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Cities Alliance Project Output

Updated City Development Strategy


Report for Iloilo City 9 Mar 2009
City Development Strategies in the Philippines: An Enabling
Platform for Good Governance and Improving Service Delivery
P098173

This project output was created with Cities Alliance grant funding.

CDS 00

Iloilo City
I LO I LO, P H I L I P P I N E S
C I T Y D E V E LO P M E N T
S T R AT E G I E S I N
THE PHILIPPINES

An Enabling Platform
for Good Governance and
improving Service Delivery

C I T Y D E V E L O P M E N T S T R AT E G I E S R E P O R T

City Development Strategies Report

CITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES IN THE PHILIPPINES:


AN ENABLING PLATFORM FOR GOOD GOVERNANCE AND
IMPROVING SERVICE DELIVERY
The CDS3 Project is a technical assistance grant funded by Cities Alliance and
supported by the Asian Development Bank, Japan International Cooperation
Agency, UN-Habitat, and the World Bank. The CDS project was developed
in response to the need to introduce an integrated, comprehensive, and
participatory approach to urban management. Founded on the principles
of livability, bankability, competitiveness and good governance, the CDS
process guides the cities in the preparation of comprehensive, longterm development strategies, where the city government involves local
stakeholders in the entire strategic planning process-assessment, visioning,
strategy formulation and project prioritization and capital investment
planning-through a series of consultations.
The World Bank implemented the pilot phase in the 1999 with 7 cities.
Since then, the League of Cities of the Philippines, carried out 2 succeeding
phases, which expanded the program to 58 cities in all. In 2001, the Upscaling Poverty Focused City Development Strategies (CDS2) covered
31 new cities. In 2006, the project CDS in the Philippines: An Enabling
Platform for Good Governance and Improving Service Delivery (CDS3)
added 15 new cities to the roster of CDS cities in the Philippines. Under
the preparation grant for the City Development and Investment Project,
the League also carried out CDS for 5 new cities. As of 2008, 64 of 120 cities
have participated in the CDS program, including 3 cities assisted by ADB
under the Cities without Slums Project (Caloocan, Quezon and Taguig),
and the 3 cities that participated in the Local Environmental Planning
and Management Project of the UN Habitat (Lipa, Cagayan de Oro and
Tagbilaran).
For more information on CDS, you may visit http:www.cdsea.org
Contact
Mayor
: Hon. Jerry P. Treas
Address : Iloilo City Hall, Mabini Wing, 3rd Floor Robinsons Mall
Mabini St., Iloilo City
Tel. Nos. : (033) 3373773; 3370085
Fax No. : (033) 3350689
Mobile No : (0917) 7188424
Email
: jerry_trenas@yahoo.com
URL/web : www.iloilocity.com.ph

CDS 2008

Iloilo City
I LO I LO, P H I L I P P I N E S

CIT Y DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGIES IN
THE PHILIPPINES

An Enabling Platform
for Good Governance and
improving Service Delivery

CDS Core Team


Hon. Jerry P. Treas
City Mayor
Mr. Melchor U. Tan
City Administrator
Mr. Francis T. Cruz
Executive Assistant
Mr. Jose Roni SJ Pealosa,
City Planning and Development Coordinator
Ms. Ma. Cristina V. Octavio,
Asst. City Environment and Natural Resources Officer

C I T Y D E V E L O P M E N T S T R AT E G I E S R E P O R T

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Selected Urban Karte Indicators
Introduction

Situation Analysis

Livability
Competitiveness

12

Bankability

13

Good Governance

13

Vision and City Brand

15

Strategies

17

PROJECT PROFILES

24

SELECTED URBAN KARTE INDICATORS


INDICATORS

2000

2007

A1

Total Population (2000-2007)

366,391

94,466
418,710

A2

Population Growth Rate (2000-2007)

1.97%

A11

Administrative Land Area (Km2)

99,880
1.86%
5.73%
70.84 Km2

A7

Urban Population (projected 2005)

A15

Number of Households (2000)

A17

Estimated Employment by Industry Sector

70.23 Km2
12,747.351 Km2

18,234
20,007
39,437

72,218
84,946
19,751

Primary (agriculture, fishery, forestry)

5,000

1495,000

Secondary (manufacturing, mining, processing)

18,000

538
19,000

Tertiary (services, banking, insurance, wholesale/


retail

107,000

9,979
109,000

What are the Citys geographical advantages?

