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Public Review: N42.

51 Draft 11-2013
Performance Specifications for
Instrumentation Systems Designed to
Measure Radon Gas in Air
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Rev. 06-01-2008

N42.51

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation Systems


Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

INTRODUCTION
SCOPE: This standard specifies minimum performance
criteria and testing procedures for instruments and/or systems
designed to quantify the concentration of 222Rn gas in air.
These are consistent but general performance criteria
applicable to the wide variety of radon measurement devices
used for indoor measurements, primarily in residential
environments or buildings not associated with the possession
or handling of radioactive materials. Also included is a
description of documentation necessary for demonstration of
compliance with this standard. This initial edition of the
standard addresses performance criteria for radiological and
environmental parameters only.
This standard does not address the calibration or other quality
assurance requirements for the use of the instruments and/or
systems, or the measurement of other isotopes of radon such
as 220Rn and 219Rn or progeny of any radon isotope. A
complementary standard, ANSI N42.50, Performance
Specifications for Systems Designed to Measure Radon
Progeny in Air, (ANSI/IEEE N42.50) has been promulgated to
address instrumentation for the measurement of radon
progeny.
Significance of Use:
This standard seeks to address needs of measurement
professionals, manufacturers, citizens, private proficiency
programs, regulators and anyone concerned with conducting
measurements of radon gas (222Rn). The specifications and
practices in this standard can be adopted as requirements for
contractual relationships or as recommendations or
requirements of a state, country, private proficiency program
or other jurisdiction of authority.
Keywords:
Radon Gas, Radon Test Devices, Radon Measurement, Radon
Metric Conversions
Conversions from English-American measurement units to the
International System of Units (SI) are included with literal
conversion or as per conventional rules for SI conversion.
Consensus Process
The consensus process developed for the AARST Consortium
on National Radon Standards and as accredited to meet
essential requirements for American National Standards by the
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has been
applied throughout the process of approving this document.
Notice regarding unresolved objections: While each
committee seeks to resolve objections, if you desire to
recirculate any unresolved objections for further consideration,
please notify the committee responsible for an action or
inaction. Notice of right to appeal. (See Bylaws for the
AARST Consortium on National Radon Standards - Operating
Procedures for Appeals available at www.radonstandards.us,
Standards Forum, Bylaws): (2.1) Persons or representatives
who have materially affected interests and who have been or
will be adversely affected by any substantive or procedural

action or inaction by AARST Consortium on National Radon


Standards committee(s), committee participant(s), or AARST
have the right to appeal; (3.1) Appeals shall first be directed to
the committee responsible for the action or inaction.
Contact information:
AARST Consortium on National Radon Standards.
Email: standards@aarst.org
Website: www.radonstandards.us
P.O. Box 2109, Fletcher, North Carolina 28732
Disclaimer: The AARST Consortium on National Radon Standards
strives to provide accurate, complete and useful information. The
AARST Consortium on National Radon Standards will make every
effort to correct errors brought to its attention. However, neither the
AARST Consortium on National Radon Standards, its sponsoring
organization the American Association of Radon Scientists and
Technologists nor any person contributing to the preparation of this
document makes any warranty, express or implied, with respect to the
usefulness or effectiveness of any information, method or process
disclosed in this material. Nor does AARST or the AARST
Consortium on National Radon Standards assume any liability for
the use of, or for damages arising from the use of, any information,
method or process disclosed in this document. It is the sole
responsibility of radon practitioners using this standard to stay
current with changes to the standard and to comply with local and
federal codes and laws relating to their practice.

Sect.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 SCOPE
2 PURPOSE
3 INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW
4 DEFINITIONS & ABBREVIATIONS
5 UNIT ABBREVIATIONS & CONVERSIONS
6.0 CLASSIFICATIONS OF INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS
Continuous Radon Monitors
6.1
Scintillation Cells
6.1.1
Pulse-ion Chambers
6.1.2
Solid-state Detectors
6.1.3
Integrating Methods
6.2
Electret Ion Chambers
6.2.1
Alpha-track Detectors
6.2.2
Electronic Integrating Devices
6.2.3
Equilibrating Methods
6.3
Gamma-ray Spectroscopy
6.3.1
Liquid Scintillation Spectroscopy
6.3.2
7.0 PERFORMANCE & TESTING CRITERIA
8.0 DOCUMENTATION
Exhibit 8-1 N42.51 Test Report
Appendix A
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Informational Supplements
INFORMATIONAL REFERENCES
A-1
N42.51 Consensus Body Participants

N42.51

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

1 SCOPE
This standard specifies minimum performance criteria and testing procedures for
instruments and/or systems designed to quantify the concentration of 222Rn gas in air.
These are consistent but general performance criteria applicable to the wide variety of
radon measurement devices used for indoor measurements, primarily in residential
environments or buildings not associated with the possession or handling of radioactive
materials. Also included is a description of documentation necessary for demonstration
of compliance with this standard. This initial edition of the standard addresses
performance criteria for radiological and environmental parameters only.
This standard does not address the calibration or other quality assurance requirements for
the use of the instruments and/or systems, or the measurement of other isotopes of radon
such as 220Rn and 219Rn or progeny of any radon isotope. This initial edition of the
standard does not address grab sampling methods, mechanical and electrical issues
related to the devices, or performance criteria for laboratory equipment that might be
used to analyze devices, such as a gamma-ray spectroscopy system for analyzing a
charcoal canister. Sampling periods of less than one hour in duration are explicitly
excluded from consideration in this standard.

2 PURPOSE
This standard provides manufacturers and/or laboratories minimum performance
specifications for their instruments or measurement systems with the associated tests that
they should perform, or have performed by a third party, to demonstrate compliance with
the standard. Such tests shall be conducted under laboratory conditions at a radon
reference facility with a Standard Test Atmosphere for Radon (STAR) as defined in
section 4. Tests conducted under conditions other than the controlled laboratory
conditions of a STAR are insufficient to determine whether the requirements of this
standard have been met.

