-m0-

Carl Reinecke

:ft
2S:v p=3=
t*==bi*zfcr

SZ^fe^^fcz^

fc!

-=*#-=*

-p-nf
g-

si

fc=*^=ft
-#-=^

S*=i*

Written Lesson

Have

the following melody copied on the blackboard.

Mendelssohn

fi

tfi:

3^3

gP

*-L"*-

v=

j=-^-*

SEE^33E3

atr*:

After the pupils sing the melody, they will write

it

is

**

on the bass

staff,

from the blackboard copy, thus:

*
^ft J

-m\a

!
1

0
V-=t

*=

i-f
fc=
-

r*
"IH^ f J-E
W-

a>

^V*-

1*
1*

h^

L,

:U=fc

^
1

'

MUSICAL DICTATION

182

No

be found with

difficulty will

this lesson

if

the pupil thinks (hears)

the scale tones as he writes.

melody should be played both at the pitch


written on the bass staff, and as it appears an octave higher on the
a piano

If
it is

available, the

is

treble staff.

Written Dictation
>

(Two

The

Parts)

The

teacher plays the exercise slowly and distinctly,

parts

should not be played separately.

The

pupils listen, then write.

\%=^t

i=

2: ?=-

-Zh

-&-

3Z
^Z

^="3
-G5&-

TZ.

r
10

^-jt

11

-<s-

14

13
fc
5>

-&
8

-r3-

?=

-&-

:22i

imm
<~n
:zi2

:e

-&-

s<-

zc2d

12

-J

zz

*- I*

is

I^nrg=2Z
^?c

3?e*

rt

^F

-<s>-

16
-<s>-

pegs

-&II

APRIL
Material for Written Dictation

The entire exercise should be played while the pupils beat and
The melody should then be played in sections as the pupils

listen.

write.

(Music Tablet.)
The Bass

part of a Chorale

Robert Schumann

El=EEEE
part of "

The Bass

America

?z

^ &*=t

Henry Carey
I*-

=m

J^-#

-m

(?)

S-

BJEZ-jg.

?2=

-hi

The Bass

&-

"

See
P==P

\=.
<S?

-&>

V-

part from an

Anthem

Mozart

be

*
I

*__^_

-**:
^__j_

sr-zU

::

_l

<

The Bass

^_
S>$-%
rt

part to tune " Beatitude"

p
!

^ 5^EE^

-^

i^f-

:f
-*>-?*.

John

^21

183

^r-

=*

-i

-f
'

-<S>

*-

B.

Dykes

* J=*-l

'

-<s>-

-<s>-

MUSICAL DICTATION

84
5

Bass part from " The Creation "

m i ^^=r=r=^
#
S fe
72L

Franz Josef Haydn

Se m

E=4

^-5"

*=tE

^=F

~w

^=^i

Written Lesson
The teacher names
down and sustaining

the key and plays each chord, holding the keys


the tones as the pupils write.

Care should be

taken to have each tone "sing" distinctly.


6

~rzr

SEE

MAY
Material for Written Dictation
Sir

John Stainer

m^:

-G>

Sir

-^
V

T&f L^
Epfe^3
\

ahtrs
ft*

*
w

r
t*

F
1

F -+

'

John Stainer

^
i

&
i

m +

-+ *-*-{

Russian Folksong

2=3=2=

4==5fc*

*=d^

d *

W=3=2
J

&

=fc=f

*^
fr

-h.

S*

Anton Rubinstein

ifc
4z^

J-^-hg

-o-

<^

rt

<^

Mendelssohn

*fc

&=

&2=&=^S
4 TPr^V=gT E^4
t,

*s*
iS

^ sP
-*-

JUNE
(General Review)

Written Lessons

LESSON

Write the following scales, descending, on the bass staff, without key
Indicate the half steps with the slur,
signature, using whole notes.

and place the letter name under each note.


i. Major scale from C.
Minor scale (normal form) from C.
2.
3. Minor scale (harmonic form) from C.
4. Chromatic scale from C.

The

scales should

^ o

'u

appear as follows:

issz^biJgr^S

i2i

-&ZIZZL

CBAGFEDC

4. -g2j&s.
'-

-*~&*2-?Z2_

g>pg?-

&&SZ. *&- 221

Hearing and Writing

is

^-J
i

I22ZiZ2
fa
-<&-

T^T
i

Eb

S&SSr-gS^

II

Two

Parts

ihHtM^L ^
"

1221

"f-,

-^

4b
1

Ab

&mm
2

^r-^-te2L

C B B> A Ab G Gb F E Eb D Db C

B Ab G F Eb D C

LESSON

i*aa

Bfr

4c

u rpp-in
186

::^

-*-!-*

J =4=i

4-1-4

SEVENTH YEARJUNE

LESSON

I8 7

III

Place the following melody on the blackboard:

m z^-^
5
=1

After singing the melody, the pupils will write

it

on the bass

staff,

thus:

-&

-^^4

-&-

-e*-

w=r*--

v=*

gj

Transpose the blackboard copy into


nature, thus:

=*

fi

>&>-

fisst

?=TR

55=

A7 major;

write without key

sig-

^fFY^^M

LESSON IV
Place the following melody on the blackboard:
Robert Schumann

^g

^ee

After, singing the

=^=--^=f=^

= #

melody the pupils

~Th

^ .~~n

without key

will write it

sig-

nature, thus:

ad*

se*
They

&m
a
The

will

ML

->

then write the melody in


-$*

^j==jvj^_j?

major without signature, thus:

3*1

-$*

teacher sings or plays the following; the pupils write.


