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Maturity Model for Digital Workplace Programs


Published: 26 March 2015

Analyst(s): Gavin Tay, Hanns Koehler-Kruener, Carol Rozwell

An effective digital workplace is crucial to succeeding in the digital economy.


Gartner's maturity model for digital workplace programs helps IT leaders
understand the logical progression toward a fully realized digital workplace.

Key Findings
The digital workplace facilitates new ways of working by enabling employee engagement and
creating a more consumerized work environment.
Digital workplace leaders require guidance to determine their program maturity before
systematically advancing their efforts. Digital workplace leaders should assess the maturity of their
program to help identity where additional investments need to be made.
Digital workplace initiatives will vary from organization to organization. Different parts of the
organization will often be at different levels of maturity and move at different speeds. Digital
workplace leaders will have to nurture and mature with the unique constraints and opportunities in
each part of their organization.
It is not appropriate or necessary for every organization to achieve the highest level of maturity in
each of the eight dimensions.

Recommendations
Do not treat a digital workplace initiative as one big single project. Instead, develop a digital
workplace program and an implementation strategy that meets the specific needs of your
organization.
Ensure that there are both qualitative and quantifiable returns to the business. IT leaders must not
be fixated about rapidly advancing to the next level.
Baseline the current level of maturity with both qualitative and quantitative key performance
indicators at each level across the organization and individual business units. Apply the actionable
steps prescribed to iteratively improve the current practices before advancing to the next level.
Advancing to the next level of maturity is not only about procuring the best-in-class technology.
Digital workplace leaders need to pay attention to all of the eight dimensions of maturity.

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Table of Contents
Strategic Planning Assumptions............................................................................................................. 2
Analysis.................................................................................................................................................. 2
How to Use the Maturity Model........................................................................................................ 4
The Five Levels of Digital Workplace Program Maturity..................................................................... 5
Level 1 Reactive.....................................................................................................................5
Level 2 Exploratory.................................................................................................................7
Level 3 Emerging................................................................................................................... 9
Level 4 Integrated................................................................................................................ 11
Level 5 Optimizing................................................................................................................12
Gartner Recommended Reading.......................................................................................................... 14

List of Figures
Figure 1. Maturity Model for a Digital Workplace Program.......................................................................4

Strategic Planning Assumptions


By 2018, 30% of organizations will formalize workforce digital literacy strategies to improve
business outcomes and employee engagement.
By 2020, 20% of organizations will include employee engagement improvement as a shared
performance objective for HR and IT groups.

Analysis
Interest in digital workplace has risen significantly over the course of the last 12 months. The
frequency that Gartner clients discussed digital workplace with analysts doubled in the second half
1

of 2014 as compared with the second half of 2013. The progress of digital workplace initiatives
varies from those that are making good progress to those that are struggling to kick off such an
initiative. There are also some which failed with an initial attempt that are being revamped and
restarted.
A digital workplace initiative is not solely an IT initiative but a collective effort of a myriad of different
disciplines within an organization. It involves promoting new ways of working, takes into account
evolving business models and leverages existing organizational culture change initiatives. Given the
potential wide scope, progress can be an extremely "slow boat." Digital workplace leaders will
therefore require conviction in describing the long journey (to both their teams and business
leaders), justifying how their actions will impact business change, and tracking progress over the
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long haul. As a result, sustaining investment and commitment over the potentially long journey will
be another challenge.
Gartner's maturity model for the digital workplace (see Figure 1) will help digital workplace leaders
responsible for such initiatives advance their strategy and efforts. They should use this model to
assess the maturity of their digital workplace program by identifying the greatest gaps,
opportunities, shortcomings and what they must do to achieve their desired business goals at each
level. At each level of maturity, we delve into the eight dimensions described in Gartner's building
block framework (see "Attention to Eight Building Blocks Ensures a Successful Digital Workplace
Initiative"). It is not appropriate or necessary for every organization to achieve the highest level of
maturity. Every organization will be different, and each organization should use the model to
determine where it is best for the organization to make investments.
It should be noted that this maturity model is for the program and not the workplace itself. It is also
imperative to note that demands of a digital business will inevitably cause the digital workplace
within organizations to evolve alongside them. This evolution will include changes in employee
behavioral dynamics, the adoption of supermaneuverable processes and applicable technologies.
Gartner's maturity model will be updated to reflect how these changes affect a digital workplace
program as the initiative evolves.

