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13th International Balkan Workshop

on Applied Physics
Constana, Romania, July 4-6, 2013

Book of Abstracts

Editors:
Marius BELC, Iuliana M. STNESCU

Constana, 2013

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied


Physics
Constana, Romania, July 4-6, 2013

Is jointly organized by:


OVIDIUS UNIVERSITY OF CONSTANTA

in cooperation with:
BALKAN PHYSICAL UNION

ROMANIAN PHYSICAL SOCIETY

under the patronage of:


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, RESEARCH, YOUTH AND SPORTS

Chairman
Marius Belc
Physics and Electronics Department Chair,
Ovidius University of Constanta
Co-Chairman:

Co-Chairman:

Yesim Oktem
President, Balkan Physical Union

Nicolae V. Zamfir
President, Romanian Physical Society

Steering Committee
Dnu Tiberius Epure
Rector, Ovidius University of Constana

Gabriela Stanciu
Vice-Rector,Ovidius University of Constana

International Organizing Committee


Goran Djordjevi (vicepresident of BPU),
Athanasios Lambros (General Secretary of BPU),
Radu Constantinescu (Scientific Secretary of BPU),
Nicholai Tonchev (Scientific Project Coordinator of BPU),
Baki Akkus (Turkish Physical Society),
Angelos Angelopoulos (Hellenic Physical Society),
Emil Burzo (Romanian Physical Society and Romanian Academy of Science),
Damyan N. Damyanov (Union of Scientists in Bulgaria),
Antoneta Deda (Albanian Physical Society),
Stavros Ioannou (Physical Society of Cyprus),
Valeriu Kantser (Moldovian Physical Society),
Predrac Miranovic (Physical Society of Montenegro),
Zenun Mulaj (Albanian Physical Society),
Alexander Petrov (Bulgarian Physical Society),
E. Polychroniadis (Hellenic Physical Society)

Local Organizing Committee


Viorica Popescu, Ovidius University
Rodica Vladoiu, Ovidius University
Iuliana M. Stnescu, Ovidius University
Aurelia Mande, Ovidius University
Mirela Conulov, Ovidius University
Virginia Dinc, Ovidius University
Gabriel Prodan, Ovidius University
Madalina Prodan, Ovidius University

Viorel Ionescu, Ovidius University


Florin Moscalu, Ovidius University
Corneliu I Oprea, Ovidius University
Camelia Oprea, Ovidius University
Jeanina Lungu, Ovidius University
Constana tefanov, Ovidius University
Petre Panait, Ovidius University
Mihai A. Gru, Ovidius University

Advisory Committee
Horia Alexandru (Romania)
Alexandru Aldea (Romania)
Stefan Antohe (Romania)
Simion Astilean (Romania)
Metin Arik (Turkey)
Pervin Arikan (Turkey)
Nicolae Avram (Romania)
Dimiter Balabanski (Bulgaria)
Antun Bala (Serbia)
Virgil Baran (Romania)
Ibrahim Belenli (Turkey)
P. Berberi (Albania)
Dj. Bek-Uzarov (Serbia)
Aleksandar Bogojevi (Serbia)
Dennis Bonatsos (Greece)
Madalin Bunoiu (Romania)
Emil Burzo (Romania)
Gheorghe Cata-Danil (Romania)
Gabriela Carja (Romania)
Gheorghe V. Cimpoca (Romania)
Victor Ciupin (Romania)
Horia Chiriac (Romania)
Onuc Cozar (Romania)
Vladimir Cvjetkovi (Serbia)
Dragoljub Dimitrijevi (Serbia)
Maria Dinescu (Romania)
Ivan Dojinovi (Serbia)
Mahmut Dogru (Turkey)
Branko Dragovi(Serbia)
Miroljub Dugi(Serbia)
Mustafa Erol (Turkey)
Mats Fahlman (Sweden)
Mihai Gru (Romania)
A. Georgieva (Bulgaria)
Constantin Grigoriu (Romania)
Husnu Salih Guder (Turkey)
Dan Grecu (Romania)
Felicia Iacomi (Romania)
Alexandru Jipa (Romania)
Wilhelm Kappel (Romania)
Nafiye Gunec Kiyak (Turkey)

Dragana Krsti (Serbia)


I. Lalov (Bulgaria)
Dumitru Luca (Romania)
Cristian P. Lungu (Romania)
Ion Malaescu (Romania)
Ion N. Mihailescu (Romania)
Pedja Mihailovi (Serbia)
A. Minxhozi (Albania)
Ioan Morjan (Romania)
Ibrahim Halil Mutlu (Turkey)
Christo Nanev (Bulgaria)
Ljubia Nei (Serbia)
Alexandru Nicolin (Romania)
Dragoslav Nikezi (Serbia)
Milica Pavkov-Hrvojevi (Serbia)
Lucian Pintilie (Romania)
E. Polychroniadis (Greece)
Viorel Pop (Romania)
Gheorghe Popa (Romania)
Ion V. Popescu (Romania)
Mihai Popescu (Romania)
Marco Popovic (Serbia)
Goran Risti (Serbia)
Gheorghe Samoilescu (Romania)
Roman Schrittwieser (Austria)
Simion Simon (Romania)
Alexandru Stancu (Romania)
Darko Tanaskovi (Serbia)
Cristian Teodorescu (Romania)
Mihai Toma (Romania)
N. Tonchev (Bulgaria)
Valentin Urumov (Macedonia)
E. Valcheva (Bulgaria)
Miroslav Veskovi (Serbia)
Valentin Vlad (Romania)
Rodica Vladoiu (Romania)
Mihai Visinescu (Romania)
Daniel Vizman (Romania)
Dumitru Vulcanov (Romania)
Latife Sahin Yalcin (Turkey)
Ch. Zerefos (Greece)

Topics:
1.

Materials Physics
Semiconductors, Dielectrics and Organic Materials
Spintronics, Magnetism and Superconductivity
Crystal growth, Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films
Polymers and Amorphous Materials

2.

Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics and Applications


Laser Physics and applications
Plasma Physics and applications
Optoelectronics and photonics
Applied and non-linear optics
Ultrafast phenomena and applications

3.

Nuclear and sub-Nuclear Physics and Applications


Nuclear and subnuclear sciences and Engineering
Advanced detection systems
Accelerated particle beams
Nuclear Techniques and applications
Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

4.

Cross-disciplinary Applications of Physics


Nonlinear dynamics, complex systems and applications
Biological complexity and Genetics
Econophysics
Physics of Social System

5.

Engineering and Industrial Physics


Physics of energy transfer, conversion and storage
Environmental Physics
Sensors and Device Physics
Micro- and Nanoelectronics
Microelectromechanical systems
Instrumentation and Metrology
Imagining, Microscopy and Spectroscopy and their applications
Instrumentation, processing, fabrication and measurement technologies
Applications of fluid mechanics and microfluidics

6.

Topics in Physics Education Research


Physics curriculum design
Active learning techniques
Classroom teaching, demonstrations and laboratory experiments

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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S0 Plenary Session
S0 01
APPLIED PHYSICS RESEARCH AT THE EUROPEAN CENTER EXTREME LIGHT
INFRASTRUCTURE - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (ELI-NP)
Nicolae-Victor ZAMFIR
S0 02
APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
Dimiter L. BALABANSKI
S0 03
SOLITONS AND VORTICES IN BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES: A PARTICLE-PICTURE BASED
UNIFYING PERSPECTIVE
D. J. FRANTZESKAKIS
S0 04
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR SOFT LASER TRANSFER OF BIOMATERIALS FOR
NANOBIOMEDICINE
Ion N. MIHAILESCU, Carmen RISTOSCU, Felix SIMA
S0 05
CATALYTIC PROPERTIES OF NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS:
TWO CASESTUDIES
Florina MATEI, Steven LIM, Yuan CHEN, Drago CIUPARU
S0 06
LASER PROCESSING OF POLYMERS: APPLICATION TO GAS SENSORS
A. PALLA-PAPAVLU, D. CANNAT, M. BENETTI, F. DI PIETRANTONIO, E. VERONA,
V. DINCA, T. LIPPERT, A. WOKAUN, M. DINESCU

Section 1 Materials Physics


Semiconductors, Dielectrics and Organic Materials
Spintronics, Magnetism and Superconductivity
Crystal growth, Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films
Polymers and Amorphous Materials
INVITED LECTURES
S1 L01
HIGH ENERGY PERMANENT MAGNETS
E.Burzo
S1 L02
ORGANIC/INORGANIC HYBRID STRUCTURES FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC APPLICATIONS
tefan ANTOHE
S1 L03
DIELECTRIC SPECTROSCOPY IN FERROELECTRIC RELAXATION OF TGS CRYSTAL
Horia V. ALEXANDRU, Carmen MNDRU , Constantin Paul GANEA and Liviu NEDELCU
S1 L04
FIRST ORDER REVERSAL CURVES METHOD FOR HYSTERESIS IN MATERIALS:
APPLICATION ON SPIN CROSSOVER COMPOUNDS
Cristian ENACHESCU

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S1 L05
DISCOVERING THE POLES OF THE MOLECULAR MAGNETS
Marilena FERBINTEANU and Fanica CIMPOESU
S1 L06
SiC MULTI-LAYER PROTECTIVE COATING ON CARBON: SYNTHESIS AND
CHARACTERISATION
V. CIUPINA, C. P. LUNGU, R. VLADOIU, T-D. EPURE, G. PRODAN, C. POROSNICU, I. JEPU, M. BELC,
M. PRODAN, I. M. OANCEA- STANESCU, C. STEFANOV, M. CONTULOV, A. MANDES, V. DINCA, E.
VASILE, V. ZAROVSCHI,V. NICOLESCU
S1 L07
X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY OF FERROELECTRICS AND
METAL/FERROELECTRIC INTERFACES
Cristian-Mihail TEODORESCU
S1 L08
SPECTROSCOPIC ELLIPSOMETRY: A USEFUL NON-DESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUE TO PROBE
THE PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS
Aurelian-Catalin GALCA
S1 L09
3D NUMERICAL COMPUTATION OF SUBMICRONIC PARTICLE SUSPENSION DISTRIBUTION
IN A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE UNDER DIELECTROPHORESIS
A. NECULAE, M. BUNOIU, T. MARIAN and M. LUNGU
S1 L10
METAL OXIDE THIN FILMS FOR FUNCTIONAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES
F. IACOMI
S1 L11
ENLARGING THE FUNCTIONAL CHARACTER OF TIO2-AU/AG BASED MATERIALS
Monica BAIA, Virginia DANCIU, Zsolt PAP and Lucian BAIA
S1 L12
FAST AS A NEW BRAZING ROUTE FOR REFRACTORY MATERIALS
M. GALATANU, B.POPESCU, I .ENCULESCU, I. TISEANU, A. GALATANU
S1 L13
LOW-LOSS MICROWAVE DIELECTRICS: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES, AND APPLICATIONS
L. NEDELCU and M. G. BANCIU
S1 L14
DUAL EMITTER ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS:THERMAL AND STRUCTURAL
CHARACTERISTICS
S. POLOSAN, I.C. CIOBOTARU, C.C. CIOBOTARU
S1 L15
MAGNETIC ORDERING IN A FAMILY OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MOLECULAR MAGNETS A
COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH
Corneliu I. OPREA, Bogdan FRECU, Petre PANAIT, Fanica CIMPOESU, Marilena FERBINTEANU and
Mihai A. GRU
ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S1 O01
SPIN TRANSPORT IN GRAPHENE BORON NITRIDE HYBRID MATERIALS WITH
TRANSITIONAL METAL IMPURITIES
Camelia VISAN

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S1 O02
USING AFM TOPOGRAPHY MEASUREMENTS IN NANOPARTICLE SIZING
Dan CHICEA
S1 O03
NEW IrQ(ppy)2 ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUND FOR OLED APPLICATIONS: SYNTHESIS AND
OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION
I.C. CIOBOTARU, S. POLOSAN, C.C.CIOBOTARU, H. IOVU
S1 O04
THE INFLUENCE OF CoFe2O4 LAYER ON Pb(Zr0.2 Ti0.8)O3 AND BaTiO3, EPITAXIAL THIN FILMS
DEPOSITED BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION
C.CHIRILA, G.BONI, L. HRIB, A. GALCA, R. NEGREA, I.PASUK, V. KUNCSER, C. GHICA, I. PINTILIE
AND L.PINTILIE
S1 O05
FULLY TRANSPARENT TRANSISTORS BASED ON AlN-GATE DIELECTRIC
AND IGZO-CHANNEL SEMICONDUCTOR
C. BESLEAGA, S. ANTOHE, G.E. STAN, A.C. GALCA, P. BARQUINHA, E. FORTUNATO
S1 O06
FE LOCAL CONFIGURATION AND PHASE COMPOSITION IN FESE0.3TE0.7 SINGLE CRYSTALS
STUDIED BY TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT MSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY
S.G. SANDU, L. MIU, P. BADICA, T. NOJI, Y. KOIKE, V. KUNCSER

POSTERS

S1 P01
BLUE UPCONVERSION LUMINESCENCE IN LANGANITE AND LANGATATE DOPED WITH Tm
AND Yb
Cristina MATEI, Serban GEORGESCU, Ana-Maria VOICULESCU, Angela STEFAN
S1 P02
UPCONVERSION PROCESSES IN LANGASITE NANOPOWDERS DOPED WITH THULIUM AND
YTTERBIUM
Ana-Maria VOICULESCU, Serban GEORGESCU, Cristina MATEI, Angela STEFAN, Silviu NASTASE
S1 P03
FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF Zn-Ni FERRITE FILMS DEPOSITED BY SPIN COATING
M. IRIMIA, P. A. RAMBU, V. NICA, F. IACOMI
S1 P04
PREPARATION AND STUDY OF STRUCTURAL PROPERTIS, MORPHOLOGY AND
COMPOSITION OF PHISYCAL VAPOR DEPOSITTED Cu, Co AND Ni NANOSTRUCTURERED
MULTILAYERS
D. RSLEANU, V. CIUPIN, G. PRODAN, C. P. LUNGU, I. JEPU, V. EUGENIU
S1 P05
EFFECT OF GALLIUM CONCENTRATION ON THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS
IGZO THIN FILMS
Aurelian C. GALCA, Liliana M. TRINCA, Gabriel SOCOL, Valentin CRACIUN
S1 P06
STRUCTURAL, MORPHOLOGICAL, ELECTRICAL, AND OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION of
ZnTe THIN FILMS
O. TOMA, Raluca CONSTANTINEANU, C. VANCEA, I. STAN, A. RADU, L. ION, S. ANTOHE

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S1 P07
METAL OXIDE ACTIVE NANOSTRUCTURED COATINGS ON FABRIC SUBSTRATES
N. VRINCEANU, M. SUCHEA, I.V. TUDOSE, F. IACOMI, E. KOUDOUMAS
S1 P08
RADIATION PROCESSING FOR POLYELECTROLYTE SYNTHESIS
Gabriela CRACIUN, Elena MANAILA, Daniel IGHIGEANU
S1 P09
FLOCCULATION EFFICIENCY OF POLYELECTROLYTE OBTAINED BY RADIATION
PROCESSING
Gabriela CRACIUN, Elena MANAILA, Daniel IGHIGEANU
S1 P10
INFLUENCE OF TRIMETHYLOPROPANE TRIMETHACRYLATE ON CROSS-LINK DENSITY OF
ETHYLENE-PROPYLENE RUBBER VULCANIZED BY IRRADIATION
Elena MANAILA, Maria Daniela STELESCU, Gabriela CRACIUN, Daniel IGHIGEANU
S1 P11
CROSS-LINK DENSITY AND SWELLING PROPERTIES OF WASTE FLAX/NATURAL RUBBER
COMPOSITES OBTAINED BY ELECTRON BEAM IRRADIATION
Elena MANAILA, Maria Daniela STELESCU, Gabriela CRACIUN, Daniel IGHIGEANU
S1 P12
OPTICAL, STRUCTURAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR DIFFERENT
METALLIC OXIDES
Sorina IFTIMIE, J. MERIGEON, S. ANTOHE, M. KOMPITSAS, Mihaela GIRTAN
S1 P13
EPR CHARACTERIZATION OF MICRO AND NANOSTRUCTURED Zn 1-xFexO POWDERS
O.RAITA, A.POPA, D.TOLOMAN, M.STAN,and L.M.GIURGIU
S1 P14
LIFE ESTIMATION OF CABLE INSULATIONS BY DSC AND FT-IR ANALYSIS
Marius Eduard LUNGULESCU, Tanta SETNESCU, Radu SETNESCU, Iulian BANCUTA, Anca
GHEBOIANU, Roxana BANCUTA
S1 P15
STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF Zn-DOPED LPFO THIN FILMS DEPOSITED
BY RF MAGNETRON SPUTTERING
C. DOROFTEI, F. IACOMI, P.D. POPA
S1 P16
MAGNETIC SPIN VALVES BASED ON GROUP-III NITRIDE NANOWIRES
George Alexandru NEMNES, Camelia VISAN
S1 P17
Cu(II), Co(II) AND Zn(II) COMPLEXES OF A NEW POLYAZOMETHINE CONTAINING SILANE
UNITS AND OXADIAZOLE RINGS WITHIN THE CHAIN
Mirela-Fernanda ZALTARIOV, Maria CAZACU, Angelica VLAD, George STIUBIANU, Anton AIRINEI
S1 P18
FLUORESCENCE QUENCHING OF SOME ANTHRAQUINONE DERIVATIVES. SENSOR
APPLICATIONS
Ionut Radu TIGOIANU, Anton AIRINEI, Mirela-Fernanda ZALTARIOV, Maria CAZACU, Volker
RIBITSCH, Christian GRUBER

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S1 P19
DESIGN AND TESTING OF FLEXIBLE CARBON NAOCOMPOSITES FOR RESISTIVE FORCE
SENSING APPLICATIONS
Leila ZEVRI, Iulian IORDACHE, Aristofan Al. TEIANU and Gheorghe IONI
S1 P20
FERROMAGNETIC FERROELECTRIC INTERFACES STUDIED BY MSSBAUER
SPECTROSCOPY
S.G. SANDU, M. VOPSON, I. GHITA, A. IUGA, V. KUNCSER
S1 P21
STRUCTURAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF C-AXIS ORIENTED ALUMINUM NITRIDE THIN
FILMS PREPARED AT LOW TEMPERATURE BY REACTIVE RF-MAGNETRON SPUTTERING
George E. STAN, Aurelian C. GALCA, Liliana M. TRINCA, C. Catalin NEGRILA, Leona C. NISTOR
S1 P22
SIZE EFFECTS IN THERMAL HYSTERESIS OF SPIN CROSSOVER NANOPARTICLES STUDIED
BY FORC DIAGRAMS WITHIN A MONTE CARLO BASED ISING-LIKE MODEL
Alexandru ATITOAIE, Radu TANASA, Alexandru STANCU, Cristian ENACHESCU
S1 P23
TAILORING THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SILICONES BY CHEMICAL MODIFICATION
Carmen RACLES, Mihaela ALEXANDRU, Valentina MUSTEATA, Adrian BELE, Maria CAZACU
S1 P24
THE INFLUENCE OF THE MORPHOLOGY OF BARIUM TITANATE NANOPARTICLES ON
DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SILICONES
Adrian BELE, George STIUBIANU, Maria CAZACU, Carmen RACLES
S1 P25
IMPROVING THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SILICONES BY INCORPORATION OF LEAD
ZIRCONATE NANOPARTICLES
George STIUBIANU, Adrian BELE, Maria CAZACU, Carmen RACLES
S1 P26
BINDING AND ELECTRON TRANSFER FROM A METAL-FREE DYE WITH CARBOXYL,
HYDROXYL AND SULFONIC ANCHORS TO A TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOCLUSTER
Jeanina LUNGU, Corneliu I. OPREA, Petre PANAIT, Daniela STAMATE, Anca DUMBRAV, Fanica
CIMPOESU and Mihai A. GRU
S1 P27
CURRENT TRENDS IN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF TENSORESISTIVE SENSORS
Leila ZEVRI, Iulian IORDACHE
S1 P28
DFT STUDY OF EXCHANGE INTERACTIONS IN MOLECULAR MAGNETS BASED ON
MANGANESE-PORPHYRINS
Petre PANAIT, Corneliu I. OPREA, Bogdan FRECU, Fanica CIMPOESU,Marilena FERBINTEANU and
Mihai A. GRU
S1 P29
BROKEN SYMMETRY DFT CALCULATIONS OF EXCHANGE CONSTANTS OF M(TCNE) x HIGHTEMPERATURE MOLECULAR MAGNETS,
(M = V, Mn, AND Fe)
Florin MOSCALU, Corneliu I. OPREA, Petre PANAIT, Fanica CIMPOESU, Mihai A. GRU
S1 P30
COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF RU- AND RH-BASED COMPLEXES FOR DYESENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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Petre PANAIT, Corneliu I. OPREA, Boris F. MINAEV and Mihai A. GRU


S1 P31
PHOTOCHEMICAL FORMATION OF METAL NANOPARTICLES WITH SILICA
Eleonora BURNETE, Sorina IFTIMIE, S. ANTOHE, V. CIUPINA
S1 P32
PECULIAR DIELECTRIC CHARACTERISTIC of Ba1-X SrXTiO3 CERAMICS
of TECHNOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE
Raluca BACSEI, Liviu NEDELCU and Horia ALEXANDRU
S1 P33
INFLUENCE OF Al DOPING ON THE OPTICAL AND GAS SENSING PROPERTIES OF ZnO THIN
FILMS
A.P.RAMBU, N.IFTIMIE, V.TIRON, V.NICA, G.G.RUSU, F.IACOMI
S1 P34
NANOSTRUCTERED CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS
V.CIUPIN, R.VLDOIU, G.PRODAN, L.PETRESCU, .G.TUTUN, C. PORONICU, E.VASILE
S1 P35
APPLICATION OF CARBON BASED NANISTRUCTURES IN DIVERTORS COATING FROM
FUSION REACTOR
V.CIUPIN, R.VLDOIU, G.PRODAN, .G.TUTUN, L.PETRESCU, C. PORONICU, E.VASILE
S1 P36
PROPERTIES INVESTIGATION OF COBALT OXIDE COMPOSITE LAYERS
Romana DRASOVEAN, Steluta GOSAV
S1 P37
CuFeCo THIN FILMS OBTAINED BY THERMOIONIC VACUUM ARC METHOD
I.PRIOTEASA, V.CIUPINA, E. VASILE
S1 P38
EVALUATION OF THE PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN PETROLEUM COKE
Semaghiul BIRGHILA and Ionela CARAZEANU POPOVICI
S1 P39
TERAHERTZ PROPERTIES OF BARIUM TANTALATE - BASED
MICROWAVE DIELECTRICS
L. NEDELCU, C. BUSUIOC, M.G. BANCIU, H.V. ALEXANDRU
S1 P40
STRUCTURAL VARIETIES OF Cu(II) COMPLEXES WITH BIDENTATE LIGANDS
Daniela STAMATE, Violeta MACOVEI, Marilena FERBINTEANU, Mihai. A. GRU
S1 P41
NEW Co(II) MIXED LIGAND COMPLEXES FOR DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS
Daniela STAMATE, Marilena FERBINTEANU, Mihai A. GRU
S1 P42
POSSIBILITY FOR PERMEABLE THERMOELECTRIC ELEMENTS APPLICATION
Radion CHERKEZ

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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Section 2 Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics and Applications


Laser Physics and applications
Plasma Physics and applications
Optoelectronics and photonics
Applied and non-linear optics
Ultrafast phenomena and applications
INVITED LECTURES

S2 L01
PLASMA THRUSTERS, PRINCIPLES, APPLICATIONS AND DIAGNOSTICS
K. DANNENMAYER, A. PETIN, S. MAZOUFFRE, P. KUDRNA, M. TICH
S2 L02
MIXED FILMS INTERACTION WITH PLASMA PRODUCED BY HIGH POWER LASERS
C. P. LUNGU, C. POROSNICU, I. JEPU, P. CHIRU, A. M. LUNGU, D. URSESCU, R. BANICI, G.
COJOCARU, R. UNGUREANU, C. LUCULESCU, A. MARCU, R. VLADOIU, A. MARIN, P. OSICEANU, I.
FERARU, C. GRIGORESCU
S2 L03
DEPOSITION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH ENTROPY ALLOY CARBIDE COATINGS
M.BRAIC, A.VLADESCU, I. PANA, A. PARAU, M. DINU, V.BRAIC, M. BALACEANU
S2 L04
COMPOSITION-PROPERTIES RELATIONS IN MULTI-COMPONENT CARBON BASED
NANOMATERIALS
R. VLADOIU, M CONTULOV, A. MANDES, V. DINCA, V. CIUPINA, C. POROSNICU, C. P. LUNGU
S2 L05
DEPOSITION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MODIFIED DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON COATINGS
PREPARED BY PECVD
Adrian STOICA, Vilma BURKOV, Vratislav PEINA
POSTERS
S2 P01
MODELING THE EVOLUTION OF SOME FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF ELECTRON BEAM
TREATED STARCHES
Mirela BRAOVEANU, Monica R. NEMANU
S2 P02
BEHAVIOUR OF THE COLORIMETRIC AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF THE
IRRADIATED SEA BUCKTHORN OIL
MONICA R. NEMANU, MIRELA BRAOVEANU
S2 P03
AN ELECTRON PLASMA SOURCE
O. S. STOICAN
S2 P04
POLYMER-GRAPHENE COMPOSITES PREPARED BY UV AND 2PP CURING FOR COATING
APPLICATIONS
Emil C. BURUIANA, Florentina JITARU, George EPURESCU, Ioana ION, Tinca BURUIANA
S2 P05
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF OPTICAL, ELECTRONIC AND PHOTOLUMINISCENT
PROPERTIES OF ARYLENEVINYLENE AND ARYLENEETHYNYLENE POLYMERS BASED ON
2,7 AND 3,6 DISUBSTITUTE CARBAZOLE UNITS

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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Ana-Maria CATARGIU, Mircea GRIGORAS


S2 P06
LASER IRRADIATION EFFECT ON OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTRA IN A THOMSON
SCATTERING EXPERIMENT
Ana HARABOR, Novac-Adrian HARABOR, Ion PALARIE
S2 P07
EFFECTS OF ZR AND CR ADDITION ON THE PROPERTIES OF TISICN COATINGS
M.BALACEANU, M.BRAIC, A.VLADESCU, V.BRAIC
S2 P08
COMBIATORIAL FE-CO BASED GRANULAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES, OBTAINED BY
THERMIONIC VACUUM ARC METHOD
I. JEPU, C. POROSNICU, C.P. LUNGU, C. LUCULESCU, V. KUNCSER, G. IACOBESCU, V. CIUPINA
S2 P09
PURE BE AND BE-W MIXED THIN FILMS EXPOSED TO PISCES B DEUTERIUM PLASMA
I. JEPU, C. POROSNICU, C.P. LUNGU, R. DOERNER, T. DITTMAR
S2 P10
APPLICATION OF PLASMA DISCHARGES IN PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY
P. CHIRU, C.P. LUNGU, I. JEPU, C. POROSNICU, A. M. LUNGU,
S2 P11
GROWTH AND MORPHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF PURE Mg AND Mg EMBEDDED IN
HYDROGEN-FREE AMORPHOUS CARBON (a-C) MATRIX
M. CONTULOV, R. VLADOIU, A. MANDES, G. PRODAN
S2 P12
ZINC OXIDE OBTAINED BY PULSED LASER TEDOSITION, THERMIONIC VACUUM ARC AND
THERMAL EVAPORATION THIN FILMS CHARACTERIZATION
C. GHITULETE, V. CIUPINA, C. POROSNICU, I. JEPU, A. MARCU, C. LUCULESCU
S2 P13
DEUTERIUM PLASMA CHARACTERIZATION USED FOR FUSION RELATED MIXED FILMS
Corneliu POROSNICU, Cristian STANCU, Vasile TIRON,Cristian LUNGU, Ionut JEPU
S2 P14
EVALUATION OF SILVER AND TITANIUM CARBIDES THIN FILMS WETTABILITY BY MEANS
OF CONTACT ANGLE MEASUREMENTS
DINCA Virginia, VLADOIU Rodica, CONTULOV Mirela
S2 P15
SUBSTRATE INFLUENCE ON THE PROPERTIES OF SIC THIN FILMS DEPOSITED BY
THERMIONIC VACUUM ARC (TVA) METHOD
Aurelia MANDES, Rodica VLADOIU, Virginia DINCA, Gabriel PRODAN and Victor CIUPINA
S2 P16
A COMPARATIVE MATHEMATICAL APPROACH FOR THE KRAMERSKRONIG METHOD
IMPLEMENTATION. CASE STUDY OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF Bi2O3
Gabriel MURARIU, Adrian DINESCU, Simona CONDURCHE BOTA
S2 P17
HERALDED BELL STATE CREATION USING GHZ STATES
O. DNIL and P. E. STERIAN

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Section 3 Nuclear and sub-Nuclear Physics and Applications


Nuclear and subnuclear sciences and Engineering
Advanced detection systems
Accelerated particle beams
Nuclear Techniques and applications
Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

INVITED LECTURES

S3 L01
PHOTOREACTION STUDIES PERFORMED WITH LASER COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA
SOURCES
Dan FILIPESCU
S3 L02
NUCLEAR DIPOLE DYNAMICS WITHIN MICROSCOPIC TRANSPORT MODELS
V. BARAN
S3 L03
COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR COLLISIONS AT RELATIVISTIC ENERGIES
Catalin RISTEA, Oana RISTEA, Alexandru JIPA, Calin BESLIU
S3 L04
RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS IN ATOM-LASER INTERACTION
Madalina BOCA, Viorica FLORESCU
ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S3 OP1
PROMPT EMISSION MODELING IN THE FISSION PROCESS
Iuliana VISAN, Georgiana GIUBEGA, Anabella TUDORA
S3 OP2
DESCRIPTION OF Pt EVEN-EVEN ISOTOPES WITHIN A SOLVABLE MODEL FOR THE
QUADRUPOLE INTRINSIC VARIABLES
A. A. RADUTA and P. BUGANU
S3 OP3
MULTIPLE BACKBENDING IN EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI
R. BUDACA and A. A. RADUTA
S3 OP4
QUARTET CONDENSATION AND NEUTRON-PROTON PAIRING IN ATOMIC NUCLEI
N. SANDULESCU, D. NEGREA, C. W. JOHNSON
S3 OP5
SOURCES OF NUCLEAR MATTER JETS IN He+Cu RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS
Danut ARGINTARU, Madalin CHERCIU, Eliodor CONSTANTINESCU

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POSTERS

S3 P01
ACCURATE DETERMINATION OF CONVERTING COEFFICIENT OF GAMMA RAY DETECTION
TO FAST NEUTRON
COUNTING IN NE102 PLASTIC SCINTILLATOR BY MCNP CODE
Amin ATTARZADEH, Behnam MAHDIAN
S3 P02
CENTRALITY DERTEMINATION IN HEAVY-ION COLLISIONS
Valerica BABAN, Alexandru JIPA
S3 P03
NEUTRINO INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE GASES
Daniela CHESNEANU
S3 P04
LOW ACTIVITY POSITRON SOURCES PRODUCED WITH A PET CYCLOTRON
L. S. CRACIUN, R. G. RATA, C. CIMPEANU, C. IONESCU, M. STRATICIUC, I. BURDUCEA, P. M
RACOLTA, A.T. SERBAN
S3 P05
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE TO INCREASE THE
IRRADIATION CAPABILITIES FOR TR-19 CYCLOTRON IN IFIN-HH
L. S. CRACIUN, R. G. RATA, C. IONESCU, D. NICULAE
S3 P06
GROSS ALPHA ACTIVITY DETERMINATION IN LIQUID EFFLUENTS
USING LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING
R. I. DOBRIN, C. N. DULAMA, AL. TOMA, C. N. CIOCIRLAN, S. M. STOICA
S3 P07
LESSONS LEARNED IN APPLYING RADIOPROTECTION PROGRAMME IN THE CONTROLLED
AND SURVEILLED AREA OF WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
GH. DOGARU, F. DRAGOLICI, M. NICU, L. IONASCU
S3 P08
STUDY OF THE CONDITIONING MATRICES FOR ALUMINIUM RADIOACTIVE WASTES
L. IONASCU, M. NICU, C. TURCANU, F. DRAGOLICI, GH. ROTARESCU
S3 P09
THE INFLUENCE OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MANUFACTURING PROCESS ON
THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Fe-Cr-Ti-W-Y2O3 FERRITIC
STEELS
V. MIHALACHE, D. SIMANDAN, M. CIOANGER
S3 P10
ELEMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS IN GAFRARIUM TUMIDIUM CLAMS DETERMINED BY INAA
AND PIXE
Ana PANTELICA, Marius GUGIU, Catalin Ionut CALINESCU, Dan Gabriel GHITA
S3 P11
DESIGN OF THE INNER ZONE OF THE CBM-TOF WALL FOR SIS100
L.RADULESCU, D. BARTOS, Gh. CARAGHEORGHEOPOL, M.PETRIS, M.PETROVICI, V.SIMION
S3 P12
THE FIRST NON-SCALING FIXED FIELD ALTERNATING GRADIENT (NS-FFAG) ACCLERATOR
Roxana RATA, Roger BARLOW, Rob EDGECOCK

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S3 P13
DOSIMETRIC MEASUREMENTS ON DIFFERENT ABSORBING MATERIALS WITH
APPLICATIONS IN RADIOTHERAPY
M. SPUNEI, I. MALAESCU
S3 P14
RADON MITIGATION STUDIES IN A PILOT HOUSE FROM BIA-TEI RADON PRONE AREA
(ROMANIA)
Constatin COSMA , Botond PAPP, Alexandra DINU (CUCO), Begy ROBERT, Liviu SUCIU , Gheorghe
BANCIU , Carlos SAINZ
S3 P15
HUMAN CONTRIBUTION TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS RISK
Gholamreza JAHANFARNIA, Kaveh KARIMI, Seyed Mohsen HOSEYNI

Section 4 Cross-Disciplinary Applications of Physics


Nonlinear dynamics, complex systems and applications
Biological complexity and genetics, Biophysics and bioengineering
Econophysics
Physics of Social Systems
INVITED LECTURES
S4 L01
LINEAR AND NONLINEAR LIGHT BULLETS: RECENT STUDIES
Dumitru MIHALACHE
S4 L02
DIPOLAR BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES WITH WEAK DISORDER
Axel PELSTER
S4 L03
NONLINEAR EXCITATIONS IN BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES: PARAMETRIC AND
GEOMETRIC RESONANCES
Antun BALAZ
S4 L04
DENSITY WAVES IN BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES
Alexandru NICOLIN
S4 L05
ASSYMETRY OF THE INVERSE STATISTICS IN STOCK MARKETS: FEAR FACTOR AND
RELEVANT TIMESCALES
Bulcs SNDOR, Imre BALOGH, Blint Zsolt NAGY, Ingve SIMONSEN and Zoltn NDA
S4 L06
HOW TO TRADE USING THE (SHANNONIAN) TRANSFER ENTROPY? AN APPLICATION FOR
CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN FINANCIAL MARKETS
Bogdan DIMA, tefana Maria DIMA, Flavia BARNA , Miruna NCHESCU
S4 L07
COHERENCE, CORRELATION AND SCALING IN THE NOISY SPACE OF ROMANIAN
FINANCIAL TIME SERIES
E.I. SCARLAT

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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POSTERS
S4 P01
THE USE OF ISOTOPE RATIOS IN COMMERCIAL FRUIT JUICES AUTHENTICATION
Dana Alina MAGDAS, Romulus PUSCAS, Gabriela CRISTEA
S4 P02
EXISTENCE OF RADIAL SOLUTIONS FOR A COUPLED SYSTEM OF STATIONARY
SCHRDINGER EQUATIONS TYPE
Drago-Ptru COVEI
S4 P03
JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS
D. IORDACHE and R. DOBRESCU
S4 P04
NONLINEAR IMPEDANCE OF BUCHAREST STOCK EXCHANGE MARKET BY TIME SERIES
ANALYSIS: OPTIMAL FUNCTION AND SATURATION
E.I. SCARLAT, Cristina STAN, C.P. CRISTESCU, Cristina M. CRISTESCU
S4 P05
COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF SURFACE PROPERTIES OF EF-HAND CALCIUM BINDING
PROTEINS
Dana CRACIUN, Adriana ISVORAN
S4 P06
ESTIMATING WINE YEAST CONCENTRATION BY FAR FIELD CONTRAST MEASUREMENT
Dan CHICEA, Ovidiu TIA, Mihaela TIA, Ecaterina LENGYEL
S4 P07
PRECISION CADASTRAL AND PHOTOGRAMMETRY APPLICATIONS USING UAV. CASE
STUDY VANATORI DISTRICT
Gabriel MURARIU, Mocanu Ionut RAZVAN, Florin MINGIREANU, Lucian GEORGESCU
S4 P08
COMPARISON BETWEEN STATISTICAL AND DYNAMICAL MODELS OF STATUS
PARAMETERS FOR AQUATIC SYSTEMS. CASE STUDY - RIVER PRUT
Gabriel MURARIU, Mihaela TIMOFTI, Lucian GEORGESCU, Catalina TOPA
S4 P09
EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF SOME FLAVONOIDS AS PROTEIN
KINASE INHIBITORS USING THE MOLECULAR DOCKING APPROACH
Steluta GOSAV, Hlne JAMET, Romana DRASOVEAN
S4 P10
A NOVEL NON-POLYNOMIAL SCHRDINGER EQUATION FOR HIGH-DENSITY CIGARSHAPED
Mihaela Carina RAPORTARU , Alexandru I. NICOLIN
S4 P11
MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK OF EPIGENETIC DNA METHYLATION IN REPEAT
ELEMENTS ARABIDOPSIS
Diana DAVID-RUS, Joel L. LEBOWITZ, Vincent COLOT
S4 P12
CHARACTERISTICS AND BIODEGRADATION PROPERTIES OF POLYCAPROLACTONE POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL COATINGS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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A. VISAN, M. MIROIU, C. NITA, R. CRISTESCU,G. SOCOL, N. STEFAN, G. DORCIOMAN, N. SERBAN,


M. SOCOL, I.ZGURA, O.L. RASOGA, C. BREAZU, L. SIMA, C. R. LUCULESCU, A. STANCULESCU, I.N.
MIHAILESCU
S4 P13
BIOMIMETIC NANOCRYSTALLINE APATITE COATINGS SYNTHESIZED BY MATRIX
ASSISTED PULSED LASER EVAPORATION FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
A. VISAN, D. GROSSIN, N. STEFAN, L. DUTA, F. M. MIROIU, M. SOPRONYI, F. MICULESCU, M.
FRECHE, C. CHARVILAT, O, MARSAN, S. CIUCA, I.N. MIHAILESCU
S4 P14
ADVANCES IN STATISTICAL POTENTIALS FOR PROTEIN STRUCTURE PREDICTION
Ionel RATA
S4 P15
MANAGEMENTUL CALITII N ACTIVITILE DE CERCETARE
GEORGESCU tefan

Section 5 Engineering and Industrial Physics


Physics of energy transfer, conversion and storage
Environmental Physics
Sensors and Device Physics
Micro- and Nanoelectronics
Microelectromechanical systems
Instrumentation and Metrology
Imagining, Microscopy and Spectroscopy and their applications
Instrumentation, processing, fabrication and measurement technologies
Applications of fluid mechanics and microfluidics
INVITED LECTURES

S5 L01
PASSIVELY Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG LASERS FOR IGNITION OF AN AUTOMOBILE
ENGINE
Nicolaie PAVEL, Gabriela SALAMU, and Traian DASCALU
S5 L02
B OSONIC J OSEPHSON EFFECTS AND NON - LINEAR MACROSCOPIC SEF TRAPPING IN
PHOTONIC MOLECULES
M. ABBARCHI, A. AMO, V. G. SALA, A. LEMAITRE, I. D. D. SOLNYSHKOV, H. FLAYAC, E.
GALOPIN, L. FERRIER, I. SAGNES, P. SENELLART, G. MALPUECH, and J. BLOCH
S5 L03
AB-INITIO SIMULATIONS OF PLATINUM-GROUP CATALYSTS UNDER OXYGEN-RICH
CONDITIONS
Nicola SERIANI
S5 L04
BIOENGINEERING STRUCTURES AS DENTAL MATERIALS CHARACTERIZED BY ADVANCED
METHODS OF PHYSICS
Horia IOVU

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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S5 L05
TAILORING PHOTOCATALYSTS NANOARCHITECTONICS FOR
DEGRADING INDUSTRIAL DYES
Livia BIBIRE, Laura DARTU, Dragos MARDARE and Gabriela CARJA
S5 L06
WETTING LAYER CONTRIBUTION TO InAs/GaAs (001) QUANTUM DOTS NUCLEATION
GH. V. CIMPOCA, O. BUTE
S5 L07
NEURAL NETWORKS TO PREDICT THE ULTIMATE TENSILE STREGTH OF AUSTENITIC
STAINLESS STEEL USING IN NUCLEAR INDUSTRY
ZGAN Remus , BORMAMBET Melat, ZGAN Sabina & CHIU Greti
S5 L08
PULSE-MATCHED SYNTHESIS OF CONTINUOUS SOURCES FOR ULTRA-WIDE BAND
APPLICATIONS
Rzvan D. TAMA, Daniela DEACU, Alin DNIOR and George CRUNTU
S5 L09
ON THE USE OF COMPUTER ACOUSTIC MODELING ONBOARD SHIPS
Gheorghe SAMOILESCU, Tiberiu PAZARA
S5 L10
SEQUENTIAL PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF Al DOPED AND Ni-Al CO-DOPED ZnO THIN
FILMS
Cristian URSU, Tudor COMAN and Ovidiu Florin CALTUN
S5 L11
ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS
IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Antoaneta ENE
S5 L12
DENSITY FUNCTIONAL STUDY OF SPIN-ORBIT COUPLING EFFECTS IN PHOSPHORESECNT
OLEDS
Boris MINAEV
S5 L13
CONFORMATIONAL TRANSITIONS OF NUCLEIC ACIDS UNDER EXTERNAL FORCES:
EXAMPLES AND A STOCHASTIC PATH INTEGRAL THEORY FOR THEIR KINETICS
Ioan ANDRICIOAEI
ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S5 OP01
NANOCRYSTALLINE Sr-MANGANITE FOR CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF HYDROCARBONS
C. DOROFTEI, P.D. POPA, E. REZLESCU, N. REZLESCU
S5 OP02
A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF COUMARIN-BASED DYES ADSORBED ON TIO2
NANOCLUSTERS APPLICATIONS TO DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS
Corneliu I. OPREA Petre PANAIT,Fanica CIMPOESU,Marilena FERBINTEANU and Mihai A. GRU

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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POSTERS
S5 P01
DETECTION SYSTEM WITH NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES FOR BIOSENSORS AND
IMAGING WITH RESOLUTION BELOW THE DIFFRACTION LIMIT
Costel Cotirlan-SIMIONIUC, Constantin LOGOFATU, Rodica GHITA, Catalin Constantin NEGRILA
S5 P02
TESTING THE INFRASOUND METHOD ON THE BLACK SEA COAST
I.A. MOLDOVAN, V.E. TOADER, A.S. MOLDOVAN, D.V.GHICA
S5 P03
THE EFFECT OF SOLAR STORMS ON SEISMIC AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AS
RECORDED IN VRANCEA SEISMOGENIC AREA
MOLDOVAN Iren Adelina, Victorin Emilian TOADER, Emilia POPESCU, Anica Otilia PLACINTA, Angela
Petruta CONSTANTIN
S5 P04
A DEMONSTRATION FOR THE WEIGHTED MEAN AND ITS IMPROVED DISPERSION
Enric Leon GRIGORESCU, Viorel SERBAN
S5 P05
THE DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE FROM DAMBOVITA
COUNTY TO BE USED IN AGRICULTURE
R. BANCUTA. I. BANCUTA, R. SETNESCU, A. CHILIAN, T. SETNESCU, R. ION, GH. V. CIMPOCA, I.
V. POPESCU, A. GHEBOIANU, O. CULICOV
S5 P06
THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH ZINC CONCENTRATIONS FROM SOIL ON ABSORPTION AND
TRANSPORT PROCESSES OF COPPER, MANGANESE, IRON IN ZEA MAYS L
A. CHILIAN, R. BANCUTA, I. BANCUTA, R. SETNESCU, C. RADULESCU, T. SETNESCU, GH. V.
CIMPOCA, I. V. POPESCU, A. GHEBOIANU, R.-M. ION
S5 P07
THE CLAUSIUS-MOSSOTTI FACTOR IN LOW FREQUENCY FIELD OF THE POWDERS
RESULTED FROM WASTES COMBUSTION
Iosif MALAESCU , Mihai LUNGU , Raluca GIUGIULAN (POENARU) , Nicolae STRAMBEANU
S5 P08
X-RAY TECHNIQUES FOR M ATER IALS CHARACTERIZATIO N
Antoaneta ENE, Constantin GHEORGHIES, Oleg V. IGNATENKO, Marina V. FRONTASYEVA
S5 P09
MOSS BIOMONITORING OF AIR QUALITY IN ROMANIA
POPESCU V. I., FRONTASYEVA M., STIHI C, ENE A., CUCU-MAN S., TODORAN R., CULICOV O.,
ZINICOVSCAIA I., MY TRINH, PAVLOV S.S., RADULESCU C.1, CHILIAN A, GHEBOIANU A,
BANCUTA R, CIMPOCA GH. V., BANCUTA I., DULAMA I , TOMA L.G., BUCURICA A. DIMA G.,
CHELARESCU E.D., DRASOVEAN R., SION A.,CONDURACHE-BOTA S., BUHACEANU R., TARCAU
D., TODORAN D.
S5 P10
STRUCTURAL, ELECTRICAL AND CATALYTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF
NANOSTRUCTURED IRON MANGANITE
C. DOROFTEI, P.D. POPA, E. REZLESCU, N. REZLESCU
S5 P11
MODELING OF GASEOUS POLLUTANT DISPERSION IN THE VICINITY OF AN
INTEGRATED IRON AND STEEL WORKS
Viorel MUNTEANU, Antoaneta ENE

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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S5 P12
RADIOACTIVITY LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS IN GALATI TOWN, EASTERN
ROMANIA
Antoaneta ENE, Viorel MUNTEANU
S5 P13
ALARA PRINCIPLE APPLICATION IN THE DECOMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES OF THE
UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS PIPES FROM THE IFIN-HH VVR-S RESEARCH
REACTOR
Ioan IORGA, Alexandru PAVELESCU, Mitica DRAGUSIN
S5 P14
EVALUATION OF LIMESTONE WITH NON-INVASIVE ANALITICAL METHODS
Anca-Andreea BALOG. Nicoleta COBRZAN, Lucian BARBU-TUDORAN
S5 P15
CHARACTERISATION OF MORTARS COMPATIBILITY USING MICROSCOPICAL AND XRD
ANALYSIS
Nicoleta COBRZAN, Voicu DUCA, Anca-Andreea BALOG
S5 P16
SATELLITE DATA FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF AIR POLLUTION IN
BUCHAREST URBAN AREA
M. A.ZORAN, R.S.SAVASTRU, D.M. SAVASTRU
S5 P17
SPECTRAL MIXTURE ANALYSIS OF MULTISENSOR SATELLITE IMAGERY
OF CONSTANTZA URBAN ENVIRONMENT
Maria ZORAN, Roxana SAVASTRU, Dan SAVASTRU, Marina TAUTAN, Sorin MICLOS, Laurentiu
BASCHIR
S5 P18
SHORT TERM LOAD FORECASTING USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS
Otilia Elena DRAGOMIR, Florin DRAGOMIR
S5 P19
TEST STAND FOR SOLAR PV PANELS
Florin DRAGOMIR, Otilia Elena DRAGOMIR, Nicolae OLARIU, Adrian OPREA, Liviu OLTEANU
S5 P20
SENSOR DATA ACQUISITION USING AN ARDUINO AND DISPLAYING AND ADJUSTING
PARAMETERS ON AN ANDROID TABLET
BUNU Liviu Octavian, Florin DRAGOMIR
S5 P21
HIGH PERFORMANCE TAPPED-INDUCTOR BUCK DRIVER FOR LED ARRAYS
Marius APETREI , Adrian GEORGESCU2
S5 P22
FINITE ELEMENT METHOD MODELLING OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE PEM FUEL CELL
Viorel IONESCU
S5 P23
CAPACITIVE MEMS PRESSURE SENSOR DESIGN MODELLING USING COMSOL
MULTIPHYSICS
Viorel IONESCU
S5 P24
TUNING THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN SiC BASED METALLO-CERAMIC COMPOSITES

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


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M. GALATANU, M. ENCULESCU, A. GALATANU


S5 P25
DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS WITH NATURAL DYES - A COMBINED EXPERIMENTAL AND
THEORETICAL APPROACH
Anca DUMBRAV, Corneliu I. OPREA, Irina ENACHE, Adrian GEORGESCU, Petre PANAIT, Mihai A.
GRU
S5 P26
CASE STUDY FOR 3 DEGREES OF FREEDOM OF REACTIVE SOLID FUEL SYSTEMS
Gabriel MURARIU, Florin MINGIREANU, Lucian GEORGESCU, MOCANU Ionut Razvan
S5 P27
CHARACTERIZATION OF CEMENT PASTES USING X-RAY FLUORESCENCE, X-RAY
DIFFRACTION AND REHOMETRY
I. M. ION, N. ANGELESCU, GH. VLAICU, I. BANCUTA
S5 P28
CU-W FUNCTIONAL GRADIENT MATERIALS
M. GALATANU, B. POPESCU, M. ENCULESCU, A. GALATANU
S5 P29
CHARACTERIZATION OF HONEY QUALITY USING HIGHLY SENSITIVE ANALYTICAL
METHODS
Elena Daniela CHELARESCU , Claudia STIHI, Cristiana RADULESCU, Andrei CHILIAN, Lucica GRIGORA
TOMA
S5 P30
EFFECT OF CARBONATED DRINKS ON THE TOPOGRAPHY AND HARDNESS OF HUMAN
TEETH EXAMINED USING AFM TECHNIQUE
Cristina IONESCU, Liviu Stefan CRACIUN
S5 P31
CHARACTERIZING THE ORIGIN OF BOTTLED WATERS ON THE ROMANIAN MARKET USING
IRMS AND ICP-MS
Gabriela CRISTEA, Cezara VOICA, Romulus PUSCAS, Alina MAGDAS
S5 P32
METHODS FOR IMPROVING TEM CONTRAST IN BIOLOGICAL SECTIONS ANALYSIS
C.STEFANOV, V.CIUPINA, G.PRODAN, I.M.OANCEA-STANESCU
S5 P33
CHARACTERIZATION OF SPIN COATED TiO2 BLOCKING LAYER FOR DYE SENSITIZED
SOLAR CELLS
Jeanina LUNGU, Adrian GEORGESCU, Camelia OPREA, Gabriel PRODAN, Gabriel SOCOL, George E.
STAN, Ctlin LUCULESCU, Victor CIUPIN, Ion N. MIHILESCU1 and Mihai A. GRU
S5 P34
IRON CONTAINING LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES: AN XPS STUDY OF THEIR SURFACE
PROPERTIES
Magda PUSCASU, Dragos MARDARE and Gabriela CARJA
S5 P35
A SURVEY ON STATE-OF-THE-ART DESIGN OF UNDERWATER SENSOR NETWORKS AND
OPTIMAL LOCATION DEPLOYMENT AROUND OFFSHORE STRUCTURES
Mitrut C. CARAIVAN , Ioan G. SURUGIU , Valentin G. SGARCIU

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Section 6 Topics in Physics Education Research


Physics curriculum design
Active learning techniques
Classroom teaching, demonstrations and laboratory experiments

INVITED LECTURES
S6 L01
REFORMING PRE-UNIVERSITY PHYSICS TEACHING
Roxana ZUS
S6 L02
RELEVANCE OF CONCEPTUAL CONFLICTS IN PRE-UNIVERSITARY PHYSISCS TEACHING
Cristian HATU
S6 L03
STRUCTURED LEARNING UNITS DESIGN SUPPORTING
COMPETENCES CENTERED CURRICULUM
Iulian LEAHU

ORAL PRESENTATIONS

S6 OP01
MODERN TECHNOLOGIES BASED ON THE STIMULATION OF STUDENTS INTEREST FOR
RESEARCH AND SCIENTIFIC INOVATION IN EDUCATION
Mdlina IVNESCU, Filis OPREA, Elisabeta STAN
S6 OP02
A POSSIBLE APPROACH TO THE DIFFICULT LEARNING UNITS
I. CAZACU-DAVIDESCU
S6 OP03
LEARNING PHYSICS BETWEEN GOALS AND RESULTS
Cristina ANGHEL, Daniela TEPES
S6 OP04
PHYSICS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL - CHALLENGES AND POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
DANIELA TEPES, CRISTINA ANGHEL
S6 OP05
PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS IN HIGH SCHOOL - A NEW APROACH
Ion BARARU

POSTERS
S6 P01
ENERGY WILLOW A SUSTENAIBLE ALTERNATIVE, ECONOMIC AND FRIEDLY WITH THE
ENVIRONMENT
Felicia BUCURA, Claudia SANDRU, Marius CONSTANTINESCU

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S6 P02
WORLD FAMOUS ROMANIAN PHYSICISTS
D. RSLEANU, D. PETRE, A. DANCU, C. CATALAN-SERBANESCU
S6 P03
COMPLEXITY THEORY AND EXACT SCIENCES CURRICULA
D. IORDACHE, E. BODEGOM, R. WIDENHORN, V. IORDACHE
S6 P04
DIFFUSION AND OSMOSIS-IN TERMS OF PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY
Jasmina DJOKIC JOVANOVIC, Vladimira HREPIC, Tihomir LAZAREVIC, Tatjana MISIC, Marina
NAJDANOVIC LUKIC
S6 P05
NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING PHYSICS IN ROMANIAN HIGH SCHOOLS
Valerica BABAN, Alexandru JIPA, Sorina LEU
S6 P06
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR EARTH PHYSICS - EDUCATION AND PUBLIC OUTREACH
ACTIVITIES
Dragos TATARU, Bogdan ZAHARIA, Bogdan GRECU, Constantin IONESCU

S6 P07
CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME HEAT EVENTS IN URBAN AREAS IN RELATION WITH
HEALTH
Mariana Rodica DIDA, Maria ZORAN
S6 P08
COMPUTER SIMULATION OF ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF BIPYRIDINE- AND
PHENANTROLINE-BASED LIGANDS
Adrian TRANDAFIR, Ana Maria TRANDAFIR, Mihai GIRTU
S6 P09
COMPUTER SIMULATION OF VARIOUS COUMARIN-BASED DYES FOR DYE-SENSITIZED
SOLAR CELLS
Anamaria TRANDAFIR, Adrian TRANDAFIR and Mihai A. GIRTU
S6 P10
FRICTION: A PLURIDISCIPLINARY TOPIC
Irina MARIN
S6 P11
STUDY OF SOME PERFORMANT METHODS IN PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE AND ART
Mihaela GHELMEZ (DUMITRU), Paul I.CONSTANTINESCU, Cristian Ghiocel TOMA , Paul AGARICI
S6 P12
FIELD EFFECTS IN LIQUID CRYSTALS
Mihaela GHELMEZ (DUMITRU)1, Gabriela SAVU (CONSTANTIN)2, Cristian TOMA1
S6 P13
NUMERICAL COMPUTATION OF THE SYMMETRIES FOR THE MECHANICAL MODELS OF
FIELD THEORIES. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH
Afrodita Liliana BOLDEA , Costin Radu BOLDEA
S6 P14
MEASUREMENT OF AC ELECTRIC PARAMETERS AND EVIDENCE OF ODD HARMONICS IN A
HID LAMP
Novac Adrian HARABOR, Ana HARABOR, Elena Loredana HARABOR

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics


25

S6 P15
ONTO AN APPROPRIATE LIST OF ABILITIES OF THE CURRICULUM FOR PHYSICS
Gheorghe DUMITRESCU
S6 P16
PHYSICS AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT
Sorina Maria LEU and Valerica BABAN
S6 P17
EFFECTIV METHODS OF TEACHING PHISICS
Adriana CIOCAN

26

PLENARY SESSION

13th International Balkan Workshop on Applied


Physics
Constana, Romania, July 4-6, 2013

ABSTRACTS

S0 PLENARY SESSION

PLENARY SESSION

27

S0 01
APPLIED PHYSICS RESEARCH AT THE EUROPEAN CENTER EXTREME LIGHT
INFRASTRUCTURE - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (ELI-NP)

Nicolae-Victor ZAMFIR

National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest, Romania

ELI Nuclear Physics, one of the 4 pillars of ELI, will be built in Bucharest-Magurele, Romania. It is meant as an
unique research facility to investigate the impact of very intense electromagnetic radiation (Extreme Light) on
matter with specific focus on nuclear phenomena and their applications. The extreme light is realized at ELI-NP
in two ways: by very high optical laser intensities and by the very short wavelength beams on -ray domain. The
Gamma Beam System, based on Compton backscattering of a laser beam on electron beam accelerated by a
warm LINAC, will produce variable energy gamma beam (E = 0.2 19.5 MeV) with a very good bandwidth (in
the 10-3 domain) and with very high brilliance. This combination allows for stand-alone experiments with a stateof-art high-intensity laser, standalone high resolution -beam experiments or combined experiments of both
photon sources. The description of the future ELI-NP facility, the planned applied physics experiments and the
status of the project implementation will be presented.

S0 02
APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS
Dimiter L. Balabanski 1,2
1

Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering,


30 Reactorului Street, RO-077125 Mgurele, jud. Ilfov, Romania
2
Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences,
72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., BG-1784 Sofia, Bulgaria
Different applications of nuclear physics techniques will be reviewed. These include accelerator-based
techniques for production of radioisotopes, which are used in medical diagnostics and spectroscopic techniques
for their utilization, accelerator-based techniques for cancer therapy. Special attention will be paid to novel
techniques, which rely on heavy-ion therapy. Novel detector systems will be reviewed, which find application in
home-land security projects. An example will be provided with landmine demining. Accelerator-based
techniques related to cultural-heritage studies and environmental research will be presented. Special emphasis
will be put on applications which will become possible at the ELI-NP facility* which is currently under
construction at Mgurele, such as nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) for nuclear materials and radioactive
waste management.

_________________________________
* This work is supported by Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) Phase I, a project co-financed by the European
Union through the European Regional Development Fund.

S0 03
SOLITONS AND VORTICES IN BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES: A PARTICLE-PICTURE BASED
UNIFYING PERSPECTIVE
D. J. Frantzeskakis
University of Athens, Greece
Results on the statics, stability, dynamics and interactions between solitons and vortices in atomic Bose-Einstein
condensates with repulsive interatomic interactions are presented. Different settings, namely 1D, 2D and
multicomponent, are studied following the same strategy. In particular, dynamical properties of single
solitons/vortices in the presence of the external trapping potential are studied, at first, by means of perturbation

28

PLENARY SESSION

theory and asymptotic methods. The linearization spectrum around stationary soliton/vortex states reveals their
stability properties, as well as the existence of characteristic (anomalous mode) eigenfrequencies associated with
the soliton/vortex motion. Next, interactions between solitons in the absence of the trap are studied by means of
integrability results and variational methods. Finally, the full problem of multiple soliton/vortex states in the
presence of the trapping potential is studied by means of dynamical systems methods and bifurcation theory
techniques. Importantly, this blend of different, yet complementary, methods offers a clear particle-like picture
for solitons and vortices, which is in quantitative agreement with direct simulations and pertinent experimental
results.