Regional/provincial center

yes

Accessibility to an airport of international


standards

yes

Accessibility to a port of international standards

accessibility to NCR
and other
yes provinces yes

L1

% of HH with access to piped water (level 3)

19.53 58.30%24.62

L11

Cohort survival rate for elementary (2006-2007)

81.12 99.08%76.68

L14

Cohort survival rate for high school (2006-2007))

L30

Infant mortality rate

65.99 95.08%67.47
3.48%

L41

Crime solution efficiency rate

L45

Number of HH living in informal settlements

C18

Building permits issued within the last 5 years

86.25%2,067

99.7%
344

14

37

Residential

Commercial

28 14.19% 196

Special

Institutional

1017 10.84% 52
73 8.53% 14

A18

C29

Unemployment rate

C32

% population with undergraduate degree

B3

% Total Debt Servicing Needs to Total Regular


Income

B4

% of savings to expenditures (2007)

735

yes
yes

yes

yes yes

5.77% 586

286.37
81.11

SELECTED URBAN KARTE INDICATORS


INDICATORS

INTRODUCTION
2000

2007

FP2-B

Per Capita Allocation to Health Services

94,466

FP2-D

Per Capita Allocation to Education Sector

99,880

G2

Average Number of days to issue a NEW business


license (w/ complete documents)

G2

Average Number of days to RENEW business


license (w/ complete documents)

5.73%
12,747.351 Km2

39,437
25 mins
19,751


44.82%
% of local revenue/total revenue
149
Frequency of meetings of the Local Development
2 yrs.
2 yrs.
538
Council (LDC)

G7
G11

ADDITIONAL DATA (from the survey)

9,979

Poverty Incidence

Performance of elementary children in NAT

yes

Performance of high school children in NAT

yes

Percentage of participation of Local Special


Bodies (LSBs) in public hearings conducted

Presence of ELA (if yes, proceed to questions 6


and 7; if no, proceed to question 8)

Percentage of Projects implemented from ELA


derived from CLUP

Percentage of Projects implemented from AIP


derived from ELA

No. of registered small and medium industires


(2001 vs. latest for all types)

Number of barangays practicing segregation at


source and served by an MRF

10

Percent of waste generated diverted from


disposal

11

Presence of sanitary landfill

 | City of Iloilo

yes
accessibility to NCR
and other provinces
58.30%
99.08%

Iloilo City, is one of the most accessible cities in the country. Its strategic
location of about 283 statute miles from Manila through Antique waters
and 337.6 nautical miles through Capiz waters, made it the business and
government gateway to the flourishing region of Western Visayas. From
Manila, Iloilo City is only 45 minutes by plane and 18 hours by the fastest
ship. From Cebu, it is only 25 minutes by plane.
With determination to recapture its crown as the Queen City of the South,
the City continues to stride towards revitalizing socio-economic growth.
The entry of multi-million investments, the rise in real estate development,
and the emergence of new industries are concrete manifestation of this
economic vision of Iloilo.
The ability to provide a better living condition for its constituents underlies
this motivation of Iloilo City to become an economic powerhouse. A
population that grew at an average of 1.95 percent over the past decade
made Iloilo one of the most populous and densest cities in the Philippines.
It is only with rapid growth that the City can provide for employment and
livelihood opportunities and basic social services for its constituents.
The City is gearing itself up to become a premier city by 2015, a vision
that is nurtured by good governance. The tenets of participation and
consultation, and transparent, accountable and ethical public service
are being entrenched in the local bureaucracy. This demonstrates to the
external and internal stakeholders of Iloilo City the political will to bring
about reform in local governance, thereby ensuring that the consequent
economic gains will benefit a broader constituency, especially the
marginalized.

City Development Strategies Report

Luzon
Visayas

A. Antique
B. Iloilo
C. Capiz
D. Aklan

Iloilo City
Mindanao

Iloilo City
Visayan Sea

 | City of Iloilo

Guinticgan

Sara
San Rafael San Dionisio
Conception
Bingawan

Estancia
Batad

Barotac Viejo
Calinog Passi
Banate
Lambunao Dueas
Badlangan
Anilao
Janiuay
Pototan
Dumangas
Cabatuan
Zarraga
Maasin
Leganes
Tubungan
Iloilo City
Oton
Igbaras
Tigbauan
Guimbal
Miagao
San joaquin

