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DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Part B
1 Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives (75)
1.1 Vision and Mission (5)
1.1.1 State the Vision and Mission of the institute and department (1)
(List and articulate the vision and mission statements of the institute and department)

1.1.1. State the Mission and Vision of the institute and department (1)
The Mission of Our Saveetha Engineering College is
To promote academic excellence, widen intellectual horizons Inculcate self-discipline and high ideals for
the holistic development of the individual.
The Vision of Our Saveetha Engineering College is
To be recognized for setting the standards of excellence in Engineering education and high quality
research in Science and Technology.
The Mission of our Department is
MISSION
1. Imparting quality education to the students and enhancing their skills to make them globally competitive
Mechanical Engineers.
2. Maintaining vital, state of the art research facilities to provide its students and faculty with opportunities
to create, interpret, apply and disseminate knowledge.
3. To develop linkages with world class research and development organizations and educational
institutions in India and abroad for excellence in teaching, research and consultancy practices.
The Vision of our Department is
The Mechanical Engineering Department strives to be recognized globally for outstanding education
and research leading to well-qualified engineers, who are innovative, entrepreneurial and successful
in advanced fields of engineering and research.
1.1.2 Indicate how and where the Vision and Mission are published and disseminated (2)
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(Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula books) the vision and mission are published and how
these are disseminated among stakeholders)

In College Web site www.saveetha.ac.in


In Academic Calendar
In College Magazines
In Display board
1.1.3 Mention the process for defining Vision and Mission of the department (2)
Articulate the process involved in defining the vision and mission of the department from the vision and
mission of the institute.)
Mission and Purpose
Mission and purpose are used interchangeably, though at theoretical level, there is a difference between two.
Institution provides access to higher education opportunities that enable students to develop knowledge and
skills necessary to achieve their professional goals, improve the productivity of their organizations and
provide leadership and service to their communities.
Purposes

To facilitate cognitive and affective student learningknowledge, skills, and valuesand to promote

use of that knowledge in the students work place.


To develop competence in communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and information utilization,
together with a commitment to lifelong learning for enhancement of students opportunities for career
success.
To provide instruction that bridges the gap between theory and practice through faculty members who
bring to their classroom not only advanced academic preparation, but also the skills that come from the
current practice of their professions.
To provide General Education and foundational instruction and services that prepares students to engage
in a variety of university curricula.

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To use technology to create effective modes and means of instruction that expand access to learning
resources and that enhance collaboration and communication for improved student learning.
To assess student learning and use assessment data to improve the teaching/learning system, curriculum,
instruction, learning resources, counseling and student services.
Developing a Mission Statement
Start thinking about the role of your college, its purpose and its achievements. Take your time when writing
a college mission statement its a hard but very important task, learning how to write a college mission
statement takes time it needs to be both positive and inspirational.
Vision Statements:
Vision statement for a company or organization focuses on the potential inherent in the companys future, or
what they intend to be. While a vision statement might contain references to how the company intends to
make that future into a reality, the how is really part of a "mission" statement, while the vision statement is
simply a description of the what, meaning, what the company intends to become.
Developing a Vision Statement
Our vision is to bring our students into the 21st century through innovation and modern technology.
Learning will be enhanced with computer software and educational games that will allow students to
proceed at their own rate according to their ability.
As we move towards our goal of being a world-class institute, we will support research on a global scale.
Locally, our campus will service the research needs of the learning community, granting access to many
informational resources.

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1.2 Programme Educational Objectives (15)


1.2.1 Describe the Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) (2)
(List and articulate the programme educational objectives of the programme under accreditation)

PEO1: Have high level of technical competency combined with research and problem solving skills to
generate innovative solutions in mechanical engineering or related areas.

PEO2: Be able to communicate effectively to various stakeholders and practice their profession with high
regard to societal needs, diversity, constraints in the professional workplace and ethical responsibilities.

PEO3: Continuously updating themselves in areas and technologies that are relevant to their career,
participate in personal development and increasing their understanding of matters that are current and
important to society at national and international context.

PEO 4: Solve complex technical problems and /or design systems that are useful to society by applying the
fundamental scientific principles that underpin the mechanical engineering profession.

PEO 5: Graduates are able to undertake lifelong learning and adapt to the changing environment.

1.2.2 State how and where the PEOs are published and disseminated (2)
(Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula books) the PEOs are published and how these are
disseminated among stakeholders)

In College Web site www.saveetha.ac.in

In Academic Calendar
In College Magazines
Display boards

1.2.3 List the stakeholders of the programme (1)


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(List stakeholders of the programme under consideration for accreditation and articulate their relevance)

Employer
Alumni
Industry Peoples
Parent
1.2.4 State the process for establishing the PEOs (5)
(Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the PEOs are based on the needs
of the programmes various stakeholders. )
The process to establishing and evaluating attainment of the PEOs includes indirect measures that
include employer, alumni survey, Program Advisory Committee and department faculty. The advice
provides opportunities for the department to evaluate attainment of the PEO and alignment with
institutional mission and vision.
The Program Advisory Committee & employer surveys seek to assess and evaluate the degree to
which our graduates meet and achieve our PEOs from the Program Advisory Committee & employers
perspectives. This assessment process taken place periodically: the surveys are collected and are processed
every three years, and the results are used to evaluate the achievement of the program objectives. Alumni
input on objectives is solicited and documented through periodic alumni Surveys. These surveys seek not
only to find of our alumni believe that we are satisfying our objectives, but also how important they consider
each objective is to them. In addition to the indirect surveys to assess our PEOs, the annual direct (and
indirect) assessment of our program outcomes is also used to assess attainment of our PEO, as they are
linked together. As a final step in the Educational objectives review process, the recommendations of the
faculty are presented to the Program Advisory Committee for discussion, revisions and approval. This
Program Advisory Committee review is documented in the minutes.

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1.2.5 Establish consistency of the PEOs with the Mission of the institute (5)
(Describe how the Programme Educational Objectives are consistent with the Mission of the department.)

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1.3 Achievement of Programme Educational Objectives (20)


1.3.1 Justify the academic factors involved in achievement of the PEOs (5)
(Describe the broad curricular components that contribute towards the attainment of the Programme
Educational Objectives.)

The curriculum, the syllabi, and duration of degree level programs in engineering followed in most of the
technical institutes are suggested and directed by the All India council of Technical Institute (AICTE) which
is a statutory body. AICTE is the competent body which approves or recommends for approval the
engineering programs throughout India (with the exception of Indian Institute of Technologies).
The reason for this is that the graduates as they seek employment, are assessed based on their knowledge on
the curricular courses of the programs followed widely across the technical institutes/universities/colleges in
India. Similar yardstick is also applied when the graduates seek entry to post graduate programs. Therefore
the program educational objectives are formulated based on the curriculum and syllabi widely followed in
India.
1.3.2 Explain how administrative system helps in ensuring the Achievement of the PEOs (5)
(Describe the committees and their functions, working process and related regulations.)

The Program Educational Objectives are established and evaluated through a regular consultation and
review process that involves four constituents:
Academic Council committee

The Academic Council is the highest academic body of the college and is responsible for the
maintenance of standards of instruction, education and examination within the College.

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The council members can be drawn from different spheres of academic life like, Heads of the
institute, Head of the Department, Class Advisors, Representatives of Teachers and Students,
External experts from R&D and Industries.

The

members of the academic council,

plan and review College wide academic changes,

and promote the highest standards of teaching and learning for adapting to the changing
advancements.

The Academic Council has the power to make Regulations and to amend or repeal them, to
advise the Executive committee and monitoring board on all academic matters. The Council
meets ordinarily once in a year.

Academic Planning and Monitoring Committee

The Academic Planning and Monitoring Unit is the quality assurance organ of the college.

The board reviews the academic activities also the student and faculty development programs.

Formulates the Master Plan for campus development, facilitating implementation of the provision of
the perspective plan and draw new schemes of development for the college.

To plan for resource mobilization through industry interaction, consultancy and extra mural
funding, and for sustaining the quality of education, quality improvement and accreditation of the
college.

Promotes research and extension activities in the college campus and to recommend schemes

to

promote participation of academic departments in community development activities in the


region.