S0 04
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR SOFT LASER TRANSFER OF BIOMATERIALS FOR
NANOBIOMEDICINE
Ion N. Mihailescu, Carmen Ristoscu, Felix Sima
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiations Physics, Lasers Department, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box
MG-54, Magurele - Ilfov, RO-077125, Romania
We review recent results on progress in laser technologies for soft transfer of biomaterials in form of thin films.
We present comparative results on characterization of pullulan thin films of biopolymer obtained by PLD
(pulsed laser deposition) and MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation). It was demonstrated by FTIR
that only MAPLE is appropriate for transfer with high structural and compositional fidelity.
We immobilized urease in the form of thin films using MAPLE. The kinetic analyses indicated that under
optimum conditions the laser immobilized enzyme remains active in breaking down urea.
We analyze the transfer of novel PMMA-bioglass composites to uniform thin layers. The presence of both
PMMA and bioglass cations was evidenced in all deposited structures. The cells cultivated on PMMA-bioglass
layers entirely covered the structures proving their high biocompatibility. We showed that the composite
PMMA-bioglass films deposited by MAPLE efficiently protects metal implants against corrosion in human
fluids.
Thin films of Alendronate-HA composite nanocrystals with increasing bisphosphonate content (0, 3.9, 7.1% wt)
were synthesized by MAPLE. In the presence of alendronate, the MG63 cells displayed a normal morphology,
increased proliferation and high values of differentiation parameters. In contrast, osteoclasts showed
significantly reduced proliferation and increased level of Caspase 3. These evolutions support the potential
application of the composite coatings for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone diseases.
Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is a promising alternative to HA as biomaterial for hard tissues repair.
Magnesium substituted OCP and Strontium substituted OCP deposited by MAPLE on Ti substrates enhance
osteoblast activity and differentiation. The increased proliferation, and superior activity and differentiation of the
cells grown on SrOCP and MgOCP with respect to those cultivated on undoped OCP films or on polystyrene
plate controls demonstrated that ion-doping improves the beneficial effect of OCP on bone cells, suggesting that
MgOCP and SrOCP coatings could be usefully applied on Ti implants for orthopedic use. The production of
procollagen-type I, transforming growth factor -1, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin indicated that the level
of differentiation of the cells grown on the different coatings increased in the order OCP < MgOCP < SrOCP.
Normal cell morphology and optimal spread with differentiation potential have been demonstrated by
fluorescence and SEM, when human osteoblast precursor cells were cultivated on multistructures consisting of
extra-cellular matrix (ECM) protein/HA/Ti implant.
We transferred by laser direct write (LDW) fibronectine, an ECM protein, vital for material bio-activation by
adsorption and cell adhesion at the interface. The obtained structures had good lateral resolution and exhibited no
detectable decomposition.
We conclude that the deposited thin films and structures were identical to the starting materials, preserving their
chemical structure and very likely their functionality and biological activity.

S0 05
CATALYTIC PROPERTIES OF NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS:
TWO CASESTUDIES
FLORINA MATEI1, STEVEN LIM2, YUAN CHEN3, DRAGO CIUPARU1

PLENARY SESSION

29

Petrol Gaze University, Ploieti; 2 Exxon Mobil Corporation, USA;


3
Nanyang Technological University, Sinagapore

For many years, the use of catalysts has been considered as depending solely on the chemical nature of
the catalytic materials and on usual reaction parameters. Recent advances in materials characterization
complementing reactivity studies have led to discovery of interesting correlations between the structure of the
materials involved in the catalytic process both the catalytic materials and its support and their performance
in various chemical reactions, especially with respect to reactivity and selectivity. Maybe the most spectacular
example is the reactivity of gold, well known to catalysis researchers as one of the most catalytically inert
materials, in oxidation reactions controlled by the size of the metallic clusters. Gold nanoparticles ranging in
diameter from 1 to 8 nanometers were shown different oxidation behavior when exposed to atomic oxygen with
a maximum oxidation resistance for magic-number clusters containing 55 gold atoms. Latter on other researchers
demonstrated that gold-55 clusters act as especially effective oxidation catalysts, such as for oxidizing carbon
monoxide. Here we will approach two case studies demonstrating, on one hand, a rather unusual metallic cluster
size control and its indirect use for selective production of uniform diameter single wall carbon nanotubes, and,
on the other hand, and exotic type of catalysis electrochemically promoted, where the catalytic activity is nonFaradaic modified (NEMCA) by the application of an electric potential between the catalyst and a reference,
inert electrode located on opposite sides of a solid ceramic electrolyte disc. In each case the structure of the
catalytic materials is extremely important for their catalytic performance.
In the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method the diameter of
the resulting single wall carbon nanotubes strongly correlates with the size of the metallic clusters used as
catalysts in the process. However, in classic catalytic systems where metallic particles are dispersed on different
supports, stabilizing clusters of uniform diameter under real synthesis conditions is rather difficult due to the
high temperatures a partial pressures of electron donor molecules such CO, which cause metal mobility,
clustering and particle growth with negative impact on the diameter uniformity and carbon type selectivity, as
larger metallic particles generate amorphous carbon, multiwall carbon nanotubes and graphite. We show here a
method of controlling metallic cluster size by using metal precursors initially entrapped in a silica matrix and
slowly reduced and released from the template to generate uniform diameter clusters and, thus, uniform diameter
SWNT.
The second case study refers to a comparison of the behavior of the same catalysts dispersed on
supports of the same chemical nature, but with different porosity in an experimental setup demonstrating the
Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic activity phenomenon. Palladium catalysts dispersed on dense yttriastabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte have had an encouraging open circuit activity in methane complete
oxidation and showed good values of the parameters characterizing the NEMCA phenomenon. However, when
the same catalyst was interfaced with a porous layer of YSZ, its open circuit activity was significantly higher,
but still showing considerable NEMCA effect despite the low electrical conductivity of the porous interlayer and
high in-plane resistance of the catalyst. This behavior was explained by the oxidation state of the catalyst that
was found to be different in one system than the other, with the porous layer favoring oxygen transfer between
the support and the dispersed catalyst particles.

S0 06
LASER PROCESSING OF POLYMERS: APPLICATION TO GAS SENSORS
A. PALLA-PAPAVLUa, D. CANNATb, M. BENETTIb, F. DI PIETRANTONIOb, E. VERONAb,
V. DINCAa, T. LIPPERTc,A. WOKAUN, M. DINESCUa
a. National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele, Romania
b. O.M. Corbino Institute of Acoustics, Italian National Research Council CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere
100, 00133 Rome, Italy
c. General Energy Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland
Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is an advantageous method used for the deposition of a wide
range of materials both in solid or liquid phase. In LIFT, a laser beam is focused through a transparent support
plate onto the backside of a thin film coated with the material to be transferred (donor film). Each single laser
pulse promotes the transfer of the thin film material (donor film) onto a receiver substrate that is usually placed
parallel and facing the thin film at a short distance. The donor substrate can be previously coated with a
polymeric layer (triazene polymer TP), which is called dynamic release layer (DRL) or sacrificial layer. This
layer has the purpose to improve the process efficiency and to reduce the risk of damaging the layer to be
transferred. An important opportunity arises from the applicability of polymers i.e.

30

PLENARY SESSION

hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), ethylcellulose (EC), polyepichlorhydrine (PECH), polyisobutylene


(PIB), polyethyleneimine (PEI), to Surface Scoustic Waves (SAW) devices for their broad range of applications
aiming toxic gas detection.
This talk shall focus on the development of sensors and sensor arrays based on SAW resonators coated
with chemoselective polymers i.e. HPMC, EC, PECH, PIB, and PEI deposited by LIFT using an excimer laser.
The donor films used in LIFT were prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE).
MAPLE is a physical vapor deposition method, similar to the conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) that
involves diluting the material of interest in a volatile, noninteracting matrix or solvent (0.15 wt%) freezing the
mixture to create a solid target. When the system is irradiated by laser beam, the solvent evaporates whereas the
molecules of interest (polymer or biological compounds) are collected on a substrate. Parameters such as laser
fluence, target film morphology, thickness of the donor film, etc. were investigated in order to determine the
optimum experimental conditions under which sensitive polymer pixels can be obtained. It was found that
better results in terms of polymer pixel morphology are obtained by using TP as a DRL compared to the LIFT
process without a DRL; thin films obtained by MAPLE deposition have a higher quality (for the application as
donor films in LIFT) than films deposited by spin coating and also for sensor application, a maximum thickness
of 60 nm should be used for the polymer layers.
Following the morphological and structural characterization, the responses of the polymer coated sensors
was measured together with the sensitivity towards different analyte concentrations. The sensor arrays were
tested upon exposure to dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, a simulant for nerve gases and pesticides
containing phosphonate ester groups), dichloromethane (DCM, an industrial applied toxic compound and
simulant for choking agents, such as chlorine or phosgene), and ethyl acetate (EtOAc, a wide spread solvent in
medical and industrial applications which can be harmful to humans) vapors, showing, for each of the sensors, a
different sensitivity to the selected chemical agents. The best sensitivities for DMMP and DCM, obtained by
using a PECH coated sensor, are 66.23 Hz/ppm and 0.034 Hz/ppm, respectively, whereas the best sensitivity for
EtOAc, obtained using PIB, is 0.33 Hz/ppm. These results prove the feasibility of LIFT as a deposition method
of active material in sensors and sensor arrays.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

SECTION
S1 Materials Physics
Semiconductors, Dielectrics and Organic Materials
Spintronics, Magnetism and Superconductivity
Crystal growth, Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films
Polymers and Amorphous Materials

31

32

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

INVITED LECTURES
S1 L01
HIGH ENERGY PERMANENT MAGNETS
E.Burzo
Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, M. Kogalniceanu 1, 400084, Cluj-Napoca

The permanent magnets are essential elements in a very large number of technical applications. Now,
billion dollars. In the first part of the report, the time evolution of permanent magnets performances and their use
in daily-life applications are presented. The status of permanent magnets characteristics and the research
directions in this area are then presented, particularly on iron-containing magnets. The energy product of Nd-FeB magnets is now close to the theoretical limit. The researches in this field focused on nanocomposites materials
having low Nd content, particularly anisotropic ones. Other directions are connected with rare-earth-ironnitrogen, Sm-Fe-C or Y-based magnets. Clustered Fe-Pt magnets are also of interest as well cheaper iron based
magnets, free of rare-earths. The studies in the field of permanent magnets performed by our groups in
correlation with those realized at international level will be then presented.

S1 L02
ORGANIC/INORGANIC HYBRID STRUCTURES FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC APPLICATIONS
tefan ANTOHE
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, P.O.Box: MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele, 077125 ROMANIA, E-mail:
santohe@solid.fizica.unibuc.ro
In the last decades the second, third and forth generations of photovoltaic cells based both on the
organic thin films and hybrid nanostructured inorganic/organic materials structures have attracted a great deal of
interest among scientists involved in the research efforts to produce efficient and low-cost solar cells. Using of
organic semiconductors is expected to result in the desired reduction of the costs. Moreover, these
semiconductors can be produced from non-toxic precursors, and the technology needed for producing thin films
is simpler. Among the organic semiconductors envisaged to be used in such structures, small molecules like
metal-doped phthalocyanines (MePc, with Me=Cu, Mg, Zn, etc.) and polymers are the most studied, due to their
peculiar optical properties. Their optical absorption in the visible range of the solar spectrum is strong, but based
on an excitonic mechanism. Most of the photogenerated excitons annihilate by direct recombination before the
occurring of the charge separation in the internal field of the structure. This charge extraction problem can be
avoided by creating a large area heterostructure at the interface with an inorganic semiconductor. This approach
should also reduce the series resistance of the structure. Excitons photogenerated near this interface will
dissociate by electronic transfer. A typical value for the diffusion length of the exciton in organic semiconductors
is of 30-80 nm, while in order to achieve the required efficiency in light absorption, the absorber layer has to be
at least 100 nm thick. One way to improve the extraction of the charge carriers will consist in significantly
increasing of the area of the interface between the two components of the heterostructure, expecting to take place
in the third and fourth generation of solar cells.
In this work are summarized the electrical and photoelectrical properties of the organic photovoltaic
cells based on the organic thin films and hybrid inorganic/organic structures.
In the case of second generation of photovoltaic cells, first the single-layer structures (ITO/CuPc/Al
and ITO/TPyP/Al) were been prepared and characterized. The double-layer photovoltaic structures based on the
p-n heterojunction present at the interface between two organic layers, like, ITO/CuPc/TPyP/Al and ITO/Chl
a/TPyP/Al, exhibits stronger spectral sensitivity and better spectral matching to a solar spectrum than Schottky
cells using either CuPc or TPyP layer, having a power conversion efficiency with about two orders of magnitude,
higher than those of single-layer structures. Three-layered organic solar cells with an interlayer of codeposited
dyes of p-type CuPc and n-type TPyP, between the respective dye layers were also prepared and characterized,
showing an increased power conversion efficiency, with respect of doublelayer structures.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

33

The spectral sensitization of a-Si: H solar cells using an organic layer were also obtained. The action
spectrum was extended by 30 nm to longer wavelength range, using a 100 nm thick layer of TPyP.
In the case of third generation of solar cells, the polymer (P3HT, PCBM or MEH-PPV, PCBM and their
blend) based photovoltaic cells were produced by spin-coating technique. The structures based on the P3HT:
PCBM (1:1) blend shows a promising photovoltaic response, with a power conversion efficiency increased of
about two order of degree, with respect of those measured in the case of structures based on P3HT or PCBM
polymers.
Such as above shown, one way to improve the extraction of the charge carriers will consist in
significantly increasing of the area of the interface between the two components of the heterostructure, then
reducing the dimensions of D/A heterojunctions to the dimension of exciton diffusion length in the organic
absorber. In this way the driving forces, due to potential difference between Donor LUMO and Acceptor LUMO,
will acts efficiently for exciton dissociation and photo charge carrier generation, what is expected for the
efficient fourth generation solar cells.
In this case we report two kind of prepared and characterized structures: i) hybrid structures based on
nanostructured ZnO electrode, photosensitized by CuPC; ii) hybrid structures based on CdTe nanowires
arrays/ZnPc or TPyP.
Three types of hybrid structures based on nanostructured ZnO were prepared: a) Nanostructured ZnO
thin films/CuPc; b) ZnO nanowires array/CuPc; c) ZnO nanotubes array/CuPc. EQE of ZnO wire arrays/CuPc
structures was 4 time larger than that of ZnO nanostructured film/CuPc structures and EQE of ZnO nanotubes
arrays/CuPc structures was about one order of magnitude higher than that of ZnO nanostructured film/CuPc
structures.
For second type, hybrid cells based on the heterostructure at the interface between wire arrays of CdTe,
and the organic film ZnPc and TPyP, were produced and characterized. EQE of CdTe nws/CdTe (200nm)/ZnPc
structures was two order of magnitude higher than in the case of CdTe nws/ZnPc.
Currently, work is in progress to improve the efficiency of these structures, by increasing the density of
the nanowire or nanotube arrays, improving the crystalline quality of both the wires and the organic dyes thin
films and improving also the quality of the inner interface of the structures.

S1 L03
DIELECTRIC SPECTROSCOPY IN FERROELECTRIC RELAXATION OF TGS CRYSTAL
Horia V. ALEXANDRU 1 *, Carmen MNDRU 1, Constantin Paul GANEA 2 and Liviu NEDELCU
1

Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Romania


National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
* Corresponding author, e-mail: horia@infim.ro

Triglycine sulphate crystal (TGS for short) has a typical second order ferroelectric transition of orderdisorder
type around 49 oC. A peculiar instability of both components of permittivity appears in the ferroelectric phase,
crossing down the Curie point. Pure TGS crystal was grown in the paraelectric phase and we have investigated
the dielectric dispersion on the frequency range 1 Hz 10 MHz (seven orders of magnitude) and on a large
temperature range -120 to +65 oC, crossing up and down the Curie point. Two fundamental relaxations and an
intermediate one we have found in the Cole-Cole representations.
The higher frequency relaxation with the relaxation time of H = (3-4)10-7 sec is related to the critical slowing
down mechanism and has almost constant value on the temperature range 40 / + 45 oC, being related to a long
distance order in the lattice, not affected by the thermal energy (has non-Arrhenius temperature dependence).
The lower frequency relaxation having a relaxation time of L ~10-3 sec is related with ferroelectric domain
relaxation and has a peculiar thermal evolution, with the activation energy of 0.65-0.70 eV.
An unusual mid frequency relaxation time of M ~10-5 sec, we have detected for the first time in the literature, in
specific temperature ranges of the ferroelectric phase (JOAM 14 (1912) 157-162, thesis Carmen MNDRU nov.
2012). This type of relaxation does not seem to have a real physical support being rather an interaction of the
previously two related mechanisms.
Some other peculiar aspects evidenced by the dielectric spectroscopy on the mentioned frequency range shall be
presented.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

34

S1 L04
FIRST ORDER REVERSAL CURVES METHOD FOR HYSTERESIS IN MATERIALS:
APPLICATION ON SPIN CROSSOVER COMPOUNDS
Cristian ENACHESCU
Faculty of Physics and CARPATH Center, Al. I. CuzaUniversity of Iasi, Romania
cristian.enachescu@uaic.ro
Hysteresis is a complex phenomenon determined by the lag that can be observed between the input
parameter, i.e. the applied magnetic field in magnetism and the output parameter, i.e. the magnetic moment of
the sample. A distinction has to be made between the rate dependent hystereses, which appear only as an effect
of lag vanishes for low-frequency measurements and rate independent hystereses which do not change if the
field rate in the measurements is modified in a wide range of values. The rate independent hysteresis can be
linked with the existence in the system of entities with metastable states. Each such entity has its individual
hysteresis loop that depends on the particles shape, anisotropy, volume, etc. It is characterized by a free energy
function that has for a definite domain of the input parameter two minima separated by a maximum. The
behavior of an ensemble of particles will also display hysteresis that will be controlled not only by the hysteretic
properties of each isolated particle but also by the interactions between particles.
The First Order Reversal Curves (FORC) method is a general, model-independent technique which provides
a sensitive characterization of the interactions and domain behavior in materials with hysteresis with applications
in physics, geology and technology. The FORCs are a specific class of minor hysteresis loops, for which the
sweeping process of the input parameter is reversed once from one of the branches of the major hysteresis loop.
This method allows a direct determination of a two-dimensional distribution (FORC diagram), usually of
individual hysteresis width and interactions between domains.
A special area of interest in recent years was the application of and FORC technique as a tool to understand
the hysteretic behavior spin crossover molecular magnets, materials that do show a complex nonlinear behavior.
The spin crossover materials display in the two stable states (low spin and high spin) different magnetic
properties (diamagnetic and paramagnetic), but do not illustrate a classical magnetic hysteresis. Nevertheless,
due to elastic interactions, some of these compounds show a complex nonlinear behavior including temperature,
pressure, and light-induced thermal hysteresis. We have applied the FORC diagram method for the thermal
hysteresis of spin crossover materials and have shown that the diagram can be interpreted in terms of
distributions of physical parameters such as the energy gap between the states, or interactions between like-spin
domains. The FORC method applied on diluted spin crossover materials has suggested that distributions of
internal stresses and domain size increase with dilution. In addition, we present experimental FORC data for rate
dependent light induced hysteresis and for the pressure hysteresis. Finally, we discuss the models for all
hysteresis and their correlations with experiments. Acknowledgements This work was supported by Romanian
CNCS projects TE 185/2010 and PCCE 9/2010.
References
[1] R. Tanasa, C. Enachescu, A. Stancu, F. Varret et al, Phys. Rev. B 71, 014431 (2005)
[2] C. Enachescu, R. Tanasa, A. Stancu, F. Varret, et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 054413 (2005)
[3] C. Enachescu, L. Stoleriu, A. Stancu, A. Hauser, Phys. Rev. Lett, 102, 257204 (2009)
[4] A. Tissot, C. Enachescu, M.L. Boillot, J. Mater. Chem., 22, 20451 (2012)
[5] P. Chakraborty, C. Enachescu, A. Hauser, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem, 5-6, 770 (2013)

S1 L05
DISCOVERING THE POLES OF THE MOLECULAR MAGNETS
Marilena FERBINTEANUA and Fanica CIMPOESUB
a

University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Inorg. Chem. Dept., Dumbrava Rosie 23, Bucharest 020462,
Romania
b
Institute of Physical Chemistry, Splaiul Independentei 202, Bucharest 060021, Romania
Email: marilena.cimpoesu@g.unibuc.ro, cfanica@yahoo.com

The modern age of molecular magnetism was initiated about two decades ago,[1] reconsidering at
molecular level (triggering also a full universe of related chemistry), the mechanisms and varieties of spin
couplings, that where seminally known from early solid state physics.[2] Whether the problems of spin-coupling

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

35

were resolved in the first stages of this evolution, the complex issue of magnetic anisotropy came only recently
in the consideration,[3] as a new generation of paradigms. In this key, we proposed relevant case studies on
newly synthesized corroborated with innovative theoretical methodologies and inter-pretations in the spirit of
chemical and physical intuition. A part of the synthetic strategies is devoted to lanthanide chemistry, considering that most of the f ions are intrinsic carriers of anisotropy. A series of systems, assembled in
supramolecular extended systems is analyzed, identifying the conditions determining the manifestation of
magnet at molecular and at nano-scale levels.
The true understanding of the various magnetic systems is realized including in the focus the theoretical
subtleties of electronic structure. However, the quantum chemistry of lanthanide system is not simple, because of
hidden technical difficulties residing in the non-aufbau configura-tions of the f ions. Original methodological
developments [4,5] facing this problem allowed us unprecedented insight in the analysis of magnetic anisotropy
(Figure 1). Powerful approaches enabling the representation polar maps of microscopic magnetization and
analysis relating its dependence on local crystal field parameters offer a suggestive insight in the electronic and
magnetic properties of considered systems.

(a)

(b)

Figure 1. The polar map of axial magnetic anisotropy


(a) determined by the axial crystal field pattern; (b)
considered for a Tb(III) site in a binuclear systems
Acknowledgements: The financial support
from the CNCS/UEFISCDI research grant PN2-IDPCCE-239/2010 is gratefully acknowledged.
References:
[1] Kahn, O. Molecular Magnetism, Wiley, NewYork,

1993.
[2] Goodenough, J. B. Magnetism and the Chemical Bond, Interscience, New York, 1963.
[3] Gateschi, D.; Sessoli, R. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 268.
[4] Cimpoesu, F.; Dahan, F.; Ladeira, S.; Ferbinteanu, M.; Costes, J-P. Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 11279.
[5] Ferbinteanu, M.; Cimpoesu, F.; Girtu, M. A.; Enachescu, C.; Tanase, S. Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 40.

S1 L06
SiC MULTI-LAYER PROTECTIVE COATING ON CARBON: SYNTHESIS AND
CHARACTERISATION
V. Ciupina1,2,3, C. P. Lungu4, R. Vladoiu1, T-D. Epure1, G. Prodan1,2, C. Porosnicu4, I. Jepu4, M. Belc1, M.
Prodan1, I. M. Oancea- Stanescu1, C. Stefanov1, M. Contulov1, A. Mandes1, V. Dinca1,E. Vasile5, V.
Zarovschi4,V. Nicolescu6
1Department of Plasma Physics, Faculty of Physics, Chemistry, Electronics and Oil Technology, Ovidius
University, Mamaia 124, Constanta, 900527, Romania
2
Institute for Nanotechnology and Alternative Energy Sources, Ovidius University, Mamaia 124, Constanta,
900527, Romania
3
Faculty of Physics Bucharest University, Atomistilor No. 405, Magurele, 077125, Romania
4
National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 077125,
Bucharest Romania
5
Metav CD SA, C.A.Rosetti No. 31, Bucharest, 020011, Romania
6
CERONAV, Pescarilor No. 69, Constanta, 900581, Romania

SiC single-layer or multi-layer on C used to improve the oxidation resistance and tribological properties of C
have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 200nm thickness carbon thin films was
deposed on glass or Si substrate and then 100500 nm thickness SiC successively layers on carbon thin film was
deposed. The microstructure and mechanical characteristics of as-prepared SiC coating were investigated by
Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Scanning Electron
Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and tribological techniques.
Samples containing SiC single-layer or multi-layer coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000 oC. The
results of thermal treatments reveals the increase of oxidation resistance with increase of the number of SiC

36

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

layers. The mechanism of oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen
resulting SiO2 and CO.
The tribological behavior of SiC coatings was evaluated with a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from
CSM device with 6mm diameter sapphire ball, sliding speed in dry conditions being 0.1m/s, with normal contact
loads of 1N, 3N and 10N, under unlubricated conditions. The friction coefficient on SiC was compared with the
friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer.
Electrical conductivity of SIC coating on carbon was measured comparing the potential drop on the sample with
potential drop on a series standard resistance in constant current mode. The electrical conductivity of SiC
coatings was monitoring relative to the uncoated carbon layers at different temperatures.

S1 L07
X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY OF FERROELECTRICS AND
METAL/FERROELECTRIC INTERFACES
Cristian-Mihail TEODORESCU
National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov, Romania
X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is nowadays widely used in the characterization of surfaces
and interfaces [1]. The most important features of this technique are (i) the element sensitivity, allowing one to
derive compositions with accuracies below 1 atomic %; (ii) the chemical sensitivity, allowing one to derive
ionization and hybridation states and hence the nature of the chemical compounds; (iii) the surface sensitivity,
allowing one to investigate in depth the composition and the nature of the chemical compounds. To these kind of
analyses, I will demonstrate in this Contribution how a fourth feature may be added, namely the quantification of
band bendings at charged surfaces and at interfaces between metals and semiconductors with different
workfunctions [2,3].
Free ferroelectric surfaces stablise depolarization charges, which induce bendings of the vacuum level
and of the valence band maxima. Owing to the extremely high surface sensitivity of the XPS technique, the core
level position of atoms situated at the surface of the sample may be used to quantify the band bendings as
function of the out-of-plane polarization state of the sample surface, as shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 2 shows a practical
example of this technique, where a Pb(Ti,Zr)O3 (PZT) sample is investigated as function of thermal treatments,
where induced oxygen vacancies progressively influence the out-of-plane polarization state [3]. Fig. 3 shows
how the deposition of a metal (Au) layer onto PZT induces a change in the out-of-plane polarization state,
together with the Schottky band bending.
Throughout this contribution, I will also sketch a new theoretical approach of band bending at free
ferroelectric surfaces and at metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts and I will discuss XPS-derived band
bendings obtained on interfaces formed by several metals (Au, Cu, Pt) on ferroelectric single crystal substrates
(PZT, barium titanate). The XPS results will be compared with results obtained by piezoresponse force
microscopy (PFM) and by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Finally, I will present
also some very new data, pointing on the induction of ferromagnetism by the depolarization charge in Mn atoms
diffused in the ferroelectric material.

Figure 1. Band diagrams at ferroelectric surfaces: (a) outwards


polarization; (b) inwards polarization; (c) shows how such effects
should be visible in core level photoelectron spectroscopy.
__________________________________________
[1] S. Hfner, Photoelectron Spectroscopy: Principles and
Applications, Springer, Berlin, 2003.
[2] S.M. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, Wiley,
Hoboken, NJ, 1981.
[3] N.G. Apostol et al., Appl. Surf. Sci. 273, 415 (2013); Thin
Solid Films, 10.1016/j.tsf.2013.04.092; Mater. Sci. Eng. B,
10.1016/j.mseb.2013.02.007.

Figure 2. Relationship between the


position of a core level (Pb 5d) and that
of the valence band maximum for a PZT
sample subject to several thermal
treatments in UHV.

Figure 3. O 1s core level XPS


spectra for Au layers deposited
on PZT.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

37

S1 L08
SPECTROSCOPIC ELLIPSOMETRY: A USEFUL NON-DESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUE TO PROBE
THE PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS
Aurelian-Catalin GALCA
National Institute of Material Physics, Magurele, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125, Romania
ac_galca@infim.ro ; http://old.infim.ro/~ac_galca/index.htm
Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a unique characterization technique which measures the change in
polarization of a light-probe reflected from a sample. The measurements are relatively fast, low cost and nondestructive.
By fitting the ellipsometry data with an adequate optical model, there are determined in the first step the
thicknesses and the complex dielectric function (also expressed as refractive index and extinction coefficient) of
the sample (usually a thin film). Using results for complementary techniques, advanced optical models can be
developed in order to determine fast and non-destructively physical properties such as: degree of crystallinity,
crystallites size and orientation, porosity, density, composition and electrical properties.
In this work it will be presented the principle, the advantages and the possibilities of spectroscopic
ellipsometry technique. Recent examples [1-5] will be given, highlighting the usefulness of a fast a non invasive
technique such as ellipsometry.

Fig. 1. Graphical representation of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry principle.


References
[1] A.C. Galca, G.E. Stan, L.M. Trinca, C.C. Negrila, L.C. Nistor, Thin Solid Films 524 2012, 328333 doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2012.10.015
[2] G.E. Stan, I. Pasuk, L.M. Trinca, A.C. Galca, M. Enculescu, F. Miculescu, Dig. J. Nanomater. Biostruct. 7
(1) 2012, 41-50 http://www.chalcogen.infim.ro/41_Stan.pdf
[5]. C. Besleaga, G.E. Stan, A.C. Galca, L. Ion, S. Antohe, Appl. Surf. Sci. 258 (22) 2012, 88198824 doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2012.05.097
[4]. A.C. Galca, G. Socol, V. Craciun,Thin Solid Films 520 (14) 2012, 4722-4725 doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2011.10.194
[5].M. Cernea, L. Trupina, C. Dragoi, A.C. Galca, L. Trinca,J. Mater. Sci. 47 (19) 2012, 69666971 doi:10.1007/s10853-012-6646-1
[6] A. Le Febvrier, A.C. Galca, Y. Corredores, S. Dputier, V. Bouquet, V. Demange, X. Castel, R. Sauleau, R.
Lefort, Ly. Zhang, G. Tann, L. Pintilie, M. Guilloux-Viry, ACS Appl. Mat. Interf. 4 (10) 2012, 52275233 doi:10.1021/am301152r

S1 L09
3D NUMERICAL COMPUTATION OF SUBMICRONIC PARTICLE SUSPENSION DISTRIBUTION
IN A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE UNDER DIELECTROPHORESIS
A. NECULAE, M. BUNOIU, T. MARIAN and M. LUNGU
Faculty of Physics, West University of Timisoara, Romania

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

38

S1 L10
METAL OXIDE THIN FILMS FOR FUNCTIONAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES
F. IACOMI
Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506-Iasi, Romania
Functional oxide thin films recent advances made possible a fantastic development of transparent oxide
electronics. For metal oxide applications in advanced electronic devices there are necessary n and p type
semiconductors. Oxide-based electronics can handle higher voltages than silicon-based electronics and could
also be used to create new sensors for monitoring gases. The present contribution reports recent results obtained
on n and p type metal oxides (In2-(x+y)SnxZnyO, Zn1-xCoxO, ZnGaO, Fe2O3, Ni1xCoxFe2O4) deposited on different
substrates (glass, quartz, alumina, silicon) by using different deposition methods (spin coating, vacuum thermal
evaporation, rf magnetron sputtering).

b)
a)

c)

d)

Fig.1. a) Dependence on temperature of electrical conductivity of n and p type In2-(x+y)SnxZnyO thin films; b) Effect of
2h UV irradiation on the EPR spectrum registered at 110K of 25% Co doped ZnO thin film; c)Sensing properties of
2% Ga doped ZnO; d)Evidence of iron species from XPS spectrum of Ni0.25Co0.75Fe2O4 thin films.

Thin films structural and functional investigations (XRD, XPS, EPR, optical, magnetic, gas sensing techniques,
Fig.1) proved that by controlling the doping, post deposition annealing and UV irradiation procedures one can
finely tune the structural, optical, electronic, magnetic and gas sensing properties providing the proper
functionality for the targeted application.
[1] A. Yildiz, F. Iacomi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81 (2012) 054602
[2] A. Yildiz, B. Yurduguzel, B. Kayhan, G. Calin, M. Dobromir, F. Iacomi, J Mater Sci: Mater Electron 23
(2012) 425.
[3] F. Tudorache, P. D. Popa, M. Dobromir, F. Iacomi, Mater. Sci. Eng. B (2013),
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mseb.2013.03.019

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

39

S1 L11
ENLARGING THE FUNCTIONAL CHARACTER OF TIO2-AU/AG BASED MATERIALS
Monica BAIA,1,2 Virginia DANCIU,3 Zsolt PAP,3 and Lucian BAIA1,2
1

Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, M. Kogalniceanu 1, 400084 Cluj-Napoca, Romania


2
Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Bio-Nano-Sciences, Babes-Bolyai University,
Treboniu Laurian 42, 400271, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
3
Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Arany Janos 11,
400028, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

The environmental friendly character of TiO2 is well-known and an often debated aspect, especially in the
framework of the photocatalytic investigations, where titania based materials are involved. Additionally to the
photocatalytic destruction of water pollutants, the activation of other functionalities of such materials, such as the
contaminants capture, or even better their sensing, represents an important task. By considering the great
enhancement of the Raman signal given by a pollutant molecule located on a nanoscale-roughed noble metal
surface, i.e. gold and silver, or even in its very close vicinity (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering or SERS
technique), the obtaining of multifunctional materials, which additionally to the water pollutant destruction are
capable to efficiently detect contaminants, becomes a challenge. Taking into account the benefit brought by the
appropriate dimensions of the noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) relative to those of the TiO 2 aerogels pores, we
designed by various synthesis methods porous composites that efficiently exhibit the above mentioned
functionalities. Thus, alongside the remarkable photocatalytic properties of the obtained nanoarchitectures, their
mesoporous character existence makes possible the diffusion of pollutant molecules through the threedimensional network, and consequently, the quick detection of contaminants by SERS. In this work the
discussion is mainly focused on both evaluating the pollutant sensing functionality of various synthesized porous
composites by using a large variety of standard pollutant molecules as well as assessing their destruction
capacity of water pollutants by photocatalysis, their structural and morphological particularities being
emphasized as well. The best performances related to the mentioned functionalities were acquired for the
samples obtained by titania gel impregnated with Au/Ag NPs followed by supercritical drying. The lowest
pollutants detectable concentrations were found to vary between 10 -2 and 10-10 M, depending on the sample
obtaining procedure, pollutant species and the type of the excitation, i.e. off and under resonant condition, and
the best photodegradation rate constant was found for TiO2-Au NPs porous composites (31.35x10 -3 min-1). The
obtained results demonstrate the enormous potential of the porous nanoarchitectures for further use in the
development of nano-devices capable to detect very fast minute concentrations of known chemical pollutants
from various aquatic media or even of novel SERS-based sensors for water quality monitoring.
Acknowledgment: This work was supported by the grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific
Research; project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0442.
S1 L12
FAST AS A NEW BRAZING ROUTE FOR REFRACTORY MATERIALS
M. GALATANU 1, B.POPESCU 1, I .ENCULESCU 1, I. TISEANU 2, A. GALATANU 1
1)

2)

National Institute of Materials Physics, Magurele 077125 Romania


National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele 077125 Romania

We have developed a simple and effective technique for brazing refractory materials like Tungsten or Silicon
carbide using the field assisted sintering technology (FAST). By this route we have succeeded in joining W and
SiC using W, V, Ti, Pd, Fe and Cu foils and adequate process parameters. However, detailed morphology
investigations of the joint area performed by SEM/EBS/EDX showed that not all brazing materials are well
suited to create a strong joint. Depending on the melting temperature and the wettability of W by the respective
material crack are developing in W close to the joining surface. In the case of SiC, the wettability of SiC by the
brazing material plays a more important role, due to the higher SiC porosity. Thus, if the brazing process takes
place near the melting temperature of the brazing element, materials with higher wettability tends to develop
roots which create strong joints. High temperature measurements of thermal diffusivity of the joined pieces were
also used to asses the joint performance aiming to develop selection criteria for the brazing materials in high heat
flux resistant components.
Acknowledgement

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

40

This work was supported by the European Communities in the framework of EFDA by WP13MAT-HHFM-0401/MEdC/PS contract

S1 L13
LOW-LOSS MICROWAVE DIELECTRICS: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES, AND APPLICATIONS
L. NEDELCU and M. G. BANCIU
National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, nedelcu@infim.ro
In the last years there has been a growing interest in the development of low-loss microwave dielectrics
[1-3]. These temperature-stable materials influence decisively such wireless communication systems as GSM,
UMTS, LTE, WiMAX, Wi-Fi, GPS, etc. Among the dielectrics used in applications, bulk ceramics are by far the
most employed as they offer cost-effective solutions for manufacturing enterprises [2]. We survey here some of
the results concerning the microwave materials and devices obtained in our group [4-8]. In the first part of the
talk,
the
synthesis
and
characterization
of
four
types
of
low-loss
dielectrics
(Ba1-xPbxNd2Ti5O14, Zr0.8Sn0.2TiO4, BaZn1/3Ta2/3O3, and BaMg1/3Ta2/3O3) will be discussed. The advantages of
Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy over the conventional FTIR technique used to characterize the dielectric
properties of materials in far-infrared domain will be emphasized. In the second part, the talk will be focused on
the modeling, design, manufacturing, and characterization of several types of microwave passive components.
Electromagnetic design in frequency domain (HFSS) and time domain (CST microwave studio) of microwave
resonators, band-pass filters and dielectric resonator antennas will be presented. The devices simulated responses
are in good agreement with the measured responses. Development of new dielectric materials suitable for
particular microwave applications is possible by appropriate tuning in the synthesis microstructure
properties - applications cycle. With the advent of new low-loss dielectrics, the field of microwave passive
components will continue be very attractive in the future [3].
References
1. S.J. Fiedziuszko et al., Dielectric materials, devices, and circuits, IEEE Trans. Microw. Theory Techn. 50
(2002) 706.
2. M. T. Sebastian, Dielectric Materials for Wireless Communication, Elsevier, Oxford, 2008.
3. H. Ohsato, Functional advances of microwave dielectrics for next generation, Ceramic International 38S
(2012) S141.
4. A. Ioachim, M. G. Banciu, M. I. Toacsen, L. Nedelcu, D. Ghetu, H. V. Alexandru, G. Stoica, G. Annino, M.
Cassettari, M. Martinelli, Nickel-Doped (Zr0.8,Sn0.2)TiO4 for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Applications,
Mater. Sci. Eng. B 118 (2005) 205.
5. A. Ioachim, M.G. Banciu, L. Nedelcu, C.A. Dutu, Band-Pass filters with (Zr0.8,Sn0.2)TiO4 Dielectric
Resonators, J. Optoelectron. Adv. Mater. 8 (2006) 941.
6. M. Ene-Dobre, M.G. Banciu, L. Nedelcu, A. Ioachim, H.V. Alexandru, Dielectric resonator antennas of ZST
advanced ceramics, J. Optoelectron. Adv. Mater. 8 (2010) 1926.
7. L. Nedelcu, M. I. Toacsan, M. G. Banciu, A. Ioachim, Microwave properties of Ba(Zn 1/3Ta2/3)O3 dielectric
resonators, J. Alloy. Compd. 509 (2011) 477.
8. O. G. Avadanei, M. G. Banciu, I. Nicolaescu, L. Nedelcu, Superior modes in high permittivity cylindrical
dielectric resonator antenna excited by a central rectangular slot, IEEE Trans. Anten. Propag. 60 (2012) 5032.
Acknowledgements: This work was partially supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for
Scientific Research, CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-PD-2011-3-0237.

S1 L14
DUAL EMITTER ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS:THERMAL AND STRUCTURAL
CHARACTERISTICS
S. POLOSAN1, I.C. CIOBOTARU1, C.C. CIOBOTARU2,
1

National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele 077125, Romania


University "POLITEHNICA" of Bucharest, Calea Victoriei 149, Bucharest, 010072, Romania

The new OLED technologies are searching of white efficient organometallic emitters which can be
obtained by mixing blue with red and green colors. Such systems were synthesized in a form of mixed ligand

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

41

cationic iridium complexes. IrQ(ppy)2 is one of these mixed ligands in which phenylpyridine gives green
phosphorescence and quinoline gives red phosphorescence.
To synthesize IrQ(ppy)2 compound, a two step reaction procedure must be followed, resulting an
intermediate and a final compound.
Thermal analisys of the intermediate compound shows a strong exothermic peak at 200 oC assigned to
the decomposition of the bridged dimer and a peak at 423 oC, assigned to the phenylpiridine decompositions. The
final compound, IrQ(ppy)2 shows one exothermic peak at 365oC assigned to decomposition of the mixed
ligands.
The XPS peak positions of the 4f levels of iridium, shows different behaviours between the intermediate
and final compound. The intermediate compound have two peaks centered at 66.3 and 64.8 eV assigned to
iridium-chloride in bridged dimers, and Ir-C bonds, respectively. For the final compound, the presence of the
peak centered at 63.06 eV could be assigned to Ir-O bound from quinoline ligand, by comparison with IrO x
compunds.
The SEM images show a polycrystalline structure in both samples and the backscattering electron
images shows a relative uniform distribution of iridium ions. XRD patterns of partially crystalline powder,
obtained from dichlormetane, exhibit a P-1 triclinic structure, which was confirmed by SEM and
cathodoluminescence (CL) images.
The CL spectrum between 400-800 nm, presents two peaks centered at 530 nm (green
emission) and 635 nm (red emission) and the CL image, in the monochromatic light at 635 nm, confirms a
triclinic phosphorescent organometallic compound.

Cathodoluminescence patterns and photoluminescence of IrQ(ppy)2 organometallic compound

S1 L15
MAGNETIC ORDERING IN A FAMILY OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MOLECULAR MAGNETS A
COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH
Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Bogdan FRECU,1 Petre PANAIT,1 Fanica CIMPOESU,2 Marilena FERBINTEANU,3
and Mihai A. GRU1,*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527, Romania


Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bucharest 060021, Romania
3
University of Bucharest, Bucharest 020462, Romania
**Email: cornel.oprea@univ-ovidius.ro, mihai.girtu@univ-ovidius.ro
2

The recent discovery of spin injection in hybrid organic-inorganic spin valves based on films of
V[TCNE]x (x~2, TCNE = tetracyanoethylene) [1], has brought back to the front line the first roomtemperature molecule-based magnet. We present the results of a theoretical study correlating the structure
and the special magnetic properties of the M[TCNE]2 (M = V, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co) family of materials, with

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

42

focus on the V[TCNE]2 system. Starting from the available experimental data on M[TCNE] 2 systems, we
perform Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations with periodic boundary conditions to optimize the
geometry. The DFT calculations indicate antiparallel spin alignment resulting in ferrimagnetic ordering, but
heavily overestimate the value of the exchange coupling. Better estimates of the exchange coupling
parameters, J, are obtained by means of ab initio multiconfiguration calculations, performed on smaller
molecular models cut from the optimized crystal lattice. Further spin-orbit and ligand-field calculations
allowed the modeling of the environment of the V(II) ions yielding a 10Dq ~18400 cm-1 parameter, a
uniform magnetic anisotropy of the bulk, Dc = -0.03 K, and a random anisotropy of Dr = 0.56 K.

[1] J.-W. Yoo, C.-Y. Chen, H. W. Jang, C. W. Bark, V. N. Prigodin, C. B. Eom, and A. J. Epstein, Nature. Mat.
9, 638 (2010).
*Acknowledgments: The authors acknowledge the financial support from CNCS/UEFISCDI through the
research grant PN2-Idei-PCCE-239/2010, contract no. 9/2010.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S1 O01
SPIN TRANSPORT IN GRAPHENE BORON NITRIDE HYBRID MATERIALS WITH
TRANSITIONAL METAL IMPURITIES
Camelia VISAN
Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH),
The Department of Computational Physics and Information Technologies,
077126 Magurele-Ilfov, Romania
The ongoing search for efficient spin filter devices turned the attention towards low dimensional diluted
magnetic semiconductors. One example is hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with transitional metal impurities
[1,2], which is an isomorph of graphene with a very similar lattice constant.
Hybrid graphene-hBN materials have been synthesized [3], combining the properties of the large
bandgap hBN semiconductor with metallic properties of graphene. This allows the construction of spintronic
devices based on graphene-hBN nanoribbons, with metallic electrodes and semiconducting active region,
suitable for field effect applications. Inserting Mn impurities the device structures prove to possess good spin
current filtering and spin current switching properties [4], as the magnetic impurities scatter differently the two
spin channels and a net spin current is obtained.
This study investigates comparatively the efficiency of doping the hBN with different transitional metal
impurities (e.g. Co, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni) with respect to spin filtering properties. The formation energies of the
considered point defects are calculated using ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations [5,6]. The

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

43

polarization of the spin current is extracted, for several configurations of the


magnetic moments. For the structures with several magnetic impurities, the
exchange couplings are evaluated.
The analyzed structures show high spin current polarizations
indicating their suitability for spin filter devices. Moreover, by using the
differences in spin transport properties they may be used as detection
devices, since an external magnetic field can switch the spin configurations
of the TM impurities.
REFERENCES:
[1] D. Ma, Z. Lu, W. Ju, and Y. Tang, Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, vol. 24, no. 14, 145501 (2012)
[2] T. L. Mitran, A. Nicolaev, G. A. Nemnes, L. Ion, and S. Antohe, Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, vol.
24, no. 32, 326003 (2012)
[3] L. Ci, L. Song, C. Jin et al., Nature Materials, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 430435 (2010)
[4] G.A. Nemnes, Journal of Nanomaterials 748639 (2012)
[5] C. Visan, T.L. Mitran, Adela Nicolaev, G.A. Nemnes, L. Ion, S. Antohe, Digest Journal of Nanomaterials
and Biostructures, vol. 6, No 3, p. 1173-1177 (2011)
[6] G.A. Nemnes, C. Visan, S. Antohe, Physica E 44, 1092 (2012)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
This work was supported by the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research project PN
09370104/2013.

S1 O02
USING AFM TOPOGRAPHY MEASUREMENTS IN NANOPARTICLE SIZING
Dan CHICEA
Environmental Sciences Department, University Lucian Blaga of Sibiu, Dr. Ion Ratiu Str. 7-9, Sibiu, 550012,
Romania, dan.chicea@ulbsibiu.ro
A simple recipe for preparing a small amount of Fe 3O4 nanoparticles was used and is briefly presented
in the extended work. The Fe3O4 nanofluid was deposited on a mica substrate following a precise protocol that
attaches them strong wnough to withstand the scanning process. An AGILENT 5500 atomic force microscope
was used to investigate the samples in tapping mode. The surface topography was analyzed and the grain
statistics was used in assessing the nanoparticle size distribution. The already traditional DLS technique was
used as a reference procedure for nanoparticle sizing. The results of the DLS procedure are presented in detail as
well and discussed in connection with the AFM results. An AFM topography image of the nanoparticles
deposited on mica substrate are presented in the following figure.

References
1. NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES SIZING BY DLS AND AFM, D. Chicea,
Optoelectronics and Advanced Materials Rapid Communications vol. 4, issue 9, 2010, p. 1310 1315.
2. THE APPLICATION OF AFM FOR BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES IMAGING, D. Chicea, B. Neamtu, R.
Chicea, L. M. Chicea, Digest Journal of Nanomaterials and Biostructures Vol. 5, No 4, 2010, p. 1015-1022
3. ASSESING FE3O4 NANOPARTICLE SIZE BY DLS, XRD AND AFM
D. CHICEA, E. INDREA, C. M. CRETU, JOURNAL OF OPTOELECTRONICS AND ADVANCED
MATERIALS Vol: 14, Issue: 5-6, 2012, pp: 460-466.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

44

S1 O03
NEW IrQ(ppy)2 ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUND FOR OLED APPLICATIONS: SYNTHESIS AND
OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION
I.C. CIOBOTARU1), S. POLOSAN1), C.C.CIOBOTARU2), H. IOVU2)
1)

2)

National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele 077125, Romania


Advanced Polymer Materials Group, Politehnica University of Bucharest,Calea Victoriei 149, Bucharest,
010072, Romania

Iridium complex compounds have attracted much attention as emitters of highly efficient
electrophosphorescent devices. A special attention was devoted for the compounds with different types of
ligands. IrQ(ppy)2 combine two types of ligands, phenylpyridine for green phosphorescence and quinoline for
red phosphorescence.[1]
To synthesize IrQ(ppy)2 compound, a two step reaction procedure can be applied. In the first step, iridium
chloride is combined with phenylpiridine, forming a bridged dimer. In the second step, the reaction of these
dimers with 8-hydroxiquinoline lead to formation of the final complex, IrQ(ppy)2.[2]
Step1:
reflux, 24 h

+ 2 IrCl3

+ 4 HCl

150C

Step 2:

Na2CO3

+2

Reflux, 12h
N2 , 150C

For the absorption measurements, the complex IrQ(ppy) 2 was disolved in dichlormetane. The spectrum
exibits large peaks in the visible range, between 2.5 and 4 eV, assigned to the metal-ligand hibridization,
followed by the * transition peaks comming from the both ligands.
The photoluminescence measurements shows a structured band centered at 2.47 eV assigned to the
metal-to-ligand charge transfer from Ir3+ to the phenylpiridine ligand and a broad band centered at 1.87 eV
assigned to the quinoline charge transfer.
References
[1] L. Vaska and J.W. DiLuzio (1961). "Carbonyl and Hydrido-Carbonyl Complexes of Iridium by
Reaction with Alcohols. Hydrido Complexes by Reaction with Acid". Journal of the American Chemical Society
83 (12): 27845.
[2] S. Polosan, I.C.Radu, T. Tsuboi, J. Lum, 132, 998 (2012).
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research,
CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0620.
The work has been funded by the Sectorial Operational Program Human Resources Development 2007
2013 of the Romanian Ministry of Labor, Family and Social Protection through the Financial Agreement
POSDRU/107/1.5/S/76903.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

45

S1 O04
THE INFLUENCE OF CoFe2O4 LAYER ON Pb(Zr0.2 Ti0.8)O3 AND BaTiO3, EPITAXIAL THIN FILMS
DEPOSITED BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION
C.CHIRILA, G.BONI, L. HRIB, A. GALCA, R. NEGREA, I.PASUK, V. KUNCSER, C. GHICA, I. PINTILIE
AND L.PINTILIE
National Institute of Material Physic, BucharestMagurele, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125, Romania
We have investigated non-symmetric heterostructures of Pb(Zr0.2 Ti0.8)O3/CoFe2O4 (PZT/CFO) and BaTiO3/
CoFe2O4 (BT/CFO) grown on SrTiO3 (100) substrates by using pulsed laser deposition. PZT /CFO and BT/CFO
layers were sequentially deposited on the STO substrate with a bottom electrode, SrRuO 3 layer (20 nm) in order
to observe the influence of the ferrimagnetic layer onto epitaxial ferroelectric structures. X-ray diffraction and
transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements reveals crystalline structure and epitaxial relationship
between PZT or BT and CFO. The electric properties of non-symmetric heterostructures were characterized by
using P-V loop, C-f, and C-V measurements at room temperature. The remnant polarization and coercivity are
significantly affected after the top-layer CFO is deposited. The M-H loop measurements from 5K to 300 K,
reveal that the heterostructures possess a weak ferrimagnetic response even at room temperature.

Fig. 1. TEM image of the non-symmetric heterostructures; a) STO-SRO-PZT-CFO,


b) STO-SRO-BT-CFO
References:
[1] J. X. Zhang, J. Y. Dai, C. K. Chow, C. L. Sun, V. C. Lo, and H. L. W. Chan, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92 (2008)
022901
[2] K.S. Chang, M. A. Aronova, C.L. Lin, M. Murakami, M.H. Yu, J. H.Simpers,O. O. Famodu, S. Y. Lee, R.
Ramesh, M. Wuttig and I. Takeuchi, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84 (2004) 16
[3] J. X. Zhang, J. Y. Dai and H. L. W. Chan, J. Appl. Phys. 107 (2010) 104105
[4] R. Ramesh, Nicola A. Spaldin, Nature Materials 6 (2007) 21 - 29
[5] J. F. Scott Ferroelectric Memories, Advanced Microelectronics Series, edited by K. Itoh and T. Sakurai
/Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2000

S1 O05
FULLY TRANSPARENT TRANSISTORS BASED ON AlN-GATE DIELECTRIC
AND IGZO-CHANNEL SEMICONDUCTOR
C. BESLEAGA1,2, S. ANTOHE1, G.E. STAN2, A.C. GALCA2 P. BARQUINHA3, E. FORTUNATO3
1 University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-11, 077125, Magurele-Ilfov,
Romania
2 National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor, PO Box MG.7, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov, Romania
3 Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Department of Materials Science, New University of Lisbon and
CEMOP-UNINOVA, Quinta da Torre, P 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Because of its poor thermal conductivity, the application of a SiO 2 insulating layer in high-power, hightemperature logic devices is limited by the self-heating effect. The overheating of such devices could cause the
degradation of the operations and the reduction of the device lifetime. Therefore, it is important to develop new
insulating materials with good thermal conductivity and high dielectric constants.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

46

Aluminum nitride (AlN) exhibits a high thermal conductivity (of ~17 Wm1K1 for 150 nm thin layer
[1], more than ten times higher than SiO2 (~1.3 Wm1K1), low thermal expansion coefficient (~4.5x10-6 K-1),
high intrinsic resistance (>1013 cm), a dielectric constant >10 for 200 nm thick films (as it will be shown
further), small dielectric loss tangent and good stability at high temperatures [2]. Therefore, the use of AlN layer
as gate dielectric should reduce the influence of the self-heating effect observed in traditional devices. Moreover,
AlN exhibits a wide energy band gap of approximately 6.2 eV being an alternative material for the use in
transparent electronics as gate dielectric.
Fully transparent transistors based on AlN gate dielectric and indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) as
channel semiconductor were obtained using magnetron sputtering in RF regime and photolithography patterning.
Field effect mobility values larger than 6 cm2/Vs and ION/ IOFF ratio of 107 were achieved on the staggered
bottom-gate transistor geometry having the channel width/ length ratio of 180m/ 20m.

[1] C. Duquenne, M-P. Besland, P. Y. Tessier, E. Gautron, Y. Scudeller, D. Averty, Journal of Physics D:
Applied Physics, vol. 45, 2012, p. 015301-015301
[2] R. D. Gould, S. A. Awan, Thin Solid Films, vol. 469-470, 2004, p. 184-189

S1 O06
FE LOCAL CONFIGURATION AND PHASE COMPOSITION IN FESE0.3TE0.7 SINGLE CRYSTALS
STUDIED BY TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT MSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY
S.G. SANDU1,3, L. MIU1, P. BADICA1, T. NOJI2, Y. KOIKE2, V. KUNCSER1
1

National Institute of Materials Physics, Magurele 077125, Romania


Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba, Aramaki,
Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan
3
Physics Department, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-11, Magurele 077125, Romania

Fe local configurations and hyperfine parameters were studied in a FeSe 0.3Te0.7 single crystal by means of
Mssbauer spectroscopy measurements performed in different geometries and at different temperatures
corresponding to the normal and superconducting states. The FeSe 0.3Te0.7 was grown by the Bridgman method
[1]. An asymmetric paramagnetic pattern was obtained in perpendicular geometry, similar to the spectra
presented in previous studies [2,3]. However, in these reports the asymmetric doublet was related to two
different FeSe1-xTex phases or a FeSe1-xTex and an impurity phase. We show that the asymmetry is considerably
reduced by rotating the sample with respect to the wave vector of the gamma radiation, proving so that the
observed asymmetry in perpendicular geometry is mainly related to peculiar transition probabilities observed in
highly textured crystals. While the involved angles made by the radiation with the electric field gradient axes of
the unique phase were completely determined from measurements performed in different geometries at 5 K, the
temperature dependence of the hyperfine parameters specific to the normal and superconducting states was
discussed through temperature dependent Mssbauer spectroscopic results.
Acknowledgements: The financial support through the Core Program PN09-450103 of the Romanian Ministry
of Education, Youth and Sport is highly acknowledged.
References
[1] D Miu, T Noji, T Adachi, Y Koike, L Miu, Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 (2012) 115009.
[2] R.W. Gmez, V. Marquina, J.L. Prez-Mazariego, R. Escamilla, R. Escudero, M. Quintana, J.J. HernndezGmez, R. Ridaura, M.L. Marquina, J Supercond Nov Magn 23 (2010) 551.
[3] J. Lindn, J.-P. Libck, M. Karppinen, E.-L. Rautama, H. Yamauchi, Solid State Communications 151 (2011)
130.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

47

POSTERS
S1 P01
BLUE UPCONVERSION LUMINESCENCE IN LANGANITE AND LANGATATE DOPED WITH Tm
AND Yb
Cristina MATEI1,2, Serban GEORGESCU1, Ana-Maria VOICULESCU1, Angela STEFAN1,2
1

National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Jud. Ilfov, 077125, Romania
2
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Magurele, Jud. Ilfov, 077125, Romania

In this paper we investigate, for the first time, the upconversion luminescence in La 3Ga5.5Ta0.5O14
(langatate, LGT) and LaGa5.5Nb0.5O14 (langanite, LGN) ceramic samples doped with thulium and ytterbium:
LGT:Tm(1at.%):Yb(3at.%),
LGT:Tm(0.5at.%):Yb(4at.%),
LGN:Tm(1at.%):Yb(3at.%)
and
LGN:Tm(0.5at.%):Yb(4at.%) .Langanite and langatate ceramics doped with Tm3+ and Yb3+ was synthesized, by
solid state reaction, from stoichiometric quantities of high purity oxides (La 2O3, Ga2O3, Tm2O3, Yb2O3, Nb2O5,
Ta2O5). The purity of the langatate phase and langanite phase was checked by X ray diffraction.

Fig.1. Powder XRD patterns of 1% Tm and 3% Yb


Fig.2: Upconversion luminescence of LGT:Yb(4
doped LGT crystals.
at.%):Tm(0.5 at.%) crystals.
Besides the diffraction lines of LGT phase (Fig. 1) (the XRD pattern for LGN is similar), some other
lines, but with very low intensities, were observed. The extralines belong to perovskite LaGaO 3 and -Ga2O3
phases.
The samples was characterized by optical spectroscopy (luminescence, absorption, decay
measurements).
For upconversion measurements, the luminescence was excited at 973 nm (with the laser diode
DioMod980/30/400). UV (360 nm 1D23H6), blue (465 nm 1G43H6), red (650 nm 1G43F4) and infrared (800
nm 3H43H6, 1200 nm 3H53H6 and 1700 nm 3F43H6) luminescence was observed at room temperature. The
strong blue luminescence of LGN:Tm:Yb and LGT:Tm:Yb recommends this materials as upconversion blue
phosphors.
Luminescence intensity vs. IR pump intensity measurements have shown that 1G4 level was populated
by a three-photon process, 3H4 level by two-photon process and 3F4 by one-photon process.
For decay measurements, the luminescence was excited with the Quantel Rainbow OPO. Luminescence
lifetimes of 1G4 and 3H4 are: for LGN:Yb(3%):Tm(1%) 183 and 432 s, for LGN:Yb(4%):Tm(0.5%) 204 and
433 s, for LGT:Yb(3%):Tm(1%) 186 and 450 s and for LGT:Yb(4%):Tm(0.5%) 210 and 445 s.
This paper was supported by the Project ID82/06/10/2011

S1 P02
UPCONVERSION PROCESSES IN LANGASITE NANOPOWDERS DOPED WITH THULIUM AND
YTTERBIUM
Ana-Maria VOICULESCU1, Serban GEORGESCU1, Cristina MATEI1,2, Angela STEFAN1,2,
Silviu NASTASE3
1

National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Magurele, Ilfov, 077125,
Romania,
2
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, 077125, Magurele-Ilfov, Romania

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

48
3

University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Bucharest,
Romania
ana.voiculescu@inflpr.ro

In this work we present preliminary results concerning synthesis and characterization of langasite
(La3Ga5SiO14, LGS) nanopowders doped with Tm3+ (1% at.) and Yb3+ (3% at.). The upconversion luminescence
in LGS nanocrystals doped with Tm3+ and Yb3+ has not been reported yet. The doped nanopowders were
prepared by a Pechini sol-gel method. The nanopowders were annealed in air, at various temperatures (750 C,
800C, 900C and 1000C) for 5 hours. The purity of the langasite phase was checked by X ray diffraction using
the Rigaku MiniFlexII (Cu, K) diffractometer.
The XRD patterns for LGS:Yb:Tm are shown in Fig. 1. Besides the diffraction lines of LGS phase (card
PDF-01-070-7027), some other lines (present in the XRD spectrum of the sample annealed at 1000 C), are
observed. These extralines, denoted with *, belong to the perovskite LaGaO 3 (card PDF-00-041-1103). The
nanocrystallite size (the coherence domain) is about 38 nm.

Fig. 1. XRD patterns of LGS:Yb:Tm nanopowders


annealed at various temperatures.

Fig. 2. Luminescence spectrum of LGS:Yb:Tm


nanopowder annealed at 1000oC pumped in IR.

The sample was characterized by optical spectroscopy (luminescence, absorption, decay


measurements). The luminescence of the LGS:Yb:Tm powders was excited in IR, at 973 nm, with a laser diode
and in blue, at 476.5 nm, with Argon laser. For decay measurements, the luminescence was excited with the
Quantel Rainbow OPO. All the measurements were performed at room temperature.
The luminescence spectrum of the LGS:Yb:Tm nanopowder annealed at 1000C for IR pumping at 973
nm is given in Fig. 2. The transition 1G4 3H6 is responsible for the blue luminescence while the transition 1G4
3F4 is responsible for the red one.
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Romanian National Research Council (CNCS) in the frame of the Project
PD 51/05.10.2011.

