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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2016
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2016
E Edition at www.progressnewspaper.org
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BATTLE OF THE BOOK WINNERS 12A

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Volume 142 No. 36, Paulding, Ohio

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Special sales events from Chief, Rite Aid, Rural King, Tractor Supply, WalMart Ruler Foods

Around

Paulding

County

Audubon plans nature walk

ANTWERP – A nature walk will be sponsored by the Black Swamp Audubon So- ciety on Saturday, April 30. The walk is at the Audubon Sanctuary, Road 192, north of Antwerp and will begin at 9 a.m. For more information, call 419-258-4515.

Nominate a grand marshal

PAULDING – Paulding Chamber of Commerce is currently seeking nomina- tions for grand marshal for this year’s John Paulding Day Parade. The event will be Friday, July 8. Submit nominees’ names by email to pauldingchamber@gmail. com.

Blood drive set

PAULDING – Ameri- can Red Cross will hold a bloodmobile from noon-5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 5, at the First Presbyterian Church, Paulding. To donate blood, download the American Red Cross Blood Donor app, visit www.redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-

800-733-2767).

Thanks to you

We’d like to thank the Paulding County Election Board for subscribing to the Progress!

County Election Board for subscribing to the Progress ! Increased courthouse security begins May 2 PAULDING

Increased courthouse security begins May 2

PAULDING – Starting Monday, increased securi- ty measures will be put in place in the Paulding Coun- ty Courthouse, including limiting access and search- ing bags. In a press release issued Tuesday morning, Sher- iff Jason K. Landers an- nounced: “In conjunction with the Paulding County commissioners, my office plans to implement full-time courthouse security by Mon- day, May 2. This comes as a result of talks between the commissioners, common pleas judge, county prose- cutor and the sheriff to make our courthouse a safer place for our county employees to work, as well as for citizens to conduct their business. “Over the past four weeks, we have been putting plans in place to make this a fluid operation. We have talked to many people that have been doing this type of se- curity and asking questions. We have toured other court- houses to see their opera- tions and what works for them,” said Landers. “We want things to op- erate in a smooth, friendly manner, all while limit- ing weapons and potential weapons from being pos- sessed in the courthouse.” Among the changes:

• The east door of the

courthouse will be the only

door utilized after the date of implementation.

• All persons entering

the courthouse will walk through a metal detector. Folks will be required to

empty their pockets and all baggage will be subject to search.

• No weapons will be al-

lowed in the courthouse nor any items deemed a possi- ble weapon by the deputies. Some examples of pro- hibited items include: fire- arms, knives, pepper spray and Leatherman style tools (which have knives inside). There will be a system in place for deputies to hold prohibited items while peo- ple conduct their business. “I feel we have a very well thought-out plan. I also realize we will learn as time goes on, so some things might change as we gain experience,” said Sheriff Landers. “The east door was cho- sen due to its location on the square since it is not on US 127, and it allows more room for our equipment in the hallway. “I ask for your patience as we get started. We are behind most counties in re-

See SECURITY, page 2A

We are behind most counties in re- See SECURITY, page 2A Melinda Krick/ Paulding County Progress

Melinda Krick/Paulding County Progress

Notices have been posted at the Paulding County Courthouse alert- ing visitors that starting Monday, all entrances except the east door on Main Street will be closed as part of increased security measures.

Hospital sued by former chief of staff

By DENISE GEBERS Progress Staff Writer PAULDING – A long-time county physician has filed a complaint against the Paulding County Hospital. He is seek- ing compensation for damages and a declaratory judgment on issues dealing with an alleged breach of contract. Dr. James H. Gray, who is one of two board-certified os- teopathic primary care physi- cians in the Paulding County, established his practice in the county in 1985. In 2010, he entered an agreement with the hospital making him one of their employees. The lawsuit states the hos- pital board terminated Gray’s five-year contract 29 days before it was complete and he was put on “involuntary vacation” immediately. Doc- uments further state the doc- tor was barred from his office building in Antwerp and locks on the doors were changed in spite of the fact Gray owns the property. Dr. Gray is asking the

See LAWSUIT, page 2A

the property. Dr. Gray is asking the See LAWSUIT, page 2A The Payne PTO and many

The Payne PTO and many of the community business are working together to secure funding for a playground “facelift” at the elementary school.

At Payne

Community working together for playground facelift

By JOE SHOUSE Progress Staff Writer PAYNE – Playground equipment may not seem like a very important part of the overall welfare of a community, but that’s not the case for a small group of individuals in the village of Payne. Convinced that if it’s safe and updated with quality equipment, a playground can be- come the place where children can go during and after school, where friendships are created and bonding with students takes place. With a dream in mind, a goal was set. For Lora Lyons, who has three children at- tending Payne Elementary and is PTO presi- dent, the dream was simple. She wanted to see the playground equipment at Payne Elementary updated. Reaching the goal would have its obstacles. Of course, nothing that’s worthwhile is ever easy. The equipment is beginning to show its age

and isn’t as safe as it once was in serving stu- dents’ needs. Knowing that, Lyons put a plan

into action and the light at the end of the tunnel

is beginning to glow.

“I had a dream of creating a place where kids could go and develop friendships,” said Lyons.

“A playground that would serve as the center of outdoor living for the kids. More than a place

to play and exercise, it would be a place where

kids could bond together, become better friends, while feeling safe in their environment.”

Last November, Lyons applied for and re- ceived a $15,000 grant through the KaBOOM and Dr. Pepper Snapple Group. The grant al-

lowed Lyons to put her dream in motion, and

a PTO playground planning committee was

formed. The grant required a match of $9,000, and with the funding secured, the committee

See PLAYGROUND, page 2A

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2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

n PLAYGROUND

Continued from Page 1A

was off and running. Once it decided on the style of playground equipment that would compliment the exist- ing equipment, the committee hit an obstacle they were not expecting. “We found out through re- search and planning that our current surface is not compli- ant and we have to resurface the area prior to having the equipment installed,” said Payne principal Jody Dun- ham. The unexpected resur- facing added another $10,000 to the project. Lyons, along with commit- tee members Shiloh Wittwer, Lisa Laukauf, Kendra Stoller, Sherri Rager and Steve Sinn, serving as the construction

team leader, were not discour- aged. Needing to work on addi- tional fundraising, the com- mittee continues to stay op- timistic in hopes of reaching their September 2016 dead- line for funding. “Once we received the grant, we were given one year to raise the additional funds, and if we can’t begin the con- struction by September, then we lose the grant,” said Dun- ham. “We are all excited about the project and as a committee we cannot say enough about our chairman, Lora Lyons,” said board member Shiloh Wittwer. “She is always so upbeat and positive and never

Wittwer. “She is always so upbeat and positive and never Under the leadership of PTO president

Under the leadership of PTO president Lora Lyons, a very en- thusiastic committee continues to work together in fundraising as they plan for a new playground at the elementary school. This climber is an example of some of the planned new pieces.

seems discouraged. Her at- titude about the project has been contagious and the rest of the committee feels that same excitement.” The grant received is com- munity-based, which encour- ages community support by collaboration in many of the different aspects of the total project. “The community support has been great. We have six businesses so far who have donated or have pledged to donate. We recently had a very successful PTO fund- raiser and we are excited about the end result. It is cru- cial to have as many as possi- ble within the community to get on board with this play- ground,” said Dunham. Raising funds is certainly a major part of the project and anyone who would like to do- nated can still do so. About $8,000 is needed. Donations can be sent to Payne Elemen- tary School, 501 W. Town- line St., Payne OH 45880. Checks should be made pay- able to Wayne Trace Local Schools earmarked “Payne Playground.” “Raising funds is certainly an important part of seeing this dream of a new play- ground come to fruition, but in the meantime, seeing how this community has joined together has been a great joy,” said Wittwer. “God has opened doors for us and we are confident we will see a facelift to the playground that will make this community and school proud.” For more information, visit Payne PTO’s Facebook page; go to www.facebook.com and search for Payne PTO.

Library offers intellectual property law program

PAULDING – The Pauld- ing County Carnegie Library will be hosting a free pro- gram on intellectual property protection covering inven- tions, patents, trademarks and copyrights. The program will be held from 6:30-7:45 p.m.

Thursday, May 5. All businesses have intellec- tual property in one form or an- other. Entrepreneurs, inventors, and business leaders interested in learning more about this im- portant topic are encouraged to attend. Jacob M. Ward, regis-

tered patent attorney with the law firm of Fraser Clemens Martin & Miller LLC will pres- ent this seminar. This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited, so prereg- istration is required. Call 419- 399-2032 to reserve a spot.

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E Edition at www.progressnewspaper.org
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web l print l tablet l mobile facebook.com/pauldingpaper Joe Shouse/ Paulding County

facebook.com/pauldingpaper

print l tablet l mobile facebook.com/pauldingpaper Joe Shouse/ Paulding County Progress Troopers investigate

Joe Shouse/Paulding County Progress

Troopers investigate the scene of a fatal two-vehicle crash near Grover Hill on Friday. The driver of the car (above) sustained injuries while a second driver was pronounced dead at the scene.

One dead, one injured in crash near Grover Hill

GROVER HILL – The Van Wert Post of

the Ohio State Highway Patrol is investigating a two-vehicle fatal crash Friday afternoon on Ohio 114 east of Grover Hill. Dead is William Bates, 63, of Grover Hill. Troopers said that at approximately 4 p.m. April 22, Bates was driving east on Ohio 114 near the intersection of Road 151 when his 2002 GMC pickup truck collided head on with

a 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier, driven by Kyle

Childs, 27, of Payne. Child’s vehicle was west- bound on 114 and determined to have driven left of center and struck Bates’ vehicle. Bates was pronounced dead at the scene by county Coroner Dr. Joseph Kuhn. Childs was transported to Paulding County Hospital, where he was treated for serious but

non-life threatening injuries. Childs was wearing a seat belt. Evidence suggests that Bates was not wearing a seat belt, according to troopers. Alcohol is believed to be a factor in the crash. The crash remains under investigation. Charges in the incident are pending, said post commander Lt. Tim Grigsby. Any charges will take “at least a month while the investigation continues.” The crash resulted in a brief closure of Ohio 114 east of Grover Hill. The roadway was re- opened. The Van Wert Post was assisted by the Paulding County Sheriff’s Office, Grover Hill Fire and EMS, Parkview Samaritan Life Flight, and Gideon’s Towing Services.

Museum calling for glass, pottery works for exhibit

PAULDING – John Pauld- ing Historical Society is pre- paring to host its third annual Celebration of Arts and Artists. This year’s event will feature glass art and pottery. Paulding County artists or their family members are in- vited to bring their pieces to

n SECURITY

Continued from Page 1A

gards to courthouse security,

so I am excited to move for-

ward as we continue to work hard to better serve our com- munity.” The courthouse, which opened in 1888, was con- structed with four entrances. Around 1914, the north and south entrances were altered with outside steps to accom- modate two basement entranc-

es, making a total of six doors

to access the building. Now,

five of these doors will be closed.

PauldingCountyProgress

copyright © 2016 Published weekly by The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O. Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding, Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015 Fax: 419-399-4030 website: www.progressnewspaper.org

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Entered at the Post Office in Paulding, Ohio, as 2nd class matter. Subscription rates: $38 per year for mailing addresses in Defiance, Van Wert Putnam and Paulding counties. $46 per year outside these counties; local rate for Military person- nel and students. Deadline for display advertising 1 p.m.

Monday. News deadline 3 p.m. Thursday.

rate for Military person- nel and students. Deadline for display advertising 1 p.m. Monday. News deadline

the John Paulding Historical Society Museum, 600 Fair- ground Drive, Paulding, on any Tuesday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. to be displayed in the art show. Deadline for entry is May 10. The art display will be open to the public beginning Sat- urday, May 14 and will run

n LAWSUIT

through the month of June. For more information, please call the museum at 419-399- 8218 or 419-399-3667. The museum is open free to the public every Tuesday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and the first Sat- urday of the month from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Continued from Page 1A

Paulding County Common Pleas Court for a judgment against the hospital in an amount over $25,000 for “rent, lost income and other damages.” Additionally, he is asking the Court to declare anti-compet- itive provisions of the broken contract to be unenforcible; to restore possession of his Buffa- lo Street building; and that he not have to pay sums of money

the hospital has demanded of him. Two exhibits with the com- plaint are a notice to the hos- pital of termination of (rental) lease and a notice to leave the premises, dated March 9. As of the April 15 filing date, the hospital has refused to vacate the premises. Their lease with Gray expired Dec. 31, 2015. The complaint alleges hospital officials demanded $6,792.12 for an unamortized amount due under a profession- al liability insurance coverage agreement, and an additional $8,588.79 because the doctor did not work through the end of his contract. In the complaint’s first claim,

a portion of the employment

agreement between Gray and the hospital is quoted: “ the Physician agrees that he shall not render professional medical

services to or for any person or

firm for compensation

a 50 mile radius of the Hospital for a period of two years after the termination of this Agree- ment.” A number of Dr. Gray’s pa- tients had attended meetings of

the hospital’s board of directors to speak on his behalf at the beginning of 2016 when they learned his contract had been terminated in December. According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Paulding County is a “health profession-

al shortage area” as well as a

“medically underserved area/ population.” Additionally, it is a certified shortage area, as de- clared by the Ohio Governor’s Office and Ohio Department of Health. Dr. Gray’s complaint was filed with the Court on April 15. No further activity was seen in the case file as of Monday evening.

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Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 3A

Obituaries Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
Obituaries Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
Church Calendar
Church Calendar

MAVRIK BARAJAS

MELROSE – Mavrik Ed- ward Allen Barajas was still- born at 8:27 a.m. Saturday, April 16, 2016 at Van Wert Hospital. His parents are Amanda Hopkins and Augus-

tine Barajas, both of Melrose. He is also survived by his sister, Maylie Hopkins; a brother, Marty Hopkins; his maternal grandparents, Joe and Freida Hopkins of Mel- rose; paternal grandmother, Sonya (Steve Shaw) Barajas of Oakwood; paternal grand- father, Bronson (Brianna) Bartley of Oakwood; and his paternal great-grandmother, Carolyn (Eugene Wirts) Bart- ley, Paulding. He was preceded in death by his great-grandparents, An- tonia and Pascual Barajas and Ottis Bartley.

A funeral service was held

Saturday, April 23 at Heit- meyer Funeral Home, Oak- wood, with Pastor Todd Mur- ray officiating. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery, Dupont. Condolences can be ex- pressed at www.heitmeyerfu- neralhome.com.

DAVID COTTRELL

1957-2016

ANTWERP – David John Cottrell, 59, of Antwerp, passed away Monday, April 18 at Parkview Regional Med- ical Center, Fort Wayne.

MARLENE ADAMS

1940-2016

OAKWOOD – Marlene Adams, 75, of Oakwood, died

at 7:10 a.m. Tuesday, April 19 at The Gardens of Paulding. She was born Dec. 6, 1940 in Defiance to the late La- Verne and Doris (Bryan) Durham. On June 1, 1963, she married Dale Adams, who survives in Oakwood. Marlene worked for JoAnn Fabrics in Defiance. She was a member of Twin Oaks United Method- ist Church, Oakwood. She en- joyed doing crafts and work- ing in the garden. Also surviving are three children, Greg Adams of Oak- wood, Chad (Jillian) Adams of Paulding, and Bryan Adams of Oakwood; two grandchildren, Justin Adams and Andrew Adams; and a sister, Myra LaGorin of New Bavaria. She was also preceded in death by a son, Robert Adams.

A funeral service was held

Friday, April 22 at Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, Oakwood, with Pastor Brady Feltz officiating. Burial was in Sherman Cemetery, Oakwood. Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Oakwood, was in charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers, memori- als may be made to Twin Oaks UMC. Condolences can be ex- pressed at www.heitmeyerfu-

neralhome.com.

JANET BENNETT

1943-2016

SHERWOOD – Janet Elaine Bennett, 72 years, of Sherwood, passed away Tues- day, April 19 at the University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, with her family by her

bedside.