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Members

Profession

Designation

Dr.R.Venkatasamy

Principal, SEC

Chairman

Prof. Dheenadayalu

Dean, SEC

Member

Dr. A. R.Lakshmanan

Head R&D, SEC

Member

Dr. B. K Gnanavel

Head of Department, SEC

Member

Dr. V. Muthukumar

Professor, SEC

Member

Dr. G. Manimaran

Professor , SEC

Member

Mr. G. Kalaiselvan

Country Head, Severn Glucon (I)

Member

Ltd.,
Mr. N. Arunachalam

Chairman, Cutech

Member

Dr. R. Ravichandran

Manager, CVRD

Member

Program advisory board:


The Program Advisory Board (PAB) serves a consultative role, providing ideas and critical feedback to the
Institute for the development. The role of the Program Advisory Board is to provide advice to the
Department on academic activities. This advice includes comment on curriculum design and content,
course delivery, course assessment, and evaluation of courses. The PAB will also provide advice on
strategic academic alliances.
The constituencies of the program are:
Undergraduate students
Alumni
Faculty
Industry
1.3.3 Indicate the additional co-curricular activities undertaken towards the attainment of the PEOs (10)
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(Describe the committees and their functions, working process and related regulations.)

SAEINDIA Collegiate Club Mr.S.Thleeepan, Mr. H.Ravikumar, to organize the student convention
programme inside the campus. Also the students to motivate to participate the SAEINDIA BAJA,
SUPRA, & EPICYCLIC GEAR TRAIN.

ICTACT Skill edge V. Perumal ICTACT runs SKILLEDGE A skill development initiative
dedicated to create & enhance employability skills among the graduating students in both
Engineering and Arts & Science Colleges to feed the ICT industry and ITES industry respectively.

Anna University Edusat R.Saravanan The Centre for Faculty Development of Anna University
Chennai conducts the ANNA EDUSAT live interactive audio video lecture programmes transmitted
through KUBand provided by ISRO, Bangalore from January 2006 onwards. Live audio video two
way interactive lectures are given by expert faculty drawn from Anna University/IIT/affiliated
colleges during semester session on working days.

INFOSYS campus connects R. Saravanan Campus Connect is an industry academia partnership


initiative launched by Infosys. The Campus Connect initiative aims to enhance the education level of
engineering students, nationwide and thus increase the employability of these engineers. As a part of
this initiative. Infosys shares with partner colleges its proven courseware, methodology and education
experiences. Campus Connect thus helps partner colleges groom Industry ready engineers

IITB Spoken Tutorials Mr. G. Nagappan

An initiative of National Mission on Education through

ICT, Government of India, to promote IT literacy through Open Source Software. We regularly
conduct FOSS(Free Open Source Software) courses from IIT Bombay Spoken Tutorial such as Linux,
Latex, Scilab, Python and PHP MySql etc.

IITB Aakash Project Center Mr. G. Nagappan In coming years, the Aakash tablet launched by
MHRD, is likely to become an ubiquitous tool in the hands of students. Our research aims at
developing useful Open Source applications and contents for different versions of the tablet. These
will range from animations to scientific computing, and will encompass the entire educational
spectrum covering schools, colleges, and professional studies.

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IITB Remote Center G. Nagappan. The "Teach 1000 Teachers" programme was initiated in 2009,
to enhance the teaching skills of engineering faculty. Participants attend workshops at multiple remote
centers. Lectures are delivered by an expert using multi way visual interaction. Tutorials and labs are
conducted at remote centers by expert faculty at IIT Bombay, trained earlier by the expert.

Wipro Mission 10x Monika P. Suresh Mission 10X is a faculty development program conducted by
WIPRO for senior Engineering College faculty members in India. It aims to Expose the faculty
members to modern and advanced ways of teaching, to Move from a (only) chalkandtalk approach to
more interactive methods, Demonstrate some of the interactive methods through active participation
from the attendees, A paradigm shift from teaching to learning and to help teachers build a bond
with their students and work together towards a common goal..

Synapse Training program Mr. Bala Synapse is to enhance the Professional, Career, and Holistic
development of student and staff community of Saveetha Engineering College.

Drestein Dr. Godfrey Winster and Mr.N.Balaji & C.V.Agilan National Level Technical Festival
DRESTEIN is DReam,dESign,compeTE,wIN. A National level technical symposium conducted by
SAVEETHA ENGINEERING COLLEGE every year in the month of August with Exciting events,
workshops....

Guest Lectures Guest lectures and seminars are offered as additional learning activities to regular
courses provided within the curriculum of Computer Science & Engineering, where issues related to
advanced developments in the industry can be shared and discussed with Academic & Industrial
experts.

Seminars Researchers and trainers from around the world present their cutting edge work at the
seminars as often as once as twice a semester on advanced topics.

Industrial Visits Mr. P.Subburam Industrial visit is a part of an engineering course, during which
students visit companies and get insight regarding the internal working environment of a company
and how a company functions, as well as useful information related to the practical aspects of the
educational course which cannot be visualized in lectures.

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Educational Tours Mr. . P.Subburam from the name itself we can derive that during those tour the
students, under the vigilant eyes of their teachers, travel and tour different places. When the students
visit some of the most strategically and historically important places. So, by visiting those places,
they explore places which they have, until then, have seen only their school books, expose themselves
to altogether new people, culture and places. In this way they can broaden their thoughts and also
think out of the box.

Conferences Conference is a formal event where researchers present their work, experiments and
results. one National conference is organized every year in the department. Now planned for one
international conference for coming academic year.

Workshops To take the students career to the next level with proper target, skills based workshops
are designed to enhance and improve their professional development the industry academia gap by
competency based skills training.

College Magazine Expression It is like an annual report which documents the achievements and
contributions of the staff and students and also details the infrastructural developments made on the
college campus. Few students involve in preparation of this while others submit their articles and art
works add to the content

College Monthly Newsletter Saveetha Sparks

College Newsletter is monthly magazine with

articles written by students & staff and edited by Prof. R. Dheenadayalu and his team. The newsletter
feature articles on academic advice, career tips, student success stories, sports achievements, aptitude
questions and celebrity interviews.

Faculty Development Programs Faculty development training programmes cater to the needs of
faculty members, by training the teachers to plan and prepare the lessons, understand the subject
contents and improve the teaching quality. These programmes are conducted during the summer /
Winter Vacation to enable the teachers to participate and benefit. The resource persons are
experienced faculty members from University and also experts from the industry.

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1.4 Assessment of the Achievement of Programme Educational Objectives (25)


1.4.1 Indicate tools and processes used in assessment of the attainment of the PEOs
(5)
Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to which the
Programme Educational Objectives are attained. Also include information on:
a) A listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of
each programme educational objective is based. Examples of data collection processes may include, but
are not limited to, employer surveys, graduate surveys, focus groups, industrial advisory committee
meetings, or other processes that are relevant and appropriate to the programme
b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
Assessment Tools:
The assessment process for the POs and the PEOs relies on several tools that seek feedback from students,
alumni, faculty department advisory board and the student representative committee. The input is evaluated
by the department and proper corrective actions are taken whenever necessary.
Outcome
Measurement

Assessment Tool
Administered and examined by
End of course survey
. Faculty
Student Comments
Faculty
Program outcomes
Faculty evaluation report
Department
specific to each course
Class room work
Faculty
Course performance report Faculty
End of course survey
Department
Faculty evaluation report
Program Outcomes
Department
Student exist Survey
evaluated overall
Faculty
Alumni Survey
courses
Alumni Advisor
Student Advisory
Department
Committee
Employer satisfactory
Program Educational
Survey
Objectives
Department
Alumni Survey
Alumni Advisory Board

The constituents (Faculty, Students, Alumni and Industry) of the department are engaged in the following
manner in the department assessment activities.
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Faculty:
Prior to the start of an Under Graduate course, every course instructor is advised to review:
1. The course objectives and outcomes of his/her course in order to familiarize themselves with the expected
outcomes for the course and how these course outcomes related to the Program outcomes.
2. Past course performance form to identify any points of weakness that may require additional emphasis.
During the offering of an UG course, every course instructor is asked to:
Save samples of student works on a regular basis (Homework & Exam Solutions, Lab & Design Reports)
assess the contribution of the course to its Program Outcomes by evaluating student performance Comment
on the overall course performance towards meeting its objectives and outcomes. Encourage students to
participate in the end of the course surveys Students.
The Department collects feedback from Under Graduate students for each course relating to student input
on course material, course organization and content delivery, the survey assessment for each course, the
main topic that students are expected to have been exposed to during the course. Students are asked to rate
on a scale from poor to excellent, based on their feedback whether they feel that they had an opportunity to
learn the specific course outcomes well. The department also collects feedback from student representative
committee composed of representatives of the ISTE, SAE, and the student input is then summarized

Individual reports on course performance for each course

Yearly reports on course performance during an Academic year.