S1 P03
FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF Zn-Ni FERRITE FILMS DEPOSITED BY SPIN COATING
M. IRIMIA, P. A. RAMBU, V. NICA, F. IACOMI
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania
Ferrite thin films have been investigated by a large number of researchers due to the possibility of their use in
various applications such as electronics, sensors, microwave devices, memory devices, satellite communication,
video, audio and digital recording, permanent magnets etc. and, more recently, as transparent magnetic
semiconductors and spintronic applications [1-3].
Zinc doped nickel-ferrite (Ni1-xZnxFe2O4) nanocrystalline thin films, with different zinc contents (0.0 x 1.0
at.%), were deposited by spin coating on glass and alumina substrates. The structural, optical, electrical and
magnetic properties of the obtained films are investigated in detail and correlated with chemical composition and
crystalline structure. The electrical conductivity of thin films has been investigated as a function of temperature
and the mechanism of electrical conduction is discussed. The magnetic measurements, made at room
temperature, evidenced a ferromagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization dependent on Zn
concentration.
References
[1] S.M. Chavana, M.K. Babrekarc, S.S. Moreb, K.M. Jadhavc, J. Alloys Compd., 507 (2010) 21.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

49

[2] M.U. Islama, T. Abbasa, S. B. Niazib, Z. Ahmada, S. Sabeena, M. A. Chaudhrya, Solid State Commun., 130
(2004) 353.
[3] Y. F. Chen, D. Spoddig, M. Ziese, Epitaxial thin film ZnFe2O4: a semi-transparent magnetic semiconductor
with high Curie Temperature, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 (2008) 205004
Acknowledgements:
This work is part of the researches of the grant PN-II-CT-RO-FR-2012-1-0065 and under financial support of
this.

S1 P04
PREPARATION AND STUDY OF STRUCTURAL PROPERTIS, MORPHOLOGY AND
COMPOSITION OF PHISYCAL VAPOR DEPOSITTED Cu, Co AND Ni NANOSTRUCTURERED
MULTILAYERS
D. RSLEANU1, V. CIUPIN1, G. PRODAN1, C. P. LUNGU2, I. JEPU2, V. EUGENIU3
1. Department of Physics, Ovidius University, Constanta, 900527, Romania
2. National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, 077125, Romania
3. Metav-CD S.A., Bucharest, 050025, Romania
In this paper we present an approach of the obtaining and study of structural properties, morphology
and composition of nanostructured materials. The Cu/Co/Cu/Ni multilayers thin films are grow by physical
vapor deposition technique. This material has special resistive magnetic properties.
The morphological and structural investigations were achieved by means of electron microscopy
technique: TEM (Philips, CM120ST and TECNAI F30) and SEM.
The compositional analysis of the films with the atomic percentage determination of the constituent
elements was performed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

S1 P05
EFFECT OF GALLIUM CONCENTRATION ON THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS
IGZO THIN FILMS
Aurelian C. GALCA1, Liliana M. TRINCA1, Gabriel SOCOL2, Valentin CRACIUN2,3
1

National Institute of Material Physics, Magurele, 077125, Romania


National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, 077125, Romania
3
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
ac_galca@infim.ro ; http://old.infim.ro/~ac_galca/index.htm

The paper investigates the dependence of the optical properties on cation concentration of amorphous-like
indium gallium zinc oxide thin films (Inx w Gaw Zn1xO1+0.5x) with
various (In + Ga)/(In + Ga + Zn) and Ga/(In + Ga) ratios obtained by
pulsed laser deposition. X-ray reflectivity and spectroscopic
ellipsometry thickness results were in good agreement. The
proportionality between density and the refractive index in the
transparency range is evidenced. The extracted physical parameters
are clearly influenced by the variation of cation concentration.

Fig. 1. (a) Thin films thicknesses determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry


(filled symbols) and by X-ray reflectivity (open circles). In the inset is
represented a XRD pattern of In0.48Ga0.02Zn0.5O1.25 thin film deposited on
glass. (b) Thin films refractive index (filled symbols) at = 630 nm obtained
by ellipsometry and the mass density (open circles) derived from X-ray
reflectivity. The density values written in the inserted text are those of bulk
crystalline compounds.

References
[1]. A.C. Galca, G. Socol, L.M. Trinca, V. Craciun, Thin Solid
Films 2013, doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2013.01.176

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

50

S1 P06
STRUCTURAL, MORPHOLOGICAL, ELECTRICAL, AND OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION of
ZnTe THIN FILMS
O. TOMA, Raluca CONSTANTINEANU, C. VANCEA, I. STAN, A. RADU, L. ION, S. ANTOHE
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-11, 077125, Magurele-Ilfov,
Romania e-mail: santohe@solid.fizica.unibuc.ro thtoma72@yahoo.com
Zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin films were deposited on optical glass substrates using thermal vacuum evaporation
technique. The sublimation of zinc telluride powder was carried out from a single quartz crucible, covered with a
quartz wool, at temperature of 580 C. The substrates temperatures were maintained constant at 190 C. All the
samples were subjected to post - deposition thermal treatments in the same deposition chamber, at 200 C for 30
minutes. Structural and morphological investigations were carried out by XRD, AFM and SEM measurements.
All these studies confirmed that post deposition annealing improved the grains growth and their distribution
over the entire surface of the film. The electric characterization by resistivity measurements and Hall
measurements in a wide range of temperatures, was carried out and the influence of post deposition treatments
over the electric properties for ZnTe thin films were investigated. Optical constants (refraction indices and
extinction coefficients) of ZnTe thin films were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 190 nm
to 2200 nm. Optical measurements were completed with the spectral dependencies of transmission and
absorption using a double beam UV - VIS spectrophotometer.
Keywords: ZnTe, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Spectrophotometry, AFM, SEM.

S1 P07
METAL OXIDE ACTIVE NANOSTRUCTURED COATINGS ON FABRIC SUBSTRATES
N. VRINCEANU 1,3, M. SUCHEA*1,2,4, I.V. TUDOSE 1, F. IACOMI 1, E. KOUDOUMAS 2,4
1

Al.I.Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Bulevard Carol I, Iasi, 700506, Romania, Romania


Center of Materials Technology and Laser, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute
of Crete, Heraklion, Greece
3
Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Departament of Textile Technologies, Sibiu, Romania
4.
Electrical Engineering Department, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Greece
Correspondence: M. Suchea email: mirela.suchea@uaic.ro

Nanostructured materials have received the last years a lot of attention due to their excellent performance in
various applications. In recent years, when the study of one-dimensional (1D) materials became the front edge of
nano-science and nanotechnology, since abilities to work at nanosize opened the possibility for exploring novel
electrical, mechanical, chemical and optical properties, metal oxides developed as key technological materials.
Since ZnO has almost the same band-gap energy (3.3 eV) as TiO2, their photocatalytic capabilities are
anticipated to be similar, ZnO being relatively cheaper. Moreover, ZnO is transparent in the visible, can be
highly conductive by doping and can be prepared in various morphologies, such as nanobelts, nanowires,
nanocages, nanocombs, nanosprings, nanorings and nanohelixes. Controlling the growth kinetics, makes possible
to control the morphology of ZnO nanostructures, while, low cost and low temperature growth of ZnO
nanostructures can be achieved using chemical growth techniques such as aqueous chemical growth, nonaqueous
solution growth, sol gel and spray deposition. ZnO nanowire-like structures are the ideal system for studying the
transport process in 1D confined objects and understanding the fundamental phenomena in low-dimensional
systems, as well as for developing new generation high performance nano-devices. The lack of a centre of
symmetry in wurtzite, combined with large electromechanical coupling, results in strong piezoelectric and
pyroelectric properties and the consequent use of ZnO in mechanical actuators and piezoelectric sensors.
Moreover, ZnO as wide band-gap compound semiconductor is suitable for short wavelength optoelectronic
applications. As an example, the high exciton binding energy (60 meV) in ZnO crystal can ensure efficient
excitonic emission and room temperature ultraviolet (UV) luminescence has been reported in ZnO disordered
nanoparticles and thin films. ZnO is also transparent in the visible and can become highly conductive by doping,
properties leading in applications as transparent electrodes. At present time, several reports in the literature are
presenting state of art approaches for using ZnO material deposited on textile substrates in applications such as
antibacterial, deodorizing and UV protection, but none regarding a systematic approach of its optimized direct
growth on textile supports. However, the successful employment of nanostructured ZnO in various technological
applications, like photocatalysis, requires the development of suitable techniques for controlling the

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

51

nanostructured material properties. The present contribution presents preliminary results on controlled
chemically grown nanostructured ZnO and TiO2 on textile substrates and analysis of their properties that makes
them suitable as active coatings in air purification applications.
Acknowledgments
This work was partially supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, CNCS
UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2012-3-0202

S1 P08
RADIATION PROCESSING FOR POLYELECTROLYTE SYNTHESIS
Gabriela CRACIUN, Elena MANAILA, Daniel IGHIGEANU
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Electron Accelerators Laboratory, 077125
Magurele, Ilfov, Romania, e-mail: gabriela.craciun@inflpr.ro
The effects of electron beam irradiation conditions for polyelectrolyte synthesis were investigated. A correlation
between monomers solution chemical composition, polyelectrolyte properties (conversion coefficient, residual
monomer concentration, intrinsic viscosity, linearity coefficient given by the Huggins constant) and synthesis
conditions (absorbed dose and dose rate levels) was made. The electron beam absorbed dose rate level is critical.
Polymerization process is strongly affected by dose and dose rate levels. At high dose rate levels, the
polymerization process is incomplete, monomer conversion decreases, polyelectrolyte properties become very
sensitive to the chemical composition and variations in absorbed dose level. The effect of high-absorbed dose
rate is reduced by the additional introduction of NaCl into acrylamide-acrylic acid aqueous solutions that under
irradiation markedly increases conversion coefficient to nearly 100% and decreases residual monomer
concentration under 0.01. Because the optimum absorbed dose for the acrylamide-acrylic acid aqueous solution
polymerization is rather small, about 1 kGy, the use of electron accelerators is economically attractive for
commercial production of the polyelectrolytes, if all auxiliary systems are made and suitably adapted. The
estimation of processing rate is up to 1800 kg h-1 for an electron beam power of 1 kW and for an electron beam
power utilization factor of 0.5.

S1 P09
FLOCCULATION EFFICIENCY OF POLYELECTROLYTE OBTAINED BY RADIATION
PROCESSING
Gabriela CRACIUN, Elena MANAILA, Daniel IGHIGEANU
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Electron Accelerators Laboratory, 077125
Magurele, Ilfov, Romania, e-mail: gabriela.craciun@inflpr.ro
Correlations between polyelectrolyte physical and chemical properties (conversion coefficient, residual
monomer concentration, intrinsic viscosity, linearity coefficient given by the Huggins constant), its obtaining
conditions and flocculation efficiency (total suspended solids, extractable substances with petroleum ether,
chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand) were made. Flocculation studies were carried out using
a standard jar test. Treatment options based on polyacrylamide-acrylic acid for waste water taken from oil plants
are presented. Polyacrylamide-acrylic flocculants obtained by EB irradiation have the capability to provide
measurable improvements in waste water quality, especially leading to a significant reduction of the extractable
substances with petroleum ether quality indicator (the most difficult to be reduced in case of waste water from
oil plants), compared with the classical treatments. Are used in very small amounts and their application reduces
the amount of classical electrolytes necessary in combined treatments in the range of 20-40%. So, these products
exhibit good performance in waste water treatment and eliminate shortcomings such secondary pollution of
classical treatments.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

52

S1 P10
INFLUENCE OF TRIMETHYLOPROPANE TRIMETHACRYLATE ON CROSS-LINK DENSITY OF
ETHYLENE-PROPYLENE RUBBER VULCANIZED BY IRRADIATION
Elena MANAILA1, Maria Daniela STELESCU2, Gabriela CRACIUN1, Daniel IGHIGEANU1
1

National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Electron Accelerators Laboratory, #409
Atomistilor St., 077125 Magurele, Romania, e-mail: elenam_inflpr@yahoo.com
2
National Research and Development Institute for Textile and Leather Leather and Footwear Research
Institute, 93 Ion Minulescu St., Bucharest, Romania,
e-mail:dmstelescu@yahoo.com
Ethylene-propylene diene elastomers (EPDM) are one of the most versatile, fastest growing and
interesting synthetic rubber polymers. They are obtained by copolymerization of ethylene and propylene in the
presence of an unsaturated diene. The saturated polymer backbone results in excellent resistance to heat,
oxidation, ageing, ozone, polar solvents, or microbial attack [1-3]. A common physical-chemical treatment
performed on elastomers is the curing (cross-linking), imparting the rubber mechanical and thermal stability.
Elastomers show low thermal conductivity values, and therefore, require complex and high cost heating
methods; thus, the ionizing (gamma and accelerated electrons) method shows high interest for the grafting and
cross-linking processes [4] . At industrial level, electron beam (EB) processing brings especially unique advantages
such as energy saving and capabilities inducing cross-linking at room temperature, but the required radiation doses
are generally too high. Low irradiation doses are required for the process efficiency and a high dose rate must be
used to give large production capacities. Many investigations have been undertaken to find out the effect of
different polyfunctional monomers (coagents) on the physical properties of different rubber types cross-linked by
electron beams [5-9]. Appropriate polyfunctional monomers in polymer matrix can be used to obtain desired
cross-linking density at low irradiation doses. In this paper is presented the effect of polyfunctional monomer
(trimethylopropane trimethacrylate, TMPT) concentration on the cross-link density and gel fraction of ethylenepropylene rubber (EPDM) cross-linked by electron beam processing. Dependence of gel fraction and crosslink
density on irradiation dose was determined from a dose range of 12.5 kGy to 50 kGy. From the obtained results
it was observed that the addition of TMPT (polyfunctional monomer) increase the cross-link density and gel
fraction comparing with control samples (without TMPT). In terms of radiation dose, the highest values were
obtained for blend irradiated with 50.0 kGy, for both EPDM and EPDM / TMPT samples, but the best are for
those containing TMPT. So, we can say that cross-link density for EPDM/TMPT is found to be not only a
function of polyfunctional monomer concentration, but also of irradiation dose.
KEYWORDS: ethylene-propylene, cross-linking, electron beam
REFERENCES
[1] Lu, J., Chen, S., Zhang, J., Xu, Z., J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 2010, 117, 1741;
[2] Ahmadi, S.J., Huang, Y., Li, W., Compos. Sci. Technol., 2005, 65, 1069;
[3] Homocianu, M., Airinei, A., Stelescu, M.D., Timpu, D., Ioanid, A., Polymer Composites, 2012, 33(3), p.379387
[4] Manaila, E., Stelescu, M.D., Ighigeanu, D., Craciun, G., Berechet, D., Leather and Footwear Journal, 2011,
11 (3), 201-210;
[5] Yunshu, X., Yoshii, F., Makuuchi, K., J. Macromol. Sci. (Pure Appl. Chem.), 1995, A32 (10), 1801-1808.
[6] Majumder, P. S., and Bhowmick, A. K., J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 2000, 77, 323-327;
[7] Jinhua, W., Yoshii, F., and Makuuchi, K., Radiat. Phys. Chem., 2001, 60(1-2), 139-142.
[8] Yasin, T., Ahmed, S., Yoshii, F., and Makuuchi, K., React. Funct. Polym., 2002, 53, 173-181.
[9] Han, H.D., Shin, S.H., and Petrov, S., Radiat. Phys. Chem., 2004, 69, 239-243

S1 P11
CROSS-LINK DENSITY AND SWELLING PROPERTIES OF WASTE FLAX/NATURAL RUBBER
COMPOSITES OBTAINED BY ELECTRON BEAM IRRADIATION
Elena MANAILA1, Maria Daniela STELESCU2, Gabriela CRACIUN1, Daniel IGHIGEANU1
1

National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Electron Accelerators Laboratory, #409
Atomistilor St., 077125 Magurele, Romania, e-mail: elenam_inflpr@yahoo.com
2
National Research and Development Institute for Textile and Leather Leather and Footwear Research
Institute, 93 Ion Minulescu St., Bucharest, Romania,
e-mail:dmstelescu@yahoo.com

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

53

Natural fibre reinforced composites is an emerging area in polymer technology. Strong environmental
regulations and increased interest in the proper utilization of renewable natural resources have prompted the
composite industry to develop ecofriendly components [1].
Natural rubber (NR) is a high molecular weight polymer of isoprene in which essentially all the
isoprene's have the cis 1-4 configuration. Since it is of biological origin, it is renewable, inexpensive and creates
no health hazard problems. NR is an interesting material with commercial success due to its excellent physical
properties, especially high mechanical strength, low heat build-up, excellent flexibility, and resistance to impact
and tear, and above all its renewability [2]. The most important stage in the rubber processing technology is
vulcanization or cross-linking. This is normally done by sulphur or peroxides in the presence of many auxiliary
materials called additives. Additives used in rubber manufacture include vulcanizing agents, accelerators,
activators and/or retarders, fillers, anti-degradants, among others. These compounds (additives) and their
reaction products could be responsible for cytotoxicity [3] and allergy-causing compounds, such as nitrosamines
and nitrosatable materials. Fillers represent one of the most important additives used in rubber compounding.
Fillers are added to rubber formulation in order to optimize properties needed for service application [4]. Due to
strong environmental regulations worldwide and increased interest in the proper utilization of renewable natural
resources, efforts have been made to find alternative reinforcements that are environmentally friendly while
providing the same performance as their synthetic counterparts (fillers). With their low cost, easy availability,
ease of chemical and mechanical modification, and high specific mechanical properties, natural fibres represent a
good, renewable and biodegradable alternative to the most common synthetic reinforcement [5-7]. Besides the
conventional techniques, cross-linking of NR can also be achieved by means of high energy radiation.
This paper studies the influence of flax fibre amount and electron beam irradiation dose on crosslinking density and swelling properties of polymeric composites based on natural rubber and flax wastes. The
cross-linking rates of samples, measured using the Flory-Rehner equation increase as the amount of flax waste in
blends increases and as the electron beam irradiation dose increases. The swelling parameters of samples
significantly depend on the amount of flax wastes in blends, because the latter have hydrophilic characteristics.
KEYWORDS: natural rubber, flax, cross-link density
REFERENCES
[1] Mathew L., Joseph K.U., Joseph R., Bull. Mater. Sci., 29(1), 2006, 91-99.
[2] Daniel D., Punyanich I., Quang N.T, Fredderic G., Charoen N., Eur. Polym. J., 45, 2009, 820-836.
[3] Ikarashi Y., Toyoda K., Ohasawa N., Uchima T., Tsuchiya T., Kaniwa M.A., Sato M., Takahashi M.,
Nakamura A., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 26 (3), 1992, 339..
[4]. Setua D. K., De S. K., Rubber Chem. Tech., 56 ( 4), 1983, 808.
[5]. Chakraborty S. K., Setua D. K., De S. K., Rubber Chem Tech, 55 (5) , 1982, 1286.
[6] Egwaikhide P.A, Akporhonor E.E, Okieimen F.E, Int. J. of Phys. Sci., 2(2), 2007, 39.
[7] Lovely M, Joseph K.U, Joseph R., Bull. Mater. Sci., 29(1), 2006, 91.
.

S1 P12
OPTICAL, STRUCTURAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR DIFFERENT
METALLIC OXIDES
Sorina IFTIMIE1,2, J. MERIGEON2, S. ANTOHE1, M. KOMPITSAS3,
Mihaela GIRTAN2
1

MDEO Research Center, Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Romania


2
LPHIA Laboratory, LUNAM - Angers University, France
3
National Hellenic Research Foundation, LATA Laboratory, Athens, Greece

In this study we proposed a very simple method for obtaining transparent and conductive oxides that
can be potential candidates for different electronic and optoelectronic applications, particularly for photovoltaic
cells. Different sputtered metallic thin films were thermally oxidized in such a way to obtain metallic oxides that
can be used in transparent electronics and optoelectronic devices. The optical properties of the new compounds
were investigated and compared in UV-VIS range using a Perkin Elmer 19 UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The
morphological features were analyzed in non-contact mode by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a LP
Research Thermomicroscope Autoprobe and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a JEOL
microscope.The structure was determined by X-ray diffraction using a Bruker D8 diffractometer.
Keywords: metallic thin films, TCO, photovoltaic cells

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

54

Acknowledgments: S.I. is grateful to the Pays de la Loire and Angers University for the post-doc fellowship No
2012-12029 financial support and wants to thank Dr. Flavia Pop (Moltech Laboratory, Angers University) for
fruitful discussions.

S1 P13
EPR characterization of micro and nanostructured Zn 1-xFexO powders
O.RAITA, A.POPA, D.TOLOMAN, M.STAN,and L.M.GIURGIU
National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath,
400293 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
ZnO is an attractive system for quite a wide variety practical applications, being a chemically stable
oxide semiconductor. It has been shown that Fe doping produces ferromagnetic semiconductor at room
temperature. This material, therefore, has the potential for use in spintronic devices such as spin transistors, spin
light emiting diodes, very high density nonvolatile semiconductor memory and optical emitters. It is believed
that oxygen vacancies and substitutional incorporation are important to produce ferromagnetism in
semiconductor oxide doped with transition metal ions.
The present paper reports detailed electron paramagnetic resonance investigations (EPR) of the samples
in order to investigate how Fe ions are incorporated into the ZnO lattice and their interaction with environment.
X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of Fe3+ ions in Zn1-xFexO powders with X = 1%, 3%,
5% is reported. These samples are interesting to investigate as Fe doping produce ferromagnetism in ZnO,
making a promising ferromagnetic semiconductor at room temperature.

S1 P14
LIFE ESTIMATION OF CABLE INSULATIONS BY DSC AND FT-IR ANALYSIS
Marius Eduard LUNGULESCU1, Tanta SETNESCU2, Radu SETNESCU1,2, Iulian BANCUTA3, Anca
GHEBOIANU3, Roxana BANCUTA4
1

R&D Institute for Electrical Engineering, Department for Advanced Materials, 313 Splaiul Unirii, Bucharest
030138, Romania
2
Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, 18-22 Unirii Av., Targoviste 130082, Romania
3
Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Science and Technologies, 18-22
Unirii Av., Targoviste 130082, Romania
4
The Water Company from Targoviste, Dambovita County, 130055, Romania
The aim of this study was the diagnosis of the unexpected rapid deterioration (after 5 - 7 years of
exploitation) of some multi-conductor instrumentation cables, exposed indoor in different vented distribution
racks. Used cable samples from different production lots, not-used cables (in the as received state) as well as the
raw PE materials, were studied. Appropriate thermo-oxidative accelerated tests were carried out in laboratory.
DSC method in isothermal mode, typically at 205C, was applied to obtain the oxidation induction time
(OIT) values of the studied materials. DSC in scanning temperature mode was used to obtain the oxidation onset
temperature (OOT). The ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was applied to characterize the chemical nature of the
oxidized groups in the aged cables. The room temperature volatility of the antioxidants became a factor to be
taken into account for a polymer insulator situated in open air atmosphere: due to their steadily depletion, the
long term antioxidative polymer protection is endangered.

S1 P15
STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF Zn-DOPED LPFO THIN FILMS DEPOSITED
BY RF MAGNETRON SPUTTERING
C. DOROFTEI1,2, F. IACOMI2, P.D. POPA1
1

Institute of Technical Physics, Bd. D. Mangeron 47, 700050 Iasi, Romania.


Al. I. Cuza University, Faculty of Physics, 11 Carol I Blvd, 7000506 Iasi, Romania.
e-mail: docorneliu@yahoo.com

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

55

Lanthanum perovskite LaFeO3 (LFO) is a semi-conducting oxide and has been extensively studied with
reference to several potential applications, such as gas sensors, humidity sensors and catalysts. This oxide
crystallizes in an orthorhombic perovskite structure. We have studied in this work the structural and electric
properties of some thin films obtained through RF magnetron sputtering using as targets La0.8Pb0.2FeO3 (LPFO)
perovskites in which Fe-ions are partially substituted with Zn-ions. We have investigated the effects of the
substitutions, of the substrate (quartz and alumina) and its temperature during deposition, of plasma composition
(Ar/O2 ratio) and of subsequent thermal treatments.
Electrical behavior of the deposited layers is that of an n-type semiconductor. Thermal activation energy
(Ea) is around 0.5 eV and increases to 0.62 eV with the amount of zinc ions (x=0 to 0.2) in LPFO target.
The influence of the environmental humidity on the electric resistivity of the obtained films was
determined within the 0% 98% RH interval. With increasing amount of zinc ions which substitute the iron in
LPFO target, layers much more sensitive to humidity between 53% and 98% RH were obtained.
References:
[1] I. Hole, T. Tybell, J. K. Grepstad, I. Warnhus, T. Grande, K. Wiik, Sol. Stat. Electr. 47, 2279 (2003).
[2] J.K. Grepstad, Y. Takamura, A. Scholl, I. Hole, Y. Suzuki, T. Tybell, Thin Solid Films 486, 108 (2005).

S1 P16
MAGNETIC SPIN VALVES BASED ON GROUP-III NITRIDE NANOWIRES
1 George Alexandru NEMNES, 2 Camelia VISAN

1 Faculty of Physics, Materials and Devices for Electronics and Optoelectronics


Research Center, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-11, Ilfov 077125 Magurele, Romania
2 Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH),

The Department of Computational Physics and Information Technologies,


077126 Magurele-Ilfov, Romania
Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance effect, a lot of effort has been devoted in developing
a wide range of magnetic sensing applications. The spin valve is nowadays the most commonly utilized device
in hard-disk industry and The current technology is almost exclusively based on conventional thin-film
geometry. However, new prototypical spin valve devices [1] have been proposed based on nanowires, which
have certain advantages over the conventional planar technology. These relate to the possibility to avoid the
inherent limitations associated with planar surfaces, better scaling and an increased overall sensitivity.

Ni-AlN-Ni nanowire spin valve


Group-III nitride nanowires already provide nowadays a vast number of applications, ranging from
chemical and temperature sensors, thermoelectrical [2] and field emitter devices and nanomechanical resonators.
Recently, spin transport in AlN atomic sized nanowires with transitional metal impurities has been investigated,
indicating the spin filtering properties [3].
Although AlN is a wide bandgap semiconductor, in thin nanowires this is reduced by the presence of the surface
states. Furthermore, a small tensile stress can switch between the bulk-like wurtzite (WZ) configuration of the
nanowires to a graphite-like (GL) structure, which has consequences in the magnetic behavior.
We investigate here a spin valve structure with fcc-Ni(111) electrodes, which ensure a natural coupling
to the WZ structure of the AlN semiconducting spacer, using spin constrained DFT calculations [4,5]. The
current is obtained for both parallel and anti-parallel configurations of the magnetic contacts. We also evaluate
the efficiency of the device, working as spin valve, in the context of introducing additional transitional metal
impurities. The switching between the WZ and GL configurations is also investigated.
REFERENCES:
[1] Keith T. Chan et al., IEEE TRANS. ON MAGNETICS 46, NO. 6, JUNE (2010)
[2] G.A. Nemnes, C. Visan, S. Antohe, Physica E 44, 1092 (2012)
[3] G.A. Nemnes, Journal of Nanomaterials 408475 (2013)
[4] G.A. Nemnes and S. Antohe, Materials Science and Engineering B, in print,
10.1016/j.mseb.2013.04.014 (2013)
[5] A. Reily Rocha and S. Sanvito, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 09B102 (2007)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

56

This work was supported by the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research project PN-II-RU-PD2011-3-0044 and in part by the European Commission under EU FP7
Project HP-SEE (under Contract no. 261499).

S1 P17
Cu(II), Co(II) AND Zn(II) COMPLEXES OF A NEW POLYAZOMETHINE CONTAINING SILANE
UNITS AND OXADIAZOLE RINGS WITHIN THE CHAIN
Mirela-Fernanda ZALTARIOV1, Maria CAZACU1, Angelica VLAD1, George STIUBIANU1, Anton
AIRINEI1
1

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, 41A, Iai
700487, Romania

Polyazomethines have been extensively studied, being one of the most attractive candidates for
opto(electronic) applications. Attaching of metal ions to the polyazomethine backbone can induce major changes
in their physical and chemical activities. Their metal complexes are of high interest as catalyst, sensors and
antimicrobial agents.
A new silicon-containing dialdehyde, bis(formyl-p-phenoxymethyl)-dimethylsilane, was obtained and
used to prepare polyazomethine by condensation with 2,5-bis(p-aminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (Scheme 1).

Scheme 1. Chemical structure of the prepared polyazomethine


This polymer was used as a ligand to syntesize complexes of Cu(II), Co(II) and Zn(II). Both ligand and
derived metal complexes were characterized by spectral methods while their thermal, optical, electrochemical,
and dielectric properties were evaluated by appropriate techniques.
The presence of ether linkages and Si-C bonds confer flexibility to the polymer chain reflected in low
glass transition and good solubility, while the presence of oxadiazole rings confers fluorescence. By metal
coordination to the nitrogen atoms from oxadiazole ring, the thermostability reduces as compared with the
starting polyazomethine and the intensity of emission spectra decreases in the following order: PAZ-Zn > PAZCo > PAZ-Cu > PAZ. The metal presence leads instead to the increasing in the dielectric constant and
conductivity values.
References:
1. Saegusa Y, Koshikawa T, Nakamura S., J Polym Sci Polym Chem 1992;30(7):1369-73.
2. Saegusa Y, Sekiba K, Nakamura S., J Polym Sci Polym Chem 1990;28(13):3647-59.
3. Hamciuc E, Hamciuc C, Cazacu M., Eur Polym J 2007;43(11):4739-49.
Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by European Regional Development Fund,
Sectoral Operational Programme "Increase of Economic Competitiveness", Priority Axis 2 (SOP IEC-A2O2.1.2-2009-2, ID 570, COD SMIS-CSNR: 12473, Contract 129/2010-POLISILMET).

S1 P18
FLUORESCENCE QUENCHING OF SOME ANTHRAQUINONE DERIVATIVES. SENSOR
APPLICATIONS
Ionut Radu TIGOIANU1, Anton AIRINEI1, Mirela-Fernanda ZALTARIOV1, Maria CAZACU1, Volker
RIBITSCH2, Christian GRUBER2
1

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, 41A, Iai-700487,
Romania
2
University of Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28A, 8010, Graz, Austria

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

57

Anthraquinone derivatives are some of the most widely used polycyclic compounds in nature and
technology. Dyes based on anthraquinones have been among the major compounds used in dye technologies or
in dyeing of textiles. These compounds have proven to be useful as functional elements of organic photoelectric
structures, optical transducers and oscillators and thin-film structures. An important feature of anthraquinone
derivatives is their strong fluorescence which is very useful in order to construct highly sensitive fluorescent
chemical sensors for metal ion detection.
Fluorescence quenching of a siloxane anthraquinone derivative (A3_DHAQ) by metal ions (Ni2+, Co2+,
2+
2+
Zn , Fe , Ca2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, As) was investigated in water solutions at room temperature. The Stern-Volmer
plots of A3_DHAQ are linear at low concentrations of quencher. A deviation from the linearity was observed for
higher concentrations of quencher. The Stern-Volmer constant for A3_DHAQ calculated from the initial part of
Stern-Volmer curve is 505.4 l/mol for Fe2+. From the decay measurements a lifetime of 1.9 ns was obtained for
A3_DHAQ. A new sensor for detecting Fe2+ (< 18 mg/l) from water was developed.

S1 P19
DESIGN AND TESTING OF FLEXIBLE CARBON NAOCOMPOSITES FOR RESISTIVE FORCE
SENSING APPLICATIONS
Leila ZEVRI1, Iulian IORDACHE2, Aristofan Al. TEIANU2 and Gheorghe IONI1
1

Valahia University from Trgovite, Bd. Carol I, Nr. 2, 130024, Trgovite, Dmbovia, Romania
National Institute for Research in Electrical Engineering (INCDIE ICPE-CA), Splaiul Unirii, No. 313, Sector 3,
030138, Bucharest, Romania

Research developed and presented in this work led to the obtaining of electrically conducting nanocomposite
materials with properties which allow their use as resistive force sensors. The experimental method for obtaining
nanocomposite consisted of the addition of electrically conductive particles of nanometric dimensions in a
polymer matrix-silicone elastomer. Research developed shows that this type of nanocomposites can generate
flexible materials with large surface for mechanical detection applications. Functional testing of nanocomposite
materials in static conditions it was made. Percolation graphs (conductive-nonconductive transitions) were drawn
by evaluating the electrical resistivity of nanocomposite materials type SE-KTJ and SE-CHB obtained by adding
nanocarbon filler for five different mass concentrations. The samples SE-KTJ-5, SE-KTJ-6, SE-CHB-6 and SECHB-7, were tested extensively showing a volume electrical resistivity for SE-KTJ-5 and SE-KTJ-6 o v~105
4
6

cm compared with SE-CHB-6 and SE-CHBcm respectively


v~10
v~10
4
cm. These differences in resitivities acount for the tensile sensitivity of the nanocomposite materials
v~10
and are explained by close examination of the structure by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray
difractometry. Functional testing of nanocomposite samples SE-KTJ-5, SE-KTJ-6, SE-CHB-6 and SE-CHB-7, in
dynamic conditions, was performed using a mechanical testing machine Zwik Roell (50kN) with adapted grips
for testing of the compression and elongation properties under an electrical field appiled to samples. For all
samples tested in the dynamical conditions were recorded the variations of electrical resistance according to the
applied force and was demonstrated the ability of the nanocomposite materials to respond to instantaneous
application of a constant force in the range of (0.550) N. Nanocomposite materials, wich were extensively
studied, shows a modulus of 0.3 MPa and an elongation at break of 400%, keeping the elastic characteristics of
the pure polymer. At a strain of 100% the electrical resistivity is doubled. For instance, it was demonstrated a
sensitivity of nanocomposite materials SE-KTJ-6 of

in the range of the compressive


strength (0.025 1) N.

S1 P20
FERROMAGNETIC FERROELECTRIC INTERFACES STUDIED BY MSSBAUER
SPECTROSCOPY
S.G. SANDU1,4, M. VOPSON2,3, I. GHITA1,4, A. IUGA1, V. KUNCSER1
1

National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, Magurele 077125, Romania


The University of Portsmouth, School of Applied Physics, Burnaby Building, Portsmouth PO1 3QL, UK
3
National Physical Laboratory, Office F9/A8, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW, UK
4
Physics Department, University of Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-11, Magurele 077125, Romania

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

58

Keywords: ferromagnetic-ferroelectric interfaces, texture, RF sputtering, CEMS


Magneto-electric coupling in heterostructured artificial multiferroics is of high interest in spintronics, data
storage, MRAM etc. The interface of Fe containing ferromagnetic layers coupled to ferroelectric substrates is
investigated by means of Mssbauer spectroscopy and the effect of an applied voltage on the ferroelectric
electrodes to their magnetic properties is considered. Iron thin films have been deposited on PZT substrates by
means of Radio-frequency sputtering. A voltage was applied to the heterostructure electrodes during the
collection of the conversion electrons following the Mssbauer events. The Mssbauer spectroscopy
measurements were performed in perpendicular and in 45 geometry (the angle indicating the orientation of the
gamma rays relative to the sample plane). Textured Fe phases were evidenced at the Fe/PZT interface and the
variation of the hyperfine parameters as a function of the applied voltage was investigated.
Acknowledgements: The financial support through the Project PCCE-C2-006/2012 of the Romanian Ministry
of Education, Youth and Sport is highly acknowledged.

S1 P21
STRUCTURAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF C-AXIS ORIENTED ALUMINUM NITRIDE THIN
FILMS PREPARED AT LOW TEMPERATURE BY REACTIVE RF-MAGNETRON SPUTTERING
George E. STAN, Aurelian C. GALCA, Liliana M. TRINCA, C. Catalin NEGRILA, Leona C. NISTOR
National Institute of Material Physics, Magurele, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125, Romania
george_stan@infim.ro
Spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy experiments are
employed to characterize aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films obtained by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at
low temperature (50 C).
To understand the growth mechanism and to get in depth information of such films by using ex situ
characterization techniques, the AlN thin film sample series were prepared for different sputtering times, while
keeping constant all the other deposition conditions. The diffraction studies reveal a [002] oriented growth of the
AlN thin films. The misorientation of this crystallographic axis to the normal to the surface reduces
progressively with film growth.
A nonmonotonic behavior of the AlN pseudo-refractive index versus deposition time indicates a
complex depth profile of the AlN thin films optical properties. The difference in orientation dispersion of the
[002] crystallite axis, the variation of defects concentration and each constituent atom density influence the
refractive index evolution. Our interpretation validity was verified by producing and characterizing samples
obtained at intermediate deposition time.
The AlN thin films show also very good pull-out adherence values.

Fig. 1. SAED patterns of a sample: (a) on the Si substrate, (b) at the Si/AlN film interface, (c) on the AlN film
close to the Si support and (d) on the AlN film, close to the film surface.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

59

References
[1] A.C. Galca, G.E. Stan, L.M. Trinca, C.C. Negrila, L.C. Nistor, Thin Solid Films 524 2012, 328333 doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2012.10.015
[2] G.E. Stan, I. Pasuk, L.M. Trinca, A.C. Galca, M. Enculescu, F. Miculescu, Dig. J. Nanomater. Biostruct. 7
(1) 2012, 41-50 http://www.chalcogen.infim.ro/41_Stan.pdf

S1 P22
SIZE EFFECTS IN THERMAL HYSTERESIS OF SPIN CROSSOVER NANOPARTICLES STUDIED
BY FORC DIAGRAMS WITHIN A MONTE CARLO BASED ISING-LIKE MODEL
Alexandru ATITOAIE, Radu TANASA, Alexandru STANCU, Cristian ENACHESCU
Faculty of Physics and CARPATH Center, A. I. CuzaUniversity of Iasi, 700506 Iasi, Romania
Spin crossover compounds are a class of molecular magnets with two states in thermodynamic
competition, a diamagnetic low spin state (LS) with minimum total spin and a paramagnetic high spin state (HS)
with maximum total spin. These two states are inter-switchable by temperature and pressure variation, by light
irradiation or magnetic field, the the first order transition being followed by changes in magnetic, optical or
volume properties. These bistable materials raised a significant research interest in the development of solid state
temperature or pressure sensors and also for being possible candidates for replacing the materials currently used
in recording media industry. Recent experimental studies of spin crossover nanoparticles [1] showed particular
transition properties, the reduction in size of the nanoparticles was leading to a decrease of the thermal hysteresis
width, along with a shift of the transition temperature towards lower values and a smoother and narrower
hysteresis loop.
The model proposed in this work is based on the procedures experimentally used for producing the spin
crossover nanoparticles, which are synthesized in a polymer matrix for confining their dimension, introducing a
new interaction between the surface molecules and embedding ones [2]. The simulations are using a Monte
Carlo method based on Arrhenius dynamics applied for an Ising-like Hamiltonian, taking into account both
short- and long- range interactions. We reproduced all the main properties of thermal transitions of spin
crossover nanoparticles using appropriate boundary conditions. We propose a theoretical analysis for systems of
nanoparticles characterized by a size distribution based on first order reversal curves (FORC) diagram method
(Fig. 1).

Figure 1. FORCs and FORC diagram for a system of spin crossover nanoparticles
References
Volatron, F., et al., Inorg. Chem., 2008. 47: p. 6584.
Atitoaie, A., C. Enachescu, and R. Tanasa, J. Magn. Magn. Mater., 2012. 324(8): p. 1596-1600.

1.
2.

S1 P23
TAILORING THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SILICONES BY CHEMICAL MODIFICATION
Carmen RACLES1, Mihaela ALEXANDRU1, Valentina MUSTEATA1, Adrian BELE1, Maria CAZACU1
1

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487, Romania

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

60

Silicones are very interesting materials for dielectric elastomers because they are resistant to oxygen,
ozone, and sun-light irradiation and therefore resistant to weathering and ageing [1]. Additionally, they have high
shear stability, good dielectric strength, and low toxicity. However, their low permittivity and low fracture
resistance make the handling of thin films difficult and reduce their electromechanical performance [2]. One way
to increase the dielectric permittivity of silicones is to chemically bond polar groups.
We undertook a systematic investigation on the influence of composition and molecular weight of
polysiloxanes on dielectric properties. For this purpose, copolymers with different content of cyanopropyl
groups, along with different non-polar groups (methyl, hexyl) were synthesized in identical conditions (in a
multireactor) and characterized. Different synthetic methods were used for tailoring the molecular weight of the
starting copolymers [3]. Especially the dielectric properties of the cyano-propyl modified copolymers, as well as
the corresponding cross-linked materials were of interest, with the final goal to optimize the actuation
performances of such materials.
[1] Jershow P 2002 Silicone Elastomers, Wacker-Chemie GmbH, RAPRA.
[2] Zhang X, Lwe C, Wissler M, Jhne B and Kovacs G 2005 Adv. Eng. Mater. 7 361; Michel S, Zhang X Q,
Wissler M, Lwe C and Kovacs G 2010 Polym. Int. 59 391.
[3] Racles C, Cazacu M, Fischer B and Opris D M, 2013 Smart Mater. Struct. 22 (in press).
Acknowledgements: This work was financially supported by the Swiss Enlargement Contribution in the
framework of the Romanian-Swiss Research Programme, under Project number IZERZO_142215 / 1, RSRP
NR: 10 / RO-CH/RSRP/01.01.2013. The contribution of European Scientific Network for Artificial Muscles,
ESNAM (COST Action MP1003) is also acknowledged.

S1 P24
THE INFLUENCE OF THE MORPHOLOGY OF BARIUM TITANATE NANOPARTICLES ON
DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SILICONES
Adrian BELE1, George STIUBIANU1, Maria CAZACU1, Carmen RACLES1
1

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487, Romania

Silicones are well-known dielectric elastomers used in actuators, since this class of polymers possesses
highly desired elastic behaviour for flexible devices. The most studied amongst them, polydimethylsiloxane, is
known for its unusual rheological/flow properties [1]. In order to improve the dielectric constant of the silicones
based composites, high permittivity inorganic fillers are often used.
BaTiO3, a ferroelectric crystal which presents spontaneous polarization and high electrical breakdown
strength is one of the fillers used in this aim [2]. Thus, it has been incorporated in different polymeric matrices
[3]. In this study, BaTiO3 nanoparticles with various morphologies (spheres, tubes, prisms) and size ranges were
synthesized using different chemical routes. Polysiloxane rubber crosslinked with a trifunctional silane at room
temperature was used as matrix for the composites. The effect of the morphology and size of barium titanate
nanoparticles on the properties of the composites was studied. Thus each type of nanoparticles leads to
composite materials with different mechanical and dielectric properties and this represents a way for further
optimization of the properties of silicone-based dielectric actuators.
1. Koulouridis, S.; Kiziltas, G.; Zhou, Y.; Hansford, D. J.; Volakis, J. L. IEEE T. MICROW. THEORY, 54(12),
2006, 42024208
2. Chon, J.; Ye, S.; Cha, K. J.; Lee, S. C.; Koo, Y. S.; Jung, J. H.; Kwon, Y. K., Chem. Mater., 22, 2010, 5445
5452
3. Sebastian, M. T.; Jantunen, H. Int. J. Appl. Ceram. Technol., 7(4), 2010, 415434.
Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by the 7th Framework Program through Grant
number 309139 (PolyWEC).

S1 P25
IMPROVING THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SILICONES BY INCORPORATION OF LEAD
ZIRCONATE NANOPARTICLES
George STIUBIANU1, Adrian BELE1, Maria CAZACU1, Carmen RACLES1
1

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487, Romania

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

61

Silicone rubber is a well-known dielectric elastomer which is used in actuators [1] due to its outstanding
properties consisting in stability over a wide range of temperature, and frequency [2], low surface energy, water
repellence, resistance to oxygen, ozone and sunlight irradiation and, as a result resistance to weathering and
ageing. The polarizability of the Si-O bond that constitutes a premise for a high dielectric constant is higher as
compared to organic nonpolar polymers such as polyethylene, but not so much, due to the side methyl groups (in
the case of polydimethylsiloxane), which prevent Si-O dipoles from approaching each other too closely [2].
Fillers are often used to enhance the dielectrical as well as the mechanical properties of the silicones [3]. These
may be ceramic particles with a high dielectric constant, such as BaTiO 3 or TiO2, or other conductive particles,
such as carbon nanotubes, carbon black, copperphthalocyanine/polyaniline, polyaniline, polythiophene, etc. In
this work we prepared nanoparticles of lead zirconate, known as a ferroelectric with high electrical breakdown
strength [4,5], and used them as fillers for polysiloxanes. PbZrO3 nanoparticles were previously surface treated to
improve the compatibility and dispersability within the matrix. A polysiloxane rubber custom- synthesized by
room temperature crosslinking was used as matrix and a trifunctional silane was used as a crosslinker. The effect
of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties was studied and it was found that the dielectric constant
of nanocomposites increases significantly with the increase in PbZrO 3 concentration where as the volume
resistivity decreases continuously. Strain-stress tests also revealed a high influence of the filler on the
mechanical behaviour of the films.
1. Gharavi, N.; Razzaghi-Kashani, M.; Golshan-Ebrahimi, N. Smart Mater. Struct., 19(2), 2010, 025002
2. Gubbels, F.; De Jaeger, R.; Gleria, M. Chapter 2. Silicones in Industrial Applications Inorganic Polymers p.
61-162, Nova Science Publishers, 2007.
3. Carpi, F.; Gallone, G.; Galantini, F.; De Rossi, D. Chapter 6. Enhancing the dielectric permittivity of
elastomers, p. 60, Carpi, F.; De Rossi, D.; Kornbluh, R.; Pelrine, R.; Sommer-Larsen, P. (Eds.), Elsevier Ltd.,
2008.
4. Pansa-Ard, C.; Y. Pornchaisiriarun, N. Tangboriboon, Energy Res. J. 2, 2011, 34-37
5. Ersin Emre Oren, Ercan Taspinar, A. Cuneyt Tas, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 80(10), 1997, 271416
Acknowledgements: This research occurred in the frameworks of European Scientific Network for
Artificial Muscles, ESNAM (COST Action MP1003) and 7th Framework Programme that provided financially
support through Grant number 309139 (PolyWEC).

S1 P26
BINDING AND ELECTRON TRANSFER FROM A METAL-FREE DYE WITH CARBOXYL,
HYDROXYL AND SULFONIC ANCHORS TO A TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOCLUSTER
Jeanina LUNGU,1 Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Petre PANAIT,1 Daniela STAMATE,1
Anca DUMBRAV,1 Fanica CIMPOESU,2 and Mihai A. GRU1,*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana, Romania


Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bucharest, Romania

We report results of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations of a metal-free dye, 5-(4sulfophenylazo)salicylic acid disodium salt, known as Mordant Yellow 10 (MY-10), used as sensitizer for TiO2
dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Given the need to better understand
the behavior of the dyes adsorbed on the TiO2 nanoparticle we studied
various single and double deprotonated forms of the dye bound to a TiO2
cluster, taking advantage of the presence of the carboxyl, hydroxyl and
sulfonic groups as possible anchors.
We discuss various binding
configurations to the TiO2 substrate and the charge transfer from the pigment
to the oxide by means of DFT calculations. In agreement with other
reports, we find that the carboxyl group tends to bind in bidentate bridging
configurations. The salycilate uses both the carboxyl and hydroxyl
substituent groups for either a tridentate binding to adjacent Ti(IV) ions, or
a bidentate Ti-O binding together with an O-H-O binding, due to the
rotation of the carboxyl group out of the plane of the dye. The sulfonic
group prefers a tridentate binding. We analyze the propensity for electron
transfer of the various dyes and find that for MY-10, as a function of the
anchor group, the DSSC performance decreases in the order hydroxyl +
carboxyl > carboxyl > sulfonate.
*Acknowledgments: The authors acknowledge the financial support

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

62

received from SNSF and UEFISCDI under the Romanian-Swiss Research Programme, through the grant RSRP
#IZERO-142144/1 PN-II-ID-RSRP-1/2012.
**E-mail: jmatei@univ-ovidius.ro, mihai.girtu@univ-ovidius.ro

S1 P27
CURRENT TRENDS IN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF TENSORESISTIVE SENSORS
Leila ZEVRI1, Iulian IORDACHE2
1

Valahia University from Trgovite, Bd. Carol I, Nr. 2, 130024, Trgovite, Dmbovia, Romania
National Institute for Research in Electrical Engineering (INCDIE ICPE-CA), Splaiul Unirii, No. 313, Sector 3,
030138, Bucharest, Romania

Abstract. Research presented in this work led to present current trends in research and development of tenseresistive sensors. Robotics today is constantly expanding from a fixed medium, of a production line, for more
complex environments such as homes, offices and hospitals. The new application domains require versatile,
autonomous, intelligent robots, which can interact with humans and their broad range of instruments, tools in
real-world environments. Touch detection in robotics is defined as continuous detection of contact forces. This
information can be used to determine if the robot is in contact with an object, which is the contact configuration,
grasping, as well as stability and feedback to control the robot force. MEMS tactile sensors are generally
classified based detection mechanisms. These include type tactile sensors pieo-resistive, capacitive, piezoelectric
and optical. polimerOf these, the piezo-resistive type are widely used because they are easy to manufacture and
have a low cost price. Due to difficulties of applications of tactile sensors on a rigid body, recent reports have
focused on MEMS tactile sensors based on polymers. Conducting polymers (CP-Conducting Polymer) has
excellent electrical properties, chemical and mechanical biosensors useful for designing efficient, versatile and
real-time response. It is shown that a frequent choice of pressure sensitive materials are elastomers that are
enriched with conductive filler particles.

S1 P28
DFT STUDY OF EXCHANGE INTERACTIONS IN MOLECULAR MAGNETS BASED ON
MANGANESE-PORPHYRINS
Petre PANAIT,1 Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Bogdan FRECU,1 Fanica CIMPOESU,2
Marilena FERBINTEANU,3 and Mihai A. GRU1*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527


Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bucharest 060021, Romania
3
University of Bucharest, Bucharest 020462, Romania

We report results of Broken Symmetry Density Functional Theory (BS-DFT) calculations providing the
optimized geometries and the exchange coupling constants for three members of the quasi-one-dimensional
manganese-porphyrin family of molecular magnets, [MnTPP][TCNE], [MnOEP][HCBD] and
[MnTtBuPP][HCBD] (TPP = meso-tetraphenylporphyrinato, OEP = octaethylporphyrinato, TtBuPP =mesotetrakis-(4'-tert-butylphenyl)porphinato, TCNE = tetracyanoethylene, and HCBD = hexa-cyanobutadiene) [1,2].
We compare the results of Broken Symmetry DFT calculations for extended systems, with periodic boundary
conditions, and for finite systems, magnetic dimers modeling the actual molecular magnets. By varying
systematically the main angles, we are able to
determine the geometry dependence of the
exchange interaction.
Structure-properties
correlations in these charge transfer salts
reveal the determinant role of the Mn(NC)TCNE bond angle on the strength of the
ferrimagnetic coupling between the S1 = 2
spin located on the MnIII-porphyrin donor and
the S2 = 1/2 spin positioned on the
cyanocarbon acceptor.
Based on a
phenomenological model providing the geometry dependence of the exchange coupling constants, we fitted the
results of the DFT calculations and obtained parameters describing the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

63

parts of the superexchange interaction. The large differences between the magnetic properties of these systems
are explained based on the correlation between the exchange coupling constant and the overlap between the
Mn(III) d and the HCBD * orbitals and on the torsion angle of the cyanocarbon backbone.
[1] C.I. Oprea, F. Cimpoesu, P. Panait, B. Frecu, M. Ferbinteanu, M.A. Gru, Theor. Chem. Acc. 129, 847
(2011).
[2] C.I. Oprea, P. Panait, F. Cimpoesu, I. Humelnicu, M. Ferbinteanu, M.A. Gru, Theor. Chem. Acc. 131, 1249
(2012).
*Acknowledgements: The financial support from the CNCS/UEFISCDI research grant PN2-ID-PCCE239/2010 is gratefully acknowledged.
**E-mail: p_panait@yahoo.com, mihai. girtu@univ-ovidius.ro

S1 P29
BROKEN SYMMETRY DFT CALCULATIONS OF EXCHANGE CONSTANTS OF M(TCNE) x HIGHTEMPERATURE MOLECULAR MAGNETS,
(M = V, Mn, AND Fe)
Florin MOSCALU,1 Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Petre PANAIT,1 Fanica CIMPOESU,2 Mihai A. GRU1,*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527


Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bucharest 060021, Romania

We present a comparative Density Functional Theory (DFT) study of M(TCNE) 2 molecular magnets (with
M = V, Mn, and Fe, TCNE = tetracyanoethylene) discussing the structure and the magnetic properties of these
high Tc systems. The structure of these amorphous systems has not been resolved experimentally but for
V(TCNE)x (x ~ 2) it was previously shown that the vanadium ion is in the +2 oxidation state, being surrounded
by six nitrogen atoms, at distances of about 2 . For the Fe-based materials Mssbauer spectroscopy suggested
the same +2 oxidation state, and the IR spectra suggest similar binding to the TCNE radical anion. Experimental
magnetism studies revealed Tcs of about 370 K, 75 K and 95 K for M = V, Mn, and Fe, respectively. We
propose model structures for the M(TCNE)x systems starting from the requirements of stoichiometry, with trans
V-TCNE-V bridging along both a and b axes. The stacking along the c axis is realized with tetra-coordinated
TCNEs in the ac plane and bis-connected TCNEs in the bc planes. We compare and contrast the lattice
parameters obtained by DFT optimization with periodic boundary conditions (PBC) of the three systems,
emphasizing the role of the transition metal ion. We also used the Broken Symmetry DFT approach to calculate,
based on the simple Ising approximation, the exchange coupling constants. Although DFT overestimates the
exchange interaction, it provides a first estimation that can be compared to the experimental results, based on the
mean-field expression of the critical temperature.
*The financial support from the CNCS research grant PN2-ID-PCCE-239/2010, contract no. 9/2010, is
gratefully acknowledged.
**E-mail: flmoscalu@univ-ovidius.ro, mihai.girtu@univ-ovidius.ro

S1 P30
COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF RU- AND RH-BASED COMPLEXES FOR DYESENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS
Petre PANAIT,1 Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Boris F. MINAEV,2,3 and Mihai A. GRU1,*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527, Romania


2
Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 10691 Sweden
3
B. Khmelnitsky National University, Cherkassy 18031 Ukraine
We report Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations providing the infrared and Raman spectra of
[Ru(II)(bpy)3-n(dcbpy)n]2+ and [Rh(III)(bpy)3-n(dcbpy)n]3+ complexes, where bpy = 2,2-bipyridyl, dcbpy = 4,4dicarboxy-2,2-bipyridyl, and n = 0, 1, 2, 3, studied in the context of dye-sensitized solar cells. We compare and
contrast the role of the metallic ion and of the COOH groups on the vibration and phosphorescence properties of
these complexes. DFT calculations providing the structure, electronic properties and UV-Vis absorption spectra
revealed the better matching with the solar spectrum of the absorption properties of the Ru(II) complexes [1]. Of
the complexes studied, the most suited as pigments for dye-sensitized solar cells are the [Ru(II)(bpy)3-

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

64

n(dcbpy)n]

2+

complex with n = 1 and 2, based on their intense absorption band in the visible region, the presence
of the anchoring groups allowing the bonding to the TiO2 substrate as well as the charge transfer, and the good
energy level alignment with the conduction band edge of the semiconducting substrate and the redox level of the
electrolyte. The vibrational spectra are not very sensitive to the replacement of the metal ion, but the presence of
carboxyl groups leads to a richer spectrum due to the additional bands caused by the COOH groups.
Comparison with the limited experimental data available allowed the assignment of the Raman bands. The
calculated phosphorescence lifetimes suffer only modest changes when the COOH groups are introduced but
vary significantly when changing the metal ion, being two orders of magnitude larger for Rh(III) than for the
Ru(II) complexes [2].

[1] C.I. Oprea, B. Frecus, B.F. Minaev, M.A. Gru, Molec. Phys. 109, 2511 (2011).

[2] C.I. Oprea, P. Panait, B.F. Minaev, H. gren, F. Cimpoesu, M. Ferbinteanu, M.A. Gru, Molec. Phys. in
press (DOI: 10.1080/00268976.2013.777811).
*Acknowledgements: C. I. Oprea acknowledges the financial support from CNCS/UEFISCDI grant code PN2RU-PD-603/2010, contract no. 172/2010.
**E-mail: p_panait@yahoo.com, mihai. girtu@univ-ovidius.ro

S1 P31
PHOTOCHEMICAL FORMATION OF METAL NANOPARTICLES WITH SILICA
Eleonora BURNETE1, Sorina IFTIMIE2, S. ANTOHE2, V. CIUPINA1
1

Ovidius University, Mamaia 124,Constana, 900527, Romania.


University of Bucharest, PO Box MG-38, Bucharest - Mgurele, Romania

For application of nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis, gold and silver nanoparticles have been formed on
and in silica surfaces. The paper presents the photochemical reduction of Au3+ and Ag1+ using benzophenone.
The current study investigates the effect of adsorbing the benzophenone or metal salt on the silica before
irradiation to develop methods where the starting material can be separated from the reducing material to
enhance stability after irradiation. The use of silica films with adsorbed benzophenone allows the generation of
stable gold and silver nanoparticles in solution. Silica films with gold and silver ions impregnated generate metal
nanoparticles after irradiation in aqueous solution with benzophenone. Thus metal nanoparticles are generated
that can be used as stable catalytic particles or as a method of removal of metal ions from solution. This
technique has the additional advantage of separating the nanoparticles formed from the chemicals used in the
solution.

S1 P32
PECULIAR DIELECTRIC CHARACTERISTIC of Ba1-X SrXTiO3 CERAMICS
of TECHNOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE
Raluca BACSEI 1, Liviu NEDELCU 2 and Horia ALEXANDRU 1*
1

Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Romania


National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
* Corresponding author, e-mail: horia@infim.ro

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

65

The ceramic solid solution family of alloys Ba1-XSrXTiO3, 0 X 1, presents a major interest in microwave
applications for electrically controlled devices such as tunable filters, steerable antennas, faze shifters, varactors,
etc. A small decrease in the unit cell volume was detected with the Sr increase concentration. Besides SrTiO 3 is
non-ferroelectric vs. BaTiO3. Experimental data has shown a linear decrease of the Curie point TC (C) 120
360x, versus x strontium mol fractions (H.V.Alexandru et al, Mater. Sci. Eng. B109 (2004)152).
BaTiO3 has 3 transitions, between four stable ferroelectric phases: (C) cubic, (T) tetragonal, (O) orthorhombic,
(R) rhombohedral. Approximate phase diagrams of these Sr alloys were presented (H.V.Alexandru et all Appl.
Surf. Sci. 253 (2006) 354).
In this contribution we present new data analyzing also some literature data (Jae-Ho Jeon, J. Europ. Ceramic
Soc. 24 (2004) 1045). Curie temperatures and peak values of permittivity for three annealing temperatures
(1350, 1400, 1450 oC) and six compositions shall be analyzed (Jeon 2004). Curie temperature evolution of para,
ferro phases and the standard ratio Cpara/Cferro shall be carefully analyzed.
Dramatic slope changes of peak values, around 0.3-0.4 mol% Sr content, suggest an increasing Sr position order
in the lattice with the annealing temperature increase. Curie temperature break of the paraelectric phase at 1350
o
C support this idea. Unexpectedly, we have found an exponential dependence of the Curie constant of the ferro
phase, versus Sr content. The ratio Cpara/Cferro which theoretically would have to be two, oscillate one order of
magnitude up and down this figure. All this data do not support the idea of the ferroelectric transition change
from first to the send order with the Sr increase of the solid solutions.

S1 P33
INFLUENCE OF Al DOPING ON THE OPTICAL AND GAS SENSING PROPERTIES OF ZnO THIN
FILMS
A.P.RAMBU1, N.IFTIMIE2, V.TIRON1, V.NICA1, G.G.RUSU1, F.IACOMI1
1

Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania
National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Blvd., 700050, Iasi,
Romania

Based on its electrical and optical properties, zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been investigated for applications
in solar cells, varistors, spintronic devices, photodetectors, surface acoustic wave devices, light emitting diodes,
etc. Among these, ZnO is considered as the earliest discovered and most widely investigated gas sensor material.
Undoped and 1-3% Al doped ZnO films were obtained by spin-coating and the influence of Al content on the
optical and gas sensing properties of respective films was investigated. The structure of spin coated thin films
were analyzed by means of a Shimadzu LabX XRD-6000 diffractometer (with CuK radiation, =1.5418 ).
Characteristic X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that spin coated films are polycrystalline. In the characteristic
diffractograms are identified three well-defined XRD peaks, which are assigned to belong to hexagonal ZnO
structure. No diffraction peaks characteristic to other secondary phases (such as Al 2O3 or ZnAl2O4) were
identified. The average size of the crystallite size is evaluated using the DebyeScherrer formula; the obtained
values indicating a decrease of crystallite size as the Al doping concentration increases. Atomic force
microscopy investigations were carried out using an NT-MDT Solver Pro-M microscope. Characteristic images
indicate that Al doping influences the surface morphology of ZnO films.
The optical transmittances spectra, in the wavelength range 300 nm 1700 nm, were recorded for undoped ZnO
and Al doped ZO films. It was observed that the undoped film is the most transparent one and the films
transparency decreases as the Al doping content increases. This behavior can be explained on the bases of
presence of structural defects, surface roughness, etc. Also, the gas sensing properties of the spin coated thin
films were investigated. Characteristic gas sensing parameters were evaluated (sensitivity, selectivity, optimum
operating temperature, response time) and their values are discussed in correlation with morpho-structural
characteristics of the films.
Acknowledgements:
This work is part of the researches of the grant PN-II-CT-RO-FR-2012-1-0065 and under financial support of
this.