Rossini

atat

-w~w

^f^^f

sppN

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL FOR ADVANCED MUSICAL


DICTATION
(Melodic)

For Use in High Schools, Colleges and Music Schools

The student who has

written the following material from dictation

have mastered musical notation and the ordinary tonal and rhythmic
problems of music. He will also have become " saturated' with good
melodies, a large proportion of which will remain in his memory.
Taking down a melody from hearing is perhaps the most effective means of
retaining the melody in the memory.
The hearing and writing of more than two parts demands a knowledge
of the structure and progression of chords, and obviously is a feature of
Harmonic, rather than Melodic Ear Training. Consequently, only
one and two-part material is included in these lessons.
For the benefit of teachers who have not had experience in giving
will

'

dictation the following suggestions are offered.


i.

Clear and decided rhythm

tionate duration of tones

and

is

essential;

accuracy in the propor-

rests is absolutely necessary.

Primary accents should be somewhat exaggerated and secondary


accents made less prominent than is usual.
3. No audible singing should be allowed during the writing.
4. The instructor will name the key and the beat note, indicate the
tempo (not the kind of measure, or the accent), and then play the entire
melody while the pupils listen and visualize. A section of the melody
(usually two or four measures), is then given out and repeated two or
three times as the pupils write.
It should not be necessary to sound
the key tone before playing the melody.
The material may also be used for oral dictation.
2.

188

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

I89

For the convenience of the instructor the material is arranged in the


form of lessons. The lessons will prove to be too long for some classes
where the recitation period is short, or when the time is not wholly devoted to written dictation. In such cases, the lesson will provide material for

two

recitations.

LESSON

1SW

z2:

-&-

*Wr

-^>-i

ifete^f

-&-

-&-

Mozart

^FH ^=s

P3
=g=^+^z=3gb

iffi^

*-*- 2^

13

tst

-&-

Brahms

Beethoven

:p:

m-

-S>

ifa*

John Hatton

pi

34. j

^z-i

6
felS

^^
2

zjzj!j

-x-

lEZ

LESSON

ft

-<s>-

II

Se
22:

32:

izz
-s>-

251

22:
22:

-<~z?~

-*-

32

-H-

John Hatton

-s>-

fej

22

MUSICAL DICTATION

190

i^^

-<s>-

tS>-

Johannes Brahms

Z2I
-<&-

5S*

F=t=is
\-

gzz:
Folk Song

if=^

3M^

^=C

mm

22=*:

*^-^^
a -

-*-

&-

-s>-

-Gh~0-

Folk Song

2 at*

=Si
t^=zt

Folk Song

ia

5 =&*

SEb 6f

*-*-*

LESSON
2
-zx^r~75~.
=^r Z22I Z22_TZ?._

I2Z

&^fe
*
g

It

III

3
zs:

fez -<s>i^:

#^= -<s SZ3 SS

:22=|^=Z2:

^
c?

Albert Methfessel

Zgjfeg ^"

i;

2=i

^-fc^^-g?

Z3I

^S

S
-j

^^

sz:

$#=e3
4 -V-^-

#_

Old Air

6
-?-

*~ *-

:s2:

~r

S=*
Schubert

^fas^ip^^

~*

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL
Sir

Penzance "

" Pirates of

9I

Arthur Sullivan
-<-

+-* ^

MOZART

P=^i^-^-^-=P=j

<&-

4zzzz*

^f^H^ *--^-*-*J

r-

t=*

LESSON IV

3J=
221

^z 2

22:
22:

g^~l

O-

?^"

fcfc

-g?

3f

22:

2^r

-<s>-

22:

22:

22:

fe?

i&-

Charles Gounod

5 "Faust"

p=fiM

m=F

:8

^ *=

F^y
#

f ~*-r--2

-^

^Hiilg^lgi

ssfct

Wm. Sterndale Bennett

At
tf^

:S

-<s>-

-&-

"

*-**-

f=*

eb
*
iJ
r~py,

Old Oaken Bucket

y-

=t --

tf=F

=*=*
1*-

H*=^

^ciztazj*

fc

Mozart

Andante from Sonata No. 6


_*

SES

#.

^-*-+

Srz*:
++

"

* *

^n: p=5*

MUSICAL DICTATION

192

LESSON V

S2L

zzzj^zzz:

32:
~&L

kj e*

-?z?-

22:

-&&-

Z2If 1^122:

1=c^
Old English

There was

^m

E#

on

the

riv

jol

ly

mil

ler

once lived

Carl Reinecke
6
ft

*
-

-+?--*-

i*=
100^-+-*--

i
p

Dee

er

V *

W-

y p
^ *~

-**-

>-

it

m
l*

t*-

English Folk Dance

^m

ih

e^
fcfl

-H-3

#^Mfegg
M

V}

-3

Aida

3=

L_-Hl

"

Giuseppe Verdi

ffite

!-g>-n-

**

feiJ

LESSON VI
The Duplet and The Triplet

ita-s^;
15
fcsij

3^

rtfcSzD

r -"!*
1

S3

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL
Write No.