Hospital, Ann Arbor, with her family by her bedside. J a n e t born July

J a n e t

born

July

the

d a u g h t e r of the late

was

13,

1943,

S h i r l e y and Gladys

(Gordon) Musselman. She was a 1961 graduate of Pauld- ing High School. She married Victor G. Bennett on Aug. 10, 1963 in Cecil. Janet worked as a cashier at Kmart for 15 years until her retirement in

1999. She previously worked as a teletype setter at Defiance Crescent News. Janet and Vic- tor were members of the Cecil Presbyterian Church. She was

a Girl Scout Leader for many

years. Janet was a caring and compassionate person and was

a caretaker for her parents for many years before their pass- ing. Janet cherished her time with her friends, family, and two dogs, Brandy and Bridget. She found enjoyment in the

simple things in life, whether

it be spending time outdoors,

caring for her flower gardens or creating oil paintings. Janet

also enjoyed helping out on the family horse farm. Surviving are her husband, Victor of Sherwood; three children, Steven (Amy) Ben- nett of Sherwood, Jeffrey Ben- nett of Defiance, and JaNann (Naylan) DeVaux of Sher- wood; and two grandchildren, Brianna and Garrett Bennett. She was preceded in death by her parents; one infant daughter, Shelley Ranee Ben- nett; and one sister, Mary Jane Musselman. Funeral services were Fri- day, April 22 in Oberlin-Turn- bull Funeral Home, Sherwood, with Pastor David Meriwether officiating. Interment followed in Rochester Cemetery, Cecil. Those planning an expres- sion of sympathy are asked to consider memorial contri- butions be made to Sherwood Library, 117 N. Harrison St., Sherwood OH 43556. Condolences may be sent to the family or the online guest book may be signed at www. oberlinturnbull.com.

HELEN SCOTT

1934-2016

CONTINENTAL – Helen M. Scott, 82, of Continental, died at 12:55 p.m. Tuesday, April 19 at St. Rita’s Medical Center, Lima.

ALDEAN PRICE

1920-2016

VAN WERT – Aldean M. Price, age 95, died Wednes- day, April 20 at Van Wert In- patient Hospice, Van Wert.

She was born May 4, 1920 in Paulding County, the daughter of the late Edward and Emma (Stoller) Klopfen- stein. On June 6, 1942, she married Robert A. Price, who preceded her in death on Aug. 6, 1996. She is survived by two sons, James E. (Sue) Price, Van Wert, and Jerry R. (Co- lette) Price, Tucson, Ariz.; a daughter, Janel (Eli) Schlatter, Van Wert; a brother, Mar- vin W. Klopfenstein, Scott; eight grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. She also was preceded in death by sisters, Frances Laidig and infant Mabel Klop- fenstein; and brothers, Ray- mond, Floren, Alvin, Harold and infant Gene Klopfenstein. Funeral services were Tues- day, April 26 at Latty Apos- tolic Christian Church, Latty, with church clergymen offici- ating. Burial followed in Latty Apostolic Christian Church Cemetery. Den Herder Fu-

neral Home, Paulding, was in charge of arrangements.

In lieu of flowers, the fam- ily requests donations made to Van Wert Inpatient Hos-

pice Center or Latty Apostolic Christian Church. Online condolences may

be sent to www.denherderfh.

com.

Online condolences may be sent to www.denherderfh. com. SPC ADAM PROVINES 1979-2016 ANTWERP – SPC Adam

SPC ADAM

PROVINES

1979-2016

ANTWERP – SPC Adam

J. Provines, 37, of Antwerp,

passed away Wednesday, April 20 at Samaritan Health Systems, Watertown, N.Y.

Adam was born in Fort Wayne on March 5, 1979, a son of Marilyn (Smith) and Steven Provines. He was a 1997 graduate of Antwerp High School. Being a devot- ed father and a loving son

and brother, his best moments were spent with his family, but was equally content to golf and fish. His family was

proud of Adam’s service to his country. He served as special-

ist in the U.S. Army stationed

at Fort Drum. Adam will be sadly missed

by his son, Aiden; parents, Mar-

ilyn and Steven, all of Antwerp; and brother, Michael (Amy Lunde-Provines) of Denver. His funeral service will be

at 11 a.m. Friday, April 29 at

the Antwerp United Methodist

Church. He will be laid to rest at Maumee Cemetery in Antwerp with military honors. Visitation will be 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 28

at Dooley Funeral Home, An-

twerp, and at the church one

hour prior to services on Friday. His family strongly en- courages memorials to M. Provines, P.O. Box 452, Ant- werp OH 45813. Condolences and fond memories may be shared at www.dooleyfuneralhome.

com.

fond memories may be shared at www.dooleyfuneralhome. com. WILLIAM BATES 1952-2016 GROVER HILL – William L.

WILLIAM

BATES

1952-2016

GROVER HILL – William

L. Bates, 63, of Grover Hill,

died at 4 p.m. Friday, April 22 from injuries received in

a motor vehicle accident on

Ohio 114 in Paulding County. He born

July

was

on

15,

in

the

Glen

in Paulding County. He born July was on 15, in the Glen 1952, A d a

1952,

A d a m s

C o u n t y ,

Ind.,

son of the

late

E. and Annis K. (Marbaugh)

Bates. On Nov. 17, 2001, he married the former Rhonda Miller, who survives. Other survivors include his

four children, Brandon L. (Ali- cia) Bates of Adams County, Ind., Brenden N. (Marci) Bates of Willshire, Jessica

L. Bates of Fort Wayne and

Joshua A. (Kimberly) Bates of Van Wert; a sister, Donna Jean Williamson of Willshire; 12 grandchildren, Sean Mendez, Halle Beougher, Hunter Bates, Bailey Bates, Parker Bates, Bo Bates, Kaiden Bates, Devin Hairston, Aliviah Bates, Ben Bates, Mya Hairston and Owen Bates; his father- and mother-in-law, Lonnie and Sue Miller of Grover Hill; two brothers-in-law, Tim (Jackie) Miller of Fort Jennings and Tony (Staci) Miller of Grover

Hill; and a sister-in-law, Nan-

cy (Wade) Carnes of Celina.

Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother, Donald E. Bates. Bill was a 1970 graduate of Parkway High School. He re- tired from Parkview Hospital

in Fort Wayne and trained har- ness horses. He was a member of the Van Wert County Har- ness Horsemen’s Association, the Mercer County Harness Horsemen’s Association, and the United States Trotting As- sociation. He had been a mem- ber of the U.S. Army Reserve. Bill enjoyed the outdoors, but his family was his life – espe-

cially sharing sporting events with his grandchildren. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday, April 29 at Cowan & Son Funeral Home in Van Wert, with the Rev. Rex Roth officiating. Interment will follow at Middle Creek Cemetery near Grover Hill. Visitation will be 1-8 p.m. Thursday, April 28, and one hour prior to the services Fri- day. Preferred memorials are to the Willshire Youth Activities.

JOHN “JACK” PHIPPS

1931-2016

PAYNE – John “Jack” Phipps, 84, of Payne, passed away Saturday, April 23 at Parkview Hospital, Fort Wayne.

Thursday, April 28 Free community meal PAULDING – The Paulding United Methodist Church will offer

a free community meal on Thursday, April 28 from 5-7 p.m. If you

have questions, call the church at 419-399-3591. The church is lo- cated at 321 N. Williams St.

Thursday, May 5 National Day of Prayer PAULDING – The 65th Annual National Day of Prayer, themed “Wake Up, America,” is Thursday, May 5. The Paulding Ministe- rial Association will hold a community observance on that Thurs- day morning at 8 a.m. at the gazebo on the courthouse lawn. The event will conclude before 9 a.m. so that participants can go on with their regular day. Everyone is encouraged to join together to lift up our community, county, state and nation in prayer. For more information on the National Day of Prayer, call Becky Fishbaugh,

419-399-4891.

Thursday, May 5 National Day of Prayer PAULDING – In observance of the National Day of Prayer on Thursday, May 5, the First Presbyterian Church will be open for prayer from 6 a.m.- 6 p.m. Church members have committed to cov- ering that time period in prayer. Anyone in the community is also welcome and encouraged to enter the church sanctuary any time during the day and dedicate a quiet time to lifting up our leaders and our nation in prayer. Please note that a bloodmobile also will be in progress in anoth-

er area of the building but don’t let that keep you away. For more information on the prayer vigil, call the Presbyterian Church office, 419-399-2438, or Pastor Meriwether, 419-769-3813. Thursday, May 5

National Day of Prayer OAKWOOD – The Auglaize Chapel Church of God, Twin Oaks United Methodist Church and the Melrose United Methodist Church will be observing National Day of Prayer at noon at the town hall in Oakwood. The public is invited to gather at this time for prayer.

Plant garden, clean, write –

all in a day’s work for Lovina

We are having really nice weather this week. The garden dried up and we were able to plant some onions, lettuce and radishes. I need to go get some sweet onions and peas to plant this week. Spring is such a lovely time of the year! Dan- delion blossoms are popping up, making the greens too bit- ter to eat anymore. My husband, Joe, got the mowers oiled and ready to use. Verena, 18, and Joseph,

13, were mowing the grass for the first time this spring. Hopefully they will get the

rest done today. Joe opened the gates to the pasture field for the horses, ponies and the cow, Bessie. They are enjoying the lush green grass after a winter of

eating hay. Our hayfield is

looking promising for a nice crop of hay. Yesterday, daughters Vere- na and Loretta and I went to

help sister Emma prepare for church services. They will host church services on May 8 and May 22. Emma and her family added three bedrooms upstairs, so there is more to clean. They aren’t done re- modeling yet, but we cleaned where we could. They want

to hang drywall yet and put in new cabinets. Jacob plans to build their own cabinets. So it all takes time. Since they were behind in hosting church services, they

Since they were behind in hosting church services, they will take it twice this time. Daughter

will take it twice this time. Daughter Elizabeth and sisters Verena and Susan were also there for the day. We got a lot accomplished and even got a lot of visiting done. We all left for home around 4 p.m. Our children attended

a meeting and pizza supper

with the youth at the commu- nity building. It is under new ownership, and the new own- ers wanted the youths’ opin- ions on what they could do for improvements. I am so thank- ful that the owners are being so thoughtful. Hopefully, the youth group will all respect the new rules and have a nice place to gather on Saturday evenings. It can’t be an easy job to be responsible for the upkeep of a big building like this. The youth play volleyball, basketball and other games

there. It will be so much nicer

if some things would be added

for the youth who are handi- capped. I’m sure they would love to be able to play ball with the rest, but they can’t.

Having games there that they can play will be so much more

enjoyable for them than sitting and watching. As parents of handicapped children, we are more aware of this. My heart goes out to all children and adults with disabilities. May God bless people who care for and are thoughtful to others with disabilities. You will be greatly rewarded someday for

it!

We received a wedding in- vitation this week for niece Lovina Coblentz and Benja- min Schwartz. They will join hands in holy matrimony on May 19. Lovina is brother

Amos and Nancy’s daughter,

and the sixth of their children to be married. Lovina was named after me. I still remem- ber how special I felt when

I heard the news almost 20

years ago. Amos and Nancy’s son Ben married a girl named Lovina last spring, and so she changed her name to Lovina Coblentz. So they will still have a Lovi- na Coblentz in the family. They will now also have two “Ben and Lovinas” in their family. What a coincidence! I was asked to be cook at the wedding and wear a smoke blue dress. It looks like I better

get started sewing. I am excited about the announcement of my new

See AMISH COOK, page 6A

Cranberry Creek Nursery & Landscaping Blue Spruce, Norway Spruce, Arborvitae Container Grown - Approximately 2-2
Cranberry Creek
Nursery & Landscaping
Blue Spruce, Norway Spruce, Arborvitae
Container Grown - Approximately 2-2 1 /2 ft. tall
$12 each
Plus a large selection of Shrubs & Shade Trade Trees at low prices
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am – 6pm Sat. 10am – 2pm Closed Sunday
419-538-6568
Location: 2 miles south of Ottawa on SR 65, west on Rd. M, 1 mile on left side
Big or small, we’ll haul it all. Give us a call today for a free
Big or small, we’ll
haul it all. Give us
a call today for a
free estimate.
Materials
Landscaping products available
at our Paulding location.
All products sold
across certified scales.
• Driveway Stone
• Demolition
• Decorative Gravel
• Ditch Cleaning
• Concrete/Play Sand
• Site Prep
• Mason/Pool Sand
• Building Pads
• BULK Top Soil/Peat
• Parking Lots
• Mulch: Bulk & Bag
• Pond Clean-outs
• Flagstone
• Land/Brush Cleaning
• Certified Septic Installation
850 W. Harrison St. • Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-4856
850 W. Harrison St. • Paulding, OH 45879 419-399-4856 In memory of a wonderful Brother I
In memory of a wonderful Brother I hold onto our memories The ones that are
In memory
of a wonderful
Brother
I hold onto our memories
The ones that are so dear
To try to keep you
always close
Now you are not here
You were called,
it was your time
But it is so true
You have left a legacy
There was no one like you
Aaron
You were very special
And I want to say
I feel lost in many ways
Fellers
7-14-58 – 4-28-15
You are not here today
But I will never forget you
And I know I have
been blessed
To have you for my Brother
Because you were the best.
Love,
Lori Ann

4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD

PAULDING PROGRESS

PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
FOR THE RECORD
FOR THE RECORD

FOR THE RECORD

PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
PAULDING PROGRESS FOR THE RECORD
Legals
Legals

NOTICE The following matters are the subject of this public notice by the Ohio Environmental Protec- tion Agency. The complete public notice, including any additional instructions for submitting com- ments, requesting information, a public hearing, or filing an ap- peal may be obtained at: http:// www.epa.ohio.gov/actions.aspx or Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50 W. Town St. P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216. Ph: 614- 644-3037 email: HClerk@epa. ohio.gov Draft OAC Chapter 3745-31 Modification of Permit-To-Install and Operate GERKEN MATERIALS, INC. Crane Twp Rd 105 and County Road 180, Paulding, OH 45879 ID #: P0115925 Date of Action: 04/19/2016 Permit Desc: Chapter 31 modi- fication permit to add the use of slag and an additional fuel. The permit and complete instruc-

tions for requesting information or submitting comments may be obtained at: http://epa.ohio.gov/ dapc/permitsonline.aspx by en- tering the ID # or: Andrea Moore, Ohio EPA DAPC, Northwest District Office, 347 North Dun- bridge Road, Bowling Green, OH 43402. Ph: (419)352-8461

NOTICE The following matters are the subject of this public notice by the Ohio Environmental Protec- tion Agency. The complete public notice, including any additional instructions for submitting com- ments, requesting information, a public hearing, or filing an ap- peal may be obtained at: http:// www.epa.ohio.gov/actions.aspx or Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50 W. Town St. P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216. Ph: 614- 644-3037 email: HClerk@epa. ohio.gov Final Issuance of Administrative Modification to Permit-To-Install

Lafarge North America - Pauld- ing Plant 11435 County Road 176, P.O. Box 160, Paulding, OH 45879-

0226

ID #: P0120369 Date of Action: 04/21/2016 Administrative Modification of PTI P0116153, in conjunction with the company’s federal Con- sent Decree termination. Draft NPDES Permit Renewal - Subject to Revision Latty WWTP E end of Broadway, Latty, OH Facility Description: Wastewa- ter-Municipality Receiving Water: Zielke Ditch ID #: 2PA00073*ID Date of Action: 04/22/2016

NOTICE The following matters are the subject of this public notice by the Ohio Environmental Protec- tion Agency. The complete public notice, including any additional instructions for submitting com-

ments, requesting information, a public hearing, or filing an ap- peal may be obtained at: http:// www.epa.ohio.gov/actions.aspx or Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50 W. Town St. P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216. Ph: 614- 644-3037 email: HClerk@epa. ohio.gov Portable Source Relocation Ap- proval Gerken Materials, Inc ID #: REL03388 Date of Action: 04/22/2016 The equipment for this operation, Crushed and Broken Limestone Mining and Quarrying, has been approved to move to Twp. Rd 105 & Co. Rd. 180 Paulding, OH. All questions, requests for perti- nent information and documenta- tion concerning this action must be directed to Debbie Ko at Ohio EPA DAPC, Northwest District Office, 347 North Dunbridge Road, Bowling Green, OH 43402 or (419)352-8461.