Department Performance.

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Alumni and Industry:


Alumni Advisory Board consists of 4 representatives from industry and alumni. It meets once in a year and
examines issues related to alumni activities, industry feedback and department performance in meeting its
Educational objectives and Program Outcomes. Since several members of the Alumni Advisory Board
(AAB) are members of industry and hold management positions at leading companies that hire a good
number of our graduating seniors, their input is used by the department as the link between the department
and its industry partners.
Alumni Survey:
The Alumni survey is a comprehensive survey that not only surveys our graduates on the type of industry in
which they are employed, their primary job function and job title but also seeks to obtain from them the
degree to which our program outcomes and objectives are achieved. This assessment process takes place
periodically, the surveys are collected and are processed about every three years and the results are used to
evaluate the achievement of the program objectives.
Program Advisory Committee Survey:
The surveys asked the participants to rate their level of agreements on a scale of 1 to 5. On how well
prepared our graduates are in regard to the following 11 items listed below.
1

Effectively applying engineering knowledge in their profession

Apply engineering fundamentals in solving problems

Design/Conduct/Assess engineering experiments

Be a professional, ethical, socially responsible engineer

Function effectively in multidisciplinary teams

Complete professionally as engineer and leader

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Be a lifelong learner

Communicate effectively

Think creatively and critically

10 Have/apply global awareness skills


11 Be an entrepreneurs
The following table shows the mapping between the above items and Program Educational Objectives.

Survey Item
PEO

1,2,3
I, II, IV

4,5,6
I, II, III

7,8,9
I, V

10,11
I, II, III, IV

Employer Survey:
1. The career Development center will conduct the employer survey and the results are to be transmitted to
the Dean and to the HOD. The Dean and the HOD are to review the results and transmit them to the
faculty/staff.
2. If a program related problem is identified as a result of this assessment, then the Dean and the HOD has to
refer the problem to a faculty member or an appropriate committee for a resolution to the problem.
3. Process/Actions/Recommendations for problem resolution are to be documented and reported to the Dean
and the HOD.
Implementation:
The Department has established a comprehensive assessment process for its Program
Outcomes. The assessment process is meant to ensure that the Program Outcomes that are important to the
mission of the department and its Program Education Objectives are being monitored and measured. The
results of the assessment process are regularly applied to the improvement of the program and the
educational experience of our students.

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1.4.2 Give evidences for the attainment of the PEOs (20)


File Name
MECH PLACEMENT DETAILS
The Program Advisory committee and Employer surveys seek to assess and evaluate the degree to which our
graduates meet and achieve our PEOs from the PAC and employers perspectives. This assessment process
takes place periodically: the surveys are collected and are processed every year, and the results are used to
evaluate the achievement of the program objectives.
The surveys asked the participants to rate their level of agreements, on a scale of 1 to 5, on how well
prepared our graduates are in regard to the 14 items listed below. (1 = unsatisfactory, 2 = marginal, 3 =
average, 4 = very good, 5 = outstanding). The 14 items are listed below:
The following table shows the linkage between the above items and PEOs. Objectives are indicated with
capital letters.
1. Effectively applying engineering knowledge in their profession
2. Apply engineering fundamentals in solving problems
3. Design/Conduct/Assess engineering experiments
4. Be a professional, ethical, socially responsible engineer
5. Function effectively in multidisciplinary teams
6. Complete professionally as engineer and leader
7. Be a lifelong learner
8. Communicate effectively
9. Think creatively and critically
10. Have/apply global awareness skills
11. Be an entrepreneurs
Survey Item
PEO

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1,2,3
I, II, IV

4,5,6
I, II, III

7,8,9
I, V

10,11
I, II, III, IV

Assessment Process for Program Advisory committee Survey:


1. The Mechanical Engineering department will conduct, evaluate, and tabulate the Program Advisory
Committee Survey. The surveys are to be conducted every 3 or 6 years and the results are to be
transmitted to the HOD and to the Principal.
2. The HOD and the Principal are to review the results and transmit them to the faculty/staff.
3. If a program related problem is identified as a result of this assessment, then the HOD and the Principal
are to refer the problem to a faculty member or an appropriate committee for a resolution to the problem
4. Process/actions/recommendations for problem resolution are to be documented

Alumni input on objectives is solicited and documented through periodic alumni surveys. These surveys seek
not only to find if our alumni believe that we are satisfying our objectives, but also how important they
consider each objective is to them.

Assessment Process for the Alumni Survey:


1. The Mechanical Engineering department Engineering department will conduct, evaluate, and tabulate the
Alumni Survey. The surveys are to be conducted regularly from students who have graduated in recent
years. The results are to be transmitted to the HODs Office and to the Principal.
2. The HOD and the Principal are to review the results and transmit them to the faculty/staff.
3. If a program related problem is identified as a result of this assessment, then the HOD and the Principal are
to refer the problem to a faculty member or an appropriate committee for a resolution to the problem. 4.
Process/actions/recommendations for problem resolution are to be documented.
1.5 Indicate how the PEOs have been redefining in the past (10)
(Articulate with rationale how the results of the evaluation of PEOs have been used to review/redefine the
PEOs)
The process for reviewing and revising, as necessary, the program educational objectives as well as
engagement of the various program constituents is as follows.
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Diagram
Head of the institution leads the Undergraduate Education Committee, a faculty committee that is
directly engaged in redefining the program educational objectives. The process for revising the PEOs is
initiated by this committee, which takes into account any changes/revisions made to the College and
Department missions. The committee also uses assessment data generated from alumni surveys and our
Program Advisory Committee. The revised objectives are then presented to the faculty and the PAC for
feedback and finalization via faculty vote. The student body is made aware of the objectives through an
open forum, where they are also provided with an opportunity to provide feedback on various aspects of
their program experience.
Since the program educational objectives describe accomplishment up to 5 years after graduation, our
review cycle is established as 6 years. Our last assessment and definition occurred in 20102011 and the
next evaluation is planned for 201617. Of course, as situations change, a noncyclic review may be
conducted as needed. This process is documented in our college portal.

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2. Programme Outcomes (150)


2.1 Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Programme Outcomes
2.1.1 List the Course Outcomes (COs) and Programme Outcomes (POs) (2)
(List the course outcomes of the courses in programme curriculum and programme outcomes of the
programme under accreditation)

COURSE TITLE

COURSE OUTCOMES

1. Students learn to speak the subject matter with grammar, structure and
combination of words
2. Enables the student to write letters and reports effectively in formal and
business situations.
3. Helps the student to work as a team and talk in groups. Students learn
interview skills through GD.
4. Presentations and learn to face challenges in the outside world.

Technical English I
1. Transformation, Partial differentiation and Three dimensional techniques
are very useful to Mechanical engineering.
2. The students will be able to choose the appropriate techniques from
Engineering
calculus and geometry to generate exact and qualitative solutions of
Mathematics 1
differential equations.
3. Successfully apply the Substitution Method and Integration by Parts to
express derivatives in terms of elementary functions.
4.State and apply the fundamental definition of the derivative, understand its
relationship to the tangent line, and recognize when a function is not
differentiable
1. Understand the concept of magneto striction and Piezo electric effect.
2.Able to calculate the velocity of ultrasonic waves
3.Understand the principle and characteristics of laser
4.Able to derive an expression for N.A, acceptance angle, Schrdingers
wave equation-time dependent equation and time independent equation
5.Able to calculate number of atoms, coordination number, atomic radius,
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packing factor of SC,BCC,FCC structures.

