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CHICAGO CITATION STYLE Notes and Bibliography System for History OKANAGAN COLLEGE LIBRARY

CHICAGO CITATION STYLE

Notes and Bibliography System for History

OKANAGAN COLLEGE LIBRARY

The Okanagan College History Department requires the use of The Chicago Manual of Style’s 16 th ed. 2010 notes and bibliography system for the documentation of references in student papers. Examples of frequently used citation forms may be found in Mary Lynn Rampolla’s latest Pocket Guide to Writing in History (all campus libraries’ reference collection D13 .R295 2012). For more detailed information please refer to:

University of Chicago’s The Chicago Manual of Style, 16 th ed. 2010 (Reference Collection all campus libraries)

Okanagan College’s online subscription to The Chicago Manual of Style Online Documentation I: Notes and Bibliography http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org.ezproxy.okanagan.bc.ca/16/ch14/ch14_toc.html

Chicago Manual of Style Online – Chicago Manual of Style Quick Guide http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

Owl Purdue Online Writing Lab – Chicago Manual of Style http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/01/

Anatomy of a Footnote Footnote # Author of article Title of journal article Title of
Anatomy of a Footnote
Footnote #
Author of article
Title of journal article
Title of journal
19 Constance B. Backhouse, “Married Women’s Property Law in Nineteenth-Century Canada,” Law and History
Review 6, no. 2 (1988): 233.
Page number
Vol. #
Publication date
Issue #
 

Books

Entries typically contain the author’s full name; the book’s full title; the place, publisher, and date of publication. In the notes, include the specific page(s) on which the information or quotation appears; in the bibliography, no page numbers appear.

 

Bibliography

Corresponding Footnotes/Endnotes

Single

Glavin, Terry. A Death Feast in Dimlahamid. Vancouver:

1 Terry Glavin, A Death Feast in Dimlahamid (Vancouver: New Star Books, 1990), 106.

author

New Star Books, 1990.

 

Notes may be placed at the bottom of each page (footnotes) or at the end of the paper (endnotes). NB. While the number of the note is superscripted in footnotes, endnotes are not superscripted as in following example. 1. Terry Glavin, A Death Feast in Dimlahamid (Vancouver: New Star Books, 1990), 106.

Citing same item a 2 nd time

Not Applicable.

If you have only one source by the author, provide the author’s name and page number as in example:

2 Glavin, 108.

Citing

Glavin, Terry. Nemiah: The Unconquered Country. Vancouver: New Star Books, 1992.

If you have used more than one source by the author, provide the author’s name, an abbreviated title, and the page number:

another

source by

 

same

2 Terry Glavin, Nemiah (Vancouver: New Star Books, 1992), 78. 3 Glavin, Nemiah, 48.

author

Two

Kallet, Arthur, and Frederick. J. Schlink. 100,000,000 Guinea Pigs: Dangers in Everyday Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1933.

4 Arthur Kallet and Frederick J. Schlink, 100,000,000 Guinea Pigs: Dangers in Everyday Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics (New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1933), 47.

authors

Three

Shammas, Carole, Marylynn Salmon, and Michel Dahlin. Inheritance in America: From Colonial Times to the Present. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1987.

5 Carole Shammas, Marylynn Salmon, and Michel Dahlin, Inheritance in America: From Colonial Times to the Present (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1987), 97.

authors

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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More than

Prentice, Alison, et al. Canadian Women: A History. Toronto: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988.

6 Alison Prentice et al., Canadian Women: A History (Toronto: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988), 121-23.

three

authors

   

E-books

 

If the work is paginated, include the page number in your footnote. If the work is unpaginated, provide a chapter number or section title.

Downloaded:

Downloaded:

Andreas, Joel. Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Rise of China’s New Class. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2009. PDF e-book.

7 Joel Andreas, Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Rise of China’s New Class (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2009), PDF e-book, 61.

Andreas, Joel. Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Rise of China’s New Class. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2009. Kindle edition.

8 Joel Andreas, Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Rise of China’s New Class (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2009), Kindle edition, Chap. 2.

Online:

Online:

Boldt, Menno. Surviving as Indians: The Challenge of Self- Government. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993. http://site.ebrary.com/lib/okanagan/docDetail.