County Court
County Court

Civil Docket:

Snow & Sauerteig LLP, Fort Wayne vs. Kathleen Stickler, Payne. Small claims, satisfied. Credit Adjustments Inc., De- fiance vs. Brock D. Verfaillie, Paulding. Small claims, satis- fied. Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding vs. Michael Sharp, Paulding. Small claims, satis- fied. Portfolio Recovery Associ- ates, Norfolk, Va. vs. Harold Adkins, Oakwood. Other action, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of $558.49. LVNV Funding LLC, Green- ville, S.C. vs. Amber Stevens, Antwerp. Other action, judg- ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $755.69. Sterling Jewelers Inc., Co- lumbus vs. Zachary Litzenberg, Payne. Other action, satisfied. Topmark Federal Credit Union, Lima vs. Alyssa Boberg, Cloverdale. Other action, judg- ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $5,707.52. IOM Health System LP, Cin- cinnati vs. Lindsey Carpenter, Grover Hill. Other action, judg- ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $1,203.65. Credit Acceptance Corpora- tion, Southfield, Mich. vs. Colby Olwin, Paulding. Other action, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of $3,192.64. JBI Properties LLC, Paulding vs. Josh Walters, Paulding and Jessica Acosta, Paulding. Evic- tions, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of $2,330. Van Wert County Hospital, Van Wert vs. Cayonna Torman, Haviland. Other action, judg- ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $3,334.74. Ally Financial Inc., Columbus vs. Chad C. Hahn, Oakwood. Other action, dismissed. Credit Adjustments Inc., Defi- ance vs. Joshua Carlisle, Pauld- ing. Other action, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of

$3,789.02.

Credit Adjustments Inc., De- fiance vs. Amanda M. Treece, Paulding and Michael Treece, Paulding. Other action, judg- ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $2,757.08. Credit Adjustments Inc., De- fiance vs. Joshua Hanenkratt, Defiance. Small claims, judg- ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $1,287.69. Birdstone Inc., Paulding vs. Stephanie Altic, Antwerp. Evic- tions, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of $2,440. Van Wert County Hospital, Van Wert vs. Miriam Lyons, Payne and Chad Lyons, Payne. Other action, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of $1,300. Criminal Docket:

Diana L. Fockler, Defiance, theft; $100 fine, $154.40 costs, $234.75 restitution, 10 days jail and 170 days suspended; proba- tion ordered, complete online Third Millennium theft course, 100 hours community service, 10 days jail or 70 days EMHA. Joe Black, Defiance, disor- derly conduct with persistence; $200 fine, $235.50 costs; main- tain general good behavior. John J. Arnett, Oakwood, at- tempted theft; dismissed. John J. Arnett, Oakwood, criminal trespass; $100 fine, $314 costs, 30 days jail sus- pended; 20 hours community service, no contact with victim

or victim’s property. Joseph A. Rosa, Fort Wayne, possession; $75 fine, $95 costs, three days jail, 6-month license suspension. Kevin K. Cottrell, Antwerp, domestic violence; found not guilty by jury, case dismissed, no costs to defendant. Roger L. Feeney, Payne, fail- ure to confine dog; $50 fine, $124 costs. Mark D. Carnahan, Defi- ance, identity fraud; indicted by Grand Jury, preliminary hearing vacated. Lane T. Hunt, Payne, pos- session; preliminary hearing waived, case bound over to Court of Common Pleas. Ashley Ramirez, Defiance, possession; preliminary hear- ing waived, case bound over to Court of Common Pleas. Esiquiel M. Ramirez, De- fiance, resisting arrest and obstructing justice; waived preliminary hearings for each, cases bound over to Court of Common Pleas. Traffic Docket:

Jason M. Bills, Coldwater, Ohio, 79/65 speed; $33 fine, $85 costs. Haley R. Sinning, Ohio City, 69/55 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs. Glen D. Dunlap, Van Wert, insecure load and over width; $68 fine each count. Mark E. Kramer, Grosse Pointe, Mich., 77/65 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs. Elizabeth A. Sigg, Defiance, failure to yield to emergency vehicle; $68 fine, $77 costs. Joseph N. McVay, Paulding, seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs. Gage S. Rettig, Antwerp, tinted windows; $68 fine, $80 costs. Craig A. Kilgore, Fort Wayne, 78/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs. Eva Rodriguez-Zelinski, Bri- elle, N.J., 89/65 speed; $43 fine, $85 costs. Thomas A.R. Logan Sr., Paulding, driving under suspen- sion; $100 fine suspended, $95 costs, pay all by June 24 for sent for collection (POC). Alex M. Holofchak, Koko- mo, Ind., 75/65 speed; $33 fine, $85 costs. Erica V.D. Brown, Indianap- olis, driving under suspension; dismissed, $87 costs. Carlos Molina, Paulding, failure to control; $68 fine, $80 costs. Mary L. Rajchel, Fort Wayne,

following closely; $53 fine, $80 costs. Rachel K. Juino, Antwerp, 83/65 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs, May 27 POC. James N. Grooms, Napoleon, towing violation; $dismissed without prejudice, $77 costs. Charles P. Vanpelt, Clayton, Mich., seat belt; $30 fine, $50 costs. Brianna M. Frazier, Conti- nental, failure to control; $68 fine, $77 costs, Sept. 30 POC. Lisa A. McMichael, Oak- wood, 70/55 speed; $43 fine, $80 cost.s Christine M. Alexander, Tay- lor, Mich., 85/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Christian A. Jaynes, Fortville, Ind., 77/65 speed; $33 fine, $85 costs. Derek R. Beaumont, Plym- outh, Mich., 83/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Amber M. Williamson, Clarksville, Tenn., stop sign; $53 fine, $80 costs. De W. Lin, Paulding, seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs. Alex M. Miller, Van Wert, seat belt; $30 fine, $50 costs. Brandon A. Garnett, Monro- eville, Ind., 72/55 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Rafik Elsherif, Fort Wayne, 77/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs. Derek L. Miller, Grover Hill, seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs. Bilal M. Muta, Milan, Mich., 81/65 speed; $43 fine, $82 costs. Larry J. Mast, Fort Wayne, 87/65 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs. Dericka C. Banks, Ecorse, Mich., 87/65 speed; $43 fine, $85 costs. April L. Shipman, Mount Vernon, Wash., 89/65 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs. Aaron W. Woodby, Pauld- ing, FRA suspension; $100 fine suspended, $77 costs; May 27 POC. Aaron W. Woodby, Paulding, seat belt; $30 fine; must show proof of doctor’s notice for medical reason for not wearing seat belt. Daniel E. Mirelez, Hoagland, Ind., 80/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Lorraine K. Anderson, Hicksville, stop sign; $53 fine, $77 costs. Vineeta Pherwani, Bloom- field Hills, Mich., 90/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Matthew D. Parks, Oakwood,

towing violation; dismissed at State’s request, $77 costs. Brian L. Paige, Van wert, 66/55 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs. Charles L. Wilson, Clinton Township, Mich., 75/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs. Steven E. McClure Jr., Pauld- ing, FRA suspension; $100 fine with $75 suspended, $77 costs, pay $50 monthly, Aug. 26 POC, proof of insurance provided. Steven E. McClure Jr., Pauld- ing, headlights; $68 fine, abide by above guidelines. William J. Chastain, India- napolis, 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. John E. Gerlach, Noblesville, Ind., 83/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Shamus M. Thompson, Grand Blanc, Mich., 81/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Sara E. Milner, Toledo, 80/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Christine M. Courtney, Syl- vania, failure to yield to emer- gency vehicle; $68 fine, $80 costs. Gabriel Zepeda, La Feria, Texas, 90/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Michael A. Johnson, Hicks- ville, seatbelt; $20 fine, $47 costs. Vernon E. Schwartz, Oak- wood, seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs. Lance D. Jones, Toledo, 89/65 speed; $43 fine, $85 costs. Courtney J. Bennett, Coates- ville, Ind., 77/65 speed; $33 fine, $85 costs. Robert A. Starnes, Howell, Mich., 77/65 speed; $33 fine, $82 costs. Maria E. Jensen, Chelsea, Mich., 78/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs. Tennyson L. Saucedo, Salt Lake City, 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. Trevor C. Hester, Liberty Center, 81/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs. April R. Warner, Paulding, traffic devices/signs; $53 fine, $77 costs. Stone E. Miner, Oakwood, seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs. Mason W. Simonin, Pauld- ing, seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs. Brett W. Nicholson, Clinton Township, Mich. 76/65 speed; $33 fine, $80 costs. Deborah M. Wall, Washing- ton Township, Mich., 80/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.

Two injured, one critically, in crash Monday evening

HAVILAND – The Ohio State Highway Pa- trol’s Van Wert Post is investigating a serious injury crash that occurred at 9:53 p.m. Mon- day, April 25 on Ohio 114, east of Haviland. A 1971 Chevrolet Monte Carlo, driven by James A. Lewis, 51, of Haviland, was travel- ing westbound on 114. A John Deere tractor, pulling a trailer, driven by Evan C. Klop- fenstein, 24, of Haviland, was also traveling westbound. The car struck the rear of Klop- fenstein’s trailer. The front seat passenger of the Chevrolet, Chad E. Snavely, 44, of Haviland, was trapped in the vehicle and removed by mechanical means. Lewis was taken by Scott EMS to the Van Wert County Hospital and subsequently flown

to Parkview Regional Hospital where he was listed in stable condition. Snavely was flown by Samaritan to Parkview Regional Hospital where he was listed in critical condition. Klopfenstein was not injured. Troopers were assisted on scene by the Scott Fire Department and EMS, Paulding County Sheriff’s Office, Samaritan Life Flight, and Gideon Wrecker Service. Alcohol is believed to be a factor in the crash. Seatbelts were not in use at the time of the crash. The crash remains under investigation. The Ohio State Highway Patrol reminds motorists to wear your seat belt and don’t drive distracted or after the use of alcohol or prescription medication.

or after the use of alcohol or prescription medication. Peggy Emerson was the speaker at the

Peggy Emerson was the speaker at the Kiwanis Club of Pauld- ing County meeting. Emerson, director of the Paulding Chamber of Commerce, recently attended a meeting with some legislators in Columbus, telling about a new wind farm being proposed the county north of Payne. She showed maps of the area and dis- cussed the terms and conditions they will follow in building the wind farm. Jim States was program chairman.

Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Village’s water treatment plant

Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:

DATE

HIGH

LOW

PRECIPITATION

April 19

83

48

-0-

April 20

66

47

-0-

April 21

76

47

0.01”

April 22

76

47

0.13”

April 23

63

42

0.28”

April 24

63

39

-0-

April 25

75

39

-0-

Common Pleas
Common Pleas

Civil Docket

The term “et al.” refers to and oth- ers; “et vir.,” and husband; “et ux.,” and wife.

James H. Gray, Antwerp vs. Paulding County Hospital, Paulding. Declaratory judg- ment. JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., Columbus vs. Brian L. Miller, Paulding and Linda A. Miller, Paulding and Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclosures. Marriage Licenses Zachary James Neace, 24, Antwerp, General Motors and Elise Andrea Schroeder, 24, Antwerp, medical assistant. Parents are Charlie M. Neace and Virginia R. Meredith; and Erwin L. Schroeder and An- nette Simonis. Steven Matthew Crates, 41, Payne, disabled and Tabitha Marie Pratt, 32, Payne, Chief Supermarket. Parents are Steven K. Crates and Sheila

Crates; and Samuel Pratt and Gale Trimble. Joshua Michael Penning- ton, 32, Paulding, manager and Jessica Marie Porter, 33, Paulding, teacher. Parents are Michael Pennington and Brenda Dangler; and Gregory Porter and Christine Good. Administration Docket None filed. Criminal Docket Christopher D. Betts, 41, Paulding, will be sentenced on May 23 following a recent court appearance for posses- sion of meth (F5). He was released on his own recogni- zance on the conditions of no arrests, no drugs or alcohol and that he remain compliant with Westwood Behavioral Health Center. Brianna J. Watson, 27, of Defiance, changed her plea to guilty of trafficking in drugs (F4). She will be sentenced on May 18.

Property transfers
Property transfers

The term “et al.” refers to and others; “et vir.,” and husband; “et ux.,” and wife .

Auglaize Township Karisa Long by Sheriff to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee; Sec. 27, 5.01 acres. Sheriff’s deed. Blue Creek Township John P. Jr. and Patricia I. Rose to Jimmie J. Poling; Sec. 24, Lot 5, Pratt Parcels, 0.52 acre. Warranty deed. Lois A. Joder to Lois A. and Wayne C. Joder; Sec. 28, 74.435 acres and Sec. 32, 100 acres. Survivorship deed. Brown Township Teddy J. and Valeria S. Yates to Craig M. and Andrea S. Dobbelaere; Lots 174 and 176, Original Plat, 0.372 acre. War- ranty deed. Carryall Township William N. Rice to William N. and Raycene Rice; Sec. 15, 39.797 acres. Warranty deed. Crane Township Donna Parrish to Craig A. and Pamela K. Mills; Sec. 9 and Sec. 16, 22.963 acres. Warranty deed. Emerald Township Joseph P. Bear to Todd L. Richardson and Bernadette Bear; Sec. 21, Lots 6-9, Woodland Subdivision, 1.06 acres. Warranty deed. Bryan D. James to Bridget K. Ruppert; Sec. 6, 7.268 acres. Quit claim. Jackson Township Guy S. and Marcine D. Watkins to Brennan K. and Margaret A. Huss; Sec. 27, 5.47 acres. Warranty deed. Antwerp Village Helen E. Major Life Estate, dec. to Dan B. Major, et al.; Sec. 34, Outlots. Affidavit. Melrose Village Enviroscape Erosion Control Materials Ltd. to Adam and Angel Hibbard; Lots 50-51, Original Plat, 0.17 acre. Warranty deed. Teddy J. and Valeria S. Yates to Craig M. and Andrea S. Dobbelaere; Lot 175, 0.172 acre. Warranty deed. Paulding Village Donna J. Lane to Maribel Ramos; Lot 141, 0.03 acre. War- ranty deed. Kathleen D. Roth to Marc D. Shuherk and Virginia M. Shuherk; Lot 6, Klingler Addition, 0.24 acre. Warranty deed. Nicholas H. Martinez to Nicole K. and Eric J. Gross; Lots 230 and 235, 0.13 acre. Warranty deed. Jie Li to Desiree L. Dunbar; Lot 37, Noneman Emerald Acres Allotment #3, 0.35 acre. Warranty deed. Mary E. Grubb, dec. to John H. Grubb; Lots 15 and 16, Noneman Subdivision, 0.248 acre. Affidavit. Levi Cain Jr., dec. to Elsie Cain; Lot 14, Dix Second Addi- tion, 0.2 acre. Affidavit. Payne Village Coty Franklin et al. by Sheriff to Samuel D. and Christina M. Flynn; Lot H, Gibson Third Addition, 0.58 acre. Sheriff’s deed.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 5A

Police Report
Police Report

ACCIDENT REPORTS Thursday, April 21 3:40 p.m. Daniel J. Krick, 19, of Paulding, was cited for improper backing following a two-vehicle crash on East Wall Street. Re- ports say he backed a 2002 Dodge truck from his driveway into a 2005 Pontiac Bonneville parked across the street. There was no damage to the truck. The car had minor damage. Krick was unhurt. INCIDENT REPORTS Saturday, April 16 1:03 a.m. Someone rang a complainant’s door bell on North Main Street. 9:43 a.m. Police responded to an alarm on McDonald Pike. They found the building se- cure. 2:53 p.m. Bike was reported missing from West Jackson Street. 4:06 p.m. Neighbor problems were handled on North Main Street. 5:20 p.m. A West Perry Street resident told police an unwanted man was in their house and garage. 9:15 p.m. A caller told officers a man exited a vehicle and punched the female driver before walking away. The suspect was not found. 10:20 p.m. Tires were cut again on a North Main Street resident’s vehicle. 11 p.m. Sugar Street resident requested no contact with a second individual. Sunday, April 17 12:32 a.m. A North Main Street resident re- quested no contact with another subject. 11:30 a.m. Open burning was reported in the area of Garfield Avenue and Miller Parkway Drive. The flames were put out. 12:40 p.m. Police were told by a key holder to disregard an alarm on McDonald Pike. 12:45 p.m. Possible shoplifting at a North Williams Street business was investigated. 10:30 p.m. Junk notices were served on two Nancy Street addresses. Monday, April 18 9:18 a.m. A driver told police while in the 200 block of North Williams Street, their truck’s side mirror struck that of a truck headed in the opposite direction in a construc- tion zone. 10:19 a.m. Backing mishap in the Live Oak

Cemetery was documented. 7:05 p.m. Possible domestic was observed of a couple walking along North Williams Street with a stroller. 7:35 p.m. A man told police a kid was “get-

ting beat up pretty bad” in the area of Klingler Road and Main Street. No one was there when police arrived. 8:19 p.m. Paulding EMS was called to the Paulding Place parking area for a male found unconscious in a truck. He was taken to the hospital for evaluation. 11:42 p.m. Paulding County Hospital called for a combative patient. Tuesday, April 19 3:30 p.m. Police fielded a complaint about violations of the two-hour parking along the 100 block of East Jackson Street. 6:05 p.m. Theft of a garden tractor from Flatrock Drive was investigated. Information about the vehicle was entered into an online data base. Wednesday, April 20 9:41 a.m. The police department was no- tified of an approved application for a tem- porary alcohol permit. Paulding Eagles was given permission by the Ohio Department of Commerce, Liquor Division to serve beer and intoxicating liquor by the glass or container during an event at the Paulding County Fair- grounds, May 6-8. They may serve until 1 a.m. 9:56 a.m. Village solicitor sent a letter to a West Jackson Street resident about a violation of a zoning ordinance. 3:23 p.m. Two vehicles were involved in an accident in a North Williams Street business drive-through. 7:53 p.m. Shed fire on West Perry Street may result in charges against two juveniles. Thursday, April 21 10:35 a.m. AEP called about damaged equipment. It appeared to have been shot with

a .22 from a northerly direction. 12:07 p.m. Property damage on North Dix Street was investigated. 3:15 p.m. Theft by fraud was reported by

a North Cherry Street resident. The matter is under investigation. 11:02 p.m. Prowler complaint came in from West Perry Street.