City Development Strategies Report

FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT

ROAD NETWORK IMPROVEMENT

PAROLA PORT REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENT

DEVELOPMENT OF RESETTLEMENT SITES

RELOCATIONS SITE ALLEY

 | City of Iloilo

City Development Strategies Report

Situation Analysis
Situational analysis has traditionally been undertaken through a sectoral
approach. Sectors are categorized in accordance with the parameters
adopted for national development planning set by the National Economic
and Development Authority. The condition and performance are therefore
described in terms of economic, social, environmental, and governance
sectors. The same categorization has been applied to the formulation of
the Comprehensive Land Use Plan.
In this report, the framework of analysis deviates from the traditional
approach. The difference lies on the focus given to desired attributes
livability, competitiveness, bankability, and governance. This is not to
say that it totally deviates from the sectoral perspective, since sectors
still constitute the unit of analysis. This approach at analyzing the citys
situation is advocated by the Cities Alliance, a global network of cities and
urban governance practitioners through the City Development Strategy
(CDS). CDS is an innovative tool that permits better assessment of the
Citys needs and is more attuned to the local government practices.
Livability
The City of Iloilo has never been remiss in the delivery of the basic needs
of its constituents. In fact, the City recently awarded a resettlement area
spanning a total of 721,344 square meters to 6,401 beneficiaries on onsite,
offsite areas and those affected by the Iloilo Flood Control Project.
In terms of health services, the total number of beds rose from 1,569 in
2003 to 1,677 in 2007. Iloilo City is currently recognized as the center of
education for Western Visayas. The reference is attributed to the numerous
schools in the City with 78 elementary, 42 secondary, and 79 tertiary
including technical/vocational schools. Students coming from as far as
Luzon and Mindanao enroll in local colleges and universities every year.
The number of policemen increased by 7.9 percent over the last five years,
while the number of police stations and fire protection services remains
the same. For 2007, Iloilo Citys crime solution efficiency is 99.70%.
Iloilo is surrounded by a long coastline and is traversed by three major
rivers. In accordance with the categories set by the Department of
Environment and Natural Resources Department Administrative Order No.
34, the upstream to the midstream of these rivers (Class A) provide the
main source of water supply.

 | City of Iloilo

The increasing population in the city brought about by in-migration from


the neighboring provinces and municipalities have now contributed to
a fastpaced urbanization that has adversely affected the environmental
quality of the 7,023 sq. km. metropolis.
Rivers and waterbodies now show signs of degradation with its pollution
loads and silt from agricultural run-offs from the neighboring rice-fields and
headwaters up north, resulting in occasional fishkills in these waterbodies.
Decreasing fishstocks are also seen as a result of polluted coastal waters
that are caused by a high coliform count in the squatter colonies along the
city shorelines. Contamination and saltwater intrusion has also adversely
affected the citys groundwater resources. The World Banks Environment
Monitor has recently identified the city as one of the countrys saltwater
intrusion hotspots.
Due to the recent typhoons and extended rainfalls both in the city and at
its watershed in Maasin, the city was once again inundated and flooded.
Its constricted rivers, creeks and waterways could hardly cope with the
huge volumes of waters that surged and meandered across the city and
onwards to the river mouths and the sea. The citys old and small diameter
drainage pipes did not do well in alleviating the flood waters at the citys
low-lying areas.
About 300 tons of garbage are being generated in the city every day
and the average citizen is estimated to be generating a per capita waste
generation of .642 kgs. per day. The present generation rates are still
increasing in proportion with the increased consumption patterns and
complex lifestyles of the citys residents and daytime population.
Despite these difficulties and the high investment costs needed to
address these, the city has now complied with the Ecological Solid Waste
Management Act ( RA 9003). The Act requires the city to convert its open
dump into a controlled dump and eventually into a Sanitary Landfill by
January 2006. It also required the establishment of Material Recovery
Facilities (MRF) at various barangays in the city for the required 25% waste
diversion within a five-year period. Waste segregation at the barangay
level is the Acts other requirement and the city is now strengthening
its Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Program to help
encourage households to reduce, reuse and recycle wastes.

City Development Strategies Report

To date, the city has already converted its open dump into a controlled
dump and is set at establishing its sanitary landfill by 2010. It has already
established a central MRF and some 25 barangay-based MRFs.
Development Issues and Concerns
Social Services

Prevalence of malnutrition among urban poor children, with 527 and


3,462 estimated to be severely and moderately underweight among
preschool children, respectively

Inadequacy of health service facilities, supplies and equipment to


cope with increasing clientele needs

Solid waste clogging the drainage systems and tertiary facilities also
compound the flooding situation.