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Figure 1. Maturity Model for a Digital Workplace Program

Source: Gartner (March 2015)

How to Use the Maturity Model


Gartner's maturity model describes five levels of maturity, from reactive (Level 1) to optimizing (Level
2

5). In a worldwide survey that Gartner conducted in October 2014 across all industries, two-thirds

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of Gartner clients say that their organization is at Level 2 or Level 3, and a third of Gartner clients are
split between Levels 1, 4 and 5. (Note that a 2015 survey is underway.)
At each level, we examine the following eight dimensions:
Vision: Value proposition for the digital workplace
Strategy: Blueprint for effective execution
Employee Engagement: Design and approaches, communities and social networks,
consumerization, interaction and feedback, participation and contribution
Organizational Change: Culture and structure, skills and competencies, incentives and recognition,
governance, freedoms, responsibilities, and partnerships
Processes: Focus on augmenting dynamic, creative, nonroutine work
Information: Data and content delivered in context
Metrics: Results, benchmarks, value and return on investments
Technology: Social, mobile, cloud, analytics, smart machines, work grid
To determine the maturity of your organization's digital workplace program, find the descriptions in
this report that best match your organization's performance for each of the eight dimensions. The
maturity of the majority of dimensions will determine an organization's overall level of readiness for
successfully undertaking digital workplace initiatives. Organizations can be at different levels for
different dimensions; for example, at Level 3 for organizational change, but at Level 2 for
technology. Once you have determined your current level, use our model to determine the overall
level of maturity that your organization needs to attain to achieve its goals. Focus on building a
strong foundation at each level, otherwise attempts to reach the next level will not bring the desired
results. Not every organization needs to reach Level 5, but almost all need to reach at least a
reasonable Level 3. To prepare to move to the next level, focus on improving the dimensions with
the lowest maturity. In some cases, digital workplace leaders may want to hire external
organizational management consultants to help with tasks that the organization lacks the skills to
perform.

The Five Levels of Digital Workplace Program Maturity


Level 1 Reactive
No effort to create a digital workplace exists.
Vision: No enterprisewide vision for the digital workplace exists. The organization's senior
leadership team does not put any emphasis on workplace development. This is in part due to the
lack of awareness of the need to pursue or simply that there is no necessity to pursue a digital
workplace effort that would complement the organization's digital business strategy.

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Employees are not aligned or aware of the organization's objectives. Since the needs of workers go
unheard, their primary purpose as workers is more short term and mainly to meet their financial
needs for example, produce the desired number of products. There is no identification with an
organization's strategy.
Strategy: The organization's strategic roadmap is isolated and does not adjust to the external
business environment. There is no intent to develop a multifaceted and geographically diverse
workplace. Organizations are risk adverse, while changes are nonexistent and centered on
operational efficiency.
As a result of not having a strategy and communicating it across the organization, employees are
fixated on achieving their own outcomes and are often not too concerned about peers or colleagues
in adjacent areas. Each individual often develops his or her own work style and operational habits.
Employees typically become creatures of habit as the organization does not place any emphasis on
workforce agility and development as they are defined through their roles and tasks.
Employee Engagement: There is no set of policies, methods and measures to identify employee
engagement levels and ways to remediate poor engagement. Human resources is likely viewed as
an administrative and operational department without a strategic role. Employee surveys may
assess overall satisfaction, but there are no committed resources to address gaps or leverage areas
where employees are engaged. The result is that the organization practices a top-down approach
that dictates the conduct and expectations of its employees.
Employees are largely compliant to organizational expectations, and they inherit the norms or
traditions that have been established over the years. Organizations show a strong tendency toward
multilevel hierarchies. Employees are highly reserved on the surface, as there is not an incentive to
provide any input since the decision making is done high above in the organizational hierarchy. The
majority of employees are disengaged.
Organizational Change: No formal organizational change program for the digital workplace exists.
Leadership does not treat organizational change as a cross-cutting strategy across business and IT
projects. If organizational change is recognized as something valuable, it is packaged into change
management activities that are part of IT implementation efforts. The result is that culture evolves
organically without direction to support business objectives. The existing hierarchical structure does
not reward or encourage spreading stories of incremental and local success.
Individuals rely on informal or situational best practices and are unprepared for unforeseen
circumstances. Employees frown at the perceived chaos when dealing with change but are agile to
build their own inner circle on whom they can depend.
Processes: Processes are in existence to address specific scenarios and cannot be easily altered to
respond to changing circumstances. If any change is required, it will often entail process reengineering. Such processes are not integrated into employee work streams.
Employees do not see themselves being encouraged to voice improvements in processes.
Individuals find new and innovative ways to circumvent the system, leading to inconsistent working
practices.