Commissioners’ Journal
Commissioners’ Journal
came in from West Perry Street. Commissioners’ Journal Melinda Krick/ Paulding County Progress Solid Ground has

Melinda Krick/Paulding County Progress

Solid Ground has started work on Phase 2 of the courthouse landscaping project. The work includes raising the veterans’ memorial on the courthouse lawn.

Commissioners’ Journal April 4,

2016

This 4th day of April, 2016, the Board of County Commissioners met in regu- lar session with the following members present: Tony Zartman, Roy Klopfen- stein, Mark Holtsberry, and Nola Ginter, Clerk. MEETING NOTES OF APPOINT- MENTS Judge Tiffany Beckman; Prosecutor Joe Burkard; and Sheriff Jason Landers - Judge Beckman lead the discussion regarding courthouse security. Several options were discussed of ways to make the courthouse a more safe environment. All in attendance agreed this is something that needs to be looked into. Each agreed to investigate some of the options and re- port back next week. Matt Miller farms the Eaton Farm north of US 24. He has been noticing increased vandalism on the tillable fields and the surrounding area, including the cemetery. The vandalism is in the form of rutting and tearing up the ground, mak- ing the tillable land less productive. The same activity in the cemetery makes it hard to mow and maintain. The sheriff’s deputies have been patrolling the area more frequently. Violators will be pros- ecuted. Chad Crosby, Engineer’s Office, opened the bid for the 2016 Joint Town- ship Chip Seal Project (see resolution below). Ben Moore, Stateline Precision Farms, presented an aerial map of the Jacob Farm for the commissioners’ review. He noted the acreage will be planted to beans this growing season. Brian Shuherk, Solid Ground, pre- sented an estimate for reinforcing and raising the veterans’ memorial on the courthouse lawn. Various options were discussed regarding the type of mate- rial to use. Additional estimates will be sought. Shuherk informed the commissioners he plans to begin Phase 2 of the court- house landscaping project this week by taking out some bushes and grinding the stumps/roots. He also noted some paint- ing will be done this weekend, weather permitting. EXECUTIVE SESSION A motion was made by Holtsberry to go into executive session at 8:48 a.m. with the Paulding County Prosecutor to discuss legal matters. At 9:01 a.m. all members present agreed to adjourn the executive session and go into regular session. IN THE MATTER OF AMENDING THE RESOLUTION AUTHORIZ- ING THE PAULDING COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT TO APPLY FOR, ACCEPT, AND ENTER INTO A WATER POLLU- TION CONTROL LOAN FUND

AGREEMENT ON BEHALF OF PAULDING COUNTY FOR THE REPAIR AND/OR REPLACEMENT OF HOME SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEMS Holtsberry moved to adopt the follow- ing resolution:

BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of County Commissioners does hereby authorize Carol Sanford, R.S., Envi- ronmental Health Director, Paulding

County Health Department, to apply for

a WPCLF loan, sign all the documents

for and enter into a Water Pollution Con- trol Loan Fund with the Ohio Environ- mental Protection Agency and the Ohio Water Development Authority for the repair and/or replacement of home sew- age treatment systems on behalf of the County of Paulding, Ohio. IN THE MATTER OF THE COUNTY OF DEFIANCE, THE COUNTY OF PAULDING AND THE CITY OF DEFIANCE EN- TERING INTO AN AMENDMENT TO THE PARTNERSHIP AGREE- MENT WITH THE MAUMEE VAL- LEY SOUTH CHIP CONSORTIUM

Holtsberry moved to adopt the follow- ing resolution:

WHEREAS, it is more and more dif- ficult for low and moderate-income citi- zens of our community to afford safe and decent housing; and WHEREAS, workforce housing is becoming an economic issue not only in Paulding County, but throughout the Maumee Valley Region; and WHEREAS, Defiance County, the City of Defiance and Paulding County entered into a Partnership Agreement establishing the Maumee Valley East CHIP Consortium, effective May 27, 2014, to take advantage of housing pro- grams available under the CHIP Program administered by the Ohio Development Services Agency, Office of Community Development; and WHEREAS, Section 8 of the Partner- ship Agreement has been amended to ad- dress the HUD requirement of a separate written agreement for all HOME-funded

activities, as outlined in 24 CFR 92.504. The Amended Partnership Agreement of the Maumee Valley South CHIP Consor- tium is dated April 4, 2016; now, there-

fore

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Paulding County Board of Commissioners hereby execute the proposed “Amendment to The Maumee Valley South CHIP Con-

sortium Partnership Agreement” with the City of Defiance, Defiance County and Paulding County. IN THE MATTER OF RECEIV- ING BIDS FOR THE 2016 JOINT TOWNSHIP CHIP SEAL PROJECT This 4th day of April, 2016, being the day advertised in the West Bend News,

a paper of general circulation within the

County, as per Section 307.86 of the Ohio Revised Code, bids were received and opened for the 2016 Joint Township Chip Seal Project, to-wit; BIDDER; BID AMOUNT Ward Construction Company, Leipsic;

$273,718.30

The Paulding County Engineer’s esti- mate for the project is $347,456.03. The specifications will be studied with a de- termination to be made later.

DUV to meet in New Haven

NEW HAVEN – Members of the Rebecca Otis Tent #54 Daughters of the Union Veter- ans of the Civil War will meet Saturday, May 14 at the George- town Branch Library, Room B. For more information, contact Loretta McCann at 260-632- 0258, Vickie Day at 260-909- 0091 or Caroline Zimmerman at

419-258-2222.

Democrats meet

PAULDING – Members of the Paulding County Demo-

cratic Central Committee will convene for a meeting May

10. They will gather at 7 p.m.

in the Paulding Eagles’ hall.

Locals testify on legislation to help the building materials industry

COLUMBUS – State Rep. Tony Burkley (R-Payne) an- nounced that House Concur- rent Resolution 10 received a second hearing in the House Commerce and Labor Com- mittee. Joining him in support of the resolution were Jeff Scott, plant manager for the La- farge Paulding cement plant, and Jerry Zielke, director of Paulding County Economic Development Inc., who both provided proponent testimony to the committee members. “HCR 10 is incredibly im- portant to our industry be- cause a heavily foreign sub- sidized cement being shipped into our market could drasti- cally alter any chance at being

competitive and those of us that are supporting our com- munities would be on the los- ing end of this transaction,” said Scott. “The Lafarge plant in Paulding County is very im- portant to the northwest Ohio region and has a major eco- nomic impact on the region,” said Zielke in his testimony. “It is very important that HCR 10 move forward as soon as possible.” The goal of HCR 10 is to help Ohio jobs by urging the Office of the United States Trade Representative to en- sure that no World Trade Or- ganization rules are violated in regard to government fund- ing of the McInnis Cement

and the Port-Daniel-Gas- cons cement plant located in Quebec, Canada. Paulding County is home to a branch of Lafarge North America and the cement plant is a large employer in northwest Ohio. “I appreciate the positive impact this company has had on the citizens of Paulding County and northwest Ohio region,” said Burkley “HCR 10 contains the right message to send to our trade leaders that we need swift action to support this industry.” House Concurrent Reso- lution will now await a vote by the Commerce and Labor Committee, before moving to the House floor for further consideration.

Sheriff’s Report
Sheriff’s Report

ACCIDENTS:

Three car/deer.

INCIDENTS:

Friday, April 15

10:48 a.m. Trash bags were found along Road

179 in Auglaize Township.

1:01 p.m. Grover Hill theft complaint was inves- tigated. 1:50 p.m. Dog complaint was handled on Road

115 in Emerald Township.

2:15 p.m. Mary Fast was arrested on a warrant. 3:03 p.m. Trash was dumped on property along Road 424 in Carryall Township. 4:27 p.m. Unauthorized use of a dumpster was looked into on Ohio 66 in Brown Township. 4:42 p.m. Possible animal neglect was investi- gated on Road 114 in Paulding Township. 5:16 p.m. Defiance County Sheriff’s office re- quested a welfare check on a female on Road 138 in Brown Township. 9:37 p.m. Coon hunters were seen in a woods along Road 108 in Jackson Township. Saturday, April 16 12:17 a.m. Deputies assisted Antwerp Police

Department attempt to locate a vehicle involved in vandalism. 12:45 a.m. Four-wheelers were seen trespassing along Road 159 in Brown Township. 2:38 a.m. Deputies arrested James D. Rice Jr. on a Defiance County warrant. 1:27 p.m. Four-wheelers were seen operating on the streets of Payne. 1:49 p.m. Dog complaint was handled on Road

13 in Carryall Township.

3:10 p.m. Field fire on Road 138 was doused by two Paulding fire units and two from Oakwood. They were on the scene about 45 minutes. Pauld- ing EMS stood by. 3:31 p.m. Three Paulding fire units and two from Auglaize Township responded to a fire near

the intersection of Roads 156 and 137. They were about half an hour. 4:23 p.m. Dog complaint was handled on US

127 in Paulding Township.

4:57 p.m. Trespassing complaint was looked into on US 127 in Crane Township. 6:16 p.m. Brian Cutlip was arrested on a war- rant. 7:20 p.m. Breaking and entering was investi- gated on Ohio 637 in Latty Township. 8:07 p.m. Putnam County Sheriff’s office re- layed information to deputies about a fight. Sunday, April 17 12:45 a.m. Prowler was noted at a Jackson Township along Ohio 613. 8:02 a.m. Dog complaint on Road 11 in Harri- son Township was looked into. 11:05 a.m. Car/deer crash along Road 171 in Auglaize Township was documented. 12:23 a.m. Breaking and entering was investi- gated on Road 72 in Benton Township. 2:12 p.m. Suspicious vehicle was reported along Road 143 in Emerald Township. 4:33 p.m. Dog complaint on Ohio 613 in Jack- son Township was taken care of.

9:56 p.m. Deputy reported possession at a loca- tion on US 127 in Paulding Township. 11:16 p.m. Domestic situation was handled in Payne. Monday, April 18 12:08 a.m. Deputies delivered a message for Van Wert Hospital on Road 114 in Paulding Township. 4:26 p.m. Dog complaint came in from West Caroline Street in Paulding. 5:02 p.m. Brown Township resident of Road

179 lodged a dog complaint.

6:07 p.m. A Jackson Township resident of

Road 131 told deputies there were cows in their yard. Tuesday, April 19 7:11 a.m. Litter was noted on Road 33 north of Road 167 in Carryall Township. 10:25 a.m. Dog complaint was handled on Em- erald Road in Paulding.

11:08 a.m. Car/deer crash was handled on Road

77 near Road 66 in Washington Township.

1:29 p.m. Brown Township resident of Road

122 made a dog complaint.

1:32 p.m. Dog complaint was handled on Road

123 in Emerald Township.

2:43 p.m. Cecil resident made a dog complaint. 3:30 p.m. Dog complaint came in from Road

230 in Carryall Township.

3:32 p.m. Deputies took a dog complaint from Ohio 49 in Carryall Township. 3:42 p.m. Juvenile allegedly made a threat on US 127 in Blue Creek Township. 3:48 p.m. Suspicious vehicle was noted on Road 94 in Benton Township. 4:38 p.m. Ohio State Highway Patrol relayed

information about a shed that fell from a trailer on Ohio 66 in Brown Township. 7:51 p.m. Debit card information was reported stolen and used by another person according to a Haviland resident. 9:44 p.m. Paulding police requested a mower be entered in the online data base as stolen. 10:12 p.m. Custody dispute was handled on Road 220 in Carryall Township. Wednesday, April 20 7:05 a.m. Facebook threats were reported from US 127 in Blue Creek Township. 11:35 a.m. Theft complaint was investigated in Antwerp. 12:49 p.m. Deputies responded to a panic alarm that sounded in Grover Hill. 1:26 p.m. Rabbit cages were found dumped along Road 98 in Paulding Township. 1:39 p.m. Door alarm sounded from Road 111 in Jackson Township. 2:51 p.m. Student was allegedly making threats on US 127 in Blue Creek Township. 4:20 p.m. Dog complaint was handled on Road

153 in Auglaize Township.

5:03 p.m. Juvenile matter was looked into on Ohio 500 in Paulding Township. 6:59 p.m. Trespass complaint was lodged from Oakwood. 7:10 p.m. An Oakwood man told deputies he had been threatened by a neighbor. 7:53 p.m. Shed fire in Paulding was extin- guished by two Paulding fire units in about 20 minutes. Paulding EMS stood by. Thursday, April 21 6:54 a.m. Sheriff reported a car along Road 192 west of Ohio 49 in Carryall Township with the driver passed out. 9:37 a.m. Two-car collision in a parking lot in Payne was documented. 6:42 p.m. Possible child abuse was reported in Jackson Township. 11:40 p.m. Car/deer crash was handled on Ohio 49 in Carryall Township. Friday, April 22 4:40 a.m. Suspicious vehicle was spotted on Road 166 in Brown Township.

Paulding Mayor’s Court
Paulding
Mayor’s Court

These cases are listed on a monthly basis as they are paid in full.

Beverly D. Apple, Paulding, improper backing; $110 fine and costs. Katrina M. Barajas, Fort Wayne, improper turn; $110 fine and costs. Gregory E. Eckley, Loda, Ill., disobeyed traffic light; dismissed. Gregory E. Eckley, Loda, Ill., windshields and wipers; $150 fine and costs. Patrick M. Elkins II, Cecil, squealing tires; $100 fine and costs. Scott R. Haney, Paulding, improper backing; $110 fine and costs. Aaron T. Powell, Defiance, speed; dismissed. Jonathon M. Villarreal, Cecil, disobeyed traffic light; $115 fine and costs.

Deputies respond to calls at WTHS

HAVILAND – A series of calls for law enforcement to come to Wayne Trace High School last week has re- sulted in a report being reviewed by the prosecutor’s office for possible charges. Service requests at the Paulding

County Sheriff’s office indicate deputies

were called to the school once on Tuesday, April 19 and twice on Wednesday, April

20. All three were apparently the result of

one incident. “We had people down there three times in two days,” confirmed Sheriff Jason Landers on Monday. The first call came at 3:42 p.m. on April 19; the second at 7:05 a.m. on April 20 and the final call at 2:51 p.m. the same day.

“The call on the 19th I think was irrel-

evant,” said the Sheriff, adding that an overheard comment was misconstrued and the school handled the matter. Talk of a threat on a student’s Facebook account the next morning was the cause of the second complaint, lodged on the 20th. “It was the result of the first call, based on what was heard at the school,” said Sheriff Landers. He said his deputies stood by that morning while school offi- cials spoke with several students. The last call from the school was based on further talk centering on the second in- cident according to the sheriff. He said it was this call that generated the report sent to the prosecutor. As a result of this episode, which al- legedly involved off-the-cuff comments,

the Sheriff believes students at Wayne

Trace “

the cops show up

which we live. In response to an email inquiry from the Paulding Progress office, superintendent Steve Arnold said, “We had a situation at Wayne Trace JH/HS one day last week. Our JH/HS administrative staff worked cooperatively with our county sheriff’s of- fice and believe the situation was handled correctly.” “We cannot discuss the discipline of students, but we are confident that Wayne Trace JH/SH is as safe as it has always been,” he concluded. Sheriff Landers said he was not aware of any charges being filed at press time.

realize

when you say this stuff ”

due to the times in

6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016 PAULDING PROGRESS COMMUNITY Anniversary MR. and MRS.