Worsening traffic congestion in the city during rush hours

Presence of dilapidated old buildings and structures that are a threat


to public safety

Inadequacy of potable water supply for about 30,000 urban poor


households in the city, comprising 37 percent of total number of
households.

Strengths and Opportunities


High skilled and trainable human resources

Low completion and graduation rates especially among public high


school students at 47.51 percent and 77.84 percent respectively.

Center of education in Western Visayan

Political and institutional center in Western Visayas

Prevalence of diseases that could have been prevented through


immunization

Inadequacy of relocation sites for urban poor relocatees from


government project sites, environmental hazard zones and courtordered relocations. As of 2006, it is estimated that 13,157 urban poor
households are in need of secure tenure.

Continued existence of partnership programs for flood control, air,


and water quality monitoring, watershed management, waste water
treatment design planning and river management.

Increasing housing backlogs due to migration which grows at an


annual rate of 1.8 percent and which is projected to be around 13,882
units by 2010

Increasing informal settlement and slum areas especially along the


citys southern coastlines

Environmental Management

Competitiveness
Services, commerce and trade remain as the main focus of Iloilo Citys
economic activities, being the regional center in Western Visayas. Iloilo
Citys economy is dominated by business involved in trade and services with
wholesale and retail, averaging 50 percent of Citys total businesses for the
past years. This trend is expected to be sustained, with the proportionate
increase in the service sector.
As a major urban center, the City is a convergence point of a wide variety of
people from all cultural backgrounds. Iloilo City has a rich arts and cultural
heritage and natural attractions that have helped to increase tourist arrivals
in the last five years.

As of 2006, around 5,272 households living in slum and unsanitary


conditions are living along the Guimaras Strait coastline and the
Batiano River numbering

Poor water quality of Citys southern coastal waters, estuaries and


creeks that does not meet the DENR standards

Development Issues and Concerns

Flooding and inundation caused by the combining topographical


factors and obsolete drainage facilities. Iloilo City is the natural
catchment of the Tigum-Aganan River, which makes it vulnerable to
perennial flooding. Moreover, the drainage facilities do not meet the
requirements of a large urban area and the projected flooding cycles.

Slow business permit registration and renewal due to manual systems


and red tape

Delayed mobility of goods and services due to bad road and traffic
conditions

Mismatch between the employable qualifications of the urban poor


and available job opportunities

10 | City of Iloilo

City Development Strategies Report

11

Inadequacy of infrastructure for the complex commercial, trading and


industrial activities

Unconscionable rates of interest in banks and financial institutions

Negative attitude/outlooks among the residents towards tax


responsibilities

Strengths and Opportunities


Strengths and Opportunities

Booming industries

Center for commerce and trade in Western Visayas

Steadily increasing income of the City

Take off point for tourist

Financial soundness

Presence of Tax Incentives Ordinance

Financial, commercial center for Western Visayas

Proximity to the Iloilo International Airport

Membership in the Metro Iloilo Guimaras Economic Development


Council (MIGEDC)

Visayas has been identified as the tourism belt in the Super Region
Economic Development Strategy of President Arroyo

Weaknesses

High cost of power and water

Inadequate power supply

High acquisition and rental cost of urban land and commercial


spaces

Bankability
Iloilo City earned a total of Php648 million in 2003 and Php889 million
in CY 2007 with a growth average rate of 1.92 percent. The main sources
of revenue are taxes on goods and services, comprising 18.63 percent of
the total revenue income. This is followed by real property taxes at 15.90
percent and the income from public enterprise at 3.58 percent. Taxes and
charges are imposed on specific services that the City delivers. The share
of the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) has been reduced from 51 percent
in 2001 to 44 percent in 2007.
On the other hand, expenditures increased by 20.11 percent from the
period 2006 to 2007. For the last three years, expenditures represent 90.05
percent of the total income of the City.
Development Issues and Concerns