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Information: The organization's leaders do not see the strategic value of information, except in a few
pockets like financial or client information. There is no attempt to analyze, use or cross-link the
multitude of different information sources within the organization.
Workers dread trying to remember which folder a specific document resides in, especially in an
urgent time of need. They end up spending huge amounts of unproductive time manually searching
for the right information or making copies in personal workspaces and using non-IT approved tools
to share information.
Metrics: No metrics exist for measuring the outcomes of digital workplace initiatives. Some
organizations measure other output and track worker hours but have no way of understanding in a
detailed way the contribution of their employees or the impact of different processes in achieving
specific results. There are no soft workforce measurements, and as a result, there is no basis for
benchmarking or the ability to keep track of progression.
Employees may not have a sense of direction initially but will devise their own means of measuring
success or what is good enough. Their only feedback may come at annual review meetings with
nontransparent reasons for success or failure.
Technology: The organization enforces a variety of IT-procured systems that are found to be
haphazardly used by employees. IT is generally procured without much direct input from the
workforce. IT decides the technology, which is chosen on the basis of cost and ease of
maintenance and upgradability, rather than agility and user experience.
Employees are required to use systems that are often not very intuitive. They typically shun these
systems and try to either individually or departmentally source their own solutions. IT is seen as a
hindrance to improvements by employees.
What to Do to Move to the Next Level: Review Gartner's Eight Building Blocks for a digital
workplace and select three as the initial focus. Use the descriptors in Level 2 to learn about the
priorities of both the work practices and specific habits to focus on.

Level 2 Exploratory
The forerunners of digital workplace initiatives begin to emerge in the organization. However, these
experimental efforts are uncoordinated and are most likely underground.
Vision: No enterprisewide vision for the digital workplace exists.
Likeminded employees have the vision of what makes a digital workplace, even if it is limited by
their own points of view. They experiment with ways to improve work, and when they find each
other, they may cooperate across departmental borders. However, most remain isolated.
Strategy: An informal plan not yet really a strategy may exist among an informal group of
employees. Such groups can be found within a department or across functional areas and even
across geographies. They are agile enough to shift in accordance to changes demanded of the work
area and sometimes the business environment.

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Employees in informal groups become innovative and collaborative out of the need to succeed with
specific projects or work activities. It is less of a strategic approach and more of a community of
practice.
Employee Engagement: Some localized experiments are getting employees more involved in
decision making, thereby increasing employee engagement. However, the top-down, decisionmaking approach persists.
Highly motivated employees begin by going in search for the best approaches initially for
themselves but may chance upon others in the process. The intrinsic incentive for them is to rise
above the ranks and be seen with a positive attitude. Such employees are compliant to
organizational expectations but have created their own improvements to the norms or traditions,
thereby allowing themselves to accept current organizational status quo.
Organizational Change: There is no consistent approach to organizational change for digital
workplace initiatives.
Employees lead the change to address the needs in their respective work silos, relying on selftaught organizational change techniques. They build rapport with their managers to collectively
drive change. In so doing, they may inadvertently push their own agenda or create a following that
copies them.
Processes: Although there may be some minor changes to processes during digital workplace
experiments, existing processes continue to remain intact while ad hoc processes are derived at a
departmental level to address nuances. Both existing and ad hoc processes work in parallel to
complement each other but are not replaceable.
Employees will inject on-the-ground know-how so as to accelerate the process, but on occasions
improve upon organizational processes such that they become more relevant in their respective
department.
Information: Preventing the duplication of information is a priority. Some departments advocate the
use of business applications, as well as data and content management repositories. This instills the
discipline in employees to ensure that at least some critical processes are carried out consistently
and reliably, while relevant data and content is managed coherently. It is expected that employees
as well as systems will therefore be reliable in delivering the most up-to-date information.
Employees struggle with the unintuitiveness of navigating the central repository. On the contrary,
employees value the flexibility and the need to get work done. However, because enterprise tools
inhibit them from doing so, they yet again look for alternative means.
Metrics: Working independently, a subset of people managers explicitly hold their employees
accountable for how work gets done and their effectiveness of working in teams and communities.
Sometimes they go as far as deriving a benchmark. However, since HR is not involved, it causes
inconsistency across the organization.
Employees working for different managers are impeded because different managers have
conflicting expectations regarding effectiveness and collaboration. Employees welcome this
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approach, even if it means having to focus on developing a deeper relationship with their manager.
The dreadful moment comes when their manager moves on as they will have to begin establishing a
good rapport all over again.
Technology: Departments undertake projects with the autonomy of selecting and implementing
workplace technology independent of the organization. Department stakeholders want the agility
and perceive that their needs would be better met. SaaS is used to circumvent IT.
Employees will initially be drawn into a platform that serves their specific needs. Given time and to
the extent that their needs change or if they become aware of better alternatives, employees end up
only using the system at the tail end for compliance purposes.
What to Do to Move to the Next Level: Identify a potential candidate to become the digital
workplace leader who will commence a digital workplace pilot. Validate expectations of business
relevance and employee engagement and work toward achieving the desired results in a shorter
time frame.