S1 P34
NANOSTRUCTERED CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS
V.CIUPIN1,2,5, R.VLDOIU1, G.PRODAN1,2, L.PETRESCU3, .G.TUTUN3,
C. PORONICU4 , E.VASILE6

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

66

Department of Plasma, Faculty of Physics, Chemistry, Electronics and Oil Technology,


Ovidius University, Mamaia 124, Constana, 900527, Romania
2
Institute for Nanotechnology and Alternative Energy Sources, Ovidius University,
Mamaia 124, Constana, 900527, Romania
3
Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Atomitilor 405, Mgurele, Ilfov
4
National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest, Romania
5
Academy of Romanian Scientists, Independenei 54, Bucharest, Romania
6
METAV C.D., Bucharest, Romania
As the necessity for energy keeps on growing it has become a pressing concern the development of new methods
of producing energy both efficient and harmless for our environment. In the past the limiting factors of
renewable energy were the storage and transport of that energy. By using fuel cells and hydrogen based
technology the electrical energy from renewable sources can be distributed where and when is needed, clean,
efficient and sustainable. Nanotechnology is the area of interest in the research of new methods of improving the
performance and reducing the costs of the catalysts used in fuel cells.
In order to prepare nanostructered carbon based films (C-Si and C-Glass) for use in the anode and cathode parts
of fuel cells, the original method of thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) was used in one electronic gun configuration.
One of the main advantages of this technology is the bombardment of the growing thin film just by the ions of
the depositing film. Moreover, the energy of ions can be controlled . Thermo-electrons emitted by an externally
heated cathode and focused by a Wehnelt focusing cylinder are accelerated towards the anode whose material is
evaporated and bright plasma is ignited by a high voltage DC supply.
The nanostructered carbon films were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and
magnetoresistance analysis. While the C Glass film did not show any magnetoresistance, the C Si films
resistance dropped slightly (aprox. 2.5%) in the presence of a magnetic field of 0.3236 T.
The TEM analysis revealed that both films have a uniform morphology and amorphous structure.

S1 P35
APPLICATION OF CARBON BASED NANISTRUCTURES IN DIVERTORS COATING FROM
FUSION REACTOR
V.CIUPIN1,2,5, R.VLDOIU1, G.PRODAN1,2, .G.TUTUN3, L.PETRESCU3 ,
C. PORONICU4 , E.VASILE6
1

Department of Plasma, Faculty of Physics, Chemistry, Electronics and Oil Technology,


Ovidius University, Mamaia 124, Constana, 900527, Romania
2
Institute for Nanotechnology and Alternative Energy Sources, Ovidius University,
Mamaia 124, Constana, 900527, Romania
3
Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Atomitilor 405, Mgurele, Ilfov
4
National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Bucharest, Romania
5
Academy of Romanian Scientists, Independenei 54, Bucharest, Romania
6
METAV C.D., Bucharest, Romania
Nanostrctured corbon materials have increasingly attracted the interest of the scientific community, because of
their fascinating physical properties and potential application in high-tech devices. In the current ITER design,
the tiles made of carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are forseen for the strike point zone and tungsten (W) for other
parts of the divertor region. This choice is a compromise based mainly on experience with individual materials in
many different tokamaks. Also Carbon-Aluminium composites are the candidate material for this first Wall in
ITER.
In order to prepare nanostructured carbon based nanocomposite for the divertor part in fusion application, the
original method thermionic vaccum arc (TVA) was used both in single electronic gun configuration (for
amorphous Carbon on Si and on Glass) and in two electronic gun configuration for C-Al. One of the main
advantages of this technology is the bombardment of the growing thin film just by the ions of the depositing
film. Moreover, the energy of ions can be controlled. Thermo-electrons emitted by an externally heated cathode
and focused by a Wehnelt focusing cylinder are strongly accelerated towards the anode whose material is
evaporated and bright plasma is ignited by a high voltage DC supply.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

67

The nanostructered carbon films were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and
magnetoresistance analysis. While the C Glass film did not show any magnetoresistance, the C Si films
resistance dropped slightly (aprox. 2.5%) in the presence of a magnetic field of 0.3236 T.
The TEM analysis revealed that both films have a uniform morphology and amorphous structure.

S1 P36
PROPERTIES INVESTIGATION OF COBALT OXIDE COMPOSITE LAYERS
Romana DRASOVEAN, Steluta GOSAV
Dunarea de Jos University of Galai, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Chemistry, Physics and
Environment Department, 111 Domneasc Street, 800201, Galai, Romania
Nanostructured cobalt oxide composite film were investigated. Thin films of cobalt oxide dispersed in silica
were formed by sol-gel deposition from the colloidal solution obtained from cobalt acetate and tetraethoxysilane
. Glass slides were used as substrate.. Using the techniques of X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy,
the formation of cobalt oxide composite, the orientation of the grains have been studied. Optical constants of
these layers have been determined by using transmission spectra which were recorded with a Shimadzu UV-VIS
spectrophotometer.

AFM picture of silica film doped with CoO particles treated at 500 0C in H2/N2

S1 P37
CuFeCo THIN FILMS OBTAINED BY THERMOIONIC VACUUM ARC METHOD
I.PRIOTEASA1, V.CIUPINA2,3, E. VASILE4
1. University of Bucharest
2. Research Center on Micro-and Nanostructures, Ovidius University of Constanta
3. Academy of Romanian Scientists
4. METAV Bucharest
CuFeCo thin films have been deposited by Thermoionic Vacuum Arc method (TVA) and magnetoresistive
and structural properties have been examined. The Gigant Magnetoresistance (GMR) appears in thin films
composed of metallic alternative ferromagnetic and non ferromagnetic layers, when the magnetic grains are
isolated in the non magnetic matrix. The electric resistance of the films show a considerable decrease in the
presence of the magnetic field. There have been deposeted films with a thickness of 100 nm each on a glass
substrate. To create the films, two TVA guns have been used, which have evaporated simultaneously the
material from the two melting pots, one of them containing Cu and the other one containing Fe and Co in a
proportion of 50% each. The deposition rate was situated between 0,01nm/s for the first 30 nm deposed and
0,03nm/s for the next 70 nm. The images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at a magnification of
40 000 times have shown that at the surface of the samples there are crystallites with sises of approximately 5
nm, arranged in granular formations with a diameter between 40 and 50 nm.The examinated thin films show
gigant magnetoresistance effect.

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

68

S1 P38
EVALUATION OF THE PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN PETROLEUM COKE
Semaghiul BIRGHILA1A and Ionela CARAZEANU POPOVICI1B
1

Ovidius Universityof Constanta, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Department,


124 Mamaia, 900527, Constanta, Romania
a
email: sbirghila@univ-ovidius.ro; bemail: icarazeanu@univ-ovidius.ro

Coke is a gray to black solid carbonaceous residue (90-95% carbon) which is produced from petroleum
during thermal processing. The two most important categories are green coke and calcinated coke; green
petroleum coke are mostly used as utility fuels and as feedstocks for further upgrading caltinations. The
calcinated petroleum coke are used in production of aluminium, anode-grade, graphite electrodes, needle-grade,
TiO2 pigments [1-3].
A number of factors determine the quality of petroleum coke, such as: density, metal and sulphur
content, electrical resistivity. Knowledge of structure parameters also contributes to the characterization and
utilization of petroleum coke [4].
Also, the coke properties depend on the source of the crude oil and the quality specifications dictated by
producing refinery [5-8].
In this paper, commercial petroleum cokes were analyzed, before and after heat treatment in order to
evaluate the physical-chemical properties. The content of moisture, volatile matter, sulphur, ash and metals (Fe
Ni, Cr) was determined.
The results showed that temperature increasing led to the removal of volatile matter and sulphur
content; higher separation of sulphur was observed for coke obtained from atmospheric residue and from
decanted oil. The ash content indicates the presence of inorganic admixtures in coke.
Metal concentrations increased through calcining, due to the weight loss from removal of the volatile
matter; the coke samples revealed the higher content of nickel (151 to 279 ppm) which is the most represented
metal component in the coking feedstock.
Typical parameters that contribute to the characterization and utilization of petroleum coke showed that
the analyzed samples have a low ash, metallic and volatile matter contents therefore can be used as carburizer in
the foundries or in the production of anodes.
References
1. D.Ugarkovic, A. Radenovic, and V.N. Radovic: Carbon 31, 913 (1993).
2. A.N.Thorpe, F.E. Senftle, C. Alexander, F.T.Dulong, R.B.La Count and S.Friedman: Fuel 60, 147 (1987).
3. A. Radenovic: Nafta 60 171 (2009).
4. H. Al-Haj Ibrahim and M.M.Ali: Periodica Pol. Ser. Chem. Eng. 48, 53 (2004).
5. S. Birghila, I. Carazeanu Popovici and A. Dumitru, Romanian Journal in Physics 56(7-8), 976 (2011)
6. I. Carazeanu Popovici, S. Birghila, G. Voicu, V. Ionescu, V. Ciupina and G. Prodan: J. Optoelectron. Adv.
Mater. 12, 1903 (2010).
7. E.J.Anthony, A.P.Iribarne and J.V.Iribarne, Fuel Technology 88, 535 (2007).
8. A. Radenovic and K.Terzic: Nafta 3, 136 (2010).

S1 P39
TERAHERTZ PROPERTIES OF BARIUM TANTALATE - BASED
MICROWAVE DIELECTRICS
L. NEDELCU 1, C. BUSUIOC 1, M.G. BANCIU 1, H.V. ALEXANDRU 2
1

National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, nedelcu@infim.ro


2
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania

Low-loss microwave dielectrics influence decisively such communication systems as satellite


broadcasting or global positioning systems [1]. These materials offers miniaturization, enhanced temperature
stability, increase the equipment reliability and lower the costs in manufacturing and during the operations. Since
the modern telecommunications are moving towards higher frequency bands due to the crowding of the
electromagnetic spectrum, material characterization in millimeter and terahertz waves is required [2].
The Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an accurate measurement method. When
compared to the conventional FTIR measurement method, THz-TDS provides not only the spectral intensity, but

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

69

also the intrinsic phase shifts of the propagating THz signal allowing the direct finding of the complex dielectric
permittivity without the use of the KramersKronig relations [3].
The Ba(X1/3Ta2/3)O3 (X=Mg or Zn) complex perovskites were synthesized using solid-state reaction
method starting from high purity raw materials. The samples were sintered in air at 1600 oC for 4 h sintering
time. All preparation steps were presented in a previous work [4]. The X-ray diffraction revealed a long range
order with a 2:1 ratio of Ta and X cations on the octahedral positions of the complex perovskite structure. The
SEM micrographs put in evidence the decrease in porosity and increase in grain size with the increase in
sintering temperature.
The measurements carried out in microwave range (in the 5-6 GHz) showed very high values for the
Q x f product about 100 THz for Ba(Zn1/3Ta2/3)O3 (BZT) and 200 THz for Ba(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3 (BMT) dielectric
resonators. In addition, the measured dielectric constant was 24 for BMT and 28 for BZT samples. No
significant variation of the dielectric properties was noticed up to 100 GHz.
The THz-TDS measurements were carried out in transmission set-up by using an Aispec pulse IRS2000 Pro time-domain spectrometer on about 0.2 mm thick parallel-plane samples. The BZT sample exhibits
absorption coefficient higher than BMT. These results are in good agreement with structural and microwave
data. For both type of samples, several optical phonon modes were evidenced.
References
1. M. T. Sebastian, Dielectric Materials for Wireless Communication, Elsevier, Oxford, 2008.
2. T. Kleine-Ostmann and T Nagatsuma, A Review on Terahertz Communications Research, J. Infrared Milli.
Terahz. Waves 32, 2011, pp. 143-171.
3. K. Sakai, Terahertz Optoelectronics, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2005.
4. L. Nedelcu, C. Busuioc, M. G. Banciu, R. Ramer, Ba(X 1/3Ta2/3)O3 complex perovskites for microwave and
millimeter-wave applications, Proceedings of the 35th International Semiconductor Conference, CAS 2012, vol.
2, 2012, pp. 303-306.
Acknowledgements: This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific
Research, CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-PD-2011-3-0237.

S1 P40
STRUCTURAL VARIETIES OF Cu(II) COMPLEXES WITH BIDENTATE LIGANDS
Daniela STAMATE,a Violeta MACOVEI,b Marilena FERBINTEANU,b Mihai. A. GRU,a
a

Department of Physics, Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527


Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bucharest 020462, Romania

Two new series of Cu(II) complexes with bidentate ligands like bpca (bis(2-pyridyl-carbonyl)amine),
dibm (dibenzoylmethane) and AA (phen-1,10phenanthroline or bipy-2,2-dipyridyl) were synthesised and
charaterised in order to find new building blocks for d and d-f assemblies. The first one involves the mixed
ligands complexes [Cu(bpca)(AA)]+ with can act as ligand complexes toward oxophylic lanthanide ions. The
second series targeted building-blocks with semi-stable structure and one free coordination site, like
[Cu(phen)(dibm)]NO3 and [Cu(phen)](NO3)2. All compounds are structural characterised by single crystal X-ray
diffraction method and it was observed a large structural variety concerning the coordination mode of NO 3- unit.
A special case is the 1-D chain compound with a syn-anti coordination mode of the bridging NO 3- unit (Figure
1).

Figure 1. Molecular structure of 1D-[Cu(phen)](NO3)2

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

70

Acknowledgements: The financial support from the CNCS/UEFISCDI research grant PN2-ID-PCCE-239/2010
is gratefully acknowledged.
Email: marilena.cimpoesu@g.unibuc.ro, daniela.stamate@ymail.com

S1 P41
NEW Co(II) MIXED LIGAND COMPLEXES FOR DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS
Daniela STAMATE,a Marilena FERBINTEANU,b Mihai A. GRU a
a

Department of Physics, Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527


Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bucharest 020462, Romania

Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have attracted considerable interest over the last years, as they offer
the advantages of low fabrication costs, transparency and flexibility, when desired. We report synthesis and
characterization of a new series based on mixed ligand Co(II) complexes, [Co(AA)(BB) 2]X2, where AA and BB
are aromatic diammine, derivative of phenanthroline and bipyridil and X is chloride or
bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion. The obtaining of such compounds is a challenge due to the severe
tendency to form tris chelates compounds or to disproportionate. The synthesis was realized step by step, starting
with the obtaining of [Co(AA)Cl2] and [Co(BB)2Cl2] complexes type to which the second diamine was added.
The compunds were analyzed by means of IR and UV-VIS spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction
(Fig.1.). Further theoretical and electrochemical investigation are ongoing. The final mixed ligand complexes
will be tested for their specific electrochemical response and potential, in order to be used in the manufacture of
dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC).

Figure 1. Molecular structure for [Co(BB)2Cl(H2O)]ClC2H5OH, where BB- bis(2-pyridyl)amine


Acknowledgement: This work is supported by the RSRP # IZERO-142144/1 cofinanced in Romania through
PN-II-Idei-RSRP.
Email: marilena.cimpoesu@g.unibuc.ro, daniela.stamate@ymail.com

Section 1 - MATERIALS PHYSICS

71

S1 P42
POSSIBILITY FOR PERMEABLE THERMOELECTRIC ELEMENTS APPLICATION
Radion CHERKEZ
1

Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi, 58012,Ukraine

The results are presented of the study promising of permeable thermopiles application. Theoretical
research was carried out for different variations of permeable structures (planar, channel, porous and segmented)
for thermoelements operating in electric energy generating modes, thermoelectric cooling and heating. By
methods of the mathematical optimal control theory and computer simulation multifactor optimization problems
were solved and design and thermophysical parameters defined that deliver maximum values to energy
conversion characteristics.
The analysis of computing results for permeable cooling thermopiles for thermoelectric Bi-Te-Se-Sbbased materials has pointed to the possibility of the coefficient of performance improvement by 30-60% as
compared to conventional thermoelectric cooling. In the mode of electric energy generation the use of permeable
thermoelements enables the obtaining of energy efficiency 1.3 to 1.6 times as big as that of conventional
thermoelements.
The specimens of the planar permeable thermopiles from Bi-Te-Se- Sb-based materials were obtained.
Experimental data confirm the essentials of the theory and reveal the possibility of thermoelectricity wider
practical application.

72

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

SECTION
S2 Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics and Applications
Laser Physics and applications
Plasma Physics and applications
Optoelectronics and photonics
Applied and non-linear optics
Ultrafast phenomena and applications

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

73

INVITED LECTURES
S2 L01
PLASMA THRUSTERS, PRINCIPLES, APPLICATIONS AND DIAGNOSTICS
K. DANNENMAYER1), A. PETIN2), S. MAZOUFFRE2), P. KUDRNA3), M. TICH3)
1)

ESA - ESTEC / Electric Propulsion Section (TEC - MPE), Keperlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk ZH, The
Netherlands
2)
Institut de Combustion, Arothermique, Ractivit et Environnement, CNRS, Orlans, France
3)
Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 3, 12116 Prague 2,
Czech Republic

The use of electric/plasma propulsion of space vehicles can provide significant benefits compared to chemical
propulsion. These benefits include substantial cost savings represented by a significant reduction in the mass
required to be lifted to low Earth orbit. The basic explanation for that consists in the velocity of the propellant
that can reach several tens of kilometers per second compared to units km/s with chemical propulsion. In other
words the impulse needed for driving the space vehicle is gained from the velocity, not from the mass of the
propellant. While the plasma thrusters cannot be used to drive the rocket from Earth to the orbit their benefits
become evident on the orbit and in space. Todays most important application of electric propulsion systems is
the north-south station keeping of geosynchronous telecommunication satellites. However, tests were made
already in using the plasma thrusters as a main drive for longer mission to the Moon with applied electric power
several kilowatts. At present conceptual design of a 300-kW space vehicle is being developed by NASA, with
the capability to store nearly 40,000 kg of xenon, to support human missions to near-Earth asteroids. Among all
the different electric propulsion devices, two technologies, namely gridded ion engines (XIPS, xenon ion
propulsion systems) and Hall effect thrusters (HET), are today a mature technology.
The lecture will give information on the principles and applications of XIPS and HET. Further, the accuracy of
the plasma potential measurements by a sufficiently emitting probe in view of the negative space charge created
by the emitted electrons will be discussed [1]. The lecture will then concentrate on the diagnostics of the plasma
instabilities in HET by time-averaged and time-resolved measurements using the Langmuir and the emissive
probe [2,3].
References
[1] A. Marek, M. Jilek, I. Pickova et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys., 48, 491-496, (2008).
[2] K. Dannenmayer, P. Kudrna, M. Tichy, S. Mazouffre, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 21 (2012) 055020.
[3] K. Dannenmayer, Scaling laws and electron properties in Hall effect thrusters, PhD thesis, ICARE CNRS
Orleans, 2012.
Corresponding author address
Milan Tich
Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics
Ke Karlovu 3, 12116 Prague 2, Czech Republic
E-mail: milan.tichy@mff.cuni.cz, fax: +420 284 685 095, phone: +420 725 455 207

S2 L02
MIXED FILMS INTERACTION WITH PLASMA PRODUCED BY HIGH POWER LASERS
C. P. LUNGU1, C. POROSNICU1, I. JEPU1, P. CHIRU1, A. M. LUNGU1, D. URSESCU1, R. BANICI1, G.
COJOCARU1, R. UNGUREANU1, C. LUCULESCU1, A. MARCU1, R. VLADOIU2, A. MARIN3, P.
OSICEANU3, I. FERARU4, C. GRIGORESCU4
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, jud Ilfov, Romania
2
Ovidius University, Constanta, Romania
3
Ilie Murgulescu Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bucharest, Romania
4
National Institute R&D for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, Bucharest, Romania
The plasma produced by the laser irradiation in air and deuterium atmosphere was directed toward the
Be-C, Be-W and C-W mixed films prepared by thermionic vacuum arc method (TVA) as thin films on graphite
and silicon substrates from pure vapor plasma.
The samples were irradiated with single or multiple terawatt laser beam pulses programmed to have
durations of pico or femtoseconds, in order to obtain duration and power densities compared to the

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

74

thermonuclear plasma instabilities.


The plasma was studied using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and the irradiated films were
characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS), confocal
optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.
Surface roughness, atomic composition and chemical bonding of atoms at the surface and inside the
deposited films were analysed for different positions of the produced craters. XPS and Raman analyses have
suggested tungsten-carbide, tungsten-beryllide and carbon-beryllides formations. Materials used in this study
are foreseen to be used on the first wall of the fusion reactor.
Acknowledgements: Funding by the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, UEFISCDI,
through project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0522 is acknowledged.

S2 L03
DEPOSITION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH ENTROPY ALLOY CARBIDE COATINGS
M.BRAIC, A.VLADESCU, I. PANA, A. PARAU, M. DINU, V.BRAIC, M. BALACEANU
National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele Bucharest, Romania
The purpose of the present study was to study the characteristics of some multi-principal-element coatings, in
which the elements, except for carbon, are in almost equiatomic concentrations, according to the high entropy
alloy concept [1,2]. All the investigated coatings were almost stoichiometric. (ZrSi)C and (TiZrNbHfTa)C
reference coatings were comparatively investigated with the novel multi-principal-element coatings, obtained by
replacing each metallic element with Si. The coatings were deposited on Si and 316L substrates by co-sputtering
from independent mono-element targets, in an Ar+CH4 reactive atmosphere. The films were analyzed for
elemental and phase composition, crystalline structure, mechanical characteristics, tribological and corrosion
resistance in saline solution.
The coatings containing Si preserved the crystalline (fcc) structure of the reference multicomponent coatings,
while a reduction in the grain size was observed (Fig. 1), accompanied by an improvement of the mechanical
properties (hardness and adhesion). Fine grained and smooth surface morphologies were observed by AFM for
all the investigated coatings. All the multi-principal-element films exhibited lower wear rates and friction
coefficients, and better corrosion resistance, as compared to (ZrSi)C films. Better tribological performances of
the multicomponent coatings were observed (Fig. 2), especially when Si replaced Zr or Hf.
Considering their fine structures, good wear - corrosion resistance and friction characteristics, the high entropy
alloy carbide coatings can represent a valuable alternative in various tribological applications where a good
corrosion resistance is also needed.
30

40

50

60

70

80

(TiZrNbTaHf)C

(SiZrNbTaHf)C
240000
220000

3
Wear rate (m /N*m)

IREL(arb.units)

(TiSiNbTaHf)C

(TiZrSiTaHf)C

(TiZrNbSiHf)C

(TiZrNbTaSi)C

200000
180000
50000
40000
30000
20000
10000

50

60

70

80

a)
C

a)
C

a)
C

fT

fT

fT

rN

bH

bH
iN
iS

fS
i) C

rS
iH
iZ
(T

a)
C

bH

(T

iZ

rN

a)
C

bS
iT

fT
bH

rN
iZ

(S
iZ

40

(T

30

(T

iZ

rN

(311)(222)S

(T

(220)

31
6L

(Z
rS
i)C

(111) (200)

(ZrSi)C

2 theta(deg.)

Fig.1

XRD patterns of the coatings


Fig.2 Wear rates of the investigated coatings
.
References
[1] J.W. Yeh, S.K. Chen, S.J. Lin, J.Y. Gan et al., (2004) Adv. Eng. Mater., 6: 299- 303
[2] J.W. Yeh, Ann. Chim. Sci. Mater. (2006) 31: 633648

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

75

Acknowledgement:This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian NationalAuthority for Scientific
Research, CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-1016

S2 L04
COMPOSITION-PROPERTIES RELATIONS IN MULTI-COMPONENT CARBON BASED
NANOMATERIALS
R. VLADOIU1, M CONTULOV1, A. MANDES1, V. DINCA1, V. CIUPINA1, C. POROSNICU2, C. P. LUNGU2
1

Department of Plasma Physics, Faculty of Physics Chemistry Electronics and Oil Technology,
Ovidius University, Mamaia 124, Constana, 900527, Romania
2
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 077125,
Bucharest Romania

Composite materials at the nanometer level started to be real dimensions for coating the components on
production line. The challenge of this research is to find the best combination for coating the mechanical parts of
components by suitable complex nanocomposites and by using innovative technology. Specifically, complex
carbon and titanium based nanocomposites owing to their remarcable properties of the coating surfaces such as
wear resistance, roughness, low friction coefficients have been synthetized and investigated in different
combination and forms, such as multi-component composites.[1],[2]. Recently, the studies proved that the
dependence of the behavior on the particle sizes can allow one to engineer their properties. Characteristics as:
electronic structure, conductivity, reactivity, melting temperature, and mechanical properties have all been
observed to change when particles become smaller than a critical size. [3][4]
Multi-component thin films (binary SiC and ternary- SiCAl) as well as single thin films (silicon Si)
were deposited using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) technology. The thin films were characterized using Xray diffractometer (XRD, Philips PW1050, Cu K), scanning electron microscope (SEM, Zeiss EVO 50 SEM)
accompanied with energy dispersive spectrometer and transmission electron microscope (TEM, Phillips CM 120
ST, 100 kV). The film is composed of nanoparticles very smoothly distributed of 15-30 nanometer size
embedded in amorphous matrix film. The results reveal high hardness for SiC (10-40 GPa) and for SiCAl: low
wear rate. (6.16E-05 mm3/Nm).
Acknowledgment
This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, CNDI
UEFISCDI, project number 160/2012, PN-II-PT-PCCA-2011-3.2-1453
References
[1] P. Zhang, B.K. Tay, C.Q. Sun, S.P. Lau, Microstructure and mechanical properties of nanocomposite
amorphous carbon films, J Vac Sci Technol A, 20 (2002), pp. 13901394
[2] Y. Pauleau, F. Thiery ,,Deposition and characterization of nanostructured metal/carbon composite films,
Surf. Coa.t Technol, 180181 (2004), pp. 313322
[3] A. Y. Wang, K. R. Lee, J. P. Ahn, J. H. Han, Structure and mechanical properties of W-Incorporated DLC
films prepared by a hybrid ion beam deposition system, Carbon, 2006, 44, 1826.
[4] S. Zhang, X. L. Bui, Y. Q. Fu, Magnetron-sputtered nc-TiC/a-C(Al) tough nanocomposite coatings, Thin
Solid Films 2004, 467, 261

S2 L05
DEPOSITION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MODIFIED DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON COATINGS
PREPARED BY PECVD
Adrian STOICA1, Vilma BURKOV1,2, Vratislav PEINA3
1

Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic;


2
Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic;
3
Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, e, Czech Republic.
Over the last decades the general knowledge about diamond-like carbon (DLC) increased significantly.
DLC covers a wide range of materials with properties varying from those similar to graphite to those of natural
diamond [1]. The desired coating thickness and material properties (including microstructure, physical,
mechanical properties) can be controlled by the deposition process. Hydrogen-free carbon films can be prepared
by different methods; one of the newest techniques reported is Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) [2]. Modified

76

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

DLC can be prepared by adding other chemical elements (H, D, Si, O, N, F, Ti, etc.) into the carbon matrix,
which enables to control coatings properties such as friction, wettability, internal stress, biocompatibility,
thermal and oxidation stability [1,3]. Moreover, gradation of the modifying elements in the films enhances the
film-substrate properties [4].
In this work the focus was the preparation and characterization of nanostructured DLC thin films,
prepared by radio frequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD). Carbon coatings
incorporating H, D, N, Si, and O were deposited from different mixtures of gases, such as methane, hydrogen,
deuterium, nitrogen, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSZ), in order to vary the
content of the doping elements in the films. Thin film composition was analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering
Spectrometry (RBS), Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).
Surface free energy was evaluated on the basis of the interaction between the sample surface and various liquids
using contact angle measurements. Film thickness and optical properties were determined from
spectrophotometric and ellipsometric measurements. Mechanical properties were studied by the instrumented
indentation technique. A tribological investigation of selected coatings was also performed. The effects between
the discharge conditions, precursor mixture composition, film structure and film properties were investigated.
Altering the composition of the DLC films by incorporating the aforementioned elements enabled the successful
deposition of protective coatings on different substrates, including several polymers. The films prepared under
optimum conditions exhibited outstanding properties, such as high hardness, good adhesion, and thermal
stability. The compressive stress in the films was decreased, but in the same time maintaining the desirable
properties of DLC.
References
[1] J. Robertson. Mat. Sci. Eng. R. 37 (2002) 129-281;
[2] A. Stoica, R. Vladoiu, G. Musa, et al. Chem. Listy 105 (2011), 132-135;
[3] Y. Kawabata, M. Hino, T. Horie, et al. Nucl. Intrum. Meth. A 529 (2004) 84-86;
[4] V. Bursikova, J. Sobota, T. Fort, et al. J. Optoelectron. Adv. M. 10 (2008), 3229-3232.
Acknowledgements
This work was supported by 'CEITEC Central European Institute of Technology' project
CZ.1.05/1.1/00/02.0068, and by the project CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0086 'R&D center for low-cost plasma and
nanotechnology surface modifications' funded by European Regional Development Fund.

POSTERS

S2 P01
MODELING THE EVOLUTION OF SOME FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF ELECTRON BEAM
TREATED STARCHES
Mirela BRAOVEANU, Monica R. NEMANU1
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Electron Accelerator Laboratory, 409 Atomistilor
St., P.O. Box MG-36, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
Electron beams are used in material processing due to their efficiency to induce physical and chemical processes
in materials and thus to produce improved or new materials. The treatment of starch using electron beam with
different irradiation doses lead to modifications of its physicochemical and structural properties and offers the
opportunity to enlarge the starch applications in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic or dye industry. Apparent and
intrinsic viscosities as well as colorimetric parameters of different cereal and tuber starches exposed to
accelerated electron beam were investigated. The experimental results allowed the development of mathematical
models that can be used to predict the behavior of the investigated properties of starch as a function of irradiation
dose.
Keywords: irradiation, viscosity, color, cereal starches, tuber starch
1

Corresponding author: monica.nemtanu@inflpr.ro

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

77

Acknowledgements. This work was partially supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for
Scientific Research, CNDIUEFISCDI, project number 64/2012.

S2 P02
BEHAVIOUR OF THE COLORIMETRIC AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF THE
IRRADIATED SEA BUCKTHORN OIL
MONICA R. NEMANU, MIRELA BRAOVEANU
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Electron Accelerator Laboratory, 409 Atomistilor
St., P.O. Box MG-36, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
Sea buckthorn oil is increasingly consumed both as nutritional supplement and medicinal product due to its
valuable and unique vitamin concentrate and natural antioxidant character. Colorimetric parameters and rheology
of the sea buckthorn oil treated with accelerated electron beam were investigated. The results indicated changes
in the colorimetric parameters from yellow to red and an increase of lightness with the irradiation dose. Also,
minor changes in the rheological properties were detected after oil irradiation.
Keywords: electron beam, viscosity, colour parameters
Acknowledgements. This work was supported by projects Nucleu LAPLAS 2013 and IIN (Electron
Accelerators Laboratory of NIPLRP).

S2 P03
AN ELECTRON PLASMA SOURCE
O. S. STOICAN1
1

National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor Str.409, RO-077125 MagureleBucharest, Romania

A source of electrons extracted from glow discharge plasma is described. Its design is based on similar
approaches reported in literature [1, 2]. The resulting electron beam is intend to be used to study the effect of the
RF fields on charged particles in electric and magnetic fields generated by a Penning type disposal electrodes
system [3]. Electrical diagram of the electron source and the circuit used to measure electron current are shown
in Fig. 1. The Penning type electrodes system consists of the two cylinders P, Q, and the two halves X1 and X2
of a cylinder longitudinally sectioned. The electrical wiring of the electrodes P, Q, X1, X2 has been utilized only
to evaluate characteristics of the electron source not for typically experiments related to actual goals of the whole
experimental setup. The glow discharge occurs between anode A and cathode K. Anode A consisting of an
aluminium cylinder, drilled along its longitudinal axis, is connected to ground. Cathode K consisting of an
aluminium cylinder is connected to a negative high voltage power supply by means of a ballast resistor,
Rb=47k. The high voltage power supply operates in a constant current regime. Mechanical design of the
electrodes system allows modifying distance L between anode and cathode. The anode-cathode system is placed
into a glass tube whilst electrodes P, Q, X1, X2 are mounted in a cylindrical chamber made of Teflon. The glass
tube, Teflon chamber and vacuum system are joined together by means of standard vacuum flanges. A
Helmholtz coils system generates the magnetic field B parallel to the longitudinal axis of the electrodes.
Experimental measurements have shown that electrons current depends on the gas pressure, discharge current
and P, Q, X1, X2 electrodes electrical bias. Qualitatively, the experimental results are similar to those already
reported in literature [1, 2]. It has been found that there is a limited range of the gas pressure for that the electron
current has an useful value. Consequently, the requirements of the intended experiments regarding the necessary
gas pressure must be in accordance with the capability of the electrons source.

Fig. 1 Experimental setup (not in scale)

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

78

References:
[1] J. A. Panitz, G. Rempfer, Am. J. Phys. 74 (2006), 11, 953-956
[2] Efim Oks, Plasma Cathode Electron Sources, Chapter: Low-Pressure Discharges for Plasma Electron
Sources, Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH&Co, 2006, ISBN: 978-3-527-40634-0
[3] J. J. Bollinger, J. N. Tan, W. M. Itano and D. J. Wineland, Physica Scripta T59 (1995), 362-359

S2 P04
POLYMER-GRAPHENE COMPOSITES PREPARED BY UV AND 2PP CURING FOR COATING
APPLICATIONS
1

Emil C. Buruiana , Florentina Jitaru1, George Epurescu2, Ioana Ion3, Tinca Buruiana1
1

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley 700487 Iasi, Romania
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele,
Romania
3
National Institute for Research and Development in Electrical EngineeringICPE-CA, Splaiul Unirii no.313,
sector 3, Bucharest, Romania
Presenting author: florentina.jitaru@icmpp.ro
2

It is well known that the photoinitiated polymerization of (meth)acrylates monomers (oligomers) has a rising
relevance for a lot of industrial applications, such as coatings, adhesives, composites, dental and medical
materials, steriolithography [1]. On the other hand graphene have attracted increasing attention over the last few
years on account of its extraordinary electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties arising from its unique
structure and these features was researched for use in a variety of applications [2]. One possible method of
exploiting their specific characteristics for actual world applications would be to include graphene sheets in a
composite material [3]. In this context, the present work intends to explored the influence a small quantity of
graphene oxide (GO) or reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on the some properties of polymer matrix obtained by
UV or two photon polymerization (2PP) of new dimethacrylate oligomer (DMA-PEG) alone or in combination
with other comonomers. The structure, morphology and photopolymerization study of the synthesized polymers
composites were investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy, photoDSC analysis, ESEM/EDAX and TEM techniques.
Also, the physico-mechanical characteristics of the resulting composites will be evaluated.
Figure 1: TEM image of the DMA-PEG composites with 0.1 wt.% of GO
References
1. E. Andrzejewska, Prog. Polym. Sci. 26 (4), 605-665 (2001).
2. A. K. Geim, K. S. Novoselov, Nat. Mater. 6, 183191(2007).
3. G. Eda and M. Chhowalla, Nano. Lett. 9, 814818 (2009).
Acknowledgment:
This work was supported by CNCSIS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-I-PTPCCA-2011-3.1-1422.

S2 P05
A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF OPTICAL, ELECTRONIC AND PHOTOLUMINISCENT
PROPERTIES OF ARYLENEVINYLENE AND ARYLENEETHYNYLENE POLYMERS BASED ON
2,7 AND 3,6 DISUBSTITUTE CARBAZOLE UNITS
Ana-Maria CATARGIU, Mircea GRIGORAS
P. Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda alley, Iasi-700487, Romania; Tel. 0232217454, e-mail: anamaria.catargiu@icmpp.ro

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

79

Conjugated polymers have attracted scientific interest both from the academic and industrial point of
view, especially because of their application in the fields of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs),
photovoltaic cells, nonlinear optics devices, field-effect transistors, electrochromic windows and sensors [1].
During the last years, much attention has been paid to polycarbazoles because they are efficient short wavelength
emitters, strong electro-donating (p-type) chromophores and possesses hole transporting properties. Thus, they
are one of the most promising candidates for electro-luminescent and photorefractive devices. As it is known,
carbazole molecule can be easily functionalized at (3,6), (2,7) or N-positions and then covalently linked into
polymeric systems, in the main chain as building blocks or as pendant units.
The aim of this study is to report the synthesis and opto-electrochemical properties of four polymers
based on 2,7 or 3,6 - disubstitute carbazole units, connected by two kind of spacers like vinylene (P1, P3) and
1.4-phenylene ethynylene (P2, P4). Arylene vinylene polymers (P1 and P3) were synthesized by Stille coupling
polymerization reactions while arylene ethynylene polymers (P2 and P4) were obtained by Sonogashira coupling
polymerization reaction.
R
N

R
N

P3

P1

R
N

R
N
P4

P2

The structures of polymers were proved by 1H NMR and IR spectroscopy. Optical properties of the
polymers were investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The redox properties and HOMO and
LUMO energy levels of synthesized polymers were determinated by cyclic voltammetry technique.
References
[1] D. T. McQuade, A. E. Pullen, T.M. Swager, Chem. Rev., 100, (2000) 2537-2574
Acknowledgement: The authors thank the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research
(UEFISCU) for financial support (Grant PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0274 / Contract nr. 148/2011).

S2 P06
LASER IRRADIATION EFFECT ON OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTRA IN A THOMSON
SCATTERING EXPERIMENT
Ana HARABOR1, Novac-Adrian HARABOR2, Ion PALARIE1
1

Department of Physics, Faculty of Exact Sciences, University of Craiova, 13 A. I. Cuza Str., 200585 Craiova,
Romania; 2Department of Physics, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei,060042
Bucharest, Romania:

The paper presents the results of a Thomson scattering experiment performed in order to determine the electron
temperature and its evolution in time in the case of a mercury high intensity discharge (HID) lamp, operated at a
power of 10 W. An argon ion laser Innova 308 C type set at 440 mW and 32.8 A to obtain a wavelength of 476.2
nm has been used. As seen from Fig. 1, the calculated electron temperature through Thomson scattering
experiment in the vicinity of the electrodes was around 8200 K (in steady state) that is considerably higher than
that of around 4000 K determined by optical emission spectrometry for the electrons in the central part of the
column discharge plasma [1].

80

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

Fig. 1 - The electron temperature versus time obtained through a Thomson scattering experiment (left). Intensity
versus time in the case of some Hg spectral lines for irradiated (IRR) and non-irradiated (N) lamp.
We observed that the intensity of characteristic emission spectral lines belonging to Hg atoms as well those
belonging to Ba+- ions (from the emissive mixture deposited on W electrode), are clearly higher in the case of
laser irradiated lamp compared to non-irradiated lamp.
Since the laser beam is not perfect pencil (1 mm diameter) when passing very close to the electrode (at about 0.3
mm from the top) it can reach the electrode and photoelectric effect is contributing to the extraction of electrons
from Ba or BaO layer (extract energy around 2.2 eV) deposited on the top of the tungsten electrode. Although
multi-photon processes may nevertheless become important at very high laser irradiances.
References:
[1] N. A. Harabor, A. Harabor, I. Palarie, I. M. Popescu, G. Zissis, Time Evolution of Optical Emission
Spectrum of a Hg-HID Lamp Exposed to X-ray, Plasma Chem Plasma Process (2010) 30:449459

S2 P07
EFFECTS OF ZR AND CR ADDITION ON THE PROPERTIES OF TISICN COATINGS
M.BALACEANU, M.BRAIC, A.VLADESCU, V.BRAIC
National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele Bucharest, Romania
In the past two decades, addition of small amounts of alloying elements to traditional binary nitride or carbide
hard coatings has attracted significant attention as a method to improve the coating properties.
The goal of this work was to examine the effects of Zr and Cr additions into TiSiCN base coating system. The
coatings were prepared by the cathodic arc method using TiSi and Zr or Cr cathodes in a CH 4 + N2 reactive
atmosphere. The coatings were analyzed for elemental and phase composition, chemical bonds, crystalline
structure, morphology, residual stress, hardness, friction and wear performance, and corrosion resistance in 0.9%
NaCl solution. TiSiCN, TiSiCN-Zr and TiSiCN-Cr coatings presented a FCC solid solution structure with with
(220) preferred orientations.
As compared with the reference TiSiCN coatings, the Zr- and Cr- doped TiSiCN coatings improved their
mechanical characteristics and exhibited superior corrosion behavior, as presented in Fig.1. A grain refinement
and coatings densification was observed, concomitant with the decrease of the residual stress (from -5.9GPa
TiSiCN to -3.8GPa TiSiCN-Zr) and the hardness enhancement (from 35.2 GPa TiSiCN to 42.1 GPa
TiSiCN-Zr). As compared to the reference an improvement of the friction behavior (Fig. 2), accompanied by a
reducement of the wear rate was observed for both investigated coatings.

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

1,5
1,0

TiSiCN
TiSiCN-Cr
TiSiCN-Zr

0.7

C45
TiSiCN
TiSiCN+Cr
TiSiCN+Zr

Friction coefficient,

Potential E (V vs Ag/AgCl)

2,0

0,5
0,0

0.6

saphire ball
0.15 m/s
5N load
400 m

0.5
0.4
0.3

0
1E-10

dry sliding

0.2

-0,5
-1,0

81

1E-9

1E-8

1E-7

1E-6

1E-5

1E-4

1E-3
2

0,01

0,1

100

200

300

Sliding distance (m)

400

Current density i (A/cm )

Fig. 1 Electrochemical tests potentiodynamic curves

Fig. 2. Friction coefficients


of the investigated coatings.

S2 P08
COMBIATORIAL FE-CO BASED GRANULAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES, OBTAINED BY
THERMIONIC VACUUM ARC METHOD
I. JEPU1, C. POROSNICU1, C.P. LUNGU1, C. LUCULESCU1,
V. KUNCSER2, G. IACOBESCU3, V. CIUPINA4
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, RO


2
National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, RO
3
University of Craiova, Faculty of Physics, Craiova, RO
4
Ovidius University, Constanta, RO

Combinatorial Fe-Co based granular magnetic structures were produced using thermionic vacuum arc
technology. The aim of the work was to observe different magnetic response function of the non-magnetic
material used, cooper or magnesium oxide. It was proposed a pure Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) structure, and
a combination between GMR and Tunneling Magnetoresistive (TMR) for this study. The proposed method in
order to obtain the desired granular structures is based on electron beam emitted by an externally heated cathode,
accelerated by a high anodic potential.
Two sets of samples were prepared, first being a combination between Fe-Co as magnetic materials
embedded in a Cu matrix, with a total thickness of 200nm. The second structure was a combination between FeCo (50%-50%) alloy, embedded in a matrix of Cu combined with MgO with a thickness of 200nm. Both sets of
samples were obtained by simultaneously three type TVA discharges. Because of the substrate positioning in
respect with the three anode-cathode systems, different material concentrations were obtained. Structural and
morphological properties were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and
Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Electrical properties of the obtained samples were studied using the 4 point
measurement method, by applying a constant DC current through two of the points, and the other two were used
for reading the dropping voltage on the sample. The magnetic properties were first studied using a nondestructive optical method called MOKE (Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect). Electrical resistance behavior of the
granular type structures was studied for different values of the magnetic field, up to 0.3 T. The study was made
for different values of the samples temperature. It was observed a high variation of the magnetic response in
respect with the temperature. The magnetoresistive effect measured for the two sets of samples varied from 1.5%
to 81 % in respect with the films relative concentrations and also with the samples temperature for a constant
magnetic field.

S2 P09
PURE BE AND BE-W MIXED THIN FILMS EXPOSED TO PISCES B DEUTERIUM PLASMA
I. JEPU1, C. POROSNICU1, C.P. LUNGU1, R. DOERNER2, T. DITTMAR2
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, RO


2
University of California, San Diego, CA, USA

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

82

Pure Be and Be-W combinatorial thin films are used in order to obtain structures with the same
characteristics as the films that are deposited in different fusion reactor area. Pure beryllium and berylliumtungsten mixed thin films were obtained using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) deposition method. The expected
concentration were about 60% - 40% (wt%) and 96%-4% (at%) for the Be-W combinatorial thin film. The total
thickness of the obtained thin film was of 4 m. For the pure Be films, it was used the same set-up as in the
previous experiment. The difference consisted in applying on the substrate a negative bias voltage. For the same
working conditions, three different negative voltages have been applied: -430V, -1100V and -2000V
respectively. For both pure Be and Be-W combinatorial thin films, stainless steel polished substrates were used,
with a circular 25 mm in diameter shape.
In order to investigate deuterium retention and desorption in the pure beryllium and Be-tungsten
combinatorial thin films, it has been used the PISCES-B facility at the University of California in San Diego,
USA, which provided a steady-state, high flux (4.5 5E22 D ions m-2s-1) flowing plasma that simulates the
plasma flow conditions in ITER.
All of the Be-W samples were exposed mainly to the same deuterium plasma conditions, but for three different
fluences (D/cm2), 4.8E21, 1.65E22 and 3.7E22. For the pure Be thin films, the deuterium plasma conditions
were the same, but with two different fluences: 3.18E21 and 1.7E22 (D/cm2)
Morphological and structural studies were made before and after the plasma exposure using Scanning
Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Auger
Electron Spectroscopy. Deuterium retention in the samples was measured using programmed thermal desorption
mass spectroscopy. For both of the studied thin films it was used a linear temperature ramp with 0.3K up to 923
K and a hold time of 10 minutes at the maximum temperature.

S2 P10
APPLICATION OF PLASMA DISCHARGES IN PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY
P. CHIRU, C.P. LUNGU, I. JEPU, C. POROSNICU, A. M. LUNGU,
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, RO

One efficient method for the local treatment of tumors nowadays is considered to be the photodynamic
therapy. A photosensitive substance is usually injected in the cancerous cells. Selective absorption by this
substance when subjected to the action of light with particular wavelength leads to the destruction of the
cancerous tissue [1]. A light source based on electrical discharges in argon and xenon gases which can be used in
photodynamic therapy has been developed [2].
A system that allows testing of different spectral tubes filled with Ar or Xe at variable gas pressure and
with different electrode configurations was conceived. An AC high voltage signal with a peak amplitude of ~
1kV and a frequency of 9.7 kHz was used to ignite the discharge.
The electron temperature was evaluated using the optical emission lines of Ar atoms. The method
consists in selecting two representative lines of Ar. Using the ratio of their relative intensities we estimated the
electron temperature of the produced plasma with a formula based on the Boltzmann distribution of the species.
The electron temperature was in the range of 0.4 -1.1 eV for the discharges produced in Ar at pressures below 10
torr, and 0.35-0.45 eV for discharge produced in Ar at presuress in the range of 10 -6 torr.
The discharge tube was made of quartz and had a length of 110 mm and a diameter of 8 mm. The
electrodes were machined from pure tungsten rods and were mounted at the tubes extremities. The electrical
discharge was powered by an in-house built high-voltage supply, which delivered an AC sine wave with a peakto-peak (p-p) amplitude of 1.3 kV and a frequency in the range of 5 to 10 kHz.
The gases used were spectrally pure argon and xenon and emission spectra in the range of 300 to 800
nm were recorded by collecting the ligh emitted by the disharge. The spectra were acquired and processed using
a SM240 CCD Spectrometer and a HR2000 High-resolution Miniature Fiber Optic Spectrometer.
In order to produce a photodynamic effect emission lines of Ar at 309.34 nm, 750.59 nm, 763.51 nm
and 811.53 nm and of Xe at 537.50 nm, 823, 16 nm, 873.90 nm were produced efficiently.
[1] L. Brancaleon and H. Moseley, Lasers in Medical Sciences 17, 173-186 (2002)
[2] J. G. Levy, Photodynamic therapy; Trends Biotechnol. 13 1418 (1995)

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

83

S2 P11
GROWTH AND MORPHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF PURE Mg AND Mg EMBEDDED IN
HYDROGEN-FREE AMORPHOUS CARBON (a-C) MATRIX
M. CONTULOV, R. VLADOIU, A. MANDES, G. PRODAN
Department of Plasma Physics, Faculty of Physics Chemistry Electronics and Oil Technology, Ovidius
University, Mamaia 124, Constana, 900527, Romania
In recent years, magnesium and magnesium-based materials have received much attention owning to
their potential use as structural materials, biomaterials, sacrificial anode materials and hydrogen storage
materials [1, 2].
However, the application is still limited because the wear resistance of magnesium products is not
nearly as good as steel in ambient and high temperatures. Therefore, there is a strong demand to improve the
surface treatment that can guarantee the wear resistance of the part in the aggressive atmosphere environment. In
general, surface treatments are used to improve the surface properties such as wear resistance and corrosion
resistance. One approach to overcome this major problem is the design of new protective coating systems.
Coating of the base material, providing a barrier between the material and its environment is one of the most
effective methods to protect it against corrosion. In order to have adequate corrosion protection, the coating must
adhere well to the substrate and must also be uniform, pore free and scratch resistant. One method to alter the
grain size of nanomaterials in a controlled way is to prepare composites of Mg and other materials such as MgC
composite.
The aim of the present work is to study and achieve the controlled synthesis of pure magnesium and
nanocrystalline magnesium embedded in hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) matrix. For this reason,
increasing attention has been put on the environmental friendly TVA technology in the last years, which is an
efficient method to create advanced materials at the frontier of science. TVA is an original method for deposition
of high purity thin films with compact structure and extremely smooth, just convenient for nanostructured film
synthesis despite of the high melting point of some materials: carbon, tungsten, tantalum pentoxide as well as
magnesium [3, 4].
The comparative results of qualitative and quantitative analyses of the nanocrystalline phase in the
coatings with use of High ResolutionTransmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) combined with image
analysis are given in this paper.
Keywords: Coating, Magnesium, Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)
Acknowledgment
This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, CNDI
UEFISCDI, project number 160/2012, PN-II-PT-PCCA-2011-3.2-1453.
References
[1] Brusciotti F., Snihirova D. V., Xue H., Montemor M. F., Lamaka S. V., M. G. S. Ferreira, Corrosion Science
67, 82 -90 (2013)
[2] R. Hu, S. Zhang, J. Bu, C. Lin, G. Song, Prog. Org. Coat. 73, 129141 (2012)
[3] R. Vladoiu, V. Ciupina, A. Mandes, V. Dinca, M. Prodan, G. Musa, J. Appl. Phys. 108, no.9, 093301 (2010)
[4] R. Vladoiu, V. Ciupina, M. Contulov, A. Mandes, V. Dinca, G. Prodan, C.P. Lungu, J. Optoelectron. Adv. M
12, 553-556 (2010)

S2 P12
ZINC OXIDE OBTAINED BY PULSED LASER TEDOSITION, THERMIONIC VACUUM ARC AND
THERMAL EVAPORATION THIN FILMS CHARACTERIZATION
C. GHITULETE1, V. CIUPINA1,2, C. POROSNICU3, I. JEPU3, A. MARCU3, C. LUCULESCU3,
1

University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania


Ovidius University, Constanta, Romania
3
National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Romania
2

ZnO is one of the compounds studied actively in various fields due to its significant physical and
chemical properties. For example, ZnO has much attention as a host material for transparent conducting films
because impurity-doped ZnO films show high transparency above 90% the visible region and low electrical
resistivity.
It is very important to control the structural properties of the ZnO films for the applications. Most major

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

84

preparation methods for thin films can be used for the fabrication of ZnO thin films. Depending on the
application of ZnO thin films, a suitable preparation method is selected, and influence of the preparation
conditions on properties of ZnO thin films has to be elucidated.
In order to prepare high quality ZnO films was used thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method [1]; a
carbon crucible filled with ZnO was used as an anode and a TVA gun composed by a tungsten heated filament
inside a Whenelt cylinder was used as a cathode. High voltage in the range of 0- 1500 V DC high voltage was
applied between electrodes. The electron beam focused by the Whenelt cylinder on the crucible melted and
evaporated ZnO. Bright plasma appeared after the breakdown voltage at 850 50V. However, the oxide was not
stable due continuous electron bombardment and suspicions regarding the stoichiometry were raised. Therefore a
new setup was developed using just thermal evaporation where high current (700-800A) passes through the
crucible, heating and melting the material inside it. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was also used since it
is well known to be a very good method to obtain thick transparent ZnO layers [2]. All the films were deposited
on glass and silicon substrates having various thicknesses from 50 to 200nm.
Structural and morphological properties were analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and
optical transmission measurements. Electrical properties of the ZnO structures were analyzed using a four point
measurement system. Different electrical properties for each deposition method were observed. Each deposition
method has its advantage regarding the optical and electrical properties of the layers. This comparison is
presented in this work.
[1] C. P. Lungu, I. Mustata, V. Zaroschi et al., Phys. Scr. T128 (2007) 157
[2] Marcu, A., Enculescu, I., Vizireanu, et al. ,Digest Journal of Nanomaterials and Biostructure,
(2013), 597

S2 P13
DEUTERIUM PLASMA CHARACTERIZATION USED FOR FUSION RELATED MIXED FILMS
Corneliu POROSNICU1, Cristian STANCU1, Vasile TIRON2,Cristian LUNGU1, Ionut JEPU1
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Romania
2
Alexandru Ioan CuzaUniversity, Iasi, Romania
During the operation of the nuclear fusion plant of tokamak type, some of the ions generated in the
deuterium discharge can escape from the plasma region and arrive to the walls of installation where they interact
with the material existing there, which is mostly made of tungsten, beryllium or a mixture of these two.
Therefore it is mostly important to study the interaction phenomena between the deuterium ions and
materials of the walls, particularly the deuterium retention within the solid material. Our laboratory uses the
TVA technology in order to deposit layers of tungsten, beryllium or of their combinations for inner wall of
fusion installations.
For a best simulation of nuclear fuel interaction with the walls during the operation of ITER, the
deuterium gas flux must be ionized and the generated ions be accelerated towards the in situ deposited sample.
This acceleration is accomplished by applying different negative bias potentials on the substrate, which allow
different energy to the ions bombarding the just forming beryllium-tungsten layer. These energies must be as
much as possible near the deuterium energies present in the fusion power plant.
In order to simulate as real as possible, the phenomena appearing at the first wall of the fusion device,
we built a special small device, able to generate deuterium ions simultaneously with the beryllium and tungsten
deposition, and to accelerate them towards the substrate. A constant deuterium flux is directed through a glass
tube between two metallic electrodes made of a tungsten central wire and a stainless steel external cylinder. In
the present configuration with metallic electrodes, the plasma can be generated both by DC or AC voltages. For
the current experiments the applied voltages were of the pulse forms which repeated with different frequencies
changed from the pulse generator.
Emission spectra in the range of 300 to 800 nm were recorded by collecting the light emitted by the
discharge. Two intense emission lines are observed at 486 and 656 nm. D 2 molecular spectra are also observed,
in three broad emission peaks. The intensity of the deuterium spectra lines (atomic and molecular) increased with
the input power, suggesting that the excited population increases at the same flux. Also, decreasing the frequency
of the pulses, a decrease of the intensity of the emission lines is observed.
Plasma potential temporal evolution, measured during the symmetry axe of the electrode system. This
evolution shows a very powerful dynamics of plasma potential, with positive values on almost the entire
temporal range between two pulses. The plasma was characterized regarding the deuterium flux, frequency and
input power. Spatial distributions (on axial course) for plasma potential measured at working frequencies are
presented. For distances higher than 10 mm from the torch nozzle it can be observed a slightly increase of the
average value for plasma potential at a higher repetition frequency of voltage pulses.

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

85

S2 P14
EVALUATION OF SILVER AND TITANIUM CARBIDES THIN FILMS WETTABILITY BY MEANS
OF CONTACT ANGLE MEASUREMENTS
DINCA Virginia, VLADOIU Rodica, CONTULOV Mirela
Dep. of Plasma Physics, Faculty of Physics, Chemistry, Electronics and Oil Technology,
Ovidius University, Mamaia 124, Constanta, 900527, Romania
The present work describes the wettability characteristics by means of contact angle measurements of the
solid silver and titanium carbides thin films. By using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) technology, the carbides
thin films were deposited on glass substrates.
The samples were obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) deposition technology, with a set-up that
enables to fabricate specimens with a very fine microstructure. Due to the high vacuum conditions and the
bombardment with energetic ions of the depositing layers, the obtained films have high purity and compact
structure. [1, 2]
The deposition of a coating on a solid generates new interfaces between dissimilar materials and involves
considerations of wettability, spreading, and interface evolution. The obtained silver and titanium carbides
coatings were homogeneous and crack free.
The wettability of a solid by a liquid is characterized in terms of surface free energy calculated from the
contact angle that the liquid makes on the solid. The contact angle for spread liquid droplets was determined
from the side view and during the measurements the room temperature was 250 C. The testing liquids were
water, ethylene glycol and formamide and the surface free energy of the deposited films has been calculated by
mean of Owens Wendt (LifshitzVan der Waals) method. This method enables to determine the electron
acceptor and electrondonor parameters of the surface energy. [3, 4]
The total surface energy is a sum of apolar (LW) and polar (AB) component. The surface free energies were
72.34 mJ/m2 for TiC/glass and 23.18 mJ/m2 for CAg/glass, indicating a good hydrophobic character for C-Ag
film and a hidrophilic one for the TiC film. This study analyzed the surface free energy components and the
wettability of deposited C metal films on the same substrate and by the same deposition method.
Acknowledgments: This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific
Research, CNDI UEFISCDI, project number 160/2012, PN-II-PT-PCCA-2011-3.2-1453
References
1.
R. Vladoiu, V. Ciupina, A. Mandes, V. Dinca, M. Prodan, G. Musa, J. Appl. Phys., 108 (2010) 093301
2. R. Vladoiu, A. Mandes, V. Dinca, M. Contulov, V. Ciupina, C. P. Lungu, G. Musa, Investigation of
DLC and multilayer coatings hydrophobic character for biomedical applications in New Industrial Plasma
Technology by Wiley-VCH, (2009) 357
3. A.W. Neumann, R.J. Good, Surface and Colloid Science, vol. II, ed. R.J. Good and R.R. Stromberg
(New York: Plenum Press, 1979)
4. V. Bursikova, P. Stahel, Z. Navratil, J. Bursik, J. Janca (2004), Surface energy evaluation of plasma
treated materials by contact angle measurement.

S2 P15
SUBSTRATE INFLUENCE ON THE PROPERTIES OF SIC THIN FILMS DEPOSITED BY
THERMIONIC VACUUM ARC (TVA) METHOD
Aurelia MANDES, Rodica VLADOIU, Virginia DINCA, Gabriel PRODAN and Victor CIUPINA
Dep. of Plasma Physics, Faculty of Physics, Chemistry, Electronics and Oil Technology, Ovidius University,
Mamaia 124, Constanta, 900527, Romania
Modern technology has placed demands for increasing mechanical and chemical capability in materials used
for a variety of technological and commercial applications. As a result of recent improvement in technologies the
optimization of the material combination and deposition parameters is always a challenging subject for each
element or combination of elements.
The aim of this paper is focused on growth and characterization of silicon carbide (SiC) protective coatings
onto tree different substrates (Si, glass and stainless steel OLC 45) by using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA)
technique. The phase composition, surface, electrical and morphology of the nanostructured SiC thin films were
investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and transmission electron
microscopy. Also, the contact angles and free surface energy were determined by means of Surface Energy

Section 2 LASER, PLASMA and RADIATION PHYSICS and APPLICATIONS

86

Evaluation System (See System). The achieved results of the SiC thin films reveal a hydrophilic character
(contact angle of 76.620 for SiC/Si), high uniformity (grain size diameter ~ 23 nm) and smoothness with
promising interest for micro/nano-electromechanical system (M/NEMS) and biomedical applications.
In this way, the SiC protective coatings obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method offer
convincing advantages for a large range of industrial applications.
Acknowledgment
This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research,
CNDIUEFISCDI, project number 160/2012, PN-II-PT-PCCA-2011-3.2-1453.
References
[1] H. Jafari, N. Ehsani, S.A. Khalifeh-Soltani, M. Jalaly, Nano-SiC/SiC anti-oxidant coating on the surface
of graphite, Appl. Surf. Sci., vol. 264, pp.128 132, Ian. 2013.
[2] A.Barna, S. Gurban, L. Kotis, J. Labar, A. Sulyok, A. L. Toth, M. Menyhard, J. Kovac, P. Panjan, Growth
of amorphous SiC film on Si by means of ion beam induced mixing, Appl. Surf. Sci, vol. 263, pp. 367372,
Oct. 2012.
[3] R. Vladoiu, A. Mandes, V. Dinca, M. Contulov, V. Ciupina, C.P.Lungu, G. Musa, Investigation of DLC
and multilayer coatings hydrophobic character for biomedical applications, New Industrial Plasma Technology,
Ed. Wiley VCH, 2010, pp. 357-365

S2 P16
A COMPARATIVE MATHEMATICAL APPROACH FOR THE KRAMERSKRONIG METHOD
IMPLEMENTATION. CASE STUDY OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF Bi2O3
Gabriel MURARIU1, Adrian DINESCU2, Simona CONDURCHE BOTA1
1.

