Sunteți pe pagina 1din 530

1

Assembly Modeling
Overview of Assembly Modeling

The concepts presented in this lesson are:


the difference between multi-part assemblies and virtual assemblies
the important aspects of the two basic approaches to assembly modeling (topdown, bottom-up)
using display methods to focus on areas within an assembly on which you intend
to work
basic loading and filing options
simple ways to find out what is in an assembly

The Assembly Modeler


In Unigraphics NX, there are two approaches to assembly construction:
the multi-part approach
the virtual assembly approach
Multi-part Assemblies
The multi-part approach copies all resident part data into the assembly file.
This yields an unintelligent assembly where none of the resident parts are linked to
their original parts.

2
This approach requires more memory to store all the fully loaded piece parts that make
up the assembly.
Virtual Assemblies Using the Assembly Modeler
The virtual assembly approach links the part files that make up an assembly.
The advantages of linking part files instead of copying them are the following:
RAM requirements for your assemblies are reduced
the assembly display can be simplified without editing the underlying geometry
assemblies are automatically updated when master parts change
you can define the location relationships between assembly components
other applications (Drafting, Manufacturing, etc.) can use the master data but cannot
change it

Definitions and Descriptions


Following are some basic assembly terms:
Assembly
An assembly is a collection of pointers to piece parts and/or subassemblies. An assembly is a
part file that contains component objects.

Subassembly
A subassembly is an assembly that is used as a component object within a higher level
assembly. A subassembly contains component objects of its own.

Component Object

3
A component object is the entity that contains and links the pointer from the assembly back to
the master component part.
A component object can also be a subassembly made up of its own component parts and/or
component objects.

A component object records the following information:


Name (This can be different than the component part file name.)
Its layer, color, font, and width.
Reference set(s) being called (if specified).
Origin and orientation.
Mating constraints that relate its position to other components.
Pointers from the display of geometry in the assembly back to the component part.
Think of component object as a "post-it" note that has the above information written on
it. The "post-it" note is saved when you save the assembly. The actual geometry is not
saved in the assembly file.
Component Parts
A component part is a part file pointed to by a component object within an assembly. The
actual geometry is stored in the component part and is referenced, not copied, by the
assembly.
The term piece part is used to refer to master geometry as it exists outside of an assembly.

A component part can be:

4
In either English or metric units of measure. This means that assemblies and
subassemblies can have mixed units of measure.
In either post V10 or pre-V10 format. This means your assembly and subassembly can
use most all Unigraphics parts, past and present.
Read-only or Write accessible.
Located in your current directory or any NFS mounted node and directory.

General Assembly Concepts


There are two basic ways to define an assembly model:
top-down modeling
bottom-up modeling
Top-Down Modeling
In top-down assembly modeling you "design in context", creating new parts relative to other
components.
You create an assembly at the top of the hierarchy and move down the hierarchy, creating
subassemblies and components.
You will practice top-down assembly modeling in a later lesson.
Bottom-Up Modeling
When you use the bottom-up approach, you identify the lowest level piece parts, then create
component parts and subassemblies as you move up the assembly hierarchy.
Mixing and Matching
Realistically, you will probably mix these two approaches to add flexibility to your assembly
designs.
You can, for example, start modeling in a bottom-up mode, and then switch to a top-down
mode as your design progresses, switching back and forth as required.

The Master Model Concept


With a master model, diverse yet dependent design processes can access the same master
geometry during development.

Each application uses a separate assembly file. When the master model is revised, the other
applications will automatically update with minimal or no associativity loss.
The design intent of the various design applications can be maintained through the master
model.

The Master Model Concept


Master Model Example
Manufacturing engineers design fixture devices, define machining operations, designate cutter
tools, and save this data in their models.
By creating a manufacturing assembly and retrieving components into it, manufacturing
engineers can generate application specific geometry and data that references the master
geometry:
- This avoids duplication of model geometry.
- Multiple manufacturing designers can work in separate files simultaneously.
Manufacturing can own their assembly file(s) without having Write access to the master
model that is being referenced.

The Assemblies Toolbar


You can access the assembly functions two different ways:

6
via the Assemblies toolbar

via the Unigraphics NX main menu: Assemblies

The Assemblies Toolbar


Customizing the Toolbar
You can customize some options on the toolbar for Assemblies.
Open part file amd_doorlatch.prt from the amd/sheet_metal subdirectory.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.
The Assemblies toolbar appears.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, choose View Toolbars


choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies switch on.

Choose View

Toolbars

Customize.

Choose the Commands tab.

Choose the Assemblies option.

Assemblies commands are listed on the right side of the dialog.

Customize, then

8
By clicking the commands on or off, you can control which icons appear on the
Assemblies toolbar.
Turn the following commands off:
Create Component Array
Exploded Views
WAVE Geometry Linker
Check Clearances
Close the dialog.

Working Within Assemblies


There are two states for subassemblies and component parts of an assembly:
the work part: You create and edit geometry in the work part.
the displayed part: Shows the assembly or component context in which you are
working.
The Work Part
The work part can be the displayed part or any component part in your displayed assembly
part. You can view a whole assembly (as the displayed part) while identifying a specific
component part as the work part (the part in which work will be done).
In such a case, the work part will have color (1), the displayed part will be de-emphasized (2).

When you open a part file, it will be both the displayed and the work part.
After editing, you must save the work part for modifications to take effect.

9
You can make a read-only part the work part, but the system will notify you that any
changes you make cannot be saved.
There are four ways to make a part your work part:
Use the Make Work Part icon

in the Assemblies toolbar.

Choose the Select Components icon


, select the component, then press MB3
Make Work Part.
Select Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part.
Use Mouse Button 3 in the Assembly Navigator, or double-click on the Component
node in the Assembly Navigator.

Working Within Assemblies


Specifying the Work Part (1)
Try some of the ways to designate a component as the work part.
Note that the displayed part and the work part are the same.
Choose the Select Component icon.
Select the rail in the graphics area.

Note that the rail component highlights in the graphics area.


Choose the Make Work Part icon.

10

The rail is now displayed in color while all other components are grayed out, signifying
that they are not currently loaded into the assembly.
Now you could work on the rail as if you were working on the rail as a piece part.

Working Within Assemblies


Specifying the Work Part (2)
Make sure Select Component is active.
Select the headassm component.

With the cursor over the component, MB3

Make Work Part.

The work part is displayed in color; all other components are grayed out.

11

Working Within Assemblies


Specifying the Work Part (3)
Here's yet another way to designate the work part.
Choose Assemblies

Context Control

Set Work Part.

The Set Work Part dialog appears.


Choose leverassm from the dialog.

The subassembly highlights in the graphics area.


OK the selection.

12

Again, the work part is displayed in color while all other components are grayed out.
The last method of changing the work part uses the Assembly Navigator which is taught in
the next lesson in this course.

Working Within Assemblies


The Displayed Part
The Displayed Part is a total part file, assembly or component, that is displayed in the
graphics window.
There are five ways to change your displayed part:
Use the Make Displayed Part icon

on the toolbar.

Choose the Select Components icon


, select the component, then press MB3
Make Displayed Part.
Select Assemblies Context Control Set Displayed Part.
Select Window More Parts to brings up the Change Displayed Part dialog.
Use Mouse Button 3 Make Displayed Part in the Assembly Navigator.
As you work through the Assembly Modeling course, you will practice each of these methods.

Working Within Assemblies


Specifying the Displayed Part (1)
Now try some options for specifying the displayed part.
Currently, your displayed part is the amd_doorlatch.prt and your work part is leverassm.prt.
Make the leverassm.prt the displayed part.

13

Choose the Make Displayed Part icon

in the Assemblies toolbar.

The Class Selection dialog appears.


Select one of the components in the leverassm subassembly.
Choose Up One Level in the Class Selection dialog.
This selects the component and its parent component, in this case the whole leverassm.
OK the Class Selection dialog.
The lever subassembly is now both the displayed part and the work part. Note that changing
the displayed part is, in effect, opening the part file of that part.

The leverassm part file is displayed in wireframe with a black background.

Working Within Assemblies


Specifying the Displayed Part (2)
To switch the displayed part back to the amd_doorlatch.prt:
Choose Window on the main menu bar.
Notice that the system remembers that the amd_doorlatch.prt was the displayed part and
has it as an automatic option.
Choose amd_doorlatch.
The amd_doorlatch.prt is once again the displayed part and leverassm.prt is the work part.

14

Load Options
There are three part load states:
1) Fully loaded (displayed in color)
A part is said to be fully loaded if the whole part is loaded in computer memory from a
part file directory.
There are two ways to fully load a part:
Open the part file using File

Open.

Make the component the work part.


2) Partially loaded (displayed in de-emphasized color)
In this case, the computer only pulls into memory the model data required to display
the part.

Using partially loaded parts can greatly reduce the memory requirements for
assemblies.
Unloaded

15
A part is unloaded when it is closed or designated not to be loaded (using Load
Options) when an assembly is opened.

Load Options
Using Load Options
You can take advantage of Load Options as a tool to help you work with large assemblies.
Load Options let you control what components get loaded and from where.
You can specify:
which directories to search, and in which order, for components to load
that no components be loaded
what action Unigraphics NX should take if a component cannot be loaded
to load specific components of an assembly based on component filters you define
partial loading of components
to load the latest version of a part based on versioning rule.
Load Options do not affect the actual assembly you are opening.
Load Options only apply to component parts that need to be loaded due to the opening of an
assembly that references them.

Load Options
The Load Options Dialog
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

The Load Options dialog appears.


Using Load Options with the Assembly Navigator is a good way of to access large and
complicated assemblies.
You can retrieve an assembly structure without loading the component geometry. (The
assembly is loaded, but no components will be loaded or displayed.)
You can use the Assembly Navigator to navigate through the structure and load only
those portions of the assembly that are needed.
1) Load Method: As Saved - retrieves part from the
directory it was saved in. From Directory - retrieves part
from the directory the assembly is in. Search Directories uses the user-defined search directories.
2) Load Components: Allows control of which components
will be loaded. Also allows loading based on component sets
and filters.

16
3) Use Partial Loading: when off, components are fully
loaded when assembly is opened.

4) Abort Load on Failure and Allow Substitution dictates


how loading should proceed (or not) if a component of an
assembly is not found during loading.

5) These options are used to specify which part file


directories, reference sets or .def files will be searched for
component loading.
Cancel the dialog.

Filing Options
Using assembly filing mechanisms with load options can help you manage your virtual
assembly.
Saving Assembly Component Parts
Use File

1.
2.
3.
4.

Save to save the work part, without having to close the whole assembly.

Assembly is initially opened with components partially loaded.


comp 3 gets fully loaded when made work part.
To update piece part: File Save.
Updated part is written to disk.

If the work part is an assembly, then any edited components of that assembly are also saved.
If the work part saved is a subassembly, higher level assemblies will not be saved even if they
are modified.

17
File

Save All saves all parts within an assembly regardless of work part designation.

Filing Options
Closing Assembly Component Parts
Use File Close Selected Parts to selectively close (unload) components without having to
close the whole assembly.

1) Component gets loaded when made work part.


2) To unload component: File

Close

Selected Parts.

3) Component is unloaded from assembly.


Use File

Save to save any modifications before you close the part.

If you do not save the modifications, the changes will not be reflected in the piece part
file stored on disk.
Choose File

Close

Selected Parts.

The Close Part dialog appears.


The first half of the dialog lets you specify what component part(s) will be closed.

18

1) These switches let you determine what level of parts to list.


2) The list box list the components that can be closed based on the List Filter selection above.
The second half of the dialog lets you specify how the component part(s) will be closed.

1) The Close Method section specifies whether the close should affect part or whole assembly
2) If Force Close is on, you will not be warned if the selected part has been modified before it
is closed and all modifications will be lost. Close all closes all parts in your session.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Close Part dialog.

Filing Options
Reopening Assembly Component Parts
In a concurrent engineering environment, one designer may be working on an assembly while
another designer is modifying a part in the first designer's assembly.
The File Close Reopen Selected Parts option lets you selectively update loaded
components within an open assembly.

Example:
Designer A starts working in an assembly that references comp3.

19

Later, while Designer A is still working on his assembly, Designer B revises comp3 on the
piece part level and saves his work.

The updated part is saved to disk.


Later still, Designer A reopens comp3 (it is the work part) while his assembly is still open:
File Close Reopen Selected Parts:component.

The reopen command updates comp3 within Designer A's assembly, from disk, based on the
revisions made to it earlier by Designer B.

Filing Options
Dialog Options for Reopening Parts
Choose File

Close

Reopen Selected Parts.

The first half of the dialog lets you specify what component will be reopened.

20

1) Open As allows you to open a part file to use in place of the selected part file.
2) List of loaded components that can be reopened.

Filing Options
Second Half of the Reopen Part Dialog
The second half of the dialog lets you specify how the component will be reopened.
1) Specifies whether reopen should affect part or whole
assembly.
2) If on, you will not be warned if selected part has been
modified before it is loaded from disk.
3) Reopens all parts in session that have been changed on
disk.

Once you complete your reopen operation, the Information window lists:
the names of the parts reopened
the parts' status before they were reopened
the parts' status after they were reopened
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Reopen Part dialog.

21

Assembly Reports
The reports you can be query are:
List Components
Update Report
Where Used
Session Where Used
Assembly Diagram
Family Report
These reports describe the history of a particular assembly and its history of use.
Next, we will describe the List Components report.
The other reports are described in the Revisions and Substitutions lesson.

Assembly Reports
Listing Components of an Assembly

If necessary, open the doorlatch part again.


Make sure amd_doorlatch is the work part.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components from the top menu bar.

Information is listed about the components in the work part.


Part name: At the extreme left of the Information window, the component part name ('piece
part' name) is listed in lowercase. The indents indicate the hierarchy.
Reference set name: The reference set name column; more about this in the Reference Sets
lesson.
Component name: Next, the component name column listing the name of the component as
used in the assembly. (Name of the "post-it" note.)
Typically, this is the same as the piece part name but the part may have been given a unique
name when added to the assembly. This entry is always in uppercase.
Count: Number of components with the same name in the assembly.
Comment: Descriptions like Modified (something was changed since last loaded), Pre-V10,
Mated (component's been mated to another component) or Partially Loaded.

22
Units (of measure): English or metric.
Directory: Directory from which the component was retrieved.
You will learn other methods of interrogating an assembly model as you proceed through
this course.
Dismiss the Information window.
File

Close All Parts.

23

The Assembly Navigator


Objectives for this lesson are:
starting and manipulating the Assembly Navigator
using the Assembly Navigator toolbar
understanding the Assembly Navigator symbols
becoming familiar with the display characteristics of the Assembly Navigator
using the functional shortcuts in the Assembly Navigator

The Assembly Navigator graphically displays of the assembly's structure. This is sometimes
referred to as a "tree" structure.
You can use the Assembly Navigator to select the components of an assembly and perform
operations on them.
Each component of an assembly is displayed as a node in the assembly tree structure.

Starting the Assembly Navigator


In this section, you will open an assembly and view it in the Assemblies Navigator. You
will also explore Assembly Navigator functions
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_doorlatch.prt from the amd/sheet_metal subdirectory.

24
Choose Application

Assemblies.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
, use
MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window. (Unix users,
choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Maneuvering the Assembly Navigator
You can manipulate the Assembly Navigator in three modes:
Pullout / Pinned mode (if you are viewing CAST outside of the Resource Bar
browser).
Window mode
Docked mode (NT systems only)
Pullout and Pinned Mode [CAST outside of Resource Bar browser]
The Assembly Navigator will appear each time you position the cursor over the Assembly
Navigator tab.

You can "pin" the Assembly Navigator open by clicking on the thumb pin symbol in the left
hand corner.

If you double-click on the Assembly Navigator tab, the Assembly Navigator will appear in its
own window.
Window Mode
In window mode, the Assembly Navigator is displayed in a separate window that can be
manipulated like any other window (dragged to a new position, enlarged etc.).

25

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Docked Mode (NT users only)
In docked mode, the Assembly Navigator is inserted into the Unigraphics NX window, much
like the Modeling toolbars.
To switch from window mode to docked mode, drag the Assembly Navigator to the extreme
top, bottom, left or right of the Unigraphics NX window and release.
To switch from docked mode to window mode, select the double vertical bars in the left edge
of the docked window and drag it into the main session window.

Practice docking and undocking the Assembly Navigator.

Starting the Assembly Navigator


The Assembly Navigator Toolbar
You can access the Assembly Navigator functions two ways:
via the Assembly Navigator toolbar

26
via Tools

Assembly Navigator

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Customizing the Toolbar
You can customize some options on the Assembly Navigator toolbar:
Choose View

Toolbars

Customize.

Using the Toolbars tab, turn on (checked) the Assembly Navigator switch.
Choose the Commands tab.

Choose the Assembly Navigator option.

27
The commands for the Assembly Navigator are listed on the right.
By clicking the various commands on or off, you can control which icons appear on the
Assembly Navigator toolbar.
Turn the following commands off:
WAVE Mode
Filtering Mode
Export to Browser
Close the Customize dialog.
The toolbar is dockable on NT systems, but not on UNIX. All options can also be
accessed through Tools Assembly Navigator.

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Assembly Navigator Symbols
With the Assembly Navigator visible, notice that the assembly contains component parts and
subassemblies.

Assembly and subassembly symbols

Component symbol

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Selection and the Assembly Navigator
Mouse buttons access many assembly functions.

28
Using MB1, click on the RAIL in the Assembly Navigator.
The corresponding geometry in the graphics area becomes highlighted.
Whenever you can select components using a dialog, you can also select them using MB1
with the Assembly Navigator.
Using MB3, click on one of the nodes.

With this pop-up menu, you can perform operations on the assembly and its components.
Options are grayed out or active depending on whether the selected node is a subassembly,
an unloaded part, or a partially loaded part.
This pop-up will also appear differently if you have the WAVE mode or Filtering mode
switched on. These areas are covered where appropriate.

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Multiple Selection
Select multiple nodes by using <CTRL> MB1 and <Shift> MB1:
<CTRL> MB1 selects non-contiguous nodes.
<Shift> MB1 selects a range of contiguous nodes.
With MB1, click on a rivet node in the Assembly Navigator.

29
Hold down the <CTRL> key, then use MB1 and click on the rail node and the pipe node.

With the cursor in the highlighted blue area, click MB3.


This pop-up is different from the pop-up you get when you select only one node. That is
because each node has different qualities and a different set of functions applies to each node.
On Windows platforms, you can select away from any item to deselect everything in the
Assembly Navigator; on Unix platforms you must deselect items individually with
Ctrl Select.

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Column Display in the Assembly Navigator
The Assembly Navigator uses columns to organize information.
The number of columns depends on the assembly model opened. You can dynamically
control this.

If you use assemblies with UG/Manager, these additional columns display:


Part Number
Part Revision
Non-master types
Non-master dataset name
Item type
Sequence number
You can modify these columns through the Assembly Navigator window.
Place your cursor in the gray bar below the Assembly Navigator banner.

30
Choose MB3

Columns.

The pull-down shows the available columns and which ones are enabled (checked) to be
displayed.
Practice turning on and off various columns and note how the Assembly Navigator
changes.

Starting the Assembly Navigator


Configuring Columns
There is a method of configuring the order in which you see the columns in the Assembly
Navigator.
Place your cursor in the gray bar below the Assembly Navigator banner.

Choose MB3

Columns

Configure.

The Assembly Navigator Properties dialog appears.

31

In the Assembly Navigator Properties dialog you can turn columns on and off and also move
the various column designations up or down to change the order in which they appear in the
Assembly Navigator.
Practice positioning the various enabled columns using the up/down arrow icons to get a
feel on how you can customize the Assembly Navigator.
Cancel the Assembly Navigator Properties dialog when finished.
Table of Assembly Navigator Column Symbols

Column

Symbol/Status
Read only

Read-only

Read-Write
Partially Loaded
Read Only (Part Family Member)

Out of Date
Weight Status

Out of Date
<no symbol> Up to Date
Unreliable Value
Weight OK
Unconstrained
Partially Constrained
Fully Constrained

Position

Inconsistently Constrained
Fully Constrained with an explicit override
Fully Constrained with an implicit override
Partially Constrained with an explicit override

32
Partially Constrained with an implicit override
Unconstrained with an explicit override
Unconstrained with an implicit override
Modified
Shape

Modified
<no symbol> Unmodified
Undeformed Part
Deformed Part

The Assembly Navigator Tree Structure


The tree structure represents the components and subassemblies in the assembly.
With large assemblies you can simplify this display to focus on specific areas of the assembly.
In this section, you will explore a few methods of doing this.
Packing/Unpacking
Notice that there are several occurrences of the part named "rivet". One way to simplify this
assembly is to combine all occurrences of this component into one node by "packing".
Click on one of the rivet nodes with MB3, then click on the Pack option.

The system puts a count of how many occurrences are packed on the node.

33
The cascade menu shows Unpack whenever the pointer is over a set of packed nodes. Unpack
reverses the Pack command.

Use the Pack All icon and the Unpack All icon to effect a global pack and unpack.

Choose Unpack All.

The Assembly Navigator Tree Structure


Expanding/Collapsing
You can also expand or collapse nodes of the Assembly Navigator tree by clicking on the
+ or - boxes in the tree display.
Click on the + box of the rodassm node with MB1.

Once you expand the tree, the "+" changes to a "-". Clicking on the "-" collapses the tree,
reversing the expand operation.
Use the Expand All icon and the Collapse All icon to effect a global expand and
collapse.

34

The Assembly Navigator Tree Structure


The Assembly Navigator Display
Understanding how to interpret the symbols in the Assembly Navigator will help you work
with your assembly.
Check Boxes
The check boxes indicate 3 basic conditions:
checked in full color

: the node represents an open and unblanked part -

Example:
checked but muted in color

: the node represents an open, blanked part -

Example:
unchecked box

: represents a closed part -

Example:

The Assembly Navigator Tree Structure


Assembly Structure Icons
You can determine the loading status of the assembly by the state of the two assembly
structure icons.
Multiple "block" icons denote assemblies or subassemblies:
Fully loaded assemblies / subassemblies.
Partially loaded assemblies / subassemblies.
Unloaded assemblies / subassemblies.
Single "block" icons denote components of assemblies:
Fully loaded part.
Partially loaded part.
Unloaded part

The Assembly Navigator Tree Structure


Try an Example
Choose File
Navigator.

Close

Choose File

Options

All Parts then OK the question dialog. Do not close the Assembly
Load Options.

35
Make sure the Use Partial Loading option is on and the Load Components option is set
to No Components, then OK to accept the Load Options.
Reopen the part file amd_doorlatch.prt from the amd/sheet_metal subdirectory.

All the nodes under the doorlatch assembly node are grayed out (not loaded) because you
designated No Components for the Load Components option.
Click on the box of the rodassm node with MB1.
Click on the box of the first leverassm node with MB1.

Use MB3 to click on the base node, then choose Open

Component.

Notice that the base, along with its parent, leverassm and, in turn, its parent, rodassm, are
loaded and displayed in the graphics area.

36

The Assembly Navigator Tree Structure


Quick Assembly Manipulation Using Icons
The icons in the Assembly Navigator tell you the loading status of your components and
assemblies and provide a quick way to change working status.
Click on clear check box

of pin1015 in the Assembly Navigator.

When you click on an empty check box, the component is loaded (partially or fully,
depending on your current load options). It is also unblanked as are any components
belonging to it (in the case of a subassembly).
Click on the red check mark

of pin1015.

This instantly blanks the component, and the check is muted.


Click on the muted check mark

of pin1015.

The component is unblanked. If this node had been a subassembly, any blanked children of
the node would also be unblanked.
Close All parts.

Opening Components
The Open command has options that are available under different circumstances.
The following section will explore some of these options.
Choose File

Options

Load options.

From the Load Options dialog, make sure the Load Components option is set to No
Components. Choose OK.
Open amd_vise_assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

In the Assembly Navigator, click the plus box ( ) of amd_fixed_jaw_assm to display the

37
components.

Notice that all components are unloaded.

Opening Components
Opening a Component
In the Assembly Navigator, click amd_fixed_jaw_assm with MB3, then choose Open
Component.
Click the plus box ( ) of amd_moving_jaw_assm to display the components.
Notice that none of its components are loaded.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components.

Find "amd_fixed_jaw_assm" in the list and notice that it is now partially loaded.
The Open Component option loads the component but no child components (regardless of
how Load Components is set in the Load Options).
If Use Partial Loading is turned off, then the component is fully loaded; otherwise, it is
partially loaded.
Dismiss the Information window.

Opening Components
Opening Child Components
Select the amd_fixed_jaw_assm node with MB3, then choose Open
Components.

Child

38

The Open Child Components option loads only the selected component's next level
unloaded children components.
These components are loaded with the same status as if you had used Open

Component.

Click the plus box ( ) of amd_moving_jaw_assm to display the components.


Notice that shared child components found in other subassemblies are also opened.

1) When initial children are opened...


2) ...other occurrences of the part are also opened.

Opening Components
Opening an Assembly
Choose the main assembly, amd_vise_assm, with MB3, then Open

Assembly.

39

This opens the component and all child components all the way down to leaf nodes.
The Load Options settings determine if the parts are partially or fully loaded.

Opening Components
Opening a Component Fully and Opening a Component As
The final two open options are Open

Component Fully and Open

Component As

Open Component Fully lets you fully load a component and Open Component As allows
you to open another component in place of the original assembly component.
In this section you will use the two options to replace "jaw_plate" with "v_jaw_plate".
File

Close

All Parts, then open the part amd_vise_assm.prt again.

Use MB3 Open Component on amd__fixed_jaw_assm and


amd_moving_jaw_assm to fully load the parents of "jaw_plate".
Click on the plus boxes of amd__fixed_jaw_assm and amd_moving_jaw_assm to open
up the tree.

Opening Components
Opening a Component Fully
To open `jaw_plate' with a replacement component, `v_jaw_plate', all parents of the
replacement component must be fully loaded, and the component itself must remain unloaded.
Using the option Open

Component Fully:

Choose amd_fixed_jaw_assm node with MB3, then Open

Component Fully.

Repeat for amd_moving_jaw_assm.


The assemblies are fully loaded, but their children components are not.

40

Since "v_jaw_plate" does not have the same internal identifier (UID) as "jaw_plate", you need
to change the Load Options to Allow Substitution.

Opening Components
Using Allow Substitution
If the replacement part has the same history as the original component, any associativity
pertaining to the original component will be retained.
Choose File

Options

Load options.

Choose Allow Substitution to turn it on.


Choose OK to dismiss the dialog.
From the Assembly Navigator, select a jaw_plate node with MB3, then choose Open
Component As.
The Select Part dialog prompts you to select the replacement part you wish to open.
Select the Choose Part File option then choose part v_jaw_plate.prt from the list.
An Open Warning tells you the part is not a version of the component part.
Choose OK to dismiss the warning box.
The replacement part is loaded in place of the existing part.

41

Close All parts.

Closing Components
You can also selectively close components in the overall assembly tree.
This lets you unload a component while it is still being referenced by an assembly.
In the Assembly Navigator, the Close option works similar to the File Close
Parts function you were introduced to in the Overview of Assemblies lesson.

Selected

Closing Components
Closing Components Using the Assembly Navigator
Make sure that Load Options is set to All Components.
Choose File Options Load options.
Click the Load Components option.
Set to All Components.
Choose OK.
Open the part file amd_vise_assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.
Choose Tools
.

Assembly Navigator

Expand All or choose the Expand All icon

In general, you use the Tools Assembly Navigator options for global settings. Local
settings are done with using MB3.

42
From the Assembly Navigator, select a shaft node with MB3, then choose Close

Part.

Notice that the node symbol changes to the symbol for an unloaded component part.

From the Assembly Navigator, select a shaft_nut node with MB3, then choose Close
Part.
You now have six closed parts; the shaft nuts in the guide assembly and, as direct
components, in the vise assembly.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Update Report.

The entries for the shaft and the shaft nuts now show "Not loaded" in the Status column.
Dismiss the Information window.
Now that you have a subassembly with some of its components modified, you can close the
guide handle assembly (of a higher level assembly), or you can close the whole assembly.
From the Assembly Navigator, select amd_guide_handle_assm with MB3, then click on
Close Part.
Notice that the Assembly Navigator node icons show that the subassembly and all of its
components are now unloaded.
Check the Update report again.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Update Report.

These parts are now listed as "Not Available" in the Loaded Version column, but do show the
Referenced Version.
Dismiss the Information window.
The Open option on the Assembly Navigator MB3 pull-down is an easy way to reload
components that have been unloaded using Close.
From the Assembly Navigator, select amd_guide_handle_assm with MB3, then choose
Open Assembly to reload the subassembly.

43

Activating the Displayed and the Work Part


You can use the Assembly Navigator to activate the work part and the displayed part.
In the Assembly Navigator, use MB3 to click on the amd_guide_assm
Part.

Make Work

The work part is now amd_guide_assm.prt. Everything else in the assembly is deemphasized in both the Assembly Navigator and the graphics window.

In the Assembly Navigator, use MB3 to click on the amd_guide_assm


Displayed Part.

Make

Notice that the top assembly in the Assembly Navigator is the displayed part. Whenever
you activate the displayed part, it will always be the top assembly in the Assembly Navigator.
In the Assembly Navigator, use MB3 to click on the amd_guide_assm
Parent.

Display

44
You have three choices. When you select this option, you can then choose the immediate
parent or any of its loaded grandparents.
Choose amd_moving_jaw_assm.

The displayed part is now changed to "moving_jaw_assm", and the tree structure reflects
these changes.

Activating the Displayed and the Work Part


The Work Part-Maintain Switch
Notice that the work part is still set to "amd_guide_assm.prt".
Choose Preferences

Assemblies.

Choose Maintain (under the Work Part section) to turn it off.


When turned on, the work part will not change when you change the displayed part (as
long as the current work part is part of the displayed part).
If this option is turned off, then the new displayed part will always be the work part.
Choose OK to accept the change and dismiss the dialog.
In the Assembly Navigator, use MB3 to click on the amd_moving_jaw_assm
Parent amd_vise_assm.

Display

This time the work part automatically became the new displayed part. That `was because
Maintain Work Part was turned off.
Close all parts.

45

Bottom-Up Assemblies

The objectives of this lesson are:


understand the basic relationships of assemblies and subassemblies in a BottomUp modeling approach
understand how to add existing parts to an assembly
understand how to reposition components when added to an assembly
understand the role of Name Attributes

General Bottom-Up Concepts


With the bottom-up approach, component parts of an assembly are designed and modified
apart from the parent assembly.

46
When opened, assemblies using the component parts are automatically updated to reflect
changes made at the piece part level.

Assemblies and Subassemblies


Any Unigraphics NX part can have components added to it, therefore, any part file can
become an assembly.
You will develop several assemblies that will be used as subassemblies in higher level
assemblies. These in turn will be used as subassemblies to an even higher level assembly.

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


You will be introduced to bottom-up assembly techniques as you develop a vise assembly.

47

The vise assembly is made up of the following subassemblies:


moving jaw assembly
fixed jaw assembly
guide handle assembly
guide assembly
handle assembly

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


The Handle Assembly

The first subassembly you will create is the "handle_assm".

You should be working in the vise directory to create the new part.
Choose File

New.

Key in handle_assm for the name of the new assembly file.


Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies, if necessary.
The Assemblies Toolbar appears.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

48

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, choose View Toolbars


choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies switch on.
Choose the Trimetric icon
switch to the Trimetric view.
Choose Preferences

from the View toolbar or use MB3

Customize, then

Orient View to

Assemblies, then turn on Preview Component on Add (checked).

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


Inserting a Component into an Assembly

Choose the Add Existing Component icon


Add Existing.

or choose Assemblies

Components

The Select Part dialog appears.


More About the Select Part Dialog

1) Choose Part File option lets you retrieve a closed part.


2) Choose loaded part list shows loaded parts (if any).

3) Part name field lets you add a previously loaded part by


name.

You can also select an active part from the graphics window or using the Assembly
Navigator.
Since no parts are loaded, you must use the Choose Part File option to choose a file from
the part file directory.

49
Choose the Choose Part File option.
The Part Name dialog appears.
To Add a component, you:
1.
Designate the part file that will become a component part of the assembly.
2. Define the necessary information about the component object (the pointer
information) that will be created in the virtual assembly file.
3. Establish an origin for the component object.
The Part Name dialog specifies a part file that your (virtual) assembly will point to as a
component part.
Choose screw.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory, OK.
The Add Existing Part dialog appears.
More About the Add Existing Part Dialog

1) Multiple addition of components


2) Component designation area.
3) Ref. Set. and positioning options

4) Layer specification options

The Add Existing Part dialog specifies the following:


Multiple add: `No' is the default.
Component name: The default assumes the component's name will be the same as the
part file name (note upper case), but it does not have to be!
Reference. Set: Option list shows all reference sets in current component.
Positioning: Specifies how the component is to be positioned. Absolute is the default,
which brings in a component using absolute coordinates.

50
Whenever you add parts as component objects to an assembly, you will see the Add Existing
Part dialog.
Mark sure the Layer options is set to Work.
Because you set the assembly preferences to display a preview of any added component,
you now have a staging view window in the upper right hand corner.
Accept the other defaults by choosing OK.
The options you set in the Add Existing Part dialog affect the sequence of subsequent
dialogs. At this point, the Point Constructor dialog should display.
The Point Constructor dialog defines the component object's destination point within the
assembly.
Choose OK to accept the default Base Point of 0,0,0.
This places the component object (the screw) at the WCS 0,0,0 of your assembly.

More About Component Positioning

The component's reference point and orientation is determined in one of two ways:
If the Reference Set designation is set to Entire Part (the default), then the absolute
origin and orientation of the component part is used as the reference.

51

If the Reference Set designation is set to a specific reference set, then the WCS origin
and orientation of the in-coming reference set is used as the reference, unless
otherwise specified during reference set creation.

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


Inserting Another Component into the Assembly
The second part of the handle assembly is the handle itself.

Absolute 0,0,0 of the handle part is the center of the handle. You will add the handle to
the assembly at the existing point of the screw part.
If you get out of sequence, you can choose the Add Existing Component icon to get to the
Select Part dialog.
Choose Choose Part File on the Select Part dialog.
Choose handle.prt as the next component, then OK.
The default information in the Add Existing Part dialog is correct, so you will accept the
dialog parameters as is.
Choose OK on the Add Existing Part dialog.

52
The Point Constructor appears.
The center of the handle (absolute 0,0,0 for the handle) will be centered in the hole in the
screw shaft.
Select the Existing Point icon.
Select the point of the screw component.

The handle is added to the assembly.

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


Adding Multiple Occurrences of a Component
There are two occurrences of the handle stop in your assembly, one on each end of the
handle.

53

Choose the Choose Part File on the Select Part dialog.


Choose the handle_stop.prt to be the next component, then OK.
You can specify that you want two occurrences of a component in the Add Existing Part
dialog.
Click the Multiple Add option.

Choose OK to accept the dialog parameters.


The Point Constructor dialog appears.
Choose the Arc/Ellipse/Sphere Center icon.

from the positioning option box.

The first occurrence of the handle stop will be on the furthest end of the handle.
Select an arc at the shoulder step of the far end of the handle.

The first handle stop is added and you are returned to the Point Constructor dialog.

54

If you had not specified Multiple Add, you would have been returned to the Select Part
dialog.
Make sure the Arc Center icon is highlighted.
Select an arc at the shoulder step of the near end of the handle.
The second handle stop is added.

Notice that the new occurrence is not oriented properly. You will correct its position by
editing your assembly.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Point Constructor dialog.

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


Repositioning Components
You can manipulate components using the Reposition Component dialog.
Choose the Reposition Component icon
or choose Assemblies Components
Reposition Components.
Select the second handle_stop using the Class Selection dialog, then OK.
The Reposition Component dialog appears.

55
Select the Move handles Only option.
This allows you to move the repositioning tool to a different location for better control
during repositioning of the component.
Choose Arc/Ellipse/Sphere Center

as your positioning method.

Select an arc at the shoulder step of the near end of the improperly positioned handle stop.

The Reposition tools centers itself on the defined point.


Select the Move Objects option.
Select the XC-YC Rotate handle (the round dot in the XC-YC plane).

Key in an angle of 180, then Enter.


Choose Apply in the Reposition Component dialog.

56

Cancel the Reposition Component dialog.

Adding Existing Parts to an Assembly


Renaming Components
The two occurrences of the handle stop component have the same component name. You will
give them unique names.
This changes the component's object name (its name within the assembly). It does not
change the component's part name.
Having unique component object names has advantages:
Any component listing will enumerate uniquely named components individually.
In component selection dialogs, each unique name will be individually selectable.
Open the Assembly Navigator so you can see the effects of the name change.
Open the Assembly Navigator.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
In the Assembly Navigator, select the first handle-stop node.
With the cursor over the component, use MB3
The Component Properties dialog appears.

Properties.

57

Choose the Parameters tab in the Component Properties dialog.


In the Component Name field, key in handle_stop_1, then OK.
Notice that you now have two different handle stop names.

For the other handle stop, you will use the Global Selection method.
Choose the Select Components icon

If you do not see the Global Selection toolbar, use View


on the toolbar.

Toolbars

In the graphics window, select the second handle stop you added.
With the cursor over the component, use MB3

Properties.

Choose the Parameters tab.


Key in a new component name of handle_stop_2 then Apply.
You now have changed both component names.

Selection to turn

58
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Component Properties dialog.
More About the Component Properties Dialog

The Component Properties dialog can be accessed 2 different ways:


Using the Select Components icon in conjunction with MB3 Properties.
Selecting the component in the Assembly Navigator in conjunction with MB3
Properties.
Assembly Properties
Applies to? Functionality
Assembly Components General component properties stored in displayed part.

1) Property Type tabs: Current Type:


Assembly
2) Load, Blank and Layer status:editable
3) Visualization options.

Parameters Properties
Applies to?
Parameters

Components

Functionality
Component parameterization as controlled by the direct
parent part. Includes ?Component Name?

1) Property Type tabs: Current Type: Parameters

59

2) Suppression criteria

3) Part Family status

Attributes Properties
Applies to?
One or more components; one or more features;
Attributes
Displayed Part; one or more other objects.

Functionality
Attribute editing for one
or more objects.

1) Property Type tabs: Current


Type: Attributes

2) List window of assigned


attributes

3) List window selections are


editable

Part File Properties


Applies to?

Functionality

Part File

Part file properties

Displayed Part or Components

60

1) Property Type tabs: Current Type: Part File

2) Listing of part file data

3) Listing of remembered mating constraints

General Properties
Applies to?
Anything but features, components and
General
parts

Functionality
Name editing, access to Object Info.

1) Property Type tabs: Current Type: General


2) Component name
3) Positioning options for placing Name on graphic display
4) If the index toggle is on (checked) , the Starting index entry field becomes available
and takes the default value one, or the previous value used as an initial index in this
session, if it exists.

61
5) Information icon brings up general information of named component.
Weight Properties
Applies to?
Functionality
Weight
Displayed Part or Components
Weight information.
1) Property Type tabs: Current Type: Weight
2) Mass weight read out

3) If checked, mass calculations will be done on Save

4) Update now icon calculates weight upon demand

Attribute Names
Names are a system attribute. Component names are automatically assigned to component
objects in an assembly.
More in-depth treatment of attributes within assemblies is available in the Attributes
lesson.
Displaying Names
First you will display the names of the components in your assembly.
Choose Preferences

Visualization.

The Visualization Preferences dialog appears.

Choose the Names/Borders option.


Choose the Work View option.
Choose OK to accept.

62

By default, names are located at the origins of the components.

If components share origin locations, their names will be on top of each other.

You may need to regenerate your display to see the names. You have two choices: Use
View Operation Regenerate Work, or use MB3 Fit.
More About the Names/Borders Option

1) Turns name display on/off.


2) Name will appear in the view which was the work view when the
name was assigned.
3) All names will appear in the current work view.

Attribute Names
Arranging Names
By rearranging the position of the names, they will be more legible and more selectable.
Names are attributes, you access attribute commands through the Format dialog bar option.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the screw node.
With the cursor over the component, use MB3

Properties.

In the Component Properties dialog, choose the General tab.


Choose the Specify name location icon.

63

To avoid moving names beyond clipping planes, use WCS


View.

Orient WCS

Current

The screw component along with its name is highlighted. The Point Constructor appears.
Choose the Cursor Location icon.
Indicate a new location for the name, then Apply.

Align the remaining names using the Point Constructor.

When you select a component by its name, it will be selected regardless of its blank
status or layer/visibility status.

Creating More Subassemblies: On Your Own


So far you have created the handle assembly, one of the five assemblies that will become
subassemblies to the highest level assembly, the vise assembly.
The vise assembly is made up of the following subassemblies:

64
moving jaw assembly
fixed jaw assembly
guide handle assembly
guide assembly
handle assembly (DONE)
You will develop these assemblies "on your own" using procedures you learned while
developing the handle assembly.
To see the completed vise assembly, open part amd_vise_assm. Do not close all the
parts or you will lose your previous work.
If you cannot complete any of the component assemblies, there are master files of all the
necessary assembly files.
The completed subassembly files are prefixed with the amd_ designation.

Creating More Subassemblies: On Your Own


The Guide Assembly

The guide assembly is made up of the following components:


guide part
bushing part
shaft part (2 required)
shaft nut part (2 required)
Note that the guide assembly is made up of part files only, there are no subassemblies in
this assembly.
In this section you will create a new subassembly file and add components to it.
Things to Remember:
Each part file has a layer structure. Use the Work layer option when adding
parts.

65
Remember to make layers 1-10 visible or selectable.
Use Multiple Add to add more than one occurrence of the same part.
You will need to Reposition some components; try several options.
Use the Assembly Navigator and its mouse button 3 pop-up options for assembly
short cuts.
Choose File New.
Key in guide_assm as the new part file name.
Use the Add Existing Component icon

to insert the necessary parts.

guide part
bushing part
shaft part (2 required)
shaft nut part (2 required)

Creating More Subassemblies: On Your Own


The Guide Handle Assembly

The guide handle assembly is made up of the following components:


guide assembly
handle assembly
moving jaw part
screw nut part
The guide handle assembly is made up of part files and subassemblies.
Open a new file and add components to it.
Choose File

New.

Key in guide_handle_assm.prt for the new file name.

66

Use the Add Existing Component icon

to insert the necessary parts.

guide assembly
handle assembly
moving jaw part
screw nut part
Things to Remember:
Each part file has a layer structure.
Remember to make layers 1-10 visible or selectable.
You may need to Regenerate your display from time to time. (Fit will do it too.)
Use Blank as necessary to minimize clutter in your display.
Use the Assembly Navigator and its mouse button 3 pop-up options for assembly short cuts.

Creating More Subassemblies: On Your Own


The Moving Jaw Assembly

The moving jaw assembly is made up of the following components:


guide handle assembly
jaw plate part
plate screw part (2 required)
The moving jaw assembly is made up of part files and a subassembly.
Choose File

New.

Key in moving _jaw_assm.prt.


Use the Add Existing Component icon

to insert the necessary parts.

67
guide handle assembly
jaw plate part
plate screw part (2 required)
Things to Remember:
Each part file has a layer structure.
Use the Work layer option when adding parts.
Remember to make layers 1-10 visible or selectable.
Use Multiple Add to add more than one occurrence of the same part.
You will need to Reposition some components; try several options.
Use the Assembly Navigator and its mouse button 3 pop-up options for assembly short cuts.

Creating More Subassemblies: On Your Own


The Fixed Jaw Assembly

The fixed jaw assembly is made up of the following components:


fixed jaw part
jaw plate part
plate screw part (2 required)
Choose File

New.

Key in fixed_jaw_assm.prt.
Use the Add Existing Component icon
fixed jaw part

to insert the necessary parts.

68
jaw plate part
plate screw part (2 required)
Note that the fixed jaw assembly is made up of part files only; there are no
subassemblies in this assembly.

Creating More Subassemblies: On Your Own


The Vise Assembly

The vise assembly is made up of the following components:


moving jaw assembly
fixed jaw assembly
shaft nut parts (2 required)
The moving jaw assembly is made up of part files and subassemblies.
Choose File

New.

Key in vise_assm.prt.
Use the Add Existing Component icon

to insert the necessary parts.

moving jaw assembly


fixed jaw assembly
shaft nut parts (2 required)
Things to Remember:
Each part file has a layer structure.
Remember to make layers 1-10 visible or selectable.
Use Multiple Add to add more than one occurrence of the same part.

69
You will need to Reposition some components; try several options.
You may need to Regenerate your display from time to time. (Fit will do it too.)
Use Blank as necessary to minimize clutter in your display.
Use the Assembly Navigator and its mouse button 3 pop-up options for assembly
short cuts.
Use File Close All Parts when finished.

Reference Sets

70

The objectives of this lesson are:


understanding the characteristics of reference sets
understanding how reference sets are used
using reference sets and load options
creating reference sets
editing reference sets
using reference sets and display techniques

General Concepts
If you display an entire component part, or subassembly, you may get more than you
bargained for (especially in wireframe mode). You will get:
All of the sketches
Datum planes and axes
Construction geometry
Any other design tools

You can limit the display with reference sets.

Characteristics of a Reference Set


A reference set is a named partition of data within a part file. It is a way to isolate data groups
for particular uses.
A reference set may contain the following data:
Name, origin and orientation
Geometry, coordinate systems, datum planes/axes, pattern objects

71
Any information of a component object once it is added to a reference set
Attributes
Any functional operations using reference sets operations are performed on the work part.