3 INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW


In 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Indoor Radon and
Radon Decay Product Measurement Device Protocols as guidance for devices that were
to be listed in the EPAs National Radon Proficiency Program. This EPA program was
privatized in 1998. Because there remained a need for consensus standards related to
radon measurements in homes, schools and other buildings, radon mitigation,
measurement devices, quality assurance, etc., the American Association of Radon
Scientists and Technologists (AARST) created under its auspices the AARST
Consortium on National Radon Standards to promulgate a series of standards to address
these issues. This standard is one in that series. The primary aim of this standard is to
identify minimum performance criteria for devices or systems used for measurements of
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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

radon in indoor environments for the purpose of determining whether or not the home or
building should be mitigated to reduce the radon concentration below an applicable
guideline concentration. However, this standard may be useful for devices or systems for
measuring radon in other circumstances. Devices that are used to measure radon for the
purpose of compliance with federal or State regulations related to the possession or
handling of radioactive materials may require additional or more restrictive criteria than
set forth in this standard.
Hereafter, the term radon is used to mean specifically 222Rn gas and thoron to mean
specifically 220Rn gas; the term radon progeny means the short-lived radioactive decay
products of 222Rn gas, and thoron progeny means the short-lived radioactive decay
products of 220Rn gas. A complementary standard, ANSI N42.50, Performance
Specifications for Systems Designed to Measure Radon Progeny in Air, (ANSI/IEEE
N42.50) has been promulgated to address instrumentation for the measurement of radon
progeny.
This standard specifies minimum performance requirements for radon measuring devices,
as well as testing criteria for demonstrating and documenting compliance. The tests are
to be conducted in a STAR under various conditions of radon concentration, temperature
and humidity. A manufacturer or laboratory that makes or uses a device or measurement
system that is listed by a national radon proficiency program may already have results of
testing on file that could partially or fully suffice to demonstrate compliance with this
standard. For example, results of device exposures conducted in a STAR for device
evaluation, quality control (spiking), performance testing, or in some cases calibrations,
may be used to demonstrate compliance with this standard. Such exposures might not be
conducted as blind tests, yet may be used to demonstrate compliance with this standard.
Providers with multiple device types, or multiple models of the same device type, may
test more than one type and/or model simultaneously. Once a manufacturer and/or
laboratory has demonstrated that a device or measurement system complies with this
standard, the testing procedure would only be required again if a significant change, as
defined in section 4, was made to the instrument or measurement system.
The environmental conditions specified for the tests in a STAR are those likely to be
found in an indoor environment where people may live or work. The standard does not
consider outdoor or harsh environmental conditions. In this standard, the devices are
categorized in the following way: continuous, integrating or equilibrating. These
terms are defined in section 4.
This standard makes use of three different verbs, shall, should, and may, to indicate the
level of rigor with which a particular criterion is applied. For the purposes of this
standard, these verbs are defined in section 4.

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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

4 DEFINITIONS & ABBREVIATIONS


Accuracy - the degree of agreement between the observed value and the conventionally
true value (T) of the quantity being measured. The degree of agreement is often
expressed as the difference between the observed value (X) and T: (X T), or as a
percentage relative to T: (100 [X T] / T).
As Constant as Practicable The radon concentration, temperature and relative humidity
in a STAR during exposures for the determination of compliance with this standard
should be stable within the constraints of the chamber controls and the inherent
limitations of the particular STAR design and location. In addition, exposures of
longer than several days may be coincident with other exposures for which conditions
may need to be changed.
Atmosphere gas intended to be monitored or sampled for radon.
Bias systematic or persistent distortion of a measurement process which causes errors
in one direction. Bias is determined by measuring the positive or negative difference
from the conventionally true value, often as a percentage.
Coefficient of Variation (COV) the sample standard deviation (s) of a set of
measurements divided by the arithmetic mean (). The COV is usually expressed as
a percentage of the mean of the measurements by multiplying the ratio of s to by
100, or: COV = 100 (s / ).
Continuous Radon Monitor (CRM) an electronic device that records reviewable,
numeric measurements of radon concentration averaged over time intervals of one
hour or less. For the purpose of this standard, a CRM must have a minimum
detectable concentration (MDC) of no greater than 148 Bq/m3 (4 pCi/L) for a onehour measurement and have a detection efficiency (calibration factor) of at least 2
counts per hour per 37 Bq/m3 (0.054 cph per Bq/m3 or 2 cph per pCi/L).
Conventionally True Value the best estimate of the value of a quantity determined by a
primary or secondary standard, or by a reference instrument that has been calibrated
against a primary or secondary standard. For the purpose of this standard, the average
radon concentration value reported by the facility that exposes a device in a STAR is
considered to be the conventionally true value.
Conversion Convention In this standard the convention is a literal conversion with no
rounding. For example, 4.0 pCi/L is converted to 148 Bq/m3 and not rounded to 150
Bq/m3. However, if a conversion results in more than three significant figures, only
three significant figures are used. For example, 1500 pCi-d/L is converted to 1.33 x
106 Bq-h/m3.
Electronic Integrating Device (EID) - For the purpose of this standard, an electronic
radon measuring device that does not provide hourly measurements, or is set through
user options not to operate in that manner, or otherwise does not meet the
requirements of a CRM in this standard, is an Electronic Integrating Device (EID).
Further, an EID shall not display or otherwise provide results for a time period shorter
than that for which it has demonstrated compliance with the performance
requirements of this standard.
EPA the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