Untapped financial resources and credit facilities offered by local


commercial banks to business and commercial establishments

12 | City of Iloilo

Good Governance
The City is focused on urban governance which targets the creation of an
environment where the civil society, private sector and the government
can work harmoniously for the realization of the Citys vision.
Good governance promotes greater transparency and accountability
among government officials through values orientation and adoption of
harmonized plans and investments. It facilitates the adoption of strategic
and harmonized work approaches and processes, which informed the
formulation of the MIGEDC Roadmap 2015.
It also calls for the strengthening and broadening of alliances among the
public and private sectors and the implementation of existing laws, policies
and ordinances under a transparent system of incentives and rewards.
Out of 50 non-government organizations in the City, 35 have been duly
accredited by the legislative body. Many of them sit as members of the
City Development Council, which in turn, meet twice a year.
Aside from the regular meetings of the CDC, and other Task Forces created
whose membership are mostly NGOs , other mechanisms such as the citys
regular newsletter, Kauswagan ,regular TV and radio programs , anytime
and anyone can text the mayor for its feedback and report.
The personnel profile of the city consists of 1,593 permanent employees , 16
elective officials , 8 co-terminus, and 302 casual employees. 15 permanent
employees have masteral degrees.

City Development Strategies Report

13

Development Issues and Concerns


Need to improve client relations skills and attitudes among City


Government frontline staff

Inadequacy of computerized business transaction/work systems to


cope with increasing clientele demands at the City Hall

Weak harmonization and coordination in the implementation of some


sectoral plans and projects

Sub-optimal utilization of scarce resources that will support a more


aggressive campaign for premiership by 2015

Inadequacy in the quality and quantity of basic service delivery due to


limited logistics and resources

Weak implementation of plans and enforcement of policies, ordinances


and issuances

Absence of concrete plans and programs for sidewalk vendors and


other similar marginalized groups

Limited revenue from investments of relocation sites

Inadequacy of good governance capabilities among barangay


captains and officials which result in poor compliance to mandated
barangay service delivery systems and good governance practices,
e.g., transparent participatory planning

Inadequacy of in-house facilities and equipment for protective and


emergency response

Solid Waste Management Plan Implementation, Calajunan Dumpsite


Conversion (from controlled dumping to sanitary landfilling), Waste
Reduction Program, Flood Control and Drainage Improvement Project,
Clean Development Mechanism Program and other Carbon Crediting
Initiatives, Wastewater Treatment Program, Iloilo River Development
Project, Ateneo/WVSU scholarship program, MIS/GIS Program, Business
Permit Streamlining Project, Construction of a New Slaughterhouse with
Wastewater Treatment Plant, MIGEDC Roadmap 2010 Implementation

Vision and City Brand


In the early part of 2006, Iloilo City convened a multi-sectoral
consultative body composed of representatives from the national
government, barangays, civic groups, business, academe, church,
youth, professionals and peoples organizations. The purpose of the
consultation was to formulate a new vision for the City as it strives
to become vibrant, competitive and prosperous. This was followed
by a series of consultations (i.e., focused group discussions, analysis
of the Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats, and other
methods) to be able to identify the challenges that face the City and
the appropriate measures to be established.
The vision that was articulated from this exercise is now enshrined in City
Resolution No. 2006-453 signed on 5 April 2006. It also replaced effectively
the Comprehensive Land Use Plan set for 1998-2010 horizon.

Opportunities and Strengths

Iloilo City is now aiming to be a Premier City by 2015.


elements of this vision are enunciated below:

Availability of affordable Geographic Information System and other


computer aided urban/regional planning and growth management
technologies and tools

A leader in the practice of participatory governance that will speed up


and sustain growth and development, in order to open up more and
better opportunities for all;

Existence of the MIGEDC

Strong and active participation of national government agencies


(NGAs) and private sector groups in the development concerns of the
City

Constant upgrading in the standards of education, ethics and


transparency in government;

Sustained expansion and improvements in infrastructure, to eventually


secure a dynamic, safe, peaceful and healthy environment conducive
to learning, sports and eco-cultural tourism; and

Full dedication to the preservation and further enrichment of the citys


cultural heritage amidst modernization and growth

Ongoing implementation of many projects carried out through official


development assistance and other grant providers such as MIGEDC Tourism
Strategy, Urban Integrated Infrastructure Plan Private Sector-Initiated
Housing Project , Heritage Conservation Master Plan, Iloilo City Ten-Year

14 | City of Iloilo

The underlying

City Development Strategies Report

15

The vision is supported by the local leadership which listed the following
development targets for the city:
1. Livable and prosperous City
2. Adequate housing and human settlements
3. Center for the arts, culture and sports
4. Assurance of equal opportunities