PAULDING PROGRESS

PAULDING PROGRESS COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY

Anniversary
Anniversary

MR. and MRS. KEN BARNES

PAULDING – Ken and Marsha Barnes celebrated their 45th wedding anniver- sary on April 24. They were married in 1971 at Trinity Friends Church in Van Wert. They have resided in Paulding since 1973. Three children were born to this union: Jenny (Lea- man), Brian and Jeremy Barnes. There are seven grandchildren: Sabrinah, Abbie, Hannah, Xander, Brayton, Sarah and Eli. The couple will spend time in the Cleveland-East Lake area for their anniversary.

Hannah, Xander, Brayton, Sarah and Eli. The couple will spend time in the Cleveland-East Lake area

Fight the Bite: Avoid diseases carried by mosquitoes, ticks

COLUMBUS – With the arrival of mosquito and tick season in Ohio, the Ohio De- partment of Health (ODH) urges Ohioans to “fight the bite” and take precautions to prevent mosquito bites and tick bites to avoid diseases they may carry, such as Zika virus, West Nile virus and Lyme disease. In Ohio, ticks are usually active April through Sep- tember, and mosquitoes May through October. “You can take some sim- ple precautions at home and when traveling to prevent potentially serious mosquito- borne and tick-borne diseas- es,” said ODH medical direc- tor Dr. Mary DiOrio. “Zika virus has received a lot of attention as a disease that can be transmitted by some mosquitoes, but there are oth- er mosquito-borne diseases as well, including West Nile virus. Ticks also can transmit diseases like Lyme disease.” Mosquitoes The primary mosquito that transmits Zika virus is found in the tropics and southern U.S., but it is not known to be estab- lished in Ohio. A “cousin” of the mosquito is found in parts of Ohio and may potentially transmit Zika virus. A type of mosquito found in Ohio can transmit West Nile virus, and the state reported 35 cases last year. Mosquitoes can live indoors and outdoors, and some spe- cies bite during the day while others bite at dusk and dawn.

Here are some tips to avoid mosquito bites and prevent mosquito-borne diseases:

• If you are outdoors when

mosquitoes are most active, be

sure to wear long pants, a long- sleeved shirt, shoes and socks.

• Wear light-colored cloth-

ing, which is less attractive to mosquitoes.

• Use EPA-registered mos-

quito repellent and follow the label directions.

• Wear clothing and gear

treated with permethrin, an in- secticide (do not apply perme- thrin directly to skin).

• Install or repair screens

on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out of your home. Here are some tips to elim-

inate mosquito breeding sites around your home:

• Eliminate standing water.

• Empty or remove wa-

ter-holding containers, such as buckets, unused flower pots and bird baths.

• Make sure all roof gutters

are clean and draining proper-

ly. • Keep child wading pools empty and on their sides when not being used. Ticks Ohio ticks can transmit a variety of diseases, including

Lyme disease, and the state re- ported 154 cases last year. Here are some tips to avoid tick bites and prevent tick- borne diseases:

• Avoid direct contact with

ticks by avoiding wooded and bushy areas with high grass and leaf litter, and by walking in the center of trails.

• Wear clothing and gear

treated with permethrin, an in-

secticide (do not apply perme-

thrin directly to skin).

• Use EPA-registered tick

repellent and follow the label directions.

Here are some tips for find- ing and removing ticks at-

tached to your body using fine-

tipped tweezers:

• Use fine-tipped tweezers

to grasp the tick as close to the

skin’s surface as possible.

• Pull upward with steady,

even pressure. Do not twist or jerk the tick, which can cause

the mouth parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth

easily, leave it alone and let the

skin heal.

• After removing the tick,

thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub or

soap and water.

• Dispose of a live tick by

submersing it in alcohol, plac- ing it in a sealed bag/contain- er, wrapping it tightly in tape or flushing it down the toilet. Never crush a tick with your fingers.

• Avoid folklore remedies

such as “painting” a tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly or using heat to make the tick detach from your skin. Go to the ODH website at

odh.ohio.gov for more infor- mation about how to prevent mosquito-borne and tick- borne diseases and other in- formation and resources.

From Baby to Graduate It seemed like just a few short years --Graduate-- Graduate’s Name
From Baby to Graduate
It seemed like just a few short years
--Graduate--
Graduate’s Name
Name of School
Date of Birth
Parents Name
Grandparents Name
***NOTE: These are a reduced version of what your picture will actually look like.
Published Wednesday, May 18
“Baby To Graduate Review”

Now’s the time to reserve your space for graduates, from the Paulding County area, a spot in this “special edition” just for them. Just bring in or mail with coupon below your graduates’ favorite baby picture along with their senior picture to be published side by side on May 18. What a special way to show off that graduate that you’re so proud of. We will also include- College, Jr. High and Kindergarten Graduates

Deadline is May 6th

Enclose Check for $20 and mail to “Baby to Graduate Review” Paulding Progress

PO Box 180 Paulding, OH 45879 or email to pauldingpaper@ yahoo.org

with payment information

Review” Paulding Progress PO Box 180 Paulding, OH 45879 or email to pauldingpaper@ yahoo.org with payment

Graduate’s Name

School

Birthdate

Parents

Grandparents

Due to limited space, parents and grandparents only.

Due to limited space, parents and grandparents only. Harold Sinn (left) and his twin brother Gerald

Harold Sinn (left) and his twin brother Gerald are celebrating their 80th birthday this weekend in Paulding. The pair grew up in Briceton, but both now live out-of-state.

Sinn twins note 80th birthday

PAULDING – On April 30, 1936, twin sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Sinn at their home in Briceton. Gerald Ray Sinn, the “older one,” was born

30 minutes before his brother, and weighed in

at 7 pounds.

Harold Ralph Sinn, as he would say, the

“handsome one,” weighed 9 pounds at birth. The pair grew up with three brothers and one sister in Briceton. The town was more

populated in those days. The people were

neighbors and friends. The Sinn brothers attended Latty High School through their sophomore year, when the school closed after the Class of 1952. They

graduated in 1954 from Blue Creek High School. Both played baseball and basketball plus summer team sports for several years. Harold now lives in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has two daughters, Tamra and Nicki, who both live near Boston, Mass. Gerald resides in Carpentersville, Ill. with his wife, Marilyn. Their son, Greg, lives in Seattle, Wa. while their daughter, Jana, lives in Carpentersville. Friends and family are welcome to attend an open house in honor of the birthdays. It will be held from 5-10 p.m. on Saturday, April 30 in the Black Swamp Nature Center, Pauld- ing.

Birthdays
Birthdays

April 30 – Dave Gilbert, Addyson Hormann, Derek Koch, Brittany Mawer, Mitch Rothenbuhler, Edgar Spears. May 1 – Leona Aldred, Kara Baumle, Julia Grant, Frieda Hammons, Stephanie Mumma, Alyssa Nardone, Tatrina Neer, Ashlynn Rice, Courtney Roughton. May 2 – Victoria Geib, Jared Grace, Kathi Gross, Jordan Lotz, Deb Mericle, Audrey Smiley. May 3 – Duke Albert, Ashley Justinger, Brian Lichty, Clara Moreno, Elizabeth Tipton, Jason Unger.

May 4 – Alycia Adkins, Bill Edwards, Linda Hammersmith,

Troy Johnson, Jalyn Klopfenstein, Kate Sinn, Kenny Thomas, Oliver Zamarripa, Wesley Zeller. May 5 – Maggie Blair, Holly Douglas, Darlene Harpster, Nicholas Lawhorn, Jaylynn Parrish, Kristie Schweller, Sergio

Saldana, Diana Sierer. May 6 – Kathey Niblett, Delaney Dachenhaus, Hunter Du- gan, Derrick Miller, Eliza Doan Panico.

Anniversaries
Anniversaries

May 1 – Rich and Amanda Jasso, Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Manz. May 2 – Dave and Kris Stallkamp, Kevin and Holly Vance. May 3 – Dave and Jeanne Fellers. May 4 – Jeff and Brenda Clark, Dave and Kate Dens- more. May 5 – Shawn and Keely Kochensparger. May 6 – Butch and There- sa Caryer, Bud and Marsha Henke.

n AMISH COOK

Continued from Page 3A

cookbook coming out next year. It has taken

hours of time and effort to get this done. What

a pleasure working for the editors at Herald

Press. They have been understanding through all our busy times. I’ll share this recipe, which will be in the cookbook. It was my mom’s recipe, and it is a family favorite. God bless everyone! APPLE CRISP

9 cups apples, peeled and sliced

1 cup sugar (more or less, depending on vari- ety of apples)

2 tablespoons cinnamon Crumb Topping 3/4 cup butter (12 tablespoons) 1-1/2 cup white sugar 2 cups flour pinch of cinnamon In a large bowl, toss apples with sugar and cinnamon. Pour into 9x13-inch baking dish. Combine crumb topping ingredients in a bowl with a pastry cutter or two forks. Mix until coarse and spread over apples. Bake at 350° for 45 minutes or until apples are tender.

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Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 7A

You sure look nice today

Laughter is as good as med- icine, they say. There have been times in my own life that I thought I would never laugh again. With loss, came tears; with time, tears became smiles. Then one day, I found that even though I seemed to not be able to find the real “me” anymore, my nature to laugh and enjoy life wasn’t

lost. It was still deep within. I was still “me.” Any one who knows me is aware that I like to joke and sometimes act a fool. Maybe when you grow older, you re- alize that you only live once and we can choose to live with bitterness or make the choice

a penny for your Thoughts By Nancy Whitaker
a
penny
for your Thoughts
By Nancy Whitaker

rael are Israelites, and the peo- ple of Canaan are Canaanites,

to

try and be happy and even

are the people of Paris called

be silly. So many situations arise that are very difficult, but God, family, friends and a

Parasites?” One Sunday morning, the pastor noticed little Alex was

sense of humor, if you can find

staring up at the large plaque

it,

will help get to the top of

that hung in the foyer of the

that mountain. Sometimes, if you simply tell someone that they look pretty today or just smile and say a simple “Hello” it could make their whole day better. The other day, while going through a drive-through fast food establishment, I looked behind me and saw a lady in the car back of me. For some

church. The plaque was cov- ered with names, and small American flags were mounted on either side of it. The 7-year- old had been staring at the plaque for some time, so the pastor walked up, stood be- side the boy, and said quietly, “Good morning Alex.” “Good morning pastor,” re- plied the young man, still fo-

reason, I told the server to put that lady’s food on my bill. I did not know her and she did not know me, but just the feel- ing of doing something special made me feel good inside. Another thing that made me feel good today was that

cused on the plaque. “Pastor McGhee, what is this?” Alex asked. “Well, son, it’s a memorial to all the young men and women who died in the service.” Soberly, they stood togeth- er, staring at the large plaque.

I

found and read some of

Little Alex’s voice was bare-

the funny things that kids say in church. It is amazing the things a child says that brought to my mind Art Lin-

ly audible when he asked, “Which service, the 8:30 or the 11:00?” A father took his 5-year-

kletter’s TV show and the seg- ment “Kids Say the Darnedest Things.” Remember that one? I am going to share some

old son to several baseball games where “The Star-Span- gled Banner” was sung before the start of each game. Then

of

these funny things kids say

the father and son attended

in

church and maybe you will

a church on a Sunday short-

enjoy them as much as I did. A little girl, Casey, asked her Sunday school teacher a question: “If the people of Is-

ly before Independence Day. The congregation sang “The Star-Spangled Banner,” and after everyone sat down, the

little boy suddenly yelled out, “PLAY BALL!!!” A 6-year-old was overheard reciting the Lord’s Prayer at a church service: “And forgive us our trash passes as we for- give those who passed trash against us.” A Sunday School teacher challenged her children to take some time on Sunday after- noon to write a letter to God. They were to bring their letter back the following Sunday. One little boy wrote, “Dear God, We had a good time at church today. Wish you could have been there.” A Sunday school teacher was carefully explaining the story of Elijah the Prophet and the false prophets of Baal. She explained how Elijah built the altar, put wood upon it, cut the steer in pieces and laid it upon the altar. And then Elijah com- manded the people of God to fill four barrels of water and pour it over the altar. He had them do this four times. “Now, said the teacher, “can anyone in the class tell me why the Lord would have Elijah pour water over the steer on the altar?” A little girl raised her hand with great enthusiasm and said “To make the gravy!” I hope some of these small jokes added a smile to your day today. The sun is shining so that should make us all feel brighter. Life was made to be lived. Life was made for smiles, laughter and peace. Life was made for love, giving and sharing. Life was made for understanding, listening, and yes even for crying. Have you ever felt like you have just lost “you” in sad situations? How can a person find real happiness? How can we all find peace and get along together? Did you enjoy read- ing what kids say in church? Let me know and I’ll give you a Penny for your Thoughts. Well, let me end by saying this, “Wow! You look nice to- day.”

Master Gardeners to hold Garden Treasures contest

Inaugural contest planned during Paulding County Fair

PAULDING – If thoughts of winter are swift-

ly being replaced by visions of sunshine yellow

daffodils, cherry red tulips and tiny crocuses, if you are dreaming of a colorful landscape and if your hands are itching to dig in the soil, then the Master Gardeners Volunteers of Paulding County have just the right remedy. During the Paulding County Fair, June 13-18, local residents are invited to enter the Garden Treasures contest and possibly becoming a prize winner. Fairy gardens (or miniature gardens) and best artistic display of house plants are the two catego- ries. Participants can enter one item in each cate- gory. Inspiration can come from many sources, in- cluding books, magazines and Pinterest. Entrants will be divided into two age divisions:

youth (ages 6-17) and adult (ages 18 and up).

Make it a point to drop in during the fair in the Block Building and see what others have done. Organizers hope to make this contest a yearly event with the same categories or new ones in the hope of inspiring more and more participants. Entry forms will be available at the Pauld- ing County Extension office or on-line at www. Paulding.osu.edu under Master Gardener Events. Questions about the contest can be directed to Master Gardener Volunteers: Cathy Fowler (419- 399-3056), Karen Jacobs (419-594-2138) or any master gardener. For additional information on the Master Gar- dener Program or the Master Gardener contest, contact Sarah Noggle, Paulding County Exten- sion Educator Agriculture and Natural Resourc- es at noggle.17@osu.edu or 419-399-8225 Ext. 8228. The OSU Extension Office is located at 503 Fairground Drive, Paulding.

First Financial reports 1Q results

CINCINNATI - First Financial Bancorp last week announced fi-

nancial results for the first quarter

2016.

For the three months ended March 31, 2016, the company reported net income of $19.8 mil- lion, or $0.32 per diluted common share, compared to net income of $19.8 million, or $0.32 per diluted common share, in the fourth quar- ter of 2015 and $17.6 million, or $0.29 per diluted common share, in the first quarter of 2015. Return on average assets for the first quarter of 2016 was 0.98% while return on average tangible common equity was

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First quarter 2016 results in- cluded approximately $0.5 mil- lion of pre-tax, non-operating expenses which were primarily related to the consolidation of six branch locations during the peri- od. Excluding these items, net in- come was $20.1 million, or $0.33 per diluted common share, return on average assets was 1.00% and

return on average tangible com- mon equity was 13.27%. “We are pleased with another strong quarter of operating re- sults, which produced our 102nd consecutive quarter of profitabili- ty,” said Claude Davis, Chief Ex- ecutive Officer. Additional information about the company is available at www. bankatfirst.com.

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Keagen Sharp and McKenzie Johnson, first grade students at Payne Elementary, were among students receiving tree seedlings donated by Paulding SWCD.