Characteristics of a Reference Set


How are Reference Sets Used?
There is no limit to the number of reference sets you can create in a single part file.
Once created, you can call individual reference sets into an assembly, using Load Options,
instead of calling an entire component.
Example:
Suppose a part file has three discipline specific reference sets:
BODY: containing only solid geometry.
LATHE: containing only lathe machining data.
TOOLING: containing only tool/fixture geometry.
When developing an assembly, you may only want to add the BODY reference set of the
incoming component part into the assembly.
This avoids display confusion.

Characteristics of a Reference Set


System Defaults and Reference Sets
Every assembly component has access, by default, to two reference set conditions:
the `Entire Part' condition (all reference sets)
the `Empty' reference set
The Entire Part Condition
The Entire Part condition is the default. It refers to all geometry in a part, regardless of any
defined reference sets.
It is a quick way to address all geometry for display.

72
In various report Information windows, the term None is used when no reference sets
are in effect. This is the same as `Entire part'.

You can designate the Entire Part reference condition:


Using Assembly Navigator

MB3

Using the Replace Reference Set icon


Reference Set)

Replace Reference Set dialog.


(Assemblies

Components

Replace

Characteristics of a Reference Set


The Empty Reference Set
The "Empty" reference set is used as a placeholder in an assembly.

1) Reference set (BODY) contains the entire component part


2) Reference set (EMPTY) serves as a place holder for the component (it does not display)
You can designate the "empty" reference set:
Using Assembly Navigator
Using the Reference Set icon
Set)

MB3

Replace Reference Set dialog.

(Assemblies

Components

Replace Reference

More About Other Reference Set Conditions


In addition to the "Empty" and "Entire Part" conditions, it is possible to customize your
defaults file to include a "Model" default.

73
This is achieved by specifying a name for the following statement in the default file
Assemblies_ModelReferenceSet
Example:
Assemblies_ModelReferenceSet: "MODEL"
would yield a situation where all solid bodies or sheet bodies
would automatically be put into the Model reference set.

Model is the type of Reference Set


"MODEL", is the reference set name specified in the
defaults file.
The first word, Model, is how the system identifies the model
reference set. The second name is not that important. What
this means is that if you share your geometry with others, they
do NOT need to name their model reference sets the same.

Characteristics of a Reference Set


Reference Sets and Load Options
You can specify which reference sets to load using the Load Options dialog.
Load options are also found in the File pull-down menu.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Click on the Default Reference Sets option.


The Expanded Load Options Dialog
The Default Reference Sets option expands the Load Options dialog.

1) List of ref sets that can be loaded.


2) New reference set entry field.
3) Adds the entered reference set to list.
4) Removes selected ref. set from list.
5) Moves ref. set. up one level from selected reference
set.
6) Moves ref. set down one level from selected ref. set.
7) Saves settings in load_options.def file.

74
8) Changes ref. sets back to previous saved settings.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the dialog.

Creating Reference Sets


You can create a reference set:
in an assembly when creating a new component. (top-down environment)
in a component part, when designing in context of an assembly (can be confusing!)
in a component part, outside of an assembly, on the piece part level
First, you will create reference sets in three component parts.
Each of the three components has more than one reference set to be defined.

Creating Reference Sets


File Preparation
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_fixed_jaw_assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.
The Assemblies Toolbar appears.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

75

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, choose View Toolbars


choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies switch on.

Customize then

You will working with the components in the Fixed Jaw assembly:
jaw_plate.prt
plate_screw.prt
fixed_jaw.prt
It is helpful to use the Assembly Navigator when creating reference sets.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Next you need to change the work part to jaw_plate.


From the Assembly Navigator, select jaw_plate with MB3, then choose Make Work
Part.

76

This part file has two types of geometry:


sketch geometry (cyan)
solid geometry (blue)

Creating Reference Sets


The Create Reference Set Dialog
You will create a reference set of each type. By doing this, you can quickly display just the
solid geometry or the sketch geometry.
Choose Format

Reference Sets.

The Reference Sets dialog appears.

77
Note that the jaw plate part currently has three reference sets: one that holds some sketch
geometry and the two defaults (Entire Part and Empty).
Choose the Create icon.
The Create Reference Set dialog appears. It lets you:
Name the reference set you are creating
Reference set names must be 30 characters or less, with no embedded spaces. They
are not case sensitive.
Create a CSYS for the reference set
If Create Ref Set, CSYS is toggled to Yes, you will be prompted to specify an
orientation using the WCS Orient menu, and an origin point using the Point
Constructor dialog.
If Create Ref Set, CSYS - No is in effect, the reference set will use the WCS
orientation and origin by default.
Key in body as the reference set name and OK.

Any entry is converted to all capital letters by the system.


The Class Selection dialog appears.
Select the solid body (blue) of the jaw plate and OK.
Use the filter methods of the Class Selection dialog when dealing with more complex
models or when you have difficulty selecting.
Choose the Create icon

in the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in sketch-1 as the second reference set name and OK.


Select the sketch geometry (cyan) of the jaw plate and OK.
Your second reference set (sketch-1) is created.

Creating Reference Sets


Information on Reference Sets
There are a couple of ways to see what is in a reference set.

78
Choose BODY in the Reference Sets dialog.
Choose the Information icon.
The Information window tells you the reference set name, what is in it, and any attributes
attached to it.
Dismiss the Information window.

You can also get this information using Information

Assemblies

Reference Set.

Your next task is to create reference sets in the second component of your subassembly.

Creating Reference Sets


Creating More Reference Sets (1)
You must change the work part to plate_screw.
From the Assembly Navigator, select plate_screw with MB3, then choose Make
Displayed Part.

Choose the Create icon

in the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in body as the reference set name and OK.


Select the solid body (green) of the plate screw and OK.
The first reference set is created.
Choose the Create icon

in the Reference Sets dialog.

79
Key in sketch-1 as the second reference set name and OK.
Select the sketch geometry (cyan) of the plate screw and OK. (Use filter methods to
simplify your selection.)
Now create similar reference sets in the third component of your subassembly.

Creating Reference Sets


Creating More Reference Sets (2)
Change the displayed part to fixed_jaw.
Choose Window amd_fixed_jaw_assm.
From the Assembly Navigator, select fixed_jaw with MB3, then choose Make
Displayed Part.

Choose the Create icon

in the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in body as the reference set name and OK.


Select the solid body (green) of the fixed jaw and OK.
The first reference set of the Fixed Jaw is created. Create the next two reference sets to
contain the two sketches.

80

Choose the Create icon

in the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in sketch-1 as the reference set name and OK.


Select the sketch geometry (cyan) in the X-Y plane and OK. (Use Filter Methods.)

Reference set sketch-1 is created.


Choose the Create icon

in the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in sketch-2 as the next reference set name, then OK.


Select the sketch geometry (cyan) in the X-Z plane and accept.

Reference set sketch-2 is created.


Choose Close.
Normally, you would next use File
fixed_jaw.

Save to save the reference sets you specified in

However, you can not do this because the part files in the CAST online directory are readonly.
You can save parts if you designate a directory in which you have Write permission.
You have created body and sketch reference sets in three components of the vise assembly.
Normally, you would continue to create similarly named reference sets in the other
components within your assembly.
This has already been done for you in the CAST Online master part files.
The following table enumerates what reference sets are in the part files that make up the vise
assembly.

81
Component Part
Reference Sets Created
Name
screw_nut.prt

BODY, SKETCH-1

moving_jaw.prt BODY, SKETCH-1


guide.prt

BODY

bushing.prt

BODY, SKETCH-1

shaft.prt

BODY

shaft_nut.prt

BODY, SKETCH-1

screw.prt

BODY, SKETCH-1

handle.prt

BODY, SKETCH-1

handle_stop.prt BODY
Choose File

Close

All Parts.

Creating Reference Sets


Editing Reference Sets
It is easy to modify reference sets.
You edit reference sets through the same dialog you used to create the reference sets.

Adding/Removing data from a reference set will


present the Class Selection dialog.
Deleting a reference set does not delete geometry. It
dissolves the envelope of information relating to
geometry. You will get a confirmation message.

Creating Reference Sets


Deleting a Reference Set
Open part file amd_guide_handle_ assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.

82

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies, (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Use the Assembly Navigator to change the work part to the shaft_nut component.
Choose the Expand All icon
(or Tools Assembly Navigator Expand
All).
In the Assembly Navigator, place the cursor over a shaft_nut node and use MB3
Make Work Part.
Choose Format

Reference Sets.

The Reference Sets dialog appears. Entire Part should be selected.


Choose the BODY reference set in the list.
Choose the Set as Current icon

from the dialog.

The BODY reference set is now the current, working reference set.
Choose the Delete icon

from the Reference Sets dialog.

83

If you chose the current reference set, you receive the above message; otherwise the
reference set will just be deleted.
Choose OK to delete the reference set.
If you delete a reference set that is used in an assembly, when you open or return to the
assembly, it will show the entire part. (Remember, Entire Part is the default condition.)

Creating Reference Sets


Renaming a Reference Set
You can change a reference set's name.
Because there is only one sketch in this component, rename the reference set "sketch-1" to
"sketch".
Choose the SKETCH-1 reference set in the list.
Choose the Rename icon

from the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in sketch as the new name for the reference set and Enter.
Choose the SKETCH-1 reference set in the list.
Choose the Rename icon

from the Reference Sets dialog.

Key in sketch as the new name for the reference set and Enter.
If you rename a reference set that is used in an assembly, the system automatically
changes the name of the pointer in the assembly.
Close all open parts.

Creating Reference Sets


Changing Reference Sets
Before you created the reference sets, you had to bring entire components into your
assemblies.
This:

84
used a lot of memory
produced a lot of display clutter in the graphics window
As you work with reference sets, you will want to switch back and forth between reference
sets, of various components, within an assembly.
This is termed changing reference sets.
In this section you will replace the reference sets used in your components and subassemblies
with reference sets you created.

Creating Reference Sets


Background Information
Before you begin changing reference sets, you will need some background information.
Open part file amd_vise_assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.

Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components.

An Information window lists all the components of the vise assembly.


Notice that under the Ref Set Name column, the term None is used on all the component
parts.
This is a default condition and means the entire part is being referenced.
Remember that `entire part' is the system default reference set condition. Remember,
also, that you can change this default reference set condition in the Load Option dialog.
Dismiss the Information window.

Creating Reference Sets


Changing Reference Sets: The Assembly Navigator

85

The first subassembly you will work on is the handle assembly.


It is helpful to use the Assembly Navigator when working with reference sets.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Replacing reference sets only works on children of the work part, or if using the Assembly
Navigator, the children of the selected node.
Use the Assembly Navigator to change the work part to the amd_handle_assm
component.
Choose the Expand All icon
(or Tools Assembly Navigator Expand
All).
In the Assembly Navigator, place the cursor over a amd_handle_assm node and use
MB3 Make Work Part.

You will change the reference sets in the screw component.


Currently, the screw component has two reference sets and some datum plane geometry.
When the Entire Part condition is in effect (the default), all types of geometry are
displayed in the assembly hierarchy.

86

1) Datum plane geometry is on the component level.

Creating Reference Sets


Changing Reference Sets Individually
In this case, you want to access/display only solid geometry (BODY reference set).
There are a couple of ways to do this.
Method 1:
In the Assembly Navigator, place the cursor over the screw component of the
amd_handle_assm, then MB3 Replace Reference Set BODY.

87

Notice in the Assembly Navigator that under the Reference Set column, the screw now
shows BODY as the reference set in effect.
Notice also that the datum planes and sketch curve geometry are no longer visible (or
accessible).
Method 2:
In the second method, you can use the Reference Set entry field in the Assembly toolbar.

Click on the down arrow of the option box.


Choose the Entire Part entry.
The Entire Part reference set becomes the active reference set.
Method 3:
You can also use the Replace Reference Set option.
Choose the screw node in the Assembly Navigator (it needs to be masked).

88

Choose the Replace Reference Set icon


Replace Reference Set.

, or choose Assemblies

Components

The Replace Reference Set dialog appears.


Choose SKETCH-1 from the list, then OK.
Notice that only the sketch geometry is now active.

Creating Reference Sets


Changing Reference Sets and Assembly Hierarchy
The impact of replacing the Entire Part condition with the BODY reference set, is associative
up the display hierarchy.

1) Datum plane geometry superseded by the reference set BODY.

Creating Reference Sets


Changing Reference Sets in Mass

89
You can use a similar technique within the Assembly Navigator to change the reference
sets of multiple components and subassemblies all at once.
Note that the components in the amd_handle subassembly currently have a combination of
`Entire Part' and BODY reference sets. You can change the reference sets of all components
quickly.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the amd_handle_assm node.

Hold down the <shift> key while selecting the last handle_stop node.

With the cursor over the highlighted nodes, choose MB3


BODY.

Replace Reference Set

Note that all the components of the amd_handle_assm now have reference sets of BODY.
You can use this multiple selection technique with both the reference set pull-down
method and the Replace Reference Set (icon/menu) method of reference set
replacement.

You can use this for as many components / subassemblies as you want; you will be
notified if any parts do not have a reference set with the name you are changing.
Use the <ctrl> key while selecting in the Assembly Navigator to select multiple, nongrouped components.
Close all parts.

Creating Reference Sets


Reference Sets in Subassemblies
Just as you can create reference sets in components that contain geometry, you can also create
reference sets in subassemblies that contain component objects.

90

You are probably already familiar with using layer categories to organize part files. Typically
you create design driven categories for each layer so that you can make "all" invisible, then
turn specific layers on, such as "uppercavity" or "drivetrain".
You can use reference sets to display your assembly in similar ways.

Display Techniques for Assemblies


When working with assemblies with many component parts, it is sometimes easier to open the
assembly using the system supplied "Empty" reference set on all components.

Then you can replace specific "Empty" reference sets (those you plan to work on) with
appropriate reference sets (such as "Body", "Entire Part", etc.).
Advantages
Retrieval is very fast.
You only deal with the geometry you bring in through replacing sets.
Attribute information is still available.
Dimensions in the assembly are associative.
Disadvantages

91
You can not see the components except for the name display and bounding boxes.
You have to replace reference sets in order to do any work.
As you replace the empty reference sets, the data that is retrieved will remain in
memory. Simply changing them back to their empty counterpart will not free up the
memory.

Top-Down Assemblies
The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding general concepts of top-down modeling
using different methods of top-down modeling
working in context
understanding linking assembly components
using editing in place
understanding sketching in context

General Concepts of Top-Down Modeling


There are two methods of creating a top-down assembly.
Method One
Create component objects first.

Make a component the Work Part.

92

Create geometry in the component part.

Method Two
Create geometry in an assembly part.

Create a new component and add the geometry to it (sketch, curves, solids etc.)

Of course, most of the time when you are developing assemblies, you will be using the two
basic methods together depending on your design needs and constraints.

93

Working in Context
Working in context of the assembly means that the displayed part is an assembly and the work
part is a component in that assembly.
Any work you do in the assembly is taking place in the work part.
If the work part is a component of the assembly, any creating or editing of geometry will take
place in that component not the assembly.
Linking Geometry
While working in context of an assembly, you can also take advantage of linking geometry
from one component to that of another component.
This means you can use geometry from one component to "seed" the design of another feature
in a different component of the assembly.

Creating New Components: Method One


In this section, you will add an existing component to the assembly. You will then create a
new component in the assembly and add geometry to it by working in context of the
assembly.
Important Note
You will be unable to complete this section unless the resource control parameter
Assemblies_AllowInterpart is set to "yes" in your UG_english.def file. If you have problems
see your system administrator.
Open part amd_fix_assm.prt from the amd/fixture subdirectory.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies, if necessary.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

The Assemblies toolbar appears.


If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

94

This empty part will be used as the assembly. Several components will be added to this
assembly.
Open the Assembly Navigator.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Add the part amd_fix_baseplate.prt to the origin of the assembly.


Choose the Add Existing Component icon
or Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose the Choose Part File option on the Select Part dialog.
Choose amd_fix_baseplate.prt from the Part Name dialog, then OK.
OK the default parameters in the Add Existing Part dialog.
Make sure the coordinates of the Base Point are 0,0,0, then OK the Point
Constructor dialog.
Cancel the Add Existing Part dialog.

The first way to create components in an assembly is to create the empty component part
then add the geometry to it.

95

Choose the Create New Component icon


New).

(or Assemblies

Components

Create

Next the Class Selection dialog displays. This is where you are prompted to select the
geometry you want to add to the new component.
Choose OK to create the component without adding any geometry to it.
The Part Name dialog prompts you to enter the directory path and the component part
filename that will be used when the component is saved.
In the fixture directory, enter amd_fix_locpin as the new component part name.

Creating New Components: Method One


The Create New Component Dialog
The Create New Component dialog establishes the information about the new component
object.

Component Name - Name of the component object.


Ref. Set name - Name of reference set. If none is specified, no reference set is created.
Layer options - Work, Original or As Specified.
Component origin - Determines the origin and orientation of the component part.
Delete Originals - If geometry was added to the component, this option determines the
fate of the original data in the assembly file.
Notice that because you did not add any geometry to the new component the Delete
Originals option is not active.

96
Choose OK to accept all the settings.
The new component is now added to the assembly. Because there is no geometry in the
new component you will not see a change in the graphics area.
To verify that the component was created, you can use the Assembly Navigator display
or you can list all the components. (Assemblies Reports List Components.)

The Class Selection dialog is again displayed and you are prompted to select objects to
move or copy into the new component.
Cancel the Class Selection dialog.

Creating New Components: Method One


Creating Linked Components
The next step is to create the geometry in the new (empty) component.
There are two ways you can do this: if you want unlinked geometry, you can simply model
new geometry in the new component.
If you want the new component linked to geometry in some other component, you can link
geometry from one component to the other.
The Assemblies Wave Geometry Linker option is used to link geometry from one
component of an assembly to another.
Make amd_fix_locpin the Work Part.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.

With the amd_fix_locpin component as the Work Part and the assembly as the Displayed
Part, any geometry you create will reside in the work part.
In this case, you will use geometry in the baseplate to help define and link a locator pin in
the new, empty component you just added to the assembly.

97
This method of creating geometry is referred to as working in context of the assembly.
You will use some of the hole geometry in the baseplate to drive the development of the
locator pin.

1) Circle in baseplate will be used to create bottom part of the locator pin (2).
Choose the Wave Geometry Linker icon
Linker.

or choose Assemblies

Wave Geometry

If you do not see the WAVE Geometry Linker icon in the Assemblies toolbar:
Choose View Toolbars Customize.
Choose the Commands tab.
Choose the Assemblies option.
Turn the WAVE Geometry Linker command on.

Creating New Components: Method One


The WAVE Geometry Linker Dialog
The tools on the top part of the Wave Geometry Linker dialog let you define what kind of
geometry can be linked.
Point

Region

Curve

Body

Sketch/String

Mirror Body

Datum Plane

Routing Object

98
Face
The At Timestamp option lets you specify the timestamp at which the linked feature is placed.
The default is to place the feature after all existing ones.
The Blank Original option lets you blank the original geometry.
The Create Non-Associative option allows the creation of new geometry based on existing
geometry, but the two are not associatively linked.

Creating New Components: Method One


Creating the Linked Body: the Shaft
Choose the Curve icon.
Select the top edge of the hole as geometry to be linked, OK to accept.

Choose the Modeling icon


Modeling (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Choose the Extruded Body icon

(or choose Insert

Form Feature

Extrude)

Choose the Curve option.


Select the top curve of the hole again, then OK to accept.
OK to close the Extruded Body dialog.
Make sure that Direction and Distance is highlighted, then OK.
Use Cycle Vector Direction, if necessary, to make sure that the directional vector points
down (-ZC), then OK.
Key in .75 for the End Distance, then OK.
Cancel the Extruded Body dialog.

Creating New Components: Method One


Creating the Linked Body: the Head

99

Choose the Cylinder icon

(or choose Insert

Form Feature

Cylinder.

Choose the Diameter, Height option.


Choose ZC Axis icon

then OK.

In the Cylinder dialog, change the Diameter to .5 and the Height to 2, then OK.
The Point Constructor dialog appears.
Choose the Arc/Ellipse/Sphere Center icon.
Select the top hole curve again.
Select Unite from the Boolean Operation dialog.
Cancel the Vector Constructor dialog.
The locator pin is created and its lower diameter is linked to the hole in the baseplate.

Creating New Components: Method One


Checking Linkage
It is a good idea to check the linkage between the two components.
Linked geometry will always be referenced in the Model Navigation Tool.
Open the Model Navigator (if necessary).

Choose the Model Navigator tab.


icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

(Unix users, choose the Model Navigator

Note the special LINKED_CURVE entry with its link icon.

100

Checking Associativity
Make the baseplate the Work Part.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.
In the Model Navigator, choose the SIMPLE_HOLE(1) node.
Use MB3

Edit Parameters.

Choose the Feature Dialog option from the Edit Parameters dialog.
Key in .1 in the Edit Parameters dialog, then OK to accept.
OK again to dismiss the Edit Parameters dialog.
Notice that both the hole (baseplate) and the lower cylinder of the locator pin are modified.
This is because of the linkage between the baseplate hole and the locator pin.
Choose Edit
diameter.

Undo List

Edit Feature Parameters to get back to the original

Creating New Components: Method One


Inserting Duplicate Components to the Assembly
The next step is to add another occurrence to the assembly.
Change the Work Part back to amd_fix_assm.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.

The following procedure is the process used to add any existing part to an assembly.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
Existing.

or Assemblies

Components

Add

101
Choose amd_fix_locpin.prt from the Select Part dialog, then OK.
The Add Existing Part dialog appears.
Set the Positioning option to Reposition.
Choose OK to accept the rest of the defaults.
The Point Constructor dialog appears.
Indicate the component anywhere in the graphics area.
Because you specified the reposition method, the Reposition Component dialog appears.
Using the Translate

icon, reposition the component to the location shown below.

Creating New Components: Method One


Using Copied Geometry
In this section you will create a new component and add sketch and curve geometry to it
from the assembly part.
Once this geometry is added to the component it can be swept into a solid.
First set the layers that contain the sketch and curve geometry selectable and visible.
When selecting layers from the Layer Settings dialog you can select multiple layers by
using CTRL+Select.
Make layer 1 Selectable.
Choose the Layer Settings icon
Select layer 1.
Choose Selectable, then OK.

icon or choose Format

Layer Settings.

102
Notice sketch curves (cyan) appear in the graphics area.

Choose the Create New Component icon


New).

(or Assemblies

Components

Create

The Class Selection dialog appears.


You are now prompted to select the geometry you want to add to the new component.
Using the Class Selection dialog with Type filter, select the sketch geometry (cyan).
Choose OK on the Class Selection dialog when the curves are selected.
You are now prompted to enter the directory path and the component part filename that
will be used when the component is saved.
Key in amd_fix_locator for the name of the new component. Choose OK.
The Create New Component dialog appears. Notice that because you are adding geometry
to the new component the Delete Originals option is now active.
The Delete Originals option allows you to delete the original geometry out of the work
part.
Choose OK to create the new component.
The new component is created and added to the assembly.
Choose Cancel on the Class Selection dialog.
Change the Work Part to amd_fix_locator.
Refresh the screen to see geometry.
Notice that the sketch curve geometry was added to the component, you can now use this
geometry to extrude into a solid.

103

Creating New Components: Method One


Creating Solid Geometry
Next, you will use the sketch to create the solid geometry.
When creating solid geometry, the only difference between using sketch curves and
regular curves is that sketch geometry has parameters that can be modified to change the
geometry.
Use the sketch to create the following geometry.

Hint: you can use the following operations to create this part.
Extrude the sketch.
Use a pocket feature to create the cutout.
Use hole and blend features to complete the rest of the part.
First, extrude the sketch.
Choose the Extruded Body icon

or choose Insert

Form Feature

Extrude.

Select the curves of the sketch geometry; when all sketch geometry highlights,
then OK.
OK the Extruded Body dialog.
Choose the Direction and Distance option.
If direction vector does not point up, choose Cycle Vector Direction.
Set End Distance to 1.00, then OK.

104
Next, create a pocket feature.
Choose the Pocket icon

or choose Insert

Form Feature

Pocket.

Choose the Rectangular option from the Pocket dialog.


Select the top face of the extruded solid.
Select one of the horizontal edges as the horizontal reference.
Key in 1.25 for both X and Y Length; .5 for Z Length.
Using Line onto Line, position the pocket solid.

Next, create the corner relief cylinder/blend


Choose the Cylinder icon

or choose Insert

Form Feature

Cylinder.

Choose the Diameter, Height option.


Choose ZC Axis icon
then OK.
In the Cylinder dialog, change the Diameter to .2 and the Height to .5, then
OK.
Choose the End Point option.
Select the lower end of the corner curve again.

Select Subtract from the Boolean Operation dialog.


Choose the Edge Blend icon
or choose Insert
Edge Blend
Key in .1 as the Default Radius.
Select the vertical edge of the front corner.

Feature Operation

105

OK to create the blend.

Create the pin holes.


Use the Geometry Linker to create circles in the locator part based on the cylinder edges
in the baseplate part.
Use Extrude and Cylinder to finish off the holes.
In a writable directory, File

Save As the amd_fix_locator part.

You cannot save any new parts


you generate into the CAST parts
directory.
Change the work part back to amd_fix_assm.

Creating New Components: Method One


Instancing Geometry
With the work part changed back to the assembly you can now add three more instances of
the locator to the assembly.
Add the component to the assembly three more times and position them as shown below.

106

Creating New Components: Method Two


In this section you will create a new component called shoulderbolt and add the solid bolt
geometry to it from the assembly.
Make amd_fix_assm the work part.
Blank all the locator components in the assembly. Do this from the Assembly Navigator
by choosing MB3 Blank or click off the checkmarks.
Choose the Layer Settings icon
or choose Format
5 selectable. Choose OK to accept.

Layer Settings and make Layer

The shoulderbolt in the assembly part is now visible.

Choose the Create New Component icon


New).

(or Assemblies

Components

Create

The Class Selection dialog appears.


Choose the shoulderbolt from the graphics area, then OK to accept.
Key in amd_fix_shoulderbolt for the part name then choose OK.
In the Create New Component dialog, make sure Delete Originals is turned on, then
choose OK to create the component.
The new component is created and added to the assembly.

107

Choose Cancel to dismiss the Class Selection dialog.


Of course, for the sake of completeness, you can propagate and position the other four
shoulderbolts.
The procedure is the same as the one you used for the corner locators.
Feel free to do this on your own, if you desire.

Edit In Place
When you create a new component and add solid geometry to it, all parameterization
associated with that solid is copied into the new component. This also includes any
expressions that are required to control that parameterization.
In this section you will edit a parameter of a component part while working in context of
the assembly.
The rectangular opening in the base plate is a little too big. The locators hang over the edge
of the opening. You will edit the size of this opening.
Change the work part to the baseplate (amd_fix_baseplate).
With the baseplate as the work part you can now edit the value of the expression
controlling the size of this opening.
Choose Tools

Expression.

The Expression dialog appears.


The Expressions dialog lists all the expressions found in the current work part.
Select the following expression from the list. (You may need to use the scroll bars.)
sketchwidth=blockwidth-2
Change the expression value to the following: sketchwidth=blockwidth-3.5

108
Enter to accept the change.
The change in the expression has been made but the component will not be updated until you
choose OK or Apply.
Using Apply lets you see changes without dismissing the Expressions dialog, so you can
see if you get the right update. Using OK will update changes and dismiss the
Expressions dialog.
Choose Apply from the Expression dialog.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Expression dialog.
The baseplate component is updated as shown below.

Change the work part back to the assembly.


Unblank the four Locator components.
The assembly is completed.
Close all parts.

Sketch in Context
Sketching in context is another aspect of top-down modeling. It allows you to create and edit
sketches within the component parts of an assembly.
When sketching in context you can reference geometry within other component parts of
the current assembly.
The following is a list of things to remember when working with sketches in context of an
assembly:

109
When sketching in context, the sketch view is not available to you. Because layout
views are defined by the displayed part, the sketch view in the work part cannot be
viewed.
Sketch dimensions are not view dependant and will be visible in all views of the
displayed part while the sketch is active.
Existing entities belonging to the sketch can be selected in any occurrence of the work
part.
If the work part is changed while working on a sketch, the active sketch will be
updated and you will be given the Sketch selection dialog for the new work part.
In this activity you will open an assembly and edit one of the component sketches in
context of the assembly.
Open part amd_hinge_assm.prt from the amd/door subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies, if necessary.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Use the Assembly Navigator to change the reference set of component amd_arm (yellow)
to body_and_sketch.
Both the body and sketches (cyan) of the arm component are now visible.
Change amd_arm to the work part.
Choose the Modeling icon
Modeling (if necessary).
Choose Edit

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Sketch.

Choose SKETCH_001 from the list of sketches, then choose OK to accept.

110

With the cursor over the radius dimension p122 in the graphics area, use MB3 then choose
Edit.
Key in .25 for the new value of the dimension, then Enter.
Notice that only the sketch is updated. The solid will not be updated until you choose
Update Solid. This allows for multiple sketches to be edited with out updating the model.
Select SKETCH_002 from the Sketch Name pull-down.
With the cursor over the radius dimension p201 in the graphics area, use MB3 then choose
Edit.
Key in 2 for the new value the Enter.
Notice that only the sketch is updated. The solid will not be updated until you choose
Update Solid.
Choose the Update Model icon

or choose Tools

Update Model.

Notice that the solid has been updated to reflect the new changes.

111

Close all part files.

112

Filtering
The objectives for this lesson are:
understanding filter setup
understanding filter classifications
using attribute filters
using proximity filters
understanding zones
knowing how to drag and drop filters
understanding how filters interact with load options
understanding how to use bookmarks

Filtering Setup
As your assemblies get larger and larger, becoming more and more complex, there is anincreasing need for control over the component parts you need to see and work with.
Filtering provides a means by which you can specify which groups of components within a
total assembly are significant to you.
Certain filters can be specified and manipulated via the Assembly Navigator.
This provides a way of graphically seeing the hierarchy as well as the results of any
created filters using a tree structure.
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_mouse_assm.prt from the amd/mouse subdirectory.


Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

The Assemblies toolbar appears.


Open the Assembly Navigator.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

113

Filtering Setup
Customizing the Toolbars
If you do not see either the Assemblies or the Assembly Navigator toolbars; then their
display is turned off. You can easily check these.
Choose View

Toolbars

Customize.

Choose the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog.


Make sure the Assemblies and Assembly Navigator switches are on.

Feel free to dock the toolbars.


Choose the Commands tab.

Choose the Assembly Navigator option.


The commands associated with the Assembly Navigator are enumerated on the right side
of the dialog.
By clicking the various commands on or off, you can control which icons appear on the
Assembly Navigator toolbar.
Make sure the Filtering Mode command is on (checked).
This adds the Filtering Mode icon
Close the Customize dialog.

to the Assembly Navigator toolbar.

114

Filtering Setup
The Filtering Mode
Choose the Filtering Mode icon
Mode to turn the filter mode on.

or choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Filtering

Two things happen.


1) The Filtering Mode entry in the Tools
signifying that it is on.

Assembly Navigator pull-down is outlined,

2) In the Assembly Navigator, the Filters symbols are added into the tree structure.

Now that the Filtering Mode is on, you can turn the Assembly Filtering toolbar on.
Choose View

Toolbars

Customize.

Choose the Toolbars tab.


Turn the Assemblies Filtering option on (checked).

The Assembly Filtering toolbar appears.

115
Feel free to dock the toolbar.
Close the Customize dialog.

Session Filters / Filters in Part


There are two approaches to filtering.

You can define Session Filters that are only applicable during a specific session, and
are not to be stored with the part.
You can define Filters in Part that are stored with the part file. These include
component and user-defined filters.
Some filter considerations.
Filters can be nested. When filters contain other filters, conditions met by the nested
filters provide the input to the containing filter.
Nested filters follow a "tree structure" within the Assembly Navigator.
All filtering operations work with Unigraphics NX macros.
Undo functionality is supported within filtering.

Filter Classifications
There are two classifications of filters:
functional filters
grouping/combination filters
Functional Filters
Add Attribute Search to Filter
Add Proximity Filter
Add Zone to Filter
There are also three grouping/combination filters that can act in conjunction with the
functional filters and each other.

116
Grouping/Combination Filters
Match all of... Filter
Match any of... Filter
Exclude from Filter

Attribute Filters
Attribute filters are filters which search components for a particular quality or set of qualities.
You can specify an attribute search based on:
a part name
a part's state; its load status, work status or visibility status
a system or user-defined attribute
a list
size considerations

Attribute Filters
Adding to Filters by Name
Click on the Session Filters folder in the Assembly Navigator (this signals that the next
filter will be a session filter).
Choose the Add Attribute Search to Filter

icon.

The Add to Filter dialog appears.


Choose the By Name tab.

Choose the Contains option.


Key in screw in the Component or Part Name field, then OK.
Place the cursor over the By Name screw filter node, then MB3

Apply.

Notice that all components that contain the term "screw" are highlighted in the graphics
area and masked in the Assembly Navigator.

117
Notice also that in the Count column, that there are 7 components that meet the By Name
filter criteria.
Click on the box of the By Name screw node with MB1.

Notice that actually 4 name filters were created to check for both lower and upper case
instances of "screw" in both $NAME and $PART_NAME_CORE system naming attributes.
Click on the box of the By Name screw node to collapse it.

Attribute Filters
Adding to Filters by State
State attribute filters (default component sets in pre-V18 releases) can be thought of as
canned filters that provide a convenient way of isolating aspects of your model and moving
back and forth between different working states.
Click on the Session Filters folder in the Assembly Navigator (this signals that the next
filter will be a session filter).
Choose the Add Attribute Search to Filter

icon.

Choose the By State tab.

All Components: The default. This state filter holds all components.
Loaded Components: This state filter holds whatever components are loaded at any given
time.
Visible Components: This state filter holds whatever components are visible; i.e., not
blanked at any given time.

118
Work Part: This state filter holds whatever components are designated as the work part at
any given time.
A filter can be created to count parts that are blanked in a large assembly when Assembly
Navigator is not fully expanded.
Select the checkbox ( ) next to the "By Name screw" filter to blank the components that
are named "screw".

Notice that the components are shown as blanked in this collapsed Assembly Navigator; there
are additional components that are blanked that can not be seen.
Choose the Visible Components option.
Select OK to accept the new filter.
Key in Visible in the Filter name node, then Enter.
Place the cursor over the Visible filter node, then MB3

Apply.

There are components that are blanked that are not expanded in the Assembly Navigator;
these components are shown in the count column. The components that are visible are also
highlighted in the Assembly Navigator.

Close all parts.

119

Attribute Filters
Adding to Filters by Attribute (general)
The simplest attribute search is one that checks for the specified textual value anywhere, in
any attribute and matches any component where it is found.
Open part file valve_assm_filter2.prt from the amd/valve subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Filtering Mode (if necessary).

Customize the Assembly Filtering and Assembly Navigator toolbars (if necessary).
Choose View Toolbars Customize.
Choose the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog.
Make sure the Assemblies Filtering and Assembly Navigator switches are on.
Choose the Commands tab.
Choose the Assembly Navigator option.
Click on the Session Filters folder in the Assembly Navigator.
This signals that the next filter will be a session filter.
Choose the Add Attribute Search to Filter

icon.

Choose the By Attribute tab in the Add to Filter dialog.


Note that there are six system default attributes available.
Key in brass in the Value text field, then OK.
Notice in the Assembly Navigator that a new filter has been added with an automatic Add
to Filter condition of brass and the filter name is ready to edited.
Key in material check as the name of the filter, then Enter.

This straight attribute search will check for any attribute with the term brass in it.
(Presumably a material attribute!)

120

If you lose the automatic edit state, you can place the cursor over the filter node and use
MB3 Edit.
Position the cursor over the material check filter node, then MB3

Apply.

Note in the Assembly Navigator, in the Count column, that 6 components with the brass
attribute were found and that they are highlighted in the graphics area.

Attribute Filters
Adding to Filters by Attribute (comparison)
In an attribute comparison search, you test against an attribute name, operator and value.
Any name provided is case-insensitive and is read and stored in upper case, as is
the default for attribute definition.
Available operators: =, >, <, <=, >=, != (not equal to).
Value can be text or numeric. Numeric values do not have to be in quotes unless the
search is to a specific decimal place, e.g. .345 is general; ".34500" is specific to five
decimal places.
You will continue working with the valve_assm_filter2 assembly.
You will add an attribute comparison filter that is more specific in its search.
Click on the material check filter to mask it.
Choose the Add Attribute Search to Filter icon

Again, the Add to Filter dialog appears; the "By Attribute" tab should still be active.
Key in mat in the Name field.
Make sure the operator option is set to =.

121
Key in mild steel in the Value field, then Apply.
Note in the Assembly Navigator that your designated search is referenced. Because it is a
comparison search, the left side of the comparison is seen as an attribute title.

Position the cursor over the MAT = "mild steel" filter, then MB3

Apply.

Again, in the Assembly Navigator the Count specifies that 15 components with the mild steel
attribute were found and that they are highlighted in the graphics area (the bolts and nuts).
Combining Filters
In the last two examples, you checked for two specific attributes, one at a time
To check both at the same time, you would simply mask the higher level filter (material
check) and run that one and it would check for all components of brass and ones with a MAT
attribute of mild steel.
File Close All Parts.

Attribute Filters
Adding to Filters by Size
Open part file valve_assm_filter1.prt from the amd/valve subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Filtering Mode (if necessary).

Note that there are two filters that already exist in this part.
Customize the Assembly Filtering and Assembly Navigator toolbars (if necessary).
Choose View Toolbars Customize.
Choose the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog.
Make sure the Assemblies Filtering and Assembly Navigator switches are on.
Choose the Commands tab.

122
Choose the Assembly Navigator option.
Click on the Session Filters folder in the Assembly Navigator
Choose the Add Attribute Search to Filter

icon.

Choose the By Size tab in the Add to Filter dialog.

The operative elements of the dialog consist of a size toggle switch and a size slider
control. The slider control automatically gauges the largest aspect of the part file as the upper
limit of the search.
Choose the Smaller Than option.
Move the slider control to 3.0 on the scale, then OK.
Key in small parts as the name of the filter and Enter.
If you lose the automatic edit state, you can place the cursor over the filter node and use
MB3 Edit.
Note the system generates a system object ($BOUNDING_BOX_SIZE) comparison.

Position the cursor over the $BOUNDING_BOX_SIZE <3.0000 filter, then MB3
Apply.
The parts smaller than 3.0 are highlighted in the display and in the Assembly Navigator.
Also note in the Count column that there are 23 occurrences satisfying the filter criteria.
File

Close

All Parts.

123

Proximity Filters
Proximity filters specify that all components near a designated list of components or zones be
identified.
In this next section you will be introduced to some of the basic features of the proximity
filter mode.
You will be using a proximity filter to blank certain parts of the mouse assembly.
Open part file amd_mouse_assm.prt from the amd/mouse subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Filtering Mode (if necessary).

Customize the Assembly Filtering and Assembly Navigator toolbars (if necessary).
Choose View Toolbars Customize.
Choose the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog.
Make sure the Assemblies Filtering and Assembly Navigator switches are on.
Choose the Commands tab.
Choose the Assembly Navigator option.
Click on the Session Filters folder in the Assembly Navigator.
Choose the ball node in the Assembly Navigator (it will become masked).
Choose the Add Proximity Filter icon
, or choose MB3
Proximity Filter to define your first filter.

Filter

Create

Key in prox check 1 as the name of the filter and Enter.


If you lose the automatic edit state, you can place the cursor over the filter node and use
MB3 Edit.
Notice that the filter was generated and listed under the Session Filters section of the
Assembly Navigator.

124

The default of the proximity filter is 10 mm (this is a metric part), but this can be edited.
Using MB3, click on the within 10.0mm of... entry.
Take note of the functions in this pop-up. Also note that you can create nested filters at this
juncture by creating filters within filters.
Choose Edit from the pop-up.

Key in 2, then OK.


With the cursor over within 2.0mm of... , use MB3 to invoke the pop-up.
Choose Components

Blanking

Blank.

The only components within the mouse assembly that are not within 2 millimeters of the
ball are the fasteners.

Also, your filter operation is reflected in the Assembly Navigator symbology.

Did you notice that the MB3 Component pop-up also lets you access other operations with
any particular filter?

125

In the case of Blanking, you can also use the Blanking checkbox in the Assembly
Navigator to view the effects of a filter.
Click on the checkbox of the proximity filter.

The effects of the filter are unblanked.


File

Close

All Parts.

Zones
Zones isolate components according to their position relative to designated boxes, planes,
lines or points.
Example:
Using a zone, you can designate to "load only components that are contained within zone A."
(a Box zone).
Or, you could designate to "Blank all components that intersect with and are above zone B."
(a Plane zone)
The development of zones is a function of the Advanced Assembly Modeling module,
however you can include zones in regular assembly filters.

Zones
Checking Existing Zones in a Model
Once you know what zones exist within an assembly, you can use them to isolate different
aspects of the assembly according to your design needs.

126
Open part file valve_assm_filter1.prt from the amd/valve subdirectory.
Customize the Assembly Filtering and Assembly Navigator toolbars (if necessary).
Choose View Toolbars Customize.
Choose the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog.
Make sure the Assemblies Filtering and Assembly Navigator switches are on.
Choose the Commands tab.
Choose the Assembly Navigator option.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Filtering Mode (if necessary).

Choose the Add Zone to Filter icon.


The Add Zone to Filter dialog lists the zones that are resident in the model.

Select the Box FLOW_ZONE entry.


Note that FLOW_ZONE is highlighted in the graphics area.

The zone approximates the area that liquid would flow through the valve.

127
Cancel the Add Zone to Filter dialog.

Zones
Adding a Zone to a Filter
Here you will combine a grouping filter (Match All of...) with a functional filter (Add
Zone to Filter).
Choose the Expand All icon
or choose Tools
to expand all the subassemblies.

Assembly Navigator

Expand All

Click on the Session Filters folder in the Assembly Navigator.


Choose the Match All of ... filter icon.
Key in flowcheck as the name of the filter and Enter.
If you lose the automatic edit state, you can place the cursor over the filter node and use
MB3 Edit.
Next you will add a subassembly (subassy_intprts) to be checked as part of the Match all
of... condition.
In the Assembly Navigator, use MB1 to select the subassy_intprts node and drag it onto
the Match all of... filter you just created and drop it there.

Next, you will refine the filter to check for any parts in subassy_intprts that intersect with
the existing filter FLOW_ZONE.
In the Filter section, click on the subassy_intprts (it highlights).
Choose the Add Zone to Filter icon.
Select the BoxFLOW_ZONE entry.
Note that certain icons, applicable to the current filter, become available in the Add Zone
to Filter dialog.
Choose the Interferes icon

, then OK.

128

Your flowcheck filter is complete. Now to activate it.


With the cursor over flowcheck, use MB3

Apply.

Note in the graphics area that the components that met the filter criteria are highlighted.
Note also that in the Assembly Navigator the Count column reflects the number of
components that meet the filter requirements.
If you scroll down in the Assembly Navigator, the components that match the filter criteria
are masked as well.
Close all part files.

Load Options and Filters


One main use of filtering is to visually isolate assembly components based on user specified
criteria. Another use is to specify which assembly components are to be loaded.
Using the Load Component options in the Load Options dialog can help you make sure you
are loading the components you want.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Click on the Load Components pull-down.


More About Load Component Options

Loads all assembly components


All Components
No components are loaded
No Components
Use Last Component Loads assembly with the same components it was last saved with

129
Set
Use Last Filter
Specify Filter

Loads components based on the last filter that was used to load the
assembly (and saved)
Loads components that meet the criteria of a chosen defined filter

Click on the Specify Filter option, then OK.


Open part file valve_assm_filter1.prt from the amd/valve subdirectory.
Choose flow_filter from the component list and OK.

Only those components that meet the filter criteria of FLOW_FILTER are loaded.

The practical application of these types of loading filters is that different disciplines can
load only those components that are related to their design needs.
Close all parts.

Bookmarking
Bookmarking creates a special file (.bkm extension) that records the working context of a
Unigraphics NX session.
You can specify what is aspects of the working context are to be recorded:
currently defined assembly filters,
current load options,
current displayed part,
current set of loaded components.

130
The purpose of bookmarking is to enable you or another designer to quickly re-establish a
desired working context from one session to another.

Bookmarking
Setting Up For Bookmarking
The following activity requires you to be able to save bookmark files, therefore you must
have write access to some directory.
Choose File Options Load Options.
Set Load Components to All Components, then OK.
Open part file amd_mouse_assm.prt from the amd/mouse subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Since bookmarking tracks loaded components and displayed parts (in addition to filters
and load options) you will unload some of the mouse parts and change the displayed part
before saving a bookmark.
With the cursor over the amd_mouse_assm_sub node, use MB3
With the cursor over a m2_screw node, use MB3
components within the subassembly.

Close

Make Displayed Part.

Part to unload the

Now you will file a bookmark.


Choose File

Save Bookmark.

The Save Bookmark dialog appears. This is where you specify the writable directory in
which you will save your bookmark.
Designate the your writable directory, then key in bookmark_test_<your initials> as the
file name.

131
Click on the Record option to see all the options.

This is where you specify what aspects of your model you wish to bookmark. Since you
are interested in loaded components and the displayed part aspect of the model, you can use
the default.
Choose OK to accept the specified directory, file name and record setting.
File

Close

All Parts.

Bookmarking
Checking the Bookmark
Choose File

Open.

The Open Part File dialog appears.


Specify the directory in which you saved your bookmark file (bookmark_test_<your
initials>).
Click on the Files of type: option to see all the options.

Choose Bookmarks (*.bkm).


You now should be able to see your bookmark listed in the window of files.
Choose bookmark_test_<your initials>, then OK.
Your model appears with the same working context which you bookmarked.