193

in two-four measure, thus:

m^^^ 3^
v

-&>-

j^W^

=p

French

ilE

t ^g

^=^=F
0s *~

>^
*=

Write No. 3 in two-four measure, thus:

s 0*-- ^=

Hi!

F
-*-

3=t=:

t=l

pi

Old French Carol

=*

a:

3T~

*-^S-

Vincent d'Indy

ep*

rfe
'*

+ d J m

~m

13
r i-

?T5=?

-|S_r_

j*=^:

LESSON

IJ

VII
Beethoven

s
r

V-fM

-ft Tf- 1*1


L^>_a_j!_

S.
-J2

P
iS

IS

'_H

fe
-^

2.

-+
=;^^W
mV-

fe
-V _

is.

After correcting No.

1,

rewrite

-I

it

*_

*w

^=7*
F

Write No.

in

4.

Write No.

in

E
E

flat

*P

IS

*>-

vMl

with a quarter note having one

beat.
3.

*-

major.

major without key signature.

MUSICAL DICTATION

194

LESSON

ESBE^gqX2T+

French Song

3S

-s- * **

VIII

iV=^

Schubert

rffq
^

fa*

3 " Iolanthe

-^

=*==

**^-

"

think

the

That

say,

J-

time

=*:
=l

him

heard

*
while

It

Sir

*
I

'"*

On

way,

atz
a

3E

J*

X.

on

Arthur Sullivan

rain

#*

her

he'd

day,

(S

>_

call

Russian Folk Song

k-t^

-#

CZ==t-.*.

pi

2 ^^^^ -^O
it

J:

-#

-*

*-h-

-mh

Dervish Song

i^3q=J==* *

F=g=^

=^

*^

j _
-

*^g

" Pirates of

il2=:t=:

3f

(Egypt)

-F===3t

*-s-

LESSON
I.

To

IX

Penzance M

Sir

-H
I

Arthur Sullivan

-<*#J
J^
to-^- -Fz=
h^

r J
^ii-^H^ p-*-H

-* T

'i

--

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

^9

=t=t

After correcting No.

3.

Rewrite No.

1,

tfc

?s?

2.

, -

l^T^H*-^*.

-w-i-w

195

EE

"m-i-m

^^

rewrite in four-four measure.

(four-four measure) in

major.

LESSON X
2
zfc

-<^>-

-<^-

C=I

isr

-(S

^==

c"

-^-

221

1221

*=

G>-

1221

ie:

1221

-g^~

<S*

-<s>

*=

"c

-<s-

fe
French

fea^^^^g^
6 "Iolanthe"

-i

1-4-

Sir

g*-

32;

II

ess:

*-*-

/*v
(J.
vS-

isz:

^<&-

'*?

c^>

:sz

-<2-

-<s>

I-

^>

:<2r

jrH~

3
1

XI

22:

^2:

i^^p

sasd

:*t

LESSON

Arthur Sullivan

H^Sl

EBf=>-f7^
bS^zd5 -W-t-y

:^z:

^^teE

*=*

^p

<"^ j /

fr

rJ
l^

^v

'

J^l
"

j*i .

e>

MUSICAL DIC7ATI0N

196

2^

-(-

-<&<S<-

22:

22:

22:

Bass Parts
Mozart

ip*
6

"

Twelfth Mass

t=\

*=W-

Requiem

:feM:

V
Mozart

-&-

?3-

"

=P

"

m&
|-^4

0-

-P

*&

=E=F

EE

Brahms

"

-s^ P-

fg

p
F=t

2-

-<S>

^3L

-<&-

si
Haydn

8 "The Creation"

PSi)54-

-4-H

(*-1

-P

Heav

The

-*P-

~2

-P 1_

-0P-

ens

are

tell

fr-=EP =t=

ing the

glo

ry

EEEj

ft*--J

-0
^f-r
t={E

---

The

-1

won

der, the

work

dis- plays the

fir

-&-

-<S1

-&-

ment.

0-

wz

-&-

t=l=

Bach

.=2

2 "Orpheus"

<=*

ma

XII

=7=W-

z2*-

?E3p

4zisL

=P"_zzp:

Passion Chorale

=rf:

God,

of

^=P^ ^~=P^

LESSON

-&-.

won-der of his work, the won-der of his

-p z

Gluck

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

!*==+

=r^

^r v

W btt:

'fc-W^
-^

ft=f

-^

197

-G
m
I

+ w

el
\

E3
^3

Robert Schumann

nf e^e** fe ^^

-*--

Beethoven

m j-

i^-

-*-^-

J-

LESSON

XIII
2

!ZT
221

122:

lA

3^z=tf=t^

^s

- 1*

:?

rS?

2^:

Z2I

122:

i9-

ZZ

IS

-&-

f-

&.E c c

22:

^=**z=fs

_d2I

Z2I

25fc

Rossinj
+--*

''

-W --*

!rzzzi^S^^zfeS=^^

^ ^pi^^^^^j
Schubert

^
*

^==S
To wan-der

is

gg
the

mil

ler's

joy,

to

wan

der

MUSICAL DICTATION

198

Robert Schumann

m
iE4^
%$r~w

fczzjc

Russian Folk Song

^m

atrr*

lji^=

-*-+

i^

h*=^

LESSON XIV
John Stainer

Sir

ms^i

^?