Level 3 Emerging
The need to build the digital workplace is acknowledged by the organization's leadership. A digital
workplace leader is appointed and begins a pilot project.
Vision: The digital workplace leader drafts the organization's digital workplace vision (see "Toolkit:
Sample Job Description for a Digital Workplace Leader"). This effort gains attention of the senior
leadership and sparks the impetus to review the organization's vision.
In many enterprise departments, the employees see the benefit of close cooperation and sharing of
ideas. The digital workplace leader has a role to play in effectively communicating about common
goals.
Strategy: With the support of the organization's leadership, the digital workplace leader develops
the strategy for digital workplace. Employees within a department develop a sense of belonging.
They will also exhibit a competitive streak among department chiefs rather than sharing of best
practices.
Employee Engagement: Individual department heads or managers of teams decide for themselves
to engage more with the other team members, thereby creating isolated pockets of highly motivated
employees.
Within departments, highly motivated employees are collectively driven to improve upon traditional
practices. There may be friendly competition among employees or departments for the betterment
of the departments as well as recognition-hungry individuals.
Organizational Change: The digital workplace leader with the involvement of HR and business
leaders develops, documents and executes a formal organizational change plan that supports
the digital workplace pilot project. The plan draws upon the experience of experienced change
agents in the enterprise and incorporates the latest neuroscience concepts (see "Three Essential

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First Steps for Leading Transformational Change" and "Digital Workplace Organizational Change
Imperatives").
Processes: The digital workplace leader tests new ways of working and ensures the completeness
of the ad hoc processes developed at the departmental level. The processes are refined and
strengthened, replacing the old processes and in some cases are combined with existing
processes. Such a hybrid approach brings about improved fluidity to better respond to changing
work streams.
Employees will expand their reach with experienced colleagues in other departments to draw from
their insight. Employees can enhance the sphere of one's social networks and seeking alternative
channels as an informal means to make work light.
Information: As the growing need for workers to collaborate becomes central to a work activity,
employees within a department rely less on monolithic systems. They are complemented with tools
and content at the front end that allow social and collaborative ways of working to support the realtime exchange of information. The element of a social network where information is intertwined to
people becomes prevalent.
Employees gain the agility and speed to accomplish their work tasks. They have ease and flexibility
of access to information from both inside and outside of the organization.
Metrics: Measuring workforce effectiveness becomes a priority across roles that have a direct
impact to a customer and is pervasive across all departments. Such a metric typically relates to
time taken to respond to a client request, most commonly to solve a specific technical issue. These
metrics are very often tied to a service support agreement that the client has paid for or to the
sales organization, its sales quota. Such a metric advocates individualism rather than a collaborative
nature.
Employees in external client servicing departments are quite accustomed to being measured as it is
an expected trait that drives them. Individual departments look for measuring collaboration and
engagement.
Technology: The digital workplace leader begins to address issues such as the proliferation of
workplace platforms that have accumulated overtime, the difficulty of finding the right information
because it is scattered across the organization and the duplication of information that causes
confusion.
The digital workplace pilot employs consumerized technology in a way that improves employee
effectiveness when completing nonroutine, high-impact work.
What to Do to Move to the Next Level: Use the lessons learned from the digital workplace pilot to
expand the program and create a portfolio of initiatives. Establish a digital workplace steering
committee to keep the efforts organized.