132

Remember, you did not have any filters or specialized load options in effect in this
example, but they are also available to bookmark. And remember that you can be very
specific on what you bookmark using the options list in the Save Bookmark dialog.
File

Close

All Parts.

133

Mating Conditions
The objectives of this lesson are:
understand degrees of freedom and mating constraints
know how to assign mating conditions
understand how to mate new components
understand how to edit mating conditions
know how to develop mating alternates

Overview of Mating Conditions


By putting mating conditions on components of an assembly, you establish positional
relationships and behaviors between those components.
These relationships are termed mating constraints.
Example: If you create a mating condition making the face of a bolt coincident with the face
of a hole, anytime the hole is moved, the bolt would move with it.
It is important to make the distinction between a mating condition and a mating constraint.
A mating condition is made up of one or more mating constraints.

Degrees-of-Freedom / Constraint Indicators


The whole idea of establishing mating constraints is to limit the degrees of freedom of a
particular component within your assembly.
As you define your mating constraints, you will see what are termed constraint indicators in
the graphic area.

Linear Degrees of Freedom Rotational Degrees of Freedom


These are visual cues showing what degrees of freedom remain.

134
If all of an object's degrees of freedom are constrained, it is said that object is fully
constrained, i.e. it cannot move or rotate in any direction.
If an object's degrees of freedom are not all constrained, it is said that object is under
constrained, i.e. it can move or rotate in some direction.
Hierarchy of Terms: Mating Conditions

Mating Constraints (8)


Mate

Center

Align

Distance

Angle

Tangent

Parallel

Perpendicular

Mated components do not need to be fully constrained to be functional. It is also acceptable to


over constrain a component.

Degrees-of-Freedom / Constraint Indicators


Mating Conditions and Other Applications
Be aware that applied mating conditions interact with other applications with Unigraphics
NX. Two of particular importance:
Mating conditions in relation to UG/Scenario - Motion
This topic is beyond the scope of this lesson.
Mating conditions in relation to WAVE
Be aware that it is possible to reference mating geometry outside the current assembly
using WAVE linking technology.

Assigning Mating Conditions


Mating constraints may be assigned using one of two available methods:
Assignment on existing components within an assembly that is already configured.
This is analogous to a bottom-up approach to assembly modeling.

135
Assignment on components as they are added to an assembly. This is analogous to a
top-down approach to assembly modeling.
Both methods will be presented in this lesson.

Assigning Mating Conditions


Mating Existing Components
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_caster.prt from the amd/caster subdirectory.

1) caster_shaft
2) caster_spacer
3) caster_fork
Use Fit, Rotate, Zoom In/Out as necessary, throughout the
lesson to facilitate both object selection and your
understanding of what is happening to the geometry.
The base part of this assembly will be the caster_shaft. The spacer and the fork will be
mated in relation to it. If it moves, all other components will move with it.
The first component that will be mated to the shaft will be the caster_spacer. It will be
mated on the shaft and against the stepped shoulder of the shaft.
This mating condition will use two constraints:
one Align constraint
one Mate constraint
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

136

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose the caster_spacer node in the Assembly Navigator.
The spacer component (washer) highlights in the graphics area.
Choose the Mate Component icon
Component.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Mate

The Mating Conditions dialog appears. The mating conditions/constraints will appear in
the list box as you define them.
More About the Mating Conditions Dialog

Composite Example:
1) List area where conditions are displayed (selectable)
2) Constraint types

3) "To/From" selection

137

4) Object Selection filter pulldown

5) Centering options

6) Alternate solutions available, if any

7) Preview conditions before accepting

8) Displays errors if present

9) Invokes Vary Constraints dialog where constraints can


be modified or repositioned

Assigning Mating Conditions


Defining an Align Constraint
First, you want to constrain the spacer so that the inside cylindrical face of the spacer is
centered along the small cylindrical face of the shaft.
Choose the Align icon

as the first mating condition.

Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Face option (if necessary).
Although it is not necessary to specify a filter, it is a good habit to develop to aid in
selecting your intended type of geometry.
Notice that the From icon

is activated.

Select the inside surface of the caster_spacer.

138

If you have trouble selecting, wait for the select options cursor and identify your
selection using the QuickPick dialog.
Notice that the TO icon

is automatically activated.

Select the smaller cylindrical face of the shaft.

You will notice constraint indicators, indicating the remaining degrees of freedom. Also, in
the message area of the screen, the message, "Two degrees of freedom remaining" is
displayed.

Axial and rotational constraints are still unspecified.


If you do not see a constraint indicator, check the Mating selection dialog to see if the List
Errors option is active. If it is, this indicates something has not been properly designated.
Pressing the List Errors option will present an Information window showing the error
status. You will also see a graphic cue on your model showing where the error occurs.

139
To correct an improperly specified constraint, choose Back from the Mating selection
dialog then respecify the constraint.
Notice that the designated constraint is listed in the window in the top part of the dialog.

This listing window uses the same interactive expand/collapse operations (and other
symbols) as is used in the Assembly Navigator.
Select Apply to accept the constraint.
More About: Align Constraint

Use the Align constraint

when one geometric entity lies everywhere on the other.

Example:

By everywhere, we mean that an align constraint is solved using unbounded geometry, so the
geometric entities do not have to actually touch to be aligned.

1) Align constraint uses unbounded geometry.

140
Usage Matrix: Align

Assigning Mating Conditions


Defining a Mate Constraint
Next, apply a constraint that will keep the back, flat face of the spacer mated with the
stepped shoulder face on the shaft.
Choose the Mate icon

from the Mating Conditions dialog.

Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Face option (if necessary).
Select the inside, flat face of the spacer.

Again, notice that the TO icon

is automatically activated.

Select the flat shoulder face of the shaft.

141

This time preview how the intended mating constraint will act. The Preview function lets
you see the intended mating before you actually apply the constraint.
Choose Preview.

Again, the designated constraint is listed in the window in the top part of the dialog.

The spacer should be allowed to rotate on the shaft, so these two components are mated
sufficiently.
Select Apply to accept the constraint.
More About: Mate Constraint

Use the Mate constraint


when you want to mate objects of components with opposing
normals and want to define a physical contact between two entities.

142

1) Selected ("from") face on the base component


2) Selected ("to") face on the mated component
Usage Matrix: Mate

Assigning Mating Conditions


Mating the Caster-Fork
Next, you will apply some constraints to the caster_fork in relation to the caster_shaft and the
caster_spacer.
Again, you will be using the mating constraints:
Align
Mate
First, Align the cylindrical hole face of the fork with the shaft.

143

Choose the Align icon

mating condition.

Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Face option (if necessary).
Select the cylindrical hole face of the fork. Use the select options cursor/box to aid
selection, if necessary.

Select the stepped cylindrical face of the shaft.

Choose Apply to accept your mating operation.


Next, Mate the back face of the fork to the outward face of the spacer.
Choose the Mate icon

from the Mating Conditions dialog.

Select the back side face of the fork.

Select the outside face of the spacer.

144

Remember, you can use Preview to check the result of your mating operation before you
actually accept it.
Choose Apply to accept your mating operation.
Your successful solution should look like the illustration below.

Cancel the Mating Conditions dialog.

Mating New Components


To complete this simple assembly, you need to add an axle and a wheel.
You can add components to the assembly and constrain them with appropriate mating
conditions at the same time.
You will be using the mating constraints:
Center using faces
Mate using datum planes

145
Choose Preferences

Assemblies then turn Preview Component on Add on (checked).

Add the component caster_axle.prt to the amd_caster assembly from the amd/caster
directory.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
or Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose the Choose Part File option on the Select Part dialog.
Choose caster_axle.prt from the amd/caster directory and OK.

The Add Existing Part dialog appears and the axle is previewed in the staging view.
More About the Add Existing Part Dialog

1) Multiple add: "No" is the default.


2) Component name: The default assumes the component's name will be the same as the part
file name (note upper case), but it does not have to be!
3) Reference Set: Option list shows all reference sets in current component.
4) Positioning: Specifies how the component is to be positioned. Absolute is the default,
which brings in a component using absolute coordinates.
5) Layer specification options.

From the Positioning pulldown, choose Mate; set the Layer options to Work and
Reference Set to Entire Part, then OK to accept the options in the dialog.
Note that the Mating Conditions dialog appears, ready for you to specify a mating
constraint. From here on, the mating process is the same as you went through for the first
components of the assembly.
First, constrain the center of the axle to the center of one of the holes of the fork.

146

Choose the Center icon

as the first mating condition.

Select the cylindrical face of the axle.

Select the cylindrical face of one of the fork holes.

This ensures that the center of the axle will always be centered to the holes in the fork.
Choose Preview to see the result of your mating operation.
Notice that the constraint indicators show freedom of movement around and along the YC
axis.
Choose Unpreview to return to the staging view.

More About: Center Constraint

Use the Center constraint

when you want the center points/axes of bodies to line up.

147
Usage Matrix: Center

Mating New Components


Aligning Constraints
Next, establish a Align constraint between the datum planes of the axle and the fork. This
will ensure that the vertical center of the axle and the vertical center of the fork are always in
the same vertical plane.
Choose the Align icon

from the Mating Conditions dialog.

Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Datum Plane option.
Select the datum plane of the axle.

Select the datum plane of the fork.

148

Notice that you have vectors pointing in opposite directions.


Choose Preview to check your work.

If the axle looks like it is positioned properly, choose Apply.

Mating New Components


Mating the Wheel
The last component that needs to mated is the wheel. Of course, it must be aligned to the axle
and allowed to move freely around the axle.
This time, try it on your own. If you have trouble, click the + (more) tab in your CAST
window for step-by-step instructions.
Using the Add Existing Component icon, add the caster_wheel.prt from the amd/caster
directory: Use the Mate positioning method and use Cursor Location (Point Constructor) to
locate wheel in the assembly.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
Components Add Existing.

or Assemblies

149
Choose the Choose Part File option on the Select Part dialog.
Choose caster_wheel.prt from the amd/caster directory and OK.
The Add Existing Part dialog reappears.
Set Positioning to Mate and Layer Options to Work.
Use OK to accept the dialog parameters.

The Mating Conditions dialog appears.


Specify two mating conditions: a Center for the hole of the wheel to the axle and an Align
between the hole of the wheel and the axle.
First, constrain the center of the face of the axle to one of the holes of the fork.
Choose the Center icon
as the first mating condition.
Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Face option (if necessary).
Select the cylindrical hole face of the wheel.
Select the cylindrical face of the axle.
Choose Preview to see the result of your mating operation.
Choose Unpreview to return to the staging view.
Next, mate the datum plane of the wheel to the datum plane of the axle.
Choose the Align icon
from the Mating Conditions dialog.
Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Datum Plane option.
Select the datum plane of the wheel.
Select the datum plane of the axle.
Choose Preview to see the result of your mating operation.
Choose Apply to accept.

150

Mating New Components


Testing Component Associativity
All of the components now have some sort of mating constraints (except the shaft). You
will test this by trying to reposition a few of the components.
Choose the Reposition Component icon
Reposition Component.

or choose Assemblies

Components

The Class Selection dialog appears.


Select the fork from the Assembly Navigator or the display, then OK.
The Reposition Component dialog appears.
In the graphics area, use MB1 to attempt to drag the fork randomly around.
Note that the fork only rotates around the shaft! This is because the only degree of freedom
the fork has left, based on your applied constraints, is rotation.
Cancel the Reposition Component dialog.
Select the wheel from the Assembly Navigator or the display.
Choose the Reposition Component icon
Reposition Component.

or choose Assemblies

Components

In the graphics area, use MB1 and the rotation handles (balls) to attempt to rotate the wheel
randomly around.
Note that the wheel only rotates around the axle! Again, this is because the only degree of
freedom the wheel has left, based on your applied constraints, is rotation.
Cancel the Reposition Component dialog.
If you had used Apply in the Reposition Component dialog, the components would have
been repositioned based on your dragging in the graphics area.
Close all part files.

151

Editing Mating Conditions


Once a mating condition has been defined and accepted, you can add, delete or modify any
constraint via the mating condition listing window and mouse button 3.

Editing Mating Conditions


Mating Condition Editing Options
When using MB3 on a condition you get several editing options:
Highlight
Show/Remove Degrees of Freedom
Suppress/Unsuppress
Delete
Rename
Remember Constraints

152

Highlight will highlight or unhighlight the selected condition in the graphic area,
depending on the current display condition.

Show/Remove Degrees of Freedom will add or remove the constraint indicators from the
display.
Suppress/Unsuppress issues:
Suppressing a mating condition causes the mating condition to be ignored during
geometric edits.
With Suppress on, when you modify the geometry of constrained components, no
error message will be displayed.
If you modify a component creating a failed constraint, that constraint must be deleted
before the mating condition can be unsuppressed.
Delete removes the selected condition.
Rename activates the Condition Name input field in the Mating Conditions dialog.

Remember Constraints files the constraints for the selected mating condition with the
part file. This enables automatic mating when the component is added to an assembly.

153

Editing Mating Conditions


Mating Constraint Editing Options
When using MB3 on a constraint you get the unique options of:
Alternate Solution
Convert to

Alternate Solution allows you to check out any other available solutions that are
appropriate to the respective constraint.
Convert To invokes a list of appropriate constraints that can be used instead of the current
constraint.
In addition to the toggle options, you also can delete and rename a constraint using MB3.
Delete removes the selected condition.
Rename activates the Constraint Name input field in the Mating Conditions dialog.

More About: Alternate Solution

In many cases when mating axisymmetrical objects, there may be more than one solution to
the mating constraints defined.
In such cases, the Alternate Solution option will be activated in the Mating Conditions dialog.

154
Most cases of Alternate Solution involve reversing (anti-aligning) direction vectors of one of
the entities involved.

Example: Datum Plane - Sphere


In some cases, both the List Errors and the Alternate Solution options activate. In these
cases, it means the first specified mating condition could not be completed as specified, but
that an alternate solution is available.
When the Alternate Solution option does become available, it is a good idea to check
out the alternate solutions. You can then make a more informed decision of which
solution to apply after graphically seeing the solutions.

Editing Mating Conditions


Editing Mating Conditions: Design Intent
It has been determined (by the lead designer) that the fork should always be .125 in from the
end of the shaft and should not be mated to the spacer.

155

Open part file amd_caster_edit.prt from the amd/caster subdirectory.


Choose the Mate Component icon
Component.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Mate

Editing Mating Conditions


Suppressing a Constraint
First, you will suppress the existing planar to planar Mate constraint.
Click on the plus sign (+) of the CASTER_FORK->CASTER_SHAFT mating condition
to show all its constraints.
Click the checkbox next to the constraint Mate

Planar

Planar.

When a constraint is suppressed, the component will not move back to its original
position (before it was mated).
"What's the difference between suppressing a mating constraint and suppressing a
mating condition?"

156

By definition, if you suppress a mating condition, all the constraints that make up that
mating condition are suppressed, whereas when you suppress a mating constraint, any
other constraints that makeup that mating condition are still in effect on any respective
mated components.

Editing Mating Conditions


Adding a Distance Constraint
Once you have suppressed the original Mate constraint, you can define the new one.
Choose the Distance icon

on the Mating Conditions dialog.

Select the Filter pulldown and choose the Face option.


Select the front face of the fork as the FROM face.

Select the end face of the shaft cylinder.

The Offset Expression fields in the Mating Conditions dialog become available.

Key in -.125 to replace the 0.0 value in the Offset Expression field, then Apply.
Your successful solution should be like the illustration below.

157

More About: Distance Constraint

Use the Distance constraint


when you want to establish a minimum separation
relationship between two entities.
Usage Matrix: Distance

158

Editing Mating Conditions


Information on Mating Conditions
One way you have seen to check a mating condition is through the listing window of the
Mating Conditions dialog.
The only danger in checking mating conditions this way is that you may accidentally
change something.
A safer way to check out mating conditions (especially in an unfamiliar assembly) is
through the Information option on the menu bar.
Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions.

This dialog is a subset of the Mating Conditions dialog, invoked using Mating Conditions
option on the Edit Assembly Structure dialog, but you can not alter anything in this dialog.
Choose any of the mating conditions listed in the dialog.
Note that the appropriate constraint vectors are highlighted in the graphic area.
Once a constraint is highlighted, if you choose OK, the full Mating Conditions dialog
becomes available so that you may either make changes or add appropriate
conditions/constraints.
Cancel the dialog.
Close all parts.

Editing Mating Conditions


Information on Other Mating Constraints
In the lesson up to this point, you have used four types of mating constraints:
Align
Mate
Center
Distance
There are several other constraints with which you should be at least familiar. The following
links provide more information on mating constraints you have not had a chance to use in this
lesson.

159

More About: Angle Constraint

Use the Angle constraint


components.

when you need to control specific angles between objects of

To use the Angle constraint you must first have an existing constraint that implicitly defines a
rotation axis, such as an edge-to-edge align.
1) "from" edge

2) "to" edge 3) implied rotation axis


Orient uses the right-hand rule for interpreting angles.
1) Selected face on the mating component

2) Selected face on the base component


Usage Matrix: Angle

160

More About: Parallel Constraint

Use the Parallel constraint

when the normals of objects of components need to be parallel.


Usage Matrix: Parallel

161

More About: Perpendicular Constraint

Use the Perpendicular constraint


when you want geometry of two objects to remain
constrained to a 90 degree relationship with each other.
Usage Matrix: Perpendicular

More About: Tangent Constraint

Use the Tangent constraint


entities.

when you want to define a tangential relationship between two

There are three basic implementations:


Tangent at a point

point-on-surface

Examples:

line-tangent-surface

plane-tangent-sphere

162
Tangent along a line

plane-tangent-cylinder
Examples:
cylinder-tangent-cylinder
Tangent along a surface

Example:

surface-tangent-surface

Tangent constraints are solved using unbounded geometry (like align), so the geometric
entities do not have to actually touch to be considered tangent.

Mating Alternates
Using mating Alternates lets you substitute parts within an assembly while maintaining the
mating conditions applied to the original components of that assembly.
This is done by letting you interactively define "names" of faces and edges that you may use
to mate components.
When you substitute a component that will inherit the existing mating conditions, you must
verify the names of the significant edges and/or faces that are being referenced by the mating
conditions.

Mating Alternates
Defining Alternates
In this section you will use Alternates to substitute a different shaft and fork into your
caster assembly while maintaining the current mating constraints within the assembly.
Open part file amd_caster_edit from the amd/caster subdirectory.

163

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies (if necessary).
Choose Assemblies

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Components

Define Mating Alternates.

Choose caster_shaft from the Assembly Navigator or the graphics area, then OK.
The Define Names dialog appears.

Mating Alternates
The Define Names Dialog
The top window of the dialog lists the mating conditions of the selected caster_shaft. In
this case, the shaft has constraint relationships with the spacer and the fork.
Choose the CASTER_SPACER->CASTER_SHAFT entry in the upper window.

1) Existing Mating Conditions of selected component


(shaft)
2) Constraints of selected condition above
The bottom window of the dialog lists the mating constraints of the selected condition in
the upper box.
In our case, the first constraint listed (lower window) is the cylindrical face alignment of
the fork to the shaft, so that will be the first one you will name.

Key in shaft_align in the Name in Component entry field and Enter.

164
The next constraint between the spacer and the shaft is highlighted: Mate -Planar->Planar.
Key in shaft_face_mate in the Name in Component entry field and Enter.
OK to dismiss No Unlabeled Mating Conditions the message box.

Mating Alternates
Checking Your Work
To check to make sure that you did indeed name the faces, you can request Information on
the mating conditions
Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions.

Click on the plus sign (+) of caster_spacer -> caster_shaft.

Choose OK to dismiss the dialog.

Mating Alternates
Verifying Alternates and Substitution
Now that you have defined constraint names, you are ready to substitute in the new
component which requires that you verify the constraint names so they can be matched.
Choose Assemblies

Components

Verify Mating Alternates.

Select caster_shaft from the Assembly Navigator or the graphics area, then OK.
The Select Part dialog appears. You must identify the part that will be the replacement.
The Select Part dialog list shows only the loaded parts in the assembly, so you must go to
the other part files.
Choose Choose Part File on the top of the dialog.
Choose caster_shaft_alt from the list and OK.
The Point Constructor dialog appears. You must position the in-coming alternate shaft
part.

165
It will be easier to do the up-coming face selections if you position the in-coming shaft
away from the original one.
Indicate a position for caster_shaft_alt.

The Verify Names dialog appears.

Mating Alternates
The Verify Names Dialog
At this point, you must identify the cylindrical face on the replacement shaft that
corresponds to the highlighted condition and constraint in the dialog.
Choose the CASTER_SPACER->CASTER_SHAFT entry in the upper window of the
dialog, if necessary.

Select the cylindrical face on the new shaft that aligns with the interior face of the spacer.

166
The Verify Names dialog reflects the next constraint that must be identified on the
replacement part.

Select the face on the new shaft that mates with the front face of the fork, and accept.

The Verify Names dialog is now updated to reflect the new constraint status.
When you see the statement Solution-Mating Condition Solved in the Verify Names
dialog, choose OK.
You receive a message appraising you that all mating conditions have been accounted for:

Choose OK to accept.
The Substitute Component dialog appears.

167

Mating Alternates
The Substitute Component Dialog

In this dialog, you can designate a new component name and reference set if desired. You will
use the defaults.
Choose OK to accept.
The shaft is replaced within the assembly.

Normally, you would use File

Save at this point to save the alternate component.

You can not do this because the part files in the CAST Online directory are read-only.
You can save parts if you designate a directory in which you have write permission.

168

Mating Alternates
On Your Own: Using an Alternate Fork
Test your knowledge by replacing the current fork with an alternate fork with blended edges.

Things to Remember...
Define names for the constraints of the existing fork (the Define Names dialog).
When using Verify, position the in-coming fork so you can select faces easily.
Select the faces on the alternate fork as they correspond to the highlighted constraints in the
Verify Names dialog.
Remember to look for the Solution-Mating Conditions Solved statement in the Verify Names
dialog.
The completed alternate operation should yield an assembly like the following illustration.

169

Mating Alternates
The Update Failure List
Any change to an assembly will cause the mating conditions of the assembly's components
to be updated.
If any change/edits to the assembly make it impossible to solve any existing mating
conditions, the Update failure list will appear.
Here you will create such a situation by removing the shaft from the assembly.
Choose caster_shaft_alt in Assembly Navigator.
Choose Edit

Delete.

The graphic display is updated showing the elimination of the shaft from the assembly and
the Update failure list is displayed.
Note that the first line in the dialog reflects your edit: CASTER_SPACER->Unknown
component.
Because the shaft component was removed from the assembly, all mating conditions that
referenced it were deleted.
Also note that Delete is the only available option.
The possible failure options are:
Suppress - This blanks the affected mating condition from the assembly.
Once suppressed, a failed mating condition can only be unsuppressed when the error
condition has been resolved.
Delete - This removes the effected mating condition from the assembly.

170
Deleting the mating condition causes the assembly component to be unconstrained; it
must be reconstrained.
Ignore - This disregards the affected mating condition.
If you choose to ignore the mating condition failure, the next time an update is
performed on the assembly, the system will try to update the failed mating condition.
Choose Cancel and close all part files.

171

Flexible Components
The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding general flexible component concepts
creating a deformable part
adding a flexible component to an assembly

General Concepts
It is common for assemblies to have parts that have different shapes as they are applied to the
assembly. Components such as springs and hoses are good examples. Deformable parts are
added to an assembly by providing key parameters that control the shape of the in-coming
part.
There are two aspects to using flexible components:
the designation of the deformable part itself
the use of the deformable part as a flexible component in an assembly
The Deformable Part
Deformable parts have the following characteristics:
features and associated expressions are flagged as being definable when the part is
used in an assembly
the deformable parameters of the part are defined by the owner of the part
once a deformed component has been used in an assembly, it is editable and its
deformation can be changed by editing its deformation parameters
Once a deformable part has been specified, it can then be used as a flexible component.
The Flexible Component
Once a deformable part has been used in an assembly, it is deemed a flexible component with
the following characteristics:
a flexible component can have different shapes in different assemblies
it can be used multiple times in the same assembly; each instance with a specific shape
the shape of a flexible component is defined by the owner of the assembly
it can used as different shapes at different levels in a multi-leveled assembly

172

Making a Part Deformable


Since designating a deformable part is a modeling issue, you must first access the Modeling
application, then access the functionality through Tools Define Deformable Part.
The defining of a deformable part requires you to specify:
which features are to be included when you use it as a flexible component within an
assembly
which parameters of the included features will be modified in order to deform the
component within an assembly
The interface is in wizard format and is broken down into five categories:
Definition - a general definition of the part with access to further documentation
Features - which features of the deformable part are to be included when you use it as
a flexible component within an assembly
Expressions (optional) - which parameters of those included features that can be
modified in order to deform the component within an assembly
References (optional) - geometric reference entities can be specified
Summary (optional) - a generated summary, which can be edited for documentation

Making a Part Deformable


Creating a Deformable Part
In this activity, you will develop a deformable part of a spring and then use it in two places
within a master cylinder assembly.
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file front_spring.prt from the amd/master_cyl subdirectory.


Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

The Assemblies toolbar appears.


If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab

173
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Modeling icon


Modeling.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Open the Model Navigator.

Choose the Model Navigator tab.


icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

(Unix users, choose the Model Navigator

Making a Part Deformable


Define Deformable Part - Definition
Choose Tools

Define Deformable Part.

The Define Deformable Part dialog appears.

If you try and add further deformation qualities to a part that already has a deformable
feature you will be advised of the following:

In the Definition page you can:


designate a name that will be given to the deformable feature in the feature tree of part

174
designate a URL where any documents exist that explain the way the deformable
shape is defined
Key in coil_spring in the Name field
Choose Next to continue on to the Features page.

Making a Part Deformable


Define Deformable Part - Features

The left list box shows all the features in the part. You simply designate which features you
want to be included when the deformed part is used.
As a beginner, it is simpler to take all the features of the part.
Using the <Shift> key, select the top entry, HELIX(0), then the last entry, selecting all the
features in the left list box, then select the right arrow.

Choose Next to continue on to the Expressions page.

175

Making a Part Deformable


Define Deformable Part - Expressions
The expressions of the features are listed on the left. You can select all the expressions of a
feature, or choose individually. Once chosen, they will be listed in the right hand list box.
Of particular interest are the expressions for the helix. However the helix is used, its length
(p3) is a function of the pitch and the number of turns of the spring so that is the expression
that will be deformable.

Using the <Ctrl> key, choose turns=10 and pitch=.18 in the left list box, then select the
right arrow.

Two of the parameters that go into defining the helix are now deformable input parameters;
any user that wants to use this deformable part can designate unique helix parameters.
There is an input field just below the deformable input parameters list box where you can
change the description of the parameters.
Click on turns

Number of Turns, then choose the By Whole Number Range switch.

Enter a Minimum of 5 and a Maximum of 15 for the range of number of coils.


Now for the pitch range.
Choose pitch

Pitch from the list box and make sure the By Number Range switch is

176
on.
Enter a Minimum of .10 and a Maximum of .20 for the range of the pitch angle.
Choose Next to continue on to the References page.
More about Defining Deformable Part Expressions

177

Making a Part Deformable


Define Deformable Part - References
This page lets you add geometry as reference geometry when you add the component. In
cases where you pick all the features of the part, there would be a listing of geometric entities,
such as datum planes and datum axes.
By selecting the Add Geometry option, you will get the selection dialog to facilitate the
selection of any types of geometry for reference.
Again, to keep it simple, you will not add any reference geometry.
Choose Next to continue on to the Summary page.

Making a Part Deformable


Define Deformable Part - Summary
This page summarizes the input values designated in the past four screens.
The View Details icon brings up an editable Information window of the summation in which
you can add comments or other information of interest relating to the deformable part.
Choose Finish to complete the deformation specification.

178
Notice that once you have designated deformation a deformable feature is added to the feature
tree in the Model Navigator.

Your deformable part is now complete.

Adding a Flexible Component


Now that you have a spring part that is deformable, you will add that spring to a master
cylinder assembly twice; each occurrence having a different length.

Adding a Flexible Component


Using a Deformable Part as a Flexible Component
Open part master_cylinder_assm.prt from the amd/master_cyl subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies(if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

179
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Modeling icon


Modeling (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Open the Model Navigator (if necessary).

Choose the Model Navigator tab.


icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

(Unix users, choose the Model Navigator

Adding a Flexible Component


Analyzing for Distances
Before bringing in the deformable parts, you need to know the distances between the faces
where the springs will sit.

Choose the Distance icon

on the Analysis toolbar or choose Analysis

Distance.

Choose the Point Constructor option then use the Arc/Ellipse/Sphere option to find the
center points of the faces on each end of where the first spring will fit.

180

This distance information will help you determine what pitch to designate for the
respective springs as they are brought in as flexible components.

Adding a Flexible Component


Mating the Flexible Component
You will bring in the front spring first; designating mating conditions as you do so. You will
also specify new parameters for the deformable part as it becomes a flexible component in the
assembly.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
Assemblies Components Add Existing

on the Assemblies toolbar or choose

Use Choose Part File and select front_spring as the part you are adding.
In the Add Existing Part dialog, set Positioning to Mate and Layer options to Work, then
OK.
The Mating Conditions dialog appears and you have a Staging View window in your display.
Choose the Mate icon

from the Mating Conditions dialog.

You are going to mate the flat face on the end of the spring (1) to the step face of the plunger
(2).

181

Select the flat end face of the spring (1) as the FROM face.
Select the ring-like step face of the plunger (2) as the TO face.
Next you will align the datum axis of the spring to the cylinder of the plunger.
Choose the Align icon

as the second mating constraint.

Set the Filter to Datum Axis then select the datum axis (FROM) of the spring.
Set the Filter to Face then select the center cylindrical face (TO) of the plunger, then
Preview.

If all looks good, Apply then OK.

182

Adding a Flexible Component


Designating Parameters of the Flexible Component
Once the part is added to the assembly, you now are ready to specify whatever parameters
have been flagged as deformable to customize the instance of the component.
Because you specified both an integer range for the number of turns and a real range for the
pitch, you are presented with a dialog for those parameter inputs with the value ranges you
specified.

You know the distance the spring must occupy is 1.7655; you also know that the number of
turns must be an integer, so the combination of turns (between 5 and 10) and the pitch (real
number between .1 and .2) have to result in a value of 1.7655.
You want to keep the number of turns constant, so you will only modify the pitch value.
In the pitch field key in 1.7655/10 (total needed coil length divided by # of turns) and
Enter, then OK.
Cancel the Select Part dialog.

Adding a Flexible Component


Adding Another Mating Constraint
Now that you have the spring the proper length, you should finish off the mating conditions
by adding another face-to-face mating constraint between the front end of the spring with the
front inside end of the main tube of the master cylinder.

183

Choose the Mate Component icon


Component.
Choose the Mate icon

or choose Assemblies

Components

Mate

from the Mating Conditions dialog.

Select the Filter pull-down and choose the Face option (if necessary).
Select the flat end face of the spring.

Select the inside circular face of the end of the tube, then OK.

Now you have the flexible component installed with both ends mated and the whole spring
aligned to the center of the master cylinder.

184

Adding a Flexible Component


Editing the Parameters of a Flexible Component
In the activity above, you modified the pitch parameter of the spring as you added it to the
assembly. You can also add a flexible component without changing any of its parameters (or
mating it), choosing to change them later.
Next you will edit the pitch parameter to see how this is done, you will also see how mated
flexible components interact with other components within the assembly.
Choose Assemblies

Components

Deform Part.

The Class Selection dialog appears.


Choose front_spring node in the Assembly Navigator, then OK.
The Deform Component dialog appears.
Choose the Edit icon

in the Deform Component dialog.

Change the Pitch value to .11 (key in or use the slider), then Enter.

When you OK the operation, the spring will change size, with the mated plunger moving
along with the changed length. Watch for it.
OK to accept the edited values.

185

Flexible Component/Deformed Part Symbols

Assemblies

Components

Deform Part

(part deformed in assembly)

Flexible Component, deformed part


Shape column, deformed part
dialog of editable deformable expressions
Assemblies

Components

Deform Part

(part un-deformed in assembly)

186

Flexible Component, un-deformed part


Shape column, un-deformed part
dialog to define deformable expressions

On Your Own - Adding the Second Spring


Now that the front spring is installed, you can continue and make the rear spring deformable
then use it in the master cylinder assembly.

You can continue with the assembly you have been working with or call up a model that is
correct up to this point.

187

On Your Own - Adding the Second Spring


Adding the Rear Spring
You will be concerned with two part files:
rear_spring.prt (you must make it deformable first)
the current part file or to start from here, open part master_cylinder_assm_inwork.prt
from the amd/master_cylinder subdirectory.
Things to Remember
You must be in both the Modeling and Assemblies applications.
You have to make the rear_spring part deformable before you can use it as a flexible
component.
When adding the part, you can deform it when it is added or just add it as an un-deformed part
and deform it later (Assemblies Components Deform).
Mate both end faces of the spring and align it to the main cylinder face.

188

Variable Component Positioning


The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding general variable component positioning concepts
learning to override component position and mating constraints
learning to edit overridden mating constraints

General Concepts
Variable Component Positioning provides you with the ability to override the position and
constraints of a subassembly component within the context of a higher level assembly.
Variable Component Positioning capabilities specifically include:
different occurrences of a component in an assembly can be overridden to different
positions
the overriding of mating constraints of a subassembly component while keeping the
original mating constraints of the component, if desired
the adding of constraints to control the position of a component
overriding the positioning of a fully mated subassembly component
the editing of distance and angular constraint values on an overridden component

Overriding Component Position and Mating


Constraints
The most straightforward aspect of Variable Component Positioning is the overriding of a
component's subassembly position within the context of a higher level assembly.
Example:
In a tooling assembly, a clamping device subassembly may need to have the position of its
gripping components repositioned, perhaps several times, within the higher level assembly
If the position of a subassembly component has positional mating constraints these will be
overridden; either explicitly or implicitly.

189
Design Intent
For this section you will work on a phone assembly. You will override a subassembly mating
constraint then see the result as you reposition several components within the context of the
higher level parent assembly structure.

Overriding Component Position and Mating Constraints


Repositioning a Component - Model Setup

Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_phone_assm.prt from the amd/phone subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize, then choose the Toolbars tab, and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

190

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary) and expand all the nodes.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
,
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Tools Assembly Navigator Expand All or select the Expand All
icon.

Overriding Component Position and Mating Constraints


Examining the Subassembly
It will be helpful to examine the mating situation on the subassembly level to better
understand what will happen when the constraints are overridden.
Using the Assembly Navigator, make the ant_sub_assembly the displayed part.
Select the ant_sub_assembly node.
Use MB3 Make Displayed Part.

191
Using the Assembly Navigator, make the anten_top the work part.
Select the ant_sub_assembly node.
Use MB3 Make Work Part.
Choose the Mate Component icon
Component.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Mate

Expand all the mating conditions by clicking the + signs on the tree.
Observe the mating situation.
Mating Conditions dialog

Shows the constraints of the components of the antenna


subassembly. Of particular interest is the Distance
constraint of the bushing to the antenna upper rod. You
will be overriding that.

Graphic Display
As you select the individual constraints in the dialog tree,
the indicators show that the components are generally
unconstrained for rotation and translation along the
antenna rod.

Assembly Navigator
Position symbols reflect that three of the antenna
components are partially constrained to the antenna upper
rod.

192
You will check these constraints once you reposition the bushing in the higher level
assembly.
Cancel the Mating Conditions dialog.
Display the amd_phone_assm.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the ant_sub_assembly node, then MB3
Display Parent amd_phone_assm or:
Choose Window amd_phone_assm.

Overriding Component Position and Mating Constraints


Using Variable Positioning
Select the anten_bsh node in the Assembly Navigator.
Choose the Reposition Component icon
Reposition Components.

or choose Assemblies

Components

The Reposition Component dialog appears.


Choose the Variable Positioning tab.

(Below small dashed line): immediate active parent =


any repositioning of the component will behave like a
normal transformation

Currently selected component

Choose the amd_phone_assm entry at the top of the dialog.

"currently active parent" = any transformation or


repositioning of the component will modify this
parent

193
Indicates control of current component's position in this "parent" assembly. The "immediate
parent" (below the small dashed line) will always have this symbol since you cannot have a
component that is not positioned within a parent.

Notice that the Add Variable Position icon has become active.
Choose the Add Variable Positioning icon.

(Above small dashed line) = there is an override on the


"currently active parent", any transformation or mating
will be applied to this override.
Remember, the parent below the small dashed line will
always have this symbol since you cannot have a
component that is not positioned within a parent.

Mate Override: will bring up the Mating Conditions dialog so you can 1) override the
mating conditions from the original position or 2) add constraints to control the position of the
overridden component.

Remove Variable Positioning: Deletes the overrides of the currently active parent.

Information: gives variable positioning information.


In the Assembly Navigator, notice the updated position symbol:
(anten_upr) the component is partially constrained and explicitly overridden.
Choose the Information icon.

194

The information reflects the symbology in the Assembly Navigator:


the anten_bsh component is the component that was "explicitly" overridden (the
dark blue arrow )
If the bushing had components mated to it, when overridden, the mated components
would follow its override, creating "implicit" overrides (designated by a white arrow
)
Dismiss the Information window.

Editing Overridden Mating Constraints


In order to override the position of a component that is either fully or partially constrained,
you can suppress a particular constraint applied on the subassembly level before overriding
that constraint on the overridden component.
In this case, the bushing which you overrode up to the parent assembly level, has a Distance
mating constraint which positioned it in relation to the antenna top rod in the subassembly
level (1). You will suppress that constraint so you can specify a new Distance constraint to
position the bushing in relation to the molding of the assembly (2).

Editing Overridden Mating Constraints


Suppressing Overridden Constraints

195

The Reposition Component dialog should still be displayed.

Choose the Mating Override icon

from the dialog.

The Mating Conditions dialog appears.


Click on the checkbox for the Distance constraint to suppress it.

The Distance constraint is now suppressed.

Editing Overridden Mating Constraints


Adding a Constraint to an Overridden Component
Before starting, it is a good idea to blank the antenna top, so you can easily see and select
the bushing.
In the Assembly Navigator, click on the checkbox for anten_top to blank it.

Choose the Distance constraint icon

in the Mating Conditions

196
dialog.
Make sure Filter is set to Face.
Select the front face of the bushing.

If you have unloaded parts that play a role in the new mating conditions, you will get the
following message:

OK the message to continue.


Change the Filter to Point.
Select an outer circular edge on the tip of the molding to yield a center point.

Make sure that the Offset Expression field is set to 0.0 (for a flush mount), then Apply.
Notice that the bushing face is now constrained flush to the top of the molding.

197

OK the Mating Conditions dialog.

More About Editing Overridden Mating Constraints

In this example, you have added a new Distance constraint to the bushing component.
In Variable Component Positioning, you can also modify the numerical value of inherited
Distance and Angle constraints.
Here are a couple of considerations.
You cannot edit the original geometry the Distance or Angle constraints reference, just
change the value.
You can use expressions instead of numerical value; this allows you to designate
spatial relationships between higher and lower level components based on interpart
expressions.

Editing Overridden Mating Constraints


Checking the Overridden Constraint
Now that the bushing is constrained to the molding, if the antenna assembly is
repositioned, the overriding mating constraint on the bushing should keep it in position to the
top of the molding.
Using the Assembly Navigator, unblank the anten_top component.
Zoom the display out so you can see the assembly and have room to pull the antenna out.

198

In the Assembly Navigator, select the anten_upr node.

Choose the Reposition Component icon


Reposition Components.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Select the Y-transformation handle and move the antenna out from the molding.

Once it's in a good location to see the bushing/molding relationship, then OK the
Reposition Component dialog.
Zoom in on the bushing/molding area.

199

Notice that the Distance constraint on the overridden mating conditions keeps the bushing
flush with the top of the molding.

Editing Overridden Mating Constraints


Disabling Variable Positioning
Now check what the mating behaviors are when Variable Positioning is eliminated.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the anten_bsh node.
Choose the Reposition Component icon
Reposition Components.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Choose the Variable Positioning tab.


Make sure amd_phone_assm is selected in the top part of the dialog.

Choose the Delete icon

then OK the dialog.

Notice that the bushing reverts to its original position; the Distance constraint that was
suppressed is now unsuppressed.

200

Editing Overridden Mating Constraints


Some Considerations on Suppressed Constraints
It is possible to create a mating constraint and suppress it immediately, before the
mating condition is updated. Similarly, it is possible to suppress a mating constraint
before you have finished defining it, by selecting the checkbox. This allows a
constraint to be created in the suppressed state which in turn means that the respective
mating condition will never be solved with the new constraint unsuppressed.
It is possible to edit a suppressed constraint (name change / conversion of constraint
type) but the edited constraint must be unsuppressed before any change in the mating
condition can take effect.
The Vary Constraints dialog will ignore any suppressed angle or distance constraints.
If all the constraints of a mating condition are suppressed you will get a message
advising you that the components in question will be treated as unmated during any
drag or transform operation.

201

Component Arrays
The objectives for this lesson are:
understanding template component arrays
understanding master component arrays
editing component arrays

Overview
Component arrays are a way of quickly generating patterns of components with
corresponding mating conditions.
Component arrays are simply instances of a "template" or parent component.
These instances are all associated to the component upon which they were based, therefore,
any changes made to the original component are reflected in the instances of the component.
There are two types of component arrays:
Feature-Based arrays
Master Component arrays

The Template Component


All component arrays have a template component which defines certain properties of any
newly generated component within the array.
The properties inherited by any newly generated components from the template component
are:
component part
color
layer
name
Of course, you designate which component is to be used as the template component of any
array you generate.

202
You can re-designate the template of a component array at any time. If you do, the change
does not affect any array components based on it, only new array components based on the
new template.
If, for some reason, you delete the template of a component array, the system will
automatically assign a new one from the generated array.

The Template Component


Template Components and Component Arrays
A component array based on a feature instance set generates mating constraints that copy
those of the template component.
Therefore, the template component on which the array will be based must already have
mating constraints.
1) Component to be template must first be mated.
2) Feature instance set (2 x 3 holes)

Generated component array copies template component's mating constraints individually 5


times.
Components of a feature-based array will be mated to individual feature set geometry
whenever possible. In some cases, however, the array components may share mating
geometry.

203

1) Cylinder-to-individual instance set cylinder (2


plcs).
2) Individual faces-to-shared face.
In component arrays, it is not possible to
mate to solid edges in an instanced feature.
Only face mating is allowed.

The Template Component


Initiating the Assemblies Application
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_fixture_array.prt from the amd/fixture subdirectory.

The components of this assembly are as follows:


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

locator (cyan)
locator pin (red)
baseplate (green)
shoulder bolt (magenta)
dowel pin (white)

Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

204
The Assemblies Toolbar appears.
If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

The Template Component


Checking Mating Conditions
Some of these components have mating conditions; it is a good idea to check them out.
Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions.

Click on the + icons to open up the tree structure for unopened mated components.

205
Note that the locator, the dowel pin and the locator pin are all mated to the baseplate with two
constraints, one align (cylinder-to-cylinder) and one mate (face-to-face).
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Mating Conditions window.

The Template Component


Creating a Feature Based Array
Choose the Create Component Array icon
Create Array.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Choose dowel_pin in the Assembly Navigator, then OK. (You can also select from the
graphic display).
The Create Component Array dialog appears. From Feature ISET is the default definition
scheme.

Key in comp_array1 in the Component Array Name field and Enter.


A component array of dowel pins is generated based on the placement of hole instance set
of the baseplate.

Use MB3

Refresh as necessary to see all the newly generated geometry.

206

The Template Component


Checking Your Work
Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions.

Note that the mating conditions of the new dowel pins are the same as those of the template
(parent) component, the first shoulder bolt (four dowel pins mated to the baseplate).

Click on the + icons to open up the tree structure for unopened dowel_pin mating
conditions.
Cancel the Mating Conditions window.

The Template Component


Feature-Based Array Associativity
If the number of features in an instance set is changed, the components (of the array) attached
to those features are also changed (added or deleted).
Make the baseplate the Work Part.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.
Choose Application

Modeling (if necessary).

Choose Edit Features Parameters icon

or Edit

Feature

Parameters.

Choose instance[3](7)/simple hole(5) from the Feature Selection list and OK.

207

This is the simple hole on which the feature instance set was based. You are going to
change the instance set.
Choose Instance Array Dialog.
Key in 2 for the Number and 180 for the Angle, then OK.

Choose OK twice more to exit out of the preceding dialogs.


Make the amd_fixture_array the Work Part.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.

Notice that you now have a feature instance set of two holes and that the component array
attached to that instance set of holes now has only two dowel pins.

208

Conversely, if you had added holes to the feature instance set, you would have generated
more dowel pins.
More About Feature-Based Array Associativity

If a feature in an instance set is deleted entirely by a modeling change, the corresponding


array component will be deleted.
1) "template" component

2) Cylinder feature is deleted from instance set; corresponding array component is also
deleted.
3) new "template" component
If the deleted array component was the "template" component, the system assigns a new one
from the remaining components in the array.
Please note that if you suppress a feature of a instance set, or the whole instance set
itself, the array components based on those features will not, in turn, be suppressed.

209

Master Component Arrays


Arrays based on a master component can be generated in two ways:

As a linear array in which you generate an array in one dimension


(linear) or two dimensions (rectangular).
As a circular array which are specified in much the same way as
linear arrays. The only difference being that you specify rotational
information instead of alignment information.

Master Component Arrays


Creating a Linear Component Array
Choose the Create Component Array icon
Create Array.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Choose locator_pin in the Assembly Navigator, then OK. (You can also select from the
graphic display).
Choose Linear as the Array Definition.
Key in comp_array2 in the Component Array Name field and Enter.
The Create Linear Array dialog appears.