Physics, Chemistry and Environment Department, Science Faculty, "Dunrea de Jos" University, Galai,
Romania, No. 111 Street Domneasc, 800201 Galai, Romania
2 National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies -IMT Bucharest

The optical reflectance of Bi2O3 was measured, and the optical properties were estimated basing on the
KramersKronig transformation. The novelty of the present paper is due to the implementation of a complete
MATLAB software approach in order to cover the complex computations implied by this extrapolation. The
analytical fit of the reflectance spectrum is applied, accompanied by a careful extrapolation, which is necessary
within the KramersKronig transformation. In this way, were considered two different mathematical approach.
The study is implemented for Bi2O3 films deposited by thermal vacuum evaporation at different temperatures of
the glass substrates and the comparison with the experimental data set being made using the transmission and the
reflection optical spectra.

S2 P17
HERALDED BELL STATE CREATION USING GHZ STATES
O. DNIL and P. E. STERIAN
Optics Department, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Polytechnical University of Bucharest, 060082, Bucharest,
Romania, e-mail: paul.sterian@physics.pub.ro
Quantum cryptography has come to rely even more strongly on the innate phenomenon known as
entanglement. Known at first as a spooky action at a distance, as Einstein indicated, entanglement manifests
itself as a complex intertwinement of different observables of two quantum particles (e.g. polarization, energy)
which persists at arbitrarily long distances between the quantum particles. Manipulation of these observables
yielded coherent transmission of information, over increasingly longer distances (up to several hundred
kilometers). Due to the quantum nature of the information carriers, any unauthorized measurement of the state
will irreversibly project the said state onto an arbitrary basis, introducing an effective qubit error rate in the
exchange of information. This special property makes the qubits perfect candidates for use in quantum existing
quantum cryptography protocols. By construction, in the case of an eavesdropper, the two legitimate participants
set a qubit error rate threshold, over which the conversation is dropped. A slight disadvantage is that this
threshold can never reach zero, because even the environment may add some errors in the final qubit string. This
implies that should an optimal attack that does not break the threshold value be devised, the eavesdropper is able
to intercept the qubits undetected. Recent studies also show that an optimal attack on the quantum channel may

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87

be able to replace a noisy channel with a cleaner one in order to be situated below the error threshold when
verification is made. With this new potential threat, new communication security measures must be devised.
This paper proposes that apart from the two qubits the participants share, another qubit is created simultaneously,
and stored in an adjacent console, without any access from an outside source. Query of that control qubit may be
done internally, for absolute key integrity verification purposes. This can reduce the theoretical threshold over
which quantum key exchange is dropped to zero, making an absolute a posteriori verification of the secret key.
The paper is organized as follows: section II outlines the theoretical background of entanglement, section III
treats the implementation and simulation of the proposed quantum key distribution scheme, and section IV draws
the conclusions on the feasibility and advantages of the proposed scheme.

88

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

SECTION
S3 Nuclear and sub-Nuclear Physics and Applications
Nuclear and subnuclear sciences and Engineering
Advanced detection systems
Accelerated particle beams
Nuclear Techniques and applications
Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

89

INVITED LECTURES
S3 L01
PHOTOREACTION STUDIES PERFORMED WITH LASER COMPTON SCATTERING
GAMMA SOURCES
Dan FILIPESCU
National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering "Horia Hulubei"
Atomistilor nr. 407, Bucharest-Magurele, P.O.BOX MG6
The gamma source that will be installed at ELI-NP research facility will provide within the next years
photon beams of unprecedented quality with respect to both photon intensity and spectral intensity, thus
exceeding the performance of existing facilities by several orders of magnitude. This tremendous progress will
be enabled by Compton-backscattering of an intense laser on a high quality electron beam. We envisage to
employ these gamma beams for photofission studies on extremely deformed nuclear states of actinides,
investigating their multiple-humped potential energy landscape in a highly selective way. On the other hand,
these quasimonochromatic beams are also suited for photoneutron reaction studies on isotopes of great
astrophysics and applications interest. The talk will present the results of some test experiments performed at
HIGS and New SUBARU facilities.

S3 L02
NUCLEAR DIPOLE DYNAMICS WITHIN MICROSCOPIC TRANSPORT MODELS
V. BARAN
University of Bucharest, Theoretical Physics, Mathematics, Optics, Plasma, Lasers Department, P.O.
Box MG-11, RO 077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
Modern experimental facilities evidenced recently new collective phenomena in nuclear exotic systems.
A dipole response centred at energies well below the Giant Dipole Resonance was identified for several neutron
rich nuclei. Considering a transport approach based on Landau-Vlasov equation we investigate the collective
features of this mode, named Pygmy Dipole Resonance, as well as its dependence on the nuclear equation of
state in the isovector sector.

S3 L03
COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR COLLISIONS AT RELATIVISTIC ENERGIES
Catalin RISTEA1,2, Oana RISTEA1, Alexandru JIPA1, Calin BESLIU1
1

Faculty of Physics University of Bucharest, 077125, Magurele, Romania


2
Institute of Space Science, Magurele, Romania
*Corresponding address: catalin.ristea@live.com

Heavy-ion collisions at high energies offer an unique opportunity to probe highly excited dense nuclear
matter and study its properties. In these collisions a large number of particles of different types is produced.
Current understanding of such collisions suggest that the production of a QGP phase in relativistic heavy ion
collisions could produce significant event-by-event correlations and fluctuations in transverse momentum,
multiplicity, etc. Therefore it is important to analyze uctuations of multiplicities (net-protons, net-strangeness,
total protons) for different energies and centralities and search for anomalous behaviour due to a phase transition.
Intrinsic fluctuations of the system temperature could arise from fluctuations in existing small parts of a hadronic
system with respect to the whole system or from event-by-event type. Such fluctuations were investigated using
the Tsallis distribution for Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies and for lower energies. The multiplicity
distributions of different types of particles produced in simulated Au+Au collisions using UrQMD model at
energies ranging from 2 200 AGeV were analyzed and the moments of the distributions were calculated. The
centrality and beam energy dependence of the moments of multiplicity distributions will be shown and
discussed.

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

90

S3 L04
RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS IN ATOM-LASER INTERACTION
Madalina BOCA, Viorica FLORESCU
University of Bucharest, Department of Physics
We consider two applications of the recently published relativistic generalization of the Kramers-Henneberger
approximation [1], an approach that shows that, for initially low energy electrons, the Dirac equation in the
presence of an atomic potential V and a very intense laser field is equivalent to a Schrodinger-like equation
which contains a modified time dependent atomic potential,

The function R is the classical trajectory of the electron in the laser pulse. The equation is valid for plane-wave
laser pulses with arbitrary intensity and shape, if the initial state contains only low momentum Fourier
components.
In the first part of our work we study, based on the numerical integration of the equation written above, the
dependence of the ionization probability on the laser field intensity and we compare with the results we obtain
by adopting each of the two approximations: non relativistic dipole approximation and non relativistic
approximation with the first order retardation correction included. Our calculations focus on high frequency and
short laser pulses. The numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation is performed on a cartesian grid, using
the split-operator method. We show that in the relativistic regime the retardation effects are the main cause of the
complete ionization of the atom, destroying the stabilization.
In the second part we apply an unitary transformation to the Schrodinger-like equation above which leads to
a new equation with the Hamiltonian periodic in time. For this new Hamiltonian, we discuss the Floquet
problem and calculate the quasienergy of the dressed ground state. In this purpose, we integrate the Schrodinger
equation for a laser pulse consisting in a very long turn-on, followed by a constant amplitude part. During the
turn-on the system evolves adiabatically, being at any moment in the (intensity dependent) Floquet state
originating from the ground state of the atom. Next, during the constant part of the field, which starts at t=0, the
system remains in the Floquet state; the autocorrelation of the wavefunction has the structure

where W is the
complex quasienergy and F(t) is a periodic function with the period T of the laser field. From the autocorelation
function calculated along several periods of the laser field, we extract the quasienergy W and compare the results
with those predicted by the non relativistic high frequency Floquet theory (see, for example [2]).
[1] Madalina Boca, Viorica Florescu, Mihai Gavrila, Phys. Rev. A 85, 023425 (2012)
[2] Mihai Gavrila in Atoms in intense laser fields, ed. M. Gavrila, Academic Press 1992.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S3 OP1
PROMPT EMISSION MODELING IN THE FISSION PROCESS
Iuliana VISAN1,2, Georgiana GIUBEGA1, Anabella TUDORA1
1

University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Bucharest-Magurele,Romania


2
Institute for Nuclear Research, Mioveni-Pitesti, Romania
iuliana.visan@yahoo.com

The determinist Point-by-Point model is considered today one of the most powerful approaches for the prompt
neutron and gamma-ray emission. It provides almost all quantities characterizing both the fission fragments and
the prompt emission. The primary results of the model consist in the so-called multi-parametric matrices,

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

91

meaning many quantities as a function of fragment (Z, A) and as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE). These
matrices do not depend on fragment distributions. The fragmentation range plays a very important role. This is
built by taking into account all mass pairs covering a convenient range (from symmetric fission up to a far
asymmetric split), for each mass pair usually two up to four fragments being considered with the charge numbers
Z as the nearest integers above and below the most probable charge (taken as UCD corrected with a possible
charge polarization). For each fragment of the fragmentation range all quantities are calculated at TKE values
covering a convenient range.
The model is based on the neutron evaporation from fully accelerated fission fragments, the sequential neutron
emission being taken into account by the fragment residual temperature distribution. The compound nucleus
cross-section of the inverse process of neutron evaporation from the nuclei of the fragmentation range is
provided by optical model calculations using phenomenological potential parameterizations adequate for nuclei
appearing as fission fragments. The partition of total excitation energy (TXE) between fully accelerated
complementary fragments is obtained from the modeling at scission. This is based on the calculation of extradeformation energy at scission (with deformability provided by liquid drop model with shell corrections and
deformation parameters from Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations) and available excitation energy at scission
shared by assuming thermodynamical equilibrium at scission and fragment level density description by FermiGas. The level density parameters of fragments at scission and full acceleration are calculated in the frame of the
generalized super-fluid model.
By averaging the multi-parametric matrices over the fragment mass, charge and TKE distributions it is possible
to obtain fragment and prompt emission quantities as a function of fragment mass number (such as multiplicity
(A), prompt gamma-ray energy E(A)), average quantities as a function of TKE (such as <>(TKE), <>(TKE))
or total average quantities (such as <>tot, <E>, prompt gamma multiplicity <n>) as a function of the incident
energy.
The PbP model was successfully applied to many spontaneous and neutron induced fissioning systems, such as
252
Cf(SF), 236-244Pu(SF), 244,248Cm(SF), 233,234,235,236,238U(n,f), 239Pu(n,f), 237Np(n,f), 231-233Pa(n,f), 232Th(n,f)), being
validated by the excellent description of all existing experimental data. The evaluation of total average prompt
neutron multiplicity and spectra required in all fission applications are also based on the Point-by-Point model.

S3 OP2
DESCRIPTION OF Pt EVEN-EVEN ISOTOPES WITHIN A SOLVABLE MODEL FOR THE
QUADRUPOLE INTRINSIC VARIABLES
A. A. RADUTA and P. BUGANU
Department of Theoretical Physics, IFIN-HH, Bucharest, Magurele, Romania
The isotope chain $^{180-196}$Pt is analyzed with a recent proposed solvable model for the quadrupole
intrinsic variables, in order to see its shape evolution and whether or not a shape coexistence occurs. Moreover,
numerical results for energy spectra and reduced E2 transition probabilities of each involved isotope are
provided and compared with the corresponding experimental data.

S3 OP3
MULTIPLE BACKBENDING IN EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI
R. BUDACA and A. A. RADUTA
Department of Theoretical Physics, IFIN-HH, Bucharest, Magurele, Romania
The phenomenon of double backbending is semi-microscopically investigated based on the mixing of four
rotational bands. Each rotational band is defined by a set of angular momentum projected particle-core product
states with a specific single-particle factor function, and a model Hamiltonian describing a set of paired particles
moving in a deformed mean field and interacting with a phenomenological deformed core. The projected states
are deformed and not orthogonal but can be used to construct an orthogonal basis. The lowest eigenvalues of the
model Hamiltonian in this orthogonal basis define the yrast band. Due to this specific construction, the total
wave function acquires a complex structure which allows a quantitative description of the yrast states and their
electromagnetic properties in the region of the two backbendings.

92

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

S3 OP4
QUARTET CONDENSATION AND NEUTRON-PROTON PAIRING IN ATOMIC NUCLEI
N. SANDULESCU (1), D. NEGREA (1), C. W. JOHNSON (2)
1) Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Romania
2) San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1233
It is shown how proton-neutron pairing in N=Z nuclei is accurately described by a quartet condensate made out
of two neutrons and two protons coupled to total isospin T=0. These four-body correlations are very important
also for nuclei away of N=Z line. For nuclear systems with an excess of like-nucleon pairs, the condensate of
alpha-like quartets coexists with the extra ordinary Cooper pairs. Comparisons with exact solvable models and
with exact shell model calculations show that the quartet condensation model describes with high accuracy the
ground state of nuclei with valence protons and neutrons moving in the same major shell. Applications are made
for valence nucleons above the closed cores 16O, 40Ca and 100Sn. It is shown that the quartet condensation
model is much more accurate than the PBCS approximation with two pair condensates, one formed by neutronproton pairs and the other by neutron-neutron and proton-proton pairs.

S3 OP5
SOURCES OF NUCLEAR MATTER JETS IN He+Cu RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS
Danut ARGINTARU, Madalin CHERCIU, Eliodor CONSTANTINESCU
Constanta Maritime University
In a few previous works [1-4] we analyzed the competition between different particle production mechanisms in
nucleusnucleus collisions at 4.5 A GeV/c, like: hydrodynamic models, thermodynamic models, intranuclear
cascades and cumulative production. We found hydrodynamic specific effects (the bounce-off of the projectile
and of target spectator fragments and the squeezeout or the splashout of participant matter), as well as jets of
nuclear matter. In this work we made a comparison of the characteristics of nuclear matter jets from He +Cu
relativistic nuclear collisions (SKM200 JINR Dubna Collaboration) and the nuclear matter jets detected in
simulated collisions with the GEANT4 simulator. The results show us a similitude of properties (momentum
distributions, angular distributions, etc.) of real and simulated jets. At this energy of projectile the mechanism of
interaction seems to be the intranuclear cascades one. The nonjet events present some different properties,
indicating collective phenomena.
[1] C. Besliu et al. - Nucl.Phys.A672: 446-474, 2000;
[2] C. Beliu et al. - Eur. Phys. J. A1 (1998) 65-75.
[3] C. Beliu et al - Rom. J. Phys. 43(1-2) (1998) 489-500.
[4] C. Beliu et al -Rom. Rep. Phys. 49(5-7) (1997) 531-544.

POSTERS
S3 P01
ACCURATE DETERMINATION OF CONVERTING COEFFICIENT OF GAMMA RAY DETECTION
TO FAST NEUTRON
COUNTING IN NE102 PLASTIC SCINTILLATOR BY MCNP CODE
AMIN ATTARZADEH* BEHNAM MAHDIAN**
* The Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research, ACECR Ahwaz Iran.
** The Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research, ACECR Ahwaz Iran

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

93

Due to the extraordinary efficiency of plastic scintillator detector in fast neutrons detection and its capability to
discriminate fast neutrons from gamma-ray photons in scintillation, it is necessary to examine how the
calibration is performed. Whereas the single energy gamma- ray source is used to calibration of detector, it is
important to determine the converting coefficient of gamma- neutron accurately. In this study the situation of
detector simulated with MCNP code and not only the conversion coefficient is determined but also its relation
with the size and shape of plastic scintillator is investigated.
Keywords: NE102 plastic scintillator, calibration, convert coefficient, MNCP.

S3 P02
CENTRALITY DERTEMINATION IN HEAVY-ION COLLISIONS
Valerica BABAN1, Alexandru JIPA1
1

Bucharest University Faculty of Physics

The aim of this paper is to present an update regarding the feasibility of centrality determination
between 2GeV/u and 15 GeV/u Au-Au collisions in the CBM experiment. The Compressed Baryonic Matter
CBM experiment is a fix target heavy - ion experiment designed to investigate, in the near future, the proprieties
of highly compressed baryonic matter produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions at SIS100 and SIS300 accelerator
of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The goal of the experiment is to
explore the phase diagram of nuclear matter at very high net baryonic densities and moderate temperatures . In
the first stage of the experiment energies from 2GeV/u to 15 GeV/u will be investigate.
In heavy-ion collisions centrality can be correlated with the impact parameter which describe the
geometry of the collision and therefore is a good criterion to divide and analyze data. In the CBM experiment
case we use two parameters two evaluate the centrality , the charge multiplicity measured by STS detector and
the forward energy deposited in the PSD detector. Correlations between these two detectors are made and
multivariate analysis techniques with ROOT is used.

S3 P03
NEUTRINO INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE GASES
Daniela CHESNEANU1
1

National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, P.O.Box MG-6, RO-077125 BucharestMagurele, Romania, E-mail: chesneanu@nipne.ro

Neutrinos are very special particles produced in very different processes in nuclear and particle physics,
and also are messengers from astrophysical objects, as well as relics from Early Universe and can give us
information on processes happening in the Universe, during its evolution, which cannot be studied otherwise.
Detection of this astrophysical neutrino was realised using massive underground detectors, all based on the use
of large mass of liquids (including noble gases) who can be considered as sort of observatories for this rare
physics phenomena.
Noble gases have several advantages that make them very attractive as detection media for ionization
detectors. First of all, they are available in large amounts as byproducts of the oxygen production for the steel
industry. Argon is the third most abundant gas in the atmosphere following nitrogen and oxygen. The pure noble
gases are available in large quantities and noble gas detectors are scalable, allowing the construction of large
detectors that operate in accordance with principles explored using small prototypes. The second, noble gases
can be relatively easy purified. For detection of penetration radiation, the most popular are heavy noble gases:
argon (Ar), krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) because of their inherent high stopping power. These properties have
been extensively studied over the years and significant progress has been made in understanding the underlying
physics as well as on development of the associated technologies, notably gas purification, material cleaning,
cooling, photon and charge detection. A wide spectrum of applications has been considered involving dark
matter (DM) searches and coherent neutrino scattering (CNS) detection. For that reason, within the past few
years, in Romania, many studies have been made to determine the neutrino properties [1-7]. The analysis
presented here has the same purpose and was realized using simulation programs.
Object-Oriented programs [8,9] are toolkit supported and developed by international collaborations of
experts. This programs allowed us to generate neutrinos of different flavors and to study neutrino interactions
with noble gases. Simulation in particle physics is a computer-aided method of modeling particle interactions

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

94

with an aim to predict results of experiment. Simulations are used to evaluate the feasibility and physics reach of
proposed experiments, optimize the detector design, analyze the collected data samples and evaluate systematic
errors.
In this work we did a comparative analysis over different energy ranges (solar, accelerator, and
atmospheric neutrinos) and the obtained results will be presented in this communication.
[1] A. Saftoiu et al., Rom. J. Phys., 56, 664, 2011. [2] A. M. Apostu et al., Rom. Rep. Phys., 63, 220, 2011. [3] G.
Toma et al., Rom. Rep. Phys., 63, 383, 2011. [4] B. Mitrica et al., Rom. Rep. Phys., 62, 750, 2010
[5] D. Chesneanu, AIP Conf. Proc.1304, 489-493, 2010. [6] D. Chesneanu et al., Rom. Rep. Phys.,64, no. 3, 2012.
[7] D. Chesneanu et al., Rom. J. Phys., 57, no.7-8, 2012.
[8] C. Andreopoulos et al., Nucl.Instrum.Meth.A, vol. 614, pp. 87-104, 2010. [9] S. Agostinelli et al., Nuclear
Instruments and Methods A 506, pp. 250-30, 2003.

S3 P04
LOW ACTIVITY POSITRON SOURCES PRODUCED WITH A PET CYCLOTRON
L. S. CRACIUN1, R. G. RATA2, C. CIMPEANU, C. IONESCU1, M. STRATICIUC1, I. BURDUCEA1, P. M
RACOLTA1, A.T. SERBAN1
1

Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Romania
International Institute for Accelerator Applications West Building, University of Huddersfield Queensgate,
Huddersfield, GB

To extend the nuclear physics applications and to perform the study of vacancy type defects in metals,
semiconductors, polymers etc., we decide to promote positron annihilation techniques. In order to this goal we
started a project of dedicated positron sources produced at the IFIN-HH using TR-19 PET Cyclotron. Activities
as low as 4x105 Bq (10 Ci) are sufficient for conventional Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)
and Coincidence Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (CDBS). The principal stage to obtain these sources consists
in the target irradiation to prepare a specific radioactive species through a particular nuclear reaction. The
irradiation can be accomplished using a cyclotron beam. One strong constraint in this work is to find optimal
solutions taking into account the small / medium size cyclotron model available at IFIN-HH. 22Na is the
preferred isotope due to its long half life (2.6 a), easy to handle in water solution as 22NaCl or 22Na2CO3, and
relatively moderate price. In the same time 22Na has a + decay: 22Na 22Ne + + + e + (1.27MeV) (>90% in
decay). 1.27 MeV appears almost simultaneously with positron - can be used as start event for lifetime
spectroscopy. For production of 22Na at a small cyclotron the 22Ne(p,n)22Na reaction seems to be very promising.
This paper reports Monte Carlo Simulations for the excitation function for the (p.n) nuclear reaction on natural
neon at the proton energy up to 19MeV. A difficult problem we tried to solve it is target processing At EOB, the
neon is either released or trapped, and the target walls can be washed with a very dilute solution to recover the
22
Na. The abundance of the 22Ne in the natural neon is less than 10% but for small scale production natural neon
gas may be used as target. If enriched neon is used, then the target material should be recovered via cryogenic
trapping.
References:
[1] C. Cimpeanu, L. Craciun, E. Dragulescu, D. Dudu, N.Miron, P.M. Racolta, D. Voiculescu, 22Na Positron
Source for Annihilation Positron Spectroscopy, Proceedings of the International Conference on Application of
High Precision Atomic & Nuclear Methods, Neptun, Romania, September 2-6, 2002, p 147
[2] C. Cimpeanu, L. Craciun, D. Dudu, P. M. Racolta, I. Mihalcea, The manufacturing and the chemical
separation of Na-22 radioactive isotope used in the obtaining of a (NaCl)-Na22 positron source, Revista de
chimie, 56 (5): 499-501 May 2005
[3] Takcs, S., Trknyi, F., Qaim, S.M., Excitation function of 22Ne(p, n)22Na reaction: Possibility of
production of 22Na at a small cyclotron, Appl. Radiat. Isot. 47 (1996) 303307.

S3 P05
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE TO INCREASE THE
IRRADIATION CAPABILITIES FOR TR-19 CYCLOTRON IN IFIN-HH
L. S. CRACIUN1, R. G. RATA2, C. IONESCU1, D. NICULAE1
1

Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Romania

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

95

International Institute for Accelerator Applications West Building, University of Huddersfield Queensgate,
Huddersfield, GB

In the last four years in the frame of a large infrastructure development project in IFIN-HH was build a new
investment The Radiopharmaceutical Research Centre (RRC). The major equipment of the Center is a state-ofthe-art cyclotron TR19 manufactured by Canadian company ACSI. The TR19 is a very flexible cyclotron
because of the variable energy proton beam extraction (14-19MeV) and the highest performing radioisotope
production cyclotrons in the field boasting >300 microamps of extracted beam current. The dual beam
construction of the cyclotron allowed equipping the machine with a specifically conceived 6 m long external
beam line, ending in a separate bunker (the experimental hall). For this reason the machine can provide beams
for routine 18F production as well as for radiochemistry and radio-pharmacy developments, novel detector,
radiation biophysics, and radioprotection. This facility will offer unique opportunities for R&D in the area of
radiochemistry, material science, isotope production and their applications. In this work, the main elements of
the accelerator facility will be briefly described and the beam lines development plan in the experimental hall
will be presented. This report summarizes the results of the Monte Carlo simulation performed in order to study
the neutron and photon ambient dose equivalents around the target selector at the end of the external beam line in
the experimental hall. The goal of this calculus is to estimate the local shielding arround the irradiated target in
order to reduce the radiation dose outside of the bunker.
References:
[1] Facure A., Frana W. Optimal shielding design for bunkers of compact cyclotrons used in the production of
medical radionuclides, Med. Phys. 37 (1) 6332-6337, December 2010
[2] Facure A Monte Carlo Simulation of TR 1 9shielding (Bucharest project), Adnaced Cyclotron System Inc.,
Richmond, Canada, May 2011
[3] L. S. Craciun, D. Niculae, A. T. Serban, I. Ursu, C. Ivan, C. Ionescu, P. M. Racolta, E. Barna, The new
TR19 Cyclotron facility in IFIN-HH for medical and scientific research needs, 2nd European Nuclear Physics
Conference - EuNPC 2012, September 17-21, 2012, Bucharest

S3 P06
GROSS ALPHA ACTIVITY DETERMINATION IN LIQUID EFFLUENTS
USING LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING
R. I. DOBRIN, C. N. DULAMA, AL. TOMA, C. N. CIOCIRLAN, S. M. STOICA
Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti, PO Box 78, Romania
To ensure that the operation of the nuclear facilities have no significant radiological effects on the public and the
environment around the sites, the requirements of the regulatory bodies have imposed maximum levels for the
radioactive releases. A special attention is given to alpha emitters, which have long half-lives and high radiotoxicities. So, in accordance with the requirements of regulations, the detection limit of the method used to
assess the total alpha activity concentration in liquid discharges should be lower than 1Bq/L. Traditionally, alpha
particles have been quantitated with ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors, gas flow proportional counters (GPC) and
by alpha spectroscopy, performed by surface-barrier detectors. All of these methods measure solid samples on
planchets. Sample preparation is a difficult problem because of the self-absorption of the alpha particle by the
sample matrix or by the alpha particle itself. Several complicated and long procedures, including precipitation,
filtration, chromatography, extraction, and stripping are required to separate the alpha emitting nuclides of
interest from the sample matrix. In addition, evaporation, electrodeposition, and vacuum sublimation are
necessary to prepare the samples for accurate analysis by one of these methods. These combined procedures are
labor intensive and time consuming. They result in low counting efficiencies, low recoveries, and poor
reproducibility. Recently, a new method was developed to measure alpha activity in liquid samples. The method
combines Eichroms extraction technology based on a special resin (Actinide Resin) with liquid scintillation
counting (LSC). The approach to the gross alpha activity measurement in liquid samples based on this method is
presented in this paper. The purpose of the work was to evaluate the performances of the method and to optimise
the procedure of the sample preparation. A series of tests was performed to validate the extraction procedure of
alpha emitting radionuclides in aqueous samples with Actinide Resin, principally regarding to the contact time
required to extract all alfa nuclides. The influence of other potentially interfering factors (quality of liquid
scintillator, acid type used to bring the sample to the desired pH, etc.) was also observed. The main conclusions
were that a minimum 20 hours stirring time is needed to achieve a 100% percent recovery of the alpha nuclides
and that the counting efficiency is not influenced by the level of quench in samples. Spectral data showed that in
spite of an obvious shift to lower energy of the spectra, 100% counting efficiency was maintained irrespective of

96

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

level of quench in the samples. The method is quick and allows for detection limits lower than 1 Bq/L Alpha
activity concentrations of about 0.25 Bq/L were measured with accuracy better than 13% in only 60 minutes
counting time. The minimum detectable concentration of 0.056 Bq/L can be achieved with a 60 minute counting
time using 500 mL water aliquots. The sample preparation is faster and the detection limit is lower than in the
case of traditional GPC method.

S3 P07
LESSONS LEARNED IN APPLYING RADIOPROTECTION PROGRAMME IN THE CONTROLLED
AND SURVEILLED AREA OF WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
GH. DOGARU, F. DRAGOLICI, M. NICU, L. IONASCU
Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH,
P.O. Box MG-6, RO-077125, Magurele, Romania
After 40 years of operation, the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR) from the National Institute of R&D
for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), enter in a complex up-grading process which implies activities
to be developed in the controlled area by external workers. In this sense, STDR-IFIN-HH develop and apply a
radioprotection programme devoted to external workers have the scope to assure the radiological security, a key
issue in all nuclear activities.
The programme have clear objectives in elaborating and developing certain rules regarding the access
in the controlled area of the visitors, transport devices and equipments, as well as entrance of goods, work with
open fire, rules regarding work health and security, preventive medical examination, dangerous substances
manipulation, traffic into and out from the controlled area of devices and equipments.
In the radiological installation - Waste Treatment Plant, are implemented operational radioprotection measures
regarding the zoning layout, access control, technological ventilation system which assure a controlled
depression system, minimization of the radiation levels in the working areas, individual exposure and internal
contamination monitoring, personal training, others. A specificity of the works carried out with external workers
is the fact that during the training programme, is observed a major interest in learning and owning the
radioprotection rules, but, in relative short time routine became a fact and the rules are often forgotten and
breaked.
Having in mind that the workers protection against radiation effects and minimization of the above
related aspects are a major objective, the periodic surveillance and training of the external workers is mandatory.

S3 P08
STUDY OF THE CONDITIONING MATRICES FOR ALUMINIUM RADIOACTIVE WASTES
L. IONASCU, M. NICU, C. TURCANU, F. DRAGOLICI, GH. ROTARESCU
Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, RO-077125 Magurele,
Romania
Embedding of radioactive waste in Portland cement matrix is the most used method, applied in the
world by the countries developing nuclear energy programmes, but not all the radioactive waste types are
compatible with the normal cement matrix because of negative effects of some chemical reactions developed
during the hydrolysis and curing steps of cement paste. The radioactive aluminium, one of the as called
hazardous wastes generated by the decommissioning of research nuclear reactor as VVR-S IFIN-HH, or
other nuclear techniques applications, like irradiation/activation techniques, is a type of radioactive waste which
can not be conditioned by this method, due to behaviour of the metallic aluminium in contact with normal
cement products.
The studies and preliminary results of the work presented in the present paper is part of a research
project developed to identify a proper management of this special type of radioactive waste from the storage
phase up to final disposal.
To obtain a conditioning matrix for radioactive aluminium in accordance with the actual international
disposal requirements and respecting the waste acceptance criteria of National Radioactive Waste Disposal
Baita-Bihor, is necessary to study new formulas of low basicity binding agents, in order to minimize the alkaline
attack of cement hydrolysis products on metallic aluminium. Laboratory test and analysis performed in this
paper include: elemental analysis by XRF of the raw materials, determination of system setting time and

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

97

structural analysis by XRD to compare CEM III/A 42.5 N-LH, CEM V/A 42.5 (S-V) as reference matrices with
a magnesium phosphate cement matrix (MKP).

S3 P09
THE INFLUENCE OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MANUFACTURING PROCESS ON
THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Fe-Cr-Ti-W-Y2O3 FERRITIC
STEELS
V. MIHALACHE, D. SIMANDAN, M. CIOANGER
National Institute of Materials Physics, 77125, Magurele, Romania
e-mail address: vmihal@infim.ro
Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels, ODSFS-s, are, particularly, promising structural materials
for DEMO fusion reactor. In this study ODSFS-s were prepared from three types of mechanically allowed, MA,
powders with and without W and Y2O3: Fe-14Cr-0.4Ti-3W-0.25Y2O3, Fe-14Cr-0.4Ti-0.25Y2O3 and Fe-14Cr0.4Ti. Y2O3 with grain size of 5 nm and 350 nm were introduced into initial powders. MA powders were
consolidated by SPS method at temperatures 900C - 1100 C. Two processes of milling were used: wet milling
with ethanol as process control agent, PCA, and dry milling without PCA. Structure, composition, density and
microhardness strongly depend on the two milling conditions as follows.
Steels derived from powders mechanically allowed by dry milling (without PCA).
Some improvement of microhardness was obtained for steels containing 0.25wt. Y2O3 and especially
for those containing 3%wt. W. However, no improvement of microhardmes in the reproducible way was
observed by variation of grain size of Y2O3 introduced into initial powders. The Archimedes density increases
with increasing temperature, a maximum of 7.67 g/cm3 is reached for 1100C. In the ODSFS of the composition
FeCrTi (without W and Y2O3) and FeCrTi-Y2O3 (without W) a trace of (Cr, Fe)7C3 and (Cr, Fe)7C3, respectively,
was observed at highest sintering temperatures. FeCrTiW-Y2O3 shows the highest microhardness among the
studied steels. It reaches a maximum of 1147.34 VH at 1065 C; -phase (austenite) appears in these steels,
especially for higher sintering temperatures.
Steels derived from powders mechanically allowed by wet milling (with PCA).
ODSFS properties strongly depend on the amount of PCA used in the milling process as well as on the amount
of residual PCA in the presintering powder, so that it was hard to distinguish some important influence of Y2O3
and W addition. The steels are characterised by pronounced tendency of carbides formation/precipitation. Three
type of carbides were observed depending on the used milling conditions: (Cr, Fe) 23C3, (Cr, Fe)7C3 and
especially (Cr, Fe)3C. The microhardness values are correlated with the amount of gases evacuated during SPSsintering, consequent on the amount of residual PCA in the products: microhardness decreases with the
increasing of the residual quantity of PCA. Unexpected improved microhardness was obtained for larger
crystallite size of Y2O3 (added to and mechanically alloyed together with elemental powders). As the quantity
of residual PCA decrease the situation seem to reverse in favour of smaller crystallite size of Y 2O3, EDS
investigations show the regions reach in Y (up to 3% wt.) near the surface of steels.

S3 P10
ELEMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS IN GAFRARIUM TUMIDIUM CLAMS DETERMINED BY INAA
AND PIXE
Ana PANTELICA1, Marius GUGIU1, Catalin Ionut CALINESCU, Dan Gabriel GHITA1
Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH),
30 Reactorului St., Magurele, Ilfov county, P.O.B. MG-6, 07712, Romania,
e-mail: apantel@nipne.ro
This paper presents the macro, micro and trace element concentrations determined by Instrumental Neutron
Activation Analysis (INAA) and Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analytical techniques in Gafrarium
Tumidium clams marine biota sample. This sample was supplied by the IAEA-MEL Laboratory in Monacco in
the frame of the interlaboratory comparison exercise organized for the determination of trace elements in IAEA461 Reference Material. INAA of long-lived radionuclides was performed at the Horia Hulubei National
Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) by neutron irradiation at the TRIGA reactor in Pitesti
(neutron fluence rate 11017 m-2s-1). The gamma-ray spectrometric chain used a HPGe Ortec detector (2.3 keV

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

98

FWHM at 1332.5 keV of 60Co and 30% relative efficiency). The elements determined by INAA were Ag, As,
Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, Hg, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Ni, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th,
U, Yb, and Zn (33 elements). PIXE analysis was carried out at the 9 MV FN Van de Graaff Tandem accelerator
of IFIN-HH using a 3 MeV proton beam. Thin targets for PIXE were prepared from chemically mineralized
solution of the investigated sample as well as appropriate certified reference materials, with Y added as internal
standard. The targets were placed in the irradiation chamber at 45 0 with respect to the incident beam and X-ray
detector (Si(Li) Ortec). GUPIX (Guelph PIXE) program was used for a quantitative analysis. The elements
determined by PIXE in Gafrarium Tumidium clams were P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As,
Br, Rb, Sr, and Pb (19 elements). From them, P, S, Cl, Ti, V, Mn, Cu, and Pb are complementary to those
determined by long-lived INAA. The elements determined by both techniques were K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni,
Zn, As, Br, Rb, and Sr. The elements determined only by INAA were Ag, Au, Ba, Cd, Ce, Cs, Eu, Hf, Hg, La,
Lu, Mo, Na, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, and Yb.
Thanks are due to Sci. Res. Constantin Paunoiu, Dumitru Barbos, Petre Busuioc and nuclear reactor staff of the
Institute of Nuclear Research (RAAN-SCN) Pitesti for neutron irradiation of samples.

S3 P11
DESIGN OF THE INNER ZONE OF THE CBM-TOF WALL FOR SIS100
L.RADULESCU, D. BARTOS, Gh. CARAGHEORGHEOPOL, M.PETRIS, M.PETROVICI, V.SIMION
Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering,
Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
For hadron identification the CBM experiment at FAIR foresees an array of Multi-Gap Resistive-Plate
Chambers, which will measure the time of flight (TOF) of the collision products. The CBM-TOF wall will cover
polar angles from 2.5o to 25o corresponding to a rectangular active area of about 120 m2. It will be located at 5.5
m downstream of the target for measurements at SIS100, and at 10 m at SIS300. The expected counting rate for
the inner region of the TOF wall can reach up to 25 kHz/cm2. The wall is organized in supermodules staggered
in z-direction in order to achieve a full geometrical coverage of the solid angle.
The design proposed by us foresees to cover the rectangle of the inner wall (2.5 o 11o) in a modular way with 8
supermodules. Beside the staggering of the supermodules, a continuous coverage of the active area requires a
staggered arrangement of the RPC cells inside a supermodule with overlap of the active areas both in x- and ydirection. In order to reduce the number of electronic channels care has been taken to reduce the overlap regions
to a necessary minimum, both as far as RPCs and SMs are concerned. For a check of dead zones and overlaps we
have used the light source method with AutoCAD 2011 program.

S3 P12
THE FIRST NON-SCALING FIXED FIELD ALTERNATING GRADIENT (NS-FFAG) ACCLERATOR
Roxana RATA1 , Roger BARLOW1, Rob EDGECOCK1
1

International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH,
Huddersfield, United Kingdom, e-mail:roxana.rata@hud.ac.uk

In this paper we present the first non-scaling FFAG ever constructed, which was build at the STFC
Daresbury Laboratory in the UK. FFAG combines the best features of a cyclotron and a synchrotron. It was
build like a radical alternative to the conventional accelerator technologies because it has many features that
make it attractive for medium-energy high current machines. This entirely innovative form of the non-scaling
Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerator it is also an useful tool for cancer therapy.
Keywords: ns-FFAG, accelerator technologies, cancer therapy.
Acknowledgements : I would like to express my special gratitude to my supervisor, Professor Roger
Barlow, and also to Professor Rob Edgecock for providing the necessary facilities for the preparation of this
paper.

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

99

S3 P13
DOSIMETRIC MEASUREMENTS ON DIFFERENT ABSORBing MATERIALS WITH
APPLICATIONS IN RADIOTHERAPY
M. SPUNEI 1,2, I. MALAESCU 1
1

West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics, Bd. V. Parvan, no.4, 300223 Timisoara, Romania
2
Municipal Hospital Timisoara, Radiotherapy Center with High Energy, Timisoara, Romania

Radiotherapy is currently using directly or indirectly ionizing radiation to destroy the DNA of cancer
cells, so that they no longer reproduce and eventually lead to cell death and thus to destroy tumors.
With the upgrade of linear accelerator Varian CLINAC 2100SC in our radiotherapy center, we are able
now to deliver the prescribed dose in the cancer tumor located at high depths (from 4 to 25 cm) in patients bodies
and spare the adjacent tissues using a multileaf collimator which is taking the tumor contour. For superficial
cancers located at maximum depths of 3 cm we are using high energy electrons. Because the tumor shape is not
square, we are looking at different absorbent materials that could be used as absorbent shields for different
applications in radiotherapy and radioprotection.
For this purpose, we conducted a study on absorption of ionizing radiation on different materials
(samples) and different thicknesses. The materials tested were obtained by the authors in the laboratory of the
Physics Faculty.
The experimental results obtained show that, the radiation absorption in tested samples is ranging
between 10% and 80%. These preliminary results suggest that these materials can be used as absorbent in
radiotherapy and radioprotection.
Keywords: Radiotherapy and radioprotection; Absorbed dose; Electron beams; Linear accelerator.

S3 P14
RADON MITIGATION STUDIES IN A PILOT HOUSE FROM BIA-TEI RADON PRONE AREA
(ROMANIA)
Constatin COSMA 1, Botond PAPP 1, Alexandra DINU (CUCO) 1, Begy ROBERT 1,
Liviu SUCIU 2, Gheorghe BANCIU 2, Carlos SAINZ 1,3
1

Babe-Bolyai University, Environmental Radioactivity and Nuclear Dating Center


400294 Cluj-Napoca, Fntnele No. 30, Romania
2
ICPE Bistria S.A., Bistria, Romania
3
Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria,
Santander, 39011, Spain
Corresponding author: constantin.cosma@ubbcluj.ro

The work presents implementation and testing radon mitigation techniques in a pilot house that was selected
from an indoor radon surveing in 305 houses during 2010-2011, in Bia-tei region located near an old uranium
mine (NW part of Romania). Radon mitigation studies are based on the depressurization and pressurization of
the building sub-soil, on the effect of the combination of an eolian and an electric fan coupled to depressurization
system, applying a radon barrier membrane and testing the combination of the radon membrane with soil
depressurization system. Finally, are studied and tested an automatic system of monitoring and control indoor
radon concentrations.
Keywords: indoor radon, radon mitigation, radon-prone area.

S3 P15
HUMAN CONTRIBUTION TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS RISK
Gholamreza Jahanfarnia1, Kaveh Karimi2*, Seyed Mohsen Hoseyni2
1

Nuclear Engineering Department, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
2
Basic Sciences Department, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
*e-mail: kkarimi@iauet.ac.ir

100

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a powerful tool for investigation of risk in Nuclear Power
Plants. The methodology of PSA goes back to Reactor Safety Study (RSS) (or WASH 1400) conducted by
Professor Rasmussen in 1974 [1]. However nuclear utility community reached a consensus on this methodology
only after TMI accident occurred in 1979. Predictions of that study attracted the attention of nuclear industry by
the occurrence of TMI accident [2].
Again just after Fukushima accident, PSA methodology is attracting much more attention [3].
Beside the methodology proposed in the RSS, it was the role of human actions in the progression of
accident in TMI that was important [4].
In this study we have tried to investigate the role of human actions in the total risk of a PWR. This is done
by using PSA techniques.
The most well-known figure of merit in PSA is the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) which is not
necessarily the important one [5].
Mean value of CDF is calculated to be 2.05E-5 in this study, while uncertainty analysis using Monte
Carlo method reveals the 5th percentile to be 7.65E-06 and the 95th percentile to be 4.91E-05 per reactor critical
year. (See Figure 1)

Figure 1: Core Damage Frequency distribution


It is common to categorize human actions to category A, B and C as pre-initiator human actions, initiators and
post-initiators of accidents respectively.
In this study, by considering human actions of category A & C in the model of PSA, the role of human actions is
investigated using sensitivity analyses. Human Actions of Category A is quantified using THERP approach with
only two recovery factors. Category C actions are quantified using SPAR-H [6] method using only 3
performance shaping factors (PSFs).
Human actions of Category C showed more importance than Category A actions in such a way that Cat C actions
are on the top ten list of Fussel-Vessely (FV) importance measure [6], defined below:
IFV=QTOP(MCS including i)/ QTOP
Sensitivity analyses showed that highly reliable operator actions would decrease the CDF up to 12.76%. Highly
reliable actions in this study are defined as actions with HEP (Human Error Probability) of one order of
magnitude lesser than normal value.
Perfect human actions showed 14.29% decrease in the CDF, while perfect actions are defined as those actions
with HEP of zero.
The interesting point found in the sensitivity analyses is that less reliable actions would increase the CDF up to
563%. Just similar to highly reliable actions, less reliable actions are those actions with HEP of one order of
magnitude higher than the normal value.
With no credit to all operator actions, i.e. setting all HEP=1, CDF would be rise up to 3.65E-2 per reactor critical
year.
References:
[1] A. Rassmusen, et. al. , Reactor Safety Study, US NRC, 1974.
[2] W. Keller & M. Modarres, A Historical Overview of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Development and Its
Uses in the Nuclear Power Industry: A Tribute to the Late Professor Norman Carl Rasmussen, Reliability
Engineering and System Safety 89 (2005) 271-285
[3] Suzanne Schroer, Mohammad Modarres, An event classification schema for evaluating site risk in a multiunit nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessment, Reliability Engineering and System Safety 117 (2013)
40-51
[4] USNRC, Backgrounder on the Three Mile Island Accident, Feb. 2013

Section 3 NUCLEAR AND SUB-NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND APPLICATIONS

101

[5] Modarres, Kaminskiy and Krivtsov et. al., Reliability Engineering and Risk Analysis, A Practical Guide,
CRC Press, 2nd Edition (2010)
[6] D.I. Gertman, et. al. , The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method, Idaho National Laboratory, 2005
[7] Van Der Borst & Schoonakker, An Overview of Importance Measures, Reliability Engineering and
System Safety 72 (2001) 241-245

102

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

SECTION
S4 Cross-Disciplinary Applications of Physics
Nonlinear dynamics, complex systems and applications
Biological complexity and genetics, Biophysics and bioengineering
Econophysics
Physics of Social Systems

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

103

INVITED LECTURES
S4 L01
LINEAR AND NONLINEAR LIGHT BULLETS: RECENT STUDIES
Dumitru MIHALACHE
Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Department of Theoretical Physics,
Magurele-Bucharest, RO-077125, ROMANIA
A brief up-to-date survey of recent theoretical and experimental studies of the formation, stability and robustness
of linear and nonlinear light bullets in several physical settings is given. The spatiotemporal optical solitons
(alias nonlinear light bullets) are nondiffracting and nondispersing wave packets propagating in nonlinear
optical media [1]-[5]. The three-dimensional (3D) spatiotemporal optical solitons are localized (self-guided) in
two transverse (spatial) dimensions and in the direction of propagation due to the balance of anomalous groupvelocity dispersion and nonlinear self-phase modulation. The formation of 3D spatiotemporal optical solitons in
two-dimensional (2D) photonic lattices (2D waveguide arrays) was reported in a series of rather complex
experiments performed in 2010 and 2011 [6]-[8]. The reported experimental results confirmed the previous
theoretical studies of the formation, stability and robustness of 3D spatiotemporal optical solitons supported by
2D waveguide arrays [9]. Linear light bullets, which are robust and versatile localized wave packets combining
Bessel beams in the transverse plane with temporal Airy pulses have also been reported experimentally [10].
Spatiotemporal Airy-Airy-Airy (Airy3) light bullets in both linear and nonlinear regimes were also demonstrated
experimentally, i.e., intense spatiotemporal wave packets combining spatial Airy beams with temporal Airy
pulses were created [11].
1. B. A. Malomed, D. Mihalache, F. Wise, and L. Torner, J. Opt. B 7, R53-R72 (2005).
2. H. Leblond and D. Mihalache, Rom. Rep. Phys. 63, 1254-1266 (2011).
3. D. Mihalache, Rom. J. Phys. 57, 352-371 (2012).
4. H. Leblond and D. Mihalache, Phys. Rev. A 86, 043832 (2012).
5. H. Leblond and D. Mihalache, Phys. Reports 523, 61-126 (2013).
6. S. Minardi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263901 (2010).
7. F. Eilenberger et al., Phys. Rev. A 84, 013836 (2011).
8. F. Eilenberger et al., Opt. Express 19, 23171-23187 (2011).
9. D. Mihalache et al., Phys. Rev. E 70, 055603(R) (2004).
10. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, D. N. Christodoulides, and F. W. Wise, Nat. Photonics 4, 103-106 (2010).
11. D. Abdollahpour, S. Suntsov, D. G. Papazoglou, and S. Tzortzakis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 253901 (2010).

S4 L02
DIPOLAR BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES WITH WEAK DISORDER
Axel PELSTER
Department of Physics, Technische Universitat Kaiserslautern, Germany
The talk discusses several illustrative examples where ultracold dilute atomic gases provide important insights
into condensed matter physics. We start with reviewing the properties of Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs)
with the anisotropic and long-range dipole-dipole interaction. To this end we investigate the influence of
quantum fluctuations upon the equilibrium configuration, the low-lying oscillation frequencies, and the time-offlight dynamics. We find that both atomic magnetic and molecular electric dipolar BECs offer promising
scenarios for detecting beyond mean-field effects. Furthermore, we report on recent progress in understanding
the properties of ultracold bosonic atoms in potentials with quenched disorder. This notoriously difficult dirty
boson problem is experimentally relevant for the miniaturization of BECs on chips and can also be studied by
tailoring disorder potentials via laser speckle fields. Theoretically it is intriguing because of the competition of
localization and interaction as well as of disorder and superfluidity. Finally, we combine both previous topics
and consider the impact of weak disorder upon a polarized dipolar BEC at zero temperature. Surprisingly we
find that disorder corrections of the superfluid density yield characteristic interaction-induced anisotropies which
are not present in the absence of disorder.

104

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

S4 L03
NONLINEAR EXCITATIONS IN BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES: PARAMETRIC AND
GEOMETRIC RESONANCES
Antun BALAZ
Scientific Computing Laboratory, Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade
Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade Serbia
Bose-Einstein Condensates (BECs) are inherently nonlinear quantum systems, which leads to a number of
interesting effects. Modulation of some of the parameters of a BEC can give rise to prominent nonlinear features,
such as shifts in the frequencies of collective oscillation modes, higher harmonics generation, and resonant mode
coupling. In a recent experiment [1], a Bose-Einstein condensate of Li-7 has been excited by a harmonic
modulation of the atomic s-wave scattering length. Combining an analytical perturbative approach with
extensive numerical simulations [2], we will analyze the emerging nonlinear dynamics of the system on the
mean-field level at zero temperature. We will present resulting excitation spectra and main nonlinear effects
close to parametric resonances [3]. We will also discuss geometric resonances in BECs with two-body and threebody contact interactions, where even a geometry of the trapping potential leads to the emergence of nonlinear
effects, frequency shifts and resonant mode coupling [4].
[1] S. E. Pollack, D. Dries, R. G. Hulet, K. M. F. Magalhaes, E. A. L. Henn, E. R. F. Ramos, M. A. Caracanhas,
and V. S. Bagnato, Phys. Rev. A 81, 053627 (2010).
[2] D. Vudragovic, I. Vidanovic, A. Balaz, P. Muruganandam, and S. K. Adhikari, Comput. Phys. Commun.
183, 2021 (2012).
[3] I. Vidanovic, A. Balaz, H. Al-Jibbouri, and A. Pelster, Phys. Rev. A 84, 013618 (2011).
[4] H. Al-Jibbouri, I. Vidanovic, A. Balaz, and A. Pelster, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 46, 065303 (2013).
S4 L04
DENSITY WAVES IN BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATES
Alexandru NICOLIN
Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering
I the first part of the talk I will survey the theoretical and experimental results on the emergence of density waves
in quasi-one-dimensional one- and two-component Bose-Einstein condensates subject to parametric excitations.
In the second party I will present new analytical results on the roton-maxon spectrum of density waves in dipolar
condensates and will discuss the emergence of density waves in condensates with spatially-inhomogeneous
scattering lengths.
[1] A.I. Nicolin, Phys. Rev. E 84, 056202 (2011)
[2] A.I. Nicolin, Physica A 391, 1062 (2012)
[3] A.I. Nicolin, Proc. Rom. Acad. 14, 35 (2013)

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

105

S4 L05
ASSYMETRY OF THE INVERSE STATISTICS IN STOCK MARKETS: FEAR FACTOR AND
RELEVANT TIMESCALES
Bulcs SNDOR1, Imre BALOGH2, Blint Zsolt NAGY3, Ingve SIMONSEN4 and Zoltn NDA1
BabeBolyai University, Physics Department, Cluj-Napoca,Romania
BabeBolyai University, Department of Economics, Cluj-Napoca,Romania
Norvegian Technical University, NTNU, Physics Department, Trondheim, Norway
University of Szeged, Physics Department, Szeged, Hungary
The dynamics of stock indexes are investigated using a statistical tool borrowed from physics. The inverse
statistics method [1] gives the distribution of investment horizons, or in laymen terms the probability distribution
of the waiting times, needed to achieve a certain level of return. Unexpectedly, the inverse statistics of stock
indexes presents an asymmetric nature, which means that a negative return level is reached sooner than the same
magnitude positive level [2]. In order to understand this intriguing phenomenon a simple explanation based on
the fear factor hyphothesis is given [3]. It is shown that this hyphothesis is fully supported by empirical data
[4]. The present study offers also an answer for the long debated question concerning the relevant time-scales of
the socio-economic phenomena which is responsible for the observed asymmetry. Our results suggest that this
time-scale is of the order of 20 days and seemingly is linked with the well-known levarege effect [5].
[1] I. Simonsen, M. H. Jensen, A. Johansen, Eur. Phys. J. B, 27, 4, 583-586 (2002)
[2] M. H. Jensen, A. Johansen, I. Simonsen, Physica A, 324, 1-2, 338-343 (2003)
[3] I. Simonsen, P. T. H. Ahlgren, M. H. Jensen, R. Donangelo, K. Sneppen, Eur. Phys.J. B, 57, 153-158 (2007)
[4] E. Balogh, I. Simonsen, B. Zs. Nagy, Z. Neda, Phys. Rev. E, 82, 6, 066113 (2010)
[5] J.P. Bouchoud, A. Matacz and M. Potters, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 228701 (2001)
S4 L06
HOW TO TRADE USING THE (SHANNONIAN) TRANSFER ENTROPY? AN APPLICATION FOR
CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN FINANCIAL MARKETS
Bogdan DIMA1, tefana Maria DIMA2, Flavia BARNA3 , Miruna NCHESCU4
1 Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, West University of Timisoara, J.H. Pestalozzi Street, No.
16, 300115, Timioara, Romania, +40.256.592.556; bogdandima2001@gmail.com
2 Faculty of Economics, Vasile Goldi Western University of Arad, Mihai Eminescu Street, no. 15, 310086,
Arad, Romania, +40.257.213.066; stefana.dima@gmail.com
3 Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, West University of Timisoara, J.H. Pestalozzi Street, No.
16, 300115, Timioara, Romania, +40.256.592.556; flaviabarna@yahoo.com
4 Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, West University of Timisoara, J.H. Pestalozzi Street, No.
16, 300115, Timioara, Romania, +40.256.592.556; mnachescu@oxygencomputers.ro
The acute need of describing the functional linkages between financial markets led in the last years to the use of
econophysics methods in quantitative finance. In the framework of econophysics, it has become steadily
obvious that market interactions are highly nonlinear, unstable, and long-ranged. Also, it seems that all agents
involved in a given stock market exhibit interconnections, which represent an important internal force of the
market. We consider the possibility of employing the (Shannonian) transfer entropy in order to describe these
functional linkages between financial markets. The transfer entropy may be used with the purpose of detecting
various types of asymmetry in the interaction between two systems and distinguishing between driving and
responding forces. Such property of the transfer entropy may be considered in trading diversified portfolios on
multiple markets. We illustrate such application of the transfer entropy for a group of six Central and Eastern
European markets (Poland, Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Austria, Hungary and Russian Federation), by
considering four major indexes (S&P 50, FTSE 100, CAC 40, DAX) which may influence these markets. In
order to identify the structural changes in the involved processes, the data sample is divided in two sub-periods
(2001-2007 and, respectively, 2007-2012) and the transfer entropy is re-estimated for each sub-period. Our
results show that these emergent markets are dominated, from the point of view of the net information flows, by
WIG and S&P 500 indexes. A comparative analysis of the Central and Eastern European markets reveal some
potential explanations for the key role played, in the area, by Polands stock market. Significant level of market
capitalization, relative higher levels of market liquidity as well as good market turnovers - all these are based on
a sound regulatory and supervisory framework as well as on improved market mechanisms. We estimate the

106

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

outcomes of a trading strategy based on these markets changes for both individual markets and for a global
portfolio. The weights of this global portfolio are chosen based on the relative net information flows and its
structure is kept unchanged for the entire analyzed period. The best results are obtained in terms of return-to-risk
ratios for RTS and BUX indexes. However, these results are less robust over time and are sensitive to the
financial turbulence climate. Overall, it appears that the degree of information openness and integration in the
international flows are key determinants of the performances of a trading strategy based on information transfers
between markets.
JEL Classification: G15, G11

S4 L07
COHERENCE, CORRELATION AND SCALING IN THE NOISY SPACE OF ROMANIAN
FINANCIAL TIME SERIES
E.I. SCARLAT
University Politehnica Bucharest, Physics Department, egen@physics.pub.ro
Time series are extensively subjected to computational analyses in order to disclose the intricate deterministic
correlations among the market forces that drive the prices in long, or more often in the short run [1,2]. In
markets, each price is not evolving in isolation. Individual price changes affect the global variation of the market
trend as much as the collective dynamics are reflected in the individual behaviour. The understanding of the
properties of the interactions, dependencies and co-variations is of ultimate importance to the understanding of
the overall system.
The space considered here is consisting in four groups of time series, as follows: the series of the exchange rates
of the Romanian currency (ROL) with respect to the mostly used currencies (USD, EUR), the series of two
indices of Romanian stock exchange market (BET), a number of series of less importance with respect to the
trading volumes like British Pound Swedish Krona or Polish Zloty, and, finally, a group of synthesized Gaussian
noise considered as reference.
Typical cross-coherence functions between strong correlated
series and weak correlated series are shown in the adjacent
figure. Their time dynamic is related to the scaling features
[3].
Statistical significance and economic meaningfulness like
relevant time delays among the processes, bands of
coherence in long, medium, and sometimes short run due to
the corresponding market forces, as well as the anomalies in
the vicinity of crises could be detected. The results are
related to the previous studies performed onto the Romanian
market [4,5].
Acknowledgements
The author is grateful to C.P. Cristescu for valuable
discussions, and to Cristina Stan for fruitful collaboration.
References
[1] T. Aste, W. Shaw, T. Di Matteo, Correlation structure and dynamics in volatile markets, New Journal of
Physics 12 085009 (21pp), doi:10.1088/1367-2630/12/8/085009, 2010.
[2] E.I. Scarlat, C.P. Cristescu, C. Stan, L. Preda, A.M. Preda, M. Mihailescu, Chaotic dynamics in
econophysics: modeling the market forces, UPB Sci. Bull. A, 70, (4), pag 89-95, 2008.
[3] C.P. Cristescu, C. Stan, E.I. Scarlat, T. Minea, C.M. Cristescu, Parameter motivated mutual correlation
analysis: Application to the study of currency exchange rates based on intermittency parameter and Hurst
exponent, Physica A, 391, doi:10.1016/j.physa.2011.12.006, p. 26232635, 2012.
[4] E.I. Scarlat, C. Stan, C.P. Cristescu, Self-similar characteristics of the currency exchange rate in an economy
in transition, Physica A, 379 (1), p.188-198, DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2006.12.040, 2007.
[5] E.I. Scarlat, C. Stan, C. P. Cristescu, Chaotic features in Romanian transition economy as reflected onto the
currency exchange rate, Chaos, Solitons & Fractals, 33 (2), p.396-404, DOI:10.1016/j.chaos.2006.01.009,
2007.

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

107

POSTERS
S4 P01
THE USE OF ISOTOPE RATIOS IN COMMERCIAL FRUIT JUICES AUTHENTICATION
Dana Alina MAGDAS, Romulus PUSCAS, Gabriela CRISTEA
National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath, 71-103, P.O.
700, RO-400293, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
amagdas@itim-cj.ro
In the last years, a growing number of research articles detailing the use of natural abundance isotope
variations as a tool in the fight against fraud in the food industry have been published. One of the greatest
limitations to the applications of the technique in origin assignation is the lack of large databases of isotopic
abundance in fruit juices. The interpretation of such analysis requires a sufficient number of data for authentic
juices of the same seasonal and regional origin, especially since the isotopic parameters of these show
remarkable variability depending on climatologically factors.
The principle behind this methods consist in the fact that each plant has its own unique pattern of
naturally occurring stable isotopes of carbon ( 12C, 13C), hydrogen (1H, 2H) and oxygen (16O, 18O), whose
distribution has been influenced by a number of physical and/or biochemical properties and geoclimatic
conditions. The stable isotope ratios content of natural products depends on their botanic, geographical, climatic
and meteorological origin.
The use of stable carbon isotope analysis to determine fruit juices, authenticity is well documented in
literature. Determination of 18O and D values of water from fruit juices is today applied in routine analysis as
an automated and acknowledged method in order to differentiate between directly pressed and re-diluted single
strength juices. Authentic juices have elevated 18O and D content of water as compared to water from rediluted products made using tap water which is relatively depleted in heavy oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. On
the other hand the addition of exogenous sugar could be detected through the isotopic ratio of carbon from juice
components.
In the present study commercial fruit juices present on Romanian market were investigated from the
point of view these authenticity and the obtained results were compared with those corresponding to authentic
juices.
References:
1. D. A. Magdas, R. Puscas, Stable isotopes determination in some Romanian fruit juices, Isotopes in
Environmental and Health Study, 47, 372378 (2011)
2. Andreas Rossmann, Determination of stable isotope ratios in food analysis, Food reviews international,
17(3), 347-381 (2001)
Acknowledgements:
The financial support for this work was provided by the National Plan for Research-Development and
Innovation 2007-2013 (NPRDI II), TE, Contract No. 120/2010

S4 P02
EXISTENCE OF RADIAL SOLUTIONS FOR A COUPLED SYSTEM OF STATIONARY
SCHRDINGER EQUATIONS TYPE
Drago-Ptru COVEI
Department of Development, Constantin Brancusi University of Tg-Jiu, Tg-Jiu, Gorj, Romania,
In this paper, we establish sufficiently conditions for the existence of positive radially symmetric solutions for a
quasilinear elliptic system involving the p-Laplacian operator. The difficulty to solve such problems is twofold.