"

The Redemption

fe
**

w*

"

-^

Ste
*-=*-

11
Pi

t-r -0-

-&-

Charles Gounod
-2

(A.

?=f?=^ir-

^ "T^.F

eJ

-m

m
k=n

feii
p

m
-&-

*r

zmtim

-(^2

-Sh

5>

0-

Mendelssohn

dm^

fr'

i*-g
On

stave and

stave and

*=fc

hoop the long year thro',We work'd with

*
On

r.

will

and

pleas

hoop the long year

thro',

ure,

'*-*-

We work'd with will

and

pleas-ure.

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

199

LESSON XV
"

Marie "

B^l

A. Jensen

i9

*-

-<s<

H-H:

P-M

-'S^-

P
*

152:

#=+

iP

^#

r^

-&-

f*-

-G>

Rj

*-

~&

Tyrolese Folk Song

H^SESFi
4^-^

iP

d5

-FI*

t^i

^J. j =??t=

e
>K

<i

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

F^"rT7

feS

fe

is:

F=E=* J
-

'Thomas Morley

B8
4z*

ft:

=* :=

i2=^

^n^^
I^f

-*--+

|||=f!

fc

LESSON XVI

^^^

iim- p

#*

is

~#

=F

*-

*=^:
Mozart

as

F^F-F^^^h^

MUSICAL DICTATION

200

Handel

^f=^
ip W=^=W^=^d=*^
t=P

4 "Judas Maccabaeus

4z&

iE^

-t

^g^^^S

"

Handel

^m-0-0

&t lgfe

\=&k^t*

-*

JS

-*-*-

Sh-

LESSON XVII
Handel
ffi4^i^#i

jBglzz f* ^11*!1

0L.

ffiig

q^rT~rg=F
Beethoven

SftS

Bt

fcg

22

h
^!^-

2^: t&-<^-

g?-<s>-

Mozart

igg -^.-g-^. p
ftp4

h-

l*=fc

r * *

5
(

"

Messe Solennelle

-t-

"

Charles Gounod

<^-

-2_

4SL

-<-s>

^1
^2

-y*

bfc=
5

_2-*-

22:

cr

KZ

SUPPLEMENTAL Y MAI ERIA

201

LESSON XVIII
John E. West

* *

!S=*

p +

3?F

==^

ps^

ip

j?

*=*= :&

:c

-h-^S^Jp^*

g &-*-*

fc==t

ro

Camille Saint-Saens

t?
:zfe

foe^

:=**_* 4-m.^-A.

?-

"
2 " Samson and Delilah

-o-

-*-+-

m.

i*r_z^

t=^

^^

-<s-

tcjc

c*

~-

m-A.

:p

a^=P-

-<s>-

--

Carl Maria von Weber

?&*

f*Z^=$

-i

'-(=

1-

LESSON XIX
Felix Mendelssohn

;e!

Sr^fe

fc=*
t=js=m=j==.

fr-h-;
j^~

*-

^-

r>

Anton Rubinstein

to
asa
4

^J

-^-^- g=y
*=U

'

g?

IS

i=tprr
-<&-

iF

:=fczat

*--TJJJ

U,

MUSICAL DICTATION

202

" Patience

Sir

Im

Arthur Sullivan

w^w^

ip

_*_*.

flPha

-I

fc

lF=P
fr-Jt

#-Cj:

Beethoven

4
fl
-#"*

^4
J

=r

+.

>" >"~^-i

iw

J^

ftJ
fT

_""
1_ . . ..Hi
P
f*.
MP " eg h-^^
* 41
^

LESSON XX
English Folk Song

X "Polly Oliver"

itqr'^

=t

-#

dp

3E

&

S^i

^^ at^

i-

35
__+

-e5>-

Carl Maria von Weber

3B^

fa B

4.

^^^^

#"
22:

3 " Pirates of Penzance

pi

st

"

Sir

3
3==

=t

Write No. 3 on the bass

Arthur Sullivan

staff.

LESSON XXI
"

Midsummer

^m
3

Night's

Dream "

*=
J*- aaj

*r-^

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
H: 3=

-S>-

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

20$

__ ^ZZZ\
?
^--=^$=^^
+-\
'*-=}
4^-i
-

lU*

Folk Song

2
Qfc

=*
3

"

-&>.

L S?

l>*-8r

i&-

&d

Daughter of Jairus "

P=S=

Sir

S^

*=

S-4-S^-

L S>

John Stainer

^5

Carl Maria von Weber

fe
m=

d. p

-^r

P=pt

-e*t-

i^l

S gfy j^gFFgi

LESSON XXII
Beethoven
hzf^ut^.