Equilibrating Device a detector which functions by adsorbing and/or desorbing radon


from or to the ambient air until an equilibrium is established between the quantity of
radon in the detector and the radon concentration in the ambient air.
Individual Percent Error (IPE) the degree from which a single measured value (X)
deviates from the conventionally true value (T). The IPE is calculated using the
following equation:
IPE = [100 (X T) / T]
X = Measured value (Bq/m3, pCi/L, Bq-h/m3, or pCi-d/L)
T = Conventionally true value (Bq/m3, pCi/L, Bq-h/m3, or pCi-d/L)
Integrating Device a device that records or registers information that is directly related
to the integral of radon concentration over time within the operating range of the
device.
Lower Limit of Detection (LLDCT), Counting Technology Methods the smallest net
count rate at which there is 95% confidence that a signal above background is
detected. For the purpose of this standard, and for devices that rely on counting
technology, the following equation is used (Currie, 1968):
LLDCT = [2.71/ts + 3.29(Rb/tb + Rb/ts)]
where LLDCT = Lower Limit of Detection (cpm) for counting technology
methods
ts = Sample counting time (h)
Rb = Background or blank count rate (cph)
tb = Background or blank counting time (h)
For continuous radon monitors, the sample counting time is the time spent making a
radon measurement, and the background count rate and counting time are determined
when measuring an atmosphere free of radon, such as nitrogen or aged air. For
charcoal devices, the sample counting time is the time spent counting the sample in
the laboratory. The blank count rate and blank counting time are determined from
counting a blank sample in the laboratory. For alpha-track detectors, the parameters
are defined as follows:
ts = Area of sample scanned (mm2)
Rb = Blank sample track density (tracks/mm2)
tb = Area of blank sample scanned (mm2)
Lower Limit of Detection, Noncounting Technology Methods (LLDNCT) the smallest
measure at which there is 95% confidence that a signal above background is detected.
This value is given by the equation for LLDNCT
! = !" + !"
where !" is the mean of the blank measures, !" is the standard deviation of the
blank measures, and k is a numerical factor chosen according to the
confidence desired (4.65, in this case; IUPAC Compendium of Chemical
Terminology, 2013).
Manufacturer individual or organization engaged in the design, manufacturing, or sale
of commercial instrumentation.
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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

May signifies an acceptable method or an example of good practice.


Measurement Method the combination of air sample collection system design, detector
technology, and analysis procedure, including software, used in the instrumentation to
make radon measurements.
Minimum Detectable Concentration the lowest concentration which is detectable above
background with 95% confidence. This concentration is derived from the LLD by
applying the same factors that are used to convert the sample net count rate to radon
concentration or integrated concentration. For a CRM, the LLD is divided by the
detection efficiency (calibration factor) to obtain the MDC. For charcoal devices, the
net count rate may be divided by calibration factors that take into account such
parameters as the adsorbed moisture, the duration of the exposure, the system
counting efficiency, and radioactive decay.
NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology.
Precision a measure of mutual agreement among individual measurements of the same
property, under prescribed and similar conditions. Precision may be expressed as
variance, relative percent difference, coefficient of variation, or a similar statistic that
expresses the spread of the measurements from one another.
Provider manufacturer, laboratory or other entity who submits devices for exposure in a
STAR for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with the performance
requirements of this standard.
Quality Control the overall system of technical activities whose purpose is to measure
and control the quality of a product or service so that it meets the needs of users.
Radon the specific isotope radon-222.
Report - for purposes of this standard, report is used to indicate a value of the average
radon concentration during a measurement period for which the measurement device
or system has demonstrated compliance with the performance requirements of this
standard.
Representative devices that are from the same lot, batch, model number, or other
identifying characteristics, and are identical in operation and configuration, typical of
devices made available to consumers.
Progeny one or more radionuclides that occur anywhere in the decay chain of a
specified parent radionuclide.
Shall signifies a mandatory requirement. Note: An appropriate qualifying statement
may be included in this standard to indicate if conditional exceptions are allowed. As
an example, if a specification is stated as being a should or a may and is later
followed by a subsequent shall in the same subsection, the shall applies only if
the should or may is implemented.
Short-Lived Radon Progeny the following specific radionuclides in the
chain: 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi and 214Po.

222

Short-Lived Thoron Progeny the following specific radionuclides in the


chain: 216Po, 212Pb, 212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl.

220

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Rn decay
Rn decay

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

Should signifies a recommended specification or method. It is understood that if


something this standard states should be done is not done, the manufacturer or user
shall have included in a technical basis document the justification for not doing so.
Significant change Manufacturers periodically change device user interfaces, internal
electrical components, and instrument housings, and such changes do not generally
change the methods response characteristics and are not considered a significant
change. A measurement system change requiring retesting for conformance to this
standard includes:
1. Changes in recommended measurement durations,
2. Expansion of the range of the limits of detection,
3. Expansion of the manufacturers recommended range of temperature,
pressure, or relative humidity,
4. A change in the detection mechanism and/or geometry which results in a
change in the operating characteristics of the instrument in the field or the
laboratory analysis of the device.
Standard Test Atmosphere for Radon (STAR) A standard test atmosphere for radon
(often called a radon chamber), sufficient in size and configuration, radon
concentration range, and radon concentration controls such that:
1. five simultaneous and independent measurements of radon concentration can
be conducted at the high and/or low limits of the ranges of radon
concentration (e.g., in pCi/L) or integrated concentration (e.g., in pCi-d/L),
during which time the conditions in the STAR are as constant as practicable,
2. the performance of the devices being tested is their function for measuring
radon concentration,
3. temperature, relative humidity, and radon concentration are recorded hourly or
more frequently by devices with annual NIST-traceable calibrations (or
traceable as defined below) and documented uncertainty estimates,
4. barometric pressure is recorded,
5. temperature and relative humidity are controlled to within the limits of this
standard for the particular test being conducted,
6. the uncertainty of the average radon concentration during the exposure period
is calculated using methods recommended by NIST (NIST TN-12971),
published, and reported with each exposure,
7. the STAR is operated under a documented quality management system
consistent with recognized international standards such as ISO 90002.
Thoron the specific isotope radon-220.
Traceable For the purpose of this standard, the response of an instrument or system can
be related, or traced, to a radon concentration that was derived from a certified
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) radium-226 standard. These
1

Taylor, B, and Kuyatt, C. NIST Guidelines for Evaluating and Expressing the Uncertainty of NIST
Measurement Results, NIST Technical Note 1297, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC,
1994.
2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_9000

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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

working standards of radon are usually constructed by bubbling nitrogen, aged air or
other gas through a vessel containing a certified radium solution (Ra-226 in weak
acid). By strict definition, any sealed ampoule that was purchased from NIST and
that is opened is no longer NIST-traceable. With careful handling, however, such a
solution can be transferred to another vessel while retaining its quality. At present,
NIST produces Standard Reference Material (SRM) Ra-226 solutions that may be
used to produce working laboratory standards for radon. There is no SRM for radon.
General procedures for producing these working standards are described by (NCRP
1988) and others (e.g., Sensintaffar 1990). Traceability may be achieved through
interlaboratory comparisons with a facility using standards as described above.