9 Menno Boldt, Surviving as Indians: The Challenge of Self-Government (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993), http://site.ebrary.com/lib/okanagan/docDetail. action?docID=10200930, 23.

action?docID=10200930.

Chapter in an edited book

Sarty, Roger. “Canada and the Great Rapprochement, 1902-1914.” In The North Atlantic Triangle in a Changing World: Anglo-American-Canadian Relations, 1902-1956, edited by B.J.C. McKercher and Lawrence Aronson. 12-47. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996.

10 Roger Sarty, “Canada and the Great Rapprochement 1902-1914,” in The North Atlantic Triangle in a Changing World: Anglo-American- Canadian Relations, 1902-1956, ed. B.J.C. McKercher and Lawrence Aronson (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), 19.

Anonymous

The Lottery. London: J. Watts, 1732.

11 The Lottery (London: J. Watts, 1732), 18.

Edition

Barzun, Jacques, and Henry F. Graff. The Modern Researcher. 3rd ed. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovitch, 1977.

12 Jacques Barzun and Henry F. Graff, The Modern Researcher, 3rd ed. (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovitch, 1977), 3-5.

other than

first

Under the

Stephenson, Marylee, ed. Women in Canada. Toronto: New Press, 1973.

13 Marylee Stephenson, ed., Women in Canada (Toronto: New Press, 1973), 261.

direction of

an editor

   

Edition

Gray, James. “Our World Stopped and We Got Off.” In The Prairie West: Historical Readings, edited by R. Douglas Francis and Howard Palmer. 2 nd ed. Edmonton: Pica Pica Press, 1992, 631-39.

14 James Gray, “Our World Stopped and We Got Off,” in The Prairie West: Historical Readings, ed. R. Douglas Francis and Howard Palmer, 2nd ed. (Edmonton:

other than

first, with

editor(s)

Pica Pica Press, 1992), 632.

More than

If you used only one volume in the series:

15 Edward Hallett Carr, The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917-1923 (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1966), 3: 170-73.

one volume

Carr, Edward Hallett. The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917- 1923. Vol. 3. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1966.

If you used more than one volume in the series:

 

Carr, Edward Hallett. The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917- 1923. 3 vols. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1966.

Book in a series

Valverde, Mariana. The Age of Light, Soap, and Water:

16 Mariana Valverde, The Age of Light, Soap, and Water: Moral Reform in English Canada, 1885-1925, The Canadian Social History Series, ed. Gregory S. Kealey (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1991), 53.

Moral Reform in English Canada, 1885-1925. The Canadian Social History Series, edited by Gregory S. Kealey. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1991.

In

Solzhenitsyn, Alexander. August 1914. Translated by Michael Glenny. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974.

17 Alexander Solzhenitsyn, August 1914, trans. Michael Glenny (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974), 110.

translation

Reprint

Westerby, Herbert. The History of Pianoforte Music. 1924. Reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1971.

18 Herbert Westerby, The History of Pianoforte Music (1924; reprint, New York, Da Capo Press, 1971), 11. Citations are to the 1971 edition.

edition

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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Articles from Journals, Magazines and Newspapers

Entries typically contain the author’s full name; the article title; the journal title; the volume number (and issue number if the pagination begins at “1” in each issue); the date. In the notes, include the specific page(s) on which the information or quotation appears; in the bibliography, provide the entire page range.

   

Bibliography

Corresponding Footnote or Endnote Reference

Journal

Backhouse, Constance B. “Married Women’s Property Law in Nineteenth-Century Canada.” Law and History Review 6, no. 2 (Fall 1988): 211-57.

19 Constance B. Backhouse, “Married Women’s Property Law in Nineteenth-Century Canada,” Law and History Review 6, no. 2 (Fall 1988): 233.

article

Journal

McClain, James L. “Castle Towns and Daimyo Authority:

20 James L. McClain, “Castle Towns and Daimyo Authority: Kanazawa in the Years 1583-1630,” Journal of Japanese Studies 6, no. 2 (Summer 1980): 269, accessed

article

 

Kanazawa in the Years 1583-1630.” Journal of Japanese Studies 6, no. 2 (Summer 1980): 267-99. Accessed March 2, 2007.

appearing

in an

March 2, 2007,

electronic

database

3

Journal

Johnson, Trudi. “Women and Inheritance in Nineteenth- Century Newfoundland.” Journal of the Canadian Historical Association 13, no. 1 (2002): 1-22. Accessed February 13, 2007.