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

108

One arises from the fact that such problems have been remained open in other papers and second from the fact
that the operator p-Laplacian is nonlinear. Our method is based on the iteration procedure.

S4 P03
JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS
D. IORDACHE1 and R. DOBRESCU2
1
2

Physics Department, Univ. Politehnica Bucharest, 060032, Romania


Automations Department, Univ. Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania

It is well-known that: a) in order to improve the physical & technical performances of different
industrial devices, both these devices and the involved materials became complex, b) due to the high
Complexity of the Universe and of then present industry, the Exact Sciences are confronted with the huge
challenge of Complex systems. Given being the birth date of physical Theory of Complexity is rather late [1],
the main features of Complex systems [huge number of uniqueness parameters dominant (effective)
parameters, the similitude numbers, power laws, fractal scaling, the hierarchical structure of the high-Complexity
systems, etc] were not identified for all types of Complex systems.
That is why the main goal of the present work is to identify the main types of physical Complex
systems, i.e.: a) the industrial materials (magnetic, dielectric, semiconductor, rocks, fluids, etc), b) nanostructured materials (e.g. the pharmaceutical ones, studied by the IR spectroscopy, particularly), c) biophysics
(polypeptides, Ca channels, skeletal muscles, living beings growth), d) data processing (numerical phenomena:
pseudo-convergence, stability, attractors), e) physical theory of information (true information amount, resonance
bells, relays for cross-fertilisation) [2], etc. The accomplished study allowed to point out also several Complexity
levels associated to different types of physical Complex systems.
Acknowledgements
The authors thank very much to Professor Pier Paolo Delsanto for his important suggestions.
References
[1] a) P. W. Anderson More is different, Science, 177, 293(1972); b) P. W. Anderson The economy as an
evolving complex system, Proc. Santa Fe Institute in the Sciences on
Complexity, vol. 5, Redwood City, CA, Addison-Wesley, 1988; c) P.
W. Anderson Physics: The opening to Complexity, Proc. Natl.
Acad. Science (USA), 92, 6653-54(1995).
[2] a) R. Dobrescu, D. Iordache Complexity and Information,
Printing House of the Romanian Academy, Bucharest, 2010; b) ibid.
Complexity Modeling, Politehnica Press, Bucharest, 2007; c) D.
BET (price vs days)
Iordache Complexity, Similitude and Fractals in Applied Mechanics
rd
and Electrical Engineering, respectively, chapter 5, pp. 103-154, 3
volume Topics in Applied Mechanics, Romanian Academy Printing
House, Bucharest, 2005.
10 000

8000

6000

4000

2000

1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

10

S4 P04

NONLINEAR IMPEDANCE OF BUCHAREST STOCK


EXCHANGE MARKET BY TIME SERIES ANALYSIS:
OPTIMAL FUNCTION AND SATURATION
E.I. SCARLAT1, CRISTINA STAN1, C.P. CRISTESCU1, CRISTINA
M. CRISTESCU2

1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

Volume BVB (bil. ROL vs days)

Daily retur
10

Physics Dept., University Politehnica Bucharest,


egen@physics.pub.ro
2
Master Eng. Foreign Lang., University Politehnica Bucharest

0
1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

ns BET (abs. values)

10 9

Stock exchange markets keep the most valuable signals of the


evolution of any economic system. For this reason a lot of literature is

10 8

10 7

10 6

2000

4000

6000

8000

10 000

Impedance of BVB (a.u. vs


days)

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

109

devoted to study especially the short time characteristics by revealed by tick by tick or daily prices series [1,2].
Differing from existing definition of the market size, or market capacity, here the stock market impedance
is defined using the daily indices of BET and volume of transactions [3] by analogy with the corresponding
electromagnetic quantities.
Genuine values, log returns and derivative of the series are processed in order to extract the dynamics of
nonlinear impedance and to evidence the unbalances between the supply and demand forces. The magnitude
squared coherence function allows to detecting the relevant delays and negative values for volumes were
introduced accordingly [4].
The conclusion relates the impedance to the inertia of diffusing information in market. We found also that
the natural dynamic of the market is to reach a stationary regime characterized by the squared BET index. The
impedance is nonlinear and exhibit saturation above a certain threshold.
References
[1] T. Aste, W. Shaw, T. Di Matteo, Correlation structure and dynamics in volatile markets, New Journal of
Physics 12 085009 (21pp), doi:10.1088/1367-2630/12/8/085009, 2010.
[2] P.H. Franses, D. van Dijk, Nonlinear Time Series Models in Empirical Finance, Cambridge, 2003.
[3]http://www.bvb.ro/TradingAndStatistics/TranzactCurent.aspx.
[4] S-Y. Wang, M-X. Tang, Exact confidence interval for magnitude-squared coherence estimates, IEEE Signal
Processing Letters, 11, (3) 326-329, 2004.

S4 P05
COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF SURFACE PROPERTIES OF EF-HAND CALCIUM BINDING
PROTEINS
Dana CRACIUN1, Adriana ISVORAN2
1

Teacher Training Department, West University of Timisoara, 4 V.Pirvan, 300223 Timisoara, Romania
Department of Biology-Chemistry, West University of Timisoara, 16 Pestalozzi, 300316 Timisoara, Romania

Calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) may be divided in two families (1): CaBPs containing EF-hand motifs
(EFCaBPs) and CaBPs lacking EF-hand motifs respectively. Among EFCaBPs there are calcium sensors
involved in signal transduction processes and exhibiting extended spatial structures and calcium buffering
proteins exhibiting compact structures (2). Within present study we perform a computational analysis of the
surface properties of the two categories of EFCaBPs both at global and local level. Structures superposition
reflects higher structural similarity between extended forms, the compact ones being more divergent. Figure 1
shows that surface area per amino acid for extended forms (medium pattern) and compact forms (dense pattern)
are distinct. There is a statistically difference between the two means, 46.397.2 for extended forms and
54.466.5 for compact ones, reflected by t- and one-way ANOVA tests and underlying the distinct degree of
density of their tertiary structures.
extended forms
compact forms

4.0
3.5

frequency

3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
40

42

44

46

48

50

52

54

56

58

60

62

surface area per amino acid (A )

Fig. 1. Surface area per amino acid for extended forms and compact forms.
Also, surfaces of extended EFCaBPs present a smaller number of cavities but with larger volumes and areas than
compact ones in correlation with their biological functions. Surface electrostatic potential is higher for extended
EFCaBPs, underlying the role of electrostatics repulsions in adopting their spatial structures and also the possible

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

110

role in binding charged peptides (3). Present studies emphasize distinct surface properties of EFCaBPs
suggesting possible individual ligands to be used to inhibit their pathological interactions.
References
1. Lewit-Bentley A, Rety S (2000) EF-hand calcium-binding proteins. Curr Opin Struct Biol 10:637643.
2. Carafoli E (2003) The calcium signaling saga: tap waterand protein crystals. Nature 4: 326332.
3. Isvoran A, Craescu CT, Alexov E. (2007) Electrostatic control of the overall shape of calmodulin:
Numerical calculations. Eur Biophys J. 36(3):225237.

S4 P06
ESTIMATING WINE YEAST CONCENTRATION BY FAR FIELD CONTRAST MEASUREMENT
Dan CHICEA1,2, Ovidiu TIA2,3, Mihaela TIA3, Ecaterina LENGYEL3
1 Department of Environmental Sciences, University Lucian Blaga, Dr. Ion Ratiu str., no 5-7, Sibiu, 550012,
ROMANIA
2 Pediatric Respiratory Medicine Research Center (CCMRP), Str. Pompeiu Onofreiu Nr. 2 4 , Sibiu,
ROMANIA
3 Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Food Industry and Environmental Protection, University Lucian Blaga, Dr.
Ion Ratiu str., no 5-7, Sibiu, 550012, ROMANIA
A coherent light scattering experiment on aqueous suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisia yeast with a
concentration that covers five orders of magnitude was performed. The average scattered light far field was
recorded using a CCD. A computer code for image processing was written for this purpose and used for
providing the first order statistics of the far interference field. The variation of the average contrast with the yeast
particle concentration was analyzed and a very fast procedure for monitoring the yeast concentration is
suggested. The possibility of monitoring the fermentation process by a fast assessment of the yeast concentration
is suggested, as well.
The figure presents the variation of the average contrast with the yeast concentration. Examining the
figure we notice that the average contrast variation with the concentration in monotone for yeast concentration
bigger than 10-7 g/l and this suggests a very fast procedure for monitoring the yeast concentration, hence for
monitoring the fermentation process in aqueous solution, as most beverage fermentations are.
K vs c
1.60E+02
1.40E+02
1.20E+02

1.00E+02
8.00E+01
6.00E+01
4.00E+01
2.00E+01
0.00E+00
0.00E+00 2.00E-06

4.00E-06

6.00E-06

8.00E-06

1.00E-05

1.20E-05

c, g/l

References
1. Kurtzman C.P., Fell J.W., Yeast Systematics and PhylogenyImplications of Molecular Identification
Methods for Studies in Ecology, in Biodiversity and Ecophysiology of Yeasts, The Yeast Handbook, Edited
by C. Rosa & G. Pter, Springer-Verlag, 11-30, 2006.
2. Chicea D., Speckle Size, Intensity and Contrast Measurement Application in Micron-Size Particle
Concentration Assessment, European Physical Journal Applied Physics 2007, 40, 305-310, doi:
10.1051/epjap:2007163.

S4 P07
PRECISION CADASTRAL AND PHOTOGRAMMETRY APPLICATIONS USING UAV. CASE
STUDY VANATORI DISTRICT

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

111

Gabriel MURARIUa, Mocanu Ionut RAZVANb,*, Florin MINGIREANUb, Lucian GEORGESCUb


a

Dunrea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Domneasc Street, 47, RO800008, Galati, Romania
b
Dunrea de Jos University of Galati, European Excellence Center for the Environment , Domneasc Street,
47, RO-800008, Galati, Romania
The precision cadastral applications are currently a major current life request. A series of applications
like Google Street or is a good example. In US, ground surveys and remote sensing are integral to establishing
fair and equitable property valuations necessary for real property taxation. The International Association of
Assessing Officers (IAAO) has embraced aerial and street - view imaging as part of its standards related to
property tax assessments. In this domain, our research team succeeds in building proper UAV which could be
used in such applications. In this paper are presented preliminary results obtained in the Vanatori airport field.
These tests were made in order to prove the viability of our system.

S4 P08
COMPARISON BETWEEN STATISTICAL AND DYNAMICAL MODELS OF STATUS
PARAMETERS FOR AQUATIC SYSTEMS. CASE STUDY - RIVER PRUT
Gabriel MURARIUa, Mihaela TIMOFTI b, Lucian GEORGESCUb Catalina TOPAb,*,
a

Dunrea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Domneasc Street, 47, RO800008, Galati, Romania
b
Dunrea de Jos University of Galati, European Excellence Center for the Environment , Domneasc Street,
47, RO-800008, Galati, Romania
In this article we present a complementary approach to modelling physico-chemical state parameters of
the aquatic system. Thus, after eight years data collection of chemical and physico-chemical parameters at three
sampling station situated on Prut River amd it was tried to develop a multi-linear statistical model based on
ANOVA analysis. The analysed parameters are normally determined for classification of surface water.
In the second step, the preliminary results were used to develop a dynamic model. This dynamic model
is more reliable and describes how the analysed parameters provide information regarding the link between of
them. By comparison, these two models could offer a good representation of the studied system.

S4 P09
EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF SOME FLAVONOIDS AS PROTEIN
KINASE INHIBITORS USING THE MOLECULAR DOCKING APPROACH
STELUTA GOSAV1, HLNE JAMET2, ROMANA DRASOVEAN1
1

Dunarea de Jos University, Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, Domneasca St. 47, 800008
Galati, Romania, stelagosav@yahoo.com
2
Dpartement de Chimie Molculaire, UMR-5250, ICMG FR-2607,CNRS, 301 rue de la Chimie, 38041
Grenoble Cedex 9, France

Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have a great importance in the tumor progression, the PI3K
pathway being among the most commonly activated pathway in human cancer [1, 2]. In this paper we carried out
an exploratory analysis of the interactions between some flavonoids and PI3K isoform selected as the receptor
in the docking simulations. The flavonoids with the activity against HT-29 and Caco-2 human colon carcinoma
were collected from the literature [3]. All ligands were optimized using hybrid functional B3LYP (Becke three
parameter hybrid functional combined with LeeYangParr correlation functional) in conjunction with 6-31G(d)
basis set. Three dimensional coordinates in the X-ray crystal structure of PI3K were retrieved from the Protein
Data Bank (PDB code: 2RD0). The molecular docking process was performed using AUTODOCK 3.05
software. During the docking process, the receptor was treated as fixed while the ligands are flexible. The
binding modes of studied flavonoids were evaluated.

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

112

Keywords: PI3K, flavonoids, docking, cancer.


[1] S. Kang, A.G. Bader, P.K. Vogt, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102 (2005) 802-807.
[2] Q.W. Fan, A.A. Knight, D.D. Goldenberg, W. Yu, K.E. Mostov, D. Stokoe, K.M. Shokat, W. Weiss, Cancer
Cell 9 (2006) 341-349.
[3] S. Kuntz, U. Wenzel, H. Daniel, Eur. J. Nutr. 38 (1999) 133-142.

S4 P10
A NOVEL NON-POLYNOMIAL SCHRDINGER EQUATION FOR HIGH-DENSITY CIGARSHAPED
Mihaela Carina RAPORTARU 1,2, Alexandru I. NICOLIN1,2
1

Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului Str., 077125
Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
2
University of Bucharest. Faculty of physics, Centre for Theoretical Physics, 405 Atomistilor Str., 077125
Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
Email: mraportaru@nipne.ro
Starting from the habitual three-dimensional (3D) GrossPitaevskii equation (GPE) we derive by
variational means a 1D non-polynomial Schrdinger equation. The backbone of our variational approach is a
computationally versatile q-Gaussian ansatz which is ideally suited for high-density condensates and
outperforms the previous theoretical prediction numerically . Similar equations were obtained for low density
condensates using a Gaussian ansatz.
Acknowledgements. This work was supported in part by the Ministry of Education and Research under PN-IIID-PCE-2011-3-0972 and project PN 09370104/2013.

S4 P11
MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK OF EPIGENETIC DNA METHYLATION IN REPEAT
ELEMENTS ARABIDOPSIS
Diana DAVID-RUS1, Joel L. LEBOWITZ2, Vincent COLOT3
1 National Institute of Physics, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
2 Rutgers University, Mathematics Department, NJ, US
3 Ecole Normale Superiore, Paris, France
Our interest and goal is to create a model that explains the establishment, maintenance and stability of
methylation pattern in repeat elements Arabidopsis.
In this work we propose a theoretical framework for understanding how the methylated and un-methylated
states of cytosine residues are maintained and transmitted during DNA replication. We build a mathematical
framework in which to explore minimal models of epigenetic inheritance and identify the necessary conditions
for stability of methylated/unmethylated states of cytosine over rounds of DNA replication. The model is
flexible enough to allow adding new biological concepts and information. The approach we are using is routed in
statistical mechanics.

Section 4 CROSS-DISCIPLINARY APPLICATIONS OF PHYSICS

113

S4 P12
CHARACTERISTICS AND BIODEGRADATION PROPERTIES OF POLYCAPROLACTONE POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL COATINGS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS
A. VISAN1,** M. MIROIU1, C. NITA1,4, R. CRISTESCU1,G. SOCOL1, N. STEFAN1, G. DORCIOMAN1, N.
SERBAN1, M. SOCOL2, I.ZGURA2, O.L. RASOGA5, C. BREAZU2, L. SIMA3, C. R. LUCULESCU1 , A.
STANCULESCU2, I.N. MIHAILESCU1*,**
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Ilfov, Romania
2
National Institute of Materials Physics, Magurele, Ilfov, Romania
3
Institute of Biochemistry, Splaiul Independentei 296, Bucharest, Romania
4
Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Romania

In this study we report polycaprolactone (PCL)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) deposition on titanium,


glass and (100) double side polished silicon substrates via Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation
(MAPLE) and dip coating (DC) techniques.
Our aim was to obtain composite coatings with different biodegradation kinetics for controlled protein
release . Several co-polymeric systems have been investigated to improve the properties of the native
polymer. PCL is known for its excellent tensile properties, flexibility and biodegradability but due to its slow
degradation rate, we choose to blend with the more soluble PEG, which is recognized for its good
biocompatibility, with purpose to obtain a biodegradable polymeric material with medical applications.
The results essentially signify that the degradability of biopolymeric coatings could be adjusted
depending of their composition.
*Acknowledgments: This research was supported under the PCCA 153/2012 and ID 209/2011 Contracts.
**Email: anita.visan@inflpr.ro, ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro

S4 P13
BIOMIMETIC NANOCRYSTALLINE APATITE COATINGS SYNTHESIZED BY MATRIX
ASSISTED PULSED LASER EVAPORATION FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
A. VISAN1,** D. GROSSIN2, N. STEFAN1, L. DUTA1, F. M. MIROIU1, M. SOPRONYI1, F. MICULESCU3,
M. FRECHE2, C. CHARVILAT2, O, MARSAN2, S. CIUCA3, I.N. MIHAILESCU1*,**
1

National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Magurele-Ilfov, Romania
CIRIMAT - Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4, France
3
Politehnica University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania

This work adds to the current international trend of improving the capacity of actual bioceramics in order
to ellaborate a new generation of resorbable and highly bioactive ceramics (in our case, hydrated) for bone tissue
engineering. Researchers efforts are therefore presently concentrated on the synthesis of bioapatite materials as
close as possible to the human bone composition and structure, and their next congruent transfer onto the surface
of metallic implants.
Our results showed for the BmAp biomaterials in the form of thin films improved resemblances to the
human hard tissue structures and compositions compared to other calcium phosphates and are therefore expected
to insure a better functionality to metallic implant coatings.
To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of MAPLE deposition of thin films of poor
nanocrystalline hydrated apatites synthesized by the biomimetic method. We have proved that the main
functional groups of starting materials are present in the transferred films.
*Acknowledgments: This research was partially supported under the PCCA 153/2012 and ID 209/2011
Contracts. AV, NS, LD, MM, MS and INM acknowledge with thanks the financial support of LAPLAS 3, Cod:
PN 09 39 01 04. AV also acknowledges the support of Socrates fellowship.
**Email: anita.visan@inflpr.ro, ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro

114

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S4 P14
ADVANCES IN STATISTICAL POTENTIALS FOR PROTEIN STRUCTURE PREDICTION
Ionel RATA*
National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest, Romania
**Email: ionel.rata@nipne.ro
The accuracy of potential functions is the single most important and difficult problem in protein
structure prediction via computational means. We propose here a novel approach to protein structure evaluation
and prediction by improving on the Boltzmann statistics formalism for the experimental data in the Protein
Databank (PDB), and obtaining more accurate statistical potentials. An illustration of our results comes from
adjusting Glycine's conformation from PDB. It is known that Glycine lacks a side-chain and therefore should
have a symmetrical potential in its backbone coordinates phi-psi. Still, a plot of Glycine PDB frequencies shows
a strong preference for positive phi angles rather than the negative ones. We explain this in terms of structural
state multiplicities: Although the positive phi region of amino acids is generally restricted, proteins have a
considerable structural necessity for it and Glycine is the only amino acid which can satisfy it with no
constraints. In fact, due to the same argument, all amino acids have higher PDB frequencies in their positive phi
regions than directly derived from their real potentials (with no multiplicity factors considered). In our new
statistics we correct the potential maps of all amino acids and show that, in particular for Glycine we obtain a
symmetric map.

S4 P15
QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN RESEARCH
GEORGESCU tefan,
Andrei Saguna University of Constanta,stefan102001@yahoo.com,0744368263
Quality management in scientific research, can ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of this activity
voucher with the necessary conditions to ensure the fulfillment of the conditions made by the research
objectives. In this paper we sought to highlight some of the features of quality management activities in research,
both during the establishment of research methods as well as the creations themselves during the investigation
and establishment of research results. We also introduced the system architecture and some peculiarities of the
system compared to systems in other areas.
The paper aims to establish some basic principles for the organization and conduct of research in accordance
with referential.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

SECTION
S5 Engineering and Industrial Physics
Physics of energy transfer, conversion and storage
Environmental Physics
Sensors and Device Physics
Micro- and Nanoelectronics
Microelectromechanical systems
Instrumentation and Metrology
Imagining, Microscopy and Spectroscopy and their applications
Instrumentation, processing, fabrication and measurement technologies
Applications of fluid mechanics and microfluidics

115

116

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

INVITED LECTURES
S5 L01
PASSIVELY Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG LASERS FOR IGNITION OF AN AUTOMOBILE
ENGINE
Nicolaie PAVEL, Gabriela SALAMU, and Traian DASCALU
National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics
Laboratory of Solid-State Quantum Electronics, Bucharest R-077125, Romania
emails: nicolaie.pavel@inflpr.ro, traian.dascalu@inflpr.ro
During recent years extensive research has been performed on laser-induced ignition of air-fuel mixtures in
internal combustion engines. These investigations revealed that laser-induced ignition offers significant
advantages over a conventional spark-ignition system, such as higher probability to ignite leaner mixtures,
reduction of erosion effects, increases of engine efficiency, or shorter combustion time. In this talk I will
describe our work toward realization of passively Q-switched Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG lasers with high peak power,
especially for laser ignition of an automobile engine.
Composite, all-polycrystalline ceramics, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG-Cr4+:YAG lasers with high (MW
level) peak power were realized using quasi-continuous-wave pumping. The discussion will focus on three
applications of such a laser: (i) laser ignition of an automobile engine (Fig. 1); (ii) generation of high-peak power
laser pulses in the green visible spectrum at 532 nm by extra-cavity, single-pass frequency doubling of the 1.064+
:YAG laser with the pulse energy Ep=
0.54 mJ was used as a master oscillator in a master-oscillator-power-amplifier system, yielding pulses with
energy up to 11 mJ (peak power of ~12.8 MW) at a high (250 Hz) repetition rate.

Fig. 1 Photo of a laser prototype realized in our Fig. 2 Photo of a novel laser scheme in which the laser
laboratory for automobile engine ignition is presented.
crystal is pumped through a prism is shown.
A classical spark plug is shown, for comparison.
A new laser configuration for a compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG-Cr4+:YAG laser is proposed (Fig.
2). The laser medium is square shaped and the prism is attached on one of its lateral sides, nearby one of the
crystal extremity. The diode-laser fiber end is placed close to the prism hypotenuse, the pump radiation is
coupled into the laser crystal through the opposite surface of the prism and it propagates into the crystal trough
total internal reflections. Experiments on such a laser are given. This laser geometry is simple to align and
permits realizing of compact diode-pumped laser systems, as well as power scaling. We appreciate that such a
laser could find application in the automotive industry.
Acknowledgements This work was financed by the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research,
CNDI-UEFISCDI, project number 58/2012 (PN-II-PT-PCCA-2011-3.2-1040).

S5 L02
B OSONIC J OSEPHSON EFFECTS AND NON - LINEAR MACROSCOPIC SEF TRAPPING IN
PHOTONIC MOLECULES
M. ABBARCHI1,2,*, A. AMO2, V. G. SALA2, A. LEMAITRE2, I. D. D. SOLNYSHKOV3, H. FLAYAC3, E.
GALOPIN2, L. FERRIER2, I. SAGNES2, P. SENELLART2, G. MALPUECH3, AND J. BLOCH2

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

117

Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS (UMR 8551), Universite P. et M. Curie,
Universite D. Diderot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France. 2 LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis,
France. 3 Institut Pascal, PHOTON-N2, Clermont Universite , University Blaise Pascal, CNRS, 24 avenue des
Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex, France.
We report on a detailed experimental characterization of a bosonic Josephson[1] junction implemented by two
linked exciton/polariton condensates trapped in two coupled micropillars (i.e. a photonic molecule, PhM) [2].
The PhMs are etched from a high finesse planar microcavity and make possible a full control over localization
and coupling of exciton/polariton condensates (PC) [2]. The underlying photonic structure is reflected in the
polariton states: the interaction strength J between the two localized PCs can be easily changed by tuning the
distance between micro-pillars thus enabling the formation of coupled states (indicated as bonding and
antibonding, B and AB respectively) with extended, macroscopic coherence [2]. Moreover the excitation beam
can be used as a tuning tool for changing coupling and localization regime within the PC.
Non-resonant and resonant excitation is used to characterize and control the PC dynamics in energy, time and
space providing a full description of coherent oscillation of polariton population transferred in the two pillars
throughout the tunneling barrier. Under non resonant pulsed excitation, coherent oscillations between B and AB
states are observed in time resolved experiments in analogy with recent findings in disordered potential [3]. In
our case the period of oscillation can be tuned by playing with the coupling energy J (i.e. the center to center
distance between pillars). The most spectacular effects are obtained under resonant excitation where polaritonpolariton repulsive interaction rules the main features of the coherent oscillations and rise strong nonlinear
effects. In order to fully investigate the nonlinear tunneling dynamic of PC we study the population oscillation
under symmetric and asymmetric excitation. Our results verify the predicted non-linear generalization of
tunneling oscillations in superconducting and super-fluid Josephson junctions in analogy with recent findings in
atomic systems [5]. Real space interferograms confirm a linear evolution of the PC phase, additionally, we
confirm the onset of strong anharmonicity of the oscillations[4] and a novel nonlinear effect known as
macroscopic quantum self-trapping [5],which leads to the frustration of large amplitude tunneling oscillations
when asymmetric pumping is used.
References
[1] M. Abbarchi et al., Nat. Phys. 9, 275 (2013)
[2] M. Galbiati et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 126403 (2012)
[3] K. G. Lagoudakis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 120403 (2010)
[4] I. A. Shelykh et al., Phys. Rev. B 78, 041302(R) (2008)
[5] M. Albiez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 95, 010402 (2005)
corresponding author : marco.abbarchi@im2np.fr
Present Address: IM2NP - UMR CNRS 7334 Aix-Marseille Universite Faculte des Sciences de Saint Jerome,
Case 142 13397 Marseille Cedex 20

S5 L03
AB-INITIO SIMULATIONS OF PLATINUM-GROUP CATALYSTS UNDER OXYGEN-RICH
CONDITIONS
Nicola SERIANI
The Abdus Salam ICTP Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste, Italy
The catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum-group catalysts is influenced by size and morphology of the
nanostructures. At the same time, morphology and stability of a nanostructure depend crucially on the
environmental conditions of fabrication and operation. It is therefore of fundamental interest to understand in
detail how the environment influences these properties. In this talk, I will discuss atomistic simulations based on
density functional theory aimed at investigating the formation and stability of bulk and nanostructured oxides of
platinum-group metals in an oxygen-rich environment. I will show that the thermodynamics of oxides is
different when the nanoscopic size is taken into account and that this has consequences for their functionality.
Moreover, the calculations predict that the addition of promoters like sodium can also lead
to the formation of unconventional oxide phases. I will thoroughly compare the calculations with experimental
results on oxidation state, morphology and functional behavior of nanostructures, and I will discuss open
questions and future developments.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

118

[1] N. Seriani, W. Pompe, L. Colombi Ciacchi, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 110, 14860 (2006)
[2] N. Seriani, Z. Jin, W. Pompe, L. Colombi Ciacchi, Physical Review B 76, 155421 (2007)
[3] N. Seriani, F. Mittendorfer, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 20, 184023 (2008)
[4] A. Dianat, N. Seriani, M. Bobeth, W. Pompe, L. Colombi Ciacchi, Journal of Physical Chemistry C 112,
13623 (2008)
[5] N. Seriani, J. Harl, F. Mittendorfer, G. Kresse, Journal of Chemical Physics 131, 054701 (2009)
[6] N. Seriani, Journal of Physical Chemistry C 116, 22974 (2012)

S5 L04
BIOENGINEERING STRUCTURES AS DENTAL MATERIALS CHARACTERIZED BY ADVANCED
METHODS OF PHYSICS
Horia IOVU
University Politehnica of Bucharest, Advanced Polymer Materials Group
Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) based on dimethacrylate/epoxy resins with or without polyhedral
oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) additives were synthesized by in situ polymerization process. The differential
scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the curing parameters and also FT-IR spectrometry was employed
to reveal the influence of the organic groups from the POSS cages on the curing kinetics of the IPNs. Various
polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) structures were also used for hybrid systems synthesis in
combination with urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) monomer. In this case DSC was used to follow the degree
of conversion (DC) for the methacrylic groups founding that the chemical structure of the POSS compound
directly influences the DC value. Both advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force
Microscopy (AFM) were employed to reveal the advanced morphological structure for the synthesized POSSbased nanocomposites. The DSC data have been corroborated with those resulted from the NIR spectroscopy.
The introduction of POSS compound within the UDMA matrix leads to a decrease of the hybrid material
transparency due to the formation of agglomerates also pointed out by SEM analysis. In order to use as dental
materials the POSS-based nanocomposites were further studied concerning the kinetic behavior of the urethane
dimethacrylate (UDMA) copolymerized and reinforced by different concentrations of polyhedral oligomeric
silsesquioxane (POSS) with methacrylic groups through advanced Raman spectroscopy.

S5 L05
TAILORING PHOTOCATALYSTS NANOARCHITECTONICS FOR
DEGRADING INDUSTRIAL DYES
Livia BIBIRE, Laura DARTU*, Dragos MARDARE and Gabriela CARJA*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection,
Technical University Gh. Asachi of Iasi, Bd. D. Mangeron, Iasi 700554, Romania
* Corresponding author e-mail: carja@uaic.ro
Nanostructured photoresponsive catalysts with desired compositions and/or morphologies have been attracted
much attention in the last decade because of their potential application in the removal of all kind of pollutants in
air or water. We report nanostructured photocatalysts based on layered double hydroxides, as active
photocatalysts for degrading the industrial dyes drimaren red (DR) and drimaren navy (DN). X-ray diffraction
(XRD), IR spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UVvis analysis were used to
investigate the structure, composition, size-morphology and photoresponsive properties of the samples. The
optical spectrum gives information about the photoresponsive properties of the studied LDHs. The results point
out that the studied LDHs present high photocatalytic activity in the degradation of the dyes; the maximum
photocatalytic efficiency was almost 80% (Fig.1). The catalytic performances of the evolved nanostructured selfassemblies are a function of the specic composition of the clay.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

119

Fig.1. Degradation of DR, after 1.5 and 3h under irradiation, as a function of


number of catalytic run.
REFERENCES
1.G. Carja, E. Husanu, C. Gherasim and H.Iovu, Appl. Catal. B-Environ. 107 (2011) 253259.
2.G. Carja,. A. Nakajima, S. Dranca, C. Dranca, and K.Okada, J. Phys. Chem. C 114 (2010) 1472214728.

S5 L06
WETTING LAYER CONTRIBUTION TO InAs/GaAs (001) QUANTUM DOTS NUCLEATION
GH. V. CIMPOCA1, O. BUTE1
1

Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Science and Arts, 2 King Carol I Street, 130024 Targoviste,
Romania. E-mail: valcimpoca@yahoo.com

We have followed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) the complete evolution of InAs/GaAs (001) quantum
dots as a function of deposited InAs. A step erosion process by quantum dots nucleated at the step edges is
evidenced. Analyzing the quantum dots volume as a function of InAs coverage, we show that a surface mass
contribution to quantum dots formation exists.

S5 L07
NEURAL NETWORKS TO PREDICT THE ULTIMATE TENSILE STREGTH OF AUSTENITIC
STAINLESS STEEL USING IN NUCLEAR INDUSTRY
ZGAN Remus 2, BORMAMBET Melat1, ZGAN Sabina 2 & CHIU Greti 1
1

OVIDIUS University of Constanta, Faculty of Mechanical Enginering, Blvd. Mamaia, No. 124, 900527,
Constanta, Romania Corresponding author, zagan.remus@gmail.com
2
Maritime University of Constanta, Faculty of Naval Electromechanics, Mircea cel Btrn Street, No. 104,
Constanta, Romania
In this paper, an artificial neral networks was developed to predict the ultimate tensile strength of austenitic
stainless steel using in nuclear industry. As input we consider the chemical composition of different austenitic
stainless steel plates. The networks was trained to predict the ultimate tensile strength amounts as output.The
artificial neural networs was developed and training using a back propagation algorithm applied to the
experimental data from literature. The predicted values are in very good agreement with the measured ones.

120

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

S5 L08
PULSE-MATCHED SYNTHESIS OF CONTINUOUS SOURCES FOR ULTRA-WIDE BAND
APPLICATIONS
Rzvan D. TAMA, Daniela DEACU, Alin DNIOR and George CRUNTU
Constanta Maritime University, Str.Mircea cel Batran nr.104, 900663 Constanta
E-mail: razvan.tamas@cmu-edu.eu, tamas@ieee.org
Antenna synthesis can yield optimal radiating structures in terms of pattern diagram, gain, bandwidth or other
figures of merit. Although the synthesis might be more difficult for continuous sources than for antenna arrays
the resulting radiating structures are cheaper and easy to manufacture. Low-distortion antennas for specific
pulsed excitations can be achieved by using a method of moment (MoM) type approach based on a finite
expansion of the far-field, time-domain response. The synthesis is therefore focused on the resemblance between
the time-domain radiated waveform and the excitation waveform. Our approach is finally validated by
simulating and measuring different ultra-wide band antennas synthesized for particular waveforms of excitation.

S5 L09
ON THE USE OF COMPUTER ACOUSTIC MODELING ONBOARD SHIPS
Gheorghe SAMOILESCU, Tiberiu PAZARA
Naval Academy Mircea cel Batran, Constanta, Romania
The use of computer acoustic modeling onboard ships is a relatively new method in designing of a ship.
In the recent years, new materials have been developed in order to reduce the noise levels onboard ships [1,2,3].
Also, new proposals were made for the noise levels onboard merchant ships and passenger ships [4,5]. The
implementation of these new limits onboard ships means a careful design of the ship from early stages. For the
ships in construction, this can be easily, but for the existing ships (the ships in service), the implementation of
this limits is harder to achieve. To overcome this impediment, ship designers can use computer modeling
software which can give an optimum solution [6,7,8]. In this paper, the case of the control room onboard
training-ship Mircea is presented. Noise level in this control room, which is part of the engine compartment, is
78 80 dB(A) which exceeds the new limits proposed in standards. The engine compartment was modeled in
AutoCAD and then implemented in ODEON. Various materials for partition walls, doors and windows were
used in simulations. The values of the acoustic parameters of the materials, absorption coefficient and
transmission loss, were taken from the technical sheets of manufactures [1,2,3]. The noise levels obtained from
simulations were compared against the noise levels from measurements. In the end, remarks were made upon
which structure must be improved in order to decrease the noise level inside the control room.

1. SeaRox Marine & Offshore Insulation, Technical Guidelines, 2012, http://www.rockwool-searox.com/


2. Isover Ultimate, http://www.isover-technical-insulation.com/MARINE-INSULATION
3. B6 Akustik A/S, http://www.b6akustik.dk/en/

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

121

4. IMO Report Protection against noise on board ships Proposals for the development of amendments to
SOLAS regulation II-1/36 and a revision of the Code on noise levels on board ships, DE 53/10, 18 december
2009
5. IMO Report to the Maritime Safety Committee, DE 56/25, 28 february 2012
6. Keith J. Mirenberg Architectural Acoustic Modeling of Ship Noise and Sound Field Mapping, Sound &
Vibration / february 2011
7. C.L. Christensen, H.T. Foged A room acoustical computer model for industrial environments the model
and its verification; Euro-noise 98, Munchen, Proceedings, 1998
8. Billon A., Foy C., Valeau V., Picaut J., Sakout A. Modeling the sound transmission through partition walls
using a diffusion model, International Symposium on Room Acoustics, Satellite Symposium of the 19 th
International Congress on Acoustics, Seville, 10-12 september 2007

S5 L10
SEQUENTIAL PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF Al DOPED AND Ni-Al CO-DOPED ZnO THIN
FILMS
Cristian URSU 1, Tudor COMAN 2 and Ovidiu Florin CALTUN 2
Polymer Materials Physics Laboratory, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica
Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi, Romania
2
Faculty of Physics, Al. I. Cuza University, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania

Although pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been used extensively for manufacturing thin films of ZnO doped
with various elements, the particular case of sequential PLD (SPLD) has benefited from less attention and
consequently the results found in literature are scarce. The basic SPLD technique uses a single laser beam and
several individual targets in order to create complex compositions, ranging from compounds to doped
semiconductors and even alloys. In this work we focus on two types of materials deposited through SPLD, with
the aim of highlighting the influence of the method and the experimental conditions used on the resulting
structure, composition and physical properties.
Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) is well known for its low electrical resistivity and high transmittance in the
visible region of the spectrum. It is one of the most promising materials in the class of transparent conductive
oxides, being suited for various applications in the field of optoelectronics. ZnO films with 0 - 5 % Al were
obtained at room temperature from the ablation of metallic targets of Zn and Al in reactive atmosphere and their
optical and electrical characteristics were evaluated as a function of oxygen pressure and Al content.
Using three targets (Zn, Al, Ni) we also deposited Ni-Al co-doped ZnO. ZnO:Ni belongs to the diluted magnetic
semiconductors (DMS) category. The introduction of Al3+ ions, which act as donors, is supposed to supply
additional free carriers and enhance its ferromagnetic properties. Two series of samples were investigated, one
with various Ni concentrations for a constant Al percentage and a second one with constant Ni content but
different Al concentrations. The purpose was to identify if SPLD can be used to manufacture ZnO based DMS
materials and to modify their magnetic properties through co-doping.
Acknowledgements: This work was financially supported by the European Social Fund in Romania, under the
responsibility of the Managing Authority for the Sectoral Operational Programme for Human Resources
Development 2007-2013 [grant POSDRU/107/1.5/S/ 78342].

S5 L11
ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS
IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Antoaneta ENE
Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, Faculty of Sciences
and Environment, 47 Domneasca St., 800008 Galati, Romania
e-mail: aene@ugal.ro
This work presents some applications in metallurgical industry of instrumental neutron activation analysis
(INAA), using both thermal (reactor) neutrons and fast (14 MeV) neutrons obtained from industrial neutron
generators based on D-T 3H(d,n)4He nuclear reaction.

122

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

The INAA technique is particularly effective in solving engineering problems where multielement analysis of a
great deal of samples is required. It was proved its contribution to solution of the major problems in the studies
of the chemical composition of industrial materials involved in the technological flux, related both to the purity
of final products and to the environmental releases of pollutants. In spite of competing non-nuclear analytical
techniques (XRF, AAS, ICP-AES, ICP-MS, etc.), the reactor INAA as a primary (ratio) method continues to be
the most powerful multi-element analytical technique providing quantification of trace elements at ultra low
levels.
Thermal neutron INAA was applied to investigate the trace elemental content of raw materials (iron ores) and
final products and by-(pig iron, deoxidized steel, slag) involved in metallurgical industry at Iron and Steel Works
at Galati (Romania). The sensitivity of analysis depends on the factor a/A (where is the effective activation
cross-section, a the natural abundance of the stable (target) nuclide and A the nucleus mass, as well as on the
Compton background in the spectra). Also, matrix effects nuclear and spectral interferences must be known
and the results corrected for. For the long-lived nuclides counting could be carried out at different decay times,
in order to best detect radio nuclides of various half lives.
A study of the capabilities of 14 MeV INAA used in extraction metallurgical industry for rapid determination of
alkali metals in raw materials intended for iron and steel industry and of gold in auriferous sands and rocks in
with respect to the interferences of all useful nuclear reactions has been accomplished using the neutron
generator facility from Activation Laboratory, Nuclear Unit, Iron and Steel Works of Galati.
Future work will comprise INAA investigation of trace elements in high purity materials, such as lithium and
boron nitrides, in the frame of Romanian-Russian collaboration.

S5 L12
DENSITY FUNCTIONAL STUDY OF SPIN-ORBIT COUPLING EFFECTS IN PHOSPHORESECNT
OLEDS
Boris MINAEV
The current level of development of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) enables their effective application in
the low-cost flat panel display technology and lighting [1]. Developing of high efficient blue OLEDs attracts a
special attention because their characteristics so far are inferior to those of red or green ones. This could be
associated with low thermal and structural stability of blue organic emitting layers [1], some problems with
synthesis of materials with good charge transport properties as well as with poor injection of charge carriers into
organic emitting layers from electrodes because of large band-gap [1]. In recent years a lot of efforts have been
concentrated on the development of phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) based on transition-metal
complexes because of high quantum efficiencies which can be attained in such devices [1]. Especially the
Iridium(III) cyclometalated complexes are attracting a great interest because of their unique intersystem crossing
rate and near 100% light harvesting of the singlet and triplet exciton recombinations. DFT calculations of spinorbit coupling effects in such species afford to clarify all structural properties necessary for efficient OLED [2].
But the high cost of heavy metal phosphorescent material is one of the key obstacles that prevent the widespread
of phosphorescent OLED. Another fabrication way of the highly efficient blue-emitting OLED involves the use
of doped fluorescent host emitter systems in simple device structure. It was recently shown the possibility of the
highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes fabrication from delayed fluorescence. In such OLEDs spin upconversion from non-radiative triplet states to radiative singlet states was proposed. Herewith both singlet and
triplet excitons take part at light emission generation. However, the development of the host-guest materials is a
complicated task, since it is necessary to provide a proper energy matching of singlet and triplet levels for the
high exciton formation probability and high thermal and morphological stability of the materials.
[1] B.F. Minaev, X. Li, Z. Ning, H. Tian, H. Agren. Organic Light Emitting Diode Material, Process and
Devices. InTech, Rieca, 2011.
[2] B.F. Minaev, X. Li, H. Tian, H. Agren. J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 2072420731.

S5 L13
CONFORMATIONAL TRANSITIONS OF NUCLEIC ACIDS UNDER EXTERNAL FORCES:
EXAMPLES AND A STOCHASTIC PATH INTEGRAL THEORY FOR THEIR KINETICS
Ioan ANDRICIOAEI
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2025, USA Email: andricio@uci.edu,
Web:http://ps.uci.edu/~andricio/

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

123

I will present molecular dynamics simulations of several examples of conformational transitions that nucleic
acids and their complexes with proteins and nanoparticles undergo upon the application of external forces and/or
torques: (1) DNA supercoil relaxation by topoisomerases, (2) the condensation of DNA by dendrimers and (3)
RNA unfolding. Then I will showcase the use of the formalism of stochastic path integrals to deduce the
kinetics of these transitions, from simulation trajectories or experimental single molecule recordings of the
transition, under other conditions than those that are actually simulated or recorded.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S5 OP01
NANOCRYSTALLINE Sr-MANGANITE FOR CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF HYDROCARBONS
C. DOROFTEI1,2, P.D. POPA1, E. REZLESCU1, N. REZLESCU1
1

Institute of Technical Physics, Bd. D. Mangeron 47, 700050 Iasi, Romania.


Al. I. Cuza University, Faculty of Physics, 11 Carol I Blvd, 7000506 Iasi, Romania.
e-mail: docorneliu@yahoo.com

The high cost of the noble metals based catalysts drove many researchers to search for alternative materials as
inexpensive catalysts. The microstructure has a predominant role for catalytic purposes. Some of the most
promising materials for the catalyst applications are perovskites. The achievement of perovskites with high
specific surface areas and nanosized particles is a priority in the performance of a ceramic catalyst.
In this work the simple nanocrystalline Sr-manganite (SrMnO3) was synthesized by a novel self-combustion
method using polyvinyl alcohol as colloidal medium. The procedure offers the advantage of producing
nanosized, homogeneous and reproducible ceramic powders with precise stoichiometry.
The catalytic activity of the nanocrystalline Sr-manganite in the combustion reaction of some aliphatic and
aromatic hydrocarbons diluted in air was studied. Catalytic combustion of aromatic hydrocarbons starts at lower
temperatures, but the conversion rate is reduced. Catalytic combustion of aliphatic hydrocarbons starts at slightly
higher temperature, but the conversion rate exceeds 90%. Simple nanocrystalline Sr-manganite perovskite seems
to be a promising catalyst for low temperature (T<500 oC) combustion of aliphatic hydrocarbons.
Acknowledgements: This study was supported by a Grant CNST-UEFISCDI, Project PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-30453.
References:
[1] S.K. Samantaray, K. Parida, Appl. Catal. B: Environmental 57, 83 (2005).
[2] S. Cimino, L. Lisi, R. Pirone, G. Russo, M. Turco, Catal. Today 59, 19(2000).

S5 OP02
A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF COUMARIN-BASED DYES ADSORBED ON TIO2
NANOCLUSTERS APPLICATIONS TO DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS
Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Petre PANAIT,1 Fanica CIMPOESU,2
Marilena FERBINTEANU,3 and Mihai A. GRU1,*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527, Romania


Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bucharest 060021, Romania
3
University of Bucharest, Bucharest 020462, Romania

Coumarin-based dyes have been successfully used in dye-sensitized solar cells, leading to photovoltaic
conversion efficiencies of up to about 8% [1]. Given the need to better understand the behavior of the dye
adsorbed on the TiO2 nanoparticle, we report results of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT
studies of several coumarin-based dyes (C343, NKX-2398, and NKX-2311), as well as complex systems

124

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

consisting of the dye bound to a TiO2 cluster. We


provide the electronic structure and simulated UVVis spectra of the dyes alone and adsorbed to the
cluster and discuss the matching with the solar
spectrum. Due to the better matching to the solar
irradiance spectrum, we concluded that NKX-2311 has
superior light harvesting properties to both NKX2398 and (especially to) C343. We discuss the charge
transfer of the photoelectron from the excited state of
the dye to the semiconductor based on an analysis of
the electron density distribution over the ground and
excited states of the dye. The transfer is hindered for
NKX-2398, but facilitated for NKX-2311, due to the
tendency of the electron density to be localized closer
to the COO group (and the substrate) upon excitation by light absorption. The superiority of the more holistic
approach comes from the binding information it provides, as well as from its ability to deal with states that mix
dye and oxide character [2].
[1] K. Hara, T. Sato, R. Katoh, A. Furube, Y. Ohga, A. Shinpo, S. Suga, K. Sayama,
H. Sugihara, H. Arakawa,. J. Phys. Chem. B 107, 597606 (2003).
[2] C. I. Oprea, P. Panait, F. Cimpoesu, M. Ferbinteanu, M. A. Gru, Materials, in press,
doi:10.3390/ma50x000x,
*Acknowledgments: The authors acknowledge the financial support received from SNSF and UEFISCDI under
the Romanian-Swiss Research Programme, through the grant RSRP #IZERO-142144/1 PN-II-ID-RSRP1/2012.
**Email: cornel.oprea@univ-ovidius.ro, mihai.girtu@univ-ovidius.ro

POSTERS
S5 P01
DETECTION SYSTEM WITH NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES FOR BIOSENSORS AND
IMAGING WITH RESOLUTION BELOW THE DIFFRACTION LIMIT
Costel Cotirlan-SIMIONIUC, Constantin LOGOFATU, Rodica GHITA, Catalin Constantin NEGRILA
National Institute for Materials Physics, 105 Bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125, BucharestMagurele, Romania
The new structure for detection system comprises two superlenses with nanostructured surfaces separated at an
adjustable distance, integrated into a recording and analysis set-up for imaging and absorption spectra. This
system implements spectroscopic techniques such as: Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy (SPRS), AngleResolved Evanescent-Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (AREW-CRDS) and enables imaging with
resolution below the diffraction limit in UV-VIS range. Can detect adsorbed molecules on the nanostructured
surfaces and monitors deposition or growth of high quality thin films for new types of optoelectronic
components.
The silver nanostructured arrays on plane surfaces obtained by nanosphere lithography are sub-wavelength
diffraction gratings. To overcome the diffraction limit and achieve optical imaging with nanoscale optical
resolution, the near-field (NF) signal and the far-field (FF) signal are superimposed. The evanescent waves from
NF of object are diffracted through the first superlens in propagating waves into FF.
Above superlenses a CCD camera records the radiation distribution from the NF to FF with a high diluted
analyte present into the analysis channel. The second superlens in the front of the CCD camera is a coupler with
nanometric period, coupler that is placed in the NF of the first superlens. By translating the high spatial
frequency moir fringes in low spatial frequency fringes, the high-resolution information from the NF of the
object is translated in the FF for contrast enhancement. Results for testing of detection system are presented

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

125

without and with high diluted solutions of Rhodamine Chloride 590 in ethanol and for a nano-grating like object
in the NF of the first superlens.
Detail of
nanostructured
surface

CCD
20
Second
superlens
Analyte input

Objectiv

22
21
Object nano-grating

First superlens
AREW-CRDS mirror

Analyte output
SPRS
Monitor

Spectrometer
Laser

PMT

AREW-CRDS
Monitor

S5 P02
TESTING THE INFRASOUND METHOD ON THE BLACK SEA COAST
I.A. MOLDOVAN(1), V.E. TOADER(1), A.S. MOLDOVAN(2), D.V.GHICA(1)
National Institute for Earth Physics, POBox MG2, 077125, Magurele, Romania
AZEL Designing Group Ltd, 077125, Magurele, Romania
At the beginning of year 2013 an infrasound monitoring system was installed by NIEP, at Mangalia,
Romania, on the Black Sea coast line to test the method in correlation with local, regional and global sources
producing acoustic waves with frequencies lower than 20Hz. From the multitude of infrasonic signals that have
been recorded during time, some have been associated with different natural or anthropogenic sources as:
earthquakes, auroras, wind and storms, sea waves and tsunamis, explosions, wind mills activity, etc (Campus P.
et al, 2010). The source of many other infrasonic signals is still hidden and unknown for our knowledge.
The 6 months recordings show a predictable behavior of infrasonic activity on the seashore, suggesting the
presence of highly coherent infrasound waves in atmosphere. This type of waves was never recorded by our
infrasonic sensors in other locations far away from the sea shore (as can be seen in a comparative way between
MANR and PLOR2 on Fig 1 a,b).

Figure 1. Infrasound data recorded on (a) 22nd April 2013 on MANR station with MBAZEL2007 device. This
device was formerly installed in PLOR2; (b) 24th January 2011 on PLOR2 station with the same MBAZEL2007
device as in Figure 1a.
The precise source of these signals at higher frequencies is yet undetermined but at least two suppositions can
be made: the first one refers to the composition of atmosphere, that might be possible to act as a band-pass filter
which selects certain preferred frequencies from the background infrasonic noise induced by water's surface.
The propagation parameters of this "filter" may be altered by aerosols concentration, humidity, temperature and,
perhaps, by other factors. The second one, emphasized by the interesting aspect of the spectrogram in Figure 1a,
resides in well defined, visible superior harmonics of the dominant signal, which develops between 0-7Hz,
suggests that the source is more likely to be about a local, coherent and powerful source of infrasounds, as the

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

126

big European land-based wind farm installed at Fantanele/Cogealac is. These harmonics are clear and create the
specific "spider-legs" aspect present in spectrograms. Because the frequency domain is relatively large and
reaches values as high as 7Hz, it is difficult for us to assume that the source of these signals is originating in
natural phenomena, giving priority to the second supposition that identifies the wind mills activity as the source
of recorded infrasound signals.
Corroborating the infrasound spectrograms with local meteorological data, as the wind speed, magnitude of
sea waves or atmospheric electric field amplitude, could yield important scientific conclusions, beneficial both
for authorities and academic media.
Campus P. and Christie D. R., 2010) Worldwide Observations of Infrasonic Waves, Le Pichon et al. (eds.),
Infrasound Monitoring for Atmospheric Studies, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4020-9508-5_6, Springer Science +
Business Media B.V. 2010.

S5 P03
THE EFFECT OF SOLAR STORMS ON SEISMIC AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AS
RECORDED IN VRANCEA SEISMOGENIC AREA
MOLDOVAN Iren Adelina(1), Victorin Emilian TOADER(1), Emilia POPESCU(1), Anica Otilia PLACINTA(1),
Angela Petruta CONSTANTIN(1)
(1)

National Institute for Earth Physics, PO Box MG2, 077125, Magurele, Romania, irenutza_67@yahoo.com

Using statistical approaches, we try to find a degree of correlation between three phenomena: the solar activity,
the seismicity and the geomagnetic field behavior.
On one part, the solar activity influences the geomagnetic field, giving rise to two types of variations: regular
and irregular variations. Daily, seasonal and cyclic 11 years period are regular magnetic field variations and arise
from current systems caused by regular and periodic solar radiation changes. These regular variations are
composed with the irregular variations due to the irregular activity of the Sun. The magnetic activity indices (Ak,
Kp, ap and so on) are designed to describe variation in the geomagnetic field caused by the irregular current
systems produced by the multiple interactions between the solar wind, the magnetosphere and by the ionosphere
itself. The sunspot number has its reflection in the regular 11 years cycle of the geomagnetic activity and the
irregular solar currents (ap index) have the reflection in the irregular variations of the geomagnetic activity and is
currently used for the identification of magnetic storms. Both are influencing the geomagnetic activity and
records. Tectonic activity, on the other part, sometimes has its own signature on the geomagnetic field.
The data used in this paper are obtained from the seismicity of Vrancea source zone (Romplus catalogue), the
geomagnetic field recorded by the Romanian geomagnetic observatories (Muntele Rosu-MLR and Surlari NIEP
SRL and INTERMAGNET - SUA) and the global magnetic activity indices obtained from NOAA
(http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/alerts/solar_indices.html). The time span of more than 15 years of recordings is
covering more than one solar cycle, giving us the opportunity to study the correlation during low and high solar
activity periods.
A special designed software is used for this study. It allows the visualization and analyzing long time intervals of
records as seismicity, geomagnetic field and solar activity parameters.

S5 P04
A DEMONSTRATION FOR THE WEIGHTED MEAN AND ITS IMPROVED DISPERSION
Enric Leon GRIGORESCU1, Viorel SERBAN1
1Horia Hulubei National Institute of R&D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Magurele,
Romania.
The paper treets with the weighted mean w, wich appears when a quantity is measured with different methods
with different standard deviations i and a best mean must be obtained. Attention is given to possible type B (
systematic ) components of uncertainty. In the literature, demontrations are found for the w formula and its
associated two types of dispersions D1 (internal) and D2 (external). The text explains why D2 is the confident
value. The paper contains a simple new calcules, producing the formula of w with the expression of absolute
weight, wi. An original calcules is presented for a new D 3 dispersion, wich considers the fluctuations of wi (
aspect not found in literature !). Comments are made for conditioners wich allow to neglect D 3.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

127

S5 P05
THE DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE FROM DAMBOVITA
COUNTY TO BE USED IN AGRICULTURE
R. BANCUTA1, I. BANCUTA2, R. SETNESCU2,3, A. CHILIAN2, T. SETNESCU2,3, R. ION6, GH. V.
CIMPOCA2,4, I. V. POPESCU2,4, A. GHEBOIANU2, O. CULICOV3,5,
1

The Water Company from Targoviste, Dambovita County, 130055, Romania


Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, 130024,
Targoviste, Romania
3
R&D Institute for Electrical Engineering, Department for Advanced Materials, 313 Spl. Unirii, 030138,
Bucharest, Romania
4
Academy of Romanian Scientists, 050094, Bucharest, Romania
5
JINR Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia
6
National Research & Development Institute for Chemistry - Polymer Department, 202 Spl. Independentei
060021, Bucharest, Romania

The purpose of the study is to determine the heavy metal content in sewage sludge. These sewage sludge comes
from wastewater treatment plants from Dambovita County (cities: Fieni, Moreni, Gaesti, Pucioasa and
Targoviste). Sewage sludge has valuable agronomic properties in agriculture. In using sewage sludge must be
taken of the nutrient needs of the plants without, however, impairing neither the quality of the soil nor that of
surface and ground water. Some heavy metals present in sewage sludge may be toxic to plants and humans. The
concentrations of heavy metals in the sewage sludge were determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence
Spectrometry (EDXRF) and by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS).

S5 P06
THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH ZINC CONCENTRATIONS FROM SOIL ON ABSORPTION AND
TRANSPORT PROCESSES OF COPPER, MANGANESE, IRON IN ZEA MAYS L
A. CHILIAN1, R. BANCUTA2, I. BANCUTA1, R. SETNESCU1,3, C. RADULESCU1, T. SETNESCU1,3, GH.
V. CIMPOCA1,4, I. V. POPESCU1,4, A. GHEBOIANU1, R.-M. ION1,5
1

Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, 130024,
Targoviste, Romania
2
The Water Company from Targoviste, Dambovita County, 130055, Romania
3
R&D Institute for Electrical Engineering, Department for Advanced Materials, 313 Splaiul Unirii, Bucharest
030138, Romania
4
Academy of Romanian Scientists, 050094, Bucharest, Romania
5
Department of Analysis, National Research & Development Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry
ICECHIM, Bucharest, Romania

The aim of this study is to study the influence of high concentrations of zinc from soil on the distribution of
certain important micronutrients (Cu, Mn, Fe) in different parts of maize. Due to the statistical analysis it was
observed that zinc may produce significant changes in the processes of absorption and transport of other
elements. Zinc stress affects mostly absorption and transport of Fe and Cu in maize. Significant correlations are
observed between increase of zinc concentration from the soil and the decrease of Fe level in mature leaves (p <
0.05). The increase of zinc level from soil leads to a decrease copper level in young leaves (p < 0.05), but also to
increase of manganese concentration (p < 0.05). For elemental analysis has been using Energy Dispersive X-ray
fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

S5 P07
THE CLAUSIUS-MOSSOTTI FACTOR IN LOW FREQUENCY FIELD OF THE POWDERS
RESULTED FROM WASTES COMBUSTION
Iosif MALAESCU 1 , Mihai LUNGU 1 , Raluca GIUGIULAN (POENARU) 1 , Nicolae STRAMBEANU 2
1

West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics, Bd. V. Parvan, no.4, 300223 Timisoara, Romania
2
Pro Air Clean Ecologic SA, Str. Sulina no. 6b, 300516, Timisoara, Romania

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

128

Using the complex dielectric permittivity measurements in the frequency range between 25 Hz to 2 MHz, the
frequency ( ) dependence of the Clausius-Mossotti factor, K ( ) for some ash powder micro/nanoparticles
samples, resulted from combustion processes municipal wastes, was determined.
The results show that if the ash powder is dispersed in air, Re[ K ( )] 0 , for all samples and at all
frequencies in the investigated range. Therefore, it is possible a filtering of flue gas using positive
dielectrophoresis (pDEP), by trapping the nanoparticle in the area of the strongest electric field. The theoretical
study which was performed in this paper, show that the Re[ K ( )] may change from a positive to a negative
value, at a critical frequency, f c (which decreases from 1.416 kHz to 0.31 kHz), if the dielectric permittivity of
the dispersion medium, increases from 3 to 10.
Therefore, there is a shift from positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) to negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), and the
particles can it to move from regions by high electric field gradient to regions by low electric field gradient.
The results obtained shown that, there are the possibility of use the DEP, for retaining through manipulation and
spatial separation controlled of the nanoparticles from the powder samples investigated, leading to purification of
exhausted combustion gases and reduction of the air pollution.

S5 P08
X-RAY TECHNIQUES FOR M ATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION
Antoaneta ENE1, Constantin GHEORGHIES1, Oleg V. IGNATENKO2, Marina V. FRONTASYEVA3
1

Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Department of Chemistry, Physics
and Environment, 47 Domneasca St, 800008 Galati, Romania,
e-mail: aene@ugal.ro, cgheorg@ugal.ro
2
Scientific and Practical Materials Research Centre of NAS of Belarus,
P. Brovka St., 19, Minsk, 220072, Belarus, ignatenkoov@yahoo.com
3
Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region,
Russia, e-mail: marina@nf.jinr.ru

Knowledge of trace element content and microstructure of industrial materials is important for engineers and
technologists working in various branches due to the fact that these parameters influence the properties of the
final product. Many analytical techniques have been developed to investigate the micro-composition of materials
with different uses and much attention has been paid to atomic and nuclear spectroscopic techniques which have
the advantage of being multi-elemental and very sensitive for a large range of chemical elements. This work
provides some results obtained by the application of X-ray based techniques for the characterization of various
industrial samples from Iron and Steel Works of Galati, Romania, (steel, slag) and new synthesized materials
(lithium and boron nitrides) obtained at National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, with regard of microcomposition and structure. The employed techniques are X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) with energy dispersion
(ED-XRF) and coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Aspects
concerning the limit of detection, the range of elements analyzed, matrix effects and spectral interferences in
XRF, and its complementarity with other micro-analytical techniques are discussed. Application of SEM-EDX
using a Quanta 200 FEI type scanning electron microscope at Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania, for
the investigation of micro-composition of steels and metallurgical slag allowed the determination of chemical
elements in industrial samples (B, C, O, La, Ga, Mo, Pr, Rh, Na, K, Mg, Al, Ti, Si, V, P, Nd, Ca, Cr, Ni, Cu, Sm,
Mn, Fe, Co, Zn) and of impurity content in Li 3N samples (Na, Fe, Cl, Zr), besides the transformation of lithium
nitride into carbonate with increasing synthesizing pressure. This technique has also been extensively applied
lately for the investigation of environmental and biological micro-objects in order to correlate the trace element
compositional scheme with the distribution pattern of constituent particles and their shape in relation with
different physical-chemical properties. XRD technique using a DRON-3.0 diffractometer (Cu-K radiation) was
employed at Dunarea de Jos University of Galati for the evaluation of size and shape of amorphous and
crystalline phases, transformation of phases during activation processes, lattice parameters, texture, internal
tensions, and mineralogy in different materials and, by using advanced software for processing the XRD spectra,
the automatic determination of phases and chemical compounds existing in inclusions is possible. On-going
work is carried out in the frame of Romanian-Russian collaboration between Dunarea de Jos University of Galati
and Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia, by using
SEM-EDX and XRD for the investigation of microstructure and micro-composition of advanced materials with

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

129

special properties from Li-N and B-N systems synthesized in different nitrogen pressure conditions and
mechanically activated for different periods, which are used for hydrogen storage and various engineering
purposes (tool industry, microelectronics).

