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Faculty

Engineering

Department

Chemical Engineering

Course Title

Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I

Course Code

CHE 203

Status

Core course

Level

Credit Hours

Contact Hours

Pre-requisites
(if any)
Co-requisites
(if any)
Teaching
Methodology
Method of
Evaluation

CHE 201 and MATH 201

Instructor(s)

Semester Offered

Dr. Muataz Ali Atieh


Email: motazali@kfupm.edu.my
Office: 16-208
Tel: 8607513
Semester I, 2007-2008

Course
Objectives

1. To develop a physical awareness of the phenomena in


thermodynamics.

Nill
Lectures and tutorials
Mid Term
Quizzes
Homework (Assignments)
Final Examination
TOTAL

30 %
15 %
05 %
40 %
100 %

2. To present the fundamental laws that governs thermodynamics


and their applications.
3. To develop practical methodologies for solving engineering
problems by thermodynamics.

Bulletin
Description

4. To illustrate the extremely wide variety of thermodynamics


related applications in everyday life and in modern technology.
The first law of thermodynamics is studied in detail. Material
covered includes concepts of energy, enthalpy, heat effects,
conservation of energy, and interaction between heat transfer,

mechanical work and chemical energy liberation, equation of state,


behavior of gases and liquids and standard heat of reaction,
formation and combustion. Study of combined mass and energy
balances and the principles of the second and third law of
thermodynamics are also covered.
Learning
Outcome

1)

Determine thermodynamic information for pure fluids and


use it to perform thermodynamic calculations oriented to the
analysis of chemical processes.

2)

Evaluate the values of enthalpy, entropy, internal energy for


pure and mixed fluids.

3)

Evaluate the effect of pressure and temperature on the


properties of fluids

4)

Define and obtain thermodynamic properties of pure fluids


such as the heats of evaporation, formation and combustion.

5)

Define and use different equations of state

6)

Use enthalpy concentration charts and humidity charts in


solving problems.

7)

Define and draw thermodynamic diagrams such as P-V and


P-T diagrams for pure fluids.

8)

Able to understand the basic knowledge that is being applied


in solving the thermodynamics problems.

9)
10)
COURSE
OUTLINES /
CONTENTS

Understand the principles how the current thermodynamics


related devices are operated.

Able to develop a new thermodynamics related devices or at


least can make modification to the current devices.
WEEK
TOPICS
CHAPTER
/BOOK
Energy and Energy Balances
1-3
1. Forms of Energy: the first law of
Chapter 7/1
Thermodynamics
2. Kinetic and Potential Energy
3. Energy Balance on Closed Systems
4. Energy Balance on Open Systems at
Steady State
5. Tables of Thermodynamic Data
6. Energy Balance Procedures
7. Mechanical Energy Balance

Balance on Nonreactive Processes


4-7

Chapter 8/2
1. Element of Energy Balance
Calculations
2. Changes in Pressure at Constant
Temperature
3. Changes in Temperature
4. Phase Change Operations
5. Mixing and Solution
Balances on Reactive Processes

8-10

Chapter 9/3
1. Heat of Reaction
2. Measurement and Calculation of
Heat of Reaction
3. Formation Reactions and Heat of
Formation
4. Heat of Combustion
5. Energy Balance on Reactive
Processes
6. Fuels and Combustion

Volumetric Properties of Pure Fluids


11-13

Chapter 3/2
1.
2.
3.
4.

PVT Behavior of Pure Substances


VIRIAL Equations of State
The Ideal Gas
Application
of
the
VIRIAL
Equations
5. CUBIC Equation of State
6. Generalized Correlations for Gases
7.
Generalized Correlations for
Liquids

14-16

The Second Law of Thermodynamics


Chapter 5/2
1. Statement of the Second Law
2. Heat Engines
3. Thermodynamic Temperature
Scales
4. Entropy
5. Entropy Changes of An I deal Gas
6. Mathematical Statement of the
Second Law
7. Entropy Balance for Open Systems
8. Calculation of Ideal Work
9. Lost Work
10. The Third Law of Thermodymanics
11. Entropy from the Microscopic
Viewpoint

References

Required:
Textbook:
1)

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, 3/e, by


Richard M. Felder and Ronald W. Rosseau, J. Willey (2000).

2)

Introduction of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 6/e,


by J.C. Smith, H.C. Van Ness, and M.M. Abbot, McGrawHill (2001).

Recommended:
1. Yunus A. Cengel (1997), Introduction to Thermodynamics,
McGraw Hill.
2. Gordon J. Van Wylen and Richard E. Sonntag (1986),
Fundamentals of Classical Thermodynamics, Wiley.
3. William Z. Black and James G. Hartley (1996), Thermodynamics,
Addison-Wesley.
4. Michael J. Moram and Howard N. Shapiro (1995), Fundamentals
of Engineering Thermodynamics, John Wiley & Sons