21 Trudi Johnson, “Women and Inheritance in Nineteenth-Century Newfoundland,” Journal of the Canadian Historical Association 13, no. 1 (2002): 5, accessed February 13, 2007,

article

in an

E-journal

 
 

Cite the paragraph number [e.g., par. 16] if no page numbers are provided in a fulltext article.

Journal

Warrick, Gary. “European Infectious Disease and Depopulation of the Wendat-Tionontate (Huron- Petun).” World Archaeology 35, no. 2 (2003): 258-75.

22 Gary Warrick, “European Infectious Disease and Depopulation of the Wendat-Tionontate (Huron-Petun),” World Archaeology 35, no. 2 (2003): 272.

article with

DOI

 

doi:10.1080/0043824032000111416.

doi:10.1080/0043824032000111416.

A

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) is a unique string of numbers and letters permanently applied to the content of a

document, similar to an ISBN number assigned to a book. DOIs are typically on the first page of a journal article or are included in a database’s article information.

Book

Lutwak, Edward N. Review of The Cold War, by John Lewis Gaddis. Times Literary Supplement, March 24, 2006, 5.

23 Edward N. Lutwak, review of The Cold War, by John Lewis Gaddis, Times Literary Supplement, March 24, 2006, 5.

review

Magazine

Lang, Paul. “When Venice Saved its Grace.” BBC History, August 2006, 32-34.

24 Paul Lang, “When Venice Saved its Grace,” BBC History, August 2006, 33.

article

Newspaper

“Bull and the Gun.” Edmonton Journal, August 18, 1990,

25 “Bull and the Gun,” Edmonton Journal, August 18, 1990, G1.

article

 

G1-G2.

If

you have cited several articles from a newspaper, do not cite each article separately in the bibliography. Provide the

name of the newspaper and the date range consulted:

 

New York Times, September 1977-August 1980.

 

Reference Materials (Dictionaries and Encyclopedias)

   

Bibliography

Corresponding Footnote or Endnote Reference

Printed

Reference works are not entered in the bibliography.

26 Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. 2, s.v. “Laval, François de.”

reference

works

 

27 Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th ed., s.v. “Blake, William,” by J. W. Comyns-Carr.

28 Oxford English Dictionary, 2 nd ed., s.v. “Charivari.”

The abbreviation “s.v.” signifies the latin sub verbo, meaning “under the word.”

Online

An online reference work is cited precisely as its printed counterpart, with the addition of the date of last revision, or the access date. If the entry cites a stable URL address, include it. Otherwise, an abbreviated version is acceptable. The first example to the right includes the date of last revision and a stable URL. The second includes the date of access and an abbreviated URL.

29 Oxford English Dictionary, 2 nd ed., s.v. “Charivari,” March 2012, http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/30734.

reference

works

 

30 Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. 12, s.v. “Davie, Theodore,” accessed April 25, 2012, http://www.biographi.ca/.

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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Other

 

Bibliography

Corresponding Footnote or Endnote Reference

Unpublished

Lutz, John S. “Losing Steam: Structural Change in the Manufacturing Economy of British Columbia, 1860- 1915.” M.A. thesis, University of Victoria, 1988.

31 John S. Lutz, “Losing Steam: Structural Change in the Manufacturing Economy of British Columbia, 1860- 1915” (M.A. thesis, University of Victoria, 1988), 67.

thesis or

dissertation

Government

British Columbia. Report of Royal Commission on Matters Relating to the Sect of Doukhobors in the Province of British Columbia, 1912. Victoria: King’s Printer, 1913.

32 British Columbia, Report of Royal Commission on Matters Relating to the Sect of Doukhobors in the Province of British Columbia, 1912 (Victoria: King’s Printer, 1913), T22.

document

(published)

Interview

McVeigh, Timothy. Interviewed by Ed Bradley. 60 Minutes. Columbia Broadcasting System, March 26,

33 Timothy McVeigh, interviewed by Ed Bradley, 60 Minutes, Columbia Broadcasting System, March 26,

2000.

2000.

