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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners

Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

SIOP Instructional Unit Plan


Measurement, Data, and Science As Inquiry
Note regarding grouping: Grouping: If grouping is an option, students that need language support will be grouped with a fellow
student that speaks the same language if possible. If there is a student that needs more academic support, that student will commonly
grouped with a stronger student to facilitate that students growth, but not always. As a form of differentiation, gifted learners will
occasionally need to be grouped together as a challenge to the student. Groupings should be flexible so that all students are held
accountable for work and so that every student has a role in the group.
Methods used to ensure engagement:
Lessons will be taught by teacher with high energy, will be primarily hands on, highly interactive, meaningful, and adapted in a way
so all students can participate and have fun.
Asssessments throughout unit will be both form and informal. (See individual lesson for specifics)
Lesson 1: Measuring Centimeters
Grade/Class/Subject: 5th Grade/Math and Science Integrated
Key Vocabulary: Data Collection, Measure, Ruler, Record:

Thematic Topic: Measurement, Data, and Science as Inquiry


Standards:
S.35.SI.4
Vocabulary can potentially be taught through explicit
Essential Concept and/or Skill: Use appropriate tools and
instruction, through an interactive dialogue, a partner activity techniques to gather, process, and analyze data. Students enhance
(Think, Pair, Share), or potentially a prior lesson could
their skills with tools such as rulers, thermometers, balances,
involve a pretest to determine which words students do not
spring scales, magnifiers and microscopes.
know, so the teacher can target certain students for
Students are introduced to the use of computers and calculators
vocabulary.
for conducting investigations.
Students use of appropriate tools is guided by the questions
HOTS: Analysis
asked and the investigations students design.
Questions scripted out for higher order thinking:
1. Can you generate or think of ways that scientists can collect L.5.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
data?
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
2. How do scientists use this data to learn?

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

L.5.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Visuals/Resources/Supplementary Materials: Rulers, The
Human Body, Teacher Drawings, Demonstration Of
Measurement
Connections to Prior Knowledge/Building Background:
1. Prior to this lesson, students will have already used rulers to record lengths. Students will have used cm. and m. to calculate volume.
2. Prior to this lesson, students already have had experience collecting different types of data.
Content Objective(s):
Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence: Content Objective Assessment:
1. Students will accurately measure
1.1 Students will then be brought to the
This will occur through the following
and record their height, wingspan,
carpet. Students will be shown the
checklist:
arm length, foot size, and hand size
lesson objectives. They will appear on
in cm without significant error.
the smart board. Well, last week we
_____Measurement for height appears to
used the scales to record weight, this
be correct.
I can statement: I can correctly measure
week we will be measuring something _____ Measurement for wingspan appears
and record height, wingspan, arm length,
different. Who has used measuring tape to be correct.
foot size, and hand size in centimeters
before? The teacher will then read the _____ Measurement for arm appears to be
objectives and the class will echo the
correct
objectives with the teacher. The teacher _____ Measurement for foot appears to be
will tell the students that scientists use correct.
a lot of different ways to collect data.
_____ Measurement for hand appears to be
The teacher will then write data
correct
collection on the board. The teacher
_____ Cm. indicated on each measurement
will then tell the class to talk to their
neighbor about what data collection
means. After the students have 30
Maximum Score: 6/6
seconds to talk to one another, the
teacher will ask groups to share what
they talked about. The teacher will
then tell the class that data is basically
a collection of facts, such as

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

measurements or numbers. Have


there ever been times when you have
collected data or someone else has
collected data about you? Teacher
waits for students to respond. Teacher
than uses these examples to engage
prior knowledge and the background of
the class. Truly, then, in the past you
have collected data in other classes.
Well, if scientists can collect data, what
are all the different ways that scientists
can collect this data? Talk to your
neighbor for a minute and brainstorm
some different ways that scientists can
collect data. The teacher will then let
some of the groups share their ideas.
The teacher will say, Scientists can
collect data using a lot of different
techniques. Scientists can make
observations or use technology that
collects data. One common way that
scientists collect data is they measure
things. The teacher will show some
pictures of tools used for data
collection on the ELMO with the word
that represents the picture.
Thermometers, MRIs, telescopes,
microscopes, cameras, and
anemometers could be displayed. I
want you to now all close your eyes
imagine scientists using these different
tools to collect data. Make a mental
image or visualize what this might look

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

like (Learning strategy). What are


some things that we can measure? The
teacher will allow students to raise
their hand and share different things
that can be measured. Within reason,
all students will be encouraged to
contribute ideas.
1.2 Well, today we are going to be taking
measurements like a scientist to learn
about our class. Today we are going to
be using measuring tape to measure our
height, wingspan, foot size, and hand
size. The teacher will then model to
the class using two volunteers to show
how to measure wingspan. The teacher
will show pictures on the ELMO that
show the different lengths they will be
measuring. The teacher will show the
students how to organize a chart where
they can record their data in their spiral
notebooks. The teacher will ask if
anyone has questions.
1.3 The students will then be put into
groups that will facilitate growth, learning,
and success. If there are any ELL students
that would benefit from being grouped
with another student that speaks there
native language, that will be done.
Additionally, if necessary, ELL students
may be given a graphic organizer to help
facilitate and organize their work. The
students will then, with their partners,
measure and record their measurements.

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

The students will be provided 10-15


minutes to accomplish this task. The
teacher will monitor, observe, and provide
scaffolding during this period. The teacher
will confirm ELL students that they
understand the key words: Data
Collection, Measure, Ruler, and Record.
When students begin to finish, the teacher
will make an announcement tell the
students that when they are done to come
to the carpet for their next directions. The
teacher will pick up the students
measurements at this point.
Language Objective(s):
1. Students will successfully write 3-4
sentences about how specific tools and
techniques are needed to gather different
types of data.

Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence:


1.4 As students arrive at carpet,
instructor informs the students of
the component of the lesson that is
specific to the language objective.
The teacher tells the students that
working individually they must
now write a short answer (3-4
sentences at least) describing the
different tools and techniques that
can be used to collect data. The
students will be given 10-15
minutes to complete this essay. As
students finish, they will be told to
do their best to think of some more
tools and techniques that they can
add to their essay. After fifteen
minutes transpires, the teacher will

Language Review/Assessment:
Assessment of language objective will be
done with a checklist:
____Student wrote at least 3 sentences
____Students work included at least two
specific tools that can be used to collect
data.
____Student shows command of the
conventions of standard English grammar,
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
Maximum score 3/3

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

pick up the short essays.