2 "The Skylark"

Sf^&^
*
W
*r

i$

he^eSS
'Rb

Joseph Barnby

-rn

&

bs

Charles Gounod

3 "Faust"

*e

t*-\

pt

d-\

^m
Anton Rubinstein

*S=h=i?Z=t^I3b

1K

Mt/S/CAL DICTATION

204
5

"

Messe Solennelle

"

Charles Gounod

jfef-^
SE

te

Sir

Bohemian

John Stainer

at

arfb

**
"

Bohemian

*rat|*3t

Girl "

Michael Wm. Balfe

-^

yi-* sB^A- *^-m

~7^

-e^
r
tr
i

p^

^v

i^ ^ *-*
--J- ~^

^5

r-i*

*>

7f~

ff

W-TSZL

-A-

GlUSEPP e Verdi

" 11 Trovatc re"

3
r _l
ff

^ J

fe-H
tr
-

* r->-=:
^r
-

fc

h J-

"d

^-J

J H

^_

^tj t~~

~m

F** s

^fe

g-HS
g

^-t^

^-^

i*

>-

1-

k"-*

T^

-F^
##^srH

r*

ie=fr

1^

S=]

(Tenor)

**

-* =?c
I*

Michael Wm. Balfe

i,

&=* ^H>-

-^

XXIII

Girl

ft

=p=^

*-

LESSON
1 "

S=*

BS

U-^sJS
^

/'

* -

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

20$

LESSON XXIV
3

i^z

i?:

^==g

4 "The

&

p^

<0

>

1^511^

liE5z

_2_

-s* sz:

iz

Mendelssohn

Elijah"

#~F

:t2=S5:

Jt
gyf

J*=

Ji=t

?^-^r

gzgzfr

E^!

-0r*~

e*

^>

&-

-0-

EEESE5:
Mendelssohn

5 "The Elijah"
^*-^_^.

tog:

s:

6 "Stabat Mater"

Rossini

Mfff^^
=

g^^

*=

-C2-

*-*

&-

-<^~

-<^-

Qg

3t

-l*-^

eee;

^-rp

-2-

xt

f Sj- ^2:

^T^

35

5EG

LESSON XXV
Two Part Dictation
-4

&
r

Effi
-as*-

Auguste Mathieu Panseron

-{-4-^
*

LUIGI BORDESE

&

'

r--r

I
I

-#

z2:

'

Giuseppe Concone
I

* *-

i#-^i-

b *>

F^SF
ff

-<^-

3:

fe

:?^~
iS-S#
3=3

^-5"

ClRO PlNSUTI
J.

is
J
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=q?
U

=$

^^ n?

0-J=U=3

1113331
tet

U J- f ^

MUSICAL DICTATION

206

LESSON XXVI
Luigi Caracciolo

fe^

&

$mm&m^^&
W
t

*&

^ i

>

t^.
h*=5=

^^W^v

t-*-a

ts.

Mozart

iMfe*

fi

rfis#=^
"

Don

-*

JaJL^E.

*-

>-r-4

3t=Jt

SF

Giovanni

4A
p*

S
P

!*

fcfiS
JhE

It

f*

fv

Mozart

^^

3=

LESSON XXVII
"
1 " Cavallerja Rusticana

I>#

PlETRO MASCAGNI

^5
u
*

-?

-^r^fenn^T
^
* ^ *
"

fTr^ji
=

-*-*-

'

2 "Patience"

Sir

Arthur Sullivan

***-

M5*

S3
r rlf
g^u
j_j- *-g^

J~* j

-L *=jt,

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SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

207

=^=g3t
f^P^J

^^^J=z2E\

Swedish Folk Song

m *nr+ SS-^
iP*#

'*=+

SJ

=*

=*

V-K

~x+

""*-

Q=

LESSON XXVIII
Beethoven

1 Sonata No. 3

i
4

5
3

"

u ^ft

?*=:

g^JW^^-J

J=

fe

**

w-

-*

=1

-#

s-r^-fis

^^

-^-y

Charles Gounod

Prayer n

I*

Felix Mendelssohn
3
W=9CS

ta=Jr

^-^j-Jirjfg^
4 "Hear my

S^
3-

5BE
b4dt

tea

*=^=*

The Redemption "

SoDERMANN

A.

-+

<Sh-

T*

*<f

\~<0

'm
* s 1

J.

LESSON XXIX
From Mendelssohn's

1&
w

iij.'j. B
As

the hart pants aft-er

" Forty-second Psalm "

* CJ

the wa-ter-brooks,So panteth

&

my soul for Thee, O

God.

MUSICAL DICTATION

208

pra-M
-S^ki

\
n

i
\

y y

j
g

rir=fr

j r r

-c-J-L-

BTg*^

-#k
8:

4
/V 4
fft/, 4-

*
^ 'b/i
*
tfcf.

-*"

1_|_

1_

m-^^-K

"

O
i

^-i

-ft

>-

..

i^f-f-r rrr

r
1

-&~

'

L*

ipa

e#

'

F31?2*-

35 -P-SH*

ep

6
_2_

Ip

r^

'r^>

jg

^=^==t

r?

-2-

-<S>-

2Z

ie:

&

-<s^-

321

:s2:

LESSON XXX
Correct rhythmic interpretation often demands a decided difference
in the

primary accent, thus forming a rhythm

* Hunting the

a1

Hare

two or more measures.


Old Melody

&-

-isfr=>

of

"

=fc

2 "The Elijah"

&*

*E^

J
-<s>-

fc*-

1"

Felix Mendelssohn

czfci?

fy

-r

*
+-=*
f-

=fc

-s>-

Johannes Brahms

t*

*-

fr r,
*

1"

^&*=*i

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL
"

Dixie

"

:dat

$t

Dan. D. Emmett

2=J^
wish

not

209

was

de

in

ob

land

cot

Old

ton,

S&

=*-

for-got-ten,Look a -way, look

"

7T7

a -way,

look a

dar

folks

^*==

way,

Dix-ie

am

^
:T

land.