Your linear array can be:

210
positioned normal (perpendicular) to a face.
positioned normal (perpendicular) to datum planes.
positioned in the X and Y directions based on edges.
positioned in the X and Y directions based on a datum axis.
Choose Face Normal as the Direction Definition (if necessary).
Select the left-most face perpendicular to the XC direction, then accept.

Note the red vector pointing away from you; you now know you will be designating a
negative offset value to position the second locator pin.
At this juncture, you could define a Y direction based on any of the four Direction
Definition choices if you wanted a rectangular array. However, you will be generating a
linear array.
Note that the first two fields (X direction) are now available. You will use the default Total
Number -XC of 2.
Key in -5.75 for the Offset -XC distance (the second field) and Enter.

The 5.75 distance was determined by using the Information


and referencing the centers of the two locator pin holes.

Geometric

Distance option

211
The second locator pin is positioned and mated.

Master Component Arrays


Checking Your Work
Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions from the menu bar.

Note that you have two locator pin mating conditions.


The locator_pin->baseplate entry signifies that the parent locator pin is mated to the baseplate.
In master component arrays, new components are mated to the master component; that is why
you see the locator_pin->locator_pin entry.
Click on the + icon (if necessary) to open the locator_pin->locator_pin entry in the top
window.
Notice that you have component-to-component mating and a component-to-planar constraint.

The component-to-component mate simply copies the transformation information of the


original component to the new component.

The next constraint mates the new component to the template component and the selected
planar face.

212
Choose Mate -Component->Planar

Note that the planar face to which the component is aligned highlights. This visual cue can be
very helpful in interrogating array constraints with which you are not familiar.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Mating Conditions Information window.

Master Component Arrays


Expressions and Master Component Arrays
One of the main differences between Feature-based arrays and Master Component arrays is
that in Master Component arrays the positioning of array occurrences is done with
expressions, not features.
Choose Information

Expression

List All from the menu bar.

Notice that the expression p1_array_offset=-5.75 has been generated specifying the offset
distance. This is considered the master expression of the array.
This expression is then used in the positioning expression, p2=1*p1_array_offset.
This expression positions the new component to both the master component and the baseplate,
since the master component is mated to the baseplate.
Expressions automatically generated by master component arrays are editable in the Edit
Expressions dialog accessed through Toolbox Expressions.
Dismiss the Information window.

Master Component Arrays


Creating a Circular Component Array
Choose the Create Component Array icon
Create Array.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Choose shoulder_bolt in the Assembly Navigator, then OK. (You can also select from the
graphic display).
Choose Circular as the Array Definition.
Key in comp_array3 in the Component Array Name field and Enter.

213
The Create Circular Array dialog appears.

Your circular array can be:

Positioned about a cylindrical face.

Positioned around an edge of a


body.

Positioned around a datum axis.

Choose Datum Axis.


Select the datum axis positioned in the center of the baseplate.
The datum axis highlights and the lower fields in the Create Circular Array dialog are now
available.
Key in 4 as the Total Number and 90 as the Angle, then OK.
Three more shoulder bolts are generated.

Master Component Arrays


Checking Your Work
Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions from the menu bar.

214

Note that you have only three shoulder bolt mating conditions.
In master component arrays, the master component need not have any mating constraints.
Again, in master component arrays, new components are mated to the master component; that
is why you see the shoulder_bolt->shoulder_bolt entries.
Open one of the shoulder_bolt->shoulder_bolt entries by clicking on the + icon.
Notice that you have component-to-component mating and component orientation based on
the master component and the datum axis.

Click on the Orient Component->Datum_Axis entry.


Note in the lower part of the Mating Conditions dialog that the Angle Expression is listed as
being 3 times the p4 array offset. (Your angle expression may be slightly different depending
on the entry selected.)

Choose Cancel to dismiss the Mating Conditions dialog.

Master Component Arrays


On Your Own: Last Circular Array
Finish your fixture assembly by creating one more circular array of corner locators (cyan

215
component), as you did in the last section.
Choose the Create Component Array icon
or choose Assemblies
Components Create Array.
Choose locator from the Choose Component dialog and OK.
Choose Circular as the Array Definition.
Key in comp_array4 in the Component Array Name field and Enter.
Choose Datum Axis.
Select the datum axis positioned in the center of the baseplate.

The datum axis highlights and the lower fields in the Create Circular Array dialog are now
available.
Key in 4 as the Total Number and 90 as the Angle, then OK.
Three more locators are generated.
Close all parts.

Editing Component Arrays


There are two aspects of editing arrays:
Editing the components within an array
Editing the array itself
Open part file amd_fixture_array2.prt from the amd/fixture subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator.

Choose the Assembly Navigator tab.


Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

(Unix users, choose the Assembly

Editing Component Arrays


Editing Components within an Array
Editing array components is the same as editing non-array components.
You can edit such component characteristics as:

216
Mating conditions (Mate Component or Information
Conditions)
Layer (Edit Object Display)
Color (Edit Object Display)
Name (Component Properties Parameters)

Assemblies

Mating

Each of these characteristics are based on the individual components within an array.
Choose the Select Components icon
Components.

or choose Edit

Selection

Select

Select the last locator in the graphics display.

Choose MB3

Properties.

The Component Properties dialog appears.


Choose the Parameters tab.
Key in locator_4 as the new component name, then OK.

Choose Edit

Object Display from the menu bar.

Again, select the locator you just renamed and OK.


Change the color to some color other than cyan and OK.
All the above edits were done to an individual component in the comp_array4 array.
Next, you will modify the array itself and see how individual component edits act with
respect to array edits.

217

Editing Component Arrays


Deleting Components within an Array
A couple of considerations to keep in mind relating to array component deletion:
If you have individually modified an array component (color, layer etc.) and it
subsequently gets deleted, the modifications you made to it will be lost.
If you create a new component in the same position within the array, the system will
once again base the definition on the template component.
Because an array is nothing more than a matrix containing instances of a component, any
of those instances may be deleted; its position in the array matrix marked as empty.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the LOCATOR_4 entry.
Choose Edit

Delete.

A warning message appears.

OK the dialog.
The component is removed (both individually and from the array).

Editing Component Arrays


Checking the Deletion
Choose Assemblies

Edit Component Arrays.

218

Choose comp_array4 from the list.


Note that the constituent components of the array are highlighted in the Assembly
Navigator.
Choose the Substitute Component option from the Edit Component Array dialog.

Note that the position that the fourth locator occupied is labeled as a "Null Component",
which means the component may be gone, but the array in which it resided still is an array of
four components.
For now we will leave the null component.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Substitute Array Element dialog.
In a Master Component array, you cannot delete the master component since the definition of
the other components in the array depend on it.

219

Editing Component Arrays


Editing an Array
Components arrays may be:
Modified
Deleted
Replaced
Replacing Array Components
Choose Assemblies Edit Component Arrays.
Choose comp_array4 in the list box of the Edit Component Array dialog.
You can use the Substitute Component option in the Edit Component Array dialog to fill
"slots" of deleted array components.
Choose Substitute Component in the Edit Component Array dialog.
Choose Null Component [3] from the list and OK.
Choose locator from the Choose Component dialog and OK.
The null component slot is filled with a new locator.

Remember, that when you create a new component in a null position within an array, the
system will once again base the definition on the array's template component.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Edit Component Arrays dialog.

Editing Component Arrays


Modifying Component Arrays
You can also modify existing arrays in the following ways:
Edit Name

220
Edit Template
Edit other parameters
It is very simple to modify an array's name.
Choose Assemblies

Edit Component Arrays.

Choose comp_array1 from the list box in the Edit Component Array dialog.
Choose Edit name in the Edit Component Array dialog.
The Enter Name dialog appears.

Key in comp_array1_mod1 and Enter.


The array name is changed.
Choose Cancel.
Close all part files.

Editing Component Arrays


Editing an Array Template
Remember that you can change the "template" or parent component of an array at any time.
If you need to find out which component within an array is the "template", you can use
Information Assemblies Component Arrays to get to the Display Component Array
dialog.

221
The template component of the selected array will highlight when Display template option is
pressed.
If you do change the template component of an array, that new template component only
affects any newly designated added components to the array.

Editing Component Arrays


Deleting Component Arrays
The Edit Component Arrays dialog lets you delete arrays in two ways:
Delete Array
This disbands the array and the components of the array are no longer associated.
Delete All
This deletes the array and the components of the array (physically removed from
assembly).

Delete operations will act upon selected array in list box.

222

Exploded Views and Components


The objectives for this lesson are:
understanding basic exploded view concepts
creating a simple exploded view
understanding the relationship of exploded views and assembly drawings
learning how transformations work with exploded views
learning to use mating constraints to explode components

Overview of Exploded Views


Exploded views work much like any other user-defined views. Once defined and named, they
can be attached to any desired layouts.
Exploded views are associated and saved with the displayed part.
Some features of exploded views:
You can use all Unigraphics NX operations on exploded components.
Any operation performed on an exploded component (blanking, color etc.) is reflected
back on the regular component in unexploded views.
You can show any one explosion, or no explosions, in any view at any time.
Some limitations of exploded views:
You cannot explode bodies of an assembly component. (Only components of an
assembly.)
You cannot export or import exploded views out of your current model.
An exploded view is a named view in which specified component explosions are defined.
It is conceivable that you may have several exploded views, each having a different
configuration of exploded components.
For instance, you may have exploded views such as:
Tfr-Tri (Exploded) showing displaced components a, b and c.
Front (Exploded) showing displaced components x, y and z.
Any_Name (Exploded) showing displaced components a, c, x and z.
When creating an exploded view, Unigraphics NX will, by default, use the view name and
append the term "Exploded" to the view.

223
You may, however, designate any name you wish when creating an exploded view. If you
define a duplicate exploded view name, Unigraphics NX will add a numerical suffix to the
name.

Creating a Simple Exploded View


Use File Options Load Options to make sure Use Partial Loading is on,Load
Components is set to All Components and theLoad Method is set to From Directory.
Open part file amd_fix_assm_explode.prt from the amd/fixture subdirectory.

Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

The Assemblies Toolbar appears.


If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

224

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Pack All icon


or choose Tools Assembly Navigator
pack component nodes in the Assembly Navigator.

Pack All to

Choose the Exploded Views icon


on the Assemblies toolbar or choose Assemblies
Exploded Views Show Toolbar to display the Exploded Views toolbar (dockable).
The Exploded Views toolbar appears.

More About the Exploded Views Toolbar

The toolbar icons are broken down into two types:


Exploded Views icons (5)
Create Explosion
Edit Explosion
Auto-explode Components
Unexplode Component
Delete Explosion
Component Visibility icons (2)
Hide Component
Show Component
Component visibility operations apply to the exploded components within your exploded
views.

225

All the toolbar options are also available through Assemblies


can also turn the Exploded Views toolbar on and off here.

Exploded Views. You

Creating a Simple Exploded View


Defining the Explosion
Choose the Create Explosion icon
Create Explosion.

or choose Assemblies

Exploded Views

The Create Explosion dialog appears.

Choose OK to accept the default name. (Explosion 1).


Your model is now has an exploded view. Note that in the graphics area, you see TFR-TRI
WORK (EXPLODED) in the corner.
Choose the Edit Explosion icon
Explosion.
The Edit Explosion dialog appears.

Make sure the Selection switch is on.

or choose Assemblies

Exploded Views

Edit

226
In the Assembly Navigator, select the locator_pin x 2 node.

You can also select components for an explosion in the graphics display.
The two locator pins highlight.

Choose the Move Objects switch, turning it on.


Notice the appearance of the dynamic transformation axis in the graphic display.

The dynamic transformation handles are displayed in the center of the part. You can position
them in sync with the WCS by using the Snap Handles to WCS icon.
Choose the Snap Handles to WCS icon.
You have a couple of options at this point. You can:
dynamically drag or rotate the selected objects
designate a 'move-to-point' operation using standand point constructor methods

227
You want your component explosion to go in the Z direction.
Select the Z-axis translation handle (conehead) in the graphics display (it will highlight).
Notice in the dialog that the vector orientation pull-down becomes available and both the
Distance and Snap Increment fields are activated.
Key in 4 in the Distance field, then OK.

Creating a Simple Exploded View


Exploding the Shoulder Bolts
Next you will explode the shoulder bolts.
Choose the Edit Explosion icon
Explosion.

or choose Assemblies

Exploded Views

Edit

In the Assembly Navigator, choose the shoulder_bolt x 4 node.


The node is highlighted in the Assembly Navigator and the four shoulder bolts highlight in
the graphics display.

Choose the Move Objects switch, turning it on.


Again, you want your component explosion to go in the Z direction.
Select the Z-axis translation handle (conehead) in the graphics display (it will highlight).
Key in 5 in the Distance field, then OK.
All the shoulder_pins explode in the Z direction.

228

Creating a Simple Exploded View


Finishing the Explosion On Your Own

To complete the explosion, there are two more explosions to define:


The locators (4): +Z vector with a distance of 3.
The dowel_pins (4): +Z vector with a distance of .75.
Experiment with the techniques presented, to facilitate the last explosions.
Close all parts.

Exploded Views and Assembly Drawings


One of the main applications of exploding your model is to use an exploded view in an
assembly drawing.
Open part file amd_fix_assm_explode_draft.prt from the amd/fixture subdirectory.

229

This part file already has an exploded view that is hidden; you first must show it.
Choose Explosion 1 from the Explosion pull-down or choose Assemblies
Views Show Explosion.

Exploded

To get an exploded view onto a drawing, you import the exploded view using the Drafting
application.
Choose the Application

Drafting option.

This model already has three orthographic views placed on the drawing sheet.

For the exploded view, you will first set the display of hidden lines to invisible.
Choose Preferences

View Display from the top menu bar.

Make sure Invisible is the Font option and OK.

230

This means that Unigraphics NX will automatically remove all hidden lines from views
that you place on the drawing.

Exploded Views and Assembly Drawings


Adding the Exploded View
Choose the Add View to Drawing icon

or choose Drawing

Add View.

Remember, you are not adding a view from outside your model. This addition brings in a
view that is already in your model.
Choose TFR-TRI from the list box as the view to be added.
The exploded view you are adding is associated with the Tfr-Tri view.
Indicate the position for the center of the view to be added.

Close all parts when finished.

231

Transformations By Dragging
You can show rotation or range of movement in your exploded view dynamically by
interactively dragging components into position.

Open part file flipfone_assembly_closed.prt from the amd/plastic subdirectory.

Transformations By Dragging
Turning on Translucency
Using Translucency can help you see internal components of an assembly all at the same
time. It is useful when dealing with complex, packed assemblies.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.
Choose Preferences

Visualization.

Choose the Visual tab.


Click the Translucency switch on, then OK.
Choose the Edit Object Display icon

on the Utility toolbar or choose Edit

Object

232
Display.
Choose Select All in the Class Selection dialog, then OK.
Make sure the Partially Shaded field is set to Yes, then move the slider to about 85, then
OK.

Transformations By Dragging
Creating an Exploded View by Dragging
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Expand All icon

or choose Tools

Choose the Exploded Views icon


Choose the Create Explosion icon
Create Explosion.

Assembly Navigator

Expand All.

to invoke the Exploded Views toolbar.


or choose Assemblies

Exploded Views

Choose OK to accept the default name (Explosion 1).


Choose the Edit Explosion icon
Explosion.

or choose Assemblies

Exploded Views

Edit

233
In the Assembly Navigator, choose the flipfone_back_bottom node.
The component highlights.
Choose the Move Objects switch, turning it on.
In this case, you want to explode the component in the -Y direction.
Select the Y-axis translation handle (the conehead).
With the cursor over the conehead, depress and hold down MB1, dragging the component
along the Y-axis until you read -4 in the Distance field.

Choose the Edit Explosion icon again.


In the Assembly Navigator, choose the flipfone_pad_bottom node.
Choose the Move Objects switch, turning it on.
Select the Y-axis translation handle (the conehead).
With the cursor over the conehead, depress and hold down MB1, dragging the component
along the Y-axis until you read -3 in the Distance field.

234

Remember that the Snap Increment is on with a value of 1 so the component is translated in 1
inch increments along the -Y axis.

Transformations By Dragging
Rotating the Exploded View
Next you are going to rotate the subassembly whose components are part of Explosion 1.
Choose the Edit Explosion icon again.
In the Assembly Navigator, choose the flipfone_subassy_bottom.
Choose the Move Objects switch, turning it on.
Because you want to rotate the subassembly in a realistic way about the hinge, you will
syncronize the transformation handles with the WCS.
Choose the Snap Handles to WCS icon.

235

Select the rotation handle in the YC-ZC plane.

Notice in the dialog that you now have an Angle field and the default Snap Increment is 5
degrees. Again, at this point you can either key in an angle of rotation or drag your rotation in
5 degree increments.
Key in -130 in the Angle field, then OK.

236

Unigraphics NX remembers the first two translations (the back and the pad) then rotates
the subassembly as designated.

Transformations By Dragging
Getting Information on an Exploded View
You can check explosion view values by using the Information option of the menu bar.
Choose Information

Assemblies

Explosion.

The Exploded View menu appears listing the exploded view names in your model.
Choose Explosion 1 in the Exploded Views dialog and OK.
An Information window appears listing all the exploded components, in the order that they
were exploded and their respective delta values.
If you want a comprehensive listing of all exploded views, do not close the Information
window between Information requests. This will concatenate multiple requests into one
Information window.
Dismiss the Information window.
Close all parts.

237

Exploding Components Using Mating Constraints


You can also automatically explode components based on their mating constraints.
Open part file amd_fix_assm_explode.prt from the amd/fixture subdirectory.
To avoid surprises, it is always a good idea to check-out the mating constraints before
creating an auto-explode. How the components are mated determines how they will
explode.
Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

Choose Information

Assemblies

Mating Conditions from the main menu.

Note that the two locator pins have been aligned with their respective holes. You will use
this align constraint to automatically explode the locator pins.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Mating Conditions dialog.
Choose the Pack All icon

or choose Tools

Choose the Exploded Views icon

Assembly Navigator

Pack All.

(if necessary).

Choose the Create Explosion icon.


This time you will give the exploded view an unique name.
Key in mating_explosion and Enter.
Choose the Auto-explode Components icon
Views Auto-explode Components.

or choose Assemblies

Choose locator_pin x 2 from the Assembly Navigator, then OK.


The two locator pins are highlighted.
The Explosion Distance dialog appears.
Key in 2 in the Distance input field and OK to accept.

Exploded

238

Please note that the value you input for the offset is an absolute value, not a delta value.
If you were to repeat the Automatic process and accept the 2 value, the locator pins would not
move another 2 inches.
Close all parts.
More About the Explosion Distance Dialog

This dialog preempts the Explode Component dialog because the explosion vector is
determined by the mating constraints of the components.
All you must do is specify a distance with or without a clearance.
With Add Clearance off, whatever offset distance you specify will be absolute, i.e. the
offsetting component will move from its absolute position the specified distance.

Offset distance only (absolute)

239
With Add Clearance on, whatever offset distance you specify will be relative to the mated
component.

Offset distance with clearance offset "on" (offset distance


starts from mated component)

240

Miscellaneous Design Topics


The objectives for this lesson are:
learning how to get information on assemblies
using assembly analysis
understanding enforce piece part
setting up assembly preferences
understanding how to check assembly clearances
understanding how to use mixed unit assemblies
understanding how to use product outlines

Information on Assemblies
The most obvious place to get information regarding Assemblies is through the
Information Assemblies option, but there are some other ways as well.
This section discusses the kinds of information that you can get from an assembly and the
different methods to get that information.
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_fixed_jaw_assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.

241

Component Object Information


At times, it is important to get information about a component such as the layer it is on or
its position and rotation within the assembly.
Information for each of the components in this assembly can be accessed by selecting
Information Object or by using MB3 on the Assembly Navigator.
Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

The Assemblies Toolbar appears.


If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the fixed_jaw component in the Assembly Navigator with MB3 then Properties.
The Component Properties dialog appears.

242

Note the "tabs" along the top of the dialog. The default tab is Assembly. Note that the
Load Status of the component is shown.
Note also that certain component properties can be modified here, such as Blanking,
Layers, Translucency and Partial Shading.
Choose the Blanked check box to turn it on (checked), then Apply.
The fixed_jaw component is blanked.
Choose the Blanked check box again to turn it off (unchecked), then Apply.
Choose the Information icon.
The fixed_jaw component information listed in the Information window:
Owning part
Component member in part
Layer of component
System attributes (color, font, width)
Modified Version (version no. and date)
Created Version (version no. and date)
Component Reference Set Name
Component Translation information
Mating Conditions
Part attributes
Dismiss the Information window.

243

Component Object Information


Component Properties: Attributes
Choose the Attributes tab.

This shows you the attributes applied to the component. Here you can create, edit and
delete specific attributes of the component.
Be sure to check out the Attributes lesson within this CAST course for more information
regarding defining and editing attributes.

Component Object Information


Component Properties: Parameters
Choose the Parameters tab.

Here you can delineate component suppression schemes and get information on how a
component is used within any part families that may exist.
Choose the Information option.

244
The information comes up giving you Family Member Selection information. In this case, the
fixed_jaw component is not a member of any part family.
Be sure to check out the Part Families lesson within the Advanced Assembly Modeling
CAST course for more information regarding defining and editing attributes.
Dismiss the Information window.
Cancel the Component Properties dialog.

Component Object Information


Component Properties: Weight
Choose the Weight tab.

Note that you get a "No Weight Data" condition for the Mass. This is because the weight
of the fixed_jaw has not yet been updated based on the attributes of the part.
Choose the Update Weight Data Now icon.
Now the Mass condition reflects the weight of the component based on its material
attribute (mild steel) and units of measure. Also, in the Assembly Navigator, in the Weight
Status column you will see a checkmark signifying that the weight has been updated. In the
Weight column you will see the weight based on the mass properties assigned to the
component.
Cancel the Component Properties dialog.
Using MB3 Component Properties in the Assembly Navigator, update the Weight Data
for the jaw_plate and plate_screw components.
Notice that you get a summation of the weight properties of the components in the
Assembly Navigator.

245

Component Object Information


Reference Set Information
You can list information on a specific reference set, such as its attributes, orientation and
the number of members found in the reference set.
Change the work part to the fixed_jaw component.
Choose Information

Assemblies

Reference Set.

The Choose Name dialog now displays a list of all the reference sets found in the current
work part.
Choose SKETCH from the list of reference sets then OK.
Notice that information about the "SKETCH" reference set is displayed in the Information
window.
Dismiss the Information window.
Choose Cancel on the Choose Name dialog.
Change the Work Part back to the amd_fixed_jaw_assm.prt.
Be sure to check out the Reference Sets lesson within this CAST course for more
information regarding defining and editing attributes.

Component Object Information


Component Load Status Information
This feature provides information on all parts loaded in the current Unigraphics NX
session.
Choose Information

Part

Loaded Parts.

The Information window lists all parts in your current session with the following
information about each part.
Load Status (partially, fully or unloaded)
Modified Status (is part modified or not)
Access (Modifiable or Read Only)
Assembly Status (Assembly or Component)
Format (Operating system)
Release (Unigraphics NX release part is saved in)
Creation Date and Time
Units (inch or Millimeters)

246
Notice the "Notes" at the bottom of the Information window gives additional information
about the components.
Dismiss the Information window.
Close all parts.

Assembly Analysis
In this section you will determine where a simple interference condition exists in an
assembly. Once found, you will determine the amount of interference, then you will use this
information to correct the problem.
Open part file amd_mouse_assm_trans.prt from the amd/mouse subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Assembly Analysis
Creating Interference Solids
In this section, you will create a simple interference solid between the Mech-Elec-Trans
(blue) and the Upper Housing (cyan). This will allow you to see where the two components
are interfering and not for proper assembly of the parts.

247

Change your work layer to 10.


Key in 10 in the Work Layer box.

With the work layer as layer 10, any interference solids will be created on that layer.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Expand All icon on the Assembly Navigator toolbar


or choose Tools
Assembly Navigator Expand All to expand component nodes in the Assembly
Navigator.
Simplify the assembly by blanking all components except the mech_elec_trans and
upper_housing components.
In the Assembly Navigator, click on mech_elec_trans node (it highlights).
Holding down the <ctrl> key, select upper_housing node (it highlights).

248

Choose the Isolate Component icon


in the Assembly toolbar or choose
Assemblies Context Control Isolate Components.

Choose Analysis

Simple Interference.

The Simple Interference dialog appears.

There are two methods that you can choose to display the information:
Highlight Faces - This highlights faces that interfere with each other or that share
the same space (line on line) or are parallel and touch.
Create Interference Solid - This option creates a separate solid. It will only create this
solid if there is an interference condition. Line on line conditions will not produce
sheets.
Choose Create Interference Solid from the dialog.
Select the Upper Housing and the Mech-Elec-Trans from your display.

249
Notice that two interference solids have been created. You can now use information from the
these solids to fix the assembly.

Cancel the Simple Interference dialog.

Assembly Analysis
Checking Interference Size
You can now interrogate the interference solids to find out how large it is. You will then
use that information to make changes to the assembly.
Choose Preferences Visualization Color Settings (tab) and change your
Preselection color to Green, then choose OK to accept.
Choose the Distance icon

from the Analysis toolbar or choose Analysis

Distance.

Choose Edge from the dialog choices.


Select any edge on the bottom of the interference solid (see the following diagram).
Use MB3

Zoom as necessary to facilitate selection.

Use the Quick Pick dialog


edge, then Accept.

as necessary until you have the correct

250

ChooseEdge.
Select any edge on the top of the interference solid then Accept.

The Information window is now popped up with the minimum distance information
between the two edges you selected.
You are not necessarily interested in the 3-D distance. You are more interested in the delta
ZC distance between the two edges.
From the Information window, make a note of the Delta ZC value (4.0) so you can use it
later.
Dismiss the Information window.
Choose Cancel.
Now, change the work part and modify the parameters of the height of the Mech-ElecTrans component.
Change the work part to Mech-Elec-Trans.
Remember you must be in the Modeling application to modify any feature parameters.
Choose Application

Modeling.

Choose Edit Parameters icon

or choose the Edit

Feature

Parameters.

Select the BLOCK(2) feature from the Edit Parameters dialog, then OK your selection.
Choose the Feature Dialog option from the dialog.
Edit the Z Length so that its size is reduced by the amount of the interference solid

251
(4.0mm) and an additional one mm for clearance.
Choose OK three times to make the change.
Notice the size of the block feature has been updated with the new value.
Change the work part back to amd_mouse_assm.
Notice that the interference solid no longer falls within the Mech-Elec-Trans component.
Normally, you would use File

Save at this point to save the part files.

You can not do this because the part files in the CAST Online directory are read-only.
You can save parts if you designate a directory in which you have Write permission.
More About Analysis Options

Some of the more important Analysis function that relate to assembles are:
Geometric Properties calculates and displays geometric properties of selected points on curve
and/or faces.
Deviation checks distance and tangency of:
A Curve to another Curve
A Curve to a Face
An Edge of one Face to another Face
One Face to another Face
Curve graphically and numerically displays the radii of curvature of curves and faces. Can be
used to determine cutter diameters used for machining splines and free form faces.
Face is used to display temporary color analyses of faces. This analysis can be useful for
detection of inflections or variations on a face.
Examine Geometry allows you examine various types of geometry. With this operation you
can determine if a body is a valid object.
Simple Interference allows you to determine whether two bodies intersect. You have the
option to simply highlight the interfering faces or to create a new solid body from the
interference. See discussion below.
Assembly Clearance allows you to set up clearance scenarios within assemblies and set up
maximum/minimum tolerance studies. See the Assembly Clearance lesson in the CAST
Advanced Assembly Modeling course for detailed information.
Area using Curves is used to calculate the area and perimeter of a closed set of planar curves.
(Holes are allowed.)

252
Area using Faces displays the area and perimeter of selected faces. These faces do not have to
be related to each other.
Mass using Solids is used for finding the volume, mass, moments, and centroid of one or
more solids.
Mass using Curves & Sheets allows you to emulate a solid body by either revolving or
extruding a set of curves or by using a series of free form sheets prior to sewing.
Assembly Weight Management allows you to set up weight analysis studies within an
assembly as well as asserting different properties schemes. See the Weight Management
lesson in the CAST Advanced Assembly Modeling course for detailed information.

Assembly Analysis
Alternative use of Interference Solids
In this section, you will create the same simple interference solid between the Mech-ElecTrans (blue) and the Upper Housing (cyan). This time the solid will be used to modify the
component part
Close and Reopen All Modified parts.
File Close Reopen All Modified Parts.
Dismiss the Information window

With the work layer as layer 10, any interference solids will be created on that layer.
Open the Assembly Navigator and Expand all the nodes.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose the Expand All icon
Expand All.

or choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

253
Simplify the assembly by blanking all components except the mech_elec_trans and
upper_housing components.
In the Assembly Navigator, click on mech_elec_trans node (it highlights).
Holding down the <ctrl> key, select upper_housing node (it highlights).

Choose Assemblies

Context Control

Isolate Components.

Now, change the work part so the interference solid will be created in the Mech-ElecTrans component where it can be used to modify the part.
Change the work part back to mech_elec_trans.
Change your work layer to 10.
Key in 10 in the Work Layer box.
Choose Analysis

Simple Interference.

The Simple Interference dialog appears.

254

There are two methods that you can choose to display the information:
Highlight Faces - This highlights faces that interfere with each other or that share
the same space (line on line) or are parallel and touch.
Create Interference Solid - This option creates a separate solid. It will only create this
solid if there is an interference condition. Line on line conditions will not produce
sheets.
Choose Create Interference Solid from the dialog.
Select the Upper Housing and the Mech-Elec-Trans from your display.
If an interference condition exists, this procedure creates the interference solid(s) in the
system color. In your case that is Red.

Notice that two interference solids have been created. You can now use these solids to modify
the part that they are created in, in this case it is the Mech-elec-trans.
Cancel the Simple Interference dialog.
Remember you must be in the Modeling application to modify any feature parameters.
Choose Application

Modeling.

Choose the Subtract icon

or choose the Insert

Feature Operation

Select the Mech-Elec-Trans (blue) for the Target solid.


Select the two interference solids (red) for the Tool solids.

Subtract....

255

Choose OK to make the change.


Cancel the subtract dialog.
Notice the corners of the block have been removed.
Change the work part back to amd_mouse_assm.
This type of modification may be used depending on the design or manufacturing that is
being used.

Enforced Piece Part


If you create a component that should never have other components added to it (thus
making it a subassembly), you may want specify that it is to always be a piece part.
First change the work part.
Change the work part to upper_housing.
Choose File

Utilities

Enforced Piece Part.

The Piece Part Enforcement dialog is now displayed. With this dialog you can turn on
Enforced Piece Part which means that you cannot add any components to it to make it an
assembly.
Choose the Enforce as Piece Part option to turn it on.
Choose OK to accept.

Assemblies Preferences
The Assembly Preference dialog is where you can set the specific preferences that are
related to assemblies.

256
Choose Preferences

Assemblies.

The Assembly Preferences dialog is now displayed.


The top area of the Preferences dialog pertains to the parts list function. It controls how
levels of the assembly are displayed.
A brief description of each is listed below:
No Add, adds none of the components of the assembly to the parts list.
Single Level Add, adds only the top level components. No subassembly members will
be added.
All Levels Add, adds all levels of subassemblies to the parts list.
The lower area of the Preferences dialog deals with the display of the work part in the
assembly.
Work part emphasis, makes all other components change to the dimmed color (gray
by default) when you make a component the work part.
Maintain Work Part, specifies whether the work part should stay the same when
changing the displayed part from one assembly to another.
Display Update Report, specifies whether or not to produce an update report (if
required) when you open an assembly or execute a script.
Component Member Select, allows you to select the member geometry of a
component in some options, where the class selection dialog is available.
Color, defines the color used to represent dimmed components when the work part is
being emphasized.
The Assembly Navigator area of the Preferences dialog lets you rearrange the columns
within the Assembly Navigator.
Close all parts.

Checking Clearances
Within Unigraphics NX, there are two different ways to check assembly clearances:
Assemblies Components Check Clearances
Analysis Assembly Clearance
The first method is an interactive way to get an idea of relationships between components.
The second method is more robust in that you can set up clearance conditions, create lists of
components to check and define clearance envelopes and so on.

257
This section deals with the first method. If you want a thorough treatment of the second
method, it is recommended that you see the Clearance Analysis lesson in the CAST
Advanced Assembly Modeling course.
Open part file amd_clear_assm.prt from the amd/sew subdirectory.

This assembly is the internal mechanism of a sewing machine. You will check the
clearances of some of its parts.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Checking Clearances
Using Check Clearances
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

As stated, the Check Clearances option works on the components of an assembly. The
components that are to be checked can be selected either from the graphics display or the
Assembly Navigator.
Choose the Check Clearances icon
Clearance option.

or the Assemblies

Components

Check

258
The Class Selection dialog appears.
Select component 3_T22 from the graphics display, then OK.

The Interference Check dialog appears showing you the relationship of component 3_T22
with any other components that come into contact with it.

Note that there are 3 components that "touch" the 3_T22 component.

Checking Clearances
Types of Interferences
Interferences within Check Clearance function come in three basic types:
Touching Interference
Two objects touch each other, but there is no interference with each other.
Hard Interference
Two objects intersect each other and share 3-D space.
Containment Interference
One object is totally contained within another (may be indicative of a
modeling error).

259

Choose the Check Clearances icon


again or the Assemblies
Components Check Clearance option.
In the Assembly Navigator, choose component 3_8, then OK.

Note that 3_8 has "hard" or intersects mass with two other components.

Checking Clearances
Isolating Interferences
In the Interference Check dialog, select the first interference.

Note that the Isolate Interference option becomes active.


Choose the Isolate Interference option.

The display isolates the two components so you can see which components you are really
dealing with.
Again, if you want to provide clearance requirements within your analysis, see the
Analysis Assembly Clearance option.

260
Close all parts.

Mixed Unit Assemblies


The system will allow you to have an assembly composed of a combination of inch and
metric components.
There are, however, some limitations of how you may design in context.
Open the part amd_mouse_assm_b from the amd/mouse directory.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components.

The Information window is displayed with a list of all the components in the assembly.
Notice that all the components but one were created using metric units (mm), including the
top assembly part. The component part named "mech_elec_trans_inch" was created in inch
units.
Dismiss the Information window.
When working in context of the assembly, the units of both the work part and the
displayed part must be the same.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the mech_elec_trans_inch node to highlight it.
Choose Assemblies

Control Context

Set Work Part.

Because the displayed part is in metric and the component mech_elec_trans_inch is in inches
you will get the following message:

Choose OK to dismiss the information box.


In order for this component to be the work part the displayed part must be in the same
units.

How would you solve this problem?

261

By creating a new, inch part file and adding the metric assembly to it, the displayed part
is now in inches.
With this new part, you can now change the work part to any inch member component.
Additional level created to allow work in a mixed unit
assembly.

Choose File New to create


a new part file.
Make sure that the units for the new part is set to Inches.
Key in amd_mouse_assm_inch for the name of the new file. Choose OK to accept.
The new part is created and becomes the new displayed part.
Now that an inch part is created and is now the displayed part, add the mouse assembly to it.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon.
The Select Part dialog is displayed and prompts you to choose the part to add.
Choose amd_mouse_assm_b from the list. Choose OK to accept.
Choose OK from the Add Existing Part dialog to accept the defaults and continue.
Use the Point Constructor dialog to place the part.
Choose Cancel.
Because the displayed part is in inches, you can now change the work part to any inch
component found in this assembly.
Change the work part to the component named mech_elec_trans_inch.
The work part changes because the displayed part is also in inches.
If you want to change the work part back to one of the metric components, change the
displayed part back to the metric assembly.

262
1) Change displayed part back to the metric
assembly.

2) Change work part to any metric component.


Close all part files.

Product Outlines
Product Outlines give you the ability to quickly switch on and off a 3D ghost outline image
of an assembly. The idea is that when you have loaded the top level assembly and just a few
of its components (maybe by filtering), you can switch on the outline to work out where you
are in terms of the total product.
A demonstration is in order.
Set Load Options to No Components.
Choose File Options Load Options.
Choose the No Components option from the Load Components options, then OK
the Load Options dialog.
Open part file flipfone_assembly_outlined.prt from the amd/plastic subdirectory.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Expand all the nodes of the Assembly Navigator.

263

Choose the Expand All icon


Expand All.

or choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Load the flipfone_pad_bottom part only.


Place the cursor over the flipfone_pad_bottom node.
Use MB3 Open Component to open the component.

This simulates the idea of loading a top level assembly and just a few of its components
(maybe by filtering).
Now this model has already had some outlines defined; all you must do is turn them on.
Choose the Show Product Outline icon
Control Show Product Outline.

or choose Assemblies

Context

264

The situation is this: In the assembly, product outlines were created for three components:
flipfone_back_bottom
flipfone_back_top
flipfone_hinge
They were designated to be blue. The outlines were saved with the assembly and when
invoked using Show Product Outlines, they appear, although still unloaded, giving you some
context for the only loaded part, the bottom keypad.
Close all parts.

Creating Product Outlines


Set Load Options to All Components.
Choose File Options Load Options.
Choose the All Components option from the Load Components options, then OK
the Load Options dialog.
Open part file flipfone_assembly.prt from the amd/plastic subdirectory.
Choose Assemblies

Context Control

The Product Outline dialog appears.

Define Product Outline

265

This dialog lets you define Product Outline color, line font and translucency.

Creating Product Outlines


Assigning Product Outline Colors
Click on the color field at the top of the dialog.
Click on the Aquamarine color box.

Your color choice is reflected in the color box in the Product Outline dialog.

Creating Product Outlines


Assigning Product Outline Line Font
In addition to assigning a specific color for your outline, you can also assign a specific line
font.
This can sometimes be more helpful than assigning a color, because the display of colors
can be mistaken for loaded parts, whereas line font differences are more distinctive.

266
Click on the Line Font option.
Select the Dotted line font type.

You will leave the Translucency factor at the default of 50%.


You are now ready to select the components you want to outline.
Select the following components:
flipfone_antenna
flipfone_back_bottom
flipfone_back_top
flipfone_hinge
OK the Product Outline dialog.
Your product outline is now created.

Creating Product Outlines


Checking Your Product Outline
Of course, at this point you would save your model. In CAST, the part files are read-only
so you will unload some components to see the results of creating your outline.
Using the Assembly Navigator and MB3
subassemblies.

Close, close (thus unloading) all parts and

Place the cursor over each subassembly node then use MB3 Close
Assembly.
Place the cursor over each remaining component node then use MB3 Close
Part.

267

This effectively simulates what you would see if you opened the part file with the No
Components load options if this were a saved part file.
This allows you to now selectively load whatever components you intend to work on and
have it/them displayed in context of the product outline.
In the Assembly Navigator use MB3
flipfone_pad_bottom part.

Open

Component to open the

Creating Product Outlines


Using Display Techniques with Product Outlines
Right now, all geometry is a wireframe display. At times, it is helpful to further distinguish
between your loaded part and the product outline.
In the graphics display, use MB3
your open part.
Use MB3

Display Mode

Zoom to zoom in on the pad area.

Partially Shaded to partially shade

268

You can now better see the difference between the loaded part and your product outline.
In the graphics display, use MB3
part.

Display Mode

Shaded to fully shade your open

In the fully shaded mode, it is more difficult to distinguish between the loaded part and the
product outline.

269

Creating Product Outlines


Using the Product Outline Icon

Once you have designated your product outline, you can modally control whether it is on
or off using the Show Product Outline icon.
In the graphics display, use MB3
your open part.

Display Mode

Partially Shaded to partially shade

Right now your outline is turned on; you will turn it off.
Click the Show Product Outline icon

to turn the outline off.

The icon is graphical equivalent of Assemblies


Outline.

Context Control

Show Product

You now see only the bottom pad; the outline is off. Of course, the icon serves as a toggle
switch, turning the outline on or off.

Can you have the Product Outline on even if the outlined components are loaded?

Yes, you will just see the outline with whatever qualities you have prescribed to it, i.e.
color, line font, translucency, overlaid onto the loaded components.
Open the flipfone_back_bottom component.
In the Assembly Navigator use MB3
flipfone_back_bottom part.
Click the Show Product Outline icon

Open

Component to open the

to turn the outline on.

270

You now see loaded back of the phone with its product outline overlaid on top of it.
Close all part files.

271

Revisions and Substitutions

The objectives of this lesson are:


understanding how to track revisions by part number
understanding the relationship of load options and revisioning
knowing how to substitute components
using assembly reports
understanding the parametric approach to revisions

File Versioning/Revisions
There are many different ways to track revisions after a component has been released.
The two most common methods for revision annotation:
Reflecting the revision in the part number.
Tracking the revision level through attributes that do not change the part number.
For many applications, it is not mandatory that the whole assembly change when a change is
implemented on one of its components.

272
However, for our instructional purposes, you will assume that if a component of an assembly
is revised, then the assembly will also be revised.
To complete the following examples, you will need access to a writable directory. Remember,
you do not have Write access to the CAST Online directory.
You will be advised specifically when you need to change directories.

Tracking Revisions By Part Number


The most common way of keeping track of the legacy data for a part, is to save the part using
a new name and then make the changes to the new file.
This method is very efficient when you want to know what version of a part you are looking
at because the part name will show the revision number.
It usually includes the revision letter or number and a simple listing of a directory.
For example, a part named 123_a.prt indicates an "A" revision on part 123.
Once the new version of the part is released, the old version is usually taken offline and
archived.
There are many advantages to this method and only a few disadvantages:
Advantages
Easy to create the change. Use "Save As"
on each of the affected components.
No protection problem because owner does
the "Save As".
Since the old and new part files have
different names they can reside in the same
directory.
The legacy information is accessed (if on
line) by retrieving the older revision
assembly or component part.
Easy to track revisions on the shop floor
when looking at numbered parts.
File versioning can enable the system to
always get the latest version of the file.
Tracking Revisions By Part Number
Performing a Revision using Save As

Disadvantages
Two versions of the component part can not be
open at the same time.
If components are substituted rather than using
the file versioning options of the system, all
associated information is lost.

273
Many companies require an assembly to be revised whenever a member component of that
assembly is changed.
In this section, you will modify and perform a `save part as' on a component and also save the
revised assembly.
You will also use some of the information tools available to you to track changes.
Open the assembly named rev_fixture_assm.prt from the amd/fixture directory.

Let us say that at your company, an assembly gets revised whenever there is a change that
affects the Form-Fit-Function of a component within the assembly.
Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Make baseplate the Work Part.


Use (Modeling) Edit
Apply.

Feature to edit the parameters of the two simple holes to .25,then

Choose Application

Modeling.

Choose the Edit Feature Parameters icon


or choose Edit Feature
Parameters.
Select SIMPLE_HOLE(2) from the Edit Parameters dialog, then OK.
Select the dimension from the graphics area or choose Feature Dialog on the Edit
Parameters dialog.
Key in .25 in the Edit Parameters input dialog, then OK.
OK the Edit Parameters dialog again.
Repeat the above procedure for SIMPLE_HOLE(3), changing the parameter to .25.

274

Schematics help you visualize these steps.

Choose Cancel to dismiss the dialog.

Tracking Revisions By Part Number


The Part Modification Dialog
There is an information mechanism you can use to track modifications to various aspects of
assemblies.
Since you just made a change to the baseplate component of the fixture assembly, this would
be a good time to show you how this mechanism works.
Choose Information

Part

Modifications.

The Part Modifications dialog appears. The top part of the dialog lists the loaded parts with
the current work part highlighted.

Toggles version info between work and display parts.

275
Lists the loaded parts of the assembly.
The Version/Date and Time list shows the respective versions and when they were logged for
the part selected in the Choose Loaded Part list.

Your version numbers may be different from the ones above.


You will be checking the changes you made to the baseplate in the loaded version.
Choose the Specify Object Types option.
A list of the various types of objects that you can get information about appears. You only
want info on features.
Choose Feature, then OK.
Choose the Criteria option.
You have a choice of version comparison criteria:
At (the selected version of the part)
At or After (the selected version of the part)
After (the selected version of the part)
At or Before (the selected version of the part)
Before (the selected version of the part)
Choose At or After and then Apply.
The Information window is presented showing you that three objects have been modified "at
or after" the loaded version.
The "modified" column specifies which version the feature was modified in. The "created"
column specifies which version the feature was created in.

276
You can cross reference this information with the part history which is appended onto the
Modifications Report to see when each respective version was created and by whom on which
Unigraphics NX release.
Notice also that the Object Number field at the bottom of the Part Modifications dialog is now
active.
This lets you highlight, in the graphics display, the objects that have been modified. The
status line also reflects the specific object info.

Choose Next and Previous to see how this works.


Try one more permutation of this.
Choose At or Before on the Criteria option and then Apply.
Notice in the Modifications Report that you now have the modification history of all features
of all the versions of the baseplate.
Feel free to experiment with other Object Type settings, as well as different loaded parts and
comparison criteria.
The Information Part Modifications option is one of your most powerful tools for
tracking part and assembly histories.
Choose Cancel from the Part Modifications dialog when you are finished.

Tracking Revisions By Part Number


Saving Modifications
Now that the part has been revised, and you have learned how to check its version history,
you will save it with a new name, "baseplate_a".
Choose File

Save As.

Notice that the system automatically gave you a "Session Where Used" report so that you
track how many assemblies are currently referencing the baseplate component.
The cue line prompts you to enter a new part file name.
Key in a directory in which you have Write access in the Selection field, followed by
baseplate_a as the new part file name and Enter.