Wrap-Up/Closure: Students will be brought back to the carpet after the short answer questions are collected. Students will be shown
the lesson objectives again. They will appear on the smart board. The teacher will read these objectives and the class will echo the
objectives with the teacher again. The students will be told that it is a time for a roam and review. Students will walk around the room
and talk about one thing that they learned today. After this is complete, students will sit down again. The teacher will then ask the
students to give thumbs up if they feel they mastered the content objective. The teacher will ask the class to do the same if they have
mastered the language objective. The teacher will then ask again if anyone has questions. Based on this, the teacher will then transition
to the next content area.
Additional Features:
Preparation/Lesson Delivery
_X_ Adaptation of Content
_X_ Links to Background
_X_ Links to Past Learning
_X_Strategies Incorporated
_X_Lesson Pacing
Integration of Processes
__Reading
_X_Writing
_X_Speaking
_X_Listening

Scaffolding
_X_Modeling
_X_Guided Practice
__Independent Practice
_X_Comprehensible Input
_X_L1 Support
Application
_X_Hands-on
_X_Meaningful
_X_Linked to Objectives
_X_Promotes Engagement

Group Options/Interaction
_X_Whole Class
__Small Groups
_X_Partners
_X_Independent
__Technology
Assessment
_X_Individual
__Group
_X_Written
__Oral

Additional Strategies that could be further incorporated:


Cognitive learning strategies: establishing a purpose for the lesson, consciously making personal connections
Potential Metacognitive Learning Strategies: predicting, monitoring and clarifying, visualizing
Language Learning Strategies: breaking words into component parts, guessing and deducing, using verbal and nonverbal cues to know
when to pay attention, making logical guesses based on contextual clues
*These strategies should be taught on a case-by-case basis during independent work time or explicitly during primary lesson.
Differentiation:
Gifted learners:

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

These students will be given more challenging extension activities. For instance, they will be asked to measure different things
in other units.
These students will also be encouraged to include more detailed language and depth of explanation in their writing.
Students that need more support
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group.
These students will perhaps be directly prompted with leading questions to answer questions if they do not typically raise their
hand.
Teacher will provide direct instruction to students during the measurement lesson.
These students will be grouped with a student that may be able to assist them if necessary.
ELL students
If there are other students that speak the same native tongue, these students will be grouped with each other only if the need is
there.
If students need to use a translation dictionary, that will be available.
Academic language can be defined for these students during lesson (for instance, the word data collection)

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Example of Image that could be shown to Students to Make Data Collection More Tangible
(Taken from Clip Art in Word)
Other Potential Images: Ruler, Telescope, MRI, Video Camera, Microphone, Lab Supplies (Graduate Cylinder, for instance)

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Lesson 2: Converting Centimeters to Meters


Grade/Class/Subject: 5th Grade/Math and Science Integrated
Key Vocabulary: Convert, Meters

Thematic Topic: Measurement, Data, and Science as Inquiry


Standards:
5.MD.A.1
Vocabulary can potentially be taught through explicit
Convert among differentsized standard measurement units
instruction, through an interactive dialogue, a partner activity within a given measurement system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05
(Think, Pair, Share), or potentially a prior lesson could
m), and use these conversions in solving multistep, real world
involve a pretest to determine which words students do not
problems.
know, so the teacher can target certain students for
L.5.1
vocabulary.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
HOTS: Analysis
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Questions scripted out for higher order thinking:
Why do we need different units of measurement?
Can you think of a time when meters would more a useful
Visuals/Resources/Supplementary Materials: Khan Academy
unit than centimeters?
Video, Guided practice on board, graphic organizers
Connections to Prior Knowledge/Building Background:
1. Because of the last lesson, students will know the value of centimeters prior to this lesson
2. Students should have watched the Khan Academy video titled Unit Conversion: centimeters to meters, which should provide
students with prior knowledge about how to convert centimeters to meters.
Content Objective(s):
Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence: Review/Assessment:
After watching a relevant video and
practicing as a class, students can convert
centimeters to meters with 90% success.
I can statement:
I can correctly convert centimeters into
meters

At the end of class, all students will be told


to watch the Khan Academy video titled
Unit Conversion: centimeters to meters.
This will also be communicated to parents
by email.
2.1
Students will all be brought to the carpet
for a math lesson. As you remember,

Content Objective Assessment:


This will occur through the following
checklist:
_____Conversion for height appears to be
correct.
_____ Conversion for wingspan appears to

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

yesterday, we recorded measurements with


the measuring tape and that was a form of
data collection. Students will be shown
the lesson objectives. They will appear on
the smart board. The teacher will read these
objectives and the class will echo the
objectives with the teacher. So, last night
you were all supposed to all watch a video
in Khan Academy about converting
centimeters into meters. For a moment talk
to your neighbor about why we would need
to convert from centimeters to meters. In
other words, why is it important that we
have multiple units of measurement for
length? After students have discussed this
with their neighbor, give a few groups an
opportunity to share their thoughts. For
every good idea they have, make a note of
it on the smart board. A mind map would
be possible here. After some groups share,
tell the class, yes, sometimes it is easier to
make sense of things when they are in a
certain. Can anyone think of a time when it
would be more useful to use meters than
centimeters? The teacher will use these
DOK questions to get students thinking.
Would it make sense for me to tell you that
I am about 75 inches tall or that I am 6 feet
and three inches tall? Yes, it would not
make sense for me to give you my height
in inches because it is harder to imagine.
Would I want to measure the number
inches to New York? No! The number

10

be correct.
_____ Conversion for arm appears to be
correct
_____ Conversion for foot appears to be
correct.
_____ Conversion for hand appears to be
correct
_____ Adequate work strategy is shown.
_____ Height in cm. and meters is written
on board.
Maximum score: 6/6