LESSON XXXI
2
^2:

-=?-to-2-x22:

NMp

IT

TT"

Robert Schumann

:#i=^

*==*

3*

1^.

*~

?=

^*.

t==P

-s-

Richard Wagner

is
Pfc*

*# ^- -|W=

-ft-

3=&^

um

-&

-s-

==

^==f
pz|:|:=s2:

S3=

-<^

fci

Frederic

F.

Chopin

P=4=
H

t&*
*!

p3z=Sz=
J #g# p

_*X|

~4

53=

fc

Si

LESSON XXXII

&S

1=

ftfe

IJL-jL

:*z^:

St
?2I

a-g

=E

-*

-<s>-

IS2

MUSICAL DICTATION

210

Handel

te#=m:

3=Me$

--+

mEi

Sfcfe

=t

7 ^-^-1 1221

=-

-^-*

22=^=*=*:

Rewrite No. 3 in six-four measure.


This is the original form as Grieg wrote
4.

it.

Edvard Grieg

zz

tt=t
-*!5H^S

LESSON XXXIII
Old Melody

^3

I38

fcat

<

f *

ES
i

1=P

:s2:

fe

^=^

Mozart

2 "Ave Verum"

fcy

i*fc
:s2:

s2

**-

*tks-

3 M Lucia"

eJ

Gaetano Donizetti
=1

1~ -J:

?S*

'

cjg

riEir 1
2

H J
t g-

J.

fij

i
i

Beethoven

s#=pj

^2=^:

*^

+H

bS

?c=V
-s?

t=P

~^=W:j===t

^:
-s>-

-&>-

A. Tellier

^^
/TN

Wt%&5&f

it

!^=*-ig

Handel

6 "The Messiah"

lfe

^2=
=t

t&-

^1

SUPPLEMENTARY MA TERIAL
7 "The Golden Legend"

ift

Arthur Sullivan

Sir

=t=t
#-

J-*

*=

211

Hi

-<s>

h-

#-*

LESSON XXXIV

"
t^
1

*-*

-i
^1

^
^ .,

=5;
^

,-3

2=?

^.2^_^.

ggpgg
sz:

122:
*==^Z22ZZZZ:
22:

221

S_

4
-<^--

"^"

U
& &JfeJZ

wz

rf
:&5#=sg:

_~2Z

19:x2z:

:&^=
g^ggg
-Ei

10

:s2

ig^NE

11
--

-<^-

-<^-

ZZ

&>-ry-
23p2=^=:

jg-_^L

-<s-

-<s>-

13

12

gite
$

-<s>-

22:

22:

w/

!4

feU

~C^

vsr

22:

-*^

tS=S2=S&=SZ=
^=#^

15

16

^^^^^i=;^i^z^ :^S^J:

^tez^gR

-<&
"C7"

II

LESSON XXXV
1 "
"tr T^T

II

'

Trovatore "
nrwzi

kt^~ d

Giuseppe Verdi
.

ff

y Lr *

^~m~^

5^

"m

SHr4^-4

Ludwig Fischer
ifcfcfc

F&fe

e^e

F*

~!

MUSICAL D/CTAT/OJV

212

i^-jm:

^zz

r-^EE^g

F==J

'*=fr=r*

atrizicz

_c_

===F
Beethoven
tc

ate

?=

<==

22:

=fc

Handel

^^-F-

4-^>

^-*

'

a*

MEE

tg=H

^=iT

?-

S^E i^F

:*=*:

LESSON XXXVI
1 "

Samson and

Delilah "

~* ^-pp*
r^h-p ks-f^
[zfc^lJiF^S;

Camille Saint-Saens
....J.

t^Hh

*=&:

-m

=fin J

-+P-0-

rgEgL
-9+

* ^:

-ry~

=^^--_
^->=g
1

r-S -

^^

=z
I

U-

fcfcc

^dv :^r:

3*=*

Kzta:

HI

Richard Wagner

mm=mm
r-i

p-fr-fr

HZ*

:sz

=t=

s=

zmmmm

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

213

Mozart

3 "Don Giovanni"

LESSON XXXVII
From Gounod's
~tp*
M ij=*=^
i2:Szr

" Faust

m^^-4~,
I\ , J
r_ P-l-snr=h-JWnJ3-^

.j

*T

faa
m
u w

'W^W-

J P

-I

-*-

1^

K?

*r*

r-^
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#_^p^
t

-<S>-

T"

*
t"

*^-* *2

F-

=fc

-*

F T

F-

:r

-*. :*.

-T--12:

-=1

ic

-F-*--

-47--*
17
^=pc

EfE5

**
fi5=J:
7^

p>

*
bJ-i

-*=+:

-*

p^

LESSON XXXVIII
From Gounod's

" Faust w

1 Slowly

25.

=^-

,-* 9*=&=&
WL-F
* wL
34T*

-fr=

fr

-<s>-

S*^3
t=
#-*

MUSICAL DICTATION

214

BrgT' i

*^
^"^

\ *A

33S i

t?=^
EsEllp

_*
-

pf?

'

'

:^*-=-=*
*-*

^S

^^- ^

1*

g^g

ap*-

yr-J^Jf^^^ ^^^^^ap^

LESSON XXXIX
From Richard Wagner
4~7^r

Mp
2

played an octave below.