Engineering Physics
1.The knowledge of various kinds of impurities present in the water.
2.Calculate the hardness and alkalinity of water.
3. Understands the need of non-conventional energy sources
4. Understands the need to reduce the radiations from power plants
Engineering Chemistry

5. Understands To improve the quality of the engineering materials

1.To develop in students graphic skill for communication of concepts, ideas


Engineering Graphics

and design of engineering products


2. Students are exposed to existing national standards related to technical
drawings.
3.Developing visualization skills through free hand sketching of multiple
views from pictorial views of objects
1.Students can know the different characteristics of computers, their
generation and classification of computer
2 Students can also understand the different computer software, types of

Fundamentals
Computing

Of

software, and software development process.


3 They can also understand the problem solving techniques, how to plan the

and
computer program, purpose, how to write the algorithms, flow chart, Pseudo

Programming
code.
4. Understands the different operations and expressions in c and how to
manage the input and output operations.
5. Student can learn how to handle string character, functions, user defined
Computer
Laboratory

Practice

functions, Definitions, declarations.


1. Understand different word processing operations and will gain knowledge
about Document creation, text manipulation with scientific notations
understand Ms-word Exercises, table creation, drawing flow chart, Ms-Excel,
chart preparation, formula editor, import and export features
3. Perform about Spread sheet-inclusion of object, pictures and graphics,
protecting the document and sheet.

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4. They can understand Different data types, Expressions Evaluation,


Condition Statements.
5. Students shall able to do elegant programs like Array implementationAscending order, Descending order, min and max of arrays.
1. Students learn the functions and purpose of English Language
2. Students learn to speak the subject matter with grammar, structure and
combination of words
3. Student understands and interprets the purpose of using graphs and thereby
Technical English-II

presents the information in a professional way.


4. Enables the student to write letters and reports effectively in formal and
business situations.
5. Students learn interview skills through GD, Presentations and learn to face
challenges in the outside world.
1. Understand the various types of Ordinary differential equations and
methods to solve it.
2. Understand the method solve Line Integrals, Area Integrals and Volume

Engineering
Maths-II MA2161

Integrals.
3. Verifying Gauss Divergence Theorem, Stokes theorem and Greens theorem
4. Finding the Transformation of Complex functions using Conformal
mapping, Cauchys Integral Theorem , Cauchys Residue Theorem
5. Understand the derivation of Laplace transformation of various types of
functions
6. Understand the Laplace Transform of Integrals and Initial value and final
value theorem
1. Express electrical and thermal conductivity of metals
2. Calculate the carrier concentration the Intrinsic semiconductor
3. Understand the concept of conductors, semiconductors and its types

Engineering Physics-II

4. Understand the concept of superconducting properties and

uses of

dielectric materials
5.Understand method of preparation of metallic glasses
Engineering

1. The knowledge of various electrodes and Calculate the standard electrode

Chemistry-II

potential of metal
2. Understand the energy conversion of chemical to electrical energy and vice
versa through electrochemical cells
3. Understands the advantages and properties of LPG, CNG, Producer and
water gas
4. Helps to identify the characteristics of a good fuel and the knowledge of

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the calorific value


5. Able to predict the behavior of the system under different conditions of the
governing variables and usage of alloys
1. To understand the vectorial and scalar representation of forces and
moments, static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies both in two
ME2151

dimensions and also in three dimensions.


2. Further, student able to understand the principle of work and energy.

ENGINEERING

3. The student be able to comprehend the effect of friction on equilibrium..

MECHANICS

4. Familiarity with concepts of and applications of semi-conductor transistors.


5. Familiarity with concepts

GE2151

BASIC

ELECTRICAL

AND

ELECTRONICS
ENGINEERING
GE2155 COMPUTER

and applications

of various special

semiconductor devices.
1.To Understand The Electrical Circuits & Measurments
2.Students learn about the Construction, Principle of Operation, Basic
Equations and Applications of Electrical Machines
3.Understand the Characteristics of Semiconductor Devices And Applications
4.To Familiar about Digital Electronics and Fundamentals of Communication
Engineering
1.Study of Unix OS , Basic Shell Commands and Unix Editor
2. To understand the Simple Shell program, Conditional Statements ,Testing

PRACTICE
LABORATORY II
GS2165

Physics

&

Chemistry Laboratory
- II

and Loops
3. Students can able to Write C Programming on Unix
1.Determination of Youngs modulus and Rigidity modulus of the material
2.Determination of viscosity of liquid
3.Determination of Band Gap of a semiconductor material
4.To conduct metric titration (Simple acid base, Mixture of weak and strong
acids)
5.To conduct PH titration (acid & base)
6.Determination of water of crystallization of a crystalline salt (Copper
sulphate)
1. Study of capabilities of software for Drafting and Modeling Coordinate

ME2155 COMPUTER
AIDED
AND

DRAFTING
MODELING

LABORATORY

MA2211

systems (absolute, relative, polar, etc.) Creation of simple figures like


polygon and general multi-line figures.
2. Drawing of front view and top view of simple solids like prism, pyramid,
cylinder, cone, etc, and dimensioning.
3. Drawing isometric projection of simple objects.
4. Creation of 3-D models of simple objects and obtaining 2-D multi-view
drawings from 3-D model.
1.Making capable of mathematically formulating certain practical problems
in terms of partial differential equations, solve them and physically interpret

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the results

2. To gain a great knowledge of Fourier series, their different possible forms


and the frequently needed practical harmonic analysis that an engineer may
Transforms
Partial

And
Differential

Equations

have to make from discrete data


3. To obtain capacity to formulate and identify certain boundary value
problems encountered in engineering practices, decide on applicability of the
Fourier series method of solution, solve them and interpret the results
4. To train grasp the concept of expression of a function, under certain
conditions, as a double integral leading to identification of transform pair, and
specialization on Fourier transform pair, their properties, the possible special
cases with attention to their applications
5. To train learning the basics of Z transform in its applicability to discretely
varying functions, gained the skill to formulate certain problems in terms of
difference equations and solve them using the Z transform technique
bringing out the elegance of the procedure involved
1. To introduce the students the concepts of basic manufacturing processes
and fabrication techniques in metal casting

ME2201

2. To introduce the students the concepts of basic manufacturing processes

MANUFACTURING

and fabrication techniques in metal metal joining

TECHNOLOGY I
3. To impart knowledge on constructional details, principle of operation and
performance of metal forming and plastics
Component manufacture.
1. To achieve an understanding of principles of thermodynamics and to be
able to use it in accounting for the bulk behavior of the simple physical
ME

2202

ENGINEERING
THERMODYNAMICS

ME2203
24 | P a g e

systems.
2. To provide in-depth study of thermodynamic principles, thermodynamics
of state, basic thermodynamic relations, Principle of Psychometric&
Properties of pure substances
3. To enlighten the basic concepts of vapor power cycles
1. To understand the concept of machines, mechanisms and related

terminologies
KINEMATICS

OF

2. To analyses a mechanism for displacement, velocity and acceleration at any


point in a moving link
3. To understand the theory of gears, gear trains and cams

MACHINERY

4. To understand the role of friction in drives and brakes


1 The student is introduced to the mechanics of fluids through a thorough
understanding of the properties of the fluids. The dynamics of fluids is
ME2204

FLUID

MECHANICS

AND

introduced through the control volume approach which gives an integrated


understanding of the transport of mass, momentum and energy
2. The applications of the conservation laws of flow though pipes are studied

MACHINERY
3. The student is introduced to the hydraulics machines and their
ME

2205

ELECTRICAL

performance.
1 To understand the basic concepts of different types of electrical machines
and their performance
2. To study the different methods of starting D.C motors and induction motors

DRIVES

AND

3. To study the conventional and solid-state drives

CONTROL
ME2207

1. To gain hands on experience on working of general purpose machine tools.

MANUFACTURING

and on various manufacturing processes


2.To gain hands on experience on working of

TECHNOLOGY LAB

various manufacturing

processes

I
ME2208

FLUID

MECHANICS

AND

MACHINERY LAB

1. The student is introduced to the hydraulics machines and their


performance.
2. The student is introduced to the hydraulics equipments based on the
application of fluid mechanics laws and calibrating their performance.
1. To perform load characterization test on D.C motors and Transformers
2. To perform load characterization test on Induction motors

ME2209
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING
LABORATORY
MA 2266 STATISTICS
AND

NUMERICAL

1. To gain fundamental knowledge of the basic probability concepts


2. To understand standard distributions which can describe real life
phenomena

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3.To acquire skills in handling situations involving more than one random
variable and functions of random variables
4. To understand and characterize phenomena which evolve with respect to
METHODS

time in probabilistic manner


5.To be able to analyze the response of random inputs to linear time invariant

ME2251 HEAT AND


MASS TRANSFER

systems
1.To understand the basic concept of Heat transfer
2. To understand the basic Theory of conduction, convection and radiation
3. To understand the basic concept of Mass transfer
1. To understand the concept and basic mechanics of metal cutting, working
of standard machine tools such as lathe, shaping and allied machines, milling,

ME

2252

drilling and allied machines, grinding and allied machines and broaching
2. To understand the basic concepts of computer numerical control (CNC)

MANUFACTURING
TECHNOLOGY II

machine tool and CNC programming.