5 UNIT ABBREVIATIONS & CONVERSIONS


The units used in this standard, abbreviations of those units and some conversions
between traditional units and those of the International System of Units (SI) are listed in
Table 5.1.
Table 5.1 Unit abbreviations and conversions
Unit & Abbreviation

Conversion

becquerel (Bq) a unit of activity

1 Bq = 1 disintegration
per second = 27 pCi

becquerel per cubic meter (Bq/m3) a unit of activity


concentration

1 Bq/m3 = 0.027 pCi/L

becquerel-hours per cubic meter (Bq-h/m3) a unit of


integrated concentration

1 Bq-h/m3 = 0.00113
pCi-d/L

counts per hour (cph) a unit of rate of observed counts


counts per minute (cpm) a unit of rate of observed counts
curie (Ci) a unit of activity

1 Ci = 3.7x1010 Bq

hour (h) a unit of time

1 h = 60 min

liter (L) a unit of volume

1 L = 1000 cm3

minute (min) a unit of time

1 min = 0.0167 h

picocurie (pCi) a unit of activity

1 pCi = 0.037 Bq

picocuries per liter (pCi/L) a unit of activity concentration

1 pCi/L = 37 Bq/m3

picocurie-days per liter (pCi-d/L) a unit of integrated


concentration

1 pCi-d/L = 888 Bqh/m3

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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

6 CLASSIFICATION OF INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS


The minimum performance criteria and testing requirements specified in this standard are
consistent for all methods with the exception of two additional requirements for
continuous radon monitors used for measurements over one-hour intervals. These
additional requirements pertain to the detection efficiency and the minimum detectable
concentration. These requirements are discussed further in section 6.1. The following
brief descriptions of the various types of devices or measurement systems are included
here primarily as information supplemental to this standard.
6.1 Continuous Radon Monitors
For the purpose of this standard, an electronic instrument that records reviewable,
numeric values of radon concentration in air at intervals of one hour or less, and can meet
the minimum performance criteria set forth in this standard for this class of device, is
considered a Continuous Radon Monitor. With the exception of additional requirements
discussed below, this definition is consistent with descriptions of a Continuous Radon
Monitor in Protocol for Conducting Radon and Radon Decay Product Measurements in
Multifamily Buildings (ANSI/AARST MAMF 2012), Protocols For Radon
Measurements In Homes (AARST MAH 2005), and AARST/ANSI standards
promulgated in this series (currently under public review) including: Protocol for
Conducting Radon and Radon Decay Product Measurements in Homes (ANSI/AARST
MAH 201x) and Protocol for Conducting Radon and Radon Decay Product
Measurements in Schools and Large Buildings (ANSI/AARST MALB 201x). For the
purpose of this standard, a Continuous Radon Monitor is designated as CRM.
Described below are three types of CRM that differ by the mechanism used to detect
radiation from radon and/or its progeny. This standard does not exclude devices with
detection mechanisms that may vary from those described here. There are also devices
that use one of the detection mechanisms described here but are configured to produce
results over periods longer than one hour. Such devices, for the purpose of this standard,
are classified as Electronic Integrating Devices (see section 6.2.3) and not CRMs.
Measurements made during short time periods, such as one hour, are not independently
sufficient for determining if there is need for remedial action, or mitigation, of a
residence or building (ANSI/AARST MAMF 2012). Such short duration measurements
are used to supplement measurements of longer duration by helping to judge whether or
not there was some unusual occurrence, such as a severe weather disturbance or
tampering, during the measurement period that would invalidate the overall
measurement. To ensure that one-hour measurements provide results that are adequate for
such tasks, additional requirements for CRMs used to produce hourly measurements are
that such devices must have a minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of no greater
than 148 Bq/m3 (4 pCi/L) for a one-hour measurement and have a detection efficiency
(calibration factor) of at least 2 counts per hour per 37 Bq/m3 (0.054 cph per Bq/m3 or 2
cph per pCi/L). For results with less uncertainty, the calibration factor should be larger,
such as 0.432 cph per Bq/m3 (16 cph per pCi/L) or greater.
Continuous radon monitors may be affected by the temperature and relative humidity of
the surrounding air. For example, some devices require that a desiccant be used so that
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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

the air coming into the monitor is very dry. If effects of temperature and humidity on the
response of the device are significant, then some method must be used to eliminate or
compensate for the effects.
6.1.1 Scintillation Cells
This type of CRM uses a combination of a scintillation cell and a photomultiplier tube as
the detection mechanism. Air containing radon can be continuously pumped through the
scintillation cell, or alternatively radon can passively diffuse into the cell. The interior
surface of the cell is coated with zinc sulfide (ZnS). Alpha particles emitted by radon and
its short-lived progeny, 218Po and 214Po, strike the ZnS coating and cause it to scintillate;
i.e., emit weak flashes of light. The photomultiplier tube detects the flashes of light and
converts them to electronic signals and amplifies those signals so that they can be
detected as electrical pulses. The pulses are further processed by an electronics circuit
and are counted using a scaler. The number of counts detected over a specific period of
time is then converted to an average radon concentration through a calibration factor.
The calibration is achieved by exposing the CRM to a reference radon concentration in a
STAR.
6.1.2 Pulse-ion Chambers
This type of CRM uses an ion chamber to detect emissions of alpha particles from radon
and in some cases also from two short-lived progeny of radon, 218Po and 214Po. The ion
chamber typically consists of a metal cage or cylinder defining the sensing volume with
an electrode through the center. An electrical potential is applied between the cage or
cylinder and the center electrode. When an alpha particle creates ion pairs in the air
within the sensing volume, electrons are collected on the positively charged electrode and
positively charged ions are collected on the negatively charged electrode. An electronics
circuit detects the resulting electrical pulses, shapes the pulses and counts them using a
scaler. The radon passively diffuses into the sensing volume, or a pump or blower may
be used to bring air into the sensing volume. The number of counts detected over a
specific period of time is converted to an average radon concentration through a
calibration factor which is determined by exposing the instrument to a reference radon
concentration in a STAR.
6.1.3 Solid-state Detectors
This type of CRM uses a solid-state detector to detect alpha particles primarily from 218Po
and 214Po, but possibly also from radon itself. An alpha particle striking the surface of
the detector creates an electrical pulse. An electronics circuit detects the electrical pulse,
shapes the pulse and counts it using a scaler. The radon passively diffuses into the
sensing volume, or a pump or blower is used to bring air into the sensing volume.
Depending on the type of detector, it may be possible to identify the energy of the alpha
particle and thus perform alpha spectroscopy; i.e., measure the energy of the alpha
particle and thus identify the specific nuclide from which the alpha particle was emitted.
The number of counts detected over a specific period of time is converted to an average
radon concentration through a calibration factor which is determined by exposing the
instrument to a reference radon concentration in a STAR.