Young students receive tree seedlings from SWCD

By Staci Miller Education specialist Paulding SWCD All first grade students in the county have or will be receiving a blue spruce seedling to plant in honor of Earth Day, donated by the Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) with over 300 trees being distributed. Students learned about the different parts of a tree as well as what a tree needs to grow and survive, which includes food, water and nutri- ents. They also learned about tree cookies and how the growth rings of a tree help identify

the age of the tree. Using paper plates, students made their own tree cookies representing their ages if they were a live tree. Students then got transformed into trees where they played a game called “Every Tree for Itself.” They were competing against each other to grab their essential needs of food, water and nutrients in order to survive. After the presentation, each student received a blue spruce seedling with planting instruc- tions for them to go home and plant with a loved one. The students really enjoyed learn- ing about the essential needs of trees and ply- ing the game “Every Tree for Itself.”

of trees and ply- ing the game “Every Tree for Itself.” Paulding FFA members Cameron Strahley

Paulding FFA members Cameron Strahley and Hunter Vogel look over the greenhouse plants that the chapter has been working on. The FFA will be holding a plant sale starting Friday.

FFA plant sale starts Friday

By Chantal Monnier FFA Reporter PAULDING – The Pauld- ing FFA Chapter and FFA Alumni members have been busy preparing for their an- nual plant sale, which starts April 29 at the greenhouse on East Caroline Street. Check out the selection of over 80 varieties of flowers, vegetables and succulents sold in three-packs, flats, baskets and 4-inch pots, as well as several types of hanging baskets and

gift planters. A nice variety of Mother’s Day potted arrange- ments also will be offered. There are over 10,000 plants in all. The students always en- joy this annual project and are excited to show off their beau- tiful plants this year. Dates and times are:

• April 29, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

• April 30, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

• May 1, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

• May 6, 1-5 p.m.

• May 7, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

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ing seeds, transplanting plant starts to labeling, cleaning and watering, the students have been learning in a hands-on environment. They have enhanced their knowl- edge of plant products and greenhouse operations, while having some fun, too.

Advisors and alumni mem-

bers have helped to organize

and supervise the students to

make sure everything is in

tip-top shape for their grand opening on April 29.

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8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Cooper Farms opened its newest addition, Pheasant

Cooper Farms opened its newest addition, Pheasant Run Sow Farm, in Defiance County last week.

Cooper Farms completes new sow farm

MARK CENTER – Cooper Farms held an open house and ribbon cutting on April 22 for its new sow hog farm, Pheasant Run, located in Mark Center. The new farm will be home to female hogs and their piglets. Utilizing state-of-the-art technology, Pheasant Run takes farm- ing to a new level. “We like to think of it as more of a smart barn,” said Kevin Stuckey, sow division manager. “With the help of technology we can provide high quality individualized care for each ani- mal in the barns.” This technology controls barn temperatures, alternating fans, airflow and cooling cells to keep a consistent and com- fortable climate for the hogs at all times. The system also has the ability to self-heal. “If a fan were to stop working correctly overnight, the sys- tem would recognize that and turn on a different fan in the same area,” said Bud Koenig, facility maintenance manager. The new farm will be home to just under 5,000 mother pigs, which will give birth to approximately 2,600 baby pigs each week.

Open pen gestation allows the pregnant sows to roam in large stalls of 80 sows each. It will also feature electronic feeding stations to provide the pregnant sows with individualized diets and care, while in the open pens. “With each new farm we build, we are working to improve the environments for the animals, and make them more com- fortable by using the latest technology available,” said Stuck- ey. The farm sits on approximately 640 acres and will use a cen- ter pivot system to apply all-natural fertilizer on 120 tillable acres. Pheasant Run, which is Cooper Farms’ second farm in De- fiance County, will bring new jobs to the area, employing 20 full-time team members, one certified livestock manager and 18 other indirect jobs at the farms completion. Cooper Farms made a point to work predominantly with lo- cal businesses and contractors for the construction of the farm. Over 40 contractors took part in the construction, doing any- thing from pouring concrete to electrical work.

WBESC board updated on resource center success

PAULDING – Superintendent Brian Gerber highlighted the Western Buckeye ESC Govern- ing Board on the success of the ESC’s Resource Center during the board’s regular meeting April 20 at the Paulding ESC office. Gerber also updated the board on legislative issues, personnel items, and ESC activities. The Western Buckeye ESC Resource Center, which is based in Van Wert, is one of the crown jewels in the agency. Very sel- dom does the public hear about the voluminous amount of suc- cess stories that comes from the resource center. “Quite frankly, I give all the credit to the staff who works at the resource center,” Gerber told the board. “People make pro- grams successful. The people employed at the resource center are the heartbeat of the program. Director George Dougal and his staff go above and beyond the call of duty to help students in Paulding and Van Wert counties. “They genuinely care about the students’ well-being and guide those students toward graduation. The resource center is not based on the traditional school setting. The resource cen- ter is a school that tailors to the needs of each student in order

for that student to have direct personal contact with teachers and aides on a daily basis who provides structure, guidance, and a path towards graduation,” Gerber continued. Without the resource center, these students would not grad- uate, he said. “Finding the right blend of staff is the key to suc- cess. We have found the recipe that works for these kids.” The resource center tailors curriculum around their students to meet their specific needs. Cur- rently, there are 25 students at the RC and all 25 have a different program. The resource center has a full- time mental health staff member who provides support for the stu- dents. The RC also serves those students who need to recover credit in order to meet graduation requirements. “Dougal and his staff work together with our partner schools to develop a curriculum that will allow their students to succeed in life after graduation. This is directly related to the economic vitality of our community and state,” Gerber told the board. “These students range from the most gifted to the most at- risk, including special needs students and other at-risk pop-

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ulations such as dropouts and adjudicated youth. I cannot say

enough about the all the positives our Resource Center produces for the students they serve.” The board approved the fol- lowing consent items:

• The Thomas Edison Early

Childhood Center calendar for the 2016-17 school year.

• Budget revision for the

2016 Alternative Education

Challenge grant due to allocation increase of $2,792.

• Certified contracts for

2016-17 for Donna Clouse, Rod Dudgeon, Zachary Boyer,

Rosanah Roster, Jenna Sherry, Brian Rockhold, Ashley Shep- herd, Karla Treece, Kate Wen- ninger, Heather Frey, Amy Wannemacher, Nancy Ruhe, Janice Kohart, Brenda Recker.

• Non-certified contracts for

2016-17 for Allison Bittner, Kristina Figgins, Laura Boesch, Jeanne Gribble, Kathy Habern, Alicia Hook, Amanda Mc- Dorman, Rachel Rager, Kerry Shelton, Denise Shouse, Tasha Miller, Linda Clark, Patricia Miller, Virginia Crisp.

• Non-renewal of the follow-

ing paraprofessional contracts for Allen County ESC effective the end of the 2015-16 school year: Debra Nolte, Jamie Fields, Jessica Cartwright, Lora Market, Brittany Cunningham, Cynthia Long, Tonya Ramirez, Rachel Smith, Stephanie Archer, Terri Colley, Jessica Conley, Michael

Halker, Sarah Prine, Jana Rayer, Joseph Teodosio. This reduction is due to a transfer of employ- ment back to Allen County ESC

and is no reflection of job perfor- mance.

• Five additional days to the

2016-17 contract for Margaret Schilb.

• Julia Baldwin-McGrath as

temporary speech therapist for the remainder of the 2015-16 school year.

• Five-year service provider

contract for Internet service with NOACSC through June 30,

2021.

• Set 2016-17 payroll clerk’s

salary to $15 per hour. The next regular meeting will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 18 at the Van Wert ESC office.

Sherwood library fundraiser set

SHERWOOD Friends of the Sherwood Library are pre- paring for the Sherwood Spring Fling, their annual fundraiser for the library.

It will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, May

12-13.

The event will include a bake sale, a plant sale, a used book sale and the annual potpourri raffle. Dozens of donated items will be raffled off at 5 p.m. on Friday. Winner need not be present.

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OH 43512 (419)782-1181 Toll Free: (800)888-9838 LUNCH FOR HONOR FLIGHT – Paulding Putnam Electric’s

LUNCH FOR HONOR FLIGHT – Paulding Putnam Electric’s community lunch on Friday raised $1,650 for Honor Flight. Many people came out despite a rainy event. Here, 98.1’s Rick Small (left) and co-op CEO/general manager George Carter help pre- pare the meal. PPEC employees are raising funds for an entire Honor Flight, which costs about $70,000. The goal is to have the funds raised by June 4, when the co-op will raffle off a brand new truck. Raffle tickets can be purchased online at www.PPEC.coop.

Raffle tickets can be purchased online at www.PPEC.coop. PAY IT FORWARD – As part of a

PAY IT FORWARD – As part of a Pay It Forward Project in social studies, and in conjunction with The Ohio State University Alum- ni Association’s month of service, third graders at Antwerp Ele- mentary School held a friendly competition between classrooms

to collect food items. Students collected 689 items to donate to the Paulding County Food Bank. Students who donated the most items were Jordan McDorman, Serenity Rios, Madisyn Peters

and Colton Bashore. Along with donating, students practiced Paying It Forward each day by doing an act of kindness for some- one and asking them to do something nice for another person in return. Antwerp students work hard to gain knowledge every day,

but realize that being kind to others is just as important.

but realize that being kind to others is just as important. Northwest State Community College recently

Northwest State Community College recently recognized 17 students during the induction ceremony for the Alpha Delta Chapter of the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society. Paulding County students included Audra Phlipot of Cecil, Kylee Wen- ninger of Haviland and Brock Worden, Payne. Alpha Delta Nu aims to recognize the academic excellence of associate degree nursing students and encourage students to pursue advanced nursing degrees.

and encourage students to pursue advanced nursing degrees. Paulding High School Paulding FFA & FFA Alumni
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Plant Sale

April 29 8 am - 6 pm

April 30 – 9 am - 1 pm 9 am - 1 pm

May 8 am - 6 pm April 30 – 9 am - 1 pm • • •

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6 1 pm - 5 pm

7 9 am - 1 pm

80+ types of flowers, vegetables and

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arrangements available

 

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 9A

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 9A Grover Hill Lions Club recently donated $500

Grover Hill Lions Club recently donated $500 to Paulding-Putnam Electric’s Honor Flight project. Members include, from left – John Wilkin, Ray Treece, Jay Denny, Lonnie Miller, Terry Campbell, Bill Bolenbaugh, Reggie Hinchcliff, Andrew Kessler, Pat Commer and Jayme Denny.

Grover Hill raises over $7K for Honor Flight

GROVER HILL – The community of Grover Hill came together to raise funds for the Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative Honor Flight project recently, bringing in $7,450. The event, held April 16 at the Grover Hill VFW Post, featured Nashville artist Daryl Dasher. The proceeds included donations from various groups and individuals plus concert ticket sales and truck raffle tickets sold by Paulding-Putnam employees at the event. Many organizations pulled together to make this event a success, including the Grover Hill Lions Club, Grover Hill VFW and the Grover Hill school. Countless hours provided by many individuals. Paulding Putnam Electric especially recognizes Brad Volk of Grover Hill who organized the concert. The utility is nearing its goal of raising $70,000 to sponsor an entire flight for this region in the fall. Currently, close to $60,000 has been raised. One of the fundraisers is a raffle for a brand new truck. Raffle tickets can still be purchased online at www.PPEC.coop or from any PPEC employee. Donations may also be made online.

from any PPEC employee. Donations may also be made online. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW)

The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) in Grover Hill has contributed $500 to help fund an Honor Flight. Present for the award were, from left - John Wilkin, Larry Thornell and Gary Gudakunst.

Intellectual property law program to be offered at library

PAULDING – The Paulding County Carnegie Library will be hosting a free program on intellectual property protection covering inventions, patents, trademarks and copyrights. The program will be held from 6:30- 7:45 p.m. Thursday, May 5. All businesses have intellec- tual property in one form or an- other. Entrepreneurs, inventors, and business leaders interested in learning more about this im- portant topic are encouraged to attend. Jacob M. Ward, reg- istered patent attorney with the law firm of Fraser Clemens Martin & Miller LLC will pres- ent this seminar. This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited, so prereg- istration is required. Call 419- 399-2032 to reserve a spot.

ODOT projects

The following is a weekly re- port regarding current and up- coming highway road construc-

tion projects in the Ohio Depart- ment of Transportation District One, which includes Paulding County:

• Drainage repair at the fol-

lowing locations may restrict

traffic at times through the work zone: U.S. 127 from Paulding to the Van Wert County line; Ohio 49 north of Antwerp.

• U.S. 127 between Paulding

and the Defiance County line will be reduced to one lane through the work zone through the week for sealing of pavement cracks.

• Sealing of pavement cracks

on overpass bridge structures will take place on the following routes throughout the county through the week: U.S. 127 and Ohio 49.

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10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Speice hired as next Raider football coach

By JOE SHOUSE Progress Staff Writer HAVILAND - The Wayne Trace Local school district held its April board meeting with sev- eral recommendations being ad- dressed while hiring a new foot- ball coach to guide the Raiders for the upcoming season. After a recommendation of the superintendent, JH/HS principal

and athletic director, the board ap- proved the hiring of Mike Speice as head football coach for 2016- 17. Speice will take over the po- sition left open when former head coach Bill Speller resigned to take

a similar position at Elida. Superintendent Steve Arnold updated the board concerning new LED lighting for an exterior portion of the Wayne Trace JH/

SR campus. The cost of the light- ing is $22,122 with the recoup cost being realized in 5.5 years. Personnel matters gaining ap- proval included:

• resignation of Melissa

LaBounty and Heather Hatcher

as teachers effective at the end of the 2015-16 school year; Bethany Hughes as freshman volleyball coach; and Mike Priest as girls’ assistant basketball coach.

• one-year contracts with

Ronda Walters as a business

teacher and Matthew Wilhelm as

a Payne Elementary teacher.

a 45-day contract for Dave

Alt.

two-year certified personnel

contracts for Christen Bauer, Eliz- abeth Becker, Rachael McCros- key, Kaleb O’Donnell, Kylee Ondrus, Katherine Scarbrough, Maureen Sorensen, Angela Stokes and Marta Wilder.

• three-year certified personnel

contracts with Allyssa Alvarez, Shawn Gerber, Lori Heiby, Kara Kelly, Alexis Short and Anne Wieland.

• two-year classified personnel

contracts for Kelvin Davis, Jay Lamb, Julanne Molitor, Katie Stoller, Lisa Worden and Dawn Wright.

• one-year contracts to Rachel

Worden and Dawn Wright. • one-year contracts to Rachel MIKE SPEICE Rager as a Payne Elementary

MIKE SPEICE

Rager as a Payne Elementary paraprofessional and Camilla Kline as the four-hour cook/ca- shier at Grover Hill Elementary. In other business, the board:

• commended Miss Sharon Spinner, Mrs. Joni Wenninger, and the high school band for

earning a superior rating at this year’s OMEA regional music

Staff contracts gain attention at Antwerp

By JOE SHOUSE Progress Staff Writer ANTWERP – Antwerp Local School board met last Thursday with approval of several teacher

contracts and supplemental con- tracts being completed. The board viewed a couple of demonstra- tions from students and the latest update concerning the lighting and bleacher project was given by the superintendent. One-year teaching contracts were awarded to Jason Hale,

Areli Reutter, Alyssa Saylor, Rick Weirich, Nickolas Peckinpaugh, Marie Plassman and Zachary Lee.

Two-year teaching contracts were awarded to Wade Sisson, Ryan Zuber, Julie Bok, Sahari Owusu-Safo and Chad Schindler.

Three-year teaching contracts were also given to Amy Sorrell, Brittni George and Renee Staas. One-year contract was signed

for Lynn Bute as outside mainte- nance for 2016-17. Two-year contract went to

Leila Becker as custodian for the 2016-17 and 2017-18 school years. Continuing contracts were given to Karleen Grimes as cook and Mike Knight as bus driver be- ginning with the 2016-17 school year. Supplemental contracts for the the coming school year were made with: Jason Hale, assistant varsity football coach; Kevin Carr, assistant varsity football coach; Zac Feasby, assistant var- sity football coach; Zach Lee, assistant varsity foot- ball coach; John Brown, junior high head football coach; Chris Walters, junior high assistant football coach; Brooks Rohrs, ju- nior high assistant football coach; Susan Jewell, assistant cross country coach; Alicia Hook, junior high cheer coach; Jason Hale, weight room supervisor and Drew Altimus, mini-Archers football coach. Part-time summer workers hired were Deb Altic, Brandon

Dunderman, and Holli Altic as custodians and Cord Ehrhart in the maintenance department. Three overnight student trips gained approval: for the year- book students and Amy Sorrell from Nov. 9-12 to attend the JEA/ NSPA convention in Indianapo- lis; for student council represen- tatives and Jassmine Reyes from April 28-30 to attend the Ohio Association of Student Councils state conference in Mansfield; and for the girls basketball team along with head coach Scott McMichael to attend basketball camp from June 22-24 at Wilm- ington College in Wilmington. The board approved the NEOLA policies and policy up- dates for the school district and a resolution declaring it necessary to levy the renewal of the perma- nent improvement levy. Members of Mr. Temple’s science class were guests of the board and demonstrated a board game they created in class. Amy Sorrell and Annie Miesle also were present to share a power point presentation concerning the Ohio Scholastic Media Associa- tion and the several awards they received including their year- book. The board was updated by Su- perintendent Martin Miller con- cerning the lighting and bleacher installation project at Archer Field. Important dates as the school year comes to a close include:

prom at Grant’s on April 30 be- ginning at 6:30 p.m.; academic awards night at 6:30 p.m. on May 11; field day for the elementary students on May 17; and elemen- tary school awards at 8:30 a.m. on May 18.