Personal

Do not list personal communication in your

34 Peter Russell, telephone interview by author, October 2, 2006.

communi-

bibliography.

cation

 

Sound

Bragg, Billy. “Help Save the Youth of America.” Talking with the Taxman about Poetry. Elektra B000002H40, 1990, compact disc.

35 Billy Bragg, “Help Save the Youth of America,” on Talking with the Taxman about Poetry, Elektra B000002H40, 1990, compact disc.

recording:

Musical

Sound

Douglas, Tommy. “Disallowance of Saskatchewan Legislation, 1945.” Tommy Douglas. Introduction and commentary by Pierre Berton. Edited by H.S. Lee and Laurier LaPierre. McClelland and Stewart/RCA Recording Services. T-56966. 1971. 33 1/3 rpm.

36 Tommy Douglas, “Disallowance of Saskatchewan Legislation, 1945,” Tommy Douglas, introduction and commentary by Pierre Berton, ed. H.S. Lee and Laurier LaPierre, McClelland and Stewart/RCA Recording Services, T-56966, 1971, 33 1/3 rpm.

recording:

Speech

Sound

Roosevelt, Franklin Delano. “First Inaugural Address.” March 4, 1933. Transcript and Adobe Flash audio, 18:59. Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia. http://millercenter.org/president/speeches/

37 Franklin Delano Roosevelt, “First Inaugural Address,” March 4, 1933, transcript and Adobe Flash audio, 18:59, Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia, http://millercenter.org/president/speeches/

recording:

Online

detail/3280.

detail/3280.

 

Web Resources

Cite individual web pages (the specific page or document) rather than entire websites (the collection of documents at a specific URL address). Entries should include the following elements, where available: the title or a description of the web page, the author’s name, the owner or sponsor of the site, the URL, and the date of last revision or access. For blogs, cite the author, the entry title, the blog title, and the URL. Add the word blog in parentheses following the blog title, unless the word blog appears in the title itself.

 

Bibliography

Corresponding Footnote or Endnote Reference

Web page,

“Judge Helen Gregory MacGill.” British Columbia Archives. Accessed April 25, 2012. http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/exhibits/timemach/gal

38 “Judge Helen Gregory MacGill,” British Columbia Archives, accessed April 25, 2012, http://www.carchives.gov.bc.ca/exhibits/timemach/galler

no author

ler10/frames/macgill.htm.

10/frames/macgill.htm.

Web page,

Scarborough, Terry. “Science or Séance? Late-Victorian Science and Dracula's Epistolary Structure.” The Victorian Web. Accessed June 20, 2012. http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/stoker/

39 Terry Scarborough. “Science or Séance? Late- Victorian Science and Dracula's Epistolary Structure.” The Victorian Web. Accessed June 20, 2012, http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/stoker/

with author

scarborough1.html.

scarborough1.html.

Blog Entry

Blog entries are not cited in the bibliography.

40 K. Mandla, “The Elephant in the Room: A Coda,” Motho ke motho ka botho (blog), http://kmandla.wordpress.com.

Note: If a complete first name is available, it should be provided.

 

Please consult your instructor or librarian for guidelines on website use.

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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Sample Title Page

The Sayer Trial:

Power and Justice in Rupert’s Land

John Doe History 112: Canada to 1867 Dr. Jane Smith November 19, 2012

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Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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Sample Footnoted Page

Doe 3

States. Christopher Lasch writes that “Americans took it as axiomatic, a cherished article of

political faith, that freedom had to rest on the broad distribution of property ownership.” 7

Many English liberals, influenced by republican traditions, shared this belief: in England, it

was widely held that the United States and Switzerland were structurally democratic because

of their widespread property ownership. 8 But the idealization of the independent property-

owner went deeper than a concern for material independence. It was also rooted in an

appraisal of character. According to Eugenio F. Biagini, John Stuart Mill “was committed to

peasant proprietorship on moral and political grounds.” 9 Mill

praised the homestead farmer as the model citizen

proletarian was trained to work as part of a machine, the farmer was employed from childhood in an activity fostering independent thinking and creativity, and was free from the anguish and crushing misery that affected the factory worker. 10

While the factory

The history of general opposition to the division or specialization of labour, based on its

detrimental effect on individual character formation, pre-dates the industrial revolution

among republicans. Republicans despised professional armies and politicians, which, they

argued, contributed to masculine passivity and dependence. 11

7 Christopher Lasch, The True and Only Heaven: Progress and its Critics (New York: W.W. Norton, 1991),

204.