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

would tell me about how far it is, but the


number of inches would not tell me very
much about how far it is. Does that make
sense? All right, so now we are going to
learn how to convert centimeters into
meters. As a refresher, we are quickly
going to watch the Khan Academy video
again. The teacher will then play the three
minute Khan Academy video titled Unit
Conversion: centimeters to meters. Does
anyone have any questions about how to
convert centimeters into meters?
2.2
Using a dry erase or smart board, the
teacher will put 59 cm. on the board.
Students will be told to talk to their
neighbor for a minute to share ideas on
how they would convert those centimeters
to meters. Having given students an
opportunity to think about the problem, the
teacher now will let a few students share
their strategies. The teacher will then
model a few ways to solve this problem.
During this period of guided learning, the
instructor will confirm that key vocabulary
(Convert, Meters) is understood by all:
Using the method showed by khan
academy the teacher will multiple 59 by
1/100 and talk about how centimeter means
one hundredth of a meter. The teacher then
will show the alternative method that
involves moving the decimal place. If
students have any other ideas, the teacher

11

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

will try to use those, too. The teacher will


ask if anyone has any questions about
converting to meters from cm.
2.3
The teacher will then tell the students their
job is to independently convert all of their
measurements from yesterday into meters.
At this point the teacher will remind them
to show their work or list a strategy used.
The teacher will let them go progressively
by asking them each to explain why we
need more than one type of unit. This is a
chance for the teacher to assess the
language objective. Why do we need
more than one unit of measurement for
distance This is an informal assessment.
As students answer this question, they will
be let go to work on their assignment.
2.4
During this period of time, the teachers will
let the students work independently for
about ten minutes. Again, if necessary,
ELL students may be given a graphic
organizer to help facilitate and organize
their work. Those students who finish
without assistance will turn in their
conversion to the teacher. When students
are finished, they will be told that they can
right their height in cm and meters on the
board, so that we can put the class in order
from shortest to tallest. The teacher will
prepare a chart relevant for this component
of the activity. After they complete this,

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

they will be instructed that they can work


on activities in Khan academy to develop
their avatar or they can play math games on
their computer. Teacher will not stop
students that assist others at this time.
Those students who are not done after
fifteen minutes will be allowed a
conference with the teacher at his or her
desk. The teacher will try to give verbal
advice without completing the problem for
the student. The teacher will do everything
to help students be successful without
giving them the answer or doing the
problem for them. Eventually, the teacher
will collect all of the conversions and ask
all of the students to come back to the
carpet. Rereading them, the students will
review the objectives. The instructor will
then ask them to show five fingers if they
feel like they have mastered the first
objective and zero fingers if they feel like
they feel lost. The instructor will do the
same for the language objective. The
teacher will make mental note of students
that seem to be lost. The teacher will then
transition into the next section of the day.

13

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Language Objective(s):
Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence:
1. After discussing the value of
different types of units, students can
express verbally why we need more
than one type of unit of
measurement.

Language Objective Review/Assessment:


Assessment of language objective will be
done with a checklist:
_____ Student was able to adequately
explain why we need more than one unit of
measurement

I can statement:
I can explain why we need more than one
Maximum score 1/1
unit of measurement.
Wrap-Up/Closure: Eventually, the teacher will collect all of the conversions and ask all of the students to come back to the carpet.
Rereading them, the students will review the objectives. The instructor will then ask them to show five fingers if they feel like they
have mastered the first objective and zero fingers if they feel like they feel lost. The instructor will do the same for the language
objective. The teacher will make mental note of students that seem to be lost. The teacher will ask if anyone has any specific
questions. The teacher will then transition into the next section of the day.
Additional Features:
Preparation/Lesson Delivery
Scaffolding
Group Options/Interaction
_X_ Adaptation of Content
_X_Modeling
_X_Whole Class
_X_ Links to Background
_X_Guided Practice
__Small Groups
_X_ Links to Past Learning
_X_Independent Practice
_X_Partners
_X_Strategies Incorporated
_X_Comprehensible Input
_X_Independent
_X_Lesson Pacing
_X_L1 Support
_X_Technology
Integration of Processes
Application
Assessment
__Reading
_X_Hands-on
_X_Individual
__Writing
_X_Meaningful
__Group
_X_Speaking
_X_Linked to Objectives
__Written
_X_Listening
_X_Promotes Engagement
_X_Oral

14

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Additional Strategies that could be further incorporated:


Cognitive learning strategies: establishing a purpose for the lesson, consciously making personal connections
Potential Metacognitive Learning Strategies: Monitoring and clarifying, Making mental images
Language Learning Strategies: Self-monitoring and self-correcting while speaking English, Paraphrasing, Drawing Pictures and/or
gestures to communicate when words do not come to mind.
*These strategies should be taught on a case-by-case basis during independent work time or explicitly during primary lesson.
Differentiation:
Gifted learners:
After completion of main lesson, these students will be allowed to play math games or develop their avatar in khan academy
by completing sections.
These students will be asked questions with greater depth of knowledge during whole lesson.
Students that need more support
These students will be allowed to conference with the instructor during the independent work.
These students will be given appropriate wait time when responding to questions.
Graphic organizers are an option.
Teacher will use multiple examples and try to use varied contexts for examples.
ELL students
If there are other students that speak the same native tongue, these students will be allowed to help each other with language if
the need is there.
If students need to use a translation dictionary, that will be available.
Academic language can be defined for these students during lesson (for instance, the word conversion)

15

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Example of Graphic Organizer For Lesson 1 & 2


Name _________________________
Know these terms!
Data Collection
Measure
Convert -

1 cm = 0.01m
1 cm < 1 m

Measure this!

Centimeters

Meters

Height

_____cm.

_____m.

Wingspan
Arm
Foot
Hand
16

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Lesson 3: Conducting an Experiment with Soap


Grade/Class/Subject: 5th Grade/Math and Science Integrated
Key Vocabulary: Data Collection, Measure, Ruler, Record,
Science, Experiment, Variable, Observation, Hypothesis

Thematic Topic: Measurement, Data, and Science as Inquiry


Standards:
S.35.SI.3
Essential Concept and/or Skill: Plan and conduct scientific
Vocabulary can potentially be taught through explicit
investigations. Students should engage in systematic observation,
instruction, through an interactive dialogue, a partner activity making accurate measurements, and identifying and controlling
(Think, Pair, Share), or potentially a prior lesson could
variables.
involve a pretest to determine which words students do not
Students understand the concept of a fair test.
know, so the teacher can target certain students for
Students follow appropriate safety procedures when conducting
vocabulary.
investigations.
HOTS: Analysis
Questions scripted out for higher order thinking:
1. What does a scientist do?
2. How do you design a scientific experiment?
3. How do bubbles work?