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contest. The band will compete at the state competition the weekend

of April 30. The choir received an excellent rating at the same com- petition.

• commended Miss Joni Klop-

fenstein, Mrs. Heather Hatcher, senior Scott Wenninger, junior Brooke Lelonek, and the Wayne Trace National Honor Society for

hosting the Glow in the Dark fund raiser with proceeds benefiting the family of Wayne Trace alum- nus Tim West.

• approved an overnight trip for

invited FFA members to the FFA

state convention in Columbus on May 5-6.

• approved the list of seniors for graduation on May 29 contingent upon completing all graduation requirements.

• approved the modification of

several school board policies to

reflect changes in state and fed- eral laws.

• approved the guidelines and

agreement form for use of school facilities.

Commissioners’ Journal
Commissioners’ Journal

Commissioners’ Journal April 6, 2016

This 6th day of April, 2016, the Board of County

Commissioners met in regular session with the follow- ing members present: Tony Zartman, Mark Holtsberry, and Nola Ginter, Clerk. Absent: Roy Klopfenstein.

MEETING NOTES OF APPOINTMENTS

Emergency Preparedness Meeting - In attendance

were Lou Ann Wannemacher, Carol Temple, Ann Pease, Lynn Vance, Claudia Fickel, Ed Bohn, John

DeMuth, Katie Sunday. Bohn distributed a draft of the courthouse and county court annex emergency and evacuation plan. Several changes were suggested. Bohn agreed to edit the plan addressing the concerns of the group. When the plan is updated and approved, the com- missioners will provide evacuation maps to be dis- played in each office. Bohn announced there will be

fire extinguisher training later this year.

Mark Rassman and Rick Grimes - Rassman met with the commissioners to express his desire to con- struct a prayer park in Emerald Township at the corner of Rd 133 and SR 111. The commissioners advised Rassman to consult with an attorney to move forward.

The small parcel is the former site of the Emerald Mis-

sion Church and part of the Fred Fricke Trust. Ed Bohn, EMA director, noted he will be attending a meeting in Columbus next week. He also reported notification of a $7,830.00 grant. LEPC dollars will be used to match this grant and it will be used to fund a comprehensive haz-mat traffic study for Paulding

County. Bohn listed several roadways and intersections

of concern. He also reported Paulding County has 28 facilities handling hazardous materials. The facilities are required to report disposal procedures.

Bohn reminded the commissioners of two training sessions Paulding EMA will be hosting. On April 4, Ohio Gas will present training on residential usage and on May 5, a four-county pipeline seminar is scheduled. Bohn reported Phil Wells continues to work on emergency shelter agreements. No back-up generators are necessary for these shelters. LEPC has received approval for an exercise site at the wind farm lay-down yard at Rd 60 and SR 49. Bohn presented two press releases that will be in the paper next week. The press releases will address grant awards and the new trailer for first responders. Ramon Montes, Koorsen Fire and Security, pre- sented options for a fire alarm system in the courthouse. He noted that Ohio has very strict rules and regula- tions. He will draw up a quote and follow-up in a few weeks. EXECUTIVE SESSION

A motion was made by Holtsberry to go into ex-

ecutive session at 8:07 a.m. with the Paulding County

Prosecutor to discuss legal matters.

At 8:33 a.m. all members present agreed to adjourn

the executive session and go into regular session. IN THE MATTER OF AWARDING BID FOR THE 2016 JOINT TOWNSHIP CHIP SEAL PROJECT

Holtsberry moved to adopt the following resolu- tion;

WHEREAS, on April 4, 2016, one bid was re- ceived for the 2016 Joint Township Chip Seal Project; and WHEREAS, after review of the aforementioned bid, Travis McGarvey, Paulding County Engineer, has recommended that the project be awarded to Ward Construction Co., now, therefore BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Com- missioners does hereby award the 2016 Joint Town- ship Chip Seal Project to Ward Construction Co., in the amount of $273,718.30. IN THE MATTER OF ENTERING INTO A BUSINESS ASSOCIATE AGREEMENT Holtsberry moved to adopt the following resolution; WHEREAS, the Paulding County Commission- ers has a Service Agreement with the Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio, Inc. to provide certain functions, activities, and services to Paulding County residents through the Paulding County Senior Center; and WHEREAS, it is necessary, for the care and well-being of the residents served, to share certain in- formation that is confidential and must be afforded spe- cial treatment and protection pursuant to the Health In- surance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) of 1996; now, therefore BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Commissioners does hereby enter into a Business Associate Agreement with the Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio, Inc., a copy of which will be filed at the Paulding County Senior Center.

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Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 11A

00172785

How to be a hotel manager

One of the first things I notice when the weather turns nice is the abundance of insects flying, crawling and jumping about. Pesky house flies, ants, a mos- quito here and there, and several other unidentified flying objects seem to emerge en masse. I always count on them to be the real harbingers of spring, because for all our human wis- dom, the bugs seem to be more well-informed than we are. For them, it’s a matter of survival. We simply put on a sweater and turn up the heat. If you’ve never thought about the insects and other members of that segment of creation, maybe you aren’t aware of their impor- tance. Most of us know that each plays a part somewhere in the big picture, but we’re not quite sure what that is, and we often- times let our fear and loathing get the better of us. My husband appreciates some of the little creepy crawlies a lit- tle more than I do, with his re- spect for the life of even a spider in the house. He’ll more often take it outside and turn it loose than kill it. Good for you, Honey. Bees have the ability to fas-

cinate us with their hon- e y - m a k i n g ways, but they also command respect because of their ability to inflict pain on us when we get in their way. They’re perfectly con- tent to go about their business,

but you’d better not interfere. They de- serve our re- spect in other ways too. Without them, our food supply would be greatly diminished. We owe 50- 80% of what we eat to them, be- cause of their role in pollination. Honey bees (Apis sp.) aren’t the only bees that pollinate, however. And bees as a whole aren’t the only insect that polli- nates. The honey bee we know is a European ex-pat, coming here in the early 1600s, and has adapted nicely to its new home. Domestic bees did the job quite nicely however, before their for- eign cousins came along.

In the Garden By Kylee Baumle
In the Garden
By Kylee Baumle

There are nearly 20,000 species of bees on the planet, and these in- clude our na- tive species, which num- bers approxi- mately 4,000. One of these, the mason bee, is largely responsible for

all that zuc- chini you try to pawn off on your friends and neighbors each summer. Mason bees (Osmia sp.) are solitary, in that each mother bee is responsible for the housing and raising of her young, un- like honey bees, which live in colonies. A mason bee will take advantage of holes in various locations, perhaps one made by a beetle in a tree, or in a hollow twig. She will go in, provide a mixture of nectar and pollen as food, lay an egg, and then seal it off with mud. She will continue the process until the hole is filled. When the larva hatches, it will

eat the nectar/pollen mixture as it grows and then emerge as an adult. Though not native, leafcutter bees (Megachile sp.) do much the same thing as mason bees, but will chew a rounded section from a leaf and carry it back to the hole, where it will be used to line the cavity where she will lay an egg. You may have seen the nearly perfect round holes cut out of your rose leaves, for example, and if you’ve ever caught a leafcutter bee in the act, it’s fascinating to watch. Videos of a leafcutter bee in action can be found on You- tube and I highly recommend watching them. Neither mason bees nor leafcutter bees sting, so there are no worries there. They are very important pollinators in our gardens and farm fields, so we should welcome them. One way to do that is to put up a bee hotel, often called a pollination station. Of course, be sure to have plenty of flowers and/or edibles nearby so you can at- tract them in the first place. There are numerous bee ho-

Commissioners’ Journal
Commissioners’ Journal

Commissioners’ Journal April 11, 2016 This 11th day of April, 2016, the Board of County Commissioners met in regular session with the fol- lowing members present: Tony Zartman, Roy Klop- fenstein, Mark Holtsberry, and Nola Ginter, Clerk. MEETING NOTES OF APPOINTMENTS Judge Tiffany Beckman, Sheriff Jason Landers, Prosecutor Joe Burkard, Ed Bohn (EMA director) - The second meeting to discuss courthouse security occurred in the commissioners’ office. Sheriff Landers shared his thoughts and ideas on how to make the courthouse more secure. He pre- sented information and a quote for a metal detector to be placed at one entrance of the courthouse. Land- ers also emphasized there should be two deputies to cover the building during operational hours. He also noted he is considering all entrances to determine which one will be the most conducive for the general public, as well as for employees. All in attendance agreed better security measures for the courthouse are essential for the safety of em- ployees and the people who do business at the court- house. Ed Bohn, EMA director, resented the mitigation plan for the commissioners’ approval. The commis- sioners authorized Bohn to sign all paperwork related to the mitigation plan (see resolution below). He also reported he found a company that will pick up the containers of mercury he needs to dispose of. Sarah Noggle, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resource, presented her first quarter re- port. She reported 23 attended the Certified Livestock Manager Credit meetings. February’s topic was Pork Industry Swine Audit. March’s topic was Ohio Nutri- ent Management Record Keeping System (taught by Noggle), focusing on manure spreading regulations. Paulding County hosted its annual Agronomy Day in January. Over 25 vendor booths were exhibited, with over 75 in attendance. Noggle noted next year she will offer the pesticide recertification at this event. Noggle reported she taught four area FACT (Fer- tilizer Applicator Certification Training). Farmers and commercial applicators of fertilizer to be certified by September 2017. Noggle also noted 47 farmers recer- tified their private pesticide applicators’ license by at- tending an OSU Extension Paulding County training session. This year’s program reached 51,780 acres of cropland. Noggle reported fielding over 183 phone calls,

emails, meetings, and/or personal visits during the first quarter. She also noted many speaking engage- ments she presented during January, February and March. Noggle also hosted a Nutrient Solutions from the Farm Event, with a variety of speakers from various entities. She noted over 80 farms attended this event funded by the Ohio Environmental Council. Michael Schweinsberg, Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, reported on 4-H Development in Paulding County. He announced 364 members from 219 families, an increase of 24 members and 10 families from 2015. Paulding County has 43 certi- fied volunteers assisting with 13 4-H clubs and the Jr. Master Gardner Program. Schweinsberg also reported a new 4-H club, County Clickers, has stared in Cecil. He commented counselors are training and plan- ning for 4-H camp. The 2016 theme is “4-H Camp Palmer: It’s Dino-mite!” The focus will be dinosaurs. Schweinsberg continues to participate in junior and senior fair boards’ monthly meetings. He also announced he applied for and received a $3,800 grant from the Ohio 4-H Foundation. He purchased six Lego EV3 Robotic Kits. The kits will be used in area schools and will be made available to youths taking robotics projects on April 21. Schweinsberg noted he keeps active in the local schools. One of the projects he works on is the ChickQuest in third and first grade classrooms. He also publishes the 4-H calendar, distributing it to all advisors and families; the 4-H Family Hand- book; and the Clover Connection (a bi-monthly news- letter sent to all 4-H families in Paulding County). IN THE MATTER OF AMENDING THE 2016 ANNUAL APPROPRIATION (FUND 009) Holtsberry moved to adopt the following resolu- tion:

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Commissioners does hereby direct the County Au- ditor to amend the 2016 Annual Appropriation by appropriating the following in the Engineer-Gas Tax Fund (009), to-wit; 009-001-00008/Engineer-Gas Tax/Equipment AMOUNT: $170,857. IN THE MATTER OF MODIFYING THE 2016 ANNUAL APPROPRIATION (FUND 001-015) Holtsberry moved to adopt the following resolu- tion:

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Commissioners does hereby modify the 2016 An-

nual Appropriation and hereby directs the Paulding County Auditor to transfer funds; to-wit; FROM:

001-015-00003/General Fund/Election Board/Sup- plies TO: 001-015-00004/General Fund/Election Board/Equipment AMOUNT: $1,295.84. IN THE MATTER OF AUTHORIZING THE PAULDING COUNTY EMA DIRECTOR TO SUBMIT A MITIGATION PLAN ON BEHALF OF PAULDING COUNTY Holtsberry moved to adopt the following resolu- tion:

WHEREAS, the Paulding County EMA Mitiga- tion Plan is ready for submittal; now, therefore BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Commissioners does hereby authorize Edward Bohn, Paulding County EMA Director, to submit and sign all the documents on behalf of the County of Paulding and the Paulding County EMA. IN THE MATTER OF MODIFYING THE 2016 ANNUAL APPROPRIATION (FUND 021) Klopfenstein moved to adopt the following reso- lution:

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Commissioners does hereby modify the 2016 An- nual Appropriation and hereby directs the Pauld- ing County Auditor to transfer funds to Unclaimed Monies Fund (Fund 021); to-wit; FROM: 001- 008-00007/General Fund/Court of Common Pleas/ Jurors’ Fees $15; 35-001-00001/Township Gas Expense $2,238.44; 001-031-00013/General Fund/ Coroner $15; 001-015-00007/General Fund/Elec- tion Board/Other Expenses $32.60; 001-014-00006/ General Fund/County Court/Jurors’ Fees $15; 001- 024-00008/General Fund/Soldiers’ Relief/Transpor- tation $25; 001-031-00013/General Fund/Commis- sioners’ Misc/Trial Expenses $15; 136-001-00001/ Co Court Probation Ser/Other Expenses $240; 029- 001-00002/Trailer Tax 2nd Half $29.29; 001-031- 00013/General Fund/Commissioners’ Misc/Trial Expenses $15; 014-001-00005/Board of DD/Con- tracts/Services $1,725.17; 014-001-00012/Board of DD/Donations/Bequests $500; 001-031-00013/ General Fund/Commissioners’ Misc/Trial Expenses $15; 001-014-00006/General Fund/County Court/ Jurors’ Fees $15; 001-008-00007/General Fund/ Court of Common Pleas/Jurors’ Fees $15; 003-001- 00009/Health Department/Other Expenses $80; TO: 021-001-99999/Unclaimed Monies/Unclaimed Monies $4,990.50.

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Antwerp, OH Phone: 419-258-2955 Fax: 419-258-2956 A mason bee enters a tube in a bee hotel.
Antwerp, OH Phone: 419-258-2955 Fax: 419-258-2956 A mason bee enters a tube in a bee hotel.

A mason bee enters a tube in a bee hotel. Providing a home for these gentle, solitary bees is a way to welcome more of them into your garden, where they will happily pollinate your plants.

a bee if it doesn’t resemble one that you’re familiar with. And please don’t dismiss them as pests, because they’re far more valuable to us than you might realize. Read more at Kylee’s blog, Our Little Acre, at www.our - littleacre.com and on Face - book at www.facebook.com/ OurLittleAcre. Contact her at PauldingProgressGardener@ gmail.com.

tels available for purchase on- line, consisting of tubes which the bees will use just as they would such holes found in na- ture. A quick Google search finds that bee hotels can be or- dered from Gardener’s Supply Company, Amazon.com, and even eBay and Etsy. Instruc- tions for making your own can be readily found as well. Bees come in all shapes and sizes, so don’t assume it’s not

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12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

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Payne Elementary took the honors winning the 2016 Battle of the Books. Winning team mem- bers are, from left – Malia Wittwer, Laura Stoller, Therin Coyne, Cameron Stoller, Kate Laukhuf and Morgan Hefner.