3. To understand the concept and basic mechanics of metal cutting, working
of standard machine tools such as grinding and allied machines and
broaching
1. To impart knowledge on the structure, properties, treatment, testing of

ME

2253
metals and non-metallic materials
2. To impart knowledge on the structure, properties, treatment, testing of non-

ENGINEERING
MATERIALS

AND

metallic materials
3. To understand the testing machines like Brinel hardness, Rockwell

METALLURGY
hardness and Fatigue testing machines.
1. To gain knowledge of simple stresses, strains and deformation in
components due to external loads.
2. To assess stresses and deformations through mathematical models of
ME2254

STRENGTH

OF MATERIALSS

beams, twisting bars or combinations of both.


3. Effect of component dimensions and shape on stresses and deformations
are to be understood
4. The study would provide knowledge for use in the design courses
1.To understand the fundamental concepts of semi-conductor, transistor and
rectifier
2. To understand the fundamental concepts of digital electronics

ME2255
ELECTRONICS AND
MICROPROCESSOR
26 | P a g e

3. To understand the fundamental concepts of micro processors

1. To make the students understand and interpret drawings of machine


ME2257 COMPUTER

components so as to prepare assembly drawings either manually and using

AIDED

standard CAD packages.


2. To familiarize the students with Indian Standards on drawing practices and

MACHINE

DRAWING
standard components.
LABORATORY
ME2258

To give a practical hands on exposure to students in the various

MANUFACTURING

Measurements in metal cutting experiment.


To give a practical hand on exposure to students in the various metal cutting

TECHNOLOGY LAB
operations using commonly used machine tools.
II
To integrate the concepts, laws and methodologies from the first course in
ME2301

THERMAL

thermo dynamics into analysis of cyclic processes.


To apply the thermodynamic concepts into various thermal applications like

ENGINEERING
IC engines, Steam Turbines, Compressors.
To study the thermodynamic concepts into thermal application like
Refrigeration and Air conditioning systems
1.To understand the method of static force analysis and dynamic force
ME2302

DYNAMICS

OF MACHINERY

analysis of mechanism
2. To study the undesirable effects of unbalances in rotors and engines
3. To understand the concept of vibratory systems and their analysis
4. To understand the principles of governors and gyroscopes

1. 1. To familiarize the various steps involved in the Design Process.


ME2303 DESIGN OF
2. To understand the principals involved in evaluating the shape and

MACHINE

dimensions of a component to satisfy functional and strength requirements.


2. 3. To learn to use standard practices and standard data using catalogues of

ELEMENTS

ME2305

APPLIED

HYDRAULICS

27 | P a g e

AND

machine components.
1.To know the advantages and applications of Fluid Power Engineering and
Power Transmission System
2. To learn the Applications of Fluid Power System in automation of Machine

Tools and others Equipments


PNEUMATICS

3. 3.To practice the hydraulic and pneumatic system design.


1 To understand what constitutes the environment, what are precious
resources in the environment, how to conserve these resources.
2. what is the role of a human being in maintaining a clean environment and

GE2021
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE

AND

ENGINEERING

useful environment for the future generations


3. how to conserve these resources, and how to maintain ecological balance
4.The role of government and non-government organization in environment

ME2304

managements
1. To understand the basic principles of measurements.

ENGINEERING

2. To learn the various linear and angular measuring equipments, their

METROLOGY

AND

principle of operation and applications.


3. To learn about various methods of measuring Mechanical parameters.

MEASUREMENTS
ME2306

THERMAL

1.To conduct performance test on S.I and C.I engines

ENGINEERING LAB

2. To conduct performance and energy balance test on steam generator and

I
ME2307

turbine.
1. To understand the principles learned in kinematics and dynamics of

DYNAMICS

LAB

Machinery.
2.To familiarize the use of various equipments in the Lab.

ME2308

1. To calibrate the various measuring equipments for errors.

METROLOGY

AND
2. To measure and analyze the various mechanical parameters.

MEASUREMENT
LAB

1. After studying this course, students will be able to have a clear


understanding of the managerial functions like planning, organizing, staffing,
leading and controlling.
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MG2351 PRINCIPLES

2. Students will also gain some basic knowledge on international aspect of

OF MANAGEMENT

management. And Various planning schemes.


3. To become familiar with organization structure directing and controlling.

ME2351

GAS

1.To understand the basic difference between incompressible and

DYNAMICS AND JET

compressible flow
2. To understand the phenomenon of shock waves and its effect on flow.
3.To gain some basic knowledge about jet propulsion and
Rocket

PROPULSION

Propulsion
1. To gain knowledge on the principles and procedure for the design of power
ME2352 DESIGN OF

Transmission components.

TRANSMISSION

2. To understand the standard procedure available for Design of Transmission

SYSTEMS

systems.
3. To learn to use standard data and catalogues.

ME2353

FINITE

ELEMENT ANALYSIS

1. To understand the need for FEA study in engineering applications.


2.To study one-dimensional and 2D analysis of elements
3.To study the dynamic analysis using FEM
1. To understand the construction and working principle of various parts of an

ME2354
AUTOMOBILE

automobile..
2.To have the practice for assembling and dismantling of engine parts and

ME2355

transmission system
3. To study about the various alternative energy sources.
1.To conduct thermal conductivity Test on various apparatus

THERMAL

2. To conduct performance test on refrigeration, and air-conditioning systems.

ENGINEERING

ENGINEERING LAB
II
1. The objective of this project is to provide opportunity for the students to
ME2356 DESIGN AND
FABRICATION
PROJECT
GE2321
Communication Skills

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implement their skills acquired in the previous semesters to practical


problems.
2.The students are required to design and fabricate the chosen item in the
college and demonstrate its working apart from submitting the project report
1.To equip the learners face the linguistic demands of post-degree entrance
examinations
2.To improve the IV level active vocabulary

3.To reactivate and reinforce the language functions introduced in earlier


papers
4.To help the learner infer message from non-verbal cues and speak fluently
on them
5.To help the learners inculcate the micro skills of debating on a subject
Lab
6.To motivate the learners read English dailies and react critically to news
items
7. To help the learners acquire the skills related to organization of thoughts
while writing articles.
1. To provide knowledge on various refrigeration cycles, system

ME2022
REFRIGERATION
AND

AIR

conditioning Systems

CONDITIONING
GE2022
TOTAL

components and refrigerants.


2. To provide knowledge on design aspects of Refrigeration & Air

QUALITY

1. To understand the basic concepts of TQM.


2. To understand the TQM Tools and Techniques.
3.To understand the basics of quality system(ISO systems)

MANAGEMENT
1. To understand the interdisciplinary applications of Electronics, Electrical,
Mechanical and Computer Systems for the Control of Mechanical systems.
2.To understand the interdisciplinary applications of Electronics, Electrical,

ME 2401
Mechatronics

Mechanical and Computer Systems for the Control of Electronic Systems


3.To understand the various stages in designing mechatronics system
1. To gain knowledge about the basic fundamental of CAD.