6. Land use planning and management


7. Trade and investment promotions
8. Special projects

Strategies

7. Transformation into a financial center

In order to help realize the Citys vision and the updated Iloilo City
Comprehensive Land Use Plan, the three-year City Development Agenda
2010 seeks to achieve the following sectoral goals, which are anchored on
the localized Millennium Development Goals:

8. Progressive mass communication industry

1. Economic Development through private sector involvement

5. Establishment of a convention and tourism center


6. Establishment of an inter-modal transport system

9. Adoption of an efficient and dynamic public governance system

establish the city as a financial, convention, and tourism center

10. Center for advanced knowledge and learning

further expand tourism potentials with focus on festivals, culture,


etc.

establish an inter-modal transport system and improve


infrastructure and utilities

establish a progressive mass communications industry

make the city the hub for major export manufacturing activities

promote investment through private sector support

generate employment from information communications


technology, commerce and trade

improve incomes and productivity


development, skills enhancement, etc.

real estate development and urban redevelopment planning


through GIS

11. Healthy and productive population


12. Hub for major export manufacturing activities
In the formulation of this vision, it has been established and acknowledged
that the City alone would not be able to single-handedly carry out the
agreed programs and projects. Through the collaboration with other local
governments that comprise the MIGEDC, the City would be able to leverage
its resources in order to achieve better impacts. These partners are the
Province of Guimaras and the Municipalities of Pavia, Oton, Leganes, San
Miguel and Sta. Barbara.
This voluntary agglomeration among the local governments was
commended no less than by the President who institutionalized the
set up through Executive Order 559 signed on 28 August 2006. Iloilo
Citys development efforts will now take on a concerted planning
and management approach focused on the following eight areas of
collaboration:
1. Tourism development
2. Environmental management
3. Infrastructure development
4. Public safety and security
5. Basic services

16 | City of Iloilo

through

enterprise

2. Social Development with focus on health, education, housing and


poverty reduction
a. MDG No. 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

bring down the proportion of urban poor households without


security of tenure from 12 percent to 6 percent by 2015

bring down the proportion of underweight children under


five years old from 6.46 percent in 2007 to about 5 percent in
2010 and 3 percent by 2015

City Development Strategies Report

17

b. MDG No. 2: Achieve universal primary education (still for validation


among stakeholders)

reduce TB morbidity rate from 23 cases per 100,000 in 2005 to


zero case per 100,000 by 2010

increase the participation rate of 6-11 year old children from


90 percent in 2005 to 99 percent by 2015

reduce TB mortality rate from three cases per 100,000 in 2005


to zero case per 100,000 by 2015

increase the cohort survival rate of primary school children


from 71 percent in 2005 to 99 percent by 2015

reduce Dengue morbidity rate to zero case per 100,000 by


2010

increase the simple literacy rate of 6-11 year old children form
90 percent to 99 percent by 2015

reduce Dengue mortality rate from to zero case per 100,000


by 2010

c. MDG No. 3: Promote gender equality (still for validation among


stakeholders)

increase proportion of women enrolled at all levels of


education from 49 percent in 2005 to 50 percent by 2015

g. MDG No. 7: Ensure environmental sustainability


increase the proportion of urban poor families with security


of tenure from 51 percent in 2006 to 76 percent by 2010

improve the proportion of urban poor families all of whose


school age children are in school and no member of the
household is malnourished or has experienced illness from 75
percent in 2005 to 99 percent by 2010

improve the number of informal/slum settlements with


upgraded community facilities and which are within easy
access to recreational, economic, educational religious/faithbased and socio-cultural activities by 60 percent by 2010

increase the proportion of urban poor families with security


of tenure from 51 percent in 2006 to 60 percent by 2010

d. MDG No. 4: Reduce child mortality


reduce infant mortality rate of 12 per 1,000 livebirths in 2005


to 4 per 1,000 livebirths by 2010

reduce mortality rate among children under five years old


from 30 per 1,000 livebirths in 2005 to 10 per 1,000 livebirths
by 2010

e. MDG No. 5: Improve maternal health


reduce maternal mortality rate from 100 per 100,000 in 2005


to 25 per 100,000 by 2015

increase the proportion of married couples, who have been


married for not more than three years, availing of the Citys
reproductive health services from 70 percent in 2005 to 95
percent by 2015

f.