S5 P09
MOSS BIOMONITORING OF AIR QUALITY IN ROMANIA
POPESCU V. I.1,6,8, FRONTASYEVA M.2, STIHI C.1,6, ENE A3., CUCU-MAN S.4, TODORAN R.5,
CULICOV O.2, ZINICOVSCAIA I.2, MY TRINH2, PAVLOV S.S.2, RADULESCU C.1,6, CHILIAN A6,7,
GHEBOIANU A.6, BANCUTA R.7, CIMPOCA GH. V.1,6, BANCUTA I.6, DULAMA I.6 , TOMA L.G.6,
BUCURICA A.6, DIMA G.1,6, CHELARESCU E.D.8,9, DRASOVEAN R.3, SION A.3,
CONDURACHE-BOTA S.3, BUHACEANU R.4, TARCAU D.4, TODORAN D5.
1

Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Sciences Department, 2 Carol I St., 130024,
Targoviste, Romania,ivpopes@yahoo.com, cstihi@yahoo.com, cristianaradulescu@yahoo.com
2
Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region,
Russia, mfrontasyeva@yahoo.com
3
Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, Faculty of Sciences
and Environment, 111 Domneasca St., 800201 Galati, Romania
4
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Chemistry, 11 Carol I St., 700506, Iasi, Romania
5
Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, North University Center, 62A Victor Babes St., 430083, Baia Mare,
Romania
6
Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, 13 Sinaia
St., 130004, Targoviste, Romania
7
Valahia University of Targoviste, Doctoral School on Engineering Sciences, 35 Lt. Stancu Ion St., 130105,
Targoviste, Romania
8
Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St.,P.O.BOX MG-6,
Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
9
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Doctoral School, P.O.BOX MG - 11, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele,
Romania
The aim of this study was to assess the air quality in Romania using terrestrial moss, to reveal highly
polluted critical regions in the country in order to permanently survey the degree of atmospheric pollution and to
contribute to the European moss survey 2010/11 conducted under the auspices of the UNECE ICP Vegetation
covering some white areas in the map of atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Europe.Within the
bilateral project JINR- Romania, Nuclear and related analytical techniques for Environmental and Life
Sciences, moss samples were collected during the summer/autumn of 2010 at 303 sites in Romania: in the
Carpathian Mountains, Transylvanian plateau, and Moldavia province, following internationally accepted
guidelines. Nuclear analytical technique Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA, IUCN-Dubna, Rusia) and Atomic
Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS-Valahia University of Targoviste, Romania) were used to determine the
concentration of minor and trace elements in moss samples collected in 2010 from Romania. The results for
mean, median and geometric mean are compared with those previously obtained in 1990, 1995 and 2000
campaigns and the maps of the distribution of heavy metals were realized. A total of 42 elements (Na, Mg, Al,
Cl, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Sm,
Eu, Tb, Hf,Ta, W, Au, Hg, Pb, Th, and U) were determined by NAA (JINR-Dubna) complemented by AAS
(Valahia University of Targoviste) Romania. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were calculated.
References
1. http:icpvegetation.ceh.ac.uk/heavy metals and nitrogen in mosses.European survey 2010/11.
2. 21st International Seminar on Interaction of Neutrons with Nuclei: Fundamental Interactions & Neutrons,
Nuclear Structure, Ultracold Neutrons, Related Topics (ISINN21), Alushta, Ukraine, 20.05.-25.05.2013

S5 P10
STRUCTURAL, ELECTRICAL AND CATALYTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF
NANOSTRUCTURED IRON MANGANITE
C. DOROFTEI1,2, P.D. POPA1, E. REZLESCU1, N. REZLESCU1
1

Institute of Technical Physics, Bd. D. Mangeron 47, 700050 Iasi, Romania.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

130
2

Al. I. Cuza University, Faculty of Physics, 11 Carol I Blvd, 7000506 Iasi, Romania.
e-mail: docorneliu@yahoo.com

In this work the self-combustion method was applied to synthesize simple iron manganite (FeMnO 3)
nanopowders. Among the various methods known, the self-combustion method allows a good control over the
size of the material particles. In this method, the thermal energy for the reaction of manganite crystallites
synthesis is supplied by a fast exothermic combustion reaction and the final product is a finely divided powder.
The procedure offers the advantage of producing ultra-fine, homogeneous reproducible multicomponent ceramic
powders with precise stoichiometry.
We determined a series of microstructural, electrical and catalytic properties of nanostructured materials
obtained by this method. Among the electrical properties, electrical sensitivity to environmental humidity in 098% RH intervals was also investigated. The catalytic activity of the nanocrystalline iron manganite in the
combustion reaction of acetone vapors and of some hydrocarbons diluted in air was studied. The perovskite thus
obtained has a favorable microstructure for obtaining humidity sensors and catalysts for the combustion of gases
and vapors diluted in the air.
Acknowledgements: This study was supported by a Grant CNST-UEFISCDI, Project PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-30453.
References:
[1] W. Wang, A.V. Virkar, Sens. Act. B: 98, 282 (2004).
[2] S.K. Samantaray, K. Parida, Appl. Catal. B: Environmental 57, 83 (2005).

S5 P11
MODELING OF GASEOUS POLLUTANT DISPERSION IN THE VICINITY OF AN
INTEGRATED IRON AND STEEL WORKS
Viorel MUNTEANU1, Antoaneta ENE2
1

Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Materials and Environment Engineering, Department of
Environmental Engineering and Metallurgical Technological Systems, 111 Domneasca St, 800201 Galati,
Romania, e-mail: munteanu_viorel48@yahoo.com
2
Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Department of Chemistry, Physics
and Environment, 47 Domneasca St, 800008 Galati, Romania
This paper reports the development of a modelling system for air pollutants dispersion around the
integrated iron and steel works at Galati, Romania, based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which is
appropriate for applications that involve complex geometries. FLUENT 6.3 software was employed using
Pressure-Based Coupled Solver (PBCS) as numerical solver. This software uses advanced mathematical models
to calculate the chemical substances mixture situated in any state of aggregation (gaseous, liquid droplets or
solid particles) and also permits the modelling and simulations of the flowing phenomena using Navier-Stokes
model which describes the fluids behaviour.
For the area around Galati town it was took into consideration an almost rectangular area with a side of 13
km. This area includes also the whole sector correspondent to the Galati iron and steel complex, located in the
western part of the town. The 3D virtual space was simulated using TGRID and the construction of the
computational mesh was done using GAMBIT. The grid contained 3,380,000 cells. The wind speed and
atmospheric turbulences variations with the altitude were calculated for a medium speed of 7.5 m/s, which
corresponds to the medium annual speed in the Galati region of 4.7 m/s at a height of 10 m (pursuant to the
meteorological standards, the wind speed is measured at 1030 m height from the ground). It can be seen the
very important effect that the friction with the ground has upon the speeds profiles, the wind speed value
growing fast in the first 100 m. Dispersion modelling was made with the chemical species transport model help
available in FLUENT which uses the Ficks law for the chemical species diffusion in laminar or turbulent
regime. The turbulent Schmidt number (Sct) for the turbulent flow was set at 0.7. The fluxes values were
considered identical for all pollutants and the same in all studied situations (three wind scenarios). The
turbulence model selected for all the numerical simulations is SST k-omega.
Some conclusion could be driven linked to different polluting factors arising from the activity of iron and
steel complex: 1) the pollutants in a gas state with lower density comparative with that of the air (for example
NH3) present a lower risk due to a faster dispersion along height and of the concentration diminution from the
ground vicinity; 2) the pollutants with higher density than that of air (SO 2, NO2), have the tendency to remain a
longer time in the ground vicinity, getting dispersed especially on the horizontal direction and lass on the

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131

vertical, the affected area by big concentrations being more extended; 3) the gases with density close to the
atmospheric one (CO, H2S) have a intermediary behavior.
The results bring an advantage to the user, namely the possibility to simulate numerically situations that
require a maximum degree of precision and detail, virtual situations (ecologic accidents, natural disasters, etc.),
dispersion of pollutants in air, water and even soil, being a tool both for authorities and for operators of industrial
processes, where ambient concentrations resulting from discharges need to be assessed for human health and
ecological reasons.

S5 P12
RADIOACTIVITY LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS
IN GALATI TOWN, EASTERN ROMANIA
Antoaneta ENE1, Viorel MUNTEANU 2
1

Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Department of Chemistry,
Physics and Environment, 47 Domneasca St, 800008 Galati, Romania, e-mail: aene@ugal.ro
2
Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Materials and Environment Engineering, Department of
Environmental Engineering and Metallurgical Technological Systems, 111 Domneasca St, 800201 Galati,
Romania, e-mail: munteanu_viorel48@yahoo.com
This paper reports the results obtained for specific global beta activity of atmospheric aerosols in Galati
town, Eastern Romania, in the frame of a TACIS PHARE project referring to the development and extension of
the integrated monitoring laboratory of environmental media (air, water, soil) in the Lower Danube Euroregion,
Galati-Cahul area a transboundary region between Romania and Republic of Moldova.
222 measurements were carried out in September 2009 in four sites from Galati town, namely the Galati
Municipality (GM), the Central Plaza (CP), Micro 39A quarter (M39) and Micro 17 quarter (M17). The filters of
aerosols were analysed for immediate beta radioactivity after 3 minutes of sampling with the aid of a Mirion
Technologies portable nuclear spectrometer available at Dunarea de Jos University of Galati. The obtained
average value (mean standard deviation; n=222) of specific beta radioactivity was 0.7450.098 Bq/m 3, with a
minimum value of 0.422 Bq/m3 (M17), and a maximum value of 1.018 Bq/m3 (GM). Comparison of sites for the
average specific beta activity leads to the following sequence GM>M39>CP>M17, with the corresponding
values: 0.7910.048; 0.6070.035; 0.5870.032 and 0.5400.088 Bq/m3, respectively. The radioactivity level
varied with site, day and hour, due to the temporal fluctuations of natural/cosmogenic radioactivity,
meteorological conditions, closeness to the iron and steel industrial complex and presence of radiation emitted
by building materials. For the measurements inside the Galati Municipality building carried out in six different
days (n=166), the relative standard deviation obtained was in the range 4.21-8.96%. It was observed that
maximum values for GM site were obtained in the case when PC monitors and office printers were functioning
(0.910 and 1.018 Bq/m3, respectively). Compared the two residential quarters, M39 is closest to the iron and
steel works and M17 location is the farthest.
The results were compared with the official reports of Regional Environmental Agency of Galati for
immediate beta radioactivity of aerosols collected two times per day in September 2009 in the Environment
Radioactivity Surveying Station of Galati located in the area of the institution (2.46 Bq/m3) and with the
respective annual average value (2 Bq/m3), our results being much lower than the corresponding official reports
and the attention/warning limit (10/50 Bq/m3). The obtained results are an important statistical element for
annual evaluation of radioactivity in SE region of Romania and for national reports and will serve as a base in
further investigations.

S5 P13
ALARA PRINCIPLE APPLICATION IN THE DECOMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES OF THE
UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS PIPES FROM THE IFIN-HH VVR-S RESEARCH
REACTOR
Ioan IORGA, Alexandru PAVELESCU, Mitica DRAGUSIN
Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Romania

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

132

The IFIN-HH VVR-S Nuclear Research Reactor was built between 1955 - 1957 and operated until 1997. During
his life time, it was functional a number of 113,467 h, including 2,000 h at 3.0-3.5 MW power. The total thermal
energy produced was 9,510 Mwh/d.
Decommissioning of the reactor started in 2010 and will be completed in three phases, until 2021. The reactor
was fitted with a 30 m3 radioactive effluents leakages pond connected by an underground pipe with two 300 m 3
radioactive effluents storage ponds belonging to the IFIN-HH Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR).
The decommissioning of the reactor underground pipe structures was also planned to take place in three
execution phases in function of the working area.
There were three types of pipes that were decommissioned:
- A radioactive effluents transporting stainless steel pipe with an exterior diameter of 108 mm and a wall
thickness of 5 mm, buried in the ground at depth between 7 m and 2.75 m;
- A ventilation carbon steel pipe, for the 300 m3 ponds with an exterior diameter of 62 mm and wall
thickness of 5 mm, buried in the ground at depth between 1.5 m and 2.5 m;
- A ventilation carbon steel pipe, for the exhausted filter storage with an exterior diameter of 108 mm
and a wall thickness of 5 mm, buried in the ground at depth between buried in the ground at depth
between 1.5 m and 2.5 m, as well;
In the first phase, it was necessary to remove the underground pipes because of the preparatory activities (sitting,
authorization and building) of the European Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP).
The entire pipe decommissioning activities were performed taking into account strict radiation protection
measures, industrial safety, risk management and nuclear safety culture. The ALARA Principle for maintaining
the radiation protection exposure As Low as is Reasonable Achievable was specifically implied.
For the optimization of protection principle two guiding lines were observed:
- Implementation of a predictive approach for limiting the assumed risks;
- Dose limits conforming was not considered sufficient, therefore radiation protection had be optimized
taking into account the equipment, processes and work management.
Finally, specific measures and practices were taken into account to minimise risks and perform activities by
taking into consideration specific personnel experience and knowledge, type equipment and tools used, weather
and environmental conditions, safety practices and lessons learned, as follows:
- Reduce the mechanical risks by reinforcing the digging trench walls;
- Monitoring the airborne radioactive aerosols in the trench narrow spaces;
- Limiting works in narrow spaces (for instance cutting a 100 m pipe using only 3 cuts inside the trench,
and the rest of cutting being securely being performed outside the trench);
- Limiting the possibly of personnel exposure using the shortest calculated in situ work time;
- Avoiding the presumptive spread of contamination and leakage using covers from polyethylene and
metal vats;
- Using special safety measure like purging of compressed air through the pipes before the cutting;
- Using the inside contaminated pipes as a shield/casing for the 220 l concrete drums to store other more
active wastes at the IFIN-HH STDR;
- Optimizing the pipe cut segmentation for easy manipulation and storage.
As a result of this approach, the decommissioning activities of the underground radioactive effluents pipe
structures from the IFIN-HH VVR-S Research Reactor were successfully accomplished in a short time with
minimal expenses, as well as without any environmental incidents, damages to equipment and injuries to
working personnel and general public.
S5 P14
EVALUATION OF LIMESTONE WITH NON-INVASIVE ANALITICAL METHODS
Anca-Andreea BALOG1, Nicoleta COBRZAN1, Lucian BARBU-TUDORAN2
1

Faculty of Construction, Technical University of Cluj Napoca, Baritiu 25, 4, Cluj-Napoca, Romania,
anca.balog@dst.utcluj.ro
2
Faculty of Biology-Geology, Babe-Bolyai University, Koglniceanu 1, 400084, Cluj-Napoca,

A large number of constructions made of natural rocks are composed of limestone blocks where the
determination of the physical and mechanical properties or mineralogical and petrographical composition is
often difficult because the possibility of extracting samples is reduced (involving a large number of samples,
collected from different areas of the buildings members).

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133

In these rocks (limestone), the qualitative analyses in thin sections are incomplete due to polymorphic
transformations of carbonate minerals, being necessary to complete them with x-ray diffraction (XRD), EDX
and chemical composition analysis.
Non-invasive methods of analysis are preferable in such cases precisely because very small quantities of samples
is required (several grams powder) with the possibility of rapid investigation. These analysis techniques can
determine: the mineralogical and chemical composition of rocks (qualitative and quantitative) and secondary
mineralogical decays such as those produced by salts (efflorescence, gypsum black crust).
In this study, fine limestone powder samples and rock samples were analyzed by classical methods (density,
weight, volume, apparent density, porosity, compactness, water absorption, compressive strength, thin sections,
and polished sections) and by non-invasive one (XRD, EDX, SEM) (Figures 14).
The aim of this paper it was to determine the characteristics of limestone in order to prevent further deterioration
that may result from differentiated behaviors, secondary pressure crystallization, differentiated deformability,
and chemical reactions with the environment or with mortar used in the construction.

Figure 1 EDX analysis

Figure 2 X-ray diffraction of limestone

Figure 3 Thin section


REFERENCES:

Figure 4 Images to scaning electron


microscopy (SEM)

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

134

Anastasiu, N., 1988. Petrologie sedimentar. Editura Tehnic, Bucureti.


Evamy, B. D., 1963. The application of a chemical staining technique to a study of dedolomitisation.
Sedimentology, v. 2, pp.164-170.
Rozenbaum, O., Emmanuelle Trong, Rouet J.-L., Bruand, A., 2007. 2D-Image analysis: A
complementary tool for characterizing quarry and wethered building limestones (http://hal.archivesouvertse.fr/docs/00/08/45/30/PDF/text et figures Rozenbaum.pdf)
STAS 6200/10-73- Pietre naturale fasonate pentru construcii- Metode de ncercri fizice, mecanice i
mineralogice. Determinarea densitii i greutii volumice
STAS 6200/12-73- Pietre naturale fasonate pentru construcii- Metode de ncercri fizice, mecanice i
mineralogice.Determinarea absorbiei de ap i a cedrii apei.
STAS 6200/13-80- Pietre naturale pentru construcii - Determinarea compactitatii, porozitatii si a
coeficientului de saturatie.

1.
2.
3.

4.
5.
6.

S5 P15
CHARACTERISATION OF MORTARS COMPATIBILITY USING MICROSCOPICAL AND XRD
ANALYSIS
Nicoleta COBRZAN1, Voicu DUCA2, Anca-Andreea BALOG1
1

Faculty of Construction, Technical University of Cluj Napoca, Baritiu 25, 4, Cluj-Napoca, Romania,
nicoleta.cobarzan@ccm.utcluj.ro
2
Faculty of Biology - Geology, Babe-Bolyai University, Koglniceanu 1, 400084, Cluj-Napoca,

Old masonry work is inhomogeneous and anisotropic building material, composed of masonry units and mortar
whose mechanical and physical characteristics influences its behavior in time. Using higher-strength materials
(such as cement mortar instead of lime mortar), can lead to appearance of inhomogeneous areas in masonry
works and local stresses, which can cause high mechanical actions on adjacent materials accelerating in this way
masonry decay.
Using Portland cement in the restoration of ancient buildings is not allowed because it causes a sulphate attack
on carbonate contained in limestone which leads to the so known "black crust".
Replacement or reconstruction of destroyed or detached building materials from one construction, requires
finding mortars with similar properties to those used originally, in order to prevent further damages.
A method of rehabilitation /consolidation /restoration is effective during the time if the mortar used for
intervention is realized based on compatible recipes from mineralogical, petrographical and mechanical point of
view.
In thin sections (Figure 1) can be determined the mineralogical composition of ancient mortars, but sometimes
these determinations are insufficient for knowing the "mortar recipe" involving detailed X-ray diffraction
(XRD). That determination (X-ray diffraction) (Figure 2) allows identification of the type of binder aggregate of
a mortar composition, characterization of lime mortars and their differentiation from those of cement.

a.

a)

b.
Figure 1 Thin sections:
old mortar - carbonate corrosion of quartz boundaries
b) new mortar - carbonate corrosion of quartz

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

a.

135

b.
Figure 2 XRd analysis
old mortar (a), new mortar (b)

This study analyzes the mortar samples taken from an existing building, using destructive investigation methods
(thin sections, compressive strength, water absorption, porosity, etc.) and non-destructive analytical technique
(X-ray diffractions) to obtain a mortar compatible with it.
REFERENCES:
1. D. Voicu, 2010: Bazele fizico-chimice i mineralogice ale petroarheometriei, Seria mineralogia
aplicat, Editura Arcadia Media.
2. Van Hees, R. P.J., 2000. Damage Diagnosis and Compatible Repair Mortars. Proceeding of the
International Rilem Workshop, Historic Mortars: Characterisation and Tests. Pp.27-36, Paisley,
Scotland.
3. MP 025-04, 2004: Metodologie pentru evaluarea riscului si propunerile de interventie necesare la
structurile constructiilor monumente istorice in cadrul lucrarilor de restaurare ale acestora
4. E. Maroty, J. Kalmar, 2006: About the stone material and mortar composition of the Roman buildings,
Ulcsia Castra, Szentendre, Hungary, Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences,
vol.1/2006, nr.1, Baia Mare
5. B. Middendorf , J.J. Hughes , K. Callebaut, G. Baronio and I. Papayianni, (2005): Investigative methods
for historic mortars- Part 2: Chemical characterisation, RILEM TC 167-COM: 'Characterisation of
Old Mortars with Respect to their Repair', Materials and Structures, 771-780, (available online at
www.rilem.net)
6. A. Palomo, M.T. Blanco-Varela, S. Martinez-Ramirez, F. Puertas and C. Fortes Eduardo Torroja:
Historic Mortars: Characterization and Durability. New Tendencies for Research, (available online at
http://www.arcchip.cz/w09/w09_palomo.pdf)
7. A. Estvo Candeias1, P. Nogueira2 & J. Miro2 at all. : Characterization of ancient mortars: present
methodology
and
future
perspectives,
(available
online
at
http://www.euartech.org/files/Ext_ab/candeias.pdf).

S5 P16
SATELLITE DATA FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF AIR POLLUTION IN
BUCHAREST URBAN AREA
M. A.ZORAN, R.S.SAVASTRU, D.M. SAVASTRU
1

National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, Remote Sensing Dept., MG5 Bucharest -Magurele, 077125
Romania,

Air pollution has become a very important environmental problem in Bucharest metropolitan area in
Romania. In spite of improvements in air quality observed in Bucharest after 1990, still concentrations of
particulate matter PM (PM10, PM2.5), ozone and other pollutants have concentrations exceeding the
recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). Consequences of anthropogenic and climate
change in metropolitan area of Bucharest include an increased risk of extreme climate events (urban heat island,
heat waves, floods, droughts, losses of biodiversity, threats to human health, and damage to economic sectors
such as tourism, urban/periurban agriculture and forestry). The influence of aerosol particles on climate, and how

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

136

their properties are perturbed by anthropogenic activity, is one of the key uncertainties in climate change
assessments. In order to assess urban environment impacts is very important to quantify spatio-temporal
distribution of all air quality indicators like as particle material PM10, PM2.5, ozone and greenhouse gas
concentrations as well as meteorological parameters like air temperature, humidity, pressure, wind velocity
(intensity), precipitation, etc.
Over the past few years, satellite remotely sensed data of various spatial, spectral, angular, and temporal
resolutions have been widely used to study the land use and land cover changes associated with urban growth,
and to retrieve land surface biophysical parameters, such as vegetation fraction cover, built-up indices and land
surface temperatures, which are good indicators of conditions of urban ecosystem. In this paper, time-series of
Landsat TM and ETM+, MODIS Terra/Aqua, and high resolution IKONOS satellite data have been selected to
retrieve the urban biogeophysical parameters and brightness temperatures in relation with land cover changes for
Bucharest metropolitan area during 1990 2012 period. In order to assess the urbanization impacts on urban
climate at local and regional levels, this study analyzed the relationship between climate change and
anthropogenic activities around Bucharest city by integrating remote-sensing imagery and in situ measurements
data. Spectral signatures of different terrain features have been used to extract structural patterns aiming to
separate surface units and to classify the general categories. Change analysis during analyzed period of time
series Landsat TM/ ETM+ satellite data shows a strong urban growth inside of almost all six sectors belonging to
Bucharest metropolitan area and also a high increase rate of periurban areas. The total accuracy of all available
Landsat TM/ ETM derived LULC (Land Use Land Cover) data was places in the range of (85.6 %- 91, 5 %)
with corresponding Kappa statistics between 82.7% and 87, 9% for Landsat TM and respectively ETM data.
From time series MODIS Terra satellite data was analyzed land surface temperature (LST) in Bucharest in
relation with urban heat island (UHI) phenomena and impact of recorded summer heat wave events in 2003,
2007 and 2010 years. This study attempts to provide environmental awareness to urban planners suggesting that
future changes in urban land cover could substantially affect climate by altering biophysical landatmosphere
interactions.

S5 P17
SPECTRAL MIXTURE ANALYSIS OF MULTISENSOR SATELLITE IMAGERY
OF CONSTANTZA URBAN ENVIRONMENT
Maria ZORAN, Roxana SAVASTRU, Dan SAVASTRU, Marina TAUTAN, Sorin MICLOS, Laurentiu
BASCHIR
1

National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, MG5 Magurele-Bucharest, 077125 Romania.

Urban landscapes change over time as new urban fabric is added and also as the existing fabric is
internally modified (e.g. new buildings replace old ones, plots are amalgamated or subdivided, street layouts are
modified). These patterns of urban densification and internal modifications are of major concern to sustainable
development because they represent the physical manifestation of a range of social, economic, cultural, and
political dimensions associated with urban dynamics.
Satellite remote sensing has considerable potential for providing accurate, up-to-date information of
urban environments. Mapping land cover, biophysical and thermal parameters in urban environment can be done
through multispectral and multitemporal satellite remote sensing data. Spectral mixture analysis (SMA), based
on a physical mixture model, has ability to extract sub-pixel information such as the abundances of each
endmember presented in the pixel (image unity). In order to examine the performance of each model in dealing
with very high spectral and spatial variability of urban surface, in this paper have been applied different spectral
mixture methods. To extract the abundances of urban surface components, the comparison was focused on linear
spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) which was based on a fixed number of endmembers for the entire scene, and
multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) which allowed the number and types of endmembers
to vary from pixel to pixel.
These techniques have been applied to map the physical components of urban land cover for the urban
area of Constantza, Romania, using Landsat TM/ETM+ and IKONOS imagery for 1990 2012 period. Field
spectra of vegetation, soil, and impervious surface areas collected with the use of a fine resolution and IKONOS
image and pixel purity index tool in ENVI 4.7 software were modeled as reference endmembers in addition to
photometric shade that was incorporated in every model. This study employs thirty Two endmembers and six
hundred and sixty spectral models to identify soil, impervious, vegetation, and shade in the urban area
Constantza. The mean RMS error for the selected land use land cover classes range from 0.0045 to 0.019. The
Pearson correlation between the fraction outputs from MESMA and reference data from IKONOS 1m
panchromatic resolution data for soil, impervious, and vegetation were 0.713, 0.7242, and 0.8263 respectively.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

137

This paper demonstrates the potential of moderate-and high resolution, multispectral imagery to map
and monitor the evolution of the physical urban environment, MESMA approach being reliable as the subpixel
processor picked out the spectral signatures effectively. These techniques adequately characterize the diversity of
materials that compose land cover within a diverse urban area like Constantza, and at the same time provide a
conceptual structure for grouping the specific materials into three general classesvegetation, impervious, and
soil. These generalized classes can characterize urban land cover regardless of specific construction materials or
local environmental variation, facilitating comparison of urban data sets on a global scale.

S5 P18
SHORT TERM LOAD FORECASTING USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS
Otilia Elena DRAGOMIR, Florin DRAGOMIR
1,2

Automation, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department, Valahia University of Targoviste,
Romania, 1drg_otilia@yahoo.com, 2drg_florin@yahoo.com

This paper focus on neural networks performances in short term load forecasting. Precisely, the goal is to
forecast the DPcg (difference between the electricity produced from renewable energy sources and consumed),
for short-term horizon, using radial- basis function (RBF) and multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural networks. The
forecasting accuracy and precision, in capturing nonlinear interdependencies between the load and solar
radiation of these neural networks are illustrated and discussed using a data based obtain from an experimental
photovoltaic amphitheatre of minimum dimension 0.4kV/10kW.
Load forecasting may be included into all the operations performed by energy management system in order
to manage electricity supplies more effectively with the distribution company. From this point of view, it is
necesary to be known for any power system in order to optimally schedule or dispatch its resources. On the other
hand, grid load forecasting is an important task to provide intelligence to the smart grid. The forecast accuracy
directly impacts the economic and reliable operation of power systems. Accurate forecasting will enable a utility
provider to plan the resources like fuel in advance and also to take control actions like switching on/off demand
response appliances and revising electricity tariffs, etc.
Considering the benefits that load forecasting may bring to the security, economics and resource management
fields, the scientific community is now beginning to take some interest in this area. The control of the forecasting
performance represents the premise of a good global performance. In this context, in this paper, we attempt to
provide an overview of ANN performances, precisely radial-basis function (RBF) and multilayer perceptron
(MLP) neural networks, in load forecasting, The comparing analysis is applied on a data based obtain from an
experimental photovoltaic amphitheatre of minimum dimension (0.4kV/10kW), located in the east-centre region
of Romania, more precisely in the city of Targoviste.
The proposed work is based on the following hypotheses: the actual renewable energy sources (RES) being
complex and generally nonlinear, modeling of their behavior may be difficult or impossible. In consequence, in
many cases, it is impossible to collect data through monitoring in real time. These characteristics impose two
important limits to our work: (1) the approach will focus on the local forecasting not global one and (2) the
forecasting models will be dressed up without any a priori knowledge or experience related to the consumer
behaviors of clean energy.
In conclusions, power system operators are now forced to deal with an increasing number of problems,
largely related to increased number of loads, new environmental policies and economic pressures of the market.
Large scale adoption of RES, able to contribute to the worlds energy needs and partly to resolve these problems,
is slow. This article may be viewed as another form to promote the proliferation of alternative energy sources,
developing reliable forecasting models dedicated to macro energy harvesting (RES harvesting).
The paper dealt with MLP and RBF neural networks, which are the most popular and widely-used paradigms
in many applications, including energy forecasting, in order to obtain accurate load predictions on short term
horizon. The proposed networks architectures illustrated and discussed using a data based obtain from an
experimental photovoltaic amphitheatre of minimum dimension 0.4kV/10kW, showed that RBF neural networks
are able to surpass the multilayer feedforward neural networks as they are simple structure and have the ability to
model any nonlinear function in a straight forward way. RBF networks are local approximators with nonlinear
input-output mapping. Theirs knowledge representation is localized. Thus, RBF network are able to learn faster
and suffer less from interference, as compared to multilayer feedforward neural networks for example.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

138

S5 P19
TEST STAND FOR SOLAR PV PANELS
Florin DRAGOMIR1, Otilia Elena DRAGOMIR2, Nicolae OLARIU3, Adrian OPREA4, Liviu OLTEANU5
1,2,3,4,5

Automation, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department, Valahia University of Targoviste,
Romania, 1drg_florin@yahoo.com, 2drg_otilia@valahia.ro, 3olariu@valahia.ro, 4oprea@valahia.ro,
5
olteanu@valahia.ro

This article presents an application whose purpose is to determine the parameters of a solar PV panel (current
and voltage) needed to verify performance and optimal functioning of the PV panel. In the application to use the
NI LabVIEW graphical programming software with data acquisition board USB-6009 from National
Instruments. This work presents the construction of a application for a PV panel as well as the parameters
extraction from the data-sheet values and are real. This application is very useful for evaluating PV panels after
they have been used in a period of time. Thus we can measure the degree of wear and aging of PV panels.
Block diagram of the application:
Test installation

PV panel

Pyranomete
r
Sensor

Power
conditioning
element

Data acquisition
board - DAQ
PC
LabView

The basic unit with which to obtain conversion of solar energy into electricity is photovoltaic cell.
Photovoltaic cell is a snapshot converter that will supply power only if it receives energy in the form of solar
radiation. The solar panel contains several photovoltaic cells (depending on panel type).
All applications based on photovoltaic cells as benchmarks:
The amount of current that depends on the intensity of solar radiation;
The maximum power determined by the characteristic voltage - current.
To establish caracteristii voltage - current, it is necessary to measure the intensity using a pyranometer solar
radiation reflected in the value of the current operation.
Next it shows how to connect the PV panel, power conditioning element, the pyranometer sensor with data
acquisition board USB - 6009.

User interface and its program (developed in LabView) is shown in the figure below:

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

139

S5 P20
SENSOR DATA ACQUISITION USING AN ARDUINO AND DISPLAYING AND ADJUSTING
PARAMETERS ON AN ANDROID TABLET
BUNU Liviu Octavian, Florin DRAGOMIR
2

Automation, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department, Valahia University of Targoviste,
Romania, 1liviu.bunu@yahoo.com, 2drg_florin@yahoo.com

By conceiving this project we are attempting to emphasize the increasingly higher possibilities of sensor
readings facilitated by consumer technology progress. Considering the modern engineering and computational
goals of increased availability, mobility and reduced form factor, it is very likely for a sensor reading to be made
in every household.
In the making of this project we have used several analogue or digital sensors to measure wind speed,
temperature, humidity, luminosity and atmospheric pressure. Each of them is connected to an Atmel
microcontroller by the means of an Arduino Uno development board. In addition to precisely knowing the values
of aforementioned atmospheric parameters, is is possible to interact with the environment by the means of three
independently activated and manipulated controls: a DC (direct current ) motor, a relay, and a fan. Taking in
account their operating voltage, all of them are activated through transistors, and motor can have variable
rotations per minute, by using pulse width modulation toward the transistor which in turn acts as a switch
towards the main twelve volt power source.
All the data transmissions such as sensor readings and including the motor, fan and relay are directed to a
wireless router using an ethernet shield specifically made for the Arduino board, through the TCP/IP protocol. In
order to provide an easy and convenient method to read and alter the parameters of the measured environment,
all the variables processed by the microcontroller are displayed to an Android touchscreen tablet.
This communication is realized by opening sockets between the ethernet shield, connected by a RJ45 cable to
the router, and the tablet which can operate wirelessly with the same router, using an encrypted WPA2 (WiFi
Protected Access) connection. In order to achieve the desired security goal that only the owner or accredited
personnel of the compound where the sensors and controls operate, access to the microcontroller is possible only
after a login screen in which users must enter the name and password of an accredited account.
All the values displayed on the tablet are in the International System, the temperature reading is in degrees
centigrade, the pressure in Pa, luminosity in candles per square meter, and wind speed is displayed in meters per
second and kilometers per hour. The programming portion of the project has been made in Java,for the Android
tablet which runs on Linux kernel Android 4.0.3, using the Eclipse development environment, J.D.K.(Java
Development Kit) 16 and the android SDK(Software Development Kit).On the Microcontroller side we created
the software program in Arduino, a C++ development environment based on Processing.

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

140

S5 P21
HIGH PERFORMANCE TAPPED-INDUCTOR BUCK DRIVER FOR LED ARRAYS
Marius APETREI 1, Adrian GEORGESCU 2
1

Department of Physics, Ovidius University of Constana, Constana, 900527, Romania


School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Texas A&M University of Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi,
78412, Texas, United States of America
2

Over the last years there has been a constant increase in the number of LED applications because of their small
weight, low power consumption and low operating temperatures. Developments in the manufacturing technology
have pushed the luminous efficacy far beyond the 100lm/W boundary [1,2]. It is predicted that over the next
years the use of LEDs in the lighting sector will continue to grow dramatically [3]. In order to benefit from these
improvements in LED technology, the driver also plays an important role in the total system efficacy. With the
introduction of multichip LED arrays the assembly cost has decreased, allowing luminaire manufacturers to
provide high lumen output from compact light sources.
This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of a tapped-inductor buck converter especially
suited for use in luminaires employing LED arrays. The proposed circuit has a maximum output power of 30W
and can also be used for powering a series string of high power LEDs provided that the string voltage and
current needs are met. The driver is flexible, allowing a range of output voltages ranging from 19V to 47V. The
output current can be preset between 250mA and 700mA. The load current regulation is better than 0,6% over
the whole output voltage range and better than 3,4% over the 0C to 50C ambient temperature range.
Compared to conventional buck drivers, which regulary attain efficiencies between 82 and 86%, the
proposed circuit has a minimum efficiency of 90,2% and a peak efficiency of 93,8%. The goal was obtaining
maximum conversion efficiency at a low cost and using widely available components. The only custom
component is the tapped-inductor.
The driver operates from a high voltage, direct current input bus (between 250 420V) and works in
pulse-skipping mode at a frequency of 132kHz. The oscillator frequency is dithered 4kHz with 250Hz for
easier EMI compliance and reduced filter cost.
The TinySwitchII TNY268 from Power Integrations provides the necessary control functions and also
integrates a high voltage MOSfet for lower cost. The power consumption of the control circuit is further reduced
by disabling the internal current source and powering directly from the output of the converter. To reduce power
losses as much as possible, a low value resistor is used for output current sensing. A nondissipative snubber
recycles the leakage inductance energy to the power supply input bus. The converter prototype has a small
footprint (overall dimensions 55*45*30mm) and includes protections against overvoltage, output short-circuit
and overtemperature, providing a good reliability. Because of the high efficiency it does not require external
heatsinks.
References
[1] Solid state lighting and development, US Department of energy, April 2013
[2] Key trends in the development of LED lighting technology, Jessie Lin, DIGITIMES Research, Taipei,
03.04.2012
[3] Trends in LED Backlighting and Drivers for Mobile Devices and TVs, Publitek European Editors,
20.11.2012
[4] High brightness LED driver solutions for general lighting, ON Semiconductor, 2009

S5 P22
FINITE ELEMENT METHOD MODELLING OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE PEM FUEL CELL
Viorel IONESCU*a
a

Department of Physics and Electronics, Ovidius University, Constanta, 900527, Romania

A fuel cell is a device that can directly transfer chemical energy to electric and thermal energy. Proton exchange
membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are highly efficient power generators, achieving up to 50-60% conversion
efficiency, even at sizes of a few kilowatts. There are several compelling technological and commercial reasons
for operating H2/air PEM fuel cells at temperatures above 100 C; rates of electrochemical kinetics are enhanced,
water management and cooling is simplified, useful waste heat can be recovered, and lower quality reformed
hydrogen may be used as the fuel. All of the High Temperature PEMFC model equations are solved with finite
element method using commercial software package COMSOL Multiphysics. The results from PEM fuel cell

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

141

modeling were presented in terms of reactant (oxygen and hydrogen) concentrations and water concentration in
the anode and cathode gases; the polarization curve of the cell was also displayed.

S5 P23
CAPACITIVE MEMS PRESSURE SENSOR DESIGN MODELLING USING COMSOL
MULTIPHYSICS
Viorel IONESCUa
a

Department of Physics and Electronics, Ovidius University, Constanta, 900527, Romania

The capacitive micro sensing technique, applicable to a wide range of applications like: automotive applications,
industrial applications and biomedical applications, utilizes the diaphragm-deformation-induced capacitance
change to convert the information of pressure into electrical signals.The sensor in these example measures static
pressures of a magnitude from zero to atmospheric pressure. The Comsol Multiphysics model studied here first
computes the initial stresses from the manufacturing process; then it accounts for the structures mechanical
deformation resulting from an applied pressure. It finally calculates the sensors capacitance for the deformed
shape: the 2D model calculates the capacitance from a computed electric field, whereas the 3D model simply
integrates infinitesimal capacitance contributions over the electrode boundary.
S5 P24
TUNING THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN SiC BASED METALLO-CERAMIC COMPOSITES
M. GALATANU 1, M. ENCULESCU 1, A. GALATANU 1
1)

National Institute of Materials Physics, Magurele 077125 Romania

SiC is thermally stable and radiation resistant material which might be a good candidate for nuclear fusion
related applications. However, its mechanical and thermal properties as ceramic are not consistent to the
structural materials requirements, while the high porosity becomes an impediment when it is used in SiC/SiC
fiber reinforced composites. To conciliate between these opposite tendencies we are investigating the possibility
to create SiC based metallo-ceramic composites using low activation metals and aiming to develop a synthesis
technology scalable to large components. Here we present recent results concerning the sample morphology and
the subsequent thermal properties in different composites based on SiC whiskers, micrometric and nanometric
grains and different suitable metals. SEM/EBS and high temperature thermal properties measurements are used
as feed back parameters to optimize the fabrication technology with respect to the metallic dispersions control
and also to tune the thermal conductivity of the composites to the design required values.
Acknowledgement : This work was supported by the European Communities in the framework of EFDA by
WP13MAT-HHFM-03-01/MEdC/BS contract

S5 P25
DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS WITH NATURAL DYES - A COMBINED EXPERIMENTAL AND
THEORETICAL APPROACH
Anca DUMBRAV,1 Corneliu I. OPREA,1 Irina ENACHE,1,2 Adrian GEORGESCU,1 Petre PANAIT,1
Mihai A. GRU1,*,**
1

Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527, Romania,


Constana Maritime University, Constana 900663, Romania

We report results of combined experimental and theoretical studies of betalain natural dyes used as
sensitizers for TiO2 dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). To analyze the compliance of the various forms of
betalain dyes with the main criteria [1] that should be met by a dye to be used as TiO 2 sensitizer in a DSSCs, we
performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, which provided the optimized geometry, electronic
structure and electronic spectrum of the dyes in fully protonated as well as partially deprotonated forms, in
solution. We discuss the adsorption onto the substrate, the matching of the absorption spectrum of the dye with the
solar spectrum, the energy level alignment with the semiconductor and the electrolyte, and the charge transfer to the

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Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

substrate. By comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data referring particularly to the photovoltaic
conversion efficiency, fill factor, short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage, measured under standard AM1.5
conditions we identify the betacyanins as the useful constituents of the betalain extracts and emphasize the role of
extract purification [2, 3].

References:
[1] A. Hagfeldt, G. Boschloo, L. Sun, L. Kloo, H. Pettersson, Chem. Rev. 110, 6595 (2010).
[2] C.I. Oprea, A. Dumbrav, I. Enache, A. Georgescu, M.A. Gru, J. Photochem. Photobio. A . 240, 5 (2012).
[3] A. Dumbrav, I. Enache, C.I. Oprea, A. Georgescu, M.A. Gru, Digest J. Nanomat. Biostruct. 7, 339 (2012).
*Acknowledgements: C. I. Oprea acknowledges the financial support from CNCS/UEFISCDI grant code PN2RU-PD-603/2010, contract no. 172/2010.
**E-mail: adumbrava@univ-ovidius.ro, mihai.girtu@univ-ovidius.ro

S5 P26
CASE STUDY FOR 3 DEGREES OF FREEDOM OF REACTIVE SOLID FUEL SYSTEMS
Gabriel MURARIUa, Florin MINGIREANUb, Lucian GEORGESCUb MOCANU Ionut Razvanb,*,
a

Dunrea de Jos University of Galati, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, Domneasc Street, 47, RO800008, Galati, Romania
b
Dunrea de Jos University of Galati, European Excellence Center for the Environment , Domneasc Street,
47, RO-800008, Galati, Romania
The rocket engine has to operate outside the atmosphere, and so must carry its own oxidizer.
Contributions to the evolution of solid-propellant rocketry have come from a variety of sources.
In this paper is presented a preliminar numerical approaching tools for simulations of a small launcher for
payloads <10kg. Currently there is an increasing demand for small launchers, We propose a three stage small
launcher powered by solid fuel. Next we present a full 3 DOF model for the flight of the launcher as well as
simulation results for various flight scenarios ending with different payloads on different orbits.

S5 P27
CHARACTERIZATION OF CEMENT PASTES USING X-RAY FLUORESCENCE, X-RAY
DIFFRACTION AND REHOMETRY
I. M. ION1, N. ANGELESCU2, GH. VLAICU3, I. BANCUTA4
1

Valahia University of Targoviste, Doctoral School of Valahia University of Trgoviste, 35 Lt. Stancu Ion
Street 130105, Targoviste, Romania, e-mail: onymira@yahoo.com
2
Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Materials Engineering and Mechanics, 18-24 Unirii Boulevard,
130082, Targoviste, Romania
3
SC Special Steel SA Targoviste, 9-11 Gaesti road, 130087, Targoviste, Romania
4
Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, Carol I
Boulevard, No. 2, 130024, Targoviste, Romania

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

143

In this paper, has been adopted a new physical method to determine fluidity of cement pastes with polymers
and chemical composition of these pastes. In the research were used three types of polymers: epoxy resin in a
proportion of 10%, polyurethane, in proportion of 10% methylcellulose in the proportion of 0.6% by cement
weight. The devices used was rheometer Paar Physica, MCR 300 design, used to determine the rheological
properties of cement pastes, X-ray diffractometer Bruker AXS D8 ADVANCE type, X-ray tube with copper
anode, 40KVA / 40 mA, used for determination of hydration products and Energy Dispersive X-Ray
Fluorescence Spectrometer (EDXRF) ElvaX.
Experimental results showed that the same water/cement ratio material behave differently depending on the
polymer used. Moreover, epoxy resin gives significant improvements in workability and strength. It was found
that polymers have a positive influence on concrete.
Were performed investigations on hardened concrete structures to determine resistance developed by these
compositions.

S5 P28
CU-W FUNCTIONAL GRADIENT MATERIALS
M. GALATANU 1, B. POPESCU 1, M. ENCULESCU 1, A. GALATANU 1
1)

National Institute of Materials Physics, Magurele 077125 Romania

We have investigated the possibility to create Cu-W gradient composites, as a possible route to connect the W
armor to structural water cooled parts in the fusion reactor divertor structure.
Compositional gradient materials have been obtained from SPS-ed metallic powder mixtures. Single step or
multi-step approaches with adequate process parameters have been considered and tested for both thin (high
gradient) and large (small gradient) cylindrical samples. The resulting materials are investigated by SEM/EBS
and EDX and evaluated in comparison to similar results obtained for W-Fe (steel) gradient materials.
Acknowledgement
This work was supported by the European Communities in the framework of EFDA by WP13MAT-HHFM-0102/MEdC/BS contract
S5 P29
CHARACTERIZATION OF HONEY QUALITY USING HIGHLY SENSITIVE ANALYTICAL
METHODS
Elena Daniela CHELARESCU1,2 , Claudia STIHI3,4, Cristiana RADULESCU3,4, Andrei CHILIAN4, 5, Lucica
GRIGORA TOMA4, 5
1

Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St.,P.O.BOX MG-6,
Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
2
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Doctoral School, P.O.BOX MG - 11, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele,
Romania
3
Valahia University of Targoviste, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Sciences Department, 2 Carol I St., 130024,
Targoviste, Romania
4
Valahia University of Targoviste, Multidisciplinary Research Institute for Sciences and Technologies, 13 Sinaia
St., 130004, Targoviste, Romania
5
Valahia University of Targoviste, Doctoral School on Engineering Sciences, 35 Lt. Stancu Ion St., 130105,
Targoviste, Romania
Honey is a complex foodstuff, a natural sweet substance produced by bee from nectar of plants (honey
nectar) or hand plant sap excreted by insects (honeydew honey) [1]: is used in food and has multiple therapeutic
effects [2]. Honey contains a complex mixture of proteins, free amino acids, phenolic compounds, vitamins and
minerals necessary for the body's health, are reported to contain about 200 substances [3]. A deep control of
honey quality from different areas of Romanian is very important and necessary to verify compliance with
quality specifications of the European Union [1].The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of 14
different type nectar honey samples extracted from beehives placed in South-Muntenia region of Romania. For
this purpose physicochemical characteristics together with mineral content were evaluated. Physicochemical
parameters: pH, electrical conductivity, ash content, refractive index and water content, were analysed using the
Harmonised Methods of the International Honey Commission [4]. The mineral content of food and
environmental samples is determined using different sensitive analytical techniques [5]. In this work a rapid and

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Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

not expensive technique was used: Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) combined with Internal
Standard technique [6]. The concentrations of minerals: P, K, Ca, Fe and Zn were determined.
References
[1]. European Union Directive, Council Directive 2001/110/EC relating to honey (2002);
[2]. Alvarez-Suarez, J. M., Tulipani, S., Romandini, S., Bertoli. E., Battino, M., Contribution of honey in
nutrition and human health:a review, Mediterr J Nutr Metab (2010) 3:1523
[3]. Suguna L, Chandrakasan G, Ramamoorthy U, Thomas K. Influence of honey on biochemical and
biophysical parameters of wounds in rats. Journal of Biochemistry and Nutrition 1993;14: 91-99.
[4]. Bogdanov S., Martin P. and Lllmann C.: Harmonised methods of the European honey commission.
Apidologie (extra issue) 1-59 (1997)
[5]. Stihi, C., Radulescu, C., Busuioc, G., Popescu, I.V., Gheboianu, A., Ene., A., Romanian. Journal of
Physics, Vol. 56, No.1-2, p.257-264, 2011
[6]. Russ, J. C. (1984) Fundamentals of Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, Butterworths, London.

S5 P30
EFFECT OF CARBONATED DRINKS ON THE TOPOGRAPHY AND HARDNESS OF HUMAN
TEETH EXAMINED USING AFM TECHNIQUE
Cristina IONESCU, Liviu Stefan CRACIUN
Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele,
Romania

Understanding the effect that carbonated drinks have on teeth has become of particular interest during
the past years. For this purpose surface topography, roughness and hardness of human teeth after storage in
carbonated drinks were examined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation technique. The
AFM is one of the foremost tools for imaging matter at the nanoscale while nanoindentation is a common
technique for the determination of local mechanical properties in biological hard tissues. Six sound human teeth
were storage in freshly cola drink and orange juice for 5h. Twelve indentations were performed using the same
parameters before and after immersion of the samples. The AFM preliminary results showed that after exposure
hardness decrease and the surface became rougher and more exposed to plaque formation.
1.
Nanoindentation and storage of teeth, Stefan Habelitza, Grayson W. Marshall Jr., Mehdi Baloochb,
Sally J. Marshalla, Journal of Biomechanics 35 (2002) 995998
2.
Effect of cola drinks on the morphology and elastic modulus of dentine, Sanjiv Shrivastava, Katerina E.
Aifantis, Materials Letters 65 (2011) 2254-2256
3.
C.Ionescu, L.S. Craciun, E.S. Barna, P.M. Racolta, I.Burducea, M.Straticiuc, A.T. Serban, Rom. Journ.
Phys., Vol. 57, Nos. 78, P. 11131121, 2012

S5 P31
CHARACTERIZING THE ORIGIN OF BOTTLED WATERS ON THE ROMANIAN MARKET USING
IRMS AND ICP-MS
Gabriela CRISTEA1, Cezara VOICA1, Romulus PUSCAS1, Alina MAGDAS1
National Institute for R- D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath,
400293 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Bottled water consumption has grown steadily over the past few decades. Bottled water is an increasingly
important component of human dietary intake worldwide, with many consumers believing it to be a safe product
that originates from remote sources and unpolluted environments. The purpose of drinking water monitoring is
to bring information periodically about it organoleptic and microbiological quality, the effectiveness of treatment
technologies, focusing on disinfection technology, in order to determine if drinking water is adequate or not in
terms of the relevant parameter values established by law. In this work, we present a study which investigates the
stable isotopic (18O and 2H) and elemental composition in bottled still mineral waters randomly collected on
the Romanian market in 2012. A total of 22 brands of bottled still water (domestic and foreign) were analyzed.
The measured stable isotope ratios for Romania still waters range from -12.9 to -10.1 for 18O and from -

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

145

87.7 to -70.0 for 2H. By comparison, the isotopic values of foreign still waters range between -10.98 6.1 for 18O and -71.4 -23.5 for 2H. Neither a sample from all assortments of water does not have a
grand content of calcium, magnesium or sulphur. Most of analyzed waters correspond to low-sodium level.
Regarding toxicity, is noted that all the 22 types of water studied qualifies for regulating drinking water market.
This study is useful in determining the natural origin of bottled water, the authentication of bottled still water.
Also, the isotopic fingerprint of mineral waters can be used in the management of underground waters, in the
regulatory monitoring of water products.
Acknowledgements. The financial support for this work was provided by the National Plan for ResearchDevelopment and Innovation, Programme NUCLEI, contract no. PN09 44 01 09.

S5 P32
METHODS FOR IMPROVING TEM CONTRAST IN BIOLOGICAL SECTIONS ANALYSIS
C.STEFANOV, V.CIUPINA, G.PRODAN, I.M.OANCEA-STANESCU
Ovidius University of Constanta, Bd. Mamaia nr.124, 900527 Constanta, Romania
This paper work presents possible options for people that operate with electronic microscope in order to obtain
images with enhanced resolution and contrast for experiments in biology domain. Diagnostic Study of the cases
is related to the accurate identification of cellular components, their position in the cell, tissue or the plasma
dispersion. It is presented the method of acquisition and multiple image alignment (MIA = multiple image
alignment), to obtain an image of the area of interest inside the tissue. The choice of operating parameters such
as increasing the time of exposure and so on are directly related to the geometry of the tissue. We have
obtained an increase of contrast of 32% at a resolution of ~ 9nm using the MIA compared with images obtained
at a resolution of ~ 13nm.

S5 P33
CHARACTERIZATION OF SPIN COATED TiO2 BLOCKING LAYER FOR DYE SENSITIZED
SOLAR CELLS
Jeanina LUNGU1, Adrian GEORGESCU1, Camelia OPREA1, Gabriel PRODAN1, Gabriel SOCOL2, George E.
STAN3, Ctlin LUCULESCU4, Victor CIUPIN5, Ion N. MIHILESCU12 and Mihai A. GRU1*
1

Department of Physics, Ovidius University of Constana, Constana 900527, Romania


National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box
MG-36, RO-077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
3
National Institute of Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele, Ilfov 077125, Romania
4
National Institute for Lasers, Department of Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 111
P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest 76900, Romania
5
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor street, P. O. Box MG-11, 077125, BucharestMagurele, Romania

We report results on spin coated TiO2 intermediate blocking layer between conductive glass substrate
(FTO) and mesoporous TiO2 semiconductor in order to improve dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs)
characteristic parameters. The oxide was prepared as thin transparent film from solgel Ti(i-OPr)4 ethanolic
solution, which was spin coated at 7000 rpm on top of the FTO substrates. The basic properties of the films,
including their morphology, structure, and composition were characterized by complementary techniques.
Investigations by X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the titanium dioxide films deposited on FTO substrate and sintered
at 450C reproduce the pattern of randomly oriented tetragonal anatase TiO2 phase. The morphology of the films
investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), revealed a particulate covered homogeneous surface,
typical of PLD. The structure and crystalline status of the obtained TiO2 intermediate layer were investigated by
transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our analyses show that the films are composed by nanoparticles with
average diameters of a few tens of nm. We found experimentally that the solar cells denoted T8X showed the
best performance with maximum Voc as high as 611 mV and Isc of 8.27 mA/cm2. Photovoltaic conversion
efficiency, measured under standard AM 1.5G conditions, was 2.66%, compared with 2.26% corresponding to a
cell with chemically deposited TiO2 blocking layer.
*E-mail: jmatei@univ-ovidius.ro

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S5 P34
IRON CONTAINING LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES: AN XPS STUDY OF THEIR SURFACE
PROPERTIES
Magda PUSCASU, Dragos MARDARE and Gabriela CARJA*
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection,
Technical University Gh. Asachi of Iasi, Bd. D. Mangeron, Iasi 700554, Romania
* Corresponding author e-mail: gcarja@ch.tuiasi.ro
Nanostructured assemblies of hydrotalcite-like clays partially substituted with iron cations (Fe III) have been
obtained by co-precipitation method of low diluted aqueous solutions. The surface characteristics of as-prepared
nanoarchitectures were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),
whereas the textural properties using Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM image of FeLDH (Fig. 1)
reveals agglomerated nanoparticles, that are interconnected with each other. The binding energy values of Fe 2p
point out that iron is present as Fe2O3 on the surface of FeLDH. The fitting curve of O1s profile indicates that the
predominant signal contribution belongs to the energy band at 531.5 eV, assigned to the surface hydroxyl groups
(OH-). The band situated at 529.58 eV is attributed to the lattice oxygen in the metal oxide while that situated at
532.5 eV corresponds to the oxygen from water. These results reveal the specific surface characteristics of the
dual nanostructure of iron oxide on LDH clay.

Fig. 1. SEM micrograph of FeLDH.


REFERENCES:
1. G. Carja, H. Obata, Y. Kameshima and K. Okada, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 98 (2008) 150.

S5 P35
A SURVEY ON STATE-OF-THE-ART DESIGN OF UNDERWATER SENSOR NETWORKS AND
OPTIMAL LOCATION DEPLOYMENT AROUND OFFSHORE STRUCTURES
Mitrut C. CARAIVAN 1, Ioan G. SURUGIU 2, Valentin G. SGARCIU 3
University "Politehnica" of Bucharest, Romania 1, University "Ovidius" of Constanta, Romania 2, University
"Politehnica" of Bucharest, Romania 3
caraivanmitrut@gmail.com 1, nesurugiu@gmail.com 2, vsgarciu@aii.pub.ro 3
This paper is following the development of the PhD research of Optimizing Real-Time
Applications for Marine Operations Using Modern Modelling and Simulation Methods and presents a common
framework model for multi-purpose sensors for offshore exploration constructions and furthermore, deployment
challenges using remote operated vehicles (ROV).
Research efforts in the exploration of offshore resources have increased more and more during the
last decades, thus contributing to greater global interest in the area of underwater technologies. Underwater
sensor networks are going to become in the nearby future the background infrastructure for applications which
will enable geological prospection, pollution monitoring, oceanographic data collection and furthermore, these

Section 5 ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL PHYSICS

147

data collection networks could in fact improve offshore exploration control by replacing on-site instrumentation
data systems used today in the oil-industry system nearby well heads or in well control operations. The study is
trying to show the collateral benefits of deploying such underwater sensor networks and we address state-of-theart ideas and possible implementations of different applications like military surveillance of coastal areas or
disaster prevention systems including earthquakes and tsunami detection warning alarm in advance in order
to overcome the biggest challenge of development: the cost of implementation.
We are going to use PerrySlingsby Triton XLS and XLR models of the remote operated vehicles
(ROV), which are currently available in the Black Sea area. While having the bigger goal in mind - deploying
such networks on a large scale - we can only think now for a small test bed and before physical implementation
we create simulation scenarios on the VMAX ROV Simulator.

Fig.1: Underwater device deployment ; Fig. 2, 3: Triton XLS ROV in VMAX simulation scenarios ; Fig. 3, 4:
Schilling Robotics 7-F Arm
This is only an abstract and we need a little bit more time to implement and test our solutions via
simulation on our VMAX PerrySlingsby ROV Full-Up Simulator. Please consider this abstract submission and
we will send the camera ready article, which will address several fundamental key aspects of modeling and
simulating the deployment of our underwater "safe-nets". This is a work in progress of a research PhD thesis that
will follow shortly.

148

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

SECTION
S6 Topics in Physics Education Research
Physics curriculum design
Active learning techniques
Classroom teaching, demonstrations and laboratory experiments

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

149

INVITED LECTURES
S6 L01
REFORMING PRE-UNIVERSITY PHYSICS TEACHING
Roxana ZUS
University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, RO 077125 Bucharest-Magurele,
Romania
Apart its fundamental role as science and its leading character in the continuous developing technology,
physics provides important instruments that form abilities to investigate and analyse various phenomena, beyond
the formal borders of physics. It is mandatory to combine the recent improvements in pedagogy and didactics
with the extraordinary tools the physics has.
The Romanian physics pre-university teaching methods had just few changes in the last decades. The
traditional approach continues to be efficient for outstanding pupils/students, but in many cases it fails when
related to the knowledge and abilities formed to average pupils or high-school students. Physics remains a
challenging topic to teach and pupils view it sometimes as too difficult to even try to understand it. One needs to
adapt the teaching approach to the real life experience of pupils and to employ instructing techniques that attract
and motivate them.
Over one hundred physics teachers from different regions of Romania have voluntarily worked in
designing a methodological guide for teaching physics in schools and high-schools. Their joined effort was
backed up by academic colleagues for scientific support. The guide uses teaching/ learning techniques centred on
pupils to encourage active learning and critical thinking (namely ERR, Evocation Realization of meaning
Reflection, and cycled learning models). It proposes different learning tasks for pupils, for each topic studied in
physics from the 6th grade to the 12th. Many of the experiments use inexpensive and near at hand materials, to
overtake the lack of experimental laboratories. We hope the guide can be a starting support for physics teachers
and we encourage them to design alternative lessons to the ones proposed in this guide, according to each
individual and to the class they teach to.
All the units of the methodological guide have been taught in different schools and high-schools all
over the country. The extraordinary feed-back we gathered from both, pupils and teachers, but also the results of
an independent evaluation encouraged us to continue to further develop the project.
There are many ongoing challenges where physics pre-university teachers and academic staff continue
to work together: novel approaches for fundamental or difficult topics to teach, evaluating methods according to
the teaching methods proposed, challenging tasks for very good students, up-to-date topics in modern physics
etc.
Acknowledgments: Science Curriculum Reform is a project coordinated by Center Education 2000+
in partnership with Romanian Physical Society and supported by the Romanian-American Foundation.