277

Note that the "Session Where Used" report is updated with a line telling you `baseplate will
be saved as...' .
At this point you must make a decision. The Cue line prompts you to enter a new part file
name for the assembly.
If you enter a new name, you will be revising the assembly. If you choose Cancel, you will
not be revising the assembly.
The baseplate has had a Form, Fit or Function change (the holes), so you need to revise the
assembly also.
Key in rev_baseplate_assm_a as the name for the new assembly and Enter.
The `Ok to Save As' message pop-up displays.
The system gives you one more chance to abort what you are doing.
The Information window displays the current information. If you choose OK, the system will
save the new parts to the disk drive.
Select OK to continue.

Say that the locators now need to be revised due to a change of anodizing specification, but
this change will not alter the components Form-Fit-Function, so you do not have to revise.
Change the Work Part to one of locator(s).
Perform a Save As on the component and give it a new name of locator_a.
Because the assembly has multiple occurrences of the locator part, all occurrences reflect the
change of file name.

278
This time, when the system presents the window to save the assembly file, you are not going
to revise the assembly.
Choose Cancel to keep the system from revising the assembly.
Again, the system gives you The `Ok to Save As' message warning you to be sure that this is
what you want to do.
The Information window will also reflect the specified action and show directory paths and
filenames you have input.
Choose OK.
The `Save As Report' is informing you that the assembly that holds the updated component
was not renamed, but will reference the new component, baseplate_assm_a, if it is saved later.
Choose OK.

Dismiss the Information window.


Close all part files.

Load Options and Revisioning


If revisioning is to be handled by moving a part to a different directory when it is revised, then
you need to have a means of telling the system where to find the latest revision part.
Using load options, you can tell the system where to search and what order the
directories are to be searched.
If the system was unable to locate the specified component, you may then specify
which of two types of failure actions you would like to have performed.
The load options you define are found in a text file named load_options.def.
This file may be created interactively and saved, or it may be created in a text editor.
When you execute Unigraphics NX, the system will look for the load_options.def file in the
directory from which Unigraphics NX was launched.

279
The system uses the load_options.def file when you are performing the following assemblies
functions:
Opening or importing a Unigraphics NX assembly.
Substituting a subassembly.
Replacing a reference set and the new set calls different components. (This relates to
reference sets created within a subassembly.)
Generating a "Where Used" report.
If no load_options.def file exists in the directory from which Unigraphics NX is started, the
system will use the hard coded options listed below:
SearchPath: /current_dir...
LoadOption: Load_From_Dir
LoadFailOption: Abort
LoadLatest: No
Load Options do not affect the actual part you are opening (the assembly).
The Load Options only apply to component parts that need to be loaded due to the opening of
an assembly that references them.
Interactively, load options are found in the File pull down menu.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Load Options and Revisioning


The Load Options Dialog

1) Determines how components will be loaded. Includes


addressing component sets and component filters.
2) Controls partial loading of components. When off,
components are fully loaded when assembly is opened.

3) Will present a error message and not open the assembly.


4) When off, components to be loaded must have correct
Unique I.D. number and name. When on, UID# is ignored.

280

5) When on, latest version of component is loaded based on


versioning rules.
6) Expands dialog for search directory customization.
Choose Define Search Directories.

Load Options and Revisioning


Search Directories and Revisioning
The Define Search Directories option expands the Load Options dialog.

1) Default search directory is your login directory.

2) Directory entry field.


3) Adds the entered directory to list.
4) Removes selected directory from list.
5) Moves directory down one level from selected directory.
6) Saves settings in load_options.def file.
7) Changes search directories back to previous saved
settings.
A low level of confirmation control can be imposed by separating file versions into specific
directories.
This defines search paths to ensure that each user is accessing the appropriate version of parts.
The order of search is the order that the directories are listed (local

increasingly global).

Example:
User Smith's personal directory is the first one searched because that is where all his inprogress work is stored.

281

Once Smith's design is done, he files it in the proj_x\alpha directory (Smith is on the
alpha design team). This allows other members of the alpha team to share Smith's work.
Released versions of files are placed in the proj_x\released directory and are accessible
by all projects.
Example:

Load Options and Revisioning


Partial Loading Issues
Even though partial loading of components can improve performance and save computer
memory, there are disadvantages to using partial loading when it comes to component
revisions and substitutions.
Partial Loading: Interpart Expressions
Turn off the partial loading option if you are using interpart expressions.
Changes made to linked expressions are then immediately applied.

1) Interpart expression
is modified

2) If partial loading is off, changes based on interpart expressions


cause linked part to change immediately.

If the partial loading option is on, the update will not occur until the dependent component is
fully loaded.

Load Options and Revisioning


Partial Loading: Using Legacy Parts

282

Another advantage of not using partial loading is when you access parts from a prior
Unigraphics NX release.
Normally when you save an assembly, only the components that are modified and fully
loaded will be saved.

When loading an assembly from a prior release, the system recognizes that the components
have been modified (by being converted to the new release).
The system will save all components that have been fully loaded.

Load Options and Revisioning


Partial Loading: Sharing Components
Partial loading can also lead to the component you have loaded being out of date with the one
on the disk.
Example: If one of the components of your assembly is being shared by another assembly and
another user makes modifications to that shared component and saves the part to the disk, the
disk version will be more recent than the one in your assembly.

283

Now, if you perform an operation on Assembly 2 that requires that the shared part be loaded,
(applying a mating condition, for example), Unigraphics NX will give you an error message
because the part is out of sync with the one on the disk.
The Unique Identifier (UID)
When the system finds a component with the correct name, it does a second check before
loading it.
There is an internal file identifier, referred to as a UID (Unique IDentifier), that ensures that
the component that has been found is the genuine article, or at least a copy of it.
A new UID is not assigned (and thus, associativity is maintained) in the following cases:
When you copy or move the file in the operating system.
When you save the file into another directory using the same name.

Load Options and Revisioning


Allow Substitution
If the component is an unrelated part that happens to have the same name but a different UID,
the opening will fail unless Allow Substitution has been turned on in the Load Options.

Allow Substitution enables a component with a duplicate name to be loaded into an assembly
even though it has a different UID and is a completely different part.
If the new component has no common history with the substituted component, the
update will not have any common history and it will cause any data associated with the
original component to be lost. A report will be issued to indicate that this substitution
has taken place.

284

Substituting Components
In this section, you will revisit the door latch part. This assembly has three different styles of
"heads" that it can use.

You will substitute the original head subassembly for both of the others.
Open the door latch part.
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_doorlatch.prt from the amd/sheet-metal subdirectory.


Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

Whenever you are changing the assembly's pointer so that it references another component,
you must perform a Substitute Component command.
The system does this by discarding the old component and bringing in the new component.
The new component will come in using the same origin and orientation as the component it is
replacing.
The head assembly will be the component that you will replace.
In the Assembly Navigator, select the headassm node.
Choose the Substitute Component icon
Substitute Component.
A message is displayed giving you three options:

or choose Assemblies

Components

285
Remove and Add - removes any associative links that exist to the component being
substituted and adds the new component.
Maintain Mating - lets you re-map mating conditions if you have set up alternate
mating conditions.
Cancel - cancels the substitute operation.
Choose the Remove and Add option.
The part to be substituted is not currently loaded in memory, so you must access the part files.
Choose the Choose Part File option in the Select Part dialog.
Choose head2assm.prt as the part that will be the new component in the assembly and
OK.
The Substitute Component dialog appears.

Unigraphics NX has changed the component object name to the name of the part file. You
want to retain the same reference set.
The origin and orientation of the original component will be used.
Choose OK to accept the parameters.
The head2assm replaces the original head assembly with component names appearing at their
origins.

286
These name notes would need to be positioned with the others to be of any real use.
Normally, you would use File

Save at this point to save the substituted component(s).

You can not do this because the part files in the CAST Online directory are read-only.
You can save parts if you designate a directory in which you have write permission.

Substituting Components
Optional: On Your Own
Repeat the above procedure to substitute in head3assm for the head2assm.

More Assembly Reports


There are other reporting tools available to help you understand how a particular assembly has
changed over time.
List Components (covered in Overview)
Update Report
Where Used
Session Where Used
Make sure the doorlatch assembly, from the sheetmetal directory, is open.
Update Report
The first report you will check out is the Update Report option within the assemblies module.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Update Report.

287
This report indicates which components were updated (changed) as the assembly was
retrieved. The update information is produced when an assembly and its components are
opened.
Dismiss the Information window.
Where Used
This option may be done in any part file, and is very useful to determine what impact a
pending design change may have on other assemblies.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Where Used.

1) The component or subassembly on which you want the


report done. The system defaults to the current work part.
2) Uses the directories specified in load options.
3) Directory where the component part resides.

4) User defined directory, and its subdirectories.

Choose Options.

Example: You want to change a bracket, but you do not know how many assemblies already
use this bracket. A "where used" report will tell you the names of the assemblies, in a
specified search path, that use the bracket.
A Where Used report may take considerable time to run on large directories of parts. It
is recommended that you only search through a few hundred files maximum. Otherwise,
you should be using Open GRIP and Open C that will run in the background.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the dialog.

More Assembly Reports


Session Where Used
A Session Where Used report details where a particular component is used in the current
session.

288
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Session Where Used.

Listing showing loaded parts in current


session.

Levels of component usage you want to locate.

Choose pin1015 from the list.


Notice that the Select Owner option has become active. This signals that the pin is used as a
component within a subassembly.
Choose OK to accept.
A Information window appears detailing the usage of pin1015 within this assembly.
You have seen the Session
Where Used report before in
this lesson.
This report is automatically
provided when you do a Save
As.
Dismiss the Information window.
Close all part files.

A Parametric Approach to Revisions


How can you take advantage of the parametric nature of your model when it comes to
revisions?
What if you created a parametric model and are considering the pros and cons of revisioning.

289
Can expressions be exported?
Yes
Can the exported file be edited?
Yes
Can the edited file be reloaded and replace previous values? Yes
Can you read in a different expression file than was exported? Yes

A Parametric Approach to Revisions


An Example of Using Associative Revisions
Export your expressions before you make a change to your model. Use descriptive file
names.

Change model using associative edits and/or altering model's parametric expressions.
Do not change the name of the part file.
Export a second set of expressions now that the change has been incorporated into the
model. Give the files descriptive names.

Of course, you could do this edit/export procedure many times.


If you want to see a previous version of the component, import and replace the
existing expression list with the incoming list.

290
Advantages
Since the part name does not change, all
associated applications update without loss
of associativity.
Only one part file is kept on the system. The
revisions are exported text files and require
little disk space.
No need to do revisioning by directory; you
are certain of getting the latest revision of
the component.

Disadvantages
With only one named part file, immediate access
of old versions is not possible. The parameters
must be imported.
Only allows you to change features that are
parametrically defined in the model.
Limited application because most models are not
fully parametric.

Attributes
The objectives of this lesson are:
to give you an overview of the attribute function
understand attribute inheritance
create user defined part attributes
create user defined object attributes

291
understand reference set attributes
understand attribute hierarchy

Overview
There are two types of attributes that can be associated with Unigraphics NX objects and part
files.
System Attributes
User-Defined Attributes
System Attributes
System Attributes are attributes that the system recognizes for use in the performance of other
functions.

More About System Attributes

The system attributes recognized by Parts List are:


System Attribute

Description

Name

Equals component name by default unless otherwise specified.

Part_Name

File name without `.prt' suffix

Part_Name_Core

If versioning rules are in effect, equates to the core part of the name,
otherwise this equals $Part_Name.

Part_Name_Version If versioning rules are in effect, equates to the version part of the name,
otherwise this will be ` '.
Component_Name Equals the current component name
Grpnam

Group name

Color

Object color

Font

Object font

Width

Object/Curve width

292
Layer

Layer number

Ref_Set_Name

Reference set name of component

Attribute Inheritance
In virtual assemblies, when different assemblies point to the same part, that part's attributes
are inherited by the multiple assemblies.

You can, however, assign different object attributes to the part once it is referenced as a
component object in each respective assembly.
Example: The Name attribute of a part is `clip-a' and is referenced by an assembly.
In the assembly, the component will also use the attribute Name of `clip-a'.
However, you can assign a different Name attribute (`clip-a-assm', for instance) to the
component at the assembly level.

User-Defined Attributes
A user-defined attribute is information that is meaningful to the environment or user.
User-defined attributes are generally thought of as Bill of Material (BOM) or Parts List
information. The automatic parts list generator in Unigraphics NX uses attribute data to fill in
the fields of the parts list.
User-defined attributes come in three types:
Object attributes are assigned to component objects on the assembly level.

293

Part attributes are assigned on the displayed part level.

When that part is used in an assembly, part attributes become object attributes of the
component (object) of the assembly.

Reference Set attributes are assigned to reference sets within the components.

User-Defined Attributes
User-Defined Part Attributes

294
The majority of attribute information used in a parts list is assigned at the component part
level of an overall assembly.
Typically, this is done by making a component part the Work Part and then assigning part
attributes.

Part attributes are associative and will follow the part wherever it is referenced.
Outside of an assembly, part attributes can also be designated on the part at the piece part
level.

User-Defined Attributes
Assigning User-Defined Part Attributes
Of course, before you can assign part attributes, you must determine what those attributes
are to be.
How many fields will your parts list have?
What data is necessary for each field?
For this tutorial, we have created a listing of attribute information that relates to the vise
assembly for you to use.
Listing of Current Model Attributes

Below is a listing of the attribute information that relates to the vise assembly.
P/N Description
Fixed Jaw Assm

Material

Qty

295
Jaw Plate

1009 Jaw Plate

Brass

Plate Screw

1010 Jaw Plate Screw Purchased

Fixed Jaw

1011 Fixed Jaw

Mild Steel

Moving Jaw

1007 Moving Jaw

Mild Steel

Screw Nut

1008 Screw Nut

Purchased

Guide

1003 Guide

Mild Steel

Bushing

1004 Bushing

Brass

Shaft

1005 Shaft

Brass Alloy

Shaft Nut

1006 Shaft Nut

Purchased

Moving Jaw Assm


Guide Handle Assm

Guide Assm

User-Defined Attributes
Assigning User-Defined Part Attributes (cont'd.)
In this section, you will go through the process of putting the sample attributes on the Fixed
Jaw assembly.
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_fixed_jaw_assm.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.


Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Make jaw_plate the Work Part.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.
Select Application

Modeling.

Now you can begin entering some attribute titles.


In the Assembly Navigator, select the jaw_plate node, then use MB3

Properties.

296
Choose the Attributes tab.
First, you will key in a "title" (category name) for the attribute, then you will key in the
"value" (description).
Some attribute title rules:
You can use a maximum of ten alphanumeric characters.
You cannot begin a title with the "$" character.
You can use blank spaces in the title.
Whether you enter upper or lower case letters, the system will change your input to
upper case automatically.
Because the jaw plate is your work part, all attributes you define will be assigned to the
jaw plate.
Based on the sample listing, the first title category will be "part number" (P/N).
P/N

Description

Material Qty

Fixed
Jaw
Assm
Jaw
Plate

1009 Jaw Plate

Brass

In the Title field, key in p/n , in the Value field key 1009, then Apply.
The value is displayed in the list box of attributes.

Titles are translated into all upper case; the value input is case sensitive.
Again, based on the sample listing, "Description" is the next attribute to be defined.
P/N Description Material Qt
y
Fixed
Jaw
Assm
Jaw 1009 Jaw Plate Brass
Plate
In the Title field, key in des, in the Value field key in

297
Jaw Plate, then Apply.
The last category in our sample listing is "Material".
In the Title field, key in mat, in the Value field key in Brass, then Apply.
Check the listing of the new attributes for correctness. If you have made an entry mistake you
can:
Re-assign the attribute if you use the same title. The old value will be overwritten.
Delete the mistaken attribute and assign it again.
Select OK to signal the end of attribute assignment for the Jaw Plate.

User-Defined Attributes
Assigning Attributes On Your Own
Using the sample listing table, change the work part to each remaining components of the
Fixed Jaw assembly and assign the listed attributes.
P/N Description

Material

Jaw Plate

1009 Jaw Plate

Brass

Plate Screw

1010 Jaw Plate Screw Purchased

Fixed Jaw

1011 Fixed Jaw

Qty

Fixed Jaw Assm

Mild Steel

For even more practice, open the remaining vise sub-assemblies:


Guide Handle assembly
Guide assembly
and assign attributes to their component parts.
Things to Remember...
Attributes are added to the current work part.
Use the Assembly Navigator to facilitate changing work/display status.
Check the accuracy of the attributes after you assign them.

User-Defined Object Attributes

298
Any selectable data in a part file is referred to as an "object".
Within a part, edges, bodies and faces are good examples of geometric objects.
Theoretically, you could assign attributes to any of these objects.
There are two things you must keep in mind regarding object attributes:
Object attributes, in the context of an assembly (attributes belonging to component
objects), are "occurrence specific". This means that object attributes are not
associative and do not get copied to the part when the component object is saved.
Object attributes do not update if a new (part) attribute value is assigned at the
component part level.
Object attributes are designated in one of two ways:
Automatically
Manually

User-Defined Object Attributes


Automatically Generated Object Attributes
Object attributes are designated automatically when component parts with part attributes are
added to an assembly as component objects.
Example: A particular component part is the Work Part within an assembly. Any attributes
that you assign would be part attributes.

Then, when you make the assembly the Work Part,


component parts become component objects
part attributes become object attributes

299

User-Defined Object Attributes


Manually Generated Object Attributes
Object attributes are designated manually by making an assembly the Work Part and then
assigning attributes to objects (typically, component objects) within the assembly.

If an assigned object attribute has the same title as a part attribute, the object attribute takes
precedence for that specific occurrence within the assembly.
However the part attribute is associative and travels with the part.

User-Defined Object Attributes


Listing User-Defined Object Attributes
Listing object attributes is similar to listing part attributes.
The only difference is that you must select the objects that are to appear in the list using
the Class Selection dialog.
Make amd_fixed_jaw_assm the Work Part.
Use the Assembly Navigator: MB3 Make Work Part or...
Choose Assemblies Context Control Set Work Part or...
Choose the Make Work Part icon.

300
Choose Format

Attribute

Object.

Choose List from the options dialog.


The Class Selection dialog appears. You must explicitly address the components of the
assembly.
Choose the Type option on the Class Selection dialog.
The Select by Type dialog appears.
Choose the Component option on the Select by Type dialog and OK.
Choose Select All on the Class Selection dialog and OK.
All the components of the assembly are selected.

User-Defined Object Attributes


Listing User-Defined Object Attributes (cont'd.)
Turn on (checked) the All User-Defined and $Name switches, then OK.
An information window displays the user-defined object attributes you applied along with
their system names.
Remember, you assigned all these attributes as part attributes on the component part level of
the assembly (each component part was made the Work Part, then attributes were defined).

Once you make the assembly the Work Part, the component parts are seen as component
objects of that assembly and the part attributes of those components automatically become
object attributes.

301
Dismiss the Information window.
Close all parts.

Reference Set Attributes


The third type of attributes that you may define are reference set attributes.
Reference Set attributes are especially useful when you must associate information to separate
entities within the same component part.
Example: If you decide to keep right and left hand parts in the same file but want each to
have its own part number, you can assign each its own part number on respective reference
sets so that depending on which reference set is retrieved in an assembly, its attributes prevail.

Reference Set Attributes


Assigning Reference Set Attributes
The procedure of assigning reference set attributes is much like that of assigning part
attributes.
The only difference is that with reference set attributes, you must specifically select the
reference set that will have attributes assigned.
In this section, you will assign reference set attributes to one reference set then copy shared
attributes to the mirrored part.

Open part file bracket.prt from the amd/vise subdirectory.


Choose Format

Reference Sets.

The Reference Sets dialog appears.

302

Choose RH-BODY from the list box of the dialog.


The other options of the dialog become active.
Choose the Edit Attributes icon

from the Reference Set dialog.

The Reference Set Properties dialog appears.


You will be assigning attributes for:
Part number
Description
Material
First, you enter the part number.
Choose the Attributes tab.
In the Title field, key in p/n.
Use the <tab> key to move to the Value field.
In the Value field, key in 5000-1, then Apply.
The first Reference Set attribute appears in the list box.

Next, assign a description.

303
In the Title field, key in des.
Use the <tab> key to move to the Value field.
In the Value field, key in bracket, then Apply.

Finally, the material specification.


In the Title field, key in mat.
Use the <tab> key to move to the Value field.
In the Value field, key in 7076-alum, then Apply.

Choose OK to signal that you are done specifying reference set attributes.
It is always a good idea to check to see if the attributes were designated correctly.
Choose the Information

icon in the Reference Sets dialog.

At the bottom of the Information window, you see the attributes as stored.

Dismiss the Information window.

Reference Set Attributes


Copying Reference Set Attributes

304
The reference set attribute copy utility lets you:
copy attributes from a part to a reference set
copy attributes from a reference set to a part
copy attributes from one reference set to another reference set
In this case because both reference sets share all of the attributes, you can copy the attributes
you assigned to the right-hand reference set to the left-hand reference set. (Only the part
number value will be different.)
You can then edit the part number attribute in the left-hand reference set once all the attributes
have been copied.
Choose RH-BODY from the list box of the Reference Sets dialog.
The other options of the dialog become active.
Choose the Edit Attributes icon

from the Reference Set dialog.

Choose the Attributes tab.


In conjunction with the <Ctrl> key, select all three attributes from the list.
Choose the Copy icon

then OK.

Choose LH-BODY from the Reference Sets dialog.


Choose the Edit Attributes icon

from the Reference Set dialog.

Choose the Attributes tab.


Choose the Paste icon

, then OK.

Both reference sets show the same user-defined attributes, so you must reassign the part
number on the left-hand reference set.
Select the P/N attribute.
Edit the Value field to read 5000-2, then OK.
Check to see if the attributes were copied correctly.
With LH-BODY selected, choose the Information

icon in the Reference Sets dialog.

Check the bottom of the Information window to check that the part number was changed to
5000-2
Close all part files.

305

Attribute Hierarchy
In the case where the same attribute title occurs at more than one level, the following
hierarchy comes into effect.
1 Unigraphics NX will first check object attributes in the assembly and use these if found.
2 Next, reference set attributes will be checked and used if found.
3 Finally, any part attributes inherited from the component part are checked and used if
found.
4 If a value is undefined, it will not appear in the parts list note.
If each level has unique attributes, they will all be used in a cumulative fashion and could all
appear in the parts list.

Automating the Attribute Assignment Process


Within your assemblies and their component parts, attribute values will be different but
attribute titles (categories) should be constant.
Once you have determined the common attribute scheme that will apply to your parts,
consider creating a GRIP routine to:
prompt users for universal, enterprise-wide attribute data. This takes the burden off the
individual designer for manually inputting all attribute titles.
provide a means of enforcing your company's attribute standards by requiring that all
fields be filled in.

306

Assembly Sequencing
The objectives of this lesson are:
learning to record assembly sequences
understanding sequence step properties
learning to edit assembly sequences
creating assembly sequences
learning to playback assembly sequences
learning to sequence component groups and subassemblies

Overview of Assembly Sequencing


There are two principle areas of assembly sequencing usage: Design and Manufacturing.
Design - Assemblability

307
The product/assembly designer can use Assembly Sequencing to ensure that there are no
collision and clearance problems among the components in the assembly.
Design - Operational Studies
The product designer may use the sequencing and motion functionality to model different
operational usages of the assembly. There are obviously several types of operational usages product function, serviceability, customer usage - to name a few - that vary with every
product.
An example of a product function study for a stapler assembly is whether the stapler punch
will interfere with the slot that holds the staples. In addition to ensuring non interference, the
user may require that a certain clearance always be met, and may want to measure distances
between the punch and the slot at different points along the punches path.
The designer may want to model serviceability sequences that show how to access a particular
component in the assembly, including possibly disassembling or moving components to get to
it. For example, replacing a fuse in an engine. For more complicated operations such as
servicing an aircraft engine, there may be another sequence that describes how to service the
component in place.
Manufacturing - Assembly Planning
The manufacturing engineer can use Assembly Sequencing to generate one or more
manufacturing assembly sequences from an assembly.
A manufacturing engineer can check that the geometry of the components within an assembly
to see that the assembly can actually be manufactured in a manner that is cost effective
relative to available assembly fixtures and tools.
A manufacturing engineer can use Assembly Sequencing to include models of the assembly
resources into the assembly plan.
Assembly Sequencing lets the manufacturing engineer collaborate with the design team to
show problems in component geometry at a particular step in creating the assembly.
In addition, the manufacturing engineer may record the sequence, and guarantee that
subsequent changes in component geometry or the addition or deletion of new components in
the assembly will not invalidate the current assembly sequence.

Recording Assembly Sequences


Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file flipfone_assembly.prt from the plastic subdirectory.

308

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Assembly Sequences icon


or choose Assemblies
Sequencing to turn on Assembly Sequencing.

Sequences

Assembly Sequencing toolbar appears.

If you do not see the Assembly Sequencing toolbar, it must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assembly
Sequence switch on.

309

When the Assembly Sequencing toolbar is available, so is the Sequencing Navigator tab
which opens the Sequence Navigator. (Unix users use the Sequence Navigator icon on the
Navigators toolbar.)

The Sequence Navigator works like the Assembly Navigator in the sense that it is
comprised of a tree structure and can be docked or pinned wherever you want.
Choose the Create Sequence icon
Sequence.

or choose Assemblies

Sequences

Create

Once you begin to define a sequence, the status of the sequence appears in the Sequence
Navigator, along with default folders and accounting columns.
More About the Sequence Navigator

The sequence navigator window will, by default, show only the active assembly sequence.
The navigator displays the step number, time, cost, description and count columns. As with
Unigraphics NX other navigators, you have to option to control which columns they wish to
see.
Folders

310
There are 3 default folders:
1) Unprocessed - contains the components that have not yet been
processed in the assembly sequence. This folder can be used to
see if new components have been added into the assembly being
sequenced since the last time the sequence was created or
modified.
2) Ignored - contains components that you do not want to
consider in the assembly sequence.
3) Preassembled - contains components that have been identified
as part of the sequence before the sequencing starts. This is useful
if you are creating a disassembly sequence (all the components to
be disassembled must exist in the preassembled folder), or if you
are creating a partial assembly or disassembly sequence.
In addition, there are some other symbols you should know about.
processed step (played back)
current step
assembled step
disassembled step
The sequence view graphics is always in sync with the playback state. The playback state is
persistent;. i.e., when you change the active sequence, the active sequence will be loaded in
the playback state it was previously in.
There is an interaction between playback and sequence modeling. If the playback is stopped
in the middle of the sequence, any new steps defined for the sequence will be inserted at the
step to be played back.
These clones share the ancestry of the part they are cloning including interpart relationships
which are updated to refer to the new clone component.
These clones share the ancestry of the part they are cloning including interpart relationships
which are updated to refer to the new clone component.

Recording Assembly Sequences


The Sequence View
You also get a separate viewing window called the Sequence View.

311

The Sequence View will show the geometry of each step that you delineate in the
sequence. The Sequence View responds to all the normal viewing commands.
In the Assembly Navigator, choose flipfone_back_bottom node.
Choose the Assemble Step icon
Assembly Step.

or choose Assemblies

Sequences

Add

The first sequence step is defined both in the Sequence Navigator and in the graphics area
of the Sequence View.

312

You can also add assembly steps as a group action.


In the Assembly Navigator, choose, in order, the following nodes (Use the Ctrl key for
multiple selections).
flipfone_back_top
flipfone_pad_bottom
flipfone_pad_top
flipfone_antenna
flipfone_front_bottom
flipfone_front_top
flipfone_hinge
flipfone_cap (2X)

Choose the Assemble Step icon


or choose Assemblies
Operations Add Assembly Step.

Sequences

This "group" technique can be used to define all the sequence steps of an assembly; you
can then go back and redefine the sequence of steps as an edit operation.

313

Sequence Step Properties


Properties of a sequence step include some information that can be applied to a particular
step. These include a time parameter, a cost parameter and description area.
A sum of the Time and Cost columns will be tallied at the top of the respective columns.
Setting a Time
Recording time is information attached to the sequence step that reflects how much time
will be required to assemble a particular step.
In the Sequence Navigator, choose the flipfone_back_bottom entry.
Choose MB3

Properties.

The Step Properties dialog appears.

In the Time field, key in 3.0 (for seconds), then Apply.


Note the addition of this information in the Sequence Navigator.

314

Sequence Step Properties


Setting a Cost
The cost of a sequence step may represent:
how easy or difficult the step is based on the geometry of the component being
assembled.
the cost of handling the component
the cost of inserting or positioning the component
the cost of the motion involved in the step
In the Cost field, key in .25 (for dollars), then Apply.
Note the addition of this information in the Sequence Navigator.

Sequence Step Properties


Adding Description Information
Additional information may also be added to a step's properties. This information can run
the gamut between a simple description of the part to detailed manufacturing information.
In the Description box, key in Horizontal lay-up; no glue, then OK.
Note the addition of this information in the Sequence Navigator.
Close all parts.

Editing Assembly Sequences


Assembly sequencing allows the following edits:
the ability to redefine the contents (description, cost, time, motions etc.) of the steps in
the assembly sequence
the ability to insert and delete steps
the ability to reorder the steps
the ability to copy and paste components into an existing sequence, or copy an entire
sequence to be the starting point of another sequence
the ability to change the display state of a component (or a set of components)
depending on whether or not it is already in the sequence
Open part file assm_no_seq.prt from the pump subdirectory.

315

This is an exploded view of a displacement pump. Some details have been left out for
simplicity. This assembly has no mating conditions or subassemblies
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

316

Choose the Assembly Sequences icon


or choose Assemblies
Sequencing to turn on Assembly Sequencing.
Choose the Create Sequence icon
Operations Create Sequence.

or choose Assemblies

Sequences

Sequences

Creating An Assembly Sequence


In the Assembly Navigator, choose drive_plate_dt node.
Choose the Assemble Step icon
or choose Assemblies
Operations Add Assembly Step.

Sequences

If you change the display mode to wire frame you can see the different components being
placed in their proper location.

In the Assembly Navigator, choose brg (component name BRG1) node.


You may have to enlarge the size of the Assembly Navigator to see the component name
of each BRG part
Using the <Ctrl> key, continue selecting the following nodes in the Assembly Navigator:
rootb_dt
brg (component name BRG2)
brg (component name BRG3)
roota_dt
brg (component name BRG4)
brg (component name BRG5)
case_dt
end_cover_dt
belt_drive

317

Choose the Assemble Step icon


or choose Assemblies
Operations Add Assembly Step.

Sequences

This assembly sequence will be used in the next exercise to play back and edit.

Playing back Assembly Sequences


Once the assembly sequence has been created, you then have the ability to play it back to
ensure the proper sequence of the components with the assembly.
This play back can be also used by the manufacturing department to help visualize the
proper assembly sequence to build the assembly.
Press the play icon
on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose Assemblies
Sequences Playback Play.
Make sure you watch for any problems during the playback to ensure that the proper
assembly sequence has been achieved.
If you designated the sequence as directed above, you will notice that the first two bearings
were assembled in the wrong order.
If you play the sequence again, you will see that the first bearing that was inserted in the drive
plate would have blocked the second bearing from being inserted.

The assembly sequence has to be changed to ensure this type of error does not find its way
into production.
In the Sequence Navigator, select the first brg component and drag it down until the next
brg component highlights; this will "drop" the selection after the second component.

318

This type of click and drag function will allow you to reorder and edit your assembly
sequence.
Press the play icon again to see that the bearings are inserted in the correct order.
Close all parts.

Sequencing Component Groups and Subassemblies


In addition to being able to identify individual components of an assembly for sequencing,
you can also identify groups of components and subassemblies for sequencing. These are
termed 'compound steps'.
Compound steps may be specifically defined as being:
all components making up a subassembly
all components that are defined by a filter
components that are explicitly selected (from screen, sequence navigator or assembly
navigator)
A couple of examples of why compound steps might be used are:
repetitively used components: fasteners, bolts, etc.
subassemblies used in the larger assembly that come already assembled from outside
vendors

319
When playing back an assembly sequence that has compound steps, all the components
referenced in the step are played back simultaneously.

Sequencing Component Groups and Subassemblies


Creating an Assembly Sequence with Compound Steps
In this activity, you will create a sequence of assembly where all fasteners and one
subassembly will be treated as compound steps within the sequence.
Open part file sequence_partial_valve_assm.prt from the valve subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Choose the Assembly Sequences icon


or choose Assemblies
Sequencing to turn on Assembly Sequencing (if necessary).
Open the Sequence Navigator (if necessary).

Sequences

320

Choose the Sequence Navigator tab.


Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

(Unix users, choose the Sequence

Choose the Create Sequence icon


on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose
Assemblies Sequences Operations Create Sequence.
In the Assembly Navigator, choose the housing node.
Choose the Assemble Step icon
or choose Assemblies
Operations Add Assembly Step.

Sequences

The housing is the component to which the remaining components will be added. The next
component to be sequenced will be a vendor-supplied subassembly. Being already assembled,
it will be sequenced in as one sequence step.
In the Assembly Navigator, choose the vendor_subassy1 component.
Choose the Assemble As Group icon
Assemblies Sequences Operations

on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose


Assemble As Group.

The individual cover bolts that secure the vendor subassembly will be also be sequenced
into the assembly as a group.
In the Assembly Navigator, with the <Ctrl> key choose all the cover_bolt components
(there are 3).

321

You could have also packed the components in the Assembly Navigator, then just
selected the one packed node.
Choose the Assemble As Group icon
Assemblies Sequences Operations

on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose


Assemble As Group.

You now have your first Sequence Group, as reflected in the Sequence Navigator.

Why are the cover bolts referred to as a Sequence Group in the Sequence Navigator
while the vendor subassembly, which was also assembled as a group, is not?

The vendor subassembly is seen as one component (its components are seen as an
"implied" sequence group), while each cover bolt must be explicitly identified as being
part of a sequenced group.
There are three remaining components. The valve diaphragm will be sequenced in separately
and its two fasteners will be sequenced in as a compound step.
In the Assembly Navigator, choose valve node.
Choose the Assemble Step icon
or choose Assemblies
Operations Add Assembly Step.

Sequences

In the Assembly Navigator, with the <Ctrl> key choose the two shaft_bolt components.
Choose the Assemble As Group icon
Assemblies Sequences Operations

on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose


Assemble As Group.

322
The second Sequence Group is created and reflected in the Sequence Navigator.

Note also that in the Assembly Navigator, that each Sequence Group is defined as a filter;
make sure that they are unblanked (checked).

Sequencing Component Groups and Subassemblies


Camera Steps
Camera steps are helpful by adding view orientation during sequence playback. Any view
orientation technique such as zooming, panning, rotating and perspective can be added to the
assembly sequence.
This function is especially helpful for:
zooming in on an area before a sequence step to better see the next sequence step
visually inspecting the results of a sequence step or a series of sequence steps
Camera steps appear in the Sequence Navigator as regular steps and can be manipulated like
any other sequence step:
they can be dragged and dropped anywhere within the sequence order
they can be made the current step
they can be deleted, cut, copied and pasted
With the current assembly sequence, you will add some camera steps to ensure proper
assembly and then do an overall inspection of the assembled part.

Sequencing Component Groups and Subassemblies


Adding Camera Steps
Using MB3 Orient View Front and Pan and Zoom, orient your Sequence View to
the approximate orientation shown below.

323

Choose the Camera Step icon


on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose
Assemblies Sequences Operations Add Camera Step.
A Camera step is added in the Sequence Navigator.

In the Sequence Navigator, select the Camera entry and drag/drop it right before the
Sequence Group 2 step.

Now when the sequence is played the view orientation will zoom in to the attachment area
so you can better see the addition of the last two fasteners to the assembly.

324
Next, you will add a few more camera steps to visually inspect the final sequenced assembly.
Use Fit in the Sequence View so you can see the whole assembly.

Choose the Camera Step icon


on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose
Assemblies Sequences Operations Add Camera Step.
Use MB3 Orient View
the assembly.

Right in the Sequence View so you can see the right side of

Choose the Camera Step icon

on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose

325
Assemblies

Sequences

Operations

Add Camera Step.

Using MB3
below.

Zoom, zoom in on the Sequence View to the approximate orientation shown

Choose the Camera Step icon


on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose
Assemblies Sequences Operations Add Camera Step.
Orient the Sequence to the Top orientation.
Choose the Camera Step icon
on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose
Assemblies Sequences Operations Add Camera Step.
Orient the Sequence to the Trimetric orientation.
Choose the Camera Step icon
on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose
Assemblies Sequences Operations Add Camera Step.
Now you have five inspection orientations embedded in your Assembly Sequence.

326

Play back the assembly sequence to check your work.


Press the play icon
on the Assembly Sequencing toolbar or choose Assemblies
Sequences Playback Play.

327

Assembly Cloning
The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding basic cloning concepts
creating a clone assembly
understanding inter-part associativity

Overview of Cloning
The Assemblies

Cloning facility provides a top-down means to:

create a clone assembly based on a "seed" assembly while retaining certain


components, replacing others and/or cloning still others
globally edit component references within an existing assembly
Assembly cloning also provides a means to maintain component relationships such as:
Mating Conditions,
Interpart Expressions (IPEs),
Promoted bodies and Assembly Level Features (ALFs),
within the cloned assembly or edited components.
Assembly Cloning also has a clone naming facility capable of automatic or manual name
specification.
Cloning Log Files can be saved, imported and exported to facilitate making multiple clones
with a minimum of user interaction.
** Important **
There are substantial differences between defining a new clone assembly and editing
component references in an existing assembly.
When cloning a "seed" part or assembly, the assumption is that the seed part/assembly is not
to be modified and is to remain a stable "base" part or assembly.
When using cloning to edit component references, you are, in fact, making global
substitutions with the specific intent of modifying the part/assembly.
UG/Manager Disclaimer
Assembly Cloning is also available in the IMAN UG/Manager environment as well as native
mode.

328
This CAST Assembly Cloning lesson addresses Cloning in a native Unigraphics NX
environment, not the possible permutations inherent in a UG/Manager environment.
Be aware that there are Cloning options and dialogs specific to an IMAN UG/Manager
implementation. Check the Cloning Assemblies chapter in the Assemblies online technical
documentation for more information.

Creating a Clone Assembly


One of the primary uses for the assembly cloning function is to generate a new assembly
based on a "seed" assembly.
Example: You could develop a series of products based on a core assembly where all
variations share the same structure and many of the same components, but which have
some components that are modified and some that are completely replaced.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

First, you need to identify the assembly that is to be cloned.

329
Choose Assemblies

Cloning

Create Clone Assembly from the main menu.

When using the Cloning facility, it is not necessary to actually open a part file; this is to
facilitate dealing with large assemblies.
The Clone Assembly dialog is displayed.

Choose the Add Assembly option in the dialog.


You are prompted to select an assembly to clone.
Choose part file amd_caster_fin.prt from the caster subdirectory, then OK.

Creating a Clone Assembly


Defining Cloning Defaults
The Default Clone Action pull-down is where you define default cloning behaviors.
This is the first step in determining ultimate component clone action within the cloned
assembly.
Choose the Default Clone Action option.

The Clone Action is the default action that is applied to all components of the clone assembly,
unless exceptions to the default are designated as well.
Make sure the Clone option is in effect.

330

More About Clone Actions

There are three possible clone actions that components can assume within a clone operation:
Retain, which maintains reference to an existing component part. This clone action is
available as a default condition. It operates much like a Save As operation.
Clone, which references a clone of an existing component part. This clone action is
also available as a default condition.
These clones share the ancestry of the part they are cloning including interpart relationships
which are updated to refer to the new clone component.
These clones share the ancestry of the part they are cloning including interpart relationships
which are updated to refer to the new clone component.
These clones share the ancestry of the part they are cloning including interpart relationships
which are updated to refer to the new clone component.
Replace, which references a different existing component part. This clone action is
only available as an exception to a default condition.
To determine which option to use, assess to what degree your clone assembly is to change. If
only a few components are to change, then Retain would be a good choice. If most
components are to change, Clone would be the choice.
Please be aware that clone actions are made on a component part basis, not on individual
occurrences of a part.
If you want to modify references to individual instances of a component part, you should use
the Assemblies Components Substitute Component function.

Creating a Clone Assembly


Setting Clone Component Naming
When you clone components, a new part name must be designated for the new cloned parts.
Here you have a couple of options.
Define a Naming Rule (automatic naming)
User Naming (explicit naming of components)
The first option you will investigate will be the automatic method of Name Rule.
Choose the Naming tab.
Choose Define Naming Rule.

331
The Naming Rule dialog appears. In this dialog, you specify how you want your naming
conventions to appear.
Choose Add Prefix.
Notice that only the Add/Replace/Rename String field is activated (the Base String field is
activated only when Replace option is used).
Click in the Add/Replace/Rename String field and enter cl1_, then OK.
More About the Naming Rule Dialog

As you can see, you have four options:


Add
adds a prefix to the original part name.
Prefix:
Add
adds a suffix to the original part name.
Suffix:
Replace: lets you identify a base string of the original part name that will be replaced by a
new string that you define, thus creating a new part name for the cloned
component.
Rename: lets you reidentify the original part name to a name that you define, thus creating a
new part name for the cloned component.

Can I designate multiple Naming Rule scenarios during my cloning operations?

No. You can specify and use only one Naming Rule for any one assembly cloning
operation.

332

Creating a Clone Assembly


Checking for Naming Conflicts
After defining your cloning defaults, it is a good idea to check your cloning defaults before
continuing.
Choose the Main tab.
The Set Defaults option performs the defaults check.

Choose Set Defaults.


In the Status Line, you are informed that the application of the defaults were completed
successfully.
If there had been a problem such as a naming conflict or a part name exceeding the maximum
length, you would get an error message alerting you to the nature of the problem.
You can generally correct any conflict by:
applying a different naming scenario
modifying the specified Naming Rule

Creating a Clone Assembly


What is an Exception?
Exceptions are a way to bypass the defaults you specified initially.
You can think of defining defaults as "roughing out" the cloning designation, while
exceptions can be thought of as "detailing" the cloning designation.
Defining exceptions has two aspects:
the exception action
naming the exception
These two aspects are accessed through the Main tab and the Naming tab.

333

Creating a Clone Assembly


Defining a Naming Exception
Choose the Naming tab.
Choose the Exceptions option.
Note that the first entry in the Naming Exceptions dialog reflects the default you set up of
cl_1 but you will rename this.

Choose the first entry: amd_caster_fin (Default) cl1_amd_caster_fin then Apply.


The Output Name dialog appears. This is where you designate what the clone assembly
will be named and where it is to be filed.
Define a writable directory and key in caster_fin_clone1 as the partfile name, then OK.

Cancel the Naming Exceptions dialog.

Creating a Clone Assembly


Defining an Action Exception
Next you will define a couple Action exceptions.
Choose the Main tab.
Choose the Exceptions option.
The Action Exceptions dialog appears.
At the top of the dialog, the default clone action you specified is shown. Right below that
is the New Action option.

334

In the listing window, notice that the name of each component of the assembly is echoed
back with the to-be-cloned name with your designated prefix listed as well.
Choose the New Action option.
Notice the addition of the Replace exception condition.
For our purposes, you are going to "clone" most of the components of the Caster assembly,
but you are going to "replace" the Shaft and the Fork with different parts.
Choose Replace from the New Action option.
Choose caster_shaft from the list as your first replacement, then Apply.
The Replacement Part dialog appears.
Choose caster_shaft_alt from the list, then OK.
The Action Exceptions dialog reappears. Note that the entry for the caster_shaft now
details the replacement operation:

Choose caster_fork from the list as your second replacement, then Apply.
Choose caster_fork_alt from the list, then OK.
Again, the Action Exceptions dialog appears detailing the current state of exception
designations.

335
Choose Cancel to dismiss the dialog.

Creating a Clone Assembly


The Cloning Report
After defining cloning defaults, naming rules and exceptions, you can check the projected
outcome of the cloning operation by using the Report options.

Choose Full.
Choose the Report to Information Window option.
The Information window pops-up detailing your cloning set-up. At the top is the header
showing you your high-level cloning set-up.
The listing that follows lets you see at a glance the actions and naming rules you have
defined:

Remember, you have not performed the cloning operation yet. If any of the set-up
information is not right, you can still change it.
Dismiss the Information window.

Creating a Clone Assembly


Clone Action Conflicts
Whenever you define exceptions to cloning defaults, you run the risk of generating clone
action conflicts.
There are certain cloning rules that protect seed assemblies and any of their seed components
from being modified regardless of any explicitly specified exceptions you may make.

336
If you unknowingly specify exceptions that threaten the integrity of the seed assembly (or
seed components), the system will proceed with the cloning and deal with the conflict while
alerting you to the conflict.
Examples of Clone Action Conflict / Resolution

The following are examples of Clone Action.

337

Creating a Clone Assembly


The Cloning Log File
Before performing the actual clone operation, you can specify that you want a log file
generated that captures the clone set-up that you have specified in the dialog.
This is done using the Specify Output Log File option under the Log Files tab on the Clone
Assembly dialog.
The main use of a Log File is that of using the same set-up information to generate several
similar clones of the same "seed" assembly. That way, you do not have to re-enter the same
default and exception information over and over.
When you create a clone log file, the file has a .clone suffix appended to it to identify it as a
log file.
To customize any subsequent assembly cloning, you have two choices:
Use the Clone Assembly dialogs to make interactive changes.
Use a text editor to call up the log file and make textual changes before importing the
log file.

338

Inter-Part Associativities
When cloning, a major concern is how inter-part associativities are dealt with between
original parts and the different cloning actions of new parts.
The three inter-part associativities you are concerned with here are:
Mating Conditions
Promoted bodies
Inter-Part Expressions

Inter-Part Associativities
Cloning and Mating Conditions
In all possible cloning scenarios, attempts are made to maintain existing mating conditions.
There are several possible clone/exception scenarios that may occur.
In the most straight forward "Clone" operation, mating conditions are maintained because
they are essentially "cloned" with any cloned components.