ME 2402
2.To gain knowledge on how computers are integrated at various levels of
Computer

Integrated
planning and manufacturing
3. To understand computer aided planning and control and computer

Manufacturing

ME 2403 Power Plant


Engineering
ME
Aided

2404

Computer

Simulation

monitoring.
1. To understand the various components , operations and applications of
different types of power plants.
2.To study the economics of various power plants.
1.To conduct simulation of various system using C/Mat lab

&
2.To conduct stress and thermal analysis in various components

Analysis Laboratory
ME 2405 Mechatronics

1.Design and testing of fluid power circuits to control

Lab

(i) velocity (ii) direction and (iii) force of single and double acting actuators

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2.Simulation of basic Hydraulic, Pneumatic and Electric circuits using

MG 2451 Engineering
Economics

and

Cost

Analysis

software
1.To learn about the basics of economics and cost analysis related to
engineering.
2.To understand replacement and maintenance analysis
3.To understand the concept of depreciation
1.The objective of comprehension is to provide opportunity for the student to
apply the knowledge acquired during the earlier semesters to real life
problems which he / she may have to face in future as an engineer.

ME
Comprehension

2452

2.While learning as how to solve the real life problems, student will receive
guidance from the faculty and also review various courses learnt earlier.
3.Further this comprehension is to achieve an understanding of the
fundamentals of contemporary manufacturing systems including materials,
manufacturing process, product and process control, computer integrated
manufacture and quality
1. The aim of the project work is to deepen comprehension of principles by
applying them to a new problem which may be the design and manufacture of
a device, a research investigation, a computer or management project or a

ME 2453
Project Work

design problem.
2.Each student shall finally produce a comprehensive report covering
background
information, literature survey, problem statement, project work details and
Conclusion.

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Program Outcomes
Program outcomes are narrower statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to
do by the time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge, and behaviors.
Program Outcomes:
a) Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
b) Ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyse and interpret data.
c)

Ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints
such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, safety of health, manufacturability and
sustainability.

d) Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.


e) Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
f) Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
g) Ability to communicate effectively.
h)

The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global,
economic, environmental and social context.

i)

Recognition of the need and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

j)

Acknowledge the contemporary issues.

k) Ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
2.1.2 State how and where the POs are published and disseminated (3)

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(Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula books) the POs are published and how these are
disseminated among stakeholders)
The POs are published in College Website and Students Handbook. The information is printed in college
magazine, newsletter and circulated to the stakeholders
2.1.3 Indicate processes employed for defining of the POs (5)
(Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the POs are defined in alignment
with the graduate attributes prescribed by the NBA.)
The Program Outcomes ak listed above relate directly to the outcome requirements of Accreditation Board
for Engineering and Technology (ABET).
The Programme Outcomes addressed by basic engineering, core courses labs, and Upper level courses and
also represent number of courses from freshers level to senior level.
The specified outcomes address composition of courses, General education component by outside speaker
and also relate to the technical course.
2.1.4 Indicate how the defined POs are aligned to the Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA
(Indicate how the POs defined for the programme are aligned with the Graduate Attributes of NBA as
articulated in accreditation manual.)
Graduate Attributes defined for the mechanical engineering Programme are
1. Engineering Knowledge,
2. Problem Analysis,
3. Design/Development of Solutions,
4. Conduct investigations of complex problems,
5. Modern tool Usage,
6. The Engineer and Society,
7. Environment and Sustainability,
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8. Ethics,
9. Individual and Team Work,
10. Communication,
11. Lifelong Learning
The following table depicts the mapping of Programme Outcomes (PO) with the Graduate Attributes.

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2.1.5 Establish the correlation between the POs and the PEOs (5)
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(Explain how the defined POs of the program correlate with the PEOs)

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2.2 Attainment of Programme Outcomes (40)


2.2.1 Illustrate how course outcomes contribute to the POs (10)
(Provide the correlation between the course outcomes and the programme outcomes. The strength of the
correlation may also be indicated)

Mapping of POs to the Courses

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2.2.2 Explain how modes of delivery of courses help in attainment of the POs (10)
(Describe the different course delivery methods/modes (e.g. lecture interspersed with discussion,
asynchronous mode of interaction, group discussion, project etc.) used to deliver the courses and justify the
effectiveness of these methods for the attainment of the POs. This may be further justified using the indirect
assessment methods such as course end surveys.)

Course delivery
Qualified faculty members assigned with various theory subjects prepare lesson plans using the
standard format provided by the institute with emphasis on learning of the students.
The lectures lay emphasis on the following:
Knowledge content covering topics in the curriculum
Utility content for bridging curriculum gap covering applications in real life
Latest content for contents beyond syllabus covering recent developments and Research areas
The instructional or lecture delivery of the faculty will be through a set of Educational Technology / Tools
opted by the faculty. Documentation of delivery of course contents is done by maintaining course files by the
concerned faculty for both theory and lab courses.
Course File : The contents of the course file includes syllabus, history of subject, about subject handlers,
pass percentage, batch and no of students, Lesson plan, Subject time table, Lesson notes, Question bank
which includes previous university question papers and expected important questions, tutorial questions,
question papers of internal test, series test and model exam question papers and their answer keys, series
test / internal test/ model exam marks, sample test and exam papers, assignment topics and papers, Weekly
work load, preventive & corrective actions and PPT sheets & CDs containing softcopy of all the relevant
details like question bank, lecture notes, ebook etc. Course files are periodically updated and verified by the
head of the department to ensure that the course content and coverage is towards the attainment of POs.
Log Books: The supplementary log book is maintained by the faculty to monitor hourly attendance, topics
covered in that hour, syllabus completion, and statistics of the performance of the students to ensure that the
syllabus coverage is in right path and any deviations are noted in lesson plan.
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Teaching Methodologies
The classroom sessions will be interactive and supplemented with PowerPoint presentations, tutorials and
will encourage the students to think independently and inspire their creativity. We have also introduced
virtual classes for some topics for third and final year students. Students have been brought to the ANNA
EDUSAT Centre and made to listen to the expert lectures.
The following modes of delivery depicts the list of sample courses modes, modules and their methodologies
to justify the effectiveness of teaching content and its delivery for the satisfaction of POs.
2.2.3 Indicate the extent to which the laboratory and project course work are contributing towards the
attainment of the POs (20)
Laboratory training and practical based learning were implemented in order to train the students in making a
study design, basic laboratory skills, handling of data, technical communication, collaboration and
presentation. With this the students reported an increased coherence and synergy between course elements
and an improved academic understanding.
University has designed the theory and lab curriculum to meet with the industry expectations.
Project Work
Project Work demands comparatively lengthy and extensive student exercises which can vary enormously in
type, scope, depth and length, their solutions based on the real world applications, and in whether the
students work alone or in groups. The way in which projects are assessed will clearly depend on all these
factors.
Assessment process of the project are as follows: The students are provided with detailed guidelines on what
they are expected to do in each project, and are also made fully aware of the criteria against which their
work will be assessed. The assessment methods are well matched both to the activities that the projects
involving creative design and design related tasks and to the outcomes of the projects.
The assessment takes place via a series of department reviews conducted by the head of the department,
project coordinator, project guide and department faculty members that provide the students with feedback
on their progress, and summative assessment being based on their performance at formal presentations. Here,
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they display the final outcomes of their work, give oral presentations on what they have done, and answer
questions.
The results of the assessment of the individual projects can easily be consolidated in order to provide the
students with periodic reviews of their overall progress and to produce semester marks and grading.
Summative assessment of each students work is based on the way in which they plan and carry out the
project, on the quality of their documentation and report, and on their oral presentation of their work. Each
project is assessed by a staff member, who acts as Project Guide and overall monitored and peer reviewed by
Professors of the department acting as a Project Coordinator. Each of these first carries out an independent
assessment of the project against the criteria given below:
Conduct of project work: Preparatory work, Background reading / Literature review, Input of ideas /
Innovation, Degree of supervision required, Team or individual.
1. Project Execution: Appreciation of problems, Ability to overcome difficulties with little supervision,
Technical skills including computing skills, Achievement of aims
2. Report : General content, planning, Logical development, Readability, Clarity of introduction, Quality
of language, Quality of presentation, Standard of diagrams, Number and relevance of references,
Quality of discussions/conclusions.
3. Viva: Manner of delivery, Clarity of technical explanation.
Each project carries a possible total of 100 marks, with 30 of these being assigned to the Conduct of project
work, Project Execution, Report each and 10 to the Viva.