MDG No. 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases

h. provide adequate housing and human settlements and improve


shelter planning for urban poor relocation site acquisition and
development
i.

make the city the center for arts, culture and sports

j.

make the city the center for advanced knowledge and learning

k. sustain a healthy and productive population


l.

provide equal opportunities for all citizens

m. improve health and nutrition programs with increased logistics


n. enhance micro-lending and other livelihood assistance programs

maintain the low incidence of HIV/Ab seropositive cases at


one percent until 2010

reduce the malaria morbidity rate from 18 cases per 100,000


in 2005 to zero case per 100,000 by 2010

p. expand social welfare programs for streetchildren, women,


disabled and other marginalized groups

reduce malaria mortality rate from three cases per 100,000 in


2005 to zero case per 100,000 by 2010

q. reduce the impacts of natural hazards through effective disaster


management and sustain disaster relief programs through private
sector support

18 | City of Iloilo

o. formulate and implement a city-wide sports program

City Development Strategies Report

19

3. Environmental Management with focus on rehabilitation and


protection measures
a. MDG No. 7: Ensure environmental sustainability

increase the percentage of barangays serviced by the citys


collection system from 80 percent in 2005 to 99 percent by
2010

d. strengthen linkage/network with ODAs, NGAs, NGOs/Pos and civil


society partners and urban and regional planning and growth
management through the RDC and MIGEDC
Table 1 below summarizes the results of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and
Table 1 SWOT Matrix
Strengths

Weaknesses

improve the average of water quality rating by the Department


of Environment and Natural Resources and Bureau of Fisheries
and Aquatic Resources of the Iloilo River and the citys coastline
by 10 percent by 2015

1. The Mayor as an urban


development champion
and an effective and
efficient leader

1. Limited local incomes


and revenues to use for
service delivery

improve the citys average ambient air quality rating by 20


percent by 2015

2. Dynamic and supportive


city department heads

increase the proportion of urban poor households with access


to Levels II and III connections from 60 percent in 2005 to 80
percent by 2015

2. Bureaucratic red tape that


delay business permitting
and other transactions

3. In-house plans,
programs and policies
for sustainable city
development and growth

3. High dependency on IRA

4. Increased work
obligations and targets
set by recent laws,
issuances and policies

c. promote measures that conserve energy

4. Improving bureaucratic
reforms and improved
work systems for service
delivery and good
governance

d. put in place other air and water quality management protocols


and projects, including flood control, anti-smoke belching, sludge
management, etc.

5. Harmonious relationship
between executive and
legislative branches

5. Limited number of city


work force for basic
service delivery and
governance functions

6. Strong vertical and


horizontal linkages and
networks with the Office
of the President, NGAs,
civil society organizations
(business, academe,
private, non-government
organizations and
peoples organizations,
religious, etc.), official
development assistance
and other development
work partners

7. Current investments
on human resource
development programs

7. Limited technical
competence and
capacities for some

b. make the city more livable, through varied environmental


programs such improved solid waste management system and
citywide environmental sanitation, urban greening in partnership
with the private sector, mangrove reforestation, Iloilo River
Development,

4. Good Governance through improved work structures, plans and


policies
a. MDG No. 8: Develop a global partnership for development

improve the proportion of revenue from firms whose half of


production is exported

increase the proportion of patients served by the city health


office from 10 percent in 2005 to 12 percent by 2010

b. sustain an efficient and dynamic public governance system,


through synchronized planning, budgeting and investment
programming, strict enforcement and implementation of
harmonized plans, computerization for streamlined business
permitting system and other processes
c. improve revenue generation and collection

20 | City of Iloilo

.Poor coordination of
work distributed to
various departments,
task forces, council,
committees, etc.

City Development Strategies Report

21

urban renewal work


such as flood control
and drainage planning,
transport planning,
wastewater treatment,
etc.

8. Existence of basic city


facilities and amenities
(internet access, tourism
establishments, health/
wellness centers, intermodal transport, etc.)