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Level 4 Integrated
A formal governing structure the digital workplace steering committee is in place, which
includes digital workplace leaders from across multiple business units. This team ensures that
practices across the organization are common and consistent, efforts are coordinated, best
practices are shared and issues are responded to.
Vision: The digital workplace steering committee refines the digital workplace vision originally
formulated by the digital workplace leaders at Level 3. The steering committee's charter is one of
establishing a wider vision, with values progressively in tuned with the organization. Participation of
the senior leadership team plays a vital role in facilitating change and communicating this vision to
the board of directors.
Employees that are part of the various digital workplace initiatives are excited about the anticipated
digital workplace while those on the fringes are anxious of what the implications might be. (The
communication and training plans developed as part of the strategy help to allay these concerns, as
noted in the next section.)
Strategy: The digital workplace steering committee develops an enterprisewide strategy that
complements and integrates with other critical business change initiatives. It addresses portfolio
governance as well as communication and training.
Employees especially those involved in the digital workplace initiatives begin to comprehend
the "bigger picture" for changing how people work for the better.
Employee Engagement: The digital workplace steering committee encourages to contribute their
ideas about how to make workers performing high-impact work more effective. The committee
searches out and learns from digitally savvy employees, fostering the spread of best practices.
Groups of employees across the organization that work in teams now look for other teams to build
cross-departmental best practices. Employees feel empowered to make changes with direct
management's blessing.
Organizational Change: Dealing with organizational change is not done systematically yet and
requires external expertise. HR and IT are still trying to get a handle of whether employee
engagement revolves around the people or the technology. The digital workplace steering
committee working with HR and business leaders revises governance processes documents
best practices. There is a well-established process for enterprisewide communication and training
that is developed in conjunction with corporate communications.
Employees are positive about digital workplace change because they see how the initiatives directly
contribute to improving their work performance. They have acquired agility and adaptability, thus
expecting change to occur more continually and frequently. They actively participate in trying to
create a digital workplace by looking for improvements in the way they work and by working with
the steering committee to see them implemented.

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Processes: Members of the digital workplace steering committee facilitate the shift from a hybrid of
traditional and ad hoc processes to agile, responsive and collaborative processes within the
initiatives for which they are responsible. Use cases are identified to ensure they fit into the
enterprise's digital workplace vision and are able to meet the needs of a changing organization.
Smart machine and other emerging technologies are put to the test to ensure their interoperability
with process engines.
Information: The digital workplace steering committee facilitates the building out of an enterprise
information structure. This effort is required to ensure that the subsequent introduction of proactive
and smarter search engines will pave the way toward contextualized content delivery.
Employees experience immediate results as more intuitive and consumerized technology is
implemented. Building an enterprise information structure has its huge share of challenges that may
disengage employees.
Metrics: Data collected about digital workforce initiatives confirms improvements to workplace
effectiveness and employee engagement. It also verifies that digital workplace initiatives are having
the desired impact on business outcomes. The organization's leadership has adopted a "fail fast"
mentality that encourages risk taking. Metrics are used to make informed decisions more quickly
rather than place blame.
Collaboration is measured and valued, management looks for collaboration and tries to capture the
value. Although seen as an important trait, pockets of older behavior exist but are rare.
Technology: The digital workplace committee encourages engagement by shepherding employees
into using tools that are more social, mobile and ultimately accessible. The interconnectedness of
these platforms is documented and customization on the integration, interoperability and
consumption is uniform.
What to Do to Move to the Next Level: The digital workplace steering committee must gain the
support of the organization's senior leadership to invest in ongoing innovation in the workplace. It
should be active in enhancing the digital literacy of all employees and serve as a role model
adopting effective work practices.

Level 5 Optimizing
The steering committee is now a well-established governing group focused on continuous
improvement and evolution of digital workplace initiatives across the enterprise.
Vision: The digital workplace vision is consistent with the organization's values and easily
understood by all stakeholders. It is regularly reviewed and revised by the steering committee as
circumstances change, such as the business environment evolving or new technologies becoming
available. The update includes perspectives from employees, the organization's senior leadership
team and the board of directors.
Strategy: The blueprint is revised to clearly define the organization's digital business strategic
roadmap from across different operational areas. The organization embraces a pervasive approach