When using the Replace clone action, mating conditions will be maintained if the replacement
part is a descendant (common filing history) of the original part and has the same mating
topology available to handle the existing mating constraints.

339

Obviously, if the replacement part does not have similar mating topology, the part will be
replaced but the mating conditions will not be carried over.
You will not get any indication of the loss of mating conditions during the Replace operation.
However, upon calling up the output cloned assembly, you will get a message stating that
previous mating conditions have been lost.
There is a way of retaining mating conditions on unrelated parts (parts that do not share a
common ancestry) but you must explicitly define Alternate mating conditions for the
replacement part.

Inter-Part Associativities
Cloning and Promotions
There are some special considerations you must keep in mind when cloning components that
have been promoted.

340
First, there are no special restrictions when you use the Retain or Clone actions because you
are either dealing with the original components (retain) or components that are exact
duplicates (clone).
Complications arise when you Replace a component that is being used as the base component
of a promotion because you are dealing with new and different geometry.

The Replaced base component must be related to or share ancestry with the original base
component, otherwise the clone action exception will fail.

What about Assembly Level Features? How would they behave in the above situation?

The associativity of ALFs to a promoted base part is only supported when the part being
Replaced is related to the original. If the replacement part meets the "common ancestry"
criteria, the promotion base will be brought into the assembly and all the ALFs will be
reapplied (assuming the ALFs are defined in such a way that they can actually be
applied to the new promoted base).

Inter-Part Associativities
Cloning and Inter-Part Expressions
As with Mating Conditions and Promotions, every attempt is made by the Assembly Cloning
function to maintain and update any Inter-Part Expressions that may reside in parts that are
cloned.
The way this works is that any Inter-Part Expression link that is in the original part (outgoing
reference) is edited to refer to a like-named expression in a Clone or Replacement part.
There is no problem in the case of the Clone action; the referenced Clone part is guaranteed to
contain like-named expressions because the Clone action essentially clones any IPEs as well.

341

Problems are more likely to occur when using the Replace action.
The behavior of Replacing parts that contain IPEs is much like that of replacing parts with
Mating Conditions. That is, if the replacement part shares a file ancestry with the input part,
IPE associativity will be maintained.

There is a way of retaining IPE linkage on unrelated replacement parts (parts that do not share
a common ancestry).
In such a case, you must explicitly define expressions in the replacement part that have the
same names as those used in the original linkage between the two parts.

342
If a Replacement part does not contain an expression with the same name referenced in the
input IPE, an "update failure" occurs. The IPE is lost and replaced with the constant value the
IPE was last evaluated to.

Frequently Asked Questions


What happens with associativity relating to Cloning and Part Families? Do members of
Part Families that are cloned retain Part Family relationships?

No. The Assembly Cloning function does not support the retention of data relating to
instances of Part Family members. When an instance of a Part Family member is Cloned
or Replaced, the part instance becomes a "regular" component reference; it does not
generate a new member of the Part Family.
I have heard the term "Disposition Cascading" in relation to clone action conflicts; what
is it exactly?

Disposition Cascading is the term used to describe how clone action conflicts are
resolved. It is intended to protect the seed assembly / components from modification
during the cloning operation.

Examples of Dispostion Cascading

The following are examples of Disposition Cascading.

343

344

Formatting Parts Lists


The objectives of this lesson are:
learning to develop a parts list
defining part list fields
adding to parts lists
listing and adding to part lists

Overview
This lesson presents several issues relating to the development and editing of assembly parts
lists and their formats.

Once formats are defined in a part file, multiple users can import these formats into their own
assembly drawings.
The Modeling application will be utilized to develop a parts list format.
This lesson will be most helpful to those individuals that are responsible for setting up
CAD/CAM standards for their sites.

Developing a Parts List


Parts Lists for any assembly uses information assigned as part attributes to fill out the parts
list.
So, producing a parts list really involves two steps:
assigning attributes to component parts and subassemblie.*
organizing part attributes into a Parts List format**

345
This lesson concentrates on the second step. You should be familiar with the Attributes
lesson before starting this appendix.
You will go through the manual process of developing a Parts List format to develop the
conceptual connection between formatting and attributes.
* This process can be automated by developing a GRIP program that prompts users with
standardized Attribute Titles.
**This process can be automated by having standardized parts list formats available in a
common directory so that any specific format can be imported into your assembly drawing.

Defining Parts List Fields


You will be developing a parts list for a valve assembly of approximately twenty parts and
subassemblies.
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file amd_total_valve_assm.prt from the amd/valve subdirectory.


Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Check out the attributes of this assembly.


Choose Edit

Properties.

Using the Class Selection dialog (or the Assembly Navigator), select all the components
within the assembly.
Choose Type on the Class Selection dialog.
Choose the Component option on the Select by Type dialog and OK.
Choose Select All on the Class Selection dialog and OK to select all components.
Choose the Attributes tab in the Component Properties dialog.
Note the titles of the attributes:
CALLOUT
P/N

346
DES
MAT
These attribute titles were specified at the time that the attributes were designated.
Now that you know what the attribute titles are, you are ready to start formatting a parts list.
Cancel the Component Properties dialog.

Defining Parts List Fields


Specifying the First Field
You will designate six parts list format fields.

Unigraphics NX allows you to designate a maximum of 14 fields.


Choose Assemblies

Parts List.

Choose Define from the Parts List dialog.

Choose Insert Field from the Define Parts List dialog, then OK.
Non-key fields will not be checked for uniqueness. Your first Parts List field will be a nonkey field.
Choose Non-Key Field from the dialog, then OK.

The first field heading input dialog appears.

347

`Row One' relates to text in the column headings for the parts list fields.

Key Item into the input dialog and OK.


The next field heading input dialog appears.

`Row Two' relates to the next row heading for the parts list fields.

Key No. into the input dialog and OK.


The Attribute Title input dialog appears.

Unigraphics NX must now relate the parts list field `Item No.' to a corresponding attribute
title.

Key callout into the input dialog and OK.

348
The Insert Parts List Field dialog appears.

Since you do not expect an item number to go beyond double digits, you will specify a
smaller Field Width.
Choose the Field Width -10 field, then OK.
Key 6 into the Specify Field Width dialog and OK. This gives enough room for the parts
list field title.
OK the Insert Parts List Field dialog.

Defining Parts List Fields


Specifying the Second Field
Choose Insert Field again, then OK.
Your second Parts List field will be a key field. You must have at least one but not more than
three key fields.
Key fields check for uniqueness of the field entry and if there are identical entries in that
column (such as part numbers or names) those entries will be referenced once but the total
occurrences will appear in the Quantity column.
Choose Key Field from the dialog, then OK.
Notice that the second parts list field has a blank space for Row One on its column.

Blank out the input field then choose OK to accept the empty field.

349
Key Part Name into the Row Two input dialog and OK.
This time you will address a system attribute title
Key $Name into the Attribute Title input dialog and OK.

OK the Insert Parts List Field dialog.


Now you see new options in the Insert Parts List Field dialog which let you position the field.
Append lines up the field after the CALLOUT field.
Choose Append, then OK.

Defining Parts List Fields


Specifying the Third Field
Choose Insert Field again, then OK.
The next field will be the part number field. It will be your second key field.
Choose Key Field from the dialog, then OK.
Key Part into the input dialog for Row One and OK.

Key No. into the input dialog for Row Two and OK.
Key p/n into the input dialog as the attribute title and OK.

Choose OK to accept the defaults.


Choose Append, then OK to append this format.

350

Defining Parts List Fields


Specifying the Fourth Field
Choose Insert Field again, then OK.
The next field will be the description field.
Choose Non-Key Field from the dialog, then OK.
Blank out the input field then choose OK to accept the empty field for Row One.
Key Description into the input dialog for Row Two and OK.

Key des into the input dialog as the attribute title and OK.

Choose the Field Width - 10 field and OK.


Key 20 as the number of characters in this field and OK.
Choose OK to accept the other defaults.
Choose Append then OK.

Defining Parts List Fields


Specifying the Fifth Field
Choose Insert Field again, then OK.
The next field will be the quantity field. Like the Callout field, Unigraphics NX sees the
quantity field as a special field.

351

Choose the Quantity Field option, and OK.


Choose OK to accept the empty field for Row One.
Key Qty into the input dialog for Row Two and OK.

Since you know that the valve assembly only has 20+ component parts, you can truncate this
field.
Choose the Field Width - 10 field, then OK.
Key 3 as the number of characters in this field and OK.
Choose OK to accept the other defaults.
Choose Append, then OK.

Defining Parts List Fields


On Your Own: Specifying the Last Field
Now that you have designated the first five fields, see if you can go through the procedure on
your own.
The last field is a non-key field.
Row One is left empty.
Row Two is Material.
The attribute title is mat.
Set the format to 15.
Normally, you would use File

Save at this point to save the designated field formats.

You cannot do this because the part files in the CAST Online directory are read-only.
You can save parts if you designate a directory in which you have write permission.

352

Adding to Parts Lists


Once you have your Parts List format you must signal which component parts to add to the
Parts List.
For a more comprehensive treatment of adding to the Parts List, see Assembly Drawings The Parts List Note.
Choose the Specify Rules option from the Parts List dialog.
The Report Format dialog appears.
The Report Mode option lets you specify the type of parts list report to be output.

Choose Multi-Level from the Report Mode option and accept.


Choose OK in the Confirmation message dialog.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Add (Entries) from the Parts List dialog.
You can choose parts to add to the parts list by using the Class Selection dialog or by
addressing parts explicitly.
Choose the Class Selection option and OK.
The Class Selection dialog appears. You can select from the Assembly Navigator.
Choose the following Assembly Navigator nodes:

353
subassy_rodunit
subassy_boltnuts x 6
massy_valve
pipe2
pipe1

Note that each node and its component nodes highlight.


Choose OK to accept.
Of course, you could have selected all the parts in several different ways, but using the
Assembly Navigator greatly facilitates selection in an assembly.

Listing and Editing a Parts List


Once you have added the assembly parts to the part list, you can check your format and what
will appear on the parts list by listing the parts list.
Choose the List option in the Parts List dialog.
The Information window appears listing the formats and their contents.
Note that the Part Name and the Description columns are not wide enough to accommodate
the textual entries.
You can edit these while the Information window is up.
Choose the Define option.
Choose the Edit Field option and OK.
A dialog is presented showing the fields you specified.
Choose $Name and OK.
Choose the Format option, and OK.
Double-click on the Field Width-10 option.
Key 25 as the new number of characters and OK.
Choose OK to accept the other parameters.
Choose the Define option again.
Double-click on the Edit Field option again.
Double-click on DES.

354
Double-click on the Format option again.
Double-click on the Field Width-20 option.
Key 30 as the new number of characters and OK.
Choose OK to accept the other parameters.
Choose List to check the edited formats.
Of course, there are numerous way in which you can edit your formats. You will change your
formats in a couple of ways to illustrate the editing process.
Dismiss the Information dialog.
One common format consideration is the justification of text within a field.
Left justification is the system default, you will change the Part No. format to a right
justification scheme.
Choose Define.
Double-click Edit Field.
Double-click on $Name from the dialog.
Double-click on Format from the dialog.
Double-click on Left Justified from the dialog.
Choose Right Justified from list of options and accept.
Choose OK to accept the other parameters.
Choose Back to return to the format list.
While you are at this point you can practice a format function that is very useful, i.e. Leading
String.
Both Leading String and Trailing String work in a similar fashion.
Leading String lets you put a prefix onto a field and Trailing String lets you put a suffix onto a
field.
Choose Part No. from the list of defined titles.
Choose Format from the dialog.
Choose Leading String from the list of options.
For instructional purposes, you are going to pretend that all the parts of the valve assembly are
military standard parts.
Key MIL-STD- in the entry field and OK.
Choose OK to accept the other parameters.
Choose List again to check the edited formats.

355
Your part names should now all be right justified and all part numbers should have the MILSTD- prefix.

To learn how to apply Parts Lists to drawings,


see the Assembly Drawings lesson.
Close all part files.

356

Assembly Drawings
The objectives for this lesson are:
understanding the master model approach to drawings
creating an assembly drawing
understanding parts list notes

In this lesson you will develop a multi-view drawing and parts list for a valve assembly.
You will develop views using the Drafting application.
You will import the necessary Parts List formats.
You will automatically develop a Parts List and manually add entries to that Parts List.
The Drafting application will be utilized to create an orthographic drawing of the valve
assembly along with its part list.

Master Model Approach to a Drawing


The Master Model approach to concurrent engineering dictates that you use one master model
as the kernel source of required drawing information.
In terms of an assembly drawing, this means that prior to developing an assembly drawing,
you must create a new part file, which will contain the assembly file as a component.

Because the assembly file is a component of the drawing file, it and the drawing file are
associated.

357
This associativity means that whenever changes are made to the assembly, they will be
reflected in the assembly drawing.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


First, you will create your drawing part file. Then you will add the total valve assembly to
it as a component.
You will not need to save this file for this lesson. However, if you do want to save the
assembly drawing file, change to a parts directory in which you have write access.
Using File New, designate a new file named valve_assm_dwg.
Since you will be adding the valve assembly as a component of the drawing file, you must
specify to what level component data will be used in the parts list. To do this, you will use
Assemblies Preferences.
Choose Preferences

Assemblies from the Menu Bar.

The Assembly Preferences dialog appears.

The Parts List Add Method determines how parts list information of the assembly
components will be added to the parts list.
For your drawing, you want to add every available level.
Make sure that the All Levels Add option is on and OK.
All Levels Add ensures that data for all subassemblies of the component will be included.
Next, you will add the valve assembly to the drawing file.
Choose Application

Assemblies (if necessary).

Choose the Add Existing Component icon


Add Existing.

or choose Assemblies

Components

Choose the Choose Part File option on the Select Part dialog.
Choose amd_total_valve_assm.prt from the amd/valve directory as the part file to come
in as a component.

358
Choose OK to accept the default parameters on the Add Existing Part dialog.
Choose OK to accept the default position parameters on the Point Constructor dialog.
The total valve assembly is now a component of your drawing file.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Add Existing Part dialog.
You can visually check this relationship by using the Assembly Navigator.
Access the Assembly Navigator and notice that amd_total_valve_assm (and its
subassemblies) is now the first level of valve_assm_dwg.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Preparing the Drawing Layout
You are now ready to begin your drawing layouts.
From the top menu bar, choose the Application
Choose Preferences

Visualization

Drafting option.

Color Settings.

In the Drawing Part Settings section, turn off the Monochrome Display switch.
When you choose Drafting, the system defaults to an E-size drawing along with the
Dimensions dialog.
Changing the Drawing Size
For this part you will need to change the size of the drawing from E-size to D-size.
Choose the Edit Drawing icon

or choose Drawing

Edit from the Menu Bar.

The Edit Current Drawing dialog appears. Note that the default name for the current
drawing is SH1.
Choose the drawing size option and select D - 22 X 34.

359

Choose OK to affect the changed drawing size.


You will not need the display of the borders. You can use the Display Preferences to turn
them off.
Choose Preferences

Visualization from the Menu Bar.

Choose the Names/Borders tab.


Turn the Show View Names and Show View Borders options off (unchecked), then OK.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Loading Components in Drawings
When you use the Drafting application there are several functions which require the entire
component to be loaded.
When you utilize one of these functions, the system loads the components as it performs
the function.
Adding the Base View to the Drawing
To create an assembly drawing, you first must create a base view. The base view is the
first view added to the drawing.
The base view determines the orthographic space and is used as a reference to establish the
alignment for all subsequent orthographic views.
The base view also establishes the orientation of the part on the drawing.
Choose the Add View to Drawing icon
Menu Bar.

or choose Drawing

Add View from the

The system displays the Add View dialog. It highlights the TOP option (Top View) in the
list box.
Indicate on the graphics screen the approximate center of the base view on the drawing.

360

Because you are using the default drawing view preferences, all the hidden lines are
displayed as dashed.
You can use the Drawing Move/Copy View option to relocate the position of the
view once it has been placed.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Adding an Orthographic View to the Drawing
Once you have placed the base view on the drawing, you can add any number of additional
views, including orthographic, auxiliary, detail, and section views.
Choose the Orthographic View icon.
Select the top view as your parent view.
Indicate a position below the top view.

361

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Preparing to Add a Section View
Section views on a drawing are fully associative with the assembly model.
For the section view, you set the display of hidden lines to invisible.
This means that Unigraphics NX will automatically remove all hidden lines from future
views that you place on the drawing.
Choose Preferences

View Display

Hidden Lines from the top menu bar.

In the Color/Font/Width section, make sure the Font option is set to Invisible, then OK.
This font setting should be set to invisible, but if it had been changed prior to this exercise
this is a good time to check.

Now you are ready to add a section view.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Adding a Section View to the Drawing
Choose the Add View to Drawing icon
Menu Bar.

or choose Drawing

Add View from the

The system displays the Add View dialog.


Choose the Simple Section Cut icon.
You are prompted for the parent view upon which the section cut will be based.
Select the top view in the graphics area.
You are prompted for a hinge line. A hinge line is used as a reference to rotate a view in
proper orthographic space.
When creating a section view, the section line cut segments will be parallel to the hinge
line. The section line arrow segments will be perpendicular to the hinge line.
You want the cut segment to cut through the valve vertically.

362

Choose Inferred Vector

and change it to the YC axis.

Choose Reverse Vector (if necessary) to have vector point to the left.

Choose Apply.
The Section Line Creation dialog appears.
Next you need to indicate the segment cut positions you want to use.
This associates the cutting plane for the section with the selected geometry, so if the
geometry is modified, the section cut will be modified as well.
You will do a simple cut directly through the center of the assembly. Since there are no
lines that you can use, you will have to define a point.
For the point, you will use an arc center to position the first cut.
Choose the Point Selection option and set to Arc/Ellipse/Sphere Center.
Select the hole center of the top bolt for the first cut position, then OK.

363

It may be difficult to cleanly choose the correct hole center on the first try. Use either
the Zoom function or choose Next Object until the system picks the hole.
OK the Section Line Creation dialog.
Indicate a position for the section view within the horizontal corridor established by the
base view.

Notice that the system automatically adds hatching to show solid portions of the section
cut.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Adding a View to a Drawing
An imported view is a view which was defined in the Modeling application or in the
modeling display within Drafting and placed on the drawing at an indicated position.
One of the most common uses for this procedure is to import an isometric or trimetric view
of an assembly.
If you have generated an exploded view in a view (TRI-ISO, for example), when you
import that particular view (TRI-ISO) into a drawing, the exploded view is the one
imported.
To show you how this done, you will import a trimetric view of the assembly model and
place it on the drawing.
Choose the Add View to Drawing icon
Menu Bar.

or choose Drawing

Add View from the

364

Choose TFR-TRI as the view to be imported.


Indicate the position for the center of the view to be imported.

Remember, you specified in the View Display dialog that hidden lines (font) were to be
invisible.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Importing a Drawing Border and Title Block
A common object to import is a standard drawing border and title block.
The drawing border that you will import resides in another separate part file.
Choose File

Import

Part from the Menu Bar.

The Import Part dialog appears.

365
Choose OK to accept the default import part parameters.
Choose the file drawing_border.prt from the amd/valve subdirectory.
You will import everything in this part. It was specially prepared so the only thing it
contains is the border.
The Point Constructor dialog appears for you to designate the location of the drawing
border.
Choose OK to locate the imported part at Work Coordinates 0,0,0.
This point corresponds with the origin of the drawing coordinates as well.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the dialog.
The drawing border and title block are brought into the drawing as shown.

Creating An Assembly Drawing


Importing the Format for a Parts List
In line with the Master Model paradigm, authorized parts lists formats are typically
imported from a centralized part file directory.
Choose File

Import

Part from the Menu Bar.

Turn Create named group off (unchecked).

366
Next you need to signal that you want to import only the parts list format.
Choose the Import parts list format option and OK.

This signals that only parts list formats should be imported.


Choose total_valve_format and OK.
Choose OK to accept the Point Constructor defaults, then Cancel.
Because you have imported only the parts list formats, you do not see anything appear on
your drawing.
There is, however, a quick way to check to make sure the formats were imported.
Choose Assemblies

Parts List from the Menu Bar.

Choose Define from the Parts List Dialog.


Choose Edit Field, then OK.
You see a list of the format titles that were imported. These titles have specific formats
attached to them.
Choose Cancel.

The Parts List Note


The parts list note behaves like any other note in Unigraphics NX:
It conforms to a specified lettering size and font.
It uses the current alignment method.
It is placed view dependently on the drawing.
The next step in generating a note is to associate the parts in the assembly to the parts list
format.
You can do this automatically or manually.

367

The Parts List Note


Adding Parts to the Parts List Automatically
You can automatically create a parts list by specifying what levels of the assembly you
wish incorporated into the parts list.
If necessary, choose Assemblies

Parts List from the Menu Bar.

Choose the Specify Rules option.


The Report Format dialog appears. Right now, you are only concerned with the options on
the lower half of the dialog.
Make sure the Skip One Level option is off.

The Report Mode option lets you specify the type of parts list report to be output. There
are three options.
As Defined - generates parts list as currently
defined.
Single Level - produces a parts list based on top
level components only.
Multi-Level - produces a parts list for all levels.
The Single Level and Multi-Level options will overwrite any existing As Defined parts list
and will become the new As Defined. The previous As Defined will be lost.
Choose the Multi-Level option, then OK.
Choose OK in the Confirmation message dialog.

The Parts List Note


Checking the Multi-Level Listing Report
Choose the List option again from the Parts List dialog.
The Multi-Level report encompasses all the levels of the assembly file.

368

Close the Information window.


The automatic generation of the parts list uses the format specification which explicitly
addresses the attribute titles of the parts.
If the parts list format does not find the correct attribute titles, those missing attribute titles
will not be included in the parts list.
See the Formatting Parts Lists lesson for more information on how parts list formats use
part attribute titles.

The Parts List Note


Adding Parts to the Parts List Manually
If you need to add (or remove) parts to the parts list, you can do it manually.
Choose the Specify Rules option.
In order to manually add (or remove) to the parts list, the Skip One Level option must be
off.
Choose Skip One Level so that it is set to off.
The Report Mode must be set to As Defined.

369
Choose the As Defined option then choose OK.
Choose the Add (Entries) option.
You are going to add a non-part item that must show up in your parts list.
Choose the Enter Field Values option, then OK.
The order of the following dialogs depends on how the parts list formats were set up.
Key fields are addressed first. (For a thorough discussion of format field set-up, see
Appendix C.)
Key in Lubricant as the part name and Enter.
Key in 0011 as the part number and Enter.
Choose String as Quantity data type.
Key in AR (i.e. `as required') as the Quantity value and Enter.
Choose OK to signal a blank field for Item.
Key in White lithium grease for the description and Enter.
Blank the Material field then OK.
OK the Add to Parts List dialog.
Check your work. The new entry will be added to the bottom of the list.
Choose List to see the expanded parts list report.
Dismiss the Information window.

The Parts List Note


Placing the Parts List Note
You will now place the parts list for the assembly on the drawing. (It is considered a
Drafting note.)
First you need to define the position on the drafting note that will be used as the origin for
placement on the drawing.
Choose Preferences

Annotation from the (Drafting) Menu Bar.

The Annotation Preferences dialog appears.


Choose the [Lettering] Alignment Position option and set the position to Top Right as
shown.

370

Choose OK.
Choose Assemblies

Parts List from the Menu Bar.

Choose Create from the Parts List dialog.


Indicate the end point of the top line of the title block.

Zoom in on the note to check.


Close all part files.
If you have any pre-V10 assemblies, go on to the Upgrading Pre-V10 Assemblies lesson.
If you would like more practice with assemblies, go on to the Assembly Projects lesson.

371

Upgrading Pre-V10 Assemblies


This appendix demonstrates upgrading a pre-V10 assembly into an NX assembly.
There are two types of Pre-V10 assemblies that you may encounter:
An assembly that was created using the assemblies and component functionality and is
associated to its components.
It is this type of assembly that the upgrade utility was written to address.
One where the members were merged together and there is no association between the
component parts and the assembly.

Limitations of Not Upgrading


After you have loaded a pre-V10 component assembly, you will need to make a decision on
whether you wish to upgrade the assembly or not.
If you decide not to upgrade the assembly, you will find several limitations that may make it
difficult to be productive.
It will be large, because of the copies of the geometry that exist.
It cannot be updated to reflect revisions of its components.
You cannot reposition or rename a component.
You cannot perform a reference set substitution.
You cannot make a pre-V10 component the work part.
Remove, Substitute, and Upgrade are the only assembly options available.

Upgrading a Pre-V10 Component Assembly


The process of upgrading a component assembly into a Unigraphics NX assembly is a fairly
easy process.
There are a few structure related options you will have to make a decision on, but the system
will perform most of the work.
To perform the upgrade, the system will first try to find the component in the currently loaded
parts.

372
After that, it looks to the Load Method as defined in Load Options dialog, to determine the
component parts location.

When you execute the upgrade command, the system will delete the component geometry and
replace it with a new virtual pointer to the component part. Any application data that was
generated (i.e. dimensions, NC operations, etc.) is lost due to the deletion of the component
geometry.

Upgrading a Pre-V10 Component Assembly


Components That Can Not Be Upgraded
In pre-V10 assemblies, the data was a copy taken from a master set of data in some other file.
Since there were two sets of data, pre-V10 assemblies allowed you to perform actions that
cannot be performed in the most recent version.
Consequently, the following components may not be upgraded:
mirrored components.
scaled components.
You may choose a Pre-V10 component by selecting it in the listing window, or
entering its name. You cannot select from the graphics window.
Whole subassembly or Component only - Component only, will upgrade the single
level of the selected component. Whole subassembly will upgrade all member
components at all levels of the selected component.
Create component if required - If the system is not able to locate the component part
that matches the entity you are upgrading, this toggle will allow the system to create a
component based on the geometry that exists in the assembly.
Upgrade All - The system selects all Pre-V10 components for upgrading.
If the Create component if required toggle is on, the system will create a new component
part for each mirrored or scaled component.
The system assigns a name that reflects why the new component was created. See the
following examples.
original-name_mirrored_1_0.prt (mirrored component) original-name_scaled_1_8.prt (1.008
scaled component).

373
The Create component if required option will create the components with a pathname that
reflects the directory from which the assembly was loaded.
If you save all of the components they will be in the assembly directory.
The default is set to upgrade the Whole subassembly structure.
The system creates each of the new components, deletes the old geometry from the assembly,
and then establishes a new virtual pointer to the component.
After upgrading, the components that the system created are in active memory. They will not
exist as component parts until they are saved.
Normally, you would use File
exist in a directory.

Save at this point to save the new components so that they

You can not do this because the part files in the CAST Online directory are read-only.
You can save the new, converted components into a directory in which you have write
permission.

Upgrading a Pre-V10 Component Assembly


Upgrade a Pre-V10 Component Assembly
In this section, you will upgrade a V9.1 assembly into the current version.
If you wish to have a copy of the assembly and its components that you may work on, you
will first need to copy the assembly into a writable directory. Otherwise, you will not be able
to save the newly created components, because they cannot be put into the protected CAST
Online directory.
Choose File Options Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From
Directory.
Open part file amd_drive_assm.prt from the amd/automotive/convert_test subdirectory.

You may have noticed that the component parts do not exist (they were not in the directory).
All that you have is a V9, multi-part, component assembly. One of the options you will have
during the upgrade process, is to have the computer create the component parts, if it cannot

374
find them in the system.
To determine if an assembly has pre-V10 components, query the system by requesting a
report on components in this assembly.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components.

Note there are subassembly structures and all of the components are Pre-V10.
When you begin the upgrade process, you will only see the top level components in the list to
be upgraded, but there is an option to upgrade all subassembly components also.
Choose File

Utilities

Upgrade Component.

The Upgrade Components dialog appears.

The upgrade components option only effects Pre-V10 components. Therefore, the component
list only displays the upgradeable components.
The options available in the upgrade window are described below:
Choose Create component if required.
Choose Upgrade All.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components again to update the listing.

375

Working with a Pre-V10 Merged Assembly


The other type of assembly that you may encounter is a merged, or multi-part assembly that
has no component structure. This precludes your ability to use the upgrade command.
If all of the components of the assemblies exist, the best approach would be to discard the old
assembly and build a new V17 assembly from scratch. This way you maintain all of the data
that exists in the component part file.
If you only have the assembly file or a designers multi-part layout, the best approach is to
create new components and add the geometry to the component as it is created.

376

Assembly Projects

As demonstrated in the Mating Conditions lesson, mating constraints may be assigned using
one of two available methods:
Assignment on existing components of an assembly.
Assignment on components as they are added to an assembly.
In this project you will practice the second method, assigning mating constraints while adding
components to an assembly.
It is recommended that you attempt to complete this project using the CAST "abridged"
mode. Toggle to the "complete" mode if you need step-by-step instructions.

Establishing the Base Part


You will bring five piece parts into your assembly.

377

You will begin by creating an empty assembly part.


Create a new file, named clamp_assm in a directory where you have write permission.
Choose File New.
Determine the directory where the new part is to be filed.
Key in clamp_assm for the new file name.

The base part of this assembly will be the clamp_base. It will be the first part you bring into
the assembly.
Add the part clamp_base.prt (in the amd/clamp directory) to clamp_assm, using the Add
Existing Part defaults and making sure that the base point is at 0,0,0.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
or choose Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose the Choose Part File option from the Select Part dialog.
Choose clamp_base.prt from the amd/clamp directory.
The Add Existing Part dialog appears.

378

The Add Existing Part dialog now specifies the following:


The component's name within the assembly will be `clamp_base'.
The default assumes the component's name will be the same as the part file
name, but it does not have to be!
All reference sets of clamp_base are being added (Ref. Set: Entire Part)
You are not adding multiple clamp_bases.
You will bring the component directly into your assembly using absolute
coordinates (you will not be mating the base component).
The component will be added on the Work layer of your model.
Choose OK to accept the options in the dialog.
The Point Constructor dialog appears. This is for specifying the location of the incoming component in your assembly.
Make sure all the Base Point values are set to zero, then choose OK.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Add Existing Part dialog.
The base component has been added to your assembly and you are ready to add the
other components.
Choose MB3

Orient View

Trimetric.

379

Use MB3 Hidden Edges Invisible as necessary to help you visualize the
components as you go through this section.
The addition/mating of the rest of the components will follow a slightly different procedure.

Establishing the Base Part


Adding / Mating the Clamp Cap
The first component you will mate is the Clamp_Cap.

Using the Edit Assembly Structure dialog, add the clamp_cap.prt from the amd/clamp
directory.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
or choose Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose the Choose Part File option from the Select Part dialog.
Choose clamp_cap.prt from the amd/clamp directory.

380
The Add Existing Part dialog reappears. This time you will specify the dialog parameters a bit
differently.
Choose Change Ref. Set.
Choose BODY from the Choose Name dialog.
Choose OK to accept the BODY reference set.
This loads only the BODY reference set. Datum planes and sketch geometry will be excluded
from the component addition.
Choose Positioning and select Mate.
Use OK to accept the dialog parameters.
The Point Constructor dialog appears. This time you will indicate the position of the incoming component.
Choose the Cursor Location icon
slightly above the base.

and indicate a position for the new component

The Mating Conditions dialog appears.


To position this part correctly, you will use:
Align
Mate
Angle

381
First, Align the cylindrical hole face of the cap with the cylindrical hole face of the base.
Choose the Align icon.
Select the face of the cylindrical hole of the cap.

Choose the TO icon.


Select the cylindrical face to align to.

Choose Preview to check.


Choose Apply if preview looks good.
Next, Mate the indented back face of the cap to the inside back face of the base.
Choose the Mate icon.
Select the indented planar face of the cap.

Choose the TO icon


.
Select the face to mate to.

382

Choose Preview to check it.


Choose Apply if preview looks good.

The last constraint will constrain the cap from being able to rotate into the base.
Using Angle, constrain the top face of the cap to a top face of the base. (You will use the
default angle of 0.0)
Choose the Angle icon.
Select the top planar face of the cap.

Choose the TO icon


.
Select the face to constrain to.

Your successful solution should look like the illustration below.

383

Establishing the Base Part


Adding / Mating the Clamp Lug
The next component you will mate is the Clamp_Lug.

Choose the Add Existing Component icon


or choose Assemblies
Add Existing.
Choose the Choose Part File option from the Select Part dialog.

Components

Choose clamp_lug.prt from the amd/clamp directory.


This time you will want to use the datum planes associated with the lug so you will keep the
reference set designation set to entire part.
Make sure Positioning is set to Mate, then OK to accept the dialog parameters.
The Point Constructor dialog reappears.
Again, choose the Cursor Location icon and indicate a position for the new component
slightly above the base.

384

The Mating selection dialog appears.


You will again be using the mating constraints:
Align
Angle
First, Align the cylindrical hole face of the lug with the forward cylindrical hole face of the
base.
Choose the Align icon.
Select the face of the cylindrical hole of the lug.

Choose the TO icon


.
Select the cylindrical hole face to align to.

385

Choose Preview to check.


Choose Apply if preview looks good.
Next, Align the center datum plane of the lug with the center datum plane of the base.
Hint: Change the Filter option to Datum Plane to facilitate selection.
Choose the Align icon.
Select the center datum plane of the lug.

Choose the TO icon


.
Select the center datum plane of the base to align to.

386
Choose Preview to check it.
Choose Apply if preview looks good.
Lastly, Angle the main cylindrical Face of the lug with a top Face of the base.
Choose the Angle icon.
Select the long cylindrical face of the lug.

Choose the TO icon


.
Select the face to constrain to.

Your successful solution should look like the illustration below.

387

Establishing the Base Part


Mating the Clamp Pins: On Your Own
The last components to be added and constrained are the clamp pins.

Test your knowledge by adding and mating the two pins.


The two pins hold the cap and lug to the base.
Some things to keep in mind:
Add only the BODY of the pins; the resident datum planes are not useful to you.
When you add the pins to your model, they both get added at the same time and reside
in the same model space.
Use MB3 Hidden Lines Invisible as necessary to better visualize selectable
objects of the components.
Use Preview to check your constraints, if necessary.
Your successful solution should look like the illustration below.

Close all parts.

388

Automotive Project

Assembly Projects give you a chance to apply the lessons you have learned in the course of
this tutorial.
You are encouraged to exercise your acquired knowledge of basic assemblies on these
projects.
These models provide a safe environment in which to create reference sets, apply mating
conditions, exploding your model, apply attributes, etc.
The drive_assm.prt in the amd/automotive directory holds all the necessary part files.
Generate a listing of components of the drive_assm.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components.

Note the general relationships between the components within the assembly and the
subassemblies.
The next sections graphically detail the relationships within the subassemblies.

Automotive Project
Understanding the Assembly
Before starting to work on the drive assembly, you should familiarize yourself with the
assembly, its subassemblies and individual components.
Each subassembly will have an exploded view so that you can see how the components relate
to each other.

389
The Subassemblies
The drive assembly has 3 main subassemblies and 5 individual components, the clip being
used twice.

Automotive Project
The Hub Subassembly
Make hub_asm the Displayed Part.

Choose the Assembly Navigator tab.


(Unix users, choose the Assembly
Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Select hub_asm in the Assembly Navigator.
MB3 Make Displayed Part.

Note that the hub assembly is a simple three component subassembly.

390

Automotive Project
The Innercv Subassembly
Display the drive_assm in the Assembly Navigator.
Select hub_asm in the Assembly Navigator.
MB3 Display Parent drive_assm.
Make innercv_asm the Displayed Part.
Select innercv_asm in the Assembly Navigator.
MB3 Make Displayed Part.

Note that the innercv assembly has two components: 1 part (ccvin) and 1 subassembly
(ring_asm,.but one of them is yet another subassembly.
The ring assembly has 3 components: 2 parts and 1 subassembly named bearing_set, which
has 6 components.

391

Automotive Project
The Outercv Subassembly

392

Automotive Project
Individual Assembly Components

393

Plastic Project

Assembly Projects give you a chance to apply the lessons you have learned in the course of
this tutorial.
You are encouraged to exercise your acquired knowledge of basic assemblies on these
projects.
These models provide a safe environment in which to create assemblies/subassemblies, create
reference sets, apply mating conditions, explode your model, apply attributes, etc.
The flipfone_assembly.prt in the plastic directory holds all the necessary part files.
Generate a listing of components of the drive_assm.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

List Components.

Note the general relationships between the components and the subassemblies within the
assembly.
The next sections graphically detail the relationships within the subassemblies.

394

Plastic Project
Understanding the Assembly
Before you start to work on the phone assembly, you should familiarize yourself with the
assembly, subassemblies, and individual components.
The Subassemblies
The phone assembly has 2 subassemblies and 3 individual components.

Plastic Project
The Phone Bottom Subassembly
Make flipfone_subassy_bottom the Displayed Part.

Choose the Assembly Navigator tab.


(Unix users, choose the Assembly
Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Select flipfone_subassy_bottom in the Assembly Navigator.
MB3 Make Displayed Part.

Note that the bottom assembly is a simple three component subassembly.

395

Plastic Project
The Phone Top Subassembly
Display the flipfone_assembly in the Assembly Navigator.
Select flipfone_subassy_bottom in the Assembly Navigator.
MB3 Display Parent flipfone_assembly.
Make flipfone_subassy_top the Displayed Part.
Select flipfone_subassy_top in the Assembly Navigator.
MB3 Make Displayed Part.

Note that the flipfone_subassy_top assembly has three components.

396

Plastic Project
Individual Assembly Components

The total exploded view of the phone assembly, showing relationships:

397

398

Advanced Assembly Modeling


Component Filtering
The objectives of this lesson are:
to understand components sets and how to create them
to understand assembly zones and how to create them
to understand the value of combining filters and how to do it.
to understand the use of component scripts
to know how to use filters with load options

Why Component Filtering?


As your assemblies get larger and larger, becoming more and more complex, there is an everincreasing need for control over the component parts you need to see and work with.
Component filtering provides a means by which you can specify which subsets of components
within a total assembly are significant to you.
These component subsets may lie close together physically, yet belong to different
subassemblies.
Component filtering is especially useful when designing-in-context, reviewing assembly
designs and documenting an assembly.
In this next set of exercises you will create a set of filters and combine them so that only those
components that will come in contact with the flow going through a valve will be displayed.

399

More About: Designing-in-Context


As a designer, you are typically responsible for designing single parts or a subset of
interrelated parts of a larger assembly project.
Component filtering is useful because you can specify a filter to see the parts you are
designing, in the context of other parts that will be physically close to your parts after
assembly.
Example:
You could set up a filter that queries the modeler to "Display all the fuel system parts
in the engine assembly that come within 3 inches of this manifold"
More About: Reviewing Assembly Designs
Another use for component filtering is to facilitate that parts and assemblies fit together as
originally envisioned.
The person who is responsible for design review and validation can use component filtering
to:
check for proper fit of interfacing components
check whether components can actually be physically assembled
check that required clearances are being maintained
evaluate the impact of proposed changes
Typically, the design reviewer will require that filtering happen during the loading of
components.
To facilitate sectional review and analysis, box zones and plane zones can be designated.

400

Example: Load options can be tailored to say, "Load all components that fall within and
intersect zone A" or "load all components above plane B".

More About: Documenting an Assembly


Component filtering can also be used to isolate and customize assembly display for purposes
of assembly documentation, such as:
Assembly drawings showing how parts or subassemblies are to be installed in relation
to a larger assembly.
Shaded images of interfacing parts/subassemblies that are distant in terms of the
assembly tree structure.

Component Sets Definition


Component sets are the most fundamental of your component filtering options in terms of
definition.
A component set is really just a grouping of pointers to designated components that reside in
an assembly.
Within an assembly model it is possible to have many uniquely named component sets. It is
feasible that any one component could belong to more than one set.

401

Component Sets Definition


Customizing the Toolbars
Use File Options Load Options and make sure that Load Components is set to All
Components,Partial Loading is off, and Load Methods is set to From Directory then
OK.
Open part file advasm_total_valve_assm.prt from the advasm/valve subdirectory.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or chooseApplication

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

402

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

If you do not see either the Assemblies or the Assembly Navigator toolbars; then their
display is turned off. You can easily check these.
Choose View

Toolbars

Customize.

Choose the Toolbars tab in the Customize dialog.


Make sure the Assemblies and Assembly Navigator switches are on.

Feel free to dock the toolbars (Window users).


Choose the Commands tab.

Choose the Assembly Navigator option.


The commands associated with the Assembly Navigator are enumerated on the right side
of the dialog.
By clicking the various commands on or off, you can control which icons appear on the
Assembly Navigator toolbar.
Make sure the Filtering Mode command is on (checked).
This adds the Filtering Mode icon

to the Assembly Navigator toolbar.

403
Close the Customize dialog.

Component Sets Definition


The Filtering Mode
Choose the Filter Mode icon
Mode to turn the filter mode on.

or choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Filtering

Two things happen:


1) The Filtering Mode entry in the Tools

Assembly Navigator pull-down is set

on.

2) In the Assembly Navigator, when the Filtering Mode is on, the Filters symbols
are added into the tree structure.

Now that the Filtering Mode is on, you can turn the Assembly Filtering toolbar on.
Choose View

Toolbars

Customize.

Choose the Toolbars tab.


Turn the Assemblies Filtering option on (checked).
The Assembly Filtering toolbar appears:

Feel free to dock the toolbar.

404
Close the Customize dialog.
More About Filter Types
As depicted in the Assembly Navigator, filters can be saved in the part or just the current
session.

Session Filters
One big advantage of Session Filters is that you do not need write access to the assembly and
can be tailored to your design needs, such as, "display all components larger that 20 mm." or
"display only those components in zone A".
With session filters, you can create many filters particular to your needs without effecting the
parent assembly.
Filters in Part
Filters in Part are stored with the part, so most of these types of filters should only be made
(and saved) by the owners of the assembly.
Best practices dictate that the owner of large assemblies create a set of useful Filters in Part to
facilitate display as well as isolating significant parts of the large assembly.
Examples:
Major/Minor functional areas; e.g. all hydraulics and forward hydraulics.
Zone or plane-based filters; e.g. fuselage stations of an aircraft.
Attribute based filters such as supplier or designer
Components used for a Product Outline.

Creating a Component Set


Components Sets are handled outside of the assemblies component filters dialog. They are
handled by the Assembly Navigator with the filter mode on.
Components are created by dragging the component(s) to the filter that is required.
Open the Assembly Navigator, Expand all subassemblies, and Pack multiple component
occurrences.

405

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose the Expand All icon
Expand All.
Choose the Pack All icon
All

or choose Tools
or choose Tools

Assembly Navigator
Assembly Navigator

Pack

If one of the components of your component set is to be a subassembly, you have the
ability to designate whether you want just the component at the specified level or the
component and all of its children.

Creating a Component Set


Selecting Components For A Component Set
Place the cursor over subassy_intprts node and select MB3 and select Select Assembly.

406

Notice two things:


the subassembly highlights in the graphics area
the respective nodes highlight in the Assembly Navigator display
As you can see the subassembly is now selected, this will allow you to drag the total
subassembly to the filter.

Creating a Component Set


Moving Components into the Filter
Place the cursor over the selected components in the Assembly Navigator and press MB1
and drag them to the Filters in Part folder.
Type in INTERNAL PARTS for the name of the filter.
If you lose the automatic edit state, you can place the cursor over the filter node and use
MB3 Edit.
Hold down the <Cntl> key while choosing components cover and the three cover_bolt
components from the Assembly Navigator then drag them to the new INTERNAL PARTS
filter.
In the Assembly Navigator, the component symbols are added under the Internal Parts
Filter.

407
Make sure the check box of INTERNAL PARTS is checked (unblanked).

Double-click on the INTERNAL PARTS node in the Assembly Navigator.


The components within component set internal parts highlight.

Select the INTERNAL_PARTS filter node in the Assembly Navigator to unhighlight the
components.

Can component sets be modified?

408
Components can be added to an existing component set by either selecting the
components to be added from the graphics display or hold down the Control key and
select the components from the Assembly Navigator and drag the components to the
correct filter. To remove components that are part of an existing component set, select
the components that you want to remove, either in the graphics display or the Assembly
Navigator. Next, place the courser over the selected node and hit MB3 Delete to
remove the component from the component set filter
If you are continuing on to the next topic, you can continue using this part file, otherwise
close the part.

Zones Definition
Zones are used for volume comparisons between the zones themselves and the volume of
components or component sets.
Example:
Using Load Options, you can designate to "load only components that are contained
within zone A." (a Box zone).
Or, using filter scripts, you could designate to "Blank all components that intersect
with and are above zone B." (a Plane zone)
Zones have the following characteristics:
Zones can be 3-dimensional (Boxes) or 2-dimensional (Planes, lines or points).
Zones are defined, stored and used in the Displayed Part only.
Zones are located with respect to the Absolute coordinate system of the Displayed Part
in which they are defined.
To create a line zone, you define a box zone with two zero length sides. To create a
point zone, you define a box zone with three zero length sides.
The Set User Zone function is unique, in that it allows you to specify what might be called a
"floating" zone.
It provides interactive flexibility to choose which zone in your model you are interested in,
when zones are used in component filters and scripts.

Creating Zones
In this section, you will define a simple zone that equates with the area of flow within a valve
assembly. This is an example of how filter zones and component sets can work together.

409

Creating Zones
Creating A Box Zone
Open part file advasm_total_valve_zones.prt from the advasm/valve subdirectory, or
continue using the part file used in the previous topic.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or chooseApplication

If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.
First, you will retrieve some geometry that is necessary for this portion of the lesson.
Make layer 2 Selectable.
Choose the Layer Settings icon
or choose Format Layer Settings.
Double-Click on 2 in the Layer/Status list box to make layer 2 selectable.
Choose OK to dismiss the dialog.