Payne Elementary again Battle of the Books champs

PAULDING – For the sec- ond year in a row, Payne Ele- mentary School’s Battle of the Books team was victorious in this countywide reading com- petition. The team, made up of a fifth-grader and five sixth-grad- ers, answered more questions correctly to ease out a win over Grover Hill’s team during the April 13 finals. The Battle of the Books is a literary competition between Paulding County schools and home-schooled children, spon- sored by the Paulding County Carnegie Library. Teams made up of fifth- and sixth-graders compete by answering ques- tions about books on the Battle of the Books list. The list and books are supplied to each el- ementary school and library location at the beginning of the

school year. The winning school re- ceives a trophy and each team in the finals receives special medals. This year’s competing teams represented Antwerp, Oakwood, Payne, Grover Hill, Paulding and Divine Mercy. “This year marked the 25th anniversary of the Battle in Paulding County,” said Susan Pieper, library director. “The program has grown to be very competitive and exciting. It was great to see principals, teachers, family and friends rooting on their teams in this competition of brain-power. “What made this year’s competition unique is that many of the books were ti- tles from the past century. The library is celebrating its centennial this year and

it was our goal to encour- age young readers to read the same books their parents and grandparents and even great-grandparents might have read,” shared Pieper. “We are so grateful for our sponsors who help make this program possible,” said Sara Molitor, head of youth ser- vices. “Dr. Larry Tope and Dr. Jeffery Rhees DDS make it possible for each finalist team to receive T-shirts and Lafarge provides funding for the Battle books to be placed in the elementary school li- braries each year. We could not have a successful battle without their support.” For more information about the Battle of the Books com- petition or to help sponsor the 2017 competition, contact the library at 419-399-2032.

the 2017 competition, contact the library at 419-399-2032. A packed house rooted on teams as they

A packed house rooted on teams as they battled intensely for the county championship in the Battle of the Books.

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Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 1B

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Paulding County Progress - 1B
PAULDING PROGRESS SPORTS
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PAULDING PROGRESS SPORTS
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Varsity Softball
Varsity Softball
Progress - 1B PAULDING PROGRESS SPORTS Varsity Softball Kelly Pracht/ Paulding County Progress Paulding’s softball

Kelly Pracht/Paulding County Progress

Paulding’s softball hitter Audrey Manz makes a connection with the ball. Lincolnview defeated the Lady Panthers on 7-4 in recent action on the diamond.

LINCOLNVIEW 7 PAULDING 4 The host Lady Panthers jumped ahead early in their Northwest Conference battle against Lincolnview on Thurs- day, but the Lady Lancers came storming back and claimed a 7-4 victory. The Lady Panthers (4-6, 1-1 NWC) got a walk and stolen base from catcher Kelsey Beck to open the home first. One out later, first baseman Haylee Dom- inique picked up an RBI base hit to give Paulding a 1-0 lead. The bottom of the second featured back-to-back singles from Stephanie Trausch and Darian Andrews before Macala Ashbaugh struck out the next two batters. Consecutive errors by the Lincolnview defense al- lowed the Panthers to plate three runs before the third out was re- corded and suddenly it was 4-0, Paulding. Lincolnview got the ball roll- ing in the top of the fourth as Lakin Brant walked and Ash- baugh singled to put runners on the corners. Zoe Miller brought home the Lady Lancers’ first run of the game with an RBI single. Alena Looser picked up an RBI double to plate another run. Fi- nally, Morgan Miller and Ma- rissa Miller each got RBI base knocks to tie the game at 4-4.

The Lady Lancers took the lead in the top of the fifth as Sydney Jenkins reached on a single to right field and, after Ashbaugh collected another base hit, Miller drilled a ball to right field and Jenkins beat the throw home from Asia Arella- no to push Lincolnview lead to

5-4.

Lincolnview (4-7, 1-2 NWC) picked up some insur- ance in the top of the seventh as Brant reached via an error and Jenkins walked. Brant scored when Beck’s throw to second went into the outfield allowing Brant to score. With two outs in the seventh, Loos- er doubled to bring home the final run of the game. Ashbaugh retired nine straight batters to end the game and give the Lady Lancers their first NWC win of the year. “Give credit to Lincolnview pitcher,” Paulding head coach Matt Carr said. “She was throwing strikes and hitting the outside corner well. I think we got a little pull happy and started rolling over on the ball. It happens. I have told the girls when we focus and hit the ball up the middle we are a better team. We did that better early, but give credit to their pitcher - she was able to hit her spots.”

CRESTVIEW 12, W. TRACE 4 Crestview scored the first ten runs of the game in posting a 12-4 win over Wayne Trace in non-league softball action last Wednesday night. The Knights led 3-0 after one and widened the margin to 7-0 at the end of four innings. After Crestview made it 10-0 in the top of the fifth, Wayne Trace got on the board with a single run in the home half of the inning. The Raiders trimmed the deficit to 10-4 after six innings before Crestview wrapped up the scoring with two runs in the top of the seventh. Jade Preston took the win for the visiting Knights, toss- ing six innings while allowing seven hits, four runs and two walks to go along with five strikeouts. Madison Zartman took the loss for Wayne Trace, giving up a dozen hits and ten runs in five innings of work. Zartman also struck out one and walked four. Megan Moore, Natalie Torman, Maggie Crosby and Brooke Sinn all posted two singles for the Raiders with Zartman adding a double. TINORA 17, WAYNE TRACE 2 In Green Meadows Confer-

ence play, Tinora scored early and often in rolling to a 17-2 win over Wayne Trace. Maggie Crosby took the loss for Wayne Trace, strik- ing out one in four innings of work. Carley Wright had a double for the Raiders while Brooke

Sinn, Maggie Crosby, Carrie Thrasher and Natalie Torman picked up a single each. JEFFERSON 5, WAYNE TRACE 2 WAYNE TRACE 9, JEFFERSON 2 Wayne Trace and Delphos Jefferson split in non-league softball action on Saturday in Allen County. The Wildcats took game one 5-2 after a five-run third inning before Wayne Trace re- bounded with a 9-2 victory in the second contest. Wayne Trace jumped in front in game one with a two run third inning before the Wildcats responded by scor- ing five times in the home half of the inning. Neither team scored from that point forward as Delphos Jefferson went on top to post the 5-2 win. Claire Thompson got the victory for the Wildcats de- spite allowing 11 hits in the contest. Thompson fanned six Raiders as well. Maggie Crosby took the loss, giving up six hits, five runs and four walks while In

game two, the Raiders again jumped in front but this time hung on for a 9-2 victory over the Wildcats. In game two, the Raiders again jumped in front but this time hung on for a 9-2 victory over the Wildcats. Wayne Trace led 3-0 after one inning before the Wild- cats picked up single runs in the second and sixth to close within 3-2. However, the Raiders an- swered with a six-run seventh to seal the 9-2 win. Madison Zartman scattered seven hits and three walks while striking out five to lead Wayne Trace to the victory. Carley Wright paced the of- fense with three singles with Megan Moore and Natalie Torman adding a single and a double each. Alex Fast also had two singles for Wayne Trace. Carrie Thrasher, Maggie Crosby and Madison Zartman also chipped in a single each for the Raiders, who improve to 9-4 on the season.

each for the Raiders, who improve to 9-4 on the season. Kelly Pracht/ Paulding County Progress

Kelly Pracht/Paulding County Progress

Stephiane Trausch comes up with the ball in center field in a game that had the Lincolnview Lancers defeat the Panthers 7-4.

Archers hold on for win over WT 5-4

Antwerp hands Lady Raiders first loss of season

By KEVIN WANNEMACHER Sports Writer HAVILAND – Each team committed four errors and each team only scored one earned run. But it was visiting An- twerp who went home happy in a Green Meadows Conference and Paulding County matchup last Tuesday night as the Archers held on late for a 5-4 win over host Wayne Trace. It was far from a perfect game but it still came down to the final out before Antwerp finally settled down for the vic- tory, improving to 4-3 overall and 1-1 in the GMC. Wayne Trace, which falls to 8-1 in all games and 2-1 in the league, was first to strike. In the second, a leadoff walk to Car- ley Wright, who was then run for by Trisha Strickler, preceded strikeouts by Antwerp pitcher Avery Braaten of both Megan Moore and Maggie Crosby. After a single by Brooke Sinn, Carrie Thrasher reached on an error by the Ar- cher third baseman to score by Moore and Thrasher for a 2-0 advantage. Antwerp responded in the third with two unearned runs of its own. A leadoff single by Beth Hawley got the Archers started, before Crosby struck out Becca Johanns for the first out. Brooke Hatlevig then reached on a Raider throwing error to score Hawley but Antwerp wasn’t done. Hatlevig then

took home on a passed ball to knot the contest at 2-2. Antwerp added to their score in the fourth. Three runs, two of which were un- earned propelled Antwerp into a 5-2

advantage, ignited by a run-scoring dou-

Per-

ry then came around to score with two outs when Hawley reached on a Raider error and gave Antwerp the three-run ad- vantage. The two teams then went scoreless until the bottom of the seventh when Wayne Trace made things interesting. With one out, Madison Zartman sin- gled and Sydney Critten walked to put runners at first and second. Kalin Gerber then plated Zartman with a run-scoring single to make it 5-3 Archers. Carley Wright and Megan Moore then both reached via Archer er- rors, scoring Critten, to get the Raiders within 5-4 and load the bases with one out. However, the defensive play of the game was then made with Wayne Trace’s Maggie Crosby at the plate. Antwerp catcher Brooke Hatlevig made a diving catch of a foul pop-up for the second out of the inning. “That catch by Hatlevig with two outs was so crucial for us. A solid defen- sive play like that and Avery (Braaten) throwing smart to the Raider’s Brooke

ble from Callie Perry.

Sinn who popped out to our third base- men for the final out was obviously huge and it sealed the win,” said Antwerp head coach Heather Barnhouse. “The girls were determined to get this win and being a veteran team helps in these situations. We kept a level head and got the job done,” said Antwerp head coach Heather Barnhouse. On the other side, Raider head coach was disappointed in the defensive play of her team and the number of errors committed. “We just made too many mistakes today,” commented Wayne Trace head coach Amber Showalter after the con- test. “We had four errors again and you can’t do that and expect to win at this level. We need to work on it and get that cleaned up.” Braaten recorded the victory on the mound for Antwerp, striking out five Raider hitters while giving up eight hits, four runs and two walks. Callie Perry led the Archer offense with a single and a double while Beth Hawley and Becca Johanns each added singles. Madison Zartman, Kalin Gerber and Brooke Sinn all had two singles for Wayne Trace with Carley Wright and Megan Moore also adding singles. Maggie Crosby suffered the loss, giv- ing up four hits and two walks while fan- ning four.

Lady Panthers take two from Antwerp

By KEVIN WANNEMACHER Sports Writer PAULDING – The Lady Panthers picked up a sweep of county rival Antwerp as the Panthers won a pair of games by scores of 11-7 and 12-5. With the two squads tied at 3-3 after three innings, Pauld- ing used a four run fourth and added four more runs in the sixth to pull away for the victory. Kelsey Beck had a home run, double and single with Dar- ian Andrews adding a double and two singles to lead the Panther offense. Bailey Pieper, Asia Arellano and Haylee Dominique all posted a single and a double. Avery Braaten had a single and a double for Antwerp while Sierra Cline, Brooke Hatlevig and Lindsey Bok all chipped in two singles each. Kristen Schilt got the win for the Panthers, allowing 13 hits and four walks while fanning two in seven innings of work. Avery Braaten took the loss for Antwerp, giving up 14 hits and two walks while striking out five. In the second game, Audrey Manz struck out nine Ant- werp hitters to lead Paulding to a 12-5 win. The Panthers plated five runs in the first and never looked back, widening the advantage to as much as 9-0 after four frames. Haylee Dominique totaled four hits, drove in two runs and scored three times to lead the Panthers to the victory. Kristen Schilt, Darian Andrews and Mya Andrews all chipped in two hits each for Paulding. Emily Derck topped the Archers with four hits and Lind- sey Bok added two.

Sports Scoreboard
Sports Scoreboard

(Editor’s note: Team coaches are reminded to please submit result forms to the Progress office. We rely on these forms to report game results to your fans. You may drop off forms or fax them to 419-399- 4030, or email info to progress@ progressnewspaper.org) WAYNE TRACE Junior Varsity Baseball – Edgerton scored three times in the first and added eight in the third to knock off Wayne Trace 11-1 last week. Caleb Yenser led the way for Wayne Trace with two hits while Caleb Schaefer, Matthew Stouffer and Haydn Gillett each picked up

one hit. Schaefer also had two runs batted in while Reece Thompson scored the Wayne Trace run. Gillett suffered the loss, giving up six hits and five walks while fan- ning three in three innings of work. Caleb Yenser pitched the other in- ning, striking out three and walking two. Junior High Track – Van Wert won both the boys’ and girls’ team championships at the 20th annu- al Wayne Trace Junior High Track Invitational last Thursday night at Wayne Trace High School. The Cougar boys totaled 149- 1/2 points to get past second

place Spencerville’s 126 while Lin- colnview finished third at 72-1/2. Wayne Trace (49), Paulding (36) and Tinora (26) rounded out the field. Paulding’s Seth Dysinger won the 200 hurdles in 29.96 seconds while the Panther 1600 relay team of Riley Coil, Dysinger, Owen Carna- han and Jordan Mudel took first in

4:18.10.

Also scoring points for the ma- roon-and-white were Carnahan (high jump, tied for sixth and 110 hurdles, third), Brandon Jackson (pole vault, fifth), Dysinger (long jump, fifth), Luke McCullough (110

hurdles, sixth), Coil (400 dash, sixth), Adrian Manz (pole vault, tied for sixth) and Mudel (800 run, sixth). The Panther 400 relay quartet of Adrian Manz, Jackson, Deyton Price and Mudel took fifth. Placers for Wayne Trace were Tyce Homier (pole vault, fourth), Ethan Moore (long jump and 200 dash, fourth and 100 dash, sec- ond), Owen Manz (200 hurdles, second and long jump, sixth), Zane Shaffer (400 dash, third) and Eli Moore (400 dash, fourth). Wayne Trace’s 800 relay team of Andrew Sinn, Anthony Castilla,

Tyler Castilla and Ryan Wenninger took fourth while Eli Moore, Hom- ier, Manz and Shaffer combined to place third in the 1600 relay. On the girls side, the Lady Cougars posted 171 points with Spencerville (147) second and Paulding (41) third. Lincolnview took fourth at 36 while Wayne Trace and Tinora tied for fifth with 30 each. Girls picking up points for the Lady Panthers included Sydney McCullough (pole vault and shot put, third), Baylee March (100 hurdles, sixth), Maggie Manz (100 dash, fourth and 200 dash, sec-

ond) and Elyse Manz (1600 and

800 run, third).

Sadie Estle, McCullough, March and Maggie Manz put together a fourth place finish in the 400 relay. Lady Raiders who scored were Kaitlin Vest (long jump, second and

100 dash, third) and Krista Markley

(long jump, fifth and 200 hurdles, fifth). Wayne Trace’s 400 relay team of Ashlynn Parrish, Kassidy Camp-

bell, Maria Stoller and Vest took third while the quartet of Madison Elson, Misti Klopfenstein, Stoller and Campbell took third in the

800 relay.

2B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Varsity Games of the Week

Softball

Track

Van Wert

15

At Hicksville:

Antwerp

1

Boys’ meet – Hicksville

Wayne Trace

7

Hilltop

Miller City

6

Antwerp Girls’ meet –

Antwerp

5

Hicksville

Wayne Trace

4

Hilltop Antwerp

Crestview

12

Wayne Trace

4

At Paulding:

Fairview

8

Boys’ meet -

Antwerp

1

Spencerville Paulding

Lincolnview

7

Temple Christian

Paulding

4

Girls’ meet - Paulding

Tinora

17

Spencerville

Wayne Trace

2

Temple Christian

Delphos Jefferson

Wayne Trace

5

2

At Edgerton:

Boys’ meet -

At Hicksville:

Wayne Trace

9

Fairview

Delphos Jefferson

2

Edgerton

Paulding

11

Wayne Trace

Antwerp

7

Girls’ meet -

Paulding

12

Fairview Edgerton

Antwerp

5

Baseball

Wayne Trace

Fort Jennings

7

Boys’ meet -

Antwerp

0

Edgerton Hicksville

Van Wert

9

Wayne Trace

0

Evergreen Hilltop Antwerp

Antwerp

10

Edon

Wayne Trace

9

North Central

Paulding

15

Fayette

Continental

3

Girls’ meet -

Wayne (Ind.)

6

Edgerton Hicksville

Wayne Trace

5

Hilltop Evergreen

Fairview

10