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6.2 Integrating Methods


This class of device stores a signal that continuously updates, in such forms as an
increasing number of counts or latent tracks, or a decreasing electrical charge, during the
exposure period. The device may be later processed or read out to produce a signal that
is representative of the radon concentration over the exposure time, enabling the
calculation of the average concentration during the measurement period. Electronic
devices in this class may produce measurements in real time or store data to be read out
at a later time. Depending on the specific device, an integrating device may be used for a
measurement duration as short as two days or as long as one year.
Some devices in this class may be affected by the temperature and relative humidity of
the surrounding air. If effects of temperature and humidity on the response of the device
are significant, then some method must be used to eliminate or compensate for the
effects.
Described below are three types of integrating devices that differ by the mechanism used
to detect radiation from radon and/or its progeny. This standard does not exclude devices
with detection mechanisms that may vary from those described here.
6.2.1 Electret Ion Chambers
This type of device uses a current ion chamber made of an electrically conductive plastic
with an electret as the detecting mechanism. The surface potential of the positively
charged electret is measured before and after the exposure to radon. During the exposure,
radon passively diffuses into the ion chamber and subsequently decays. The decay of
radon and its short-lived progeny produces ion pairs in the air inside the chamber.
Electrons are attracted to the electret and discharge it. From the surface potential
measurements before and after the exposure, and the length of the exposure, the average
radon concentration during the exposure can be calculated using calibration factors
determined through exposures of devices in a STAR. Ambient gamma rays also produce
ionization inside the chamber; therefore, the effect of background gamma radiation must
be taken into account. Electrets of different sensitivities and chambers of different sizes
can be used in combination to measure a range of radon concentration over time periods
ranging from two days to one year.
6.2.2 Alpha-track Detectors
This type of device utilizes a piece of plastic, typically of either allyl diglycol carbonate
or cellulose nitrate, inside a container typically made of electrically conducting plastic.
Radon diffuses passively into the container where it subsequently decays. Alpha
particles emitted from radon and two of its short-lived progeny, 218Po and 214Po, strike the
plastic detector and create damaged volumes or latent tracks. The latent track is more
soluble in a strong caustic solution than is the surrounding undamaged plastic material.
The plastic is etched in a caustic solution, producing tracks that are visible with the use of
a microscope. The plastic is typically scanned and the track density is determined in
terms of tracks/mm2. A calibration factor, determined through exposures of devices in a
STAR, is used to convert the track density to a value of integrated concentration in the
unit of Bq-h/m3 or pCi-days/liter. The average radon concentration during the exposure
is determined by dividing the integrated concentration by the length of time of the
exposure.
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6.2.3 Electronic Integrating Devices


For the purpose of this standard, an electronic radon measuring device that does not
provide hourly measurements, or is set through user options not to operate in that manner,
or otherwise does not meet the requirements in this standard to be considered as a CRM,
is an Electronic Integrating Device (EID). One example of an EID is an electronic device
that has a detection efficiency of less than 0.054 counts per hour per Bq/m3 (2 cph per
pCi/L) and that begins displaying average radon concentration measurements after a time
period for which the device has demonstrated compliance with the performance
requirements of this standard. Another example is a device that is capable of meeting the
requirements of this standard to be classified a CRM but is set through user options to
produce periodic measurements longer than one hour. An EID typically utilizes one of
the mechanisms described in subsections 6.1.1 through 6.1.3 to detect alpha particles
emitted from radon and/or two of its progeny, 218Po and 214Po. The detector and
associated electronics record the number of alpha particles detected as counts, and the
number of counts over a given period of time is converted to a radon concentration
through a calibration factor determined by exposure of the device in a STAR.
6.3 Equilibrating Methods
This class of device employs activated charcoal to adsorb radon from the air until a state
of equilibrium is reached between the quantity of adsorbed radon and the concentration
of radon in the surrounding air. Once equilibrium is established, radon may exchange
between the charcoal and the air. Some of the adsorbed radon may be replaced by
moisture from the air and thus the amount of adsorbed radon may decrease after
equilibrium is established. If the concentration of radon in the surrounding air decreases
once equilibrium has been established, then radon will desorb from the charcoal to
maintain the state of equilibrium. Moisture in the air competes with adsorption sites on
the charcoal; therefore, less radon is adsorbed when the air contains more moisture
(higher relative humidity). Also, less radon is adsorbed at higher temperatures.
Therefore, devices using adsorption of radon by activated carbon are subject to effects of
moisture and temperature. Device providers may need to take such effects into
consideration to meet the requirements of the standard. This class of device can provide
a good approximation of the average radon concentration during the exposure period, as
long as there are no large changes in the radon concentration during the exposure.
Depending on the design of the device, its response may be significantly influenced by
the radon concentration in the air during the last twelve hours or so of the exposure
period. Because of the half-life of radon and the time it takes for equilibrium to be
established between the adsorbed radon and the radon concentration in the air, this class
of device is typically limited to exposure durations from two to seven days. Calibration
of an equilibrating device is accomplished through exposures of representative sets of
devices in a STAR for various time periods and under various controlled and monitored
conditions of radon concentration, temperature and humidity.
Described below are two types of equilibrating devices that differ by the mechanism used
to detect radiation from radon and/or its progeny. This standard does not exclude devices
with detection mechanisms that may vary from those described here or devices that use
an adsorbing material different from activated charcoal.
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6.3.1 Gamma-ray Spectroscopy