S6 L02
RELEVANCE OF CONCEPTUAL CONFLICTS IN PRE-UNIVERSITARY PHYSISCS TEACHING
Cristian HATU
Center Education 2000+, 27 Comandor Eugen Botez Street, Bucharest, Romania
In developing our methodological guide for teaching physics we relied on some important facts. Based on some
papers1 I will try to explain why students dont learn what teachers are trying to teach them.
Our institutions of formal education do not help most students to really learn science. Students fail to learn what
we try to teach them because they come to school with alternative conceptual frameworks that shape their
perceptions and interpretations. They are coming in the classroom with their own ideas about matter in
discussion. Consequently, teachers have to identify students alternative framework and address them explicitly
during the teaching process.
The aim of the teachers is to give students access to a new kind of understanding about the material world that is
incompatible with students nave ideas. This is a complex process of conceptual change. In order for this
1

Based mainly on Charles W Anderson Perspectives on Science Learning, in Handbook of Research on


Science Education, Routledge, 2010

150

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

change to take place, students have to modify their conceptual framework to accommodate the more
sophisticated scientific conceptions.
Theories about conceptual changes in science (Kuhn, Toulmin etc.) are very useful for understanding these
problems because the learning process of each student resembles the complex process of theory change in
science. Successful student learning will be driven by situations of conceptual conflict like those that have driven
historical advances in scientific communities. By means of conceptual conflicts students can see the contrast
between their conceptions and alternative scientific conceptions. The conceptual conflicts have a fundamental
role in the learning units from methodological guide developed by CEDU and Romanian Physical Society.
Acknowledgments: Science Curriculum Reform is a project coordinated by Center Education 2000+ in
partnership with Romanian Physical Society and supported by the Romanian-American Foundation

S6 L03
STRUCTURED LEARNING UNITS DESIGN SUPPORTING
COMPETENCES CENTERED CURRICULUM
Iulian LEAHU
coala Gimnazial Alexandru cel Bun Iai, Romania
The paper approaches models of didactical design supporting the application in school of the competences
centered curriculum, and modeling the students competences formation processes. The first steps were realized
in 2000, by The Ministry of National Education by publishing the series Methodological guides for the
application of the school curricula 2. The Guides offer applicative examples for the school disciplines at the
pre-universitary level, in order to promote two operational concepts: learning units and structured learning
units. The learning unit engages teacher to think teaching in terms of inter-correlated lessons, as opposed to the
traditional thinking in terms of singular lesson; the second concept is going deeper, proposing structured
learning units by sequences and lessons following the phases of a learning process. If the learning units were
progressively accepted and merely formally used in the school practice, the structured learning units were
completely eluded, maintaining teaching practices centered on the structure of the content to be taught.
The paper approaches the structured learning units design from a systemic perspective3. The process
dimension of this approach supposes getting over three phases or three didactical layouts, modeling the
processes of students competences formation. They form a hierarchy. The thematic layout reveals: (1)
problematic situations significant and engaging for students; (2) epistemic solving/ knowing models validated in
the study domain. The normative layout implies to operate on: (1) learning tasks statement based on the
curricular competences; (2) learning tasks staggering following the phases of the adopted epistemic solving/
knowledge models. The formative layout reflects the internal norms and learning models, consisting of
structured ensembles of learning organizing tasks, revealing the process dimension of the competences
formation.
The product dimension of this approach, the structured learning units design, reveals the structured
didactical projects resulting at different designing levels (annual scheduling, learning units, lessons, learning
activities), by means of three categories of instruments (structuring models). These models may be identified
as components of a system. Functionally, there are external epistemic/ knowing models used in solving specific
problem situations and validated by the discipline (project, experiment, problem solving, inquiry, case study,
debate, playing role, monographic study, narrative scheme etc.). Structurally, we refer the learning models (for
example, the Galperins stage by stage formation of mental actions), viewed as chains of judgments or cognitive
processes which students are demanded to deploy and supposed they develop in the process of competences
formation. These chains are not randomly, nor guided by the learning content, but configured by the nature of
the adopted strategy to solve the problem/ learning situation (that is the steps of the cognitive model or the subproblems encountered on the way, for example, anticipative, inductive, deductive, analogical etc.).
Operationally, we refer to the instructional or teaching instruments (methods, techniques, models) derived from
the learning theories (Meyer, G., 2000), and displayed by means of instructional events. These instruments
(active learning, cooperative learning, cognitive apprenticeship, creative learning, and intelligences profile based
learning etc.) are imperative to activate the students mental functions of the competences formation. All of the
process or product dimensions - epistemic, learning, and instructional/ teaching will be reflected in the
typology of the lessons.3
2

Singer, M. . a., coord., Ghiduri metodologice de aplicare a programelor colare, MEC/CNC, Ed. Aramis,
Bucureti 2000-2002;
3
Leahu, I., Didactica fizicii. Modele de proiectare curricular, MECTS-PIR, Bucureti 2006;

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In conclusion, the paper brings clarifications and conceptual changes to promote concepts and models of
didactical design capable to operate the competences centered curriculum: understanding the single lesson as
part of a system of lessons; epistemic models validated in the study domain, generating authentic specific
competences for learning; a holistic view on both the results of learning, and the learning process to be realized;
a cyclic vision on learning and teaching, by getting over the complete processes; a closely vision on the
ensemble of curricular key competences, defining a formative profile of the didactical activity etc.

ORAL PRESENTATIONS
S6 OP01
MODERN TECHNOLOGIES BASED ON THE STIMULATION OF STUDENTS INTEREST FOR
RESEARCH AND SCIENTIFIC INOVATION IN EDUCATION
Mdlina IVNESCU, Filis OPREA, Elisabeta STAN
Under the circumstantions of the undergoing reform in the Romanian educational system, there is
frequent reference to interdisciplinarity and learning for skills aquisition. When the processess and the
phenomena studied in one education subject can be found in other subjects as well, students tend to achieve in a
difficult way the information and knowledge compressed within a subject, the information transfer being realised
quite hard. This problem could be easily overcome if Physics, Biology, ICT, Mathematics and Chemistry
teachers collaborated with regards to the aproach and the themes taught that could result in better results in the
information transfer.
The spectacular evulution of the new technology of ICT opens wide and generous teaching
opportunities for both teachers and students, their intergation into the learning process answering to multiple
necesities.
The access to written and audio-visual documents or to interactive exercises, facilitates documentation
and publishing their own productions (through blogs, for instance), as well as interpersonal comunication. This
way, they split from the traditional teaching, not only considering the materials used but also the roles played by
the teacher and the student. That is why this matches a differentiated teaching training process, which
emphasises the individuality of teaching steps and students own autonomy and becomes a decisive point in the
growth of their own motivation.
From all the active learning methods that differentiates the teaching training process, the project seems
to be the most generous one considering differentiated students approach.
Using the project method as a work strategy with students results into aquiring specific skills and using
those necessary skills in working with new technologies, students becoming more responsible, more flexible in
their communication with the others and creative in solving the tasks. Presentation of the projects capitalises the
skills aquired by the students.
The project method offers a generous framework in differentiated training of the human individual
when compared to the multitude of the active-participatory teaching methods. In order to use efficiently the
project method and to integrate every item that the PC as a resource can involve, there have to be considered as
well the stages of planning and designing the learning unit.
The planning of student centered teaching involves the use of a strategy in which the stages of the
teaching-learning-assessing process, considered as being dependent on eachother, help in reaching the
performance standards. The teacher is going to design varied assessment techniques/ instruments in order to
facilitate the training of required skills in the 21st century. The verbal appraisal the continuous comments
along with tests, questionnaires, assessment grids and checklists elaborated from criterial and objective points of
view are going to be designed by the teacher to establish the level of students understanding, in order to
measure students progress, in order to encourage constructive self-assessment and to provide opportunities in
training improvement.
The portfolio is a complex method of assessment in terms of both the performance methodology, as
well as in the holistic assessment of the results.

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152

The portfolio represents a flexible objective assessment way for each teacher according to the
characteristics and the specificity of the subject taught, as well as for a particular situation in which he/ she
wishes to use it.
S6 OP02
A POSSIBLE APPROACH TO THE DIFFICULT LEARNING UNITS
I. CAZACU-DAVIDESCU
Miron CostinHigh School, Pascani-Iasi, Romania
Within the project "Science Curriculum Reform" initiated by the Center Education 2000+, in
partnership with the Romanian Physical Society and the support of the Romanian-American Foundation, one of
its objectives was the development of a methodological guide for teaching physics, meant to change the teacherstudent relationship in classroom activity.
Starting from the physics curriculum, learning units for each class were designed on the principle of
constructivism, using mainly the methods of critical thinking.
Some of the units have been catalogued as difficult units. Design approach of these units would have to
start from the identification of the causes for which were included in this category complex content above the
level of intellectual development of students, getting the necessary mathematics beyond the level of the class, the
need for an experimental approach difficult to put into practice with the current facilities etc.
Overcoming the difficulties identified is based on the use of participatory methods, active learning
through collaboration, free or guided discovery of notions of physics, leading to a sustainable learning by
increasing students ' motivation for learning physics.
In designing units should not be neglected the student-student or student-teacher feedback, awareness
of the students involvement in the learning process, setting clear work tasks in order to achieve the objectives of
the learning methods used and the involvement of students in the design of the final assessment.
S6 OP03
LEARNING PHYSICS BETWEEN GOALS AND RESULTS
Cristina ANGHEL1, Daniela TEPES2
Ovidius Highschool Constanta, Romania1,

Ioan Cotovu Highschool Harsova, Romania2

Why do we study physics ? What is expecting the student from his/hers physics teacher? What expects
teachers from the decision makers in the field of education and from the students? What expects the employers
and the society from the young graduates?
During the last 40 years, physics as subject at school is in a continuous changing process. The number
of classes per week changed, the school curricula changed, the text books changed, the teaching methods and
techniques changed. Are those changes reaching the same target? Are those changes correlated in order to create
a coherent path?
In the last 20 years several changes in the pre-service and in-service of the teachers took place. How are
those reflected in their activity in the classroom and in the students accomplishments?
More and more initiatives and experiments in the field of modern teaching-learning-assessment
methods are in place right now. In order to create a real reform of the physics learning it is necessary that this
become a day-by-day practice. Who is doing this? What are we willing to do for that?
If we are discussing about results, we are divided between the international contests and the national
evaluations. Can we put this two in correlation? The changes in the teaching system have to lead us to better
place in this hierarchies.
This speech tries to bring in your attention few thoughts and observations resulted after many years of
activities why many students, teachers and representatives of the academic environment.
S6 OP04
PHYSICS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL - CHALLENGES AND POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
DANIELA TEPES, CRISTINA ANGHEL

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153

Liceul Teoretic Ioan Cotovu Harsova, jud.Constanta, Romania


Liceul Teoretic Ovidius, Constanta, Romania
The intellectual and emotional profile of the students changes with the society development. This is a
reality that all the teachers are aware of, but unfortunately, our educational system has not found any solution
yet. Even if there have been some improvements concerning the means and teaching methods, the contents are
still theoretical and away from the individual needs of our students and from the requirements of a continuously
changing society.
In this context, the main challenge for the physics teachers is to make the connections between the
theoretical concepts and the students personal needs, along with developing their creativity and ability to adjust
to a moving society.
The solutions for this challenge could be found in psychologist Morris Stein`s idea which says that a
society willing to develop manly the creativity, has to assure for all its members, four essential freedoms: the
freedom of studying, of exploration and investigation, of expressing personal thoughts and the freedom to be
themselves.
Only by understanding these aspects, we can ask our students to open their minds to the study of
Sciences in general and Physics in particular.
S6 OP05
PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS IN HIGH SCHOOL - A NEW APROACH
Ion BARARU
Colegiul National Mircea cel Batran, Constanta, Romania
In the last years the students and parents interest for a career in the science field became lower. The
teaching of Physics and other sciences reached a critical level: the curricula were reduced drastically, the number
of hours of teaching decreased. Yet still, the progress of society depends of the quality of the education in the
scientific field. Recently there has appeared, at a regional level, serious analysis of the state of Physics teaching
in the pre-university field. The results are concerning and the perspectives are unclear. The "Education 2000+"
Center and the Romanian Physics Society of triggered an ample process to determine the educational system to
use active methods for the teaching of Physics. This lead to the elaboration of some important materials used for
"reviving" the applied pedagogy. Formation courses were organized and new teaching methods were tested. We
can confirm that the success was remarkable.
In this material I am presenting two ideas to support the effort of those who want to run attractive
Physics classes.
The utilization of active methods determines the expansion of the didactic process on long periods of
time. The implementation of experiments (in groups or individuals), their analysis and the interpretation of their
results lead to an important win for the scientific education of the student. He begins to manifest well-structured
abilities, but in this manner of teaching the time spent with the classic instruction may be lost. The student solves
fewer exercises, even though he has solid practical knowledge. The student who learned in the classic system
knows to solve some exercises better, even though his knowledge might never help him in his life, but he does
not have practical abilities.
The evaluation of the school progress is also in continuous improvement, but the traditional evaluation
applied to the students prepared by active methods can miss performances which the student structured in the
time of his new type of teaching. I have considered useful to approach the evaluation of the school progress by
evaluation laboratory studies. I applied this method at the 9 th grade (Mechanical equilibrium center of gravity)
and at the 10th grade (Heat). I consider that the results were promising and that this evaluation method can take
the necessary amplitude once some conditions are respected.
From other perspective, it can be stated that the experiments used so far, even though they are correct
and helpful to the process of knowledge acquirement, they are sometimes too monotonous, uninteresting and
unattractive. I think that the presentation of complex or subtle physical phenomena by simple but spectacular
experiments can represent a major help for learning Physics with active and efficient methods. I conducted such
experiments which I will present by images with accompanying comments.
If more teachers will gather the products of their activities of this kind under the scientific coordination
of the RPS, I consider that the Physics teaching in our country will make another step towards its desired
comeback.

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

154

POSTERS
S6 P01
ENERGY WILLOW A SUSTENAIBLE ALTERNATIVE, ECONOMIC AND FRIEDLY WITH THE
ENVIRONMENT
Felicia BUCURA, Claudia SANDRU, Marius CONSTANTINESCU
National R&D Institute for Cryogenics and Isotope Technologies, Rm. Valcea, Uzinei Street, No. 4, PO BOX 4,
Zip Code 1000, Rm. Valcea, ROMANIA
E-mail: felicia.bucura@icsi.ro
The purpose of this work is to examine the possibilities of the energy willow for energy production. This
paper describe some characterization techniques of the energy willow, to show the energetic potential.
To named energy willow as a fuel, it is important to determine the fuel properties:
heating value;
humidity;
ash;
C, S, N, H determination.
Methods used to characterize the energy willow as a fuel:
Heating value
The most important quality of the fuel is heating value, which is determined using a bomb calorimeter.
We determined high calorific value, low calorific value and net calorific value for samples of energy willow.
Humidity content
Humidity was determined at 700C for 8h until constant mass of the sample. After that, the samples was
dried again at 1050C for 1h.
C-N-H-S-O analysis
The elementary analysis of the samples was realized on a EA Flash 2000. We used a reactor filled with
copper oxide and electrolytic copper at 9500C to combusted the samples. Also for a good separation of the gases
resulted from energy willow combustion, a porapack column and a molecular sieve 5A column.
Ash content
Ash content it was determined at 8150C for 2h.

S6 P02
WORLD FAMOUS ROMANIAN PHYSICISTS
D. RSLEANU, D. PETRE, A. DANCU, C. CATALAN-SERBANESCU
High School Lazar Edeleanu, Navodari, Romania
Within the scientific project Physics and the Computer, we conducted activities meant to make
students knowledge about the most important contributions in Physics brought by famous Romanian scientists.
In this paper we present the biography, as well the activity of the Romanian physicist Stefan Procopiu
and Horia Hulubei.

S6 P03
COMPLEXITY THEORY AND EXACT SCIENCES CURRICULA
D. IORDACHE1, 3, E. BODEGOM2, R. WIDENHORN2, V. IORDACHE1
1

Physics Department, Univ. Politehnica Bucharest, 060032, Romania


2
Physics Department, Portland State University, Oregon - USA
3
IT Section, Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest

As it is known, the continuous improvement of the advanced materials and of the intelligent devices [1]
imposes the use of Complex systems. In parallel, the progress of the scientific research and even of the scientific
education was hindered considerably in the last decades by the insufficient knowledge of the Complexity theory
[2].

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155

Despite of these findings, the rather recent changes of the Exact Sciences School Curricula acted
exclusively for their simplification and sometimes only to re-order the basic classical topics [3], which is not
sufficient, of course. In order to ensure an efficient improvement of these Curricula, it is necessary a very clear
central (pivot) idea, which can be the use of the Complexity theory elements [4] basic features of the exact
sciences trend in future. The accomplished study pointed out: a) the presence even from the first elementary
forms of some seeds of the Complexity Theory [as some notions of Numerical Analysis, Symmetry Theory,
and even of the centrality, hierarchical structures, etc], b) the necessity to strengthen in the undergraduate
academic cycle the bridges between the main Exact Sciences: (i) symmetry and similitude theory from
Mathematics towards Physics, (ii) quantum, atomic and gravitational theories from Physics towards Chemistry,
and Cosmology, respectively, (iii) amino-acids, polypeptides, etc., from Chemistry to Biology), etc.
References
1. R. Widenhorn, E. Bodegom, D. Iordache "Computational Approach to Dark Current Spectroscopy in CCDs as
Complex Systems", Sci. Bull. "Politehnica" Univ. Bucharest, 72A(4)197-208(2010), 73A(1)149-162.
2. E. Bodegom, D. Iordache Physics for Engineers, Politehnica Press, Bucharest, vol. 2 (2008), chapter 10, pp.
294-336.
3. G. Heitmann, A. Avdelas, O. Arne Innovative Curricula in Engineering education, vol. C, Firenze
University Press, 2003.
4. a) D. Iordache Complexity in Applied Mechanics and Electrical Engineering, respectively, chapter 5, pp.
103-154, 3rd volume Topics in Applied Mechanics, Romanian Academy Printing House, Bucharest, 2005; b)
R. Dobrescu, D. Iordache Complexity and Information, Romanian Academy Printing House, Bucharest, 2010

S6 P04
DIFFUSION AND OSMOSIS-IN TERMS OF PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY
Jasmina DJOKIC JOVANOVIC1, Vladimira HREPIC1, Tihomir LAZAREVIC1, Tatjana MISIC2, Marina
NAJDANOVIC LUKIC3
1

Grammar School Sabacka gimnazija, Masarikova 13, 15 000 Sabac, 2Primary school Cegar, Skolska bb,
18 000Nis, 3Primary school Desanka Maksimovic , okot, 18 000 Nis, Serbia

The phenomena such as diffusion and osmosis are studied at different times in physics, chemistry and biology
classes. A lesson designed in this way, intended for third grade grammar school students of science links the
knowledge gained in these subjects during their previous education. Using these simple experiments as an
incentive for students, we connect these science disciplines, not only in theory but also in practice. This paper
aims at an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and popularization of physics, chemistry and biology among
students, because these sciences are unfairly being neglected.

S6 P05
NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING PHYSICS IN ROMANIAN HIGH SCHOOLS
Valerica BABAN1,2, Alexandru JIPA1, Sorina LEU2
1

Bucharest University Faculty of Physics, 2Ovidius High School Constana

Nowadays is already a reality that in the context of the rapid technological developments both the
curriculum and the teaching methods in physics should be adjusted. The main aim of this paper is to present a
proposal for an updated curriculum regarding teaching of the nuclear physics in 12 th grade in high school which
is the last class in Romanian educational system. We are able also to present a new approach related to teaching
methods of this curriculum. Our work is based on activities developed during 2012-2013 school year with
Ovidius High School students.
Nuclear physics is a major component of the modern physics and from the point of view of the
education it has at least two motive to be important for our students . First it is important that all our students
know the impact of the radiations and the nuclear technologies on their lives and to have a good understanding of
the subject. Second it is obvious the contribution of the research in high energy physics field to the knowledge of
the evolution of the Universe and to the development of the new technologies including computational
technologies.

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156

In response to the challenge described above we exemplify our approach with two topics The Uranium
and its applications and From the microcosm to the macrocosm. In the first example a historical perspective
has been made starting with the uranium discovery and its first applications continuing with nuclear fission
reaction , chain reaction , nuclear reactor and some current issues like protection against nuclear accidents and
mining conservation . The cases of the Bai and Ciudanovia , two Romanian mines, has been discussed. In
the second example we intend to bring the attention to the one most challenging research topic of our days , the
evolution of the Universe, and to discuss with the students about Big Bang and Little Bang and the new
technologies developed at CERN and other major research centers.
From the methodical point of view a web-based e-Learning platform has been developed . We think
that using interactive multimedia materials, computer simulations , virtual laboratories, and exchange the
informations over national and international educational networks will be the future of the education.

S6 P06
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR EARTH PHYSICS - EDUCATION AND PUBLIC OUTREACH
ACTIVITIES
DRAGOS TATARU1, BOGDAN ZAHARIA1, BOGDAN GRECU1, CONSTANTIN IONESCU 1
1

National Institute for Earth Physics, Magurele, Romania, dragos@infp.ro

Most people are amazed to learn that an earthquake occurred today and they are astonished to discover
that earthquakes are continually occurring. In general, the public views earthquakes as unusual events that result
in cataclysmic destruction.
The National Institute for Earth Physics NIEP (www.infp.ro) is the leading institution in Romania
responsible for the earthquake monitoring of the country and basic and applied researches in seismology. One
important objective of the institute with vital impact on society needs is the improvement of the link between
research, education and training. NIEP has become increasingly active in this direction.
One example is the a strategic national educational project ROEDUSEIS (Romanian Educational
Seismic Network; www.roeduseis.ro) started in 2012 that focuses on educational and social aspects related to
earthquake risk and e-learning in Romania. In the framework of the project, NIEP in collaboration with project
partners has recently developed a complete collection of educational materials for primary, secondary and high
schools and organized the training course Teaching Geosciences in High schools for high schools teachers
aimed at providing the scientific background, laboratory practices and new ideas on earthquakes and related
risks. A network of seismographs will be set up in schools next year following to be operated by teachers and
students. It will give them the opportunity to work with scientific real data and to achieve hand-on science
activities and experiments.
Two recent initiatives, planned to be implemented through two submitted projects, have as target
museums and Hateg National Geopark (www.geopark.go.ro) as perfect places for developing informal,
educational and training activities in the field of geosciences in general and seismology in particular.
NIEP is also known as a target institution for educational school programs and events. For example in
the school week event entitle Another kind of school - 2013 more than 500 students and teachers visited the
Institute in an organized manner getting in touch with seismology and earthquake related topics guided by
qualified personnel of the institute. Also for annual events, such as Research Saloon or Earth Day, NIEP came
with new and adapted exhibitions trying to reach the public with valuable information about earthquakes and
seismicity of Romania as well as presenting Institutes important research achievements in the field.
Improving public awareness and education of the population is an essential part of mitigation of natural
risks. Starting this effort at the level of schools will certainly be a way to increase the chances of success.
Each project and action mentioned here contain one or more outcomes that will define the Vision,
Mission and Goals of the NIEP Education, Outreach and Training Strategic Plan intended to be developed and
implemented in the next four years.

S6 P07
CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME HEAT EVENTS IN URBAN AREAS IN RELATION WITH
HEALTH
Mariana Rodica DIDA 1, Maria ZORAN 2
1

University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

157

National Institute of R&D for Optoelectronics, Bucharest Magurele, Romania

Extreme heat events (EHE), characterized by stagnant, warm air masses and consecutive nights with
high minimum temperatures, represent a significant public health problem in the European countries among that
Romania. According to that general circulation models prediction of climate change and IPCC projects during
next years EHE will be exacerbated by the synergistic effects of a warming climate, urbanization, and an aging
population. Prolonged exposure to high temperatures can cause heat-related illnesses, including heat cramps,
heat syncope, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and death.
It seems that heatwaves will become more frequent and intense, especially in the South- Eastern parts of
Romania, affecting large urban areas that are not well adapted to them.
Extreme heat eventrelated mortality is characterized by temperatures and humidities substantially greater than
the mean for a specific time of year.
In fact, exposure to extreme heat is already a significant public health problem, extreme heat events
(EHE), or heatwaves, are the most prominent cause of weather-related human mortality in Europe and Romania
being responsible for more deaths annually than thunderstorms, lightning, floods, and earthquakes combined.
This paper considers major epidemiologic risk factors associated with health problems from extreme heat
exposure and discusses future drivers of heat-related mortality, including a warming climate, the urban heat
island effect, and an aging population.
As test site case is analyzed Bucharest metropolitan area during 2000- 2012 period of time. High
ambient heat during summer periods also affects human health through its effect on air pollution with particulate
matter air pollutants (especially PM10 and PM2.5). A positive association has been found between high air
temperatures and high levels of particulate matter PM10 and ground-level ozone production with an increased
evidence of their synergistically effects on human health.

S6 P08
COMPUTER SIMULATION OF ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF BIPYRIDINE- AND
PHENANTROLINE-BASED LIGANDS

Adrian TRANDAFIR, Ana Maria TRANDAFIR, Mihai GIRTU


Faculty of Physics, Ovidius University of Constanta, Constanta, Romania

Bipyridine and phenantroline are bidentate chelating ligands, which can form with ruthenium
complexes used in dye sensitized solar cells. We report results of electronic structure calculations of various
bipyridine- and phenantroline-based ligands with fused aromatic rings and N heteroatoms. We use the Huckel
Molecular Orbital Method and the routines of Wolfram's Mathematica 7.0 software and discuss comparatively
the optical properties.

S6 P09
COMPUTER SIMULATION OF VARIOUS COUMARIN-BASED DYES FOR DYE-SENSITIZED
SOLAR CELLS
Anamaria TRANDAFIR, Adrian TRANDAFIR and Mihai A. GIRTU
Department of Physics, Ovidius University of Constanta, Constanta, 900527, Romania

Coumarin-based dyes are widely used as dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells. We present here results of
electronic structure calculations of various coumarin-based dyes. Our approach is based on the Huckel Molecular
Orbital theory and exploits numerical functions of the software Mathematica 8.0. We qualitatively discuss the
optical properties and the role of various constituents, such as cyano, ethyl and thiophene groups.

158

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

S6 P10
FRICTION: A PLURIDISCIPLINARY TOPIC
Irina MARIN
Physics Department, Economic College Mangalia, Constanta, Romania
Many topics studied in school are too complex to be approached by a single field of study. To understand and
solve complex topics approach is needed in terms of combining several disciplines.
Friction is a complex process of molecular, mechanical and energetical nature which is conducted to the contact
surface of the objects. Pluridisciplinary aspect of friction derives from the interaction of different processes at the
micro and macro level contact and in the presence of relative motion. Scientific aspects of friction reveal
irreversible mechanical processes for complex effects of energy dissipation in solids and liquids materials.
Explanation of these phenomena and their application to constructive optimization are based on knowledge of
deformable solid mechanics, fluid flow, rheology, heat transfer, materials science and chemistry. The study of
friction is important, for example, in order to obtain the best possible hip prostheses so that it can restore, as
close as possible, the natural movement of the hip. Studying friction laws, the coefficient of friction and with a
pluridisciplinary perspective of this phenomenon may help improve quality of life.

S6 P11
STUDY OF SOME PERFORMANT METHODS IN PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE AND ART
Mihaela GHELMEZ (DUMITRU)1, Paul I.CONSTANTINESCU1, Cristian Ghiocel TOMA1 , Paul AGARICI2
1

Politehnica University of Bucharest, Department of Physics, Splaiul Independentei 313, 77206, Bucharest
2
Scoala de Arta, Bucharest

Taking into account the importance of the visual information in all domains, the paper presents some answers to
the question: how photonic methods can help the modern photography, both scientific and artistic. Basic
information and mathematical models concerning aquisition, processing and deliver of images, performant
devices and software are presented. Some examples, realised by authors, are analysed. They are both theoretic
and practic, for both scientific (very accurate imagistic) and artistic (personal interpretation of the reality)
purposes.
The material of the paper is subject of a Masters degree Disertation Thesis in Photonics- at the Applied
Sciences Faculty, U.P.B.

S6 P12
FIELD EFFECTS IN LIQUID CRYSTALS
Mihaela GHELMEZ (DUMITRU)1, Gabriela SAVU (CONSTANTIN)2, Cristian TOMA1
1

Politehnica University of Bucharest, Department of Physics, Splaiul Independentei 313, 77206, Bucharest
2
Petru Poni High School, Bucharest

In the frame of spreading physics phenomena explanation in high schools, we present a material concerning the
liquid crystal state of the matter and some modern applications.
Practical data and theoretical models are discussed. Some experiments with substances important for the
medicine and biology, like fatty acids and cholesterol, in physical fields (thermal, electric, optic) are described.
Structural models of the bilogical membrane were elaborated on the basis of different physico-chemical
techniques. Electronic devices and modern lasers with liquid crystals are exemplified, with the goal that students
understand and could perform future studies on this subject.

S6 P13
NUMERICAL COMPUTATION OF THE SYMMETRIES FOR THE
MECHANICAL MODELS OF FIELD THEORIES. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH
1

Afrodita Liliana BOLDEA , Costin Radu BOLDEA

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

Department of Computer Sciences, University of Craiova Romania

Department of Computer Sciences, University of Craiova, Romania

159

This paper proposes a methodical study for the Lie symmetries investigation in the case of a general 2D
mecanical model arising from field equations, with a concrete study of an astrophysics system: the 2D HnonHeiles mechanical model.
References
[1] A. Boldea, C.R. Boldea, Symmetries for a Fourth Order Partial Differential Equation, in Proceedings
of the 6th Conference of Physics TIM - 06, Annals of West University of Timisoara, Physics Series, Vol. 48,
pp.101-107, 2006.
[2] A. Boldea, Generalized Potential Symmetries for Non-linear Evolution Equations, in Proceedings of
the 8th Conference of Physics TIM - 08, Annals of West University of Timisoara, Physics Series, Vol. 48, pp. 814, 2008.
[3] G. Bluman and S. Kumei, Symmetries of Differential Equations, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1989.
[4] Martin C. Gutzwiller, Haosul in mecanica clasic i cuantic, Ed. Thehnica, 1998.
[5] M. Henon and C. Heiles "The Applicability of the Third Integral of Motion: Some Numerical
Experiments." Astron. J. 69, 73-79, 1964.
[6] N. Ibragimov, Transformation Groups Applied to Mathematical Physics, D. Reidel, Boston, 1985.
[7] P. Olver, Applications of Lie Groups to Differential Equations, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1993.
[8] A. D. Polyanin and V. F. Zaitsev, Hanbook of Nonlinear Partial Differntial Equations, Chapman
and Hall/CRC Press Company, Boca Raton, 2004.

S6 P14
MEASUREMENT OF AC ELECTRIC PARAMETERS AND EVIDENCE OF ODD HARMONICS IN A
HID LAMP
Novac Adrian HARABOR1, Ana HARABOR2, Elena Loredana HARABOR 3
1

Department of Physics, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei, 060042 Bucharest,
Romania; 2Department of Physics, Faculty of Exact Sciences, University of Craiova, 13 A. I. Cuza Str., 200585
Craiova, Romania; 3Carol I National College, Ion Maiorescu Str., No 2, Craiova, Romania
There are known the difficulties to measure the electric parameters of a HID lamp due to very high currents in
the moment of ignition that could also damage the lamp if connected directly to the public power. Using, as
ballasts, different filamentary tungsten resistances in a vacuum bulb in the circuit of a Hg HID lamp we are able
to vary the lamp power. On the other hand there is also a possibility to delay the time until the steady state is
attained giving us the opportunity to observe, by optical emission spectroscopy, the presence in the discharge
column, together with the Hg atoms and Ar atoms (as a buffer gas) the Y +, Ba+, Ca+ ions, belonging to the
emissive mixture deposited between the tungsten electrode and the W coils around it. To record in the same time
the lamp AC electrical potential, current and power we used Pasco current-voltage sensors and adequate circuits
in order to respect the limits characterising the devices (maximum of 10 V for voltage and of 1 A for current). To
calibrate the results, Leybold multimeters have been used.
We could find the lamp current using a Thevenin equivalent circuit, where the output resistance is the one
corresponding to the incandescent tungsten filamentary resistance that has a temperature dependence of the type,
R=R0(10)) and a loosing power by thermal radiation in conformity with Stephan-Boltzmann low,
URIR=T4, where is Stephan-Boltzamann constant. The thermal increase of ballast resistance in time will
compensate the lamp low-frequency negative impedance during their warm-up phase.
The electrical behaviour in time of the discharge can be explained by the decrease of the electrical conductivity
resulting from the pressure increase due to the plasma heating that is controlled by the resistive ballast
functioning as a current-limiting element. All the gas-discharge lamps stabilized by ballasts have harmonics in
the lamp current because the voltage across the discharge tube is more or less a square wave of changing polarity
every half cycle.
As the ballast determines the current, there will be odd harmonics in the lamp current too. In our case the Fourier
analysis revealed the presence of the odd harmonics in the time dependence of the electrical parameters (current
and voltage) of the lamp [1]. Finally we calculate the nth
coefficient to see they are in compliance with the international standards.
References:

160

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

[1] N. A. Harabor, A. Harabor, Harmonic distortions of the AC waveform for a Hg HID lamp, Physics AUC,
vol. 21, 30-39, (2011)

S6 P15
ONTO AN APPROPRIATE LIST OF ABILITIES OF THE CURRICULUM FOR PHYSICS
Gheorghe DUMITRESCU
Toma N.Socolescu High School, Ploiesti, Romania, meditatie@yahoo.com
The present curriculum of the Romanian school hasnt an appropriate list of specific abilities for
physics in order to teach pupils. One of the reasons which lead to this situation is perhaps the lack of the
involving of the physicists or the teachers to accomplish this task.
We provide in our paper a list of specific abilities which can match the actual textbooks and which can help
teachers to recognize in a much easier manner the way to teach physics. Therefore teachers will be able to
improve not only their method to teach but also their manner to evaluate pupils output.
This paper may be another point of view concerning the further curriculum.

S6 P16
PHYSICS AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT
Sorina Maria LEU and Valerica BABAN
Ovidius High School, Constanta, Romania
We report results of pedagogical research in teaching physics based on experiments, projects and reports. We
have started this are endeavor inspired by the book Physics by experiments and games by Luminia Chicina et
al. [1]. As the students have very different personalities and particular learning patterns we believe that the
teacher should strive to develop the various types of intelligence [2] of the pupils. The key role played by the
teacher is to discover the talents of the students and stimulate achievements based on these strengths [3].
We found that the interest in physics is significantly strengthened by the experimental work. When the
theoretical presentation of physical laws is backed by laboratory work, with demonstrations and, more
importantly, experiments that involve directly the students, teaching is the most effective. The grades obtained
by the students at tests are significantly higher and the overall students attitude towards physics is greatly
improved.
The student reports offer the pupils with difficulty in acquiring a theoretical, abstract understanding of physics
concepts an alternative way of discovering physics. We found that students with various other talents pick
various topics of physics for which they have a particular interest and connect those topics to their own areas of
expertise or concern. Students with artistic talents learn about physics by performing/presenting their work,
people with a passion for humanities learn physics by discussing the history or philosophy of science, pupils
with business skills are interested in profit making practical applications, whereas the future politicians debate on
themes of physics with socio-economic impact on society. The final grades and the perception of physics of all
these students are impressively increased by working on such projects, reports or debates. Teaching science has
started as a philosophy of nature [1].
[1] Luminita Chicinas, Fizica prin experimente si jocuri, Ed. Eurodidact, Cluj-Napoca, 2002.
[2] Florin Ovidiu Caltun, Didactica Fizicii, Ed. Universitatii Al. I. Cuza, Iasi, 2000.
[3] Daniel Goleman, Inteligenta Emotionala, Ed. Curtea Veche, Bucuresti, 2008.

S6 P17
EFFECTIV METHODS OF TEACHING PHISICS
Adriana CIOCAN
Energetic Technical High School, Constanta, Romania

Section 6 TOPICS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH

161

Especially in the last few years, the students involvement in learning in general, also in learning physics
has decreased a lot. The fact that many Romanian students have got poor results after international evaluations as
Pisa for example has determined a group of physics teachers from our country to initiate the Project Effective
Methods of Teaching Physics.
The goal/role of this project is to teach physics using efficient and interactive methods and strategies,
starting with the concrete experiments and then teaching the theoretical lessons, in order to understand the
physical phenomenons from our nature and our everyday life. The project poster underlines this interactive way
of teaching physics and also the necessity of using these modern approaches and strategies on the national lavel

INDEX

162

A
ABBARCHI M. S5 L02
AGARICI Paul S6 P11
AIRINEI Anton S1 P17 S1 P18
ALEXANDRU H.V S1 P39.S1 P32 S1 L03
ALEXANDRU Mihaela S1 P23
AMO V. A. S5 L02
ANDRICIOAEI Ioan S5 L13
ANGELESCU N. S5 P27
ANGHEL Cristina S6 OP03 S6 OP04
ANTOHE S. S1 L02S1 O05 S1 P06 S1 P12 S1
P31
APETREI Marius S5 P21
ARGINTARU Danut S3 OP5
ATITOAIE Alexandru S1 P22
ATTARZADEH Amin S3 P01

BREAZU C. S4 P12
BUCURA Felicia S6 P01
BUCURICA A. S5 P09
BUDACA R. S3 OP3
BUGANU P. S3 OP2
BUHACEANU R. S5 P09
BUNOIU M. S1 L09
BUNU Liviu Octavian S5 P20
BURDUCEA I. S3 P04
BURNETE Eleonora S1 P31
BURKOV Vilma S2 L05
BURUIANA Emil C. S2 P04
BURUIANA Tinca S2 P04
BURZO E.S1 L01
BUSUIOC C. S1 P39
BUTE O. S5 L06

B
BABAN Valerica S3 P02 S6 P05 S6 P16
BACSEI Raluca S1 P32
BADICA P. S1 O06
BAIA Lucian S1 L11
BAIA Monica S1 L11
BALABANSKI Dimiter L. S0 02
BALACEANU M. S2 L03 S2 P07
BALAZ Antun S4 L03
BALOG Anca-Andreea S5 P14S5 P15
BALOGH Imre S4 L05
BANCIU Gheorghe S3 P14
BANCIU M. G. S1 L13 S1 P39
BANCIU M.G.
BANCUTA I. S5 P05 S5 P06 S5 P09 S5 P27 S1
P14
BANCUTA R S5 P09 S5 P06 S1 P14 S5 P05
BANICI R. S2 L02
BARAN V. S3 L02
BARARU Ion S6 OP05
BARBU-TUDORAN Lucian S5 P14
BARLOW Roger S3 P12
BARNA Flavia S4 L06
BARQUINHA P. S1 O05
BARTOS D. S3 P11
BASCHIR Laurentiu S5 P17
BELC M. S1 L06
BELE Adrian S1 P23 S1 P24 S1 P25
BENETTI M. S0 06
BESLEAGA C. S1 O05
BESLIU Calin S3 L03
BIBIRE Livia S5 L05
BIRGHILA Semaghiul S1 P38
BLOCH J. S5 L02
BOCA Madalina S3 L04
BODEGOM E. S6 P03
BOLDEA Afrodita Liliana S6 P13
BOLDEA Costin Radu S6 P13
BONI G. S1 O04
BORMAMBET Melat S5 L07
BRAIC M. S2 L03 S2 P07
BRAIC V. S2 L03 S2 P07
BRAOVEANU Mirela S2 P01 S2 P02

C
C ENE A. S5 P09
CALINESCU Catalin Ionut S3 P10
CALTUN Ovidiu Florin S5 L10
CANNAT D. S0 06
CARAGHEORGHEOPOL Gh. S3 P11
CARAIVAN MITRUT C. S5 P35
CARAZEANU POPOVICI Ionela S1 P38
CARJA Gabriela S5 L05 S5 P34
CRUNTU George S5 L08
CATALAN-SERBANESCU C. S6 P02
CATARGIU Ana-Maria S2 P05
CAZACU Maria S1 P17 S1 P18 S1 P23 S1 P24 S1
P25
CAZACU-DAVIDESCU I. S6 OP02
CHARVILAT C. S4 P13
CHELARESCU E.D. S5 P09 S5 P29
CHEN Yuan S0 05
CHERCIU Madalin S3 OP5
CHESNEANU Daniela S3 P03
CHICEA Dan S1 O02 S4 P06
CHILIAN A. S5 P05 S5 P06S5 P09
CHILIAN Andrei S5 P29
CHIRILA C. S1 O04
CHIRU P. S2 L02 S2 P10
CHIU Greti S5 L07
CIMPEANU C. S3 P04
CIMPOCA GH. V. S5 L06 S5 P09 S5 P05 S5 P06
CIMPOESU Fanica S1 L05 S1 P26 S1 P28 S1
P29 S1 L15 S5 OP02
CIOANGER M. S3 P09
CIOBOTARU C.C. S1 L14 S1 O03
CIOBOTARU I.C. S1 L14 S1 O03
CIOCAN Adriana S6 P17
CIOCIRLAN C. N. S3 P06
CIUCA S. S4 P13
CIUPARU Drago S0 05
CIUPINA V. S1 L06 S1 P04 S1 P31 S1 P34 S1
P35 S1 P37 S2 L04 S2 P08 S2 P12 S2 P15. S5
P32 S5 P33
COBRZAN Nicoleta S5 P14 S5 P15
COJOCARU G. S2 L02
COLOT Vincent S4 P11

INDEX

COMAN Tudor S5 L10


CONDURACHE-BOTA S. S5 P09 S2 P16
CONSTANTIN Angela Petruta S5 P03
CONSTANTINEANU Raluca S1 P06
CONSTANTINESCU Paul I. S6 P11
CONSTANTINESCU Eliodor S3 OP5
CONSTANTINESCU Marius S6 P01
CONTULOV M S2 L04 S1 L06 S2 P11 S2 P14
COSMA Constatin S3 P14
COTIRLAN-SIMIONIUC Costel S5 P01
COVEI Drago-Ptru S4 P02
CRACIUN Dana S4 P05
CRACIUN Gabriela S1 P08 S1 P09 S1 P10 S1 P11
CRACIUN L. S. S3 P04 S3 P05
CRACIUN Liviu Stefan S5 P30
CRACIUN Valentin S1 P05
CRISTEA Gabriela S4 P01 S5 P31
CRISTESCU C.P. S4 P04
CRISTESCU Cristina M. S4 P04
CRISTESCU R. S4 P12
CUCU-MAN S S5 P09.
CULICOV O. S5 P05S5 P09
D
DANCIU Virginia S1 L11
DANCU A. S6 P02
DNIL O. S2 P17
DNIOR Alin S5 L08
DANNENMAYER K. S2 L01
DARTU Laura S5 L05
DASCALU Traian S5 L01
DAVID-RUS Diana S4 P11
DEACU Daniela S5 L08
DI PIETRANTONIO F. S0 06
DIDA Mariana Rodica S6 P07
DIMA Bogdan S4 L06
DIMA G. S5 P09
DIMA tefana Maria S4 L06
DINCA V. S0 06
DINCA V. S1 L06 S2 L04 S2 P14 S2 P15
DINESCU Adrian S2 P16
DINESCU M. S0 06
DINU (CUCO) Alexandra S3 P14
DINU M. S2 L03
DITTMAR T. S2 P09
DJOKIC JOVANOVIC Jasmina S6 P04
DOBRESCU R. S4 P03
DOBRIN R. I. S3 P06
DOERNER R. S2 P09
DOGARU GH. S3 P07
DORCIOMAN G S4 P12.
DOROFTEI C. S1 P15 S5 OP01
DRAGOLICI F. S3 P07 S3 P08
DRAGOMIR Florin S5 P18 S5 P19 S5 P20
DRAGOMIR Otilia Elena S5 P18 S5 P19
DRAGUSIN Mitica S5 P13
DRASOVEAN R. S5 P09
DRASOVEAN Romana S1 P36 S4 P09
DUCA Voicu S5 P15
DULAMA C. N. S3 P06

163

DULAMA I S5 P09
DUMBRAV Anca S1 P26 S5 P25
DUMITRESCU Gheorghe S6 P15
DUTA L. S4 P13
E
EDGECOCK Rob S3 P12
ENACHE Irina S5 P25
ENACHESCU Cristian S1 L04 S1 P22
ENCULESCU I S1 L12
ENCULESCU M. S5 P24 S5 P28
ENE Antoaneta S5 L11 S5 P08 S5 P11 S5 P12
EPURE T-D. S1 L06
EPURESCU George S2 P04
EUGENIU V. S1 P04
F
FERARU I. S2 L02
FERBINTEANU Marilena S1 L05 S1 L15 S1 P28
S1 P40 S1 P41 S5 OP02
FERRIER L. S5 L02
FILIPESCU Dan S3 L01
FLAYAC H. S5 L02
FLORESCU Viorica S3 L04
FORTUNATO E. S1 O05
FRANTZESKAKIS D. J. S0 03
FRECHE M. S4 P13
FRECU Bogdan S1 L15 S1 P28
FRONTASYEVA Marina V. S5 P08 S5 P09
G
GALATANU M. S5 P28. S1 L12 S5 P24
GALATANU A. S1 L12 S5 P24 S5 P28
GALCA A.C S1 O04 S1 O05 S1 P05 S1 P21 S1
L08
GALOPIN E. S5 L02
GANEA Constantin Paul S1 L03
GEORGESCU Adrian S5 P25 S5 P21 S5 P33
GEORGESCU Lucian S4 P07 S4 P08 S5 P26
GEORGESCU Serban S1 P01 S1 P02
GEORGESCU tefan S4 P15
GHEBOIANU A S5 P09 S5 P05 S5 P06 S1 P14
GHELMEZ (DUMITRU) Mihaela S6 P11 S6 P12
GHEORGHIES Constantin S5 P08
GHICA C. S1 O04
GHICA D.V. S5 P02
GHITA Dan Gabriel S3 P10
GHITA I. S1 P20
GHITA Rodica S5 P01
GHITULETE C. S2 P12
GIRTAN Mihaela S1 P12
GRU Mihai A S5 P25 S1 L15. S1 P26 S1 P28
S1 P29 S1 P30 S5 OP02 S5 P33 S6 P08 S6 P09 S1
P40 S1 P41
GIUBEGA Georgiana S3 OP1
GIUGIULAN (POENARU) Raluca S5 P07
GIURGIU L.M. S1 P13
GOSAV Steluta S1 P36 S4 P09
GRECU Bogdan S6 P06
GRIGORA TOMA Lucica S5 P29

INDEX

GRIGORAS Mircea S2 P05


GRIGORESCU C. S2 L02
GRIGORESCU Enric Leon S5 P04
GROSSIN D. S4 P13
GRUBER Christian S1 P18
GUGIU Marius S3 P10
H
HARABOR Ana S2 P06 S6 P14
HARABOR Elena Loredana S6 P14
HARABOR Novac-Adrian S2 P06 S6 P14
HATU Cristian S6 L02
HOSEYNI Seyed Mohsen S3 P15
HREPIC Vladimira S6 P04
HRIB L. S1 O04
I
IACOBESCU G. S2 P08
IACOMI F. S1 L10 S1 P03 S1 P07 S1 P15 S1 P33
IFTIMIE N. S1 P33
IFTIMIE Sorina S1 P12
IFTIMIE Sorina S1 P31
IGHIGEANU Daniel S1 P08 S1 P09 S1 P10 S1
P11
IGNATENKO Oleg V. S5 P08
ION I. M. S5 P27
ION Ioana S2 P04
ION L. S1 P06
ION R. S5 P05
ION R.-M. S5 P06
IONASCU L. S3 P07 S3 P08
IONESCU C. S3 P04 S3 P05
IONESCU Constantin S6 P06
IONESCU Cristina S5 P30
IONESCU Viorel S5 P22 S5 P23
IONI Gheorghe S1 P19
IORDACHE D. S4 P03 S6 P03
IORDACHE Iulian S1 P19 S1 P27
IORDACHE V. S6 P03
IORGA Ioan S5 P13
IOVU H. S1 O03 S5 L04
IRIMIA M. S1 P03
ISVORAN Adriana S4 P05
IUGA A. S1 P20
IVNESCU Mdlina S6 OP01
J
JAHANFARNIA Gholamreza S3 P15
JAMET Hlne S4 P09
JEPU I. S1 L06 S2 P08 S2 P09 S1 P04 S2 L02 S2
P10 S2 P12 S2 P13
JIPA Alexandru S3 P02S3 L03 S6 P05
JITARU Florentina S2 P04
JOHNSON C. W. S3 OP4
K
KARIMI Kaveh S3 P15
KOIKE Y. S1 O06
KOMPITSAS M. S1 P12
KOUDOUMAS E. S1 P07

164

KUDRNA P. S2 L01
KUNCSER V. S1 O04 S1 O06 S1 P20 S2 P08
L
LAZAREVIC Tihomir S6 P04
LEAHU Iulian S6 L03
LEBOWITZ Joel L. S4 P11
LEMAITRE A. S5 L02
LENGYEL Ecaterina S4 P06
LEU Sorina Maria S6 P16
LEU Sorina S6 P05
LIM Steven S0 05
LIPPERT T. S0 06
LOGOFATU Constantin S5 P01
LUCULESCU C. R. S4 P12
LUCULESCU C. S2 L02 S2 P08 S2 P12 S5 P33
LUNGU Jeanina S1 P26 S5 P33
LUNGU Mihai S5 P07
LUNGU A. M. S2 L02 S2 P10
LUNGU C. P. S1 L06 S1 P04 S2 L02 S2 L04 S2
P08 S2 P09 S2 P10 S2 P13
LUNGU M. S1 L09
LUNGULESCU Marius Eduard S1 P14
M
M. STIHI S5 P09
MACOVEI Violeta S1 P40
MAGDAS Alina S5 P31
MAGDAS Dana Alina S4 P01
MAHDIAN Behnam S3 P01
MALAESCU Iosif S5 P07 S3 P13
MALPUECH G. S5 L02
MANAILA Elena S1 P08 S1 P09 S1 P10 S1 P11
MANDES A. S1 L06 S2 L04 S2 P11 S2 P15
MARCU A. S2 L02 S2 P12
MARDARE Dragos S5 L05 S5 P34
MARIAN T. S1 L09
MARIN A. S2 L02
MARIN Irina S6 P10
MARSAN O S4 P13
MATEI Cristina S1 P01 S1 P02
MATEI Florina S0 05
MAZOUFFRE S. S2 L01
MERIGEON J. S1 P12
MICLOS Sorin S5 P17
MICULESCU F. S4 P13
MIHAILESCU I.N. S0 04S4 P12 S4 P13 S5 P33
MIHALACHE Dumitru S4 L01
MIHALACHE V. S3 P09
MINAEV Boris F. S1 P30 S5 L12
MNDRU Carmen S1 L03
MINGIREANU Florin S4 P07 S5 P26
MIROIU F. M. S4 P13
MIROIU M. S4 P12
MISIC Tatjana S6 P04
MIU L. S1 O06
MOCANU Ionut Razvan S5 P26
MOLDOVAN A.S. S5 P02
MOLDOVAN I.A. S5 P02 S5 P03
MOSCALU Florin S1 P29

INDEX

MUNTEANU Viorel S5 P11 S5 P12


MURARIU Gabriel S2 P16 S4 P07 S4 P08 S5 P26
MUSTEATA Valentina S1 P23
N
NCHESCU Miruna S4 L06
NAGY Blint Zsolt S4 L05
NAJDANOVIC LUKIC Marina S6 P04
NASTASE Silviu S1 P02
NECULAE A. S1 L09
NDA Zoltn S4 L05
NEDELCU L. S1 L13 S1 P39 S1 L03 S1 P32
NEGREA D. S3 OP4
NEGREA R. S1 O04
NEGRILA C. Catalin S1 P21 S5 P01
NEMNES George Alexandru S1 P16
NEMANU Monica R. S2 P01 S2 P02
NICA V. S1 P03 S1 P33
NICOLESCU V. S1 L06
NICOLIN Alexandru I. S4 P10 S4 L04
NICU M. S3 P07 S3 P08
NICULAE D. S3 P05
NISTOR Leona C. S1 P21
NITA C. S4 P12
NOJI T. S1 O06
O
OANCEA- STANESCU I. M. S1 L06 S5 P32
OLARIU Nicolae S5 P19
OLTEANU Liviu S5 P19
OPREA Corneliu I. S1 L15 S1 P26 S1 P28 S1 P29
S1 P30 S5 P25 S5 OP02
OPREA Adrian S5 P19
OPREA Camelia S5 P33
OPREA Filis S6 OP01
OSICEANU P. S2 L02
P
PALARIE Ion S2 P06
PALLA-PAPAVLU A. S0 06
PANA I. S2 L03
PANAIT Petre S1 L15 S1 P26 S1 P28 S1 P29 S1
P30 S5 P25 S5 OP02
PANTELICA Ana S3 P10
PAP Zsolt S1 L11
PAPP Botond S3 P14
PARAU A. S2 L03
PASUK I. S1 O04
PAVEL Nicolaie S5 L01
PAVELESCU Alexandru S5 P13
PAZARA Tiberiu S5 L09
PELSTER Axel S4 L02
PEINA Vratislav S2 L05
PETIN A. S2 L01
PETRESCU L. S1 P34 S1 P35
PETRE D. S6 P02
PETRIS M. S3 P11
PETROVICI M. S3 P11
PINTILIE I. S1 O04
PINTILIE L. S1 O04

165

PLACINTA Anica Otilia S5 P03


POLOSAN S. S1 L14 S1 O03
POPA A. S1 P13
POPA P.D. S1 P15 S5 OP01 S5 P10
POPESCU B S1 L12 S5 P28
POPESCU Emilia S5 P03
POPESCU I. V. S5 P05 S5 P06 S5 P09
POROSNICU C. S1 L06 S1 P34 S1 P35 S2 L02 S2
L04 S2 P08 S2 P09 S2 P10 S2 P12 S2 P13
PRIOTEASA I. S1 P37
PRODAN G. S1 L06 S1 P04 S1 P34 S1 P35 S2
P11 S2 P15 S5 P32 S5 P33
PRODAN M. S1 L06
PUSCAS Romulus S4 P01 S5 P31
PUSCASU Magda S5 P34
R
RACLES Carmen S1 P23 S1 P24 S1 P25
RACOLTA P. M S3 P04
Radion CHERKEZ S1 P42
RADU A. S1 P06
RADULESCU C. S5 P06 S5 P09
RADULESCU Cristiana S5 P29
RADULESCU L. S3 P11
RADUTA A. A. S3 OP2 S3 OP3
RAITA O. S1 P13
RAMBU A.P. S1 P33
RAMBU P. A. S1 P03
RAPORTARU Mihaela Carina S4 P10
RSLEANU D. S1 P04 S6 P02
RASOGA O.L. S4 P12
RATA Ionel S4 P14
RATA R. G. S3 P04 S3 P05
RATA Roxana S3 P12
RAZVAN Mocanu Ionut S4 P07
REZLESCU E. S5 OP01 S5 P10
REZLESCU N. S5 OP01 S5 P10
RIBITSCH Volker S1 P18
RISTEA Catalin S3 L03
RISTEA Oana S3 L03
RISTOSCU Carmen S0 04
ROBERT Begy S3 P14
ROTARESCU GH. S3 P08
RUSU G.G. S1 P33
S
SAGNES I. S5 L02
SAINZ Carlos S3 P14
SALA G. S5 L02
SALAMU Gabriela S5 L01
SAMOILESCU Gheorghe S5 L09
SNDOR Bulcs S4 L05
SANDRU Claudia S6 P01
SANDU S.G. S1 O06 S1 P20
SANDULESCU N. S3 OP4
SAVASTRU D.M. S5 P16 S5 P17
SAVASTRU R.S. S5 P16 S5 P17
SAVU (CONSTANTIN) Gabriela S6 P12
SCARLAT E.I. S4 L07 S4 P04
SENELLART P. S5 L02

INDEX

SERBAN N. S4 P12
SERBAN A.T. S3 P04
SERBAN Viorel S5 P04
SERIANI Nicola S5 L03
SETNESCU Tanta S1 P14
SETNESCU R. S5 P05 S5 P06
SETNESCU Radu S1 P14
SETNESCU T. S5 P05 S5 P06
SGARCIU Valentin G. S5 P35
SIMA Felix S0 04
SIMA L. S4 P12
SIMANDAN D. S3 P09
SIMION V. S3 P11
SIMONSEN Ingve S4 L05
SION A. S5 P09
SOCOL G. S4 P12
SOCOL Gabriel S1 P05 S5 P33
SOCOL M. S4 P12
SOLNYSHKOV I. D. D. S5 L02
SOPRONYI M. S4 P13
SPUNEI M. S3 P13
STAMATE Daniela S1 P26 S1 P40 S1 P41
STAN Cristina S4 P04
STAN Elisabeta S6 OP01
STAN G.E. S1 O05
STAN George E. S1 P21 S5 P33
STAN I. S1 P06
STAN M. S1 P13
STANCU Alexandru S1 P22
STANCU Cristian S2 P13
STANCULESCU A. S4 P12
STEFAN Angela S1 P01 S1 P02
STEFAN N. S4 P12 S4 P13
STEFANOV C. S1 L06 S5 P32
STELESCU Maria Daniela S1 P10 S1 P11
STERIAN P. E. S2 P17
STIHI Claudia S5 P29
STIUBIANU George S1 P17 S1 P24 S1 P25
STOICA Adrian S2 L05
STOICA S. M. S3 P06
STOICAN O. S. S2 P03
STRAMBEANU Nicolae S5 P07
STRATICIUC M. S3 P04
SUCHEA M. S1 P07
SUCIU Liviu S3 P14
SURUGIU Ioan G. S5 P35
T
TAMA Rzvan D. S5 L08
TANASA Radu S1 P22
TARCAU D. S5 P09
TATARU Dragos S6 P06
TAUTAN Marina S5 P17
TEIANU Aristofan Al. S1 P19
TEODORESCU Cristian-Mihail S1 L07
TEPES Daniela S6 OP03 S6 OP04
TICH M. S2 L01
TIGOIANU Ionut Radu S1 P18
TIMOFTI Mihaela S4 P08
TIRON V. S1 P33

166

TIRON Vasile S2 P13


TISEANU I. S1 L12
TIA Mihaela S4 P06
TIA Ovidiu S4 P06
TOADER V.E. S5 P02 S5 P03
TODORAN D. S5 P09
DOROFTEI C. S5 P10
TODORAN R. S5 P09
TOLOMAN D. S1 P13
TOMA Cristian Ghiocel S6 P11
TOMA AL. S3 P06
TOMA Cristian S6 P12
TOMA L.G. S5 P09
TOMA O. S1 P06
TOPA Catalina S4 P08
TRANDAFIR Adrian S6 P08 S6 P09
TRANDAFIR Ana Maria S6 P08 S6 P09
TRINCA Liliana M. S1 P05 S1 P21
TRINH PAVLOV S.S. S5 P09
TUDORA Anabella S3 OP1
TUDOSE I.V. S1 P07
TURCANU C. S3 P08
TUTUN .G. S1 P34 S1 P35
U
UNGUREANU R. S2 L02
URSESCU D. S2 L02
URSU Cristian S5 L10
V
VANCEA C. S1 P06
VASILE E. S1 L06 S1 P34 S1 P35 S1 P37
VERONA E. S0 06
VISAN A. S4 P12 S4 P13
VISAN Camelia S1 O01 S1 P16
VISAN Iuliana S3 OP1
VLAD Angelica S1 P17
VLADESCU A. S2 L03 S2 P07
VLADOIU R. S1 L06 S1 P34 S1 P35 S2 L02 S2
L04 S2 P11 S2 P14 S2 P15
VLAICU GH. S5 P27
VOICA Cezara S5 P31
VOICULESCU Ana-Maria S1 P01 S1 P02
VOPSON M. S1 P20
VRINCEANU N. S1 P07
W
WIDENHORN R. S6 P03
WOKAUN A. S0 06
Z
ZGAN Remus S5 L07
ZGAN Sabina S5 L07
ZAHARIA Bogdan S6 P06
ZALTARIOV Mirela-Fernanda S1 P17 S1 P18
ZAMFIR Nicolae-Victor S0 01
ZAROVSCHI V. S1 L06
ZEVRI Leila S1 P19 S1 P27
ZGURA I. S4 P12
ZINICOVSCAIA I. MY S5 P09

INDEX

ZORAN M. A S5 P16 S5 P17 S6 P07


ZUS Roxana S6 L01

167