2.3 Assessment of the attainment of the Programme Outcomes (75)


2.3.1 Describe assessment tools and processes used for assessing the attainment of each
PO
Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to which the
Programme Outcomes are attained. Also include information on:
a) A listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation
of each the programme educational objective is based. Examples of data collection processes may include,
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but are not limited to, specific exam questions, student portfolios, internally developed assessment exams,
senior project presentations, nationally normed exams, oral exams, focus groups, industrial advisory
committee b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
The Program Outcomes are assessed and evaluated by direct and indirect assessment methods. Direct
assessment is based on student performance in core curriculum courses which includes theory subjects,
laboratory subjects, mini projects, projects and oral presentations and it is documented in course files and
department files like internal assessment marks register, Results analysis for internals and university exams.
Some program outcomes are assessed by indirect assessment techniques such as rules and performance
criteria for each program outcome are designed. Direct Assessment Process carried for Theory Courses
Daily Questionnaire Session
Faculties handling subjects ask questions in the beginning of each session from the previous class topics to
assess the understanding and continuity of the subjects and it may be based on the two marks of the covered
portion. Two marks booklet is already provided to the students.
Revision: At the end of each unit, students are orally tested by asking questions from the entire unit and
assess whether they are forwarding towards the attainment of POs. They are also asked to submit their notes
for verification. An hour is dedicated for revision and to provide important questions and question bank.
Assignments and seminars are given to emphasize the important topics.
Assignments
They serve as practice for students and usually they are given 2 or 3 assignments. They check for
understanding along the way and guide teacher decision making about future instruction They also provide
feedback to students so they can improve their performance. This makes the student understand some issues
in depth in order to write about them. For this purpose they have to gather data and think about this data and
process it. Finally drawing conclusions from the data they have gathered. They have to work to meet with
academic standards to demonstrate that they are thinking professionally in their assignments

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Seminars
Assessment of students learning and communications skills are attained through seminars either in groups or
individual.
Examination
Examination is done to assess students performance in order to know what and how to teach next. Measure
the degree to which they have learnt the information and skills being taught in the course or programme of
study. We have used assessments to measure how much our students have learned up to a particular point in
time. Periodical and supplementary tests are conducted for evaluation of the academic performance of the
students to incorporate the students with the ability to continue their formal education and be accepted to
relevant graduate degrees programs and succeed in their studies
Series Test: Series test are conducted by concerned faculty on a weekly basis in order to evaluate the
understanding of the concepts in each unit by the students and the duration of each test may last to an
entire class period. They are organized by the department exam cell coordinator.
CIA Test & Model Exam

Standardized tests like Internal I, Internal II and Model Examination are conducted. Fixed in terms of
scope, difficulty and format, and are usually held on fixed dates as determined by the institution and
organized by centralized college exam cell.

Periodically Internal Tests and Model exam are conducted to evaluate the overall performance and
toughness of the subject.

Evaluation
CIA1 Written Exam
CIA 2 Written Exam
CIA 3 Written Exam
Model Written Exam
Attendance

Topics Covered
Marks
1.5 Units
5
1.5 Units
1.5 Units
All Five Units
10
Full Semester
5
Internal Assessment Marks
20

Retest / Makeup test

Retest and makeup tests are conducted for absentees due to some important reasons and failures in
order to improve their internal assessment marks.
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University examinations
Examinations are conducted by affiliating university for both Theory and laboratory subjects. Grades
are awarded on GPA and CGPA system.
Evaluation

Marks

External Marks

80

Internal Marks

20

Documentation:
Assessment process is entirely documented in Course files and log books by the concern faculty handling the
course
Direct Assessment Process carried for Laboratory work
In courses that include a high proportion of laboratory work, the most widely used method of assessing the
laboratory content is generally some form of continuous assessment. This has the advantage of providing an
ongoing and stepped overall picture of each students performance and ability, and of providing the students
with regular feedback on how they are progressing. It can be very time consuming for the staff involved,
however, particularly if detailed feedback is given on all the work submitted. Such assessment can be carried
out both for formative and for summative purposes.
A typical scheme for the continuous assessment of laboratory work is that operated by the Department of
Information Technology. This comprehensive scheme covers all aspects of the students work, involves
standard assessment procedures and the assessment scheme following in our department will be described in
detail, since it illustrates many features of good practice. The student has to work individually in systems.
Sometimes, students below average are made to combine with class toppers for better understanding of the
lab experiments and results.
Nature of Assessment Timing and Frequency
80 | P a g e

Students Lab Observation One submission and verification in each lab weekly.
Students Lab RecordOne submission and verification in fortnight.

Oral examination once while observation correction


during all labs weekly.

Model Examination Assessment carried out once


before end semester exams

Additional experiments are included in the lab curriculum for better understanding of the concepts.
There is attendance requirement above 80% for laboratory classes. Absentees from any time table laboratory
session due to unavoidable legitimate reason is given make up lab classes to complete their exercises.
Internal assessment marks for laboratory subjects are given to them based on their attendance, observation
and record submission on time, oral examination and overall performance.
Direct Assessment Process carried for Project work
By Project Work, we mean comparatively lengthy and demanding student exercises, such projects can vary
enormously in type, scope, depth and length, in the extent to which their structure is specified by the
Professor of the department, in the extent to which they are based on the real world as opposed to a simulated
situation of some sort, and in whether the students work alone or in groups. The way in which projects are
assessed will clearly depend on all these factors, and also on the extent to which it is wished to concentrate
on the process or product aspects of the work.
Some of the features of good practice that can be identified in this assessment are as follows:
The students are provided with detailed guidelines on what they are expected to do in each project, and are
also made fully aware of the criteria against which their work will be assessed. The assessment methods are
well matched both to the activities that the projects involving creative design and design related tasks and to
the outcomes of the projects.
The assessment is staged, with formative assessment taking place via a series of interim reviews that provide
the students with feedback on their progress, and summative assessment being based on their performance at
formal presentations. Here, they display the final outcomes of their work, give short oral presentations on
81 | P a g e

what they have done, and answer questions. The results of the assessment of the individual projects can
easily be consolidated in order to provide the students with periodic reviews of their overall progress and to
produce semester marks and grading.
Summative assessment of each students work is based on the way in which they plan and carry out the
project, on the quality of their documentation and report, and on their oral presentation of their work. Each
project is assessed by a staff member, who acts as Project Guide and overall monitored and peers reviewed
by the Head of the Department and Professor of the department acting as a Project Coordinator. Each of these
first, carries out an independent assessment of the project against the criteria given below:
1. Conduct of project work: Preparatory work, Background reading / Literature review, Input of ideas /
Innovation, Degree of supervision required, attending all the project reviews, Power Point presentations
2. Project Execution: Appreciation of problems, Ability to overcome difficulties with little supervision,
Technical skills including computing skills, Achievement of aims
3. Report : General content, planning, Logical development, Readability, Clarity of introduction, Quality of
language, Quality of presentation, Standard of diagrams, Number and relevance of references, Quality of
discussions/conclusions
4. Viva: Manner of delivery, Clarity of technical explanation.

Assessment of Project Work

Conduct of Project Work


50

Project Execution
20

Report
20

Indirect Assessment Process for evaluating Program Outcomes


Course End Survey

82 | P a g e

Viva
10

Total
100

Course End survey is taken by the faculty handling the subject at the end of semester for that particular
course about the delivery of course contents, mode of delivery, lecture notes, question banks, improvement
facts etc.
Course Exit Survey
This survey is taken from the final year students who are about to leave the college about the entire
infrastructure facilities of the institution and the college, faculty availability, administrative officials contacts
etc.
Faculty Survey
Faculty survey is done by the department HOD from the students to study about the staffs knowledge,
interests, delivery methodologies, and students wavelength which will be considered for the future subject
allotments
Employer Survey
Employers of our graduates are requested for their feedback and suggestions about our graduates who have
been employed in their organizations.
Alumni Survey
Graduates after completion of course are asked to join the alumni association of our institution. Every year
alumni meet is conducted and they have been given the survey form and asked to fill the form and give their
suggestions. From that assessment, we try to evaluate the program outcomes attainment level. Our eminent
alumnus actively participates in the meet and survey. They also come forward to guide their juniors who are
undergoing courses at our college.
Class Committee meeting
Class committee meeting is held after internal test every month participated by students representative,
department representatives, HOD, Staffs handling the subjects of that class and a chair person from other
department. Feedback, grievances and suggestions about facilities, staff teaching learning process and
campus amenities are recorded in the minutes and forwarded to the principal through HOD for further
actions.
83 | P a g e

Department Performance Report


After the Announcement of University results, this report is prepared and submitted to the Principal,
Academic advisory board and the management. The comparison analysis is done for the corrective and
preventive actions to be taken in the fourth coming semester.
Comparison analysis is done for the corrective and preventive actions to be taken in the forth coming semester
.