8 Eugenio F. Biagini, Liberty, Retrenchment and Reform: Popular Liberalism in the Age of Gladstone, 1860- 1880 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), 88.

9 Biagini, 86.

10 Biagini, 86.

11 Lasch, The True and Only Heaven, 177.

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

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Sample Bibliography

Bibliography

Backhouse, Constance B. “Married Women’s Property Law in Nineteenth-Century Canada.” Law and History Review 6, no. 2 (Fall 1988): 211-257.

------. Petticoats and Prejudice: Women and Law in Nineteenth-Century Canada. Toronto: Women’s Press, 1991.

Biagini, Eugenio F. Liberty, Retrenchment and Reform: Popular Liberalism in the Age of Gladstone, 1860-1880. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Bragg, Billy. “Help Save the Youth of America.” Talking with the Taxman about Poetry. Elektra B000002H40, 1990, compact disc.

“Bull and the Gun.” Edmonton Journal, August 18, 1990, G1.

Glavin, Terry. A Death Feast in Dimlahamid. Vancouver: New Star Books, 1990.

------. Nemiah: The Unconquered Country. Vancouver: New Star Books, 1992.

Lasch, Christopher. The True and Only Heaven: Progress and its Critics. New York: W.W. Norton,

1991.

McClain, James L. “Castle Towns and Daimyo Authority: Kanazawa in the Years 1583-1630.” Journal of Japanese Studies 6, no. 2 (Summer 1980): 267-99. Accessed March 2, 2007.

http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.okanagan.bc.ca/stable/132323.

Prentice, Alison, et al. Canadian Women: A History. Toronto: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988.

Scarborough, Terry. “Science or Séance? Late-Victorian Science and Dracula's Epistolary Structure.”

The Victorian Web. Accessed June 20, 2012.

scarborough1.html.

http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/stoker/

Shammas, Carole, Marylynn Salmon, and Michel Dahlin. Inheritance in America: From Colonial Times to the Present. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1987.

Solzhenitsyn, Alexander. August 1914. Translated by Michael Glenny. Harmondsworth: Penguin,

1974.

Warrick, Gary. “European Infectious Disease and Depopulation of the Wendat-Tionontate (Huron- Petun).” World Archaeology 35, no. 2 (2003): 258-75. doi:10.1080/004382403200011

1416.

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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FOOTNOTE/ENDNOTE CITATIONS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC ENTRIES – A few tips

Provide footnotes or endnotes in the following situations:

To indicate the exact source of every quotation used.

To acknowledge indebtedness to others for opinions, ideas, or work product (e.g., statistics).

To provide authority for facts that are not common knowledge, or that the reader might be inclined to

doubt.

To provide pertinent information that would disrupt the flow of the argument if it was included in the essay itself.

Footnoting and Endnoting Rules

Notes may be placed at the bottom of the page (footnotes) or at the end of the paper (endnotes).

The names of the author(s) appear in the conventional order (first name, middle initial, last name). The title page of the work dictates whether the author’s given names or his initials are to be cited.

The first line of each note is indented. Subsequent lines are not.

Each note is single spaced. Double space (or enter a space) between notes.

If a work is cited more than once, provide a shortened reference, including the author’s last name, the title in abbreviated form, and the page number. If you cite only one source by a particular author you may omit the abbreviated title.

Sources cited in the notes must appear in the bibliography, with the exception of reference works, personal communications, and blog entries.

Bibliographies

Notes and bibliographies follow different rules. Consult pages one to four for detailed examples. The following are distinctive features of the bibliography:

The bibliography should begin on a separate page at the end of the paper (after the endnotes).

The first author of each work is listed last-name-first.

The entries are arranged alphabetically by the author’s last name (or the title of an anonymous work).

The first line of each entry begins at the left margin. Subsequent lines are indented.

When an author appears more than once in a bibliography the ditto sign for his or her name appears as a line of six hyphens followed by a period: ------.

The punctuation and style differs from the notes. Periods replace many of the commas found in note entries. Some parentheses are omitted. For books, no page numbers are provided. For articles, the entire page range is provided.

Chicago Citation Style. Notes and Bibliography.

Okanagan College History and Library Departments. Fall 2012

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