The two points you see at the ends of the valve will be used to help you define your first
zone.
Choose Assemblies

Advanced

Zones.

The Zones dialog appears. It has six functions:

Autogenerate
Zones

Delete Box or Plane

Create
Box Zones

Rename Zone

Create
Plane
Zones

Edit Zones

Choose the Create Box Zone icon.


The Zone Creation Method dialog displays.

410

Choose the Two Diagonal Points option.


The Point Constructor dialog appears.
Use Existing Point

to select the diagonal points.

A red box delineating the bounds of the zone appears along with the default name
NEW_BOX_ZONE
Be sure the new zone entry in the list box.
Choose the Rename icon.
If the Rename icon is not available then select the
NEW_BOX_ZONE form the list with MB1 to enter the edit mode.
Key in FLOWZONE as the new name, then OK.

411

The red lines of zones are very transitory. They will disappear when you Refresh or
change your display in any way. Re-select the zone entry in the list box to re-display as
needed.

Combining Filters
You can define component filters to perform comparative functions between sets of
components.
They take designated components as input:
component sets
components interfacing with zones
components with shared attributes
output from other filters
They then output components that meet the filtering requirements that you have specified.
Again, these filtering processes are for filtering during assembly loading and for customizing
the display of your assembly.
Example:
Using Component Filters, you can designate to "load only those components that
reside in zone A and intersect plane zone B."
Or, you could designate to "blank all components that are in component set A and are
contained in zone C."

412
In this next exercise you will combine the component set filter (INTERNAL_ PARTS) and
the box zone (FLOWZONE) to create a filter that is cumulative in nature.

Combining Filters
Combining a Component Set to a Zone Filter
Continue using the part file you are working on, or open part file
advasm_total_valve_combined.prt from the advasm/valve subdirectory
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies(if necessary)

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Select the INTERNAL_PARTS filter from the Assembly Navigator


Select the Add Zone to Filter icon.
Then select Box FLOWZONE from the list; this will activate the three interaction type
options.
The three actions that can be used with the box filter are Inside, Interfers and Outside.

Inside

Interfers

Outside

Select Interfers option


Select OK to accept the new addition.
As you can see this new filter is added to the INTERNAL_PARTS filter and appears in the
Assembly Navigator.

Double-click on the Interferes with FLOWZONE filter in the Assembly Navigator.


Notice that all parts that interfere with the FLOWZONE are highlighted, including
components outside of the INTERNAL_PARTS filter
To isolate just the components that are in the INTERNAL_PARTS filter and interfere with
FLOWZONE, you must designate a couple more filters to narrow down the filtering process.

Combining Filters
Creating a Match Any Of Filter

413

The Match Any of filter will allow you to the match any requirements that are in the filter
that it is associated to. In this case the Match Any of filter will be used to setup a combination
to match any of the components in the Component Set filter (INTERNAL PARTS) to the
Zone (FLOWZONE) filter.
Select the components in the Internal Parts filter by selecting the top component and then
pressing the Shift then selecting the last component.
Select MB3 over the top of the selected components and select Match Any of ... Filter

As you can see this new filter appears on the Assembly Navigator and is called Match any
of .....
Double click the Match Any of filter to see the results

414
As you can see, the Match Any Of filter addresses the same components that are valid for
the parent INTERNAL_PARTS filter.

Combining Filters
Creating a Match To All Filter
Next, you must create another filter that combines the zone interference filter
(FLOWZONE) to the Match Any Of filter you just designated.
Select the Match Any of filter node.
Press the Cntl key then select the Interferes (FLOWZONE) using MB1 so they are both
highlighted

Select MB3 while over the top of the selected filters and then select Match All of ...Filter

Double click the Match All of filter to see the results

415

As you can see, the Match All Of filter has narrowed down the amount of components that
are valid for both INTERNAL_PARTS and FLOWZONE filters and Match Any of filter
To say it another way "you have matched all components that directly touch the zone that
are in the Component Set".
Close all parts.

Component Scripts
Component Scripts give you a method of assigning actions to one or more Component Filters.
The actions available to you are:
Open: opens the component and adds it to the Current Component Set.
Close: removes the component from the Current Component Set and closes it if it has
not been modified or used elsewhere in the assembly.
Force Close: removes the component from the Current Component Set and
unconditionally closes it.
Blank: blanks the component.
Unblank: unblanks the component.
SetRefSet (<name>) sets the component to use the specified reference set, if it exists.
Select: add the component to the selection list.
Deselect: remove the component from the selection list
Example: You could designate and name a script that does the following:

416
"blank all components"
"unblank all components in zone A"
"change the reference sets of all components in zone A to 'body'"
By stringing together script statements, it is possible to develop a simple program to
manipulate your assembly.

Component Scripts
Using Scripts for Displaying Your Model
Here you will be introduced to using scripts for displaying different portions of your
assembly.
Continue using the part file you are working on, or open part file
advasm_total_valve_scripts.prt from the advasm/valve subdirectory.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies (if necessary).
Choose Assemblies

Advanced

from the Application toolbar or choose Application


Component Filters

Choose the Define Script icon.


The Define/Execute Script dialog appears.
Scripts can be named if you expect to perform a sequence of actions over and over.
However, you do not need to name a script in order to perform script functions.
For our display procedures, we will not initially name the scripts.
Choose Action

Blank option.

Click on <CSET>: IsIn(AllComponents) in the Filter list box.

417
Note that your selection is added to the Blank action in the Script Contents list box.

This is your first script statement. Now for your second.


Choose Action

Unblank from the action list.

Click on <CSET> : IsIn(INTERNAL_PARTS) in the Filter list box.


You now have your second script statement

Choose the Execute button.


You may have to Refresh your display.

The first statement in your script blanked all the components in your assembly then the
second statement unblanked the components that met the INTERNAL_PARTS filter (and its
other nested filter criteria).
You can use the scripting function in conjunction with the Loaded Changed Components
default component set to "refresh" your assembly by closing all components in the set, then
reopening them.
In a similar vein, you can also use scripting with the Unloaded Changed Components set
to update assembly level information that is associated with the components.
Close all parts

418

Load Options and Filters


Throughout the discussion on component filtering, the point has been made that one main use
of filtering is to customize how your assembly is loaded. This minimizes the number of
loaded components, thus saving memory.
To facilitate this, whenever an assembly is saved, component values such as component part
attributes and bounding boxes are stored in the assembly part.
With many people accessing the same virtual assembly, this means the assembly component
information could be out of date at any particular time.
If this is the case, when you execute a filter, you will be given the option of updating the
assembly component attribute and bounding box information.
Using the Load Component options in the Load Options dialog can help you make sure you
are loading the components you want and that they are the most up-to-date.

Load Options and Filters


Using Filters with Load Options
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Click on the Load Components button.


All Components: Loads all assembly components
No Components: No components are loaded
Use Last Component Set: Loads assembly with the same components
it was last saved with
Use Last Filter: Loads components based on the last filter that was
used to load the assembly (and saved)
Specify Filter: Loads components that meet the criteria of a chosen
defined filter
Set the Load Components option to Specify Filter.
You are going to load an assembly based on a filter like the one you defined as
INTERNAL_PARTS.
Choose OK to accept.
Open part file advasm_total_valve_scripts.prt from the advasm/valve subdirectory
Choose INTERNAL_PARTS from the component list and OK.

419

Only those components that meet the filter criteria of FLOW_FILTER are loaded.
The practical application of these types of loading filters is that different disciplines can
load only those components that are related to their design needs.
Also keep in mind that component sets are also filters and represent a simple form of
filtering for assembly loading.
Close all parts.

Frequently Asked Questions


At what level of an assembly does the Component Filter data get created?

All component filter data (zones, component sets, filters, scripts) is created in the
Displayed Part, regardless of the current work part. (There may be a higher level
assembly loaded above the Displayed Part)
Can component filter data be created during "bottom-up" modeling techniques (i.e.
zones that represent part envelopes are created in a part file and later that part is
added as a component to an assembly) be accessed at the assembly later?

Zones, filters and scripts can be created at the detail part level, before the part is added
as a component to an assembly. However, only zone and filter data can be accessed in
the context of the assembly. Any scripts created at the piece part level cannot be
accessed outside that piece part.

At what level of an assembly can the component filter data be accessed, or used?

All component filter data can be accessed from any level of an assembly, as long as the
level of assembly that contains the component filter data is the displayed part.

420

At what level of an assembly can the component filter data be modified?

The defining data (zone size, names, component set contents, etc.) can be accessed and
modified when working in the context of an assembly. However, the user making the
modifications to the component filter data must have write access to the part file
containing the data in order to keep the changes.
What effect does closing parts within the current assembly have on the access to
component filter data?

If a component part is closed, by definition, you do not have access to its filter data;
remember that component filter data is associated with the Displayed Part.

What zones retain associativity to the "spatial" model size?

Only the zone defined as Work Part Volume, or zones based on component names are
associative to any model updates, regarding physical dimension changes. Any other
zones or planes, whether created manually or automatically, are current only at the time
of creation, and will not update their size, location, or spacing after a change to a
component or the assembly.

Can zone definitions be modified?

Yes! An existing zone can be modified by choosing Component Filter Define Zone,
and selecting the desired zone from the listing. A box zone may be edited by changing
box lengths and/or transform. A plane zone may be edited by flipping the plane normal
direction and/or transform.

Can a "spatial" zone other than a box shape be defined?

Yes! You can define bounded plane zones, line zones and point zones: A bounded plane
zone can be defined by choosing Zone Box and defining a box shape with zero
height. This zone can be used with the Intersects With operator. (Be aware that since
this still a Box zone so the Above and Below operators will not work.) A point zone can
be created by choosing Zone Box with zero height and the same start and stop point.
This zone can be used to highlight data that Intersects With the point or Within a
tolerance zone of the point. A line zone can be created by choosing Zone Box with
zero height and a start point and stop point a given distance apart but along the same
axis, you could define a "line" that again could be used with the Intersects With or
Within operators. The box "sides" are created parallel to the current WCS orientation, so
you may have to rotate your WCS so that one of the axes falls along the direction of
your desired "line".

421

Representations
The objectives of this lesson are:
knowing why and when to use representations
learning how to create representations
learning how to use representations on a component and assembly level

Using representations of solids within an assembly model 'streamlines' the amount of data
associated with large assemblies, significantly reducing the processing overhead of loading all
the assembly data.
Creating representations generates faceted, lightweight mesh editions of assembly objects
which are fully associative to their solid object counterparts.
This means that if the parent solid is modified, its child representation is updated
automatically.

Why Use Representations?


When dealing with large assemblies of hundreds or thousands of component parts, loading
and model manipulation times can be impacted.
This is because all loading and model manipulation is being done on the mathematically
robust solids within the assembly.
Representations, being faceted subsets of the full solid geometry, alleviate the data burden of
working with a large solids-based model.
Sample Performance Improvement on 1000 Part Assembly
Load Performance
Improvement

Display Regeneration Performance


Improvement

3x

6x

Assembly Level 8 x

6x

Component
Level

Representations also relieve the data loading overhead when using Unigraphics NX
applications such as:
Clearance Analysis
Hardware Shading

422
Software Quick Shade
UG/Photo
Hidden Line Removal

Why Use Representations?


Representation Display
Solid geometry and its representations cannot be viewed at the same time.
Faceted representations are displayed only when their parent solid geometry is not displayed,
either by not being in the current reference set or by not being loaded.

The (loaded) assembly contains representations


(unloaded) of subassemblies 1 & 2

When subassembly 1 is loaded (opened or made work


part), solid bodies are displayed automatically.

The swap between representations and actual solids is transparent to the user.

Creating Representations
Representations can be created on the component level and the assembly level or both.
Your intended use for the representations will dictate how you configure your representations.
In this lesson, you will have an opportunity to practice the different approaches.
There are two basic steps to creating representations:
Identifying the solid/sheet bodies that will make up the representation.
Specifying a reference set that will hold the representations.
In this section, you will create representations on three component parts of an assembly.

423

Creating Representations
Creating Representations on the Component Level
Choose File Options Load Options and make sure the Load Components option is
set to All Components,Partial Loading is off, and Load Methods is set to From
Directory then OK.
Open part file advasm_fixed_jaw_assm.prt from the advasm/vise subdirectory.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

The Assemblies Toolbar appears.


If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

This assembly is made up of four components using three parts; one part being used twice:
1. jaw_plate
2. plate_screw (2x)
3. fixed_jaw

424

The first representation you will make will be for the fixed_jaw part.
Make fixed_jaw the work part.
In the Assembly Navigator, position the cursor over the fixed_jaw node then use
MB3 Make Work Part.
Choose Assemblies

Advanced

Representations.

The Define Representations dialog appears.

Choose Create.
The Class Selection dialog appears. You will use this dialog to specify the solid geometry on
which the representations will be based.
Choose Type.
Note that you have four types of geometry that can be specified to be representations:
Face
Solid Body
Sheet Body
Compound Face

425
We will be using the defaults.
Choose OK to accept the entries.
Choose the Select All option in the Class Selection dialog.
The fixed_jaw geometry highlights.
Choose OK to accept the selection.
The Status Line acknowledges that representations were generated.
The Reference Sets dialog also appears. This dialog gives you the ability to put the
representations into an existing reference set or designate a new one to hold them.
Key in facet in the New reference set field and Enter, then choose OK.
You now have a representation of the fixed_jaw in a reference set named facet.
Remember, because representations are associative, any change you make to the fixed_jaw
will automatically be reflected in its representation.
You can break this association by using the Disassociate option on the Define Representations
dialog.

When you disassociate a representation from its defining solid, the representation becomes a
'stand-alone' faceted object.

Remember, a representation and its defining solid cannot be displayed at the same time.
A disassociated representation (faceted object) can be displayed with the solid from which it
originated.
Normally, you would use File Save at this point to save the new reference set facet .
You can not do this because the part files in the CAST Online directory are ReadOnly.
There are master files that you will use later that reflect the work you are doing in
these temporary files.

Creating Representations
Checking Your Work
You can graphically check your facets by explicitly displaying them.

426
Choose the Display Members option from the Define Representations menu.
The Reference Sets dialog appears. You must specify which reference set you are interested
in.

Choose FACET from the list, then OK.


The fixed_jaw component displays the facets of the representation in red.

This display is transitory, it will disappear if you manipulate the graphics area in any way.
Use MB3

Refresh to dismiss the display of the facets.

More About Reference Set Conditions for Representations


To automate the reference set naming and generation process for representations, it is possible
to customize your defaults file to include a "Lightweight" default.
This is achieved by specifying a name for the following statement in the default file

427
Assemblies_FacetReferenceSet
Example:
Assemblies_FacetReferenceSet: "FACETED"
would yield a situation where all solid bodies or sheet bodies
would automatically have representations created and they
would be put into the Faceted reference set.

Lightweight is the type of Reference Set


"FACETED", is the reference set name specified in the
defaults file.
The first word, Lightweight, is how the system identifies the
model reference set. The second name is not that important.
What this means is that if you share your geometry with others,
they do NOT need to name their lightweight reference sets the
same.

Creating Representations
Information on Representations
Eventually you will encounter the situation of examining the representation parameters of
unfamiliar assemblies.
This can be done by using the Info option on the Define Representations dialog.
Choose the Info option on the Define Representations dialog.
The Available Representations dialog appears.

The list window displays the bodies, sheets and/or faces that make up the respective
representation.
When you have a large combination of faces/bodies/sheets, use the Select option to
streamline your list.
Use the Temporary Display option to display the facets of a selected entry.
Select body from the list, then OK.

428
A Information window appears enumerating the parameters used to define the selected listed
entries.
Dismiss the Information window.
How and when would you make use of representations that were defined in
components of an assembly?

Because representations are held in reference sets, certain reference set strategies can be
used with representations. For instance, you can use the Default Reference Sets option
in the Load Options dialog to control loading of specifically named representations.

Creating Representations
On Your Own: Creating the Remaining Representations
The fixed_jaw assembly contains two other parts that still do not have representations:
jaw_plate
plate_screw (2 occurrences)
Your task in this section is to repeat the representation procedure you just completed above
for the two remaining parts in the fixed_jaw assembly.
In the case of the plate_screw, you need only to create representations in one of its
occurrences.
Things to Remember:
Representations are created in the Work Part
Use the Assembly Navigator to facilitate specifying the Work Part.
Use Type option in the Class Selection dialog to make sure you specify the types of
solids you will be selecting.
Be sure to create a new reference set named facet to hold the representations of each
respective part.
Close all parts when finished.

Using Representations
There are different ways you can set up representation schemes in your assembly depending
on your design needs.
Of course there can be many different permutations of configuring your representations; two
will be addressed here:
Using Component Level Representations

429
Using Assembly Level Representations

Using Representations
Using Component Level Representations
In the assembly you are about to use, we have defined two references sets for you:
FACET: which holds representation data.
EXACT: which holds the exact solid model data.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Select the Default Reference Sets option.


Key in exact in the New Reference Set field, then Enter.
Next, key in facet in the New Reference Set field, Enter.
This load option scheme creates a loading hierarchy where the model is first checked for
FACET reference sets, if found, they are loaded; if not, the model is checked for EXACT
reference sets, if found, they are loaded.

OK the dialog.
Open advasm_vise_assm_comp_rep.prt from the vise directory.

The assembly was loaded using FACET as the first default reference set. Where it could not
find a FACET reference set (fixed_jaw_assm) to load, it loaded the EXACT reference set.

430
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Update Report.

The components loaded with an EXACT reference set do not have a FACET reference set to
load.
This information is also shown in the Assembly Navigator, Reference Set column:

Why are the jaw_plate and the plate_screw of the advasm_moving_jaw assembly
"Excluded"?

431
The jaw_plate and the two plate_screws were excluded because their parent assembly,
the moving_jaw_assm, had a FACET reference set but they did not. The component's
EXACT reference sets did not come into play because their parent assembly's FACET
reference set interrupted the search.

But why were the same jaw_plate and the plate_screws in the fixed_jaw_assm loaded
with no problem?

The jaw_plate and the two plate_screws of the fixed_jaw_assm do have EXACT
reference sets, as does its parent assembly, the fixed_jaw_assm.
At any time, you can check the reference set make-up by invoking an assemblies report.
Dismiss the Information window.
Close all parts.

Using Representations
Using Assembly Level Representations
Just as you created representations on the component level, you can also create
representations on the assembly level that refer to the components of the assembly.

432
A variation on this theme is utilizing the Master Model approach with representations.
The Master Model and Representations
In the Master Model scenario, a new file is created that holds the representations of the master
model (it is a component of the highest level file).

Even though you can not file any parts in the CAST directory, you will be taken through the
procedure for practice, using master files when necessary.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Click Default Reference Sets then select Entire Part from the list.
Click Move Up until the Entire Part reference set is at the top of the list, then OK.
Create a new inch file called vise_assm_rep_xxx, where xxx are your initials.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or chooseApplication

Choose the Add Existing Component icon


Assemblies Components Add Existing.

on the Assemblies toolbar or choose

Add the Master Model, in this case advasm_vise_assm, as a component to your new file.
Utilize the Select Part dialog to select advasm_vise_assm.
Make sure Layer options is set to Work, then OK the Add Existing Part dialog.
Accept the defaults of the Point Constructor dialog.
Use MB3 Replace View
centered in the display.

TFR-TRI to get your display into a trimetric view and

433

Using Representations
Representation Parameters
Unigraphics NX sets the initial facet-to-solid tolerances based on the size of the body being
faceted.
You can override the initial representation parameters manually. You may want to do this if:
you expect to use the faceted model for clearance analysis at some point
you want to generate representations for assemblies with many components
Choose Assemblies

Advanced

Representations.

Choose the Parameters option on the Define Representations dialog.


The two areas in the Edit Parameters dialog we are concerned with here are Specify Surface
Tolerance and Specify Curve Tolerance.

Click the Specify Surface Tolerance and Specify Curve Tolerance options on.
When these options are on, the tolerance values are relative to the size of the Displayed Part
within the graphics area. These system-generated tolerances can be manually adjusted.
Choose OK to accept the parameters.
Choose Create from the Define Representations dialog.
Choose Type from the Class Selection dialog and make sure all types are highlighted.

Choose OK.

434
The reason you want all types is that in any given assembly, you may not know how certain
components were modeled.
Use Select All to highlight all geometry, then choose OK.
Enter all_reps as the new reference set name, then choose OK.
Representations have been made in your new file that reference the Master Model,
advasm_vise_assm.
Normally, at this point you would save your new model that holds the representations.
Since you don't have Write access to the CAST directory, you will continue the
practice using master files that represent the work you've done so far.
Now you will see how using this Master Model approach to representations can help you
work with large or extremely large assemblies.
Close all parts.

Using Representations
Load Options and Display
At this point, imagine that the vise assembly is a very large assembly and that you must both
see the whole assembly and be able to work-in-context with parts of it.
Using Load Options and the Assembly Navigator together, this is easy.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Set the Load Component option to No Components, then OK.


Open file vise_assm_rep_xxx (this emulates the file you created, i.e. it has the Master
Model as a component and representations of its components).
Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Be aware of a couple things at this point:


No components of the highest level assembly are loaded (see Assembly Navigator).
This makes for fast loading of the top assembly.
You still can see the whole assembly and manipulate it visually.
If you want to work on a particular subassembly and its parts, you can quickly do this with
help from the Assembly Navigator.

435
With the cursor over the advasm_guide_handle_assm node, use MB3
Assembly to open (and load) the components of the subassembly.

Open

With this representation strategy, you can selectively open and close (load and unload)
components as you need to work on them.
Referencing the Master Model is a great way to use representations, however there are pros
and cons.
Positives

Negatives

Rapid part file retrieval / Component parts aren't loaded; component operations not available.
display.
Good for designing-incontext using total
assembly.
Very quick and easy to
create representations.
Allows non-owning user
to create and use
representations.
Close all part files.

Frequently Asked Questions


Does having representations in my model increase its size?

Yes, having representations in your model will increase your model size considerably.
Are there any "rules of thumb" for when to manually change surface and curve
tolerances?

One might be that when you are dealing with free form surfaces, you decrease the
tolerances so that there is a closer match between the facets and the actual free form
surface.
Can representations be edited in any other way than manually overriding the
surface/curve tolerances?

Yes. Within the Edit Parameters dialog, you can specify how many edges each facet will
have (the default is 3); you can specify a `double precision' representation, or you can

436
specify a maximum facet size. In addition, you can use Edit
the color of representations.

Object Display to change

Are there any "rules of thumb" for organizing representations?

There are, of course, many possible organizing schemes that you could use; here are a
couple of ideas.
Use descriptive names for your representation reference sets so that their function is
obvious (e.g. "facet" vs. "exact").
Put representations on designated layers within a model per enterprise-wide standards.
This way designers will know where to look for representations on unfamiliar
assemblies.

437

Promotion of Bodies
The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding promotion terminology
understanding the relationship between promoted bodies and assembly level
features
understanding how promotions work on different levels within an assembly
understanding the interaction between edited components and promotions
to introduce you to some promotion tips and techniques

Using Promotions
Important Note
You will be unable to complete this section unless the resource control parameter
Assemblies_AllowPromotions is set to "yes" in your UG_english.def file. If you have
problems see your system administrator.
A promoted body is a body of an assembly component that has been changed in a way that
features can be added to it within the assembly, without effecting the component part.
Once you promote a body into the assembly, you can work on that geometry as if you created
it within that work part. Remember that the work part must be the assembly.

When a component is promoted, a copy is made of the original body and placed in the
assembly part. Assembly level features are then added to it from within the assembly. When a
change is made to the base body (the original body), it is recopied and updated into the
assembly.

438
Because these features reside in the work part (assembly), not the component part, they are
referred to as assembly level features.

Promotions Terminology
There are several new terms that need to be defined before you continue:
The Promoted Body is the body within the assembly that has been promoted.
The Base Body is the original body within the component part file.
The Base Component is the component from which a least one body has been
promoted.
It is important to remember that it is not the component that is being promoted, it is the body
within that component.
If a single component has more than one body in it, each of those bodies would need to be
promoted separately.

Promotions Terminology
Using Promoted Bodies
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part advasm_mold_part.prt from the advasm/mold directory.


The mold part is displayed.

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies (if necessary).
The Assemblies Toolbar appears.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

439
If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.

Design Intent
In this activity, you will use promoted bodies and assembly level features to create the mold
that would be used to create this part. The mold will be fully associative to the part, when the
parameters of the part are modified the mold cavity and core will also update.
Create a new inch part called advasm_mold_cavity.prt.
Choose MB3

Orient View

Trimetric.

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

Add the component advasm_mold_block.prt to the origin of the assembly.

Choose the Add Existing Component icon


or Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose the Choose Part File option on the Select Part dialog.
Choose advasm_mold_block.prt from the list, then OK.
Set the layer to Work then OK the parameters in the Add Existing Part dialog.
Make sure the coordinates of the Base Point are 0,0,0, then OK the Point
Constructor dialog.
Cancel the Add Existing Part dialog.

440

Use MB3

Fit to fill the component in the graphics area.

Add the advasm_mold_part component to the origin of the assembly.


Choose the Add Existing Component icon
or Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose advasm_mold_part.prt from the list, then OK.
OK the default parameters in the Add Existing Part dialog.
Make sure the coordinates of the Base Point are 0,0,0, then OK the Point
Constructor dialog.
Cancel the Select Part dialog.
Use MB3

Fit to fill the component in the graphics area.

441

Promotions Terminology
Establishing Mating Conditions
Establish an Align mating condition between the CSYS of the part and the CSYS of the
block.
Choose the Mate Component icon
Components Mate Component.
Choose the Align icon
Set Filter to CSYS.
Choose the Part CSYS.

or choose Assemblies

as the mating condition.

Choose the Block CSYS.

442
Choose Apply.

Because Mating Conditions cannot reference geometry created from assembly level
features, it is a good idea to perform all mating conditions prior to promoting any
bodies.

Promotions Terminology
Create Mold Cavity
Now that the block and part are positioned correctly, the next step is to promote them so they
can be worked on at the assembly level without affecting the geometry in the component part
file.
Choose the Modeling icon
Modeling (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Choose the Promote Body icon

or choose Insert

Feature Operation

Promote.

The Promote Body dialog is displayed and you are prompted to select the bodies to be
promoted.
Choose the part and the block from the graphics area, choose OK.
Notice that the Status line confirms that two bodies have been promoted.
Cancel the Promote Body dialog.
The next step of this lesson is to use the outer surfaces of the cone-shaped body to remove the
same volume of material from the block.

443
This process will create the cavity of the mold, and will keep its associativity with respect to
the component part file. The promotion of these bodies are what makes this possible.
Before you continue, use the Assembly Navigator to change the Reference Set of both
components to Body.
With the cursor over one of the components, use MB3
Set BODY.
Repeat for second component.

Choose the Trim Body icon

or choose Insert

Replace Reference

Feature Operation

Trim.

The Trim Body dialog is displayed and you are prompted to select the body to be trimmed.
Choose the block for the target body, then choose OK to accept.

Next, you are prompted to select the faces for the Trim Body operation.
Choose the bottom flat face of the cone for the first face, then OK.

444
The face is highlighted and a direction vector is displayed.
Choose the outside conical face for the second face.

Choose OK to signal that you are done selecting faces.


Notice there are two direction vectors displayed in the graphics area. These vectors are used
to indicate which side the material will be removed from.
To create the bottom half of this mold, you need to remove the material from the inside of the
cone, not the outside as currently indicated by the direction of the arrows.
Choose Reverse Default Direction to complete the operation.
Choose Cancel to dismiss the Trim Body dialog.
In order for this assembly to retain its associativity to the part component, the component link
needs to stay intact. However, the part geometry should be removed from the display to avoid
confusion.
Set the reference set of the component advasm_mold_part to Empty.
The mold cavity has been created.

445

Promotions Terminology
Review of Assembly Level Features
Up to this point you have created an assembly with two components. After these bodies were
promoted, you were able to work with them just as if you were working in the component part
file.
Keep in mind that all work done on these bodies within the assembly (i.e. the assembly as the
work part) is stored in the assembly part file, it is not reflected back to the component part
file.

From the Assembly Navigator make advasm_mold_block the displayed part.


Notice that this part file remains unmodified. This is because the Trim Body operation took
place at the assembly level, and the data for that operation is stored in the assembly part file.

446

Change the displayed part back to the assembly by choosing MB3


advasm_mold_cavity from the Assembly Navigator.

Display Parent

Promotions Terminology
Creating the Mold Core
Next you will continue using promoted bodies and assembly level features to create the mold
core.
Use File New from the pull-down menu to create a new part file called
advasm_mold_core.prt.
A new part file is created. This part will serve as an assembly for the top half of the mold.
Change the view to TFR-TRI.
Follow the same procedures as before to add the block and cone part to the new assembly.

Once again, establish an Align Mating condition between the Csys of the part and the
block.

447

With the block and part positioned correctly, the next step is to promote the two components.
Use the Assembly Navigator to change the Reference Set of both components to Body.
With the cursor one of the components and use MB3
Set BODY.
Repeat for second component.

Choose the Promote Body icon.

or choose Insert

Replace Reference

Feature Operation

Promote.

The Promote Body dialog is displayed and you are again prompted to select the bodies to be
promoted.
Choose the two solid bodies from the graphics area, choose OK.
Once again the Status line confirms that two bodies have been promoted.
Cancel the Promote Body dialog.
With the components positioned correctly and the bodies promoted, you can now perform the
trim operation on the block.
Choose the Trim Body icon

or choose Insert

Feature Operation

You are next prompted to select the body to be trimmed.


Choose the block for the target body, then choose OK to accept.

Trim.

448

Next, you are prompted to select the face or datum plane for the Trim Body operation.
Choose the bottom flat face of the inside of the cone for the first face, then OK.

The face is highlighted and a direction vector is displayed.


Choose the inside conical face for the second face, then Accept.

Choose OK to signal that you are done selecting faces.

449
To create the top half of this mold, you need to remove the material from the outside of the
cone, not the inside as currently indicated by the direction of the arrows.
Choose Reverse Default Direction to complete the operation.

Choose Cancel to dismiss the Trim Body dialog.


Set the reference set of the component amd_mold_part to Empty.

Promotions Terminology
Completing the Mold
In order to complete this part of the mold you will next need to add both the bottom and top
parts of the mold to a single assembly.
Create a new part file called advasm_mold_assm.prt.
Using Assemblies Components Add Existing, add both assemblies you just created:
mold_coremold_cavity as components to the new part. Place them both at the origin
(0,0,0) of the assembly. Change the view to TFR-TRI.

450

The two subassemblies should be positioned correctly within the assembly. You could
have also mated the components using edges created on the promoted bodies.
Now complete the top part of the mold.
Make advasm_mold_core the work part.
Choose the Block icon

or choose Insert

Choose the Height, Two Points

Form Feature

Block.

icon.

Key in 2 for the Height (ZC) then OK to accept.


Choose Unite

from the bottom of the block dialog.

The Point Constructor dialog is displayed and you are next prompted to select two points for
the operation.
Choose these two points.

You are next prompted for the boolean operation to be used.


Choose the inside cone for the Target solid.

451

Choose OK.
The block is created and united to the existing geometry.

Change the work part back to advasm_mold_assm.

Promoted Bodies at Multiple Levels Within an


Assembly
When using promoted bodies, you can promote the same solid at different levels within the
assembly. At each of these levels you can add more assembly level features to the promoted
solid.
The information for these features is stored in the assembly file at each level.

452

Because the work part is the mold assembly and these solids have not yet been promoted at
this level, you will not be able to add any features to these bodies until they are promoted.
Choose the Promote Body icon.

or choose Insert

Feature Operation

Promote.

The Promote Body dialog is displayed and you are prompted to select the bodies to be
promoted.
Choose the mold core solid from the graphics area, and Accept.

Choose OK to continue.
Notice that the Status line confirms that one solid body has been promoted.
Choose Cancel.
To actually complete this mold you would also need to promote the mold cavity. For
this activity you will only be working on the mold core.

453

Promoted Bodies at Multiple Levels Within an Assembly


Adding Assembly Level Features
With the solid now promoted you can now add assembly level features to this assembly.
Creating the First Holes
Choose the Hole icon

or choose Insert

Form Feature

Hole.

You are next prompted for the planar placement face for the hole.
Choose the top face of the mold core in the location shown below, then Accept (stay close
to the back left edge).

Choose the bottom face of the core solid as shown for the thru face.

Key in .25 for the diameter.


Select OK to accept all the values.
The Positioning Method dialog is now displayed so you can position the hole on the face.

454

Promoted Bodies at Multiple Levels Within an Assembly


Positioning Features (1)
Choose the Horizontal icon.
Choose the specified line as the Horizontal Reference.

Next, you are prompted for the target edge.


Choose the curve for the target edge.

Choose Tangent point.


Key in .25 for the distance from the tangent point of the edge to the center of the hole
feature. Do not hit enter.
Choose the Vertical icon

from the Positioning Method dialog.

Once again, choose the curve for the target edge.

455

Choose Arc Center for the arc point.


Key in 0 for the expression value.
The operation is completed and the hole feature is added to the solid.

Choose Cancel.

Promoted Bodies at Multiple Levels Within an Assembly


Instancing the Feature
Next, you will create an instance of this hole feature.
Choose the Instance Feature icon
Instance.

or choose Insert

Feature Operation

Choose Circular Array.


Choose the simple hole from the list, then choose OK.
The hole feature you just created is highlighted, and you are prompted to key in the
parameters for the array.
From the Enter Parameters dialog, key in 2 for the Number and 180 for the Angle, choose

456
OK.
Next you are prompted to select a rotation axis for the circular instance array.
Choose Point & Direction.
Choose +ZC for the rotation Axis.
Next define a reference point for the operation.
Choose the arc center of the arc below, then Accept.

Choose Yes to create the instance.


Cancel the Feature Selection dialog.
The array is created and the hole instance is added to the part.

457

Promoted Bodies at Multiple Levels Within an Assembly


Creating More Features
You will next create another hole feature on the top of the mold core, then you will create
another instance array of that hole.
Choose the Hole icon

or choose Insert

Choose Counterbore

to create a Counterbore.

Form Feature

Hole.

Choose the top face of the mold core in the location shown below, then Accept.

Choose the bottom face of the core solid as shown for the thru face.

The Enter Parameters dialog is displayed.


Key in 1 for the C-Bore Diameter, .375 for the C-Bore Depth, and .5 for the Hole Diameter
and OK.
The Positioning Method dialog is now displayed

458

Promoted Bodies at Multiple Levels Within an Assembly


Positioning Features (2)
Choose the Horizontal icon.
Choose the edge shown below as the Horizontal Reference, then choose Accept.

You are next prompted to select the target edge for the horizontal dimension.
Choose the edge shown.

The Edit Expression dialog is displayed so you can edit the value of the dimension.
Key in 1.5 for the expression value and OK.
The Positioning Method dialog is again displayed.
Choose the Vertical icon

from the Positioning Method dialog.

You are next prompted to select the target edge for the Vertical dimension.
Choose the edge shown.

459

Key in 1.5 for the positioning dimension value.


The hole is added to the part.

Create a Circular Instance Array using the Counter bored hole you just created. Create the
array the same way you did previously except this time set the Number of instances to 4
and the Angle to 90.
When the instance array is completed the part should look like the following.

460

Editing the Mold


This mold had been created in a way that will allow you to edit the part and have the entire
mold update to reflect these edits.
Use the Assembly Navigator to change the Reference Set of one of the
advassm_mold_part to Entire Part.
Make that advassm_mold_part the Work Part.

Next you will edit the sketch.


Choose the Sketch icon

or choose Insert

Sketch.

Select SKETCH_000 from the pull-down


The dimensions are displayed on the sketch.
Double-click on the angular dimension p11 in the graphics area.

This brings up the Dynamic Input Box

461

Double-click in the value area of the Dynamic Input Box


Key in 110 for the new value then Enter.
Choose the Finish icon

Notice that not only is the mold part updated, but the entire assembly is also updated
including the Trim Body operations that were used to create the cavity and core.
Close all parts when completed.

Tips and Techniques


There are a few things to remember when working with promotions:
If several promoted bodies are booleaned together in an assembly, if you delete one
promotion all will be deleted.
When deleting a promotion, make sure all assemblies referencing that promotion are fully
loaded.
There are several ways to delete a promoted body:
Use Edit Delete from the menu bar.
Use the Remove Component operation.
Delete the base body from the component part file.
It is a good idea not have other solid bodies in an assembly with a promoted body. The main
problem with this is that you will be unable to add mating conditions between the promoted
body and the solid body of the assembly. To solve this problem push the solid down into a
component.
You should not use design in context to edit a promoted body, because, while the assembly is
the displayed part the promoted body is displayed (copy), not the base body.

462

Weight Management
The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding how weight management works on piece parts
understanding the role of part level caching
understanding how weight management works in assemblies
understanding the concept of weight caching
learning how to define weight exceptions and weight assertions
understanding the relationship between weight attributes and component filtering

Weight Management lets you calculate, display and manage the mass properties of component
parts within large assemblies. You can control component properties even though some
assembly data is not available. The functionality of Weight Management addresses the
following:
using the solids in component parts to calculate the mass properties of an entire large
assembly
calculating the mass properties of assembly components without having to have those
components loaded
managing weight properties even though the actual geometry of any given part is not
available
defining a weight envelope that warns you if the envelope is being exceeded
caching weight data which yields performance gains on very large assemblies
The Weight Management functionality works as a complement to the other Mass functions
available under the Analysis menu option.

Weight Management on Piece Parts


At the lowest level, you can use Weight Management on the piece parts that make up an
assembly. The default is that weight properties will be calculated for all solids within a given
part.
Use File Options Load Options to turn Use Partial Loading on, and set Load
Methods to From Directory, then OK.
Open advasm_total_valve_assm.prt from the valve directory.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.
The Assemblies Toolbar appears.

on the Application toolbar or choose Application

463
If you do not see the Assemblies toolbar, it is turned off and must be turned on. Choose
View Toolbars Customize then choose the Toolbars tab and turn the Assemblies
switch on.
Open the Assembly Navigator, and expand all subassemblies.

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose the Expand All icon
Expand All.

or choose Tools

Assembly Navigator

Make shaft.prt the Work Part.

Choose Analysis

Assembly Weight Management from the main menu.

The Weight Management dialog appears. First, you will do a quick weight calculation as a
point of reference.

Work Part: Calculates total weight props of work part.


Data is saved on work part (some as part attributes).
Choose the Work Part option (top) on the Weight Management
dialog.
The Information window displays the results of the calculation. Note that the listing consists
of the following:

464
Units of measure used.

Center of Mass

Accuracy used (.99 is default). Moments of Inertia (Work: relative to WCS)


Density

Moments of Inertia (Centroidal: about the center of mass)

Area
Volume
Mass
First Moments

Moments of Inertia (Spherical)


Products of Inertia: Work and Centroidal
Radii of Gyration: Work, Centroidal, Spherical
Principal Axes

Data uses WCS coordinates and the origin of the current Displayed Part.
Be aware that all solids within a piece part are included in weight calculations. These include:
Blanked solids.
Solids on invisible layers.
Weight Management works on solids only; sheet bodies or any other type of objects are not
supported.
Dismiss the Information window.

Weight Management on Piece Parts


Part Level Caching
Once weight properties are calculated, they are cached with the part for later use.
If the piece part solids used for weight calculations are changed at a later date, the data is
deleted.
If I am a designer of piece parts and I change the solids on my part, how can I ensure
that the most current solids data of my part is available to an assembly in which my part
is used?

You can ensure that the solids data needed for an assembly level weight analysis is
available by turning on the Save Options switch Generate Weight Data.
File Options Save Options:

465
This way, whenever your part is used as a component within an assembly, that
assembly will have the correct solids data it needs.

Weight Management on Piece Parts


Reference Sets and Piece Parts
As mentioned earlier, all solids of a part are included in a weight calculation including
blanked solids and invisible ones on different layers.
On the piece part level, reference sets can be designated to isolate only those solids within a
piece part that are to be used in any weight calculations.

Once designated, only solids of the ref. set contribute to weight properties of that part.

Weight Management in Assemblies


Just as you can calculate weight properties on the piece part level, you can also calculate
weight properties on the assembly level. In this case, you will check error information during
the analysis.
Make subassy_intprts.prt the Work Part.

466

Set the Give Error Information option on in the Weight Management dialog.
Choose the Work Part (Calculation) option on the Weight Management dialog.
Scroll to the bottom of the Information window.
Because you turned on Give Error Information, estimated errors are enumerated.

Error information is always generated, the Give Error Information function just displays it.
Dismiss the Information window.
In the calculation you just ran (on the assembly), the system did two things:
it calculated weight properties for six of the components of the subassembly
it added in the previous values cached with the shaft
If an assembly has components which already have weight properties cached (from weight
calculation done on the piece part level), then the component data contributes to the total sum
of all other components within the assembly.

467

Weight Management in Assemblies


Addressing Individual Components
Within an assembly, you have the ability to selectively address components for weight
property calculations.
This can be done using two basic approaches:
select components individually
use Component Sets to associate components together
In this section, you are interested only in the weight properties of the components that are
attached to the shaft within the subassembly:

You can easily isolate them for a weight analysis run using the Selected Components facility.
The Weight Management dialog should still be displayed

468
Choose the Selected Components (Calculation) option.

In the Component Selection dialog, select the following components (in conjunction with
the Ctrl key), then OK.
shaft_bolt
valve

The weight analysis is run automatically and the Information window is displayed.
Note that the listing begins with the number of contributing components, with their
component names and part names listed.

The weight properties follow.


Dismiss the Information window.

Weight Management in Assemblies


Weight Caching
If subassemblies are saved after a weight analysis, the weight data is cached with the
subassembly, not its components.

469

You now have cached weight properties for the shaft and subassy_intprts (shaft_bolts and
valve), which in turn will be used in any subsequent analyses involving these components.

Weight Management in Assemblies


Component Level Caching/Unloaded Components
When considering the loading of assemblies, there will occur variations of possible loading
scenarios, for example:
one or more of the components of an assembly is not available for loading
only certain reference sets might be loaded, so certain solids within a component may
not be loaded
an assembly might be loaded with none of its components being loaded
If you want to calculate the weight properties of an assembly, including the properties of
unloaded components, you can read the weight data from the components themselves.
When a component part with calculated weight properties (which are cached with the part) is
closed or saved, those properties are stored (cached) on components of part AND on owning
assembly.

Now when the assembly is loaded, but a component is not loaded or is not available, the
component's weight properties are still available to the owning assembly for inclusion in its
weight calculations.

470
This assembly level cache is removed if the component part is changed in such a manner that
might affect its weight properties i.e. removal of contributing solids.
There is the risk that the weight properties of unloaded component parts may change.
The Update Structure option copies weight properties from unloaded component parts
to their assembly component counterparts.

Weight Management in Assemblies


Using Exceptions with Unloaded Components
You will now see an example of how this works. First you must reset the work part and
component set designation.
Using the Assembly Navigator, make advasm_total_valve_assm the Work Part.
On the Weight Management dialog, choose the Set Component Set option.
Select All Components from the Select Component Set dialog, then OK.
You will run an analysis so you have some base weight data to compare.
Choose the Work Part (under Calculation) option on the Weight Management dialog.
Notice the WARNING at the top of the listing that certain components did not have the
necessary solids loaded, so they were not included in the overall calculation.
WARNING: some components did not have necessary solids loaded and had no
suitable cached data, and hence could not contribute to the calculation. See end of
listing for details.
Scroll down to the end of the listing.
The following components did not have necessary solids loaded and had no suitable
cached data, and hence could not contribute to the calculation:
Component RODEND (part rodend.prt)
Component HOUSING (part housing.prt)
Component PIPE2 (part pipe2.prt)
Component PIPE1 (part pipe1.prt)
This notice is called an exception; a special case that arises that impacts weight property
calculations.
Dismiss the Information window.

471

Weight Management in Assemblies


Exceptions
If necessary, turn on the Weight Status column in the Assembly Navigator and notice that the
components mentioned above (and their parent assemblies) have a question mark by their
listing.

In this case, several of the necessary components were not loaded. You have several options
to correct this situation:
Open the components in question, then recalculate.
If the components are so large that loading them would cause memory problems, each
part can be made the Work Part, then calculate the weight properties respectively (data
is cached with the parts) and close the parts. The cached data is now available to
higher level assemblies.
Close the assembly, then load each respective component in question, calculate its
weight properties then save it. Reload the assembly and use the Update Structure
option on the Weight Management dialog.
Use an assertion on the unloaded part. (assertions are discussed in the next section)
In this case, you will use the first option.
Using the Assembly Navigator, Open
rodend respectively.

Component Fully for pipe1, pipe2, housing and

Choose the Work Part (under Calculation) option on the Weight Management dialog
again.
Notice this time, there are no exceptions and the symbology in the Assembly Navigator also
reflects this.

472
Dismiss the Information window.
More About: Weight Management Exceptions
When exceptions are noted during weight calculations, the exception is noted in the
Information window and the calculation continues.
There are four basic exceptions:
Component is not loaded and does not have cached data. Calculation continues
without it; if it has child components that are loaded or have cached data, they are
included in the calculation.
Component is partially loaded and does not have cached data. Calculation continues
without it; if it has child components that are loaded or have cached data, they are
included in the calculation.
Component defines its weight properties with a reference set, but the reference set in
not currently defined. Calculation continues as if no reference set had been specified.
Component defines its weight properties via a component set which is not present in
the part. Calculation continues as if no component set had been specified.

Weight Management in Assemblies


Assertions
Assertions were mentioned as one means of dealing with exceptions within a calculation of
weight properties.
Basically, assertions have two modes:
as a means of assigning weight characteristics to piece parts
as a means of assigning weight characteristics to components of an assembly which
are unavailable or incomplete
The main difference between the two modes is when an assertion is made on a part, all
components using that part will assume the asserted properties.