8. Poor and deteriorating


infrastructure and urban
amenities

9. Low crime rate

9. Occasional brownouts/
blackouts

10. High business and


investment sector
confidence on the city
leadership

10. High cost of water and


power

11. Presence of
development-oriented
private individuals and
volunteer groups who
are aware of the citys
economic potential and
who are willing and able
to work in partnership
with the city


11. Prevalence of negative
attitudes (bahala na,
fence sitting, walang
pakialam, etc.)

12. Prevalence of city


development issues on
health, housing, poverty,
etc.
Opportunities
1. NGAs which are
supportive to the citys
development programs

2. Existence of a functional
Regional Development
Council

22 | City of Iloilo

SO Strategies
1. Implementation/
enforcement of existing
plans and policies in
partnership with the
private sector, NGAs,
and the Regional
Development Council
2. Availment of official
development assistance
through the Mayor as
champion

3. Availability of ODA
windows for urban
development

3. Adoption of MIGEDCs
regional perspective in
regional planning and
growth management
through a strong city
executive-legislative
cooperation

4. Membership in the
MIGEDC which now
enjoys a certain
recognition among
the international
development assistance
community

4. Optimization of the citys


vertical and horizontal
linkages in pursuit of
PGMAs Super Region
Economic Development
Strategy with Tourism as a
focus

5. Current focus on the


Visayas as the Tourism
Belt in the PGMAs
Super Region Economic
Development Strategy
Threats

ST Strategies

1. Mounting pressure on
the national leadership
that may impact on local
governance systems

1. Optimization of the citys


vertical and horizontal
linkages and networks for
the improvement of its
infrastructure

2. Unforeseen man-made
threats like war, terrorism,
or such political sanctions
like embargo

2. Anticipating unforeseen
man-made threats,
health threats and
environmental threats
through a pro-active
executive-legislative work
cooperation

3. Health threats (bird


flu, SARS, etc.), climate
change and other global
environ mental or public
health threats and risks

3. Resolving key issues on


poverty, housing, traffic,
power, water through the
strict implementation
of existing plans and
policies

WO Strategies
1. Augmentation of limited
financial and resources for
service delivery through
development assistance
windows of the private
sector, NGAs, and MIGEDC

WT Strategies
1. Improvement of
coordination among
departments, task
forces and other work
committees for the
solution of current city
issues and problems

4. Eradicate if not
significantly reduce the
negative attitude of the
constituents through
advocacies led by the
Champion Mayor

City Development Strategies Report

23

Priority Programs and Projects


With the Urban Karte as baseline, the citys project priorities were identified
through a process spearheaded by the Iloilo City CDS Team. The Capital Investment
Programming conducted in 2006 led to the identification of the following
priorities:
PROJECT TITLE
ESTIMATED

COST (PhP)

PROPOSED
FUNDING
SOURCE

LEVEL OF
PRIORITY (among
top 10 projects)

1. New City Hall


Building

PhP 500 M

LGU Funds,
Loan

Among top five (5)

Project Concept,
Detailed Engineering
Design, Awarded to Arch
Coscuella and associates

2. Urban Drainage

PhP 500 M

LGU Funds,
Loan

Among top five (5)

FS on- going

3. Sanitary Landfill

PhP 500 M

Loan

Among top five (5)

On- going negotiation


with funding agency and
government bank

4. Expansion of
District Health
Centers

PhP 25 M

LGU Funds

Among top five (5)

Included in the 20082209 Annual Investment


Plan

5. School Building

PhP 30 M

LGU Funds

Among top five (5)

Project Concept

6. Maintenance of
Govt.
Buildings / Structures

PhP 15 M

LGU Funds

Among top five


(10)

Included in the 200820009 Annual Investment Plan

7. Maintenance of
Roads & Bridges

PhP 26 M

LGU Funds

Among top five


(10)

Included in the 20082009 Annual Investment


Plan

8. Wastewater Treatment Plant

PhP 50 M

LGU Funds, Donor


Institution

Among top five


(10)

Project Concept

9. Implementation of
Iloilo River Development Plan

PhP 200 M

LGU Funds, Donor


Institution, Private
Sector

Among top five


(10)

On-going

10. Sites Development

PhP 100 M

LGU Funds

Among top five


(10)

On-going

11. City Road Expansion


& Improvement

PhP 100 M

LGU Funds

Among top five


(10)

On going

12. Street lighting

PhP 15 M

LGU Funds

Among top five


(10)

On going

13. Establishment /
Rehabilitation of
traffic Lights

PhP 6 M

LGU Funds, Donor


institution, Private
Sector

Among top five


(10)

On-going

14. Rehabilitations of
Public Plazas

PhP 12 M

LGU Funds, Donor


Institution

Among top five


(10)

On-going

24 | City of Iloilo

PROJECT STATUS
(project concept,
pre FS, FS on going)

City Development Strategies Report

25

26 | City of Iloilo