'?=+
-s*-

IIE

&

*=fc

fai

r.

Ji

^
=^3=

ErV

22

E#

To be

Song " (Tenor)

" Prize

j. *

^rrirfecfii^^^^

1 *-

|^

^H
^ * K k

-m

-=iP

'

-<s>-

*=t

f^^TTTT^
L.

- *

$r-JT} f !& E?

^ E

n
l

Uk

5=5

-etc

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

215

LESSON XL
From

The Messiah," George Frederick Handel

3ttf

+IM.

P-

t^-

&&fcf?

-is>

~i#:

iis^
LI1

fe

feS^

^==^e

^~

^E^EE^:

:=
V

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E=fe:

t=t
=:

:!

=ri__J^
^S>

^N

ft*

rfc

F-m=*

j|g

"

I*-

<s>-

^=Q
6

y-A

r=>

l*-M>-

?=:

tcfc

LESSON XLI
Excerpts from Neapolitan Folk Songs
r

&^

r*

4*^V-

T"

IHl

+ W=^

W~~

H*

~T-

ha
- P -mVhJS:U=t
**
gj

gf

fsr

s *' ^.

MUSICAL DICTATION

2l6

jl
-X

^J^jw-J feJ

-Hu -9m-:-<

n*

m~0-
s

^-J

-vr-H

^^
:*j*t

^Zlt

LESSON XLII
" Hiawatha's

From

Wedding Feast," Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

r0-1,

--

tr ^

gn
-\r*
1

1-

A_!_

!fc

'

*f

...

H* -0~

#h^W
-k- -k H -^ ^
i

-^

*~

m
-
S-0-4 ^

W-+- *tJ=?

-00-

-I

>_|

_|

+~a

I
i

*: --^0-1-^-*
A- J* J

^**

\zvk.

E^E3

if:

t;

-P =^-

2
-^>-

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

LESSON

2iy

XLIII
Frederic

UPIZ3_4

r\

"

fe

-j&L

p^MM3
<r- r^-r j
t
J

^ J

vD

:-rfJ=t

J= -J-4
D

^5

-|-i

L_

-1

?=?E

rz>

_^_J

Beethoven
^_i_^.

k-^

-^-*-

j-

^S

m-

-<S>

-00-

- li

major Symphony

"

-^

Pi

fei

2 Largketto,

*=9

*=I3*

t
-H-i

'ri-rrp -d-i

!
I

Chopin

F.

Tr

-s-

LESSON XLIV
(The Double Dot)

J..

^=

J.

^'tuARLES Gounod

"Gallia"

I4L-

Je

h^^

i
-

JZ2

ru
<=2

4=4

^^

^Bi?:

&
-

sa

lem

._*-!-

r:

Je

ru

sa -lem>!

fL

*=^F\

jl

jfm.

turn thee to the Lord

4="-

thy God.

42.
:t=

z4:
3

"Men

of

Welsh Air

Harlech"

rf*4
rt-

=*:

d=:

=|==t

:atz*:

<^-t *-

Z
Robert Schumann

4
^E3

0t^^.^0L

*E

w\-*--^-ww-

5B -*-#-*-

nl^^S

MUSICAL DICTATION

218

LESSON XLV
2

^^^=^

2za_ z a:

lH

^=*5E

2-

19<s>

<^-

^^P ^=g^^I^
^

Antonin Dvorak

4 "Stabat Mater"

=*^

zfifcfc*:

/C\
-<S>

__p?zpfc

^^.^

M:

^-*
^zkztF=

^fi-Hs?

S^

=6

pz^^

Tf^yp' ^jg
Wagner

-(22-

JfiSifcii

:~524:

Si

fT i *7fr r Ti==!=fi==^j

^
t;

Mozart

6 "Twelfth Mass"

^m^^f-

^=

<s>-

LESSON XLVI
1 " Stabat

Mater"

Rossini

fis=3=gp

lf#

-*-

*0fzm+.

5S

ip x

Beethoven

2 Adagio from Trio, Op. 97

^=PE

*_ *

a
-^

^=q

2E

Se^si
Wagner

-^ -^*-

fe^^^

*x:

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

u^=3

219

=^EE*EEEEEeI
pEEJESSEEEgEEEJEEEJEEEEEg

=*-

Mozart

fc*r^f^j! ^-^ IgrE


*=*=&&
F

tSgfi
KpES-4

LESSON XLVII
From Beethoven's Sonatas
X Andante, Sonata Pathetique

ilp^=^^E33E
sfe

2 Adagio from Sonata

-fVtf
V.
/k-bT
-1

'

in

^z^;

*= J- S.

-J-.

.-1

-&
j|*_

--

*-

fc*
for Piano

sm
2

-s>-

J rfAJJ.?.-..*
s*

H=^=n

u=** gZ3t

"

9_ V-&

i-

-;H-

-^

->

0-

-Jt-t

-^9N

3=I=K

=t*

a''*^2gJ-*=^=F^=f

jgjfellEEg
ir^

-..-

g*

Ifcd

p=*

a=

and Violin

<z?

z2:

C Minor

mi

3 Sonata

?z

^=^

ip

-<S>-

t=

--*-

S
f

n-it

0000

#*

&-

MUSICAL DICTATION

220

LESSON XLVIII
(Unusual Rhythms)
1

"Comin' Thro'

the

Rye"

i=:p5=^3

ns-^r

Hungarian Folk Song

gPi3w3vt

J=x=at

^aqv
7*-

:jp-^:

i=fc

*>

T=> .