L.5.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
L.5.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Visuals/Resources/Supplementary Materials: Rulers, Water,
plastic bags, straws, measuring tape, Dawn, Palmolive, and
Seventh Generation, Graphic Organizers for data collection.

Connections to Prior Knowledge/Building Background:


1. Prior to this lesson, students will have already used rulers to record lengths. Students will have used cm. and m. to calculate volume.
2. Prior to this lesson, students will already have had experience collecting different types of data.
3. Students will have experience blowing bubbles
Content Objective(s):
Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence: Content Objective Review/Assessment:
1. After discussing how an
3.1
Assessment for content objective
experiment is conducted, students
Students will all be brought to the carpet
completed by checklist:

17

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

should be able to conduct an


experiment regarding soap and
bubbles and record the resultant
data.
I can statement:
I can conduct an experiment and record
data.

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

for a math lesson. As you recall yesterday,


we converted measurements into another
unit, that is, meters. Having mastered how
to record this type of measurement or data,
today we will be applying that knowledge
to an experiment. Students will be shown
the lesson objectives. They will appear on
the smart board. The teacher will read
these objectives and the class will echo the
objectives with the teacher. As you might
have figured out, today we are going to be
scientists.
3.2
Well, if we are going to scientists, we
should know what scientists do. I would
like you to talk to your neighbor about
what scientists do. How do scientists figure
things out? (Think, Pair, Share) The
teacher then gives the students a few
minutes to discuss this with their neighbor.
The teacher then allows numerous pairs
share their ideas. Groups that get to share
will be decided by drawing names on
popsicle sticks from a can. If the students
hit on any of the follow words, they are
written on the smart board: Data
Collection, Measure, Record, Science,
Experiment, Variable, Observation, and
Hypothesis. When students bring these
words up, the teacher asks the students
what they mean. The teacher then defines
them. (Teacher should focus on
simplifying language so it is

18

____Students group conducted 15


experimental trials and provided 15 data
points to show this.
____ Data is labeled in cm.
____ Data is organized effectively or
graphic organizer is used.
Maximum score 3/3

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

comprehensible for all students.) For


instance, in an experiment a variable is
something that can be changed or
controlled and it is something that could
influence the experiment. In other words, it
is anything that can be changed or
controlled (not changed). Regularly,
variables are intentionally changed in an
experiment to see the effect the variables
has on the experiment. If I wanted to do an
experiment to see which pair of shoes
helps me run faster, what is the variable in
the experiment that I am changing? It is the
pair of shoes, because the shoes are what I
am changing. A hypothesis can be
described as an educated guess that the
scientist makes. This hypothesis regards
one specific variable that the scientist is
focusing on. So, for example, if I was
testing to see whether or not my Nike
shoes help me run faster than my converse
all stars, what could be my hypothesis?
After letting a section of the class express
their ideas, the teacher will propose
another question. Because it is part of the
content objective, teacher must explicitly
define hypothesis and variable.
3.3
Well, if we know these different words
we use in science, how does design an
experiment? Talk to your neighbor again
and discuss how one would design an
experiment. What are the different things

19

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

we need to start our experiment? The


teacher then gives the students a couple
minutes and then lets the students share
their ideas again. The teacher tried to let
other kids share this time. After letting the
kids share, the teacher announces, Today
we are going to be doing an experiment to
see which type of soap makes the best
bubbles. Who here likes bubbles? (Topic
that all kids should find relatable) Have
you ever wondered how to make the
biggest bubble? That is our question for
this experiment. How does the type of soap
we use affect how the size of bubbles that
we can make? Any idea what the main
variable is that we are going to have to
manipulate or change? The type of soap is
the main variable that we are going to
change. Our hypothesis is that the type of
soap is going to have an affect on the size
of the bubbles that we can make. We have
three different types of soap. Each table is
going to get one specific kind of soap. And
each table is going to be responsible for
collecting data for that type of soap. In
front of the class, the teacher will model to
the students how they are going to cover
their table with a black plastic bag. The
teacher will then demonstrate to them how
to blow bubbles on the black plastic with a
straw, measure, and record the size of each
bubble. The teacher will draw on the board
a way to record data and give an example

20

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

recording. Measurements should be in


centimeters Those students who have
trouble with English and those students
that need more assistance will be able to
use graphic organizers to record their data
if needed. Also, table groups will be
organized in a way so that all students can
be successful linguistically and
academically. The teacher will show them
three different types of soap: Dawn,
Palmolive, and Seventh Generation. We
will hypothesize that Seventh Generation
is the best for making bubbles. Teacher
writes this on board. What is the variable
that we are changing? Yes, we are
changing the type of soap. That is the
variable that we are changing. Each table
will only get one type of soap and will be
instructed to record the type that they are
using. Each table needs to hand in one set
of data with everyones name on it. Also, I
would like each table to provide at least 15
measurements or data points and label
them in centimeters. These requirements
will be written on the board.
3.4
The teacher will then dismiss the group by
table and use designated helpers to hand
out materials. The students will be given
ten minutes to blow bubbles on the tables
and record their measurements in
centimeters. After the students have
recorded for ten minutes, the students will

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all be brought back to the carpet to share


their experience. The teacher will ask
which measurement or data point was most
common for their soap. Which number of
centimeters was most common for you to
see with your type of soap? The teacher
will then give a chance for each table to
say their most common data point. Raise
your hand if you think that your soap was
the best at making bubbles? Alright, now
everyone hand me their data. The teacher
should check that everyone has a name on
each paper. Tonight I will be making a
visual representation of this data on the
board and will be calculating averages so
we know which soap is the best for
blowing bubbles. (If there was additional
time in this unit plan, the class would do
this on another data or the same day)
Language Objective(s):
1. After discussing how to construct
an experiment, students can write
the meaning of the word hypothesis
and variable.
I can statement:
I can define the words variable and
hypothesis.

Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence:


3.4
All right, now I need you all to complete
one last thing for science today. In your
journal I need to write 3-4 sentences that
say the meaning of these words that we
talked about: Hypothesis and variable. The
teacher will write these two words on the
board. The teacher may provide reminders
regarding their definition for students that
may not remember. The teacher provides
the students 10-15 minutes to write these

22

Language Review/Assessment:
Assessment of language objective will be
done with a checklist:
____ Student provided 3-4 sentences
____ Student adequately defined
hypothesis
____ Student adequately defined variable
____ Student demonstrated command of
the conventions of standard English
grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

3-4 sentences and then collects the


students work. During this period, the
Maximum score: 3/3
teacher can provide scaffolding for those
students that require it. After this time
goes by, teacher will pick up these short
answer definitions.
Wrap-Up/Closure: Students will be brought back to the carpet after the short answer questions are collected. Students will be shown
the lesson objectives again. They will appear on the smart board. The teacher will read these objectives and the class will echo the
objectives with the teacher again. The teacher will then ask the students to give a thumbs up if they feel they mastered the content
objective. The teacher will ask the class to do the same if they have mastered the language objective. The teacher will then ask again if
anyone has questions. Based on this, the teacher will then transition to the next content area.
Additional Features:
Preparation/Lesson Delivery
_X_ Adaptation of Content
_X_ Links to Background
_X_ Links to Past Learning
_X_Strategies Incorporated
_X_Lesson Pacing
Integration of Processes
__Reading
_X_Writing
_X_Speaking
_X_Listening

Scaffolding
_X_Modeling
_X_Guided Practice
__Independent Practice
_X_Comprehensible Input
_X_L1 Support
Application
_X_Hands-on
_X_Meaningful
_X_Linked to Objectives
_X_Promotes Engagement

Group Options/Interaction
_X_Whole Class
_X_Small Groups
_X_Partners
__Independent
__Technology
Assessment
_X_Individual
_X_Group
_X_Written
__Oral

Strategies:
Applicable Cognitive Learning Strategies:
1. Consciously making connections between personal experiences, beliefs, and feelings and content
Applicable Metacognitive Learning Strategies:
1. Predicting and inferring, Evaluating and determining importance, generating questions and using questions to guide
comprehension.
Applicable Learning Strategies:
1. Making logical guesses based on contextual and syntactic information, Guessing and deducing

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*These strategies should be taught on a case-by-case basis during independent work time or explicitly during primary lesson.

Differentiation:
Group work during experimentation allows for natural differentiation. Certain kids volunteer for certain roles within the
group, but everyone has a responsibility, but every child should get a chance to try every group role.
Gifted learners:
These students will be asked questions with greater DOK when at large group.
These students will also be encouraged to include more detailed language and depth of explanation in their writing. Perhaps
students will be told to generate different examples of hypotheses or variables.
Students that need more support
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group.
These students will perhaps be directly prompted with leading questions to answer questions if they do not typically raise their
hand.
These students may need greater scaffolding with their writing.
ELL students
If there are other students that speak the same native tongue, these students will be grouped with each other only if the need is
there.
If students need to use a translation dictionary, that will be available.
Academic language can be defined for these students during lesson (for instance, the word hypothesis)
One possibility is that academic language can be defined on graphic organizers.
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Example of Graphic Organizer for Lessons 3 & 4


Name _________________________

Record Bubble data here! Be sure to mark centimeters


1.

9.

2.

10.

3.

11.

4.

12.

5.

13.

6.

14.

7.

15.

8.

16.

Know these terms!


Key terms:

Variable -

Hypothesis -

Experiment -

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Professor Shaeley Santiago

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Lesson 4: Bubbles with Glycerin and Corn Starch


Grade/Class/Subject: 5th Grade/Math and Science Integrated
Key Vocabulary: Data Collection, Measure, Ruler, Record,
Science, Experiment, Variable, Observation, Hypothesis,
Manipulation, Average (mean)

Thematic Topic: Measurement, Data, and Science as Inquiry


Standards:
S.35.SI.3
Essential Concept and/or Skill: Plan and conduct scientific
investigations. Students should engage in systematic observation,
Vocabulary can potentially be taught through explicit
making accurate measurements, and identifying and controlling
instruction, through an interactive dialogue, a partner activity variables.
(Think, Pair, Share), or potentially a prior lesson could
Students understand the concept of a fair test.
involve a pretest to determine which words students do not
Students follow appropriate safety procedures when conducting
know, so the teacher can target certain students for
investigations.
vocabulary.
L.5.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
HOTS: Analysis
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Questions scripted out for higher order thinking:
1. Based on the graph that you are seeing, which soap
from yesterday would you say was the best for making L.5.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
bubbles?
2. What would be the variable that we are changing or
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
manipulating in our new experiment?
3. What would be one possible hypothesis we could use
for this experiment?
Visuals/Resources/Supplementary Materials: Rulers, Water,
plastic bags, straws, measuring tape, Dawn, Palmolive, and
Seventh Generation, Graphic Organizers for data collection,
Graph on board, water, glycerin, corn starch
Connections to Prior Knowledge/Building Background:
1. Prior to this lesson, students will have already used rulers to record lengths.
2. Prior to this lesson, students already have had experience collecting different types of data.
3. Students acquired experience generating hypotheses in the prior lesson.

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Content Objective(s):
1. After reading about the different
variables we will be researching,
students will be able to
successfully create and test a
hypothesis for our experiment.

Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence:


4.1
Students will all be brought to the carpet for a
math lesson. Yesterday we recorded data or
measurements about bubble size and different
types of soap. Today we will be doing
something similar, but each of you will be
I can statement:
forming your own hypothesis about the
experiment. Students will be shown the lesson
I can create and test a hypothesis for my objectives. They will appear on the smart board.
experiment
The teacher will read these objectives and the
class will echo the objectives with the teacher.
4.2
Well, as you can see I have the data you
collected represented as a graph on the board.
The data will be shown as a simple bar graph
with each different type of soap represented on
the same graph but color-coded. The dawn soap
is shown as the green color, the Palmolive is
shown as red, and the Seventh Generation is
shown as purple. What do you notice about the
graph? Talk to your neighbor for a minute about
things that you notice. Based on this graph,
which soap looks like it was the best? The
teacher will give 4-5 groups a chance to share.
This will be decided by drawing names from a
can. Well, last night also calculated averages
for each type of soap. The teacher has the class
echo this word as a group. Talk to your
neighbor for a moment about what it means to
calculate an average. The teacher writes the
word average on the board. The teacher then

27

Content objective assessment:


Students hypotheses will be assessed
with the following checklist:
________Students refer to variables in
hypothesis.
____Students make a claim in their
hypothesis that regards the effect that
the variable will have on bubbles.
____Student writes hypothesis with
standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling.
Maximum Score: 4/4

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

brings the class back to focus. The teacher then


calls on a student that can concisely explain the
meaning of average. If this is not sufficient, the
teacher will write the definition on the board and
describe how an average is calculated. An
average is calculated by adding up the data
collected from one type of soap. That number is
then divided by the total number of data points
that were collected. This tells us which soap
tended to blow the biggest bubble. The teacher
will then reveal the means or averages for each
bubble. Which average is the highest? This
tells us which bubble solutions was best at
making bubbles. As you said, Dawn had the
highest number. That means it was able to
regularly blow bigger bubbles.
4.3
Now, I would like you to read a little bit about
two new variables that we will be researching:
corn syrup and glycerin. The students will be
released to work with a partner at their desk.
Instructor will select these partners. ELL
students can be grouped with another student
that speaks their native language or someone
who can assist them. They will be given 5- 10
minutes to read a short essay explaining how
bubbles work and the properties of glycerin and
cornstarch. This essay will conflate quotes from
the following web articles:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bringscience-home-best-bubbles/

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http://www.ehow.com/info-tip_7957913_cornsyrup-bubble.html
The essay will provide important information,
but not give the answer away entirely. It will be
comprehensible for all students.
4.4
Students will be told that with their partner they
need to write a hypothesis that states what effect
glycerin and cornstarch will have on bubbles.
The teacher will show the students both of these
items. How will these two things affect the
creation of bubbles? Students will be given 5-10
minutes to write their hypothesis. Teacher
should provide scaffolding during this period for
students that are at an impasse. Teacher will
provide strategies for how to apply the
knowledge that they learned from the reading to
their hypotheses. They will be told that they
must turn in one cope of their hypothesis to the
teacher and both of their names must be on it.
Teacher should remind them to use good
grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
4.5
After completing this with partner, each pair will
be matched up with another pair. Each pair will
be asked to verbally justify their hypothesis to
the other pair. Each pair will then be given a
sheet they can use to assess the other pairs
justification. This justification will basically be
an assessment. It will include a checklist:

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Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

____Students refer to variables in hypothesis.


____Students make a claim in their hypothesis.
____Students provide a justification.
____Student speak clearly.
4.6
After students assess each other, they will be
brought back to the carpet. The teacher will
pick up the peer evaluations and the hypotheses.
Students will be told that now we will test their
hypotheses. Because it was the best at making
bubbles, we will be testing with Dawn soap. We
will test dawn with Dawn with corn syrup,
Dawn with glycerin, and Dawn without anything
else. It will be exactly like we did it yesterday.
You all attach the black bag to your table while I
hand out the straws and bubble solution. Please
record at least 15 data points or measurements
The teacher then releases the students gradually
and hands out the materials. Students will be
given 10-15 minutes to collect data. Graphic
organizers can be used if necessary.
4.6 Breakdown of soap solutions (for teacher
use)
Detergent only
3 cups of water
2 table spoons of detergent
Glycerin type
3 cups of water
2 tablespoons of detergent
One tablespoon of glycerin

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Corn syrup type


3 cups of water
2 table spoons of detergent
One tablespoon of corn syrup
4.7
Students will be brought back to the
carpet. The teacher will collect the data.
Wrap-up will occur
Language Objective(s):

Language Objective
Review/Assessment:
Assessment of language objective will
be done with a peer evaluative checklist:

Having read about the variables we


will be researching, student can
verbally express a justification for
their hypothesis to a peer.

_____Students refer to variables in


hypothesis.
____Students make a claim in their
hypothesis.
____Students provide a justification.
____Student speak clearly.

I can statement:
I can explain why I believe my
hypothesis is correct.

Maximum score: 4/4


Wrap-Up/Closure: Students will be brought back to the carpet after the short answer questions are collected. . Students will be shown
the lesson objectives again. They will appear on the smart board. The teacher will read these objectives and the class will echo the
objectives with the teacher again. The instructor will then ask them to show five fingers if they feel like they have mastered the first
objective and zero fingers if they feel like they feel lost. The instructor will do the same for the language objective. The teacher will
make mental note of students that seem to be lost. The teacher will ask if anyone has any specific questions. The teacher will then
transition into the next section of the day.
Additional Features:
Preparation/Lesson Delivery

Scaffolding

Group Options/Interaction

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_X_ Adaptation of Content


_X_ Links to Background
_X_ Links to Past Learning
_X_ Strategies Incorporated
_X_Lesson Pacing (Might be a bit long)
Integration of Processes
_X_Reading
_X_Writing
_X_Speaking
_X_Listening

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

_X_Modeling (Through graph and


discussion)
__Guided Practice
__Independent Practice
_X_Comprehensible Input
_X_L1 Support
Application
_X_Hands-on
_X_Meaningful
_X_Linked to Objectives
_X_Promotes Engagement

_X_Whole Class
_X_Small Groups
_X_Partners
__Independent
__Technology
Assessment
__Individual
_X_Group
_X_Written
_X_Oral

Strategies:
Cognitive Learning Strategies: Taking notes or outlining
Metacognitive Learning Strategies: Predicting and Inferring, evaluating and determining importance
Language Learning Strategies: Applying basic reading skills, such as previewing, skimming, scanning, and reviewing, Substituting a
known word when unable to pronounce an unfamiliar word.
*These strategies should be taught on a case-by-case basis during independent work time or explicitly during primary lesson.
Differentiation:
Gifted learners:
These students will be asked questions with greater DOK when at large group.
These students will also be encouraged to include more detailed language and depth of explanation in their hypothesis. Perhaps
these students will need to cite parts of the reading assignment in their hypothesis.
Students that need more support
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group.
These students will perhaps be directly prompted with leading questions to answer questions if they do not typically raise their
hand. Perhaps the teacher will also provide additional contextual information within the question
These students may need greater scaffolding with their writing.
These students will receive simpler language during instruction.
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Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Grouping will be done to support all students.