473
In contrast, when an assertion is applied to a component, the properties of that assertion are
valid only for that component, even if there are other components of the same part in the
assembly (or any other assemblies for that matter).

As you can see, component property assertions would be a good way of assigning different
properties to the same component, used in different places.
Example: The same bolt component is used many times in an assembly, but in some places,
the bolt has the properties of mild steel asserted and in others, the properties of hardened steel
asserted.
Since I can make assertions on both the part and component, is it possible to have one
set of properties asserted on the piece part level and another set of properties asserted
on a component that represents the piece part?

Yes. In such a case, the component assertion overrides the piece part assertion. But, the
part assertion is still used for the part itself, and in any components that include the part.

474

Weight Management in Assemblies


Data That Can Be Asserted
The data that can be asserted onto a part is a subset of the data that is used for a regular
calculation:
Any two of Density, Mass and Volume (It is also possible to assert Mass only, leaving
Density and Volume "Unknown".)
Surface Area
Centroidal Center of Mass
Centroidal Moments and Products of Inertia
This subset acts upon other data in the assembly and affects the returned data.
Assertions are good to use for "what if...?" situations, for instance, you may want to assert
densities of different materials for the same part to see the overall effect on weight for an
assembly.

Weight Management in Assemblies


Designating Assertions
For an example of how assertions work, you will make three assertions, asserting the density
of brass for the two pipes and housing.

In the Assert Values section of the Weight Management dialog, choose Selected

475
Components.
In the Component Selection dialog, select housing, then OK.
In the top part of the Assert Values dialog are four radio options.

Because assertions use the formula m = v x d (mass = volume x density) to determine


relationships, you could set any two out of the three and the third value will be extrapolated
from the two known values.
Notice there are a lot of "unknowns" in terms of data in the dialog fields.
Since there are weight properties cached for the housing (from the first analysis), you can use
those to fill in the blanks.
Choose the Copy Values from Component option on the lower part of the dialog.
Select housing, in the Copy Values From Component dialog, then OK.
The Assert Values dialog is updated with the cached weight properties of the housing.
Choose the Density and Volume switch.
The Density and Volume fields become available directly below the options. The default
value for Density is .2829.
Key in .3087 for the density of brass in the Density field, then OK.
The Component Selection dialog returns, letting you make further assertions.
Select pipe1 from the list, then OK.
Notice that the dialog remembers your input for housing, i.e. .3087
OK the input value (for density).
Select pipe2 from the list, then OK.
OK the input value (for density).
Choose Cancel on the Component Selection dialog to dismiss it.
Notice in the Assembly Navigator that you get an Asserted Weight symbol:

476

Now you will recalculate the weight properties on the total assembly.
Choose Work Part (Calculation) on the Weight Management dialog.
Scroll to the end of the Information window.
Notice that at the end of the info page, you got some assertion messages:

You can use assertions for a number of other situations:


Dismiss the Information window.
Cancel the dialog but leave the part open.
Examples of Use of Assertions

Example 1
In a situation where an assembly component is so complex that loading it into the
assembly would cause performance problems.
Complex component loading scenario:
Problem: Complex component causes performance problems when loaded with larger
assembly.
Solution: Load component separately,
calculate weight,
assert weight,
Component's solids can then be simplified / suppressed without affecting weight calculations
on assemblies containing the component.

477

Example 2
Within a concurrent engineering scenario, a part used in an assembly might not be
ready in its entirety. A placeholder component part, with the proper weight properties,
could be added to the assembly:
Concurrent engineering scenario: A place holder component representing an unfinished part is
added to an assembly with asserted weight properties.

Example 3
In a situation where certain component parts are proprietary to an outside vendor and
only certain information regarding the part is available.
Multi-vendor engineering scenario: Proprietary vendor part with only limited data available,
e.g. outer envelope only. Vendor supplied weight is asserted.

478

Weight Management in Assemblies


Assertion Hierarchy in Assemblies
If assertions are made on subassemblies, the values are assessed to be for the entire
subassembly.
Any calculation, when it comes to the asserted subassembly, will not look at any of the
children of the subassembly.

Weight Attributes and Component Filtering


One of the benefits of the weight management functionality is the ability to interface with
component filters via special attributes that are generated through using the Weight
Management functionality.
Since weight properties are cached with parts and/or components, these values can be used as
criteria for filtering processes.
Be sure to check the Filtering lesson in the Assembly Modeling course and the Component
Filtering lesson in this CAST Advanced Assembly Modeling course for more in-depth
information on component filters and how to make best use of them.

Weight Attributes and Component Filtering


Weight Attributes
Whenever weight properties are calculated, certain of these properties are stored with the
part/component as attributes, and can be accessed as such through the Define Filter dialog:
Choose Assemblies

Advanced

Component Filters.

479

Choose the Define Filter icon.


Choose the Attribute option.
Note the last five system ($) attributes in the list.

These attributes are for use with component filtering only. They will not appear in any Part
Attribute listing accessed using MB3 Properties.

Weight Attributes and Component Filtering


Weight Attribute Considerations
There are several subtle, yet important issues relating to these attributes that you need to be
aware of:
First, these five attributes are not automatically present in a part or component; they
become resident once a weight calculation is run.
These attributes are deleted from any part or component if changes to the
part/component make them unreliable, or if one of the properties is asserted to be
unknown.
The only way you can modify these attributes is to explicitly make an assertion that
overrides the original value.
The five attributes store only the contribution to the weight properties of an assembly
from the solids in the assembly itself. Contributions from components are ignored.
The units of measure of the attributes are those of the part involved in the component
filtering operation (the Displayed Part).

Weight Attributes and Component Filtering


Using Weight Limits
Within Weight Management you have the ability to set weight limits. This may be desirable
when you know that a certain part or component cannot exceed a certain maximum (or
minimum) weight (mass).

480
If any weight limits are exceeded it will be noted in the Information listing of that analysis.
In this section you will see how this works first on the part level and then on the component
level.
Cancel any remaining dialogs if necessary.
Make the shaft the Work Part.
First you will run a standard analysis to get a baseline weight for the shaft.
Choose Analysis

Assembly Weight Management from the main menu.

Choose Work Part (under Calculation) at the top of the Weight Management dialog.
The data you are interested in is the Mass value.

Now, you know that the weight (mass) of the shaft is .21836. You will set an arbitrary
maximum limit so as to violate the current weight.
Dismiss the Information window.
Choose Work Part (Set and Clear Weight Limits) option at the bottom of the Weight
Management dialog.
The Weight Limits dialog appears.

Key in .2 in the Maximum entry field, then OK.


Both Minimum and Maximum entries must be greater than 0. Once any values are entered,
they are used for the entire session and used until explicitly changed.
Notice in the Assembly Navigator that you get an Outside Weight Limits symbol:

481

Choose Work Part (Calculation) at the top of the Weight Management dialog.
In the Information window, an exception is noted:

If you scroll to the end of the listing, the parts that violated the weight limits are specified.
Close all part files.

482

Interpart Expressions
The objectives of this lesson are:
understanding the different types of interpart expressions
learning to create overriding expressions
learning to create referencing expressions
learning how IPEs work with load options
promoting recommended practices

General Concepts
Important Note
You will be unable to complete this section unless the resource control parameter
Assemblies_AllowInterpart is set to "yes" in your UG_english.def file. If you have problems
see your system administrator.
Interpart Expressions (IPEs) allow the user to establish relationships between expressions in
separate part files.
A change to an expression in one part file may affect a change to an expression in a separate
part file, thus altering the geometry of that part.
For example, you can use interpart expressions to constrain a hole in part A so that its
diameter is always linked to the pin diameter in part B.
You might create an expression like this in the assembly file where they are used:
A::dia=B::dia + tol
Thereby creating a link between the two expressions.
The result being, when either the expression "dia" in part B or" tol" in the assembly file are
changed, the hole diameter in part A automatically changes in the assembly.

Types of Interpart Expressions


Interpart expressions can be created in two different forms:
Overriding Expressions

483
Referencing Expressions
Overriding Expressions
Overriding expressions are expressions with an interpart link on the left side of the expression
equation (part_a::length=1).
The expression being overridden will be locked (a "!" is placed in the expression) which
means that it can only be edited from the expression which is overriding it.

Overriding expressions can be created in an assembly only. It is recommended that


when associating overriding expressions, the relationship should be top-to-bottom or
bottom-to-top; not component to component.

Types of Interpart Expressions


Referencing Expressions

Referencing expressions are used to reference an expression from one part to an expression in
another part. With this kind of interpart expression, the interpart link is found on the right side
of the equation (dia=B::dia).
This means that the value of one expression will depend on the value of an expression in
another part.
There are two ways that referencing expressions can be used.

484

Creating Overriding Expressions


In this section you will use the functionality within the Expressions dialog to create overriding
expressions.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Set up Load Options:


Make sure Load Method is set to From Directory.
Make sureLoad Components is set to All Components.
Make sure Use Partial Loading is turned on.
Choose OK.
Open the part file amd_caster_ipe.prt from the caster subdirectory.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.
Choose the Modeling icon
Modeling (if necessary).

from the Application toolbar or choose Application


from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Open the Assembly Navigator (if necessary).

On Windows systems, with the cursor over the Assembly Navigator tab.

485
use MB3 Undock to display the Assembly Navigator in a separate window.
(Unix users, choose the Assembly Navigator icon on the Navigators toolbar.)
Choose Tools

Expression to open the Expressions dialog.

Creating Overriding Expressions


The Expressions Dialog
The Expressions dialog contains all the functionality that relates to interpart expressions.
Expression topics not covered here can be found in the Expressions course of this CAST
product.

486

Creating Overriding Expressions


Creating Expressions
With the Expressions dialog open and with the assembly as the work part you will now create
some expressions.
Key in the expression tol=.01 and Enter.

Notice that the expression "tol=.01" is added to the list of expressions.


This expression will be used to define the tolerance between the shaft and the hole, and will
be used in one of the interpart expressions.
Key in another expression: theDia=.5 and Enter.
Notice this expression is also added to the list of expressions. This will be the master
expression and will control both the shaft and hole diameters.

Creating Overriding Expressions


Creating an Expression Link
Choose the Create Link icon

from the Expressions dialog.

You are prompted to select the part that contains the expression you want to link to.
There are several methods you can use to select this part.
Choose the part you want from the list of loaded parts.
Select a component part from the graphics area.
Key in the name of a component part in the part name field.
Choose an unloaded part by selecting the Choose Part File option.
Select the component from the Assembly Navigator.
Choose the component part named caster_shaft from the list then choose OK.
The Expression List dialog now displays a list of all the expressions found in the shaft
component part.

487

You are prompted to choose the expression to be linked.


Choose the expression boss_dia=.75 from the list of expressions then choose OK.
You have now created an interpart link to the expression boss_dia of the component part
caster_shaft. Next you will complete the expression.

Complete the expression by adding =theDia to the end of the string.


The entire expression should be:
caster_shaft::boss_dia=theDia
When the expression has been correctly defined, Enter to add it to the list.

Because "Use Partial Loading" is turned on in your Load Options, the component part that is
being referenced has not been fully loaded. Changes will not take effect until the component
part is fully loaded. You will fully load all the component parts later so you can see these
changes
Choose OK to dismiss the message box.

Creating Overriding Expressions


Creating Overriding Expressions
Create another interpart expression to override the expression shaft_dia=0.781 of the

488
caster_fork. component. Set this expression equal to theDia+tol.
Choose the Create Link option from the Expressions dialog.
Choose the component part named caster_fork from the list then choose OK.
From the bottom of the list of expressions, choose the expression shaft_dia=0.781
then OK.
Complete the expression by adding =theDia+tol to the end of the string.

The new IPE (InterPart Expression) should look like the following:
caster_fork::shaft_dia=theDia+tol
When the expression has been correctly defined choose Enter to add it to the list.
Once again you will get a message telling you that you are modifying a partially loaded part.
Choose OK to dismiss the message box.
The Expression dialog should have the these expressions (order may vary)
caster_fork::shaft_dia=theDia+tol
caster_shaft::boss_dia=theDia
p16=0.0
p17=.125
theDia=.5
tol=.01

Creating Overriding Expressions


Fully Loading Components
Choose the Open icon on

the Expressions dialog.

The Open option will open any unloaded or partially loaded component part.
When changes are made by interpart expressions to expressions in unloaded or partially
loaded parts, no updates can happen until they are fully loaded.
Choose the Load all parts in list option.
After the parts are fully loaded the components will update.

489

OK any message regarding read only parts.


These changes were made in both of the component parts:
In the caster_shaft the size of the shaft changed to .5
In the caster_fork the size of the hole changed to .51 (.5+.01).
These changes occurred because the expressions that define those values are being overridden
by the interpart expression in the assembly part.
Select the expression theDia=.5 from the list of expressions, then change its value to 1.

Press Enter to accept the new value.


Watch the shaft in the caster as you choose Apply on the Expressions dialog to update the
model.
Notice that the caster_fork and caster_shaft are again updated to reflect the new value of the
expression theDia.
The expression theDia has become the master expression. It controls both components in this
assembly.

Creating Overriding Expressions


Locked Expressions
Notice that you created these overriding expressions without having to leave the assembly
(the work part was always the assembly).
Change the Work Part to the caster_fork component.
Choose the expression !shaft_dia=1 from the list of expressions.
The "!" at the beginning of an expression means that it is locked.

490
An expression is locked to prevent it from being overridden by another part using interpart
expressions.
In this example, the expression was automatically locked when it was overridden by an IPE.
By selecting the lock icon

you can lock an expression manually.

When an expression has been locked by a user, that expression cannot be overridden by an
IPE.
Change the value of the expression to any value.
Enter to accept.
You should now receive a message telling you that the expression has been locked by the
assembly and cannot be modified.

Choose OK to dismiss the dialog.

Creating Referencing Expressions


In this section you will edit the existing IPEs then create new IPEs in the components parts.
The new IPEs will reference the expressions in the assembly.
Remember...
An overriding expression is when the interpart link is on the left side of the equal sign:
thePart::theExpressionName=theValue
A referencing expression is when the interpart link is on the right side of the equal
sign: theExpressionName=thePart::theExpression

Creating Referencing Expressions


Editing Interpart Expressions
First change the Work Part back to amd_caster_ipe.
Choose the Edit Links icon

in the Expressions dialog.

491
The Edit Interpart Links dialog provides three options
Change link
With this option you can change the link in an IPE to point to another part. For
example, the expression x=block1::length could be changed to x=block2::length
Delete link
This option allows the user to dissolve the relationship with a selected part and replace
the value with the current numeric value.
Delete all links
This option works the same as delete link but will delete ALL interpart links in the
current work part.
Choose Delete all links.
Notice that the two interpart expressions are deleted out of the list in the Expressions dialog.

Creating Referencing Expressions


Creating IPEs from Components to the Assembly
Next you will create IPE links from the two component parts back to the assembly.
Change the Work Part to the caster_shaft component.
Notice that the expression "boss_dia=1" is no longer locked (no "!" at the beginning). This is
because the IPE link that was overriding this expression has been deleted.
Choose boss_dia=1 from the list.
Choose the Create Link icon

from the Expressions dialog.

Choose amd_caster_ipe from the list of loaded parts, then select OK.
Choose expression theDia=1 from the Expression List dialog, then select OK.
Your expression thus far should read as follows: boss_dia=1amd_caster_ipe::theDia
Remove the 1 from the expression, then Enter to save the change back to the list.
The final expression should read: boss_dia=amd_caster_ipe::theDia
Next, create an expression to link the caster fork component back to the assembly.
Change the Work Part to caster_fork.

492
Choose the shaft_dia expression from the list. (you may need to scroll down to find it.)
Set the expression shaft_dia equal to amd_caster_ipe::theDia+ amd_caster_ipe::tol
(whole expression: shaft_dia=amd_caster_ipe::theDia+ amd_caster_ipe::tol), then
Enter.
This sets the expression "theDia" plus the expression "tol", in the assembly part.
Change the Work Part back to the assembly.
Choose the expression theDia=1.
Change its value to .5 and Enter.
Choose Apply on the Expressions dialog.
Notice that both components updated to reflect the new diameter value.

In the first section, you created overriding expressions in the assembly.


These overriding expressions forced the expressions in the component parts to take on a
certain value.
In this section, the expressions in the component parts referenced the expressions in the
assembly rather then being controlled by them.

Creating Referencing Expressions


Checking IPE Relationships
Choose the expression theDia=.5 from the list again.
Choose the Used by icon.
The Used by option brings up a Information window to lists a description of where the
selected expression is being used.

493

When this option is used in conjunction with interpart expressions it will only list usage by
parts currently loaded in your session.
This Information window gives you a description of where the expression is being used.
Notice that the expression is being used in both component parts.
Dismiss the Information window.
Close all parts.

Load Options and IPEs


In this section you will look at interpart expressions and how they effect unloaded or partially
loaded component parts.
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Set up Load Options:


Make sure Load Method is set to From Directory.
Make sure Load Components is set to All Components.
Make sure Use Partial Loading is turned on.
Choose OK.
Now open the part file amd_caster_ipe_a.prt from the caster subdirectory.
Choose Assemblies

Update Report to create an Update Report.

Reports

Notice that note 3 tells you the following:


The part was partially loaded and the solids require updating.
Dismiss the Information window.
Choose the Modeling icon

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

494
Modeling.
Choose Tools

Expression to open the Expressions dialog.

Notice the value for the expression "theDia" is set to .25. This expression is referenced in the
IPEs that control the diameter of the shaft and hole of the fork.

Why have the component parts not Updated?

Because the components are not yet fully loaded and hence, they have not been updated.

Load Options and IPEs


Updating the Parts
Choose the Open icon on

the Expressions dialog.

Choose Load all parts in list from the Load Parts dialog.
When the two component parts are fully loaded they both update to reflect the new shaft and
hole diameter.
Choose File

Close

Choose File

Options

Close all parts to close all parts.


Load Options.

Turn Use Partial Loading to off. Then select OK.


Open part file amd_caster_ipe_a.prt again and see what happens.
Notice that now when the assembly is loaded the components are automatically updated.
This is because Load Options were set with "Partial loading" turned off, which means that the
components are fully loaded and updated when the assembly is opened.
When a part containing an IPE is loaded, the system attempts to resolve all interpart links. It
will look for the name of the expression in the referenced part, if the correct name is found
then the system has resolved the link.
The user may delete an expression and create a new one of the same name and the system will
update its link to look at the new expression and inherit its values.
If it is impossible for the link to be resolved, the system will notify the user, delete the link,
and assign the last known constant value.
For example, the following expression is in the assembly part file:
block::dia=pin::dia+tol

495
If you were to delete the expression "dia" within the pin part file, the expression in the
assembly would revert to:
block::dia=1.25 +tol
Where 1.25 was the last constant value for the diameter in the pin component.
If you perform a Save As on a part, any loaded part which references it will rename the
expression so the link is preserved.
If the other parts are not loaded at the time the save as was performed, their expressions can
be changed later by using the Edit Link function in the expression dialog.
If versioning rules are in place and the Save As is performed using the correct naming
convention, the interpart links will automatically be changed upon opening the assembly.

Tips and Recommended Practices


It is critical that you evaluate the downstream impact of using IPEs before you start assigning
them.
IPEs are powerful tools but they complicate your assemblies and make them hard to
understand.
Some considerations:
IPEs are best used when parts have a physical constraint and are to be used in the same
assembly. (Example: when a pin must always fit in a hole.)
You should not use overriding expressions on the same component from different
assemblies. This causes the component to be updated each time it was loaded by the
different assemblies. For this reason, IPEs should not be used against a standard part
such as a bolt or screw.
It is a good practice to only edit interpart expressions when all of the referenced parts
are loaded so that the impact of the change can be immediately understood. This way
you will not be creating any traps for future users.
Consider setting up company-wide standards on how and when IPEs are to be used;
using a naming convention that makes an expression readily identifiable so any user
will know that it is, e.g. ".ipe_dia". IPE locks are recommended for critical dimensions
that the designer wants to protect from being overridden by another part or assembly
being referenced.
Although you can use IPEs with parts not assembled together, it is not recommended.

496

Tips and Recommended Practices


Troubleshooting
If a part fails to load because of an IPE change, you have the following choices.
Suppress the feature that failed to update, then unsuppress it when you have
determined the cause for failure and corrected the problem.
Close all other parts then load the problem part by itself. The part should load and
allow you to evaluate where the problem is occurring.
Your choices from there will include creating an expression lock and deleting the offending
links.

497

Part Families
The objectives of this lesson are:
to present an overview of family of parts concepts
to learn about the template part and defining family members
to learn how to save a family of parts spreadsheet
to learn how to save a family of parts into separate part files
to learn how to edit features in a family of parts
to learn how to add a family member to an assembly

Overview

Important Notice to Windows Users


To be able to do this lesson, you must be view CAST outside of the Resource Bar Training
tab, in a separate browser. This is because in this lesson, when a Spreadsheet is opened,
Unigraphics NX is locked as is the browser embedded in Unigraphics NX .
Part Families provide you with a fast way to generate a family of similar parts. Family
members are controlled by a single part file referred to as a family template.
When you make changes to the family template file, the system will automatically update all
the family members. (This template file can be a piece part or an assembly.)
Because the template part controls the family of parts, family members are read only and can
only be modified from the template part file.

498
When defining a Family of Parts, you specify which properties can be changed between the
family members. These properties are referred to as Family Attributes and can include:
Part Attributes
Components
Expressions
Mirror
Density
Feature
This option uses the spreadsheet to modify the parameters of the part family, the parameters
that are being used are defined within Unigraphics NX.
For example, the specific expression or feature being modified is defined within Unigraphics
NX, but the family table is created and edited within the spreadsheet.

Examining the Template Part


An anchor bracket part will be used as the family template for the Part Family. (A family
template file is the parent file to all the family members.)

499

As changes are made to this part, all family members are updated. For this activity, you will
be editing the total length of the part, and the length of the pad.

Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open part file advasm_anchor_bracket.prt from the advasm subdirectory.


Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.
Choose the Modeling icon
Modeling .

from the Application toolbar or choose Application


from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Use the Pan option, as necessary, to move the part to the top of the graphics area.
You will also be editing some of the various features of this model. The Model Navigation
Tool will be helpful in examining the features of this part.
Open the Model Navigator.

Choose the Model Navigator tab.


icon on the Navigators toolbar.)

(Unix users, choose the Model Navigator

500

Examining the Template Part


Defining the Family Members
The first thing to do is choose the two expressions that will be changed throughout the family
of parts.
Choose Tools

Part Families.

The Part Families dialog is displayed. The top list box contains all the expressions used in the
creation of the part.
Be sure the top option is set to Expressions.

Add the two expressions, length and pad_length to the Chosen Columns list.
Select length from the Expressions list.
Choose the Add Column option.
Select pad_length from the Expressions list.
Choose the Add Column option.
If you add the wrong expression to the Chosen Column list, choose it, then choose
Remove Column. You can also choose an item by double clicking on it in the Available
Columns list.
As you select the two items from the list, they will be added to the Chosen Columns list.

501

The items you have placed in the Chosen Columns list will be placed at the top of each
column of the spreadsheet in the same order that was found in the Chosen Columns list.
Notice that Part_Name was already in the list. This column is where you will define the
names of the family members. Because each family member must have a part name, this
column is automatically added and can not be removed.
Notice that when you single click on some expressions, the expression and its values
will highlight in the graphics area.

Examining the Template Part


Defining the Family Members (cont'd)
You will need to adjust the size of the spreadsheet so that you will be able to read the CAST
instructions.
Choose the Create option to open the spreadsheet with the specified columns.

The three items that you placed in the Chosen Columns list are now at the head of a column in
the spreadsheet. The expression value for each item is entered below the expression name.
A

1 Part_Name length pad_length


2

140

50

3
4
Next, you will edit the spreadsheet by adding all the information required for a family of parts
with three family members.
Set the column width of the three columns to snap to the width of the contents.

Add the following three part names to column A.(You do not need to add the extension

502
".prt" to the part file name.)

1 Part_Name length pad_lengt


h
2 bracket1
3 bracket2

140

50

4 bracket3
Add the following values for the length and pad_length of each part.
A

1 Part_Name length pad_length


2 bracket1

150

30

3 bracket2

200

75

4 bracket3

250

40

Examining the Template Part


Verifying Family Members
With these changes in place, the family of parts has been defined. Before you continue, it is
important that you verify that the given parameters for each part member are valid for this
model.
Choose the bracket3 cell (Cell A4).
This will be the family member you will verify first.
From the Spreadsheet menu bar, choose PartFamily

Verify Part.

The model is updated with the parameters in the selected family member. Notice that after the
model is updated, control is transferred to Unigraphics NX so you can examine that member
in the graphics area.

503

When you are done examining the geometry, choose Resume from the Part Families
dialog.
By choosing Resume, system control is transferred back to the spreadsheet and the original
template solid is displayed back in the graphics area.
The part in the graphics area returns to its previous parameters.
Follow the same instructions to view the other two family members (bracket1 and
bracket2).

Examining the Template Part


Saving the Family of Parts Spreadsheet
Before you continue, save the spreadsheet back to the part file. Keep in mind that the
spreadsheet is not saved to disk until the part file is saved.
Choose PartFamily

Save Family from the spreadsheet menu bar.

The spreadsheet is saved into the part file and then dismissed, you are now able to work back
in Unigraphics NX.

Examining the Template Part


Saving the Family of Parts into Separate Part Files
Up to this point you have:
defined your family of parts
verified your family of parts
saved your family of parts to the part file
but you have not yet saved any parts to disk.
There are two different possibilities when saving family members to disk.
You can save selected family members to disk from within the spreadsheet by using
the Create Parts option.
You can add a family member to an assembly before it has been saved to disk. When
this is done the system creates the component.

504
When you save that component the family member is saved to disk. Later in this lesson you
will use this method when you add a family member to an assembly.)

Examining the Template Part


Defining the Part Families Member Directory
Before you can save these family members to disk, you need to tell the system what directory
these part files are to be saved in. This is done from the Save Options dialog.
Choose File

Options

Save Options from the menu bar.

The Save Options dialog is displayed.

From the Save Options dialog, you can specify the location for part family members.
In the Part Families Members Dir field, key in the path name for a directory where you
have write access, then choose OK.
The path location you enter here will be the location where all family members will be saved
to disk.

Examining the Template Part


Defining the Search Directories
In order to update the family members after changes are made, you need to make sure the
directory you just entered for the Part Families Member Dir is defined in the search
directories path of the Load Options dialog.

505
Choose File

Options

Load Options.

Set the Load Method to Search Directories, then choose the Define Search Directories
option.
The Load Options dialog is changed to include a list of search directories and options to
perform operations on them.
If the Part Families Member Directory is included in a current Search Directory, then you
do not need to do anything, choose OK to dismiss the dialog.
Keep in mind that when three dots (...) follow a path name, all subdirectories are
automatically included in the search path.
If the Part Families Member Directory is not included in a current Search Directory, then
key in the directory in the New Directory field and choose Add, then choose OK to
dismiss the dialog.
With the search directories correctly set, when you update the family members from the
spreadsheet, the system will look for those member part files in the Search Directories.
If the members are not found in the specified search directories, you will get a message telling
you that the family members are not found.

Examining the Template Part


Saving the Family of Parts to Disk
Now you will re-open the spreadsheet and save the family members to disk.
From the Part Families dialog, choose the Edit option to open the spreadsheet.
Highlight cells A2 - C4.
A

1 Part_Name length pad_lengt


h
2 bracket 1

150

30

3 bracket 2

200

75

4 bracket 3 250 40
Choose PartFamily

Create Parts to save the parts to disk.

The Information dialog is displayed in Unigraphics NX and the message "Creating member
parts for family" is displayed in the spreadsheet. Then the system will post the name of each
part as it is saved.
When all the parts have been written to disk, the spreadsheet displays a message telling you
that the parts are created.

506

Dismiss the Information window.


Choose Resume in the Part Families dialog.
Choose PartFamily

Save Family from the spreadsheet menu bar.

Once again, the spreadsheet is saved into the Unigraphics NX part file and then dismissed,
you are now able to work back in Unigraphics NX.

Editing Features in a Family of Parts


After you have created a family of parts using the spreadsheet, you can edit that family by
adding columns or rows to the spreadsheet or by changing the value of any given cell.
In this part of the activity, you will edit this family of parts so you can specify if specific
features are suppressed or not in various family members.
For example, you may want a bracket with the locking lug and the split feature but without
the simple hole, or you may want only the simple hole and not the lug and the split.

Set the Available Columns option to Features.

507

All the features in the part are listed in the Available Columns list.
You can select these features and add them to the spreadsheet. Once added, you can control
whether the feature is on or off (suppressed or unsuppressed) in a specific family member.
Double click on the following features to add them into the Chosen Columns list.
EXTRUDED(8)
EXTRUDED(11)
SIMPLE_HOLE(14)

Notice that when you select each feature it is highlighted in the graphics area.
Since you have already created a spreadsheet, you now need to add these features onto it.
Choose Edit to activate the spreadsheet.
The three feature columns are added to the existing spreadsheet.
D

EXTRUDED(8) EXTRUDED(11) SIMPLE_HOLE(14)


YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

The possible choices for the cell values are YES meaning that the feature is visible in the
family member or NO meaning that it is not visible.
Set the Column Width of the new columns to snap to the width of their contents.

508
Set the following values (these values are not case sensitive).
D

EXTRUDED(8) EXTRUDED(11) SIMPLE_HOLE(14)


NO

NO

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

NO
YES

Now check the parts in the family.


Click in cell A2 (bracket1).
Choose PartFamily

Verify Part to verify bracket1.

The solid is temporally updated for you to view. Notice that the two extruded features that
made up the split and locking lug are removed from the solid and the simple hole remains.

Choose Resume from the Part Families dialog to return control back to the spreadsheet.
Verify bracket2.
In this family member notice that the split and locking lug are visible and the simple hole is
removed.

Resume when your ready to continue.


Verify that the simple hole has been removed from the model then Resume.
Verify bracket3, then choose Resume.

509

Editing Features in a Family of Parts


Updating Part Families
Now that you have made the changes to the family members, and have verified those changes
in the solid, you will next update the family member part files.
Select Cells A2..F4 then use PartFamily

Update Parts to update the parts.

Remember, the system uses the current Search Directories to locate each family member.
If the Part Family Member Directory was not defined in one of the search directories, you will
get a message indicating that the system was unable to locate the Family Member.
The spreadsheet is disconnected and the Information window is displayed to tell you that each
of the family members have been updated.
Close the Information window and choose Resume to return control to the spreadsheet.
Use PartFamily

Save Family to save and dismiss the spreadsheet.

The Save Family option saves the spreadsheet in the current file and then dismisses the
spreadsheet.
Close all parts.

Adding a Family Member to an Assembly


In this section, you will define a family of parts using the valve handle. You will then add one
of the family members to an assembly.
Open part 17043_tmp.prt from the advasm/valve2 directory.
This handle will be the template part file for the family of parts.

510

Choose the Assemblies icon


Assemblies.
Choose the Modeling icon
Modeling.
Choose Tools

from the Application toolbar or choose Application


from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Part Families.

The Part Families dialog is displayed.


The Available Columns list contains a list of expressions that can be defined for this family of
parts.

Double click on the following expressions to add them to the Chosen Columns list.
hndl_dia
hub_dia
hub_hole_rad
Keep in mind that the order you select the items from the list will be the same order that
they will appear in the spreadsheet.
As you select each of the items, it is added to the Chosen Columns list.

511

Choose Features from the Available Columns pull-down.

When Feature is selected, a list of features appears in the Available Columns list.
Double click on BOSS(28).

The boss feature is added to the Chosen Columns list (it is also highlighted in the graphics
area).
Change Available Columns to Attributes, then add PART_NUM and LEVERAGE_BAR
to the list.
The Chosen Columns List should now contain the following items.

512
Choose Create from the Part Families dialog.
The spreadsheet is displayed with all the columns that you listed in the Part Families dialog.
Format the width of all the columns in the spreadsheet to snap to the length of their
contents.

Adding a Family Member to an Assembly


Relationships Between Cells
To simplify your work, you will next create some relationships between some of the cells in
the spreadsheet.
Set the Boss feature equal to the value of the Leverage bar attribute by choosing cell E2
and changing its value to =G2.
Window Users:
With the E2 cell still selected, choose Format Cell.
Set the Category to General, then OK.
With the E2 cell still selected, click in the formula bar, then Enter.
Unix users:
Make sure the Format option is set to Default.

Notice that the value of E2 is now "yes"; the "=G2" designation reads cell G2 and copies its
value into E2. The value of the LEVERAGE_BAR attribute will now determine whether or
not the boss feature is visible.
The Boss feature in column E makes up the leverage bar on the handle. If its value is "yes"
then the feature will be visible, if the value is no then the feature will be suppressed.
The "yes" and "no" values are not case sensitive, both upper case and lower case will work the
same.

513

Next you will set the name of the family member equal to its part number.
Choose cell A2 and key in =F2 for its new value.
Window Users:
With the A2 cell still selected, choose Format Cell.
Set the Category to General, then OK.
With the A2 cell still selected, click in the formula bar, then Enter.
Unix users:
Once again set the format for the selected cell (A2) to Default.
Now the part name will always be defined by the part number attribute.
Next copy row 2 into row 3 and change a few of its values.
Choose cells A2 - G2 then copy the formulas to row 3 (A3).
More About Copying Cells

If you copy information from more than one cell, it will overwrite (replace) any
information in similar cells you are pasting to.

Highlight the cell(s) you want to copy information from.


MB3 Copy Copy Formula
Choose one cell where the information is to be pasted.
If you've copied information (formulas) from more than one cell, the system will paste it all in
starting with the cell you chose.
Also: the copied information does NOT remain in the buffer. (You can continue to paste this
information in other cells. You must copy it fresh each time.)

514

Adding a Family Member to an Assembly


Relationships Between Cells (cont'd.)
Choose cell G3 and change the value of the leverage bar attribute to no, then Enter.
Notice that cell E3 (BOSS(28)) was also changed to no.
Choose cell F3 then change the part number to 170431.
Notice the part name is changed to be the same as the part number.
These two rows will define a pair of family members with the same parameter values except
one has the leverage bar and the other does not.
Copy the formulas of these two rows three more times to create a total of 8 family
members.

These members consist of 4 separate pairs, each having different parameter values. Each of
these pairs will have one member with a leverage bar and one without.
Change the part numbers in column F as shown below. (Remember that the part name will
automatically be the same as the part number).

The "_l" at the end of some of the part numbers represent the family members that have the
leverage bar attached.

515
Make the following changes to the family of parts.

Adding a Family Member to an Assembly


Verification
Now Verify some of the family members.
Choose cell A8 then choose PartFamily

Verify Part to verify the part.

The model is updated with the parameters in the selected family member.
Examine the geometry, then choose Resume to transfer control back to the spreadsheet.
Use the Verify Part option to verify some of the other members of this part family. Notice
how they are different.
Before you save any of these family members to disk, you need to make sure you have
defined a location for the member part files.
This is done by setting the Part Families Member Directory to a directory where you have
write access. This option is found on the Save Options dialog (File Options Save
Options).
Highlight cells A8 - G9.
Choose PartFamily

Create Parts.

The Information dialog is displayed with the status of the save operation.

The two selected family members are created and saved to disk in the location you specified.

516
Dismiss the Information dialog and choose Resume on the Part families dialog to return to
the spreadsheet.
From the Spreadsheet menu bar choose PartFamily

Save Family.

Adding Family Members to an Assembly


In this part of the lesson you will open an assembly and add a member of the family of parts
you just created to it.
Do not close the handle part.
Open part advasm_valve_assm.prt from the valve2 directory.
The assembly is loaded and displayed in the graphics area.

The first task is to find the family member you want to use in the assembly. In this
hypothetical scenario, you will need a handle with a .306 hole radius but with no leverage bar.
Choose the Assemblies icon
Assemblies.

from the Application toolbar or choose Application

Choose the Add Existing Component icon


or choose Assemblies Components
Add Existing.
Choose the template file 17043_tmp from the list of loaded parts then choose OK.
The Select Family Member dialog is displayed.

517

Adding Family Members to an Assembly


The Select Family Member Dialog
This dialog is only displayed if the part you have selected is a template part for a family of
parts.
The top of this dialog contains a list of the family attributes you selected for this family of
parts. At this point you need to decide which attributes are important for this assembly.
For this assembly, the two attributes you will want to use to define the selection criteria are
the hub hole radius and the leverage bar.

Choose the hub_hole_rad from the list of Family Attributes.


The Selection Criteria section of the dialog displays all the possible values for that specific
Family Attribute.

The next step is to define the Selection Criteria for the selected family attribute. This could be
done by selecting one of the valid values from the list.
You can also define a range of values for the selection criteria, then the system will tell you
which family members meet that criteria.
Key in the following into the Selection Criteria entry field, then Enter.
hub_hole_rad>=.3 && hub_hole_rad<=.31
Notice that this range limits the family members to only those with a hub hole radius of .306.

518
The value matching the selection criteria remains in the Valid Values list and the other values
are placed in the Invalid Values list.
Notice that the Matching Members list now only contains two members. These two members
are the only ones that matched the criteria you defined.

1) Value to be used in the component.


2) Values not to be used in this component.
3) Family members that match the criteria.
The selection criteria can use regular Unigraphics NX expressions to define the valid values.
With the use of interpart expressions you can use expression values from other components in
the selection criteria.
Choose the hub_hole_rad attribute again from the Family Attributes list.
The Selection Criteria you entered before is now displayed in the Selection Criteria entry field
for you to edit.
Edit the existing Selection Criteria to the criteria shown below, then Enter.
hub_hole_rad>=valve_body::Shaft_end_rad &&
hub_hole_rad<=valve_body::Shaft_end_rad+.01
Notice that the valid values and the matching members are still the same, this time these
values will depend on the value of the Shaft_end_rad expression within the valve_body
component.
Next you will further the selection criteria by choosing another Family Attribute.
Choose LEVERAGE_BAR from the Family Attributes list to narrow the criteria.

519
Remember, you set up the leverage bar option to determine whether or not the leverage bar
will be displayed. For this first example you will be turning it off.
From the Valid Values list choose no.
You have narrowed the criteria to a family member with the following characteristics:
A hub hole radius within a specified range and,
the leverage bar is not present.
The Family Attributes list summarizes the selection criteria for you.

Notice that only one family member meets all the criteria that you have defined.

Now that you have found the correct family member you can now select it and add it to the
assembly.
Choose the only member in the Matching Members list then choose OK.
Before the operation continues the system creates the specified family member.
The Add Existing Part dialog is then displayed so you can add it to the assembly.
Change the reference set to BODY, then set the positioning method to Mate.
Choose OK to continue.
Choose OK to place the family member at the origin (0,0,0) of the assembly.
The component is added to the assembly and you are prompted to position it with the Mating
Selection dialog.
Mate the handle to the valve body. Zoom in on the model to make sure the component is
placed correctly.

520

Keep in mind that up to this point the handle has been created and added to the assembly but
has not yet been written to disk. When the handle component is saved it will be written to
disk.
Because the CAST environment is read only, you will not be able to save the assembly unless
you use the Save As option.

Adding Family Members to an Assembly


Updating Family Member Components
The next part of this lesson is to make changes to the assembly that will require you to replace
the existing handle component with one of the other family members.
First you will make several edits to the other assembly components.
Change the work part to the valve body.
Choose Tools

Expression, then set the following expression values:

Shaft_dia=1
Shaft_end_rad=.375
Choose Apply to update the component.
Because the shaft diameter has changed, the hole in the valve yoke also needs to be increased.
Change the work part to the valve_yoke.
Set the expression Center_hole to 1.03125 then choose Apply to update the model.
Change the work part back to the assembly.
Keep in mind, that, in this case, the selection criteria depends on the expression value in the
valve body component.
Because of these changes to the valve body component, the selection criteria has changed. As
a result, the current handle component no longer matches the selection criteria.

521
You can now automatically update the handle component to one which meets the new
selection criteria. First, query the system for a Family Report.
Choose Assemblies

Reports

Family Report from the menu bar.

Examine the Family Report and notice the following:

Dismiss the Information dialog.


Next you will have the system automatically update the component with the part that matches
the new selection criteria.
Choose Assemblies

Components

Part Family Update.

An Information window appears noting component 170431 was updated with a new family
member (170432) that meets the new criteria.

Remember that because you are working in a read only environment you can not save
this assembly with the new component. If at his point, you were to use the save all parts
option, this family member would then be saved to disk.
Close all parts.

Important Concepts
There are some important concepts that need to be remembered when working with Part
Families:
Each family member is saved into its own part file.
If you want to add a family member to an assembly as a component, that is not
currently saved to disk, the system will create the family member automatically.
If you want to add a family member to an assembly as a component, that is not
currently saved to disk, the system will create the family member automatically.
Each of these part files are "Read Only" parts that can only be edited by changing the
family template file and updating the family members.

522
Each of these part files are "Read Only" parts that can only be edited by changing the
family template file and updating the family members.
Each of these part files are "Read Only" parts that can only be edited by changing the
family template file and updating the family members.
Family members can not be used to create a new family of parts.
If you need to break the link between the template part and a specific family member,
use the Unigraphics NX Save As option on the file pull-down menu.
Any modifications made to the template part will be reflected in the family members.
Family members can not be edited from the family template file if they are currently
open.

On Your Own
Reopen part advasm_anchor_bracket.prt from the advasm directory.
Create a family of parts using the length and pad_length expressions just as you did in the
first part of the previous activity. This time, also add the expression hole_dia to this list.
Create this family of parts with three family members, bracket1a, bracket2a and
bracket3a. Change the values for each expression in the three family members.

Edit the family of parts to include the following features, just as you did in the previous
activity.

Now edit this part family so the slot and two holes can be turned on or off in the various
family members.

523

Spend some time and play around with the values if the various family members. Resave
the family members to disk when your done.

524

Project for Advanced Assemblies


These projects will give you an opportunity to practice some of the procedures you have
learned in the Advanced Assembly Modeling course lessons.
You should be able to complete each task from the instructions given. However, if you cannot
remember how to do a specific procedure, you can look at the complete version to see the
specific steps you will need to use to complete the task

Project 1: Promotion of Bodies


For this project you will use the Promotion of Bodies operation to create a core for this
reservoir body. The various tasks will require you to:
suppress features
create an assembly and add components
promote bodies
simplify parts
use boolean operations to complete the project

525

Project 1: Promotion of Bodies


Task 1: Suppressing Features
Choose File
Directory.

Options

Load Options and make sure the Load Method is set to From

Open advasm_reservoir_body.prt from the advasm directory.

Start the Assemblies application.


Start the Modeling application.
Suppress the two bosses shown below. Remember that any other features attached to the
two bosses will also need to be suppressed.

526

Choose the Suppress Feature icon


from the Edit Feature toolbar or choose
Edit Feature Suppress
Make sure List Dependents is on, then in conjunction with the Ctrl key, choose
BOSS(12) and Boss(18).

OK to suppress the features.

527

Project 1: Promotion of Bodies


Task 2: Creating an Assembly
Choose File

New to create a new inch part file called reservoir_core.

Use the Assemblies Add Existing Component procedure to add two occurrences of the
reservoir part to the same location, the second right over the first, at the origin of this
assembly. Change the Reference Set for both to Solid.
Choose the Add Existing Component icon
or Assemblies
Components Add Existing.
Choose advasm_reservoir_body from the list, then OK.
Set Reference Set to SOLID and Layer options to Work, then OK.
Make sure the coordinates of the Base Point are 0,0,0, then OK the Point
Constructor dialog.
Repeat the previous three steps to add a second instance of the same part.
You will be warned that you are instancing the same component twice.

OK the warning message.


Cancel the Select Part dialog.
The two instances of the advasm_reservoir_body component are reflected in the
Assembly Navigator.

Project 1: Promotion of Bodies


Task 3: Promoting Solid Bodies
Promote both of the solid reservoir bodies.
It will be easier to select each body in turn if you blank one of the bodies, promote the
other one, then blank the body just promoted; unblank the first one then promote it.

528
In the Assembly Navigator, blank (click on checkbox) the second solid body.
Choose the Promote Body icon
on the Feature Operation toolbar or choose
Insert Feature Operation Promote.
Select the unblanked reservoir solid, then OK.
In the Assembly Navigator, unblank the second solid then blank (click on checkbox)
the first solid body.
Select the other reservoir solid, then OK, then Cancel.
Make sure both solids are unblanked.

Project 1: Promotion of Bodies


Task 4: Simplifying the Parts
Next you will use the Simplify operation to fill in the pocket of one of the solid bodies.
Choose the Simplify Body icon
from the Feature Operation toolbar or choose the
Insert Feature Operation Simplify.
The Retained Faces icon
is active and you are prompted to select a retained face; the
selected face will not be removed.
Choose the specified outside face for the retained face.

Next you will need to choose the Boundary Faces.


Choose the Boundary Faces icon

from the Simplify Body dialog.

529
Choose the face shown below for the Boundary Face.

Choose Apply to simplify the body.


A message is displayed telling you that 117 faces have been removed from the solid.

OK the Result of Simplification message.


Cancel the Simplify Body dialog.

Project 1: Promotion of Bodies


Task 5: Boolean Operations
Use the Subtract feature operation to subtract the unsimplified component from the
simplified one.
Choose Insert

Feature Operation

Subtract or select the Subtract

icon.
Choose the simplified component as the Target Body.
Choose the unsimplified component as the Tool Body, then choose OK.

The subtract operation is completed.


The resulting solid consist of the material that was in the pocket of the reservoir body. This
core is fully associative to the original body.

530