This type of equilibrating device bases the detection and quantification of the adsorbed
radon on gamma-ray spectroscopy, where gamma rays from two short-lived progeny of
radon, 214Pb and 214Bi, are detected. This is often done using a multichannel analyzer
system and a sodium iodide detector. Depending on the manufacturer or laboratory, the
device may be in such forms as metal canisters, paper pouches, or trays containing
activated charcoal.
6.3.2 Liquid Scintillation Spectroscopy
This type of equilibrating device uses liquid scintillation spectroscopy to detect alpha
particles emitted by 222Rn, 218Po and 214Po, and possibly also beta particles emitted by
214
Pb and 214Bi, to quantify the adsorbed radon. The device is typically in the form of a
small vial or cartridge containing activated charcoal.

7 PERFORMANCE & TESTING CRITERIA


The following criteria are applicable to all types of radon devices or systems within the
scope of this standard. As described in section 3, results of testing in a STAR conducted
for other purposes could partially or fully suffice to demonstrate compliance with this
standard.
Due to the diversity of technologies addressed within this standard and the natural
limitations of each technology, the provider shall stipulate limits upon test procedures
(e.g., ranges of exposure durations and integrated concentrations) that are consistent with
literature published for consumers who will use the device(s). If exposures of shorter or
longer durations may cause interferences or other degradations of measurement
reliability, it is incumbent upon the device provider to address in its documentation how
shorter or longer durations affect the accuracy of results.
The ranges of environmental conditions specified in this standard are typical of indoor
environments. In order for a device or measurement system to meet this standards
specifications, it must meet the requirements in this section, including the requirements
for the high and low ranges of temperature and humidity.
Devices, or the laboratories analyzing the devices, shall not report (see definition in
section 4) measurement results for durations less than the time period for which they have
met the requirements of this standard.
7.1

Accuracy & Precision (Total Error)

7.1.1 Criteria

Each device shall demonstrate an Individual Percent Error (IPE) within 0 25% when
tested in a STAR for the shortest duration recommended by the provider (defined in
section 4) at a radon concentration in the range of 222 555 Bq/m3 (6 15 pCi/L), a
temperature in the range of 18 24C (65 75 F) and a relative humidity in the range of

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10% 55%, with radon concentration, temperature and relative humidity held as constant
as practicable (defined in section 4).
The precision of the devices shall be assessed using the COV of the set of five devices,
which shall be less than or equal to 15%.
7.1.2 Test for Accuracy & Precision (Total Error)

A set of at least five representative devices are placed in a STAR for the minimum period
of time recommended for use by the provider and under the conditions stated in
subsection 7.1.1, with the radon concentration, temperature and relative humidity held as
constant as practicable in the ranges stated in that subsection during the exposure period.
If appropriate, the devices may be exposed to an integrated radon concentration in Bqh/m3 (or pCi-d/L) equal to the minimum time specified by the provider times a radon
concentration in the range specified in subsection 7.1.1. As stated in the definition of as
constant as practicable (see Section 4), the conditions may vary outside of the ranges
specified in subsection 7.1.1 for exposures in a STAR of durations longer than
approximately one week.
7.2 Minimum Detectable Concentration
7.2.1 Criteria

The device shall have a Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) of no greater than 37
Bq/m3 (1 pCi/L) for the minimum measurement period recommended by the provider and
when using the procedures recommended by the provider. This criterion applies to a
measurement of at least two days in duration. As discussed in section 6.1, an additional
criterion applies to one-hour measurements made with CRMs.
For one-hour
measurements, the MDC shall be no greater than 148 Bq/m3 (4 pCi/L).
7.2.2 Test for Minimum Detectable Concentration

The basis for the MDC assessment is the count rate of an appropriate set of blanks, or the
background of a representative continuous radon monitor when measuring nitrogen or
aged air for a time period sufficient to produce a reliable estimate of device response to
an atmosphere free of radon. Device providers should calculate and report MDCs
specific to minimum exposure durations and typical processing. For devices that
measure counts, the MDC shall be calculated using the LLDCT equation in section 4,
derived specifically for methods that use counting technology. For devices that measure
something other than counts, such as a drop in voltage on an electret, the background
response and its variability is used in the alternate equation (LLDNCT). For example, the
US EPA requires that the MDC for ozone be calculated from the variability (measured by
the sample standard deviation) of the ozone analyzers response to ozone-free air (40
CFR 53.23(b)). It is incumbent on the provider (or manufacturer) to provide such
statistics in at least the level of detail as described in the Documentation section.
7.3 Linearity
7.3.1 Criteria

The difference between the average IPE of a set of five devices exposed at a low
concentration (or integrated concentration) and the average IPE of a set of five devices
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exposed at a high concentration (or integrated concentration) shall be in the range of 0


15%. The results of the test performed for the criteria in section 7.1 may be used for the
set of devices exposed to a low concentration (or integrated concentration). The
requirements for the high concentration (or integrated concentration) are discussed in
subsection 7.3.2.
As in section 7.1, the IPE of each individual measurement shall be in the range of 0
25% and the COV of each set of measurements shall be no greater than 15%.
7.3.2 Test for Linearity

A set of at least five devices shall be exposed in a STAR under the same conditions as
described in section 7.1 for the exposure at a low concentration or integrated
concentration. The results from the test in section 7.1 may be used here in lieu of
repeating the exposure for this test. For the exposure at a high concentration, a set of at
least five devices shall be exposed in a STAR under the same conditions of temperature
and relative humidity, as far as possible, used for the exposure at low concentration, but
with a radon concentration in the range of 1110 2220 Bq/m3 (30 60 pCi/L), or at least
three times the low concentration range, whichever is greater. Where an integrated
exposure is more appropriate, the exposure to a high integrated exposure shall be to a
value of approximately 10% less than the upper range recommended by the provider,
taking into account the limitations of the STAR.
The test for linearity is the difference between the averages of the IPEs from the two
exposures in the STAR. As an example, the average of the values of IPE from the
exposure at a low concentration (or integrated concentration) might be 5% indicating that
the devices are biased high compared to the STAR, and the average of the values of IPE
from the exposure at high concentration (or integrated concentration) might be -5%
indicating that the devices are biased low compared to the STAR. The difference
between the two values is 10% [i.e., 5% - (-5%)]; therefore, the linearity criterion is met
in this example.
7.4 Temperature
Radon measuring devices are typically calibrated at a temperature of approximately 21
C (70 F). If a temperature different from the calibration condition, but within the range
of temperatures generally found in indoor environments, causes the radon measurement
of the device to be substantially biased, then some manner of adjusting for this effect
should be incorporated into the method.
7.4.1 Criteria for Effect of Temperature