Teacher may provide one-one-support that incorporates reading strategies/strategies focused on the content
Written section can be adapted to support a lower reading level.
ELL students
If there are other students that speak the same native tongue, these students will be grouped with each other only if the need is
there.
If students need to use a translation dictionary, that will be available.
Academic language can be defined for these students during lesson (for instance, the word manipulation and average)
One possibility is that academic language can be defined on graphic organizers.
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group
Teacher may provide greater focus on these students when students are working independent from teacher.

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Reading about Surface Tension, Corn Syrup and Glycerin


Have you ever wondered what makes a bubble form? The secret to making bubbles is surface tension. Adding soap (such as
the kind you use to wash dishes in the sink) to water changes the surface tension of that water, and this creates a great solution to make
bubbles from. (Scientific American, 2011)
Surface Tension
If water sticks to itself, why can't you just blow into it and get bubbles? Because of surface tension; the top of a water surface
has plenty of it. Have you ever seen a bug walk across the top of water? That's because the surface tension of the water is stronger than
the weight of the bug. It's this same strength that prevents water alone from being a good bubble solution (Hineman).
Corn syrup and glycerin
When you mix soap into water, the soap relaxes the bond between water molecules and weakens the surface tension, allowing
for it to stretch and envelope air to form bubbles. What is happening is that a thin layer of water is actually being trapped between two
layers of soap. When you add corn syrup to the mix, its physical properties of being a thick, starchy liquid further strengthen the soap
(Hineman).
In other words, when a soapy dish detergent is added to water, it lowers the surface tension so that bubbles can form. The
detergent molecules increase the distance between water molecules and reduce those molecules' ability to interact with each other.
This decreases the pullor attractionthat the water molecules exert on each other, lowering the surface tension of the solution.
(Scientific American, 2011) Other substances, such as corn syrup or glycerin, can be added to further strengthen the soap.
Works Cited
Hineman, G. What Is in Corn Syrup That Makes a Bubble? Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/info-tip_7957913_corn-syrupbubble.html
Science Buddie. (2011, December 1). Blow the Best Bubbles. Retrieved from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-sciencehome-best-bubbles/

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Lesson 5: Conclusions and Representations


Grade/Class/Subject: 5th Grade/Math and Science Integrated
Key Vocabulary: Data Collection, Measure, Record, Science,
Experiment, Variable, Observation, Hypothesis,
Manipulation, Average (mean)

Thematic Topic: Measurement, Data, and Science as Inquiry


Standards:
S.35.SI.3
Essential Concept and/or Skill: Plan and conduct scientific
investigations. Students should engage in systematic observation,
Vocabulary can potentially be taught through explicit
making accurate measurements, and identifying and controlling
instruction, through an interactive dialogue, a partner activity variables.
(Think, Pair, Share), or potentially a prior lesson could
Students understand the concept of a fair test.
involve a pretest to determine which words students do not
Students follow appropriate safety procedures when conducting
know, so the teacher can target certain students for
investigations.
vocabulary.
L.5.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
HOTS: Analysis
grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Questions scripted out for higher order thinking:
1. Looking at this graph of our data, what conclusions
L.5.2
can you make? What do you notice? What does this
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
make you think?
2. What do averages tell us about our research?
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
3. Can anyone think of something we could research
after this?
Visuals/Resources/Supplementary Materials: Graphic,
Organizers, Graph on board, paper, pencil, art supplies, smart
board (rubric)
Connections to Prior Knowledge/Building Background:
1. Prior to this lesson, students should understand how to read a bar graph
2. Prior to this lesson, students should understand what a means tells us.
3. Prior, to this lessons students should have experience thinking about how their hypotheses relates to the data we gathered.
4. Students will already be familiar with the notion of a visual representation.

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Content Objective(s):
5.1 After discussing the results of the
data we collected, students can
summarize these results and create
a visual representation to show this.
I can statement:
I can summarize the results of our data
and create a visual representation that
shows these results.

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence: Content and language objective


5.1
assessment: Done via rubric.
Students will all be brought to the carpet
for a math lesson. Yesterday we saw the
See below for rubric.
bar graph that showed our first experiment
and completed a second experiment. Today
we will be finishing up this unit. Students
will be shown the lesson objectives. They
will appear on the smart board. The teacher
will read these objectives and the class will
echo the objectives with the teacher.
5.2
Students will receive their hypotheses and
data back. The data that students turned in
the day before will be represented on the
board in a bar graph. Soap with glycerin
will be green, soap with cornstarch in red,
and soap alone in purple. Looking at this
graph of our data, what conclusions can
you make? What do you notice? What
does this make you think? Talk to your
neighbor for a minute to help you think
about this. The teacher then brings the
class back to focus. Drawing names from
a can, the teacher lets a few groups share
ideas, but brings the focus to things that
students truly should be aware of. Thus,
although this is a dialogue, the teacher
draws all of the students attention to the
information that truly should be aware of.
For instance, the teacher will refer to the
mean of each type of soap. The teacher
will write the range of each type of soap on

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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the board. If the students seem prepared,


the teacher will discuss the medium of
each type and write that on the board. Of
course, when the teacher considers and of
these components of the data, the teacher
will define these terms and write them on
the board (mean, range, median).
All three colors will be represented in the
same bar graph. Based on means, the data
should show that Glycerin is the best for
blowing bubbles. The teacher should also
use the range as a way of considering
which bubble solution was best. The
teacher should describe the median as the
most common number. The teacher should
use this as a time to show the students
strategies to analyze the data.