4
-g?

'

^1E

-*V-

h^.i. J*t

EiSS^ia=i=a
^-^-

*:s?"

-<^-

-<s>-,

LESSON XLIX
Themes from
1

"

The

"

Grail

fe^bt
-s>_

^H

^rDJ-

Ride of the Valkyries

Jl "

R3=S=

B &z*z

=*

;s^5e3S
*

'ht.

Richard Wagner

=w=i= *_*: * T

- %

t,

fc

M Call of the

S on of the

^wr

" Benediction"

I,

of

r%tf

^**

tzzl

"

beS^*ep
7
7

Dramas

2 "The Forge"

"The Sword"

si

the Music

Woods "

d=:^z^?*=
=t:

=r*

fl

zfecfc:

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

221

LESSON L
1

Adagio from Trio, Op.

Beethoven

97

m-

r*

Lto" __=_

mi


fr 5=4=

-# .^
-_r
s

_j

_____

f-

-j

=4=-

-^=*=x
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: k-v i= f=*=
0.

=4-

~h *

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:__ *7~-f-

=t=

=*

~
.

j__z*_

US^EE

C
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d *

--

____-ffi

;s2:

Beethoven

Minor Symphony

*-

-_>

___3*- ;


_i

*
IJ73.

*
L.

-A *-

0 J

^TT +

__

0-

_El_=__i_!EF^___ -Flf-p-r*-^
__-

f
:_._3E_ !___*
11
1
I

BOCCHERINI

_-=Jb-_
=t
_-__5

1-

bi_t__:4

p^=r-*
s=j~_r

_^

J tf^-^

4 Minuet
r

_?

z^^=^zfz*=SSt^FiEE^^Tfjz:ff3^z^z
^=*

3 Andante

^4

Beethoven

2 Adagio from Septet


It)

=_

_A.i-Sl_.llJ

BOOK TWO
INDEX
Page

Absolute Pitch

Accidentals

99, 108,

133

no

Antecedent

161

Cadence
Chords

161

Enharmonic Change

170, 173

Imitation

162

Intervals

Common

23

Dominant Seventh, Resolution


Major
Seventh,

Page

Duplet

of 153

152

The

138
152

Tonic

152

Inversions of
.

153
184

Chromatic Tones
Introduction of Le, Se, Me, and
Sequential Study of ...

Ra

29

.9, 28, 39, 47,

58,71, 76,87,
116, 125

Study of

38, 135

Writing of

Illustration of 2d, 3d, etc

84
140

Sub-dominant

Writing of

S^

Definition of

106, 130

Major and Minor


Leading tone

.152

Measure

119

Compound
Duple

124
120

Triple

120

Quadruple

120

Compound Duple
Compound Triple
Compound Quadruple

120

120
120

Mediant
Melodies.

152
.

Clef

.122, 126, 129, 144, 147, 149,

162, 165, 178, 180, 183, 185,

CClef
FClef
GClef

155

Consequent

189

155

Definition of

155
161

Melody Invention.

Correlation of Reading and Singing ... 5

161
.

48, 56, 61, 6$, 66, 79,

90, 127, 145, 151

Mental Effects

10, 15, 31,

Modulation

Dotted Beat Note


Writing of.

168, 173

Music Writing Books

Introduction of

38
1

19

.81, 91, 95, 96, 101, 107,

112,

14, 122,

Phrase

126

223

161

Period

161

224

INDEX
Page

Page

Irregular

164

Practice Staff

131

Alto

132

Bass

Directions for using

Pure Scale

Staff
'

Gr eat
Tenor

156
i55> !57

155
.

156

Rhythms

Treble

One Measure

11, ^^, 88, 121,

Two Measure

Writing on

137

155
.

.158, 171, 177, 180, 183,

153

186, 195, 198, 200, 205,

208, 210, 211, 213, 215

Scales

to

Chromatic

152

Degrees
Steps and Half Steps

Major
Building of

Review

85,93,98

of

152

Sequential Study of

25

Description of

43

Sequential Study of

.4

105
106, 121, 144

Tetrachords

86

Tone Production
103

43, 104, 113, 115, 152

With Relative Major


Writing of
Writing on Bass Staff

27,70
25

145
186
162

Tune

Transposition

Sequential Study of

Singing in

Abuse of
Use of

28, 104

(See Normal Form)

Sequence

152

Names

Study of

Melodic Form

Normal Form

152

Supertonic

Syncopation

(See Normal Form)

Description of

8^
82

Superdominant
Syllable

With Relative Minor


Minor
Harmonic Form

inclusive.

Staff

141, 146, 186

Writing of

220

135, 175, 178, 187

Triads
Definition of

23

Introduction of

21

Inversion of

72,77,115

Major, Minor, Diminished.

Mental Effect of

Writing of

.88, 115

La Triad

Sequential Study of
Triplet

^2
44, 72
14, 128,

133

96

it#

Date Due

1TTF5I

)4

JEC 1 ft IMS
JUN

is
,

4&^y

c#i

taia

2 s 195&

tfcTT
MAR 19

t95Q

95f

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