Each individual device shall demonstrate a value of IPE within the range of 0 25%
when tested in a STAR for a duration of time at least as long as the minimum
recommended by the provider and at temperatures in the ranges of 16 3 C (60 5 F)
and 27 3 C (80 5 F). The value of COV for each set of five devices shall be less
than or equal to 15%.
7.4.2 Test for Effect of Temperature

Two sets of at least five devices are exposed in a STAR under the conditions specified in
subsection 7.4.1. The radon concentration should be greater than 370 Bq/m3 (10 pCi/L)
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so that the measurement uncertainty due to the radon concentration itself is not large. If
appropriate, the devices may be exposed to an integrated exposure of at least 370 Bq/m3
(10 pCi/L) times the minimum time period recommended by the provider. The relative
humidity should be kept as constant as practicable to a value in the range of 10% to
55%. As far as practicable, the radon concentration and relative humidity shall be the
same during the two exposures.
7.5 Humidity
Many radon measuring devices are affected by the humidity in the surrounding air. If
the measurements from a device are affected substantially over the range of relative
humidity generally found in indoor environments, then some manner of adjusting for
this effect should be incorporated into the method.
7.5.1 Criteria for the Effect of Humidity

Each individual device shall demonstrate a value of IPE within the range of 0 25%
when tested in a STAR for a duration of time at least as long as the minimum
recommended by the provider and at a temperature in the range of 18 24 C (65 75
F) and values of relative humidity within the ranges of 15 25% and 70 80%. The
value of COV for each set of five devices shall be less than or equal to 15%.
7.5.2 Test for Effect of Humidity

Two sets of at least five devices are exposed in a STAR under the conditions specified in
subsection 7.5.1. The radon concentration should be greater than 370 Bq/m3 (10 pCi/L)
so that the measurement uncertainty due to the radon concentration itself is not large. If
appropriate, the devices may be exposed to an integrated exposure of at least 370 Bq/m3
(10 pCi/L) times the minimum time period recommended by the provider. As far as
practicable, the radon concentration and temperature shall be the same during the two
exposures.

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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


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8 DOCUMENTATION
To meet the requirements of this standard, the manufacturer shall have available upon
request a report covering the tests performed on the device model demonstrating the
attainment of the performance requirements of this standard. The report shall list the
requirements and corresponding test results described in this standard, with the STAR
information where the tests were performed and a description of how the system used to
determine the average radon concentration from the STAR is traceable as defined in
section 4. At a minimum the report of tests shall cover, as appropriate, the information
listed in Table 8.1, with:
- ranges of radon concentration and measurement duration for which the device
meets this standards requirements,
- effects of other types of radiation,
- suggested method(s) of calibration,
- effects of temperature, pressure and humidity, and shocks inherent to the
vibrations associated with the operation of handheld or hand carried equipment,
including the results of the tests specifically listed in this standard, and
- effects of radio frequency, electrostatics, electromagnetic forces and
microwaves.
In addition to these, the manufacturer shall document any other factors that affect the
performance metrics.
Not all tests must be conducted in the same STAR. Documentation of results of testing
in a STAR shall include the information in the example report shown in Table 8.1.
Formatting and order of information may differ from that shown in the example report,
but all the information must be included in order to provide the test report that shall be
made available in order to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of this
standard.

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Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


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Exhibit 8.1: N42.51 Test Report


STAR Information, including name, location, elevation, and other factors relevant to the tests:
Conditions during exposure:
Air velocity________________ (units)
Approximate ambient gamma radiation exposure rate______________ (units)
Hourly chamber conditions, including radon concentrations, and a detailed narrative describing the derivation of the
uncertainty of average radon concentrations or integrated radon concentrations for the durations used in these exposures are
provided as an attachment to this summary report. The derivation of the uncertainty estimates should be consistent with NIST
Technical Note 1297 (Taylor and Kuyatt 1994), and include the original data used in the derivation.
Device Information:
Manufacturer: _______________________________________
Unique model identifier: ___________________________
Provider (sent by):___________________________________ Photos of devices as provided to the STAR facility are attached
Description of any operations necessary to start/stop exposure: ____________________________________________
(Photos also attached, if appropriate)
Serial numbers of the devices: ____________________________________
Test Results:
ACCURACY
Accuracy (Total Error) and Precision (sec. 7.1) Requirements: Each Individual Percent Error (IPE) = 0 25% and COV <=15% for
each set of five devices when exposed for the shortest measurement period and procedures recommended by the provider.
Temperature _______ range 18 - 24 C (65 75 F)
Rn Conc __________ range 222 555 Bq/m3 (6 15 pCi/L)
RH______ range 10 55%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Exhibit 8.1: N42.51 Test Report


ANSI/AARST N42.51 Draft 11-2013

Temp

RH

Page 17 of 21

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

LINEARITY
Linearity Test (sec. 7.3) Requirements: Each Individual Percent Error (IPE) = 0 25% and COV <=15% for each set of five devices,
and the difference between the average IPE(low concentration) and the average IPE(high concentration) must be between -15% and
+15%. Note that a test in either a high radon concentration or a high integrated radon concentration is required (not both).
Low Concentration Exposure:
Temperature _______ range 18 24 C (65 75 F)
Rn Conc __________ range 222 555 Bq/m3 (6 15 pCi/L)
RH______ range 10 55%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Temp

RH

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

High Concentration Exposure:


Temperature _______ range 18 24 C (65 75 F)
Rn Conc __________ range 1110 2220 Bq/m3 (30 60 pCi/L) or at least 3 times the low concentration, whichever is greater
RH______ range 10 55%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Exhibit 8.1: N42.51 Test Report


ANSI/AARST N42.51 Draft 11-2013

Temp

RH

Page 18 of 21

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

High Integrated Concentration Exposure:


Temperature _______ range 18 24 C (65 75 F)
Integrated Rn Conc __________ , approximately 10% less than the highest integrated concentration of the range stated by the
provider, taking into account the limitations of the STAR.
RH______ range 10 55%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Temp

RH

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

TEMPERATURE GROUP
Temperature Group (low) (sec. 7.4) Requirements: Each Individual Percent Error (IPE) = 0 25% and COV <=15% for each set of
five devices.
Temperature _______ range 16 3 C (60 5 F)
Rn Conc __________ > 370 Bq/m3 (10 pCi/L)
RH______ range 10 55%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Exhibit 8.1: N42.51 Test Report


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Temp

RH

Page 19 of 21

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

Temperature Group (high) (sec. 7.4) Requirements: Each Individual Percent Error (IPE) = 0 25% and COV <=15% for each set of
five devices.
Temperature _______ range 27 3 C (80 5 F)
Rn Conc __________ > 370 Bq/m3 (10 pCi/L)
RH______ range 10 55%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Temp

RH

Device result STAR conc

IPE

COV

RELATIVE HUMIDITY GROUP


Relative Humidity Group (low) (sec. 7.5) Requirements: Each Individual Percent Error (IPE) = 0 25% and COV <=15% for each
set of five devices.
Temperature _______ range 18 24 C (65 75 F)
Rn Conc __________ > 370 Bq/m3 (10 pCi/L)
RH______ range 15 25%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Exhibit 8.1: N42.51 Test Report


ANSI/AARST N42.51 Draft 11-2013

Temp

RH

Page 20 of 21

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

Relative Humidity Group (high) (sec. 7.5) Requirements: Each Individual Percent Error (IPE) = 0 25% and COV <=15% for each
set of five devices.
Temperature _______ range 18 24 C (65 75 F)
Rn Conc __________> 370 Bq/m3 (10 pCi/L)
RH______ range 70 80%
Serial
number

Date-time
start

Date-time
end

Temp

RH

Device result

STAR conc

IPE

COV

MINIMUM DETECTABLE CONCENTRATION (sec. 7.2)


Requirement: <= 37 Bq/m3 (1 pCi/L) for measurements of the shortest duration recommended by the provider, with a minimum of two
days; for a one-hour measurement with a CRM, the MDC shall be no greater than 148 Bq/m3 (4 pCi/L). Tests to determine MDC are
run outside the STAR(s) and the individual device results, including exposure durations, original data, and the complete calculations
are provided in this report. Calculations are performed using the algorithms in section 4. The value of MDC is: _____________
(unit) for the measurement duration of ______________.

Exhibit 8.1: N42.51 Test Report


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APPENDIX A

REFERENCES

ANSI N42.17B-1989: Radiation Protection Instrumentation-Performance


Specifications for Health Physics Instrumentation-Occupational Airborne
Radioactivity Monitoring Instrumentation

ANSI Standard N42.50 - Performance Specifications for Instrumentation Systems


Designed to Measure Radon Progeny in Air

CRC Handbook on Radioactive Air Sampling Methods, CRC Press, ed: Maiello
and Hoover

IEC 61577-1 Ed 2: Radiation Protection Instrumentation. Radon and Radon


Decay Products Measuring Instruments Part 1: General principles

IEC 61577-4: Radiation Protection Instrumentation. Equipment for the


Production Of Reference Atmospheres Containing Radon Isotopes And Their
Decay Products (STAR)

IEC 61577-5: Informative: Technical Guide To Radon And Radon Decay Product
Measuring Instruments

IUPAC. Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book").


Compiled by A. D. McNaught and A. Wilkinson. Blackwell Scientific
Publications, Oxford (1997). XML on-line corrected version:
http://goldbook.iupac.org (2006-) created by M. Nic, J. Jirat, B. Kosata; updates
compiled by A. Jenkins. ISBN 0-9678550-9-8. doi:10.1351/goldbook

National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).


Measurement of Radon and Radon Daughters in Air. Bethesda, MD: NCRP.
NCRP Report No. 97; 1988 (ISBN 0-913392-97-9)

Protocols for Radon and Radon Decay Product Measurements in Homes: US EPA
402-R-92-003

Sensintaffar, E and Windham, S. Calibration of Scintillation Cells for Radon-222


Measurements at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Journal of Research
of the National Institute of Standards and Technology 95 Number 2, 143; 1990

Taylor, B, and Kuyatt, C. NIST Guidelines for Evaluating and Expressing the
Uncertainty of NIST Measurement Results, (also known as GUM) NIST
Technical Note 1297, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 1994

Appendix A
ANSI/AARST N42.51 Draft 11-2013

A- 1

Performance Specifications for Instrumentation


Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

N42.51 201x
Performance Specifications for Instrumentation
Systems Designed to Measure Radon Gas in Air

Chair: Dr Phil Jenkins (OH)


Co-Chair: Melinda Ronca-Battista
Assist Team: Gary Hodgden, BethAnne Purvis, Kelsey Wallace,
Meg Walker, Rhea Patel, Katherine Breidenbach

Stakeholder Group

Delegate

Stakeholder Group

Delegate

(Educators)
(Educators Alt)
(Non-regulated States)
(Regulated States)
(NGO Health)
(Proficiency Program)
(Federal EPA)

Jim Burkhart (CO)


Trudy Smith (MO)
No volunteer
No volunteer
No volunteer
Shawn Price (NC)
Jani Palmer (DC)

(Measurement prof.)
(Mitigation prof.)
(Home Inspectors)
(Manufacturer)
(Manufacturer Alt)
(Scientist)

Dave Wilson (TN)


Leo Moorman (CO)
Martin Smith (VA)
Rick Straub (OH)
Dave Kapturowski (MA)
Tom Voss (NM)