Language Objective(s):
5.2
Having observed and discussed the
results, students should be able to write
conclusions that can be acquired from
the results.
I can write conclusions based on data
results.

Meaningful Activities/Lesson Sequence:


5.3
Students will be told that it is now their
responsibility to create a visual
representation that shows their hypothesis,
the results, and written conclusions from
the data. Teacher will bring the rubric up
on the smart board, so students know the
expectations for the assignment. (See
below for rubric) The teacher will show
the students a few examples of visual
representations of data on the smart board.

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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These options include bar graph, line


graph, or any other teacher approved
representation. For instance, the student
may wish to involve more visual art of
performance to communicate the results.
The student may wish to make a visual
representation on the computer. This is an
option. Students will be told that they must
include the averages for each type of soap.
Also, this will be written on the board:
Requirements for Representation:
1. Hypothesis
2. Visual Representation of Data
3. Conclusions
5.4
The students will then be slowly released
to work independently on their visual
representation and conclusions and hand
out poster board. If time allows, students
will be asked to complete a prototype or
rough draft first. The teacher will tell
students that, if anyone has any questions
or wants things clarified, they should stay
behind. The teacher will continue to leave
up information on the board and the graph
for students to use. Students will be given
45 minutes to work on this representation.
After that time is half over, teacher will
allow students to conference with peers or
the teacher for guidance. Teacher will
provide scaffolding for those students that

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


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Professor Shaeley Santiago

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require it, but will not do any writing or


creation for student. Because of time
requirements, this portion of the unit may
take additional time.
Eventually, students will be brought back
to wrap up the lesson.
Wrap-Up/Closure: Students will be brought back to the carpet after the short answer questions are collected. . Students will be shown
the lesson objectives again. They will appear on the smart board. The teacher will read these objectives and the class will echo the
objectives with the teacher again. The instructor will then ask them to show five fingers if they feel like they have mastered the first
objective and zero fingers if they feel like they feel lost. The instructor will do the same for the language objective. The teacher will
make mental note of students that seem to be lost. The teacher will ask if anyone has any specific questions. The teacher will then
transition into the next section of the day.
Additional Features:
Preparation/Lesson Delivery
_X_ Adaptation of Content
_X_ Links to Background
_X_ Links to Past Learning
_X_ Strategies Incorporated (Strategies
considered during analyses of data)
_X_Lesson Pacing (This lesson could
potentially be finished during free time or
the next day)
Integration of Processes
__Reading
_X_Writing
_X_Speaking
_X_Listening

Scaffolding
_X_Modeling (Through graph and
discussion)
_X_Guided Practice (Through large group
analysis)
__Independent Practice
_X_Comprehensible Input
_X_L1 Support

Group Options/Interaction
_X_Whole Class
__Small Groups
_X_Partners
_X_Independent
_X_Technology (Student has the option to
make their visual representation on
computer or tablet)

Application
_X_Hands-on
_X_Meaningful
_X_Linked to Objectives
_X_Promotes Engagement

Assessment
_X_Individual
__Group
_X_Written
__Oral

Strategies:
Applicable Cognitive Learning Strategies: Taking notes or outlining

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Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Applicable Metacognitive Learning Strategies: Evaluating and determining importance


Applicable Language Learning Strategies: Self-monitoring and self-correcting while writing and paraphrasing
*These strategies should be taught on a case-by-case basis during independent work time or explicitly during primary lesson.
Differentiation:
Gifted learners:
These students will be asked questions with greater DOK when at large group.
When completing assignment, these students will be pushed to dig deeper in their analysis/conclusions and be more creative in
their visual representation.
Students that need more support
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group.
These students will perhaps be directly prompted with leading questions to answer questions if they do not typically raise their
hand. Perhaps the teacher will also provide additional contextual information within the question
These students will receive simpler language during instruction.
Teacher may provide one-one-support that incorporates reading strategies/strategies focused on the content
Teach will allow student-teacher conferences regarding visual representations.
Sentence starters can be given to students for the conclusion section of the assignment. For instance, the results showed me
that.
ELL students
If there are other students that speak the same native tongue, these students will be allowed to peer conference with each other
regarding their visual representation.
There will be a focus on visually engaging lessons and active learning.
If students need to use a translation dictionary, that will be available to student.
Academic language can be defined for these students during lesson (for instance, the words range, medium, and mean)
These students will be given more time when asked questions in large group
Teacher may provide greater focus on these students when students are working independent from teacher.

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EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

Rubric For Project


1
Unsatisfactory

2 Partially
Satisfactory

3 Satisfactory

4 Exceeds Expectations

Hypothesis

Students
hypothesis is
absent

Student has written a


hypothesis, but it
does not make a
specific claim or does
not mention the
variables studied.

Student has written a


complete hypothesis. It
includes a specific claim
about the variables
researched and implies the
intent of the researcher.

Students has written an excellent


hypothesis that is fleshed out, well written,
and easy to understand. For example, I
believe that glycerin makes soap bubbles
bigger than corn starch, but corn starch
added will make bigger soap bubbles than
just dawn soap solution.

Visual
Representation
Of Data

Visual
Representation is
completely
absent

Visual representation
is present, but sloppy
and does not convey
all information

Visual representation is
complete, but effort does
not seem very high.

Conclusion

Conclusions are
completely
absent

Conclusions are
present, but are
minimal. (2-4)
sentences)

Conclusions are complete


and well thought out. (5-6
sentences)

Visual representation is present and


engaging to viewer. It appears that the
student spent a great deal of time designing
and thinking about how to represent the
data.
Conclusions are complete and extremely
well thought out. Conclusions effectively
summarize the data results. High detail is
present

Student appears to
have only put
minimal work into
assignment, work is
sloppy, and written
English has many
errors.

Student seems to have put


in sufficient work and
thought, work is clean,
and written English has
minimal errors.

Overall Quality Student failed to


complete any
work on
assignment

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Student appears to have put a great deal of


work and thought into assignment, work is
extremely neat, and written English has no
errors or very few errors.

EDUC 145/245: Teaching English Language Learners


Fall 2014
Professor Shaeley Santiago

Name:_Andrew Mickunas_______

References
Echevarra, J., Vogt, M., and Short, D. (2008) Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP
Model. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

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