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governance that focuses on the continuous improvement of initiatives, anticipates demographic


change, embraces risk and requires substantial change to IT support.
Employees have a crystal clear understanding of the digital workplace strategy and of how each
individual person from different business functions and from respective geographic regions work.
Employee Engagement: The organization embraces bottom-up and top-down approaches to
change, and employees are intrinsically motivated to redesign the workplace in ways that will make
them more effective and better connected to enterprise outcomes. Employee satisfaction and
engagement is part of the reward cycle for all levels. Employees find themselves in a consumerlike
computing environment and are highly engaged.
Employees are highly motivated to provide feedback and participate in the decision-making
process. They embrace gamification techniques used in tools, such as the ability to connect their
actions to organizational outcomes and goals.
Organizational Change: Organizational change has evolved into organizational liquidity (see
"Organizational Liquidity Readies Enterprises for Digital Business"). Employee engagement
improvement is a shared performance objective for both HR and IT groups. Governance processes
are established, encouraging cooperation, capturing best practices, as well as proactively seeking
improvements and reacting very well to unforeseen circumstances.
Employees enjoy a culture of continuous improvement and authentic recognition with senior
executives who are listening and engaging at the ground level. Change is continuous as is the
feedback loop to constantly assess change in line with the vision and strategy.
Processes: Organizations employ agile, responsive and collaborative processes that do not rely on
fixed "one size fits all" rules and have the ability to respond quickly to changing circumstances.
Digital workplace technologies are integrated into workflows so they become vital tools to ensure
mission-critical work is done. The use of smart machines is prevalent in the workplace to automate
routine tasks and assist workers with nonroutine work.
Employees garner input easily when faced with making a decision about how to solve a difficult
problem, regardless of where in the social network the insight comes from. They will distribute their
work across a team of "virtual doppelgangers" to boost their personal productivity.
Information: The organization's information strategy exploits the use of mobile access and effortless
synchronization to the enterprise file sharing system.
Employees appreciate that the searching, sharing and consuming information are as "smart" and
compelling as the ones they use in their personal lives. These capabilities are like consumer
services such as Google Now, Apple's Siri, search engines and social media. Employees are able to
focus on the strategic task at hand because smart machines will provide contextualized content
recommendations or even decision support and advice in a way that helps workers complete tasks
more effectively, quickly and easily.

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Metrics: Business value metrics are evaluated to continuously monitor the impact the digital
workplace is having on business performance. Some examples include metrics such as workforce
effectiveness, employee agility, employee satisfaction, retention and other organization specific
goals. The value of these initiatives is an extension of the approach the organization currently uses
to measure its performance.
From the employees' perspective, they enjoy more autonomy especially when it comes to carrying
out work that relies on experience and creativity. They are responsible for successful outcomes.
Recognition and rewards are an indirect mechanism of feedback and also a reflection of the level of
success.
Technology: A social, mobile, accessible and information-driven workplace is augmented with smart
machines and other relevant technologies that enable a digital workplace, promoting workplace
agility, effectiveness and engagement. New ways of using technology and use of new technologies
are commonplace with digital workplace initiatives. Organizations also formalize the use of a
workgrid a service backplane designed to aid integration, interoperability and consumption of a
variety of workplace services. The choice of digital workplace technologies used is left to the
discretion of the employee within a framework of managed diversity.
The employees' mobile devices contain an established peer and extended professional networks,
which causes a blurring between what is in the workplace and what is outside.
What to Do to Remain at This Level: The digital workplace will continually evolve based on
changes in the business (internal) and in the business environment (external). The digital workplace
steering committee is a credible, well-established body at this level of maturity. Its program of work
is proactively reviewed and improved as business conditions change. It is expected that the
organization's ability to sense change (or even anticipate it using advanced predictive analytics) is
well-honed at Level 5.

Gartner Recommended Reading


Some documents may not be available as part of your current Gartner subscription.
"Create a Digital Workplace to Respond to Critical Changes in the Workforce"
"Use the Gartner Execution Model to Build the Digital Workplace"
"Attention to Eight Building Blocks Ensures a Successful Digital Workplace Initiative"
"Promoting Organizational Agility With the Digital Workplace"
"Digital Workplace Organizational Change Imperatives"
"Devise New Content Strategies to Meet the Needs of 'Business Consumers' in the Digital
Workplace"

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Evidence
1

Analysis of Gartner inquiry database.

Gartner Research Circle poll survey conducted in October 2014 with Gartner clients worldwide
(North America, Latin America, EMEA, Asia/Pacific) across all industries to solicit the level of
maturity the respondents anticipated they were at.
More on This Topic
This is part of an in-depth collection of research. See the collection:

Strategic Approaches for Digital Workplace Leaders

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