84 | P a g e

PO #

PROGRAMOUTCOME RUBRICS
An

(a)

(b)

ability

to

apply 1.Demonstrates the fundamentals of mathematics, Science and

knowledge

of their role in engineering.

An ability to design and 1.Identifies the procedures involved in designing an experiment.


mathematics,
science,
conduct experiments, as
An ability to design a
well as to analyze and

1.Identifies the key components and parameters of a

system, component, or
(c)

system, a component, or a process.

process to meet desired


needs

within

constraints

2.Identifies technical specifications and constraints in

realistic solving
such

as

1
develops
implements,
evaluates,
and information
improves a
1 Designs,
Understands,
develops
and produces
research
by collecting a great deal of information that relates to the

An ability to function on
(d)

topic.

multidisciplinary teams

An ability to identify,
formulate,

and

engineering problems

(f)

(g)

Function effectively on a team by thoroughly completing

all
assigned
taskstoby
deadline
and proactively
helps other
Acquires
ability
identify
specific
project objectives
and
see they are in line with the project definition.

solve

(e)
An

understanding

of

Acquires ability to apply engineering knowledge to plan

the project tasks gained in the class room to the problem


Understand engineering code of ethics and its impact on
professional engineering practice.

professional and ethical


responsibility

Students apply ethics in the academic environment and

An ability to communicate

Demonstrates the skills needed to achieve, Oral/written


desist from cheating, plagiarism, and report such

effectively
1

(h)

(i)

The

broad

necessary to understand

Identifies constraints and modifications necessary to

A
the need
therecognition
impact of of
engineering

Perceives
the social
need and
for global
continual
adapt to different
context.technical

for, and an ability to

professional

engage

opportunities to achieve it.

in

life-long

2
1

knowledge

85 | P a g e

techniques,

skills,

and

enhancement

and

actively

and

pursues

Recognizes professional registration as a desirable


Demonstrates knowledge of diverse standards,
regulations, and constraints applicable to the discipline.

of

contemporary issue
An ability to use the

(k)

communication.
Gains knowledge of engineering solutions to problems
specific to the discipline.

education

learning
(j)

a problem.

2
1

Demonstrates adequate knowledge of the connections


Identifies and applies current techniques to solve
discipline-specific problems.

Assessment tools used for assessing the attainment of each PO


S.N

Assessment Tool

Assessment Frequency

Assessed By

Reviewed By

Assignments
Mini project reports

Monthly
VI Semester

Faculty

Faculty

Faculty

HOD

Project Reports
Examinations
Class Test
Internal Test
Model Test
University Exams
End of course survey
Rubrics specific to

Last Semester
Weekly
Monthly
Before Semester End
Semester End
Every semester

Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
University
Faculty

Faculty/Department
Faculty/Department
Faculty/Department
External Faculty
Faculty/Department

Every six months

Faculty

Faculty/Department

O
1

3
4

PO/POS
5

Employer Survey

Every Year

Department

Department

6
7

Faculty Survey
Alumni Survey
Class
Committee

Every six months


Every Year

Institute
Department

Department
Department

Monthly

Department

Department

Every semester

Department

Department

8
Meeting
Department
9
Performance Report

The assessment process is followed as mentioned below. It is a four step process.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS
86 | P a g e

Degree of attainment of POs: Yes-y / No-x

Assessment process
87 | P a g e

PROGRAM OUTCOMES
a

1. Establish learning Criteria

2. Provide learning opportunities

3. Asses student learning

4. Use the results

*
*

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

Description of Assessment process

1. Internal assessment exam

2. Assignment

3. Seminar

4. Project

5. Practical session

*
*

6. Skill edge

*
*

*
*

B)

DESCRIPTION

OF

ASSESSMENT PROCESS
1. Internal assessment exam
2. Assignment
3. Seminar
4. Project
5. Practical session
6. Skill edge

FREQUENCY OF ASSESSMENT PROCESS


Once a month
Twice in a semester
Twice in a semester
Once a year
Once a week
Once in a semester

2.3.2 Indicate results of Evaluation of each PO (50)


c) The expected level of attainment for each of the Program Outcomes

An assessment approach for program outcomes has been developed that ensures all students meet all
the outcomes at a threshold level.

At the same time, the approach can be used as part of a strategy for continual improvement of the
program.

The approach is described and an example of the assessment of one of the program outcomes within a
single course is described.
88 | P a g e

Finally, at the end of each semester, a feedback from the students for all their subjects is collected and
attached within the course file.

c) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processesand an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of
the programme outcomes are attained.
Program outcomes

Assessment Tool

Specific

Evaluation(%

An ability to apply knowledge of

Instructor evaluation

Query/Problem
Student

)
62

mathematics,

report

Performance

science,

and

and

engineering

Department

An ability to design and conduct

performance reports
Instructor evaluation

Lab reports and

experiments, as well as to analyze

reports

assignments

89 | P a g e

(Lab

75

and interpret data.

observation

and

Record,
c

An ability to design a system,

Assignments)
Instructor evaluation

Project

component, or process to meet

reports and Student

and assignments

desired

Advisory

needs

constraints

within

such

environmental,
ethical
d

as

realistic
economic,

social,

health

reports

committee.

political,

and

safety,

manufacturability and sustainability..


An ability to function on multi-

Surveys on Alumni

disciplinary teams

and Student exit

An ability to identify, formulate and

Instructor evaluation

Project

solve engineering problems.

reports(Assignments

assignments and

An understanding of professional

and Seminar)
Student
advisory

exams
Performance on

and ethical responsibilities

committee

exams

An

ability

to

60

communicate

effectively.

and

Surveys

64

reports,

70

60

and

Instructor evaluation

assignments

reports
Department

Presentation and

performance

Project

62

reports(Presentation
h

The broad education necessary to

)
Surveys on End- of

understand

course and Student

the

impact

of

engineering solutions in a global,


economic,
i

environmental

ability

course and Student

learning.
90 | P a g e

in

Survey

73

and
Surveys on End- of

engage

69

exit.

societal context.
A recognition of the need for, an
to

Survey

life-long

exit and Department

j
k

Knowledge of contemporary issues.

Performance report
Surveys on student

Survey

70

An ability to use the techniques,

exit and alumni.


Surveys on End- of

Performance on

72

skills, and modern engineering tools

course and Alumni.

projects

necessary for engineering practice.

and

assignments.

2.4 Use of Evaluation results towards improvement of the Total Marks :


programme (10)
(Articulate, with rationale, how the results of the evaluation of the POs have been used to review/redefine
the POs)

The expected level of attainment for each of the Program Outcomes is taken as 70%

in each course(s)

which satisfies respective Program Outcomes. With reference to previous assessment process the results of
assessment tools are exhibited and it is evident that many courses have crossed this mark (70 %), which in
turn satisfies the attainment of respective Program Outcomes.
Those courses which have not crossed the expected set value (70 %) should be given more attention
and to be sent for review to Program Curriculum Coordination Committee. The recommendations and
guidance of this committee will be an input for further improvement in

expected level of attainment of

Program Outcomes. Even the suggestions and existing pattern of courses with higher performance will be
used for further sustainment of them.

91 | P a g e

The results of all assessment tools are recorded by the department as well as respective faculty and
placed in the department files and Course files maintained by them.

3 Programme Curriculum (125)


3.1 Curriculum (15)
3.1.1 Describe the Structure of the Curriculum (5)

92 | P a g e

Total Marks : 120.00


Total Marks : 15.00
Institute Marks : 5.00

93 | P a g e

3.1.2 Give the Prerequisite flow chart of courses (5)


(Draw the schematic of the prerequisites of the courses in the curriculum)

94 | P a g e

3.1.3 Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the program specific criteria (5)

Institute Marks : 5.00

(Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the program specific criteria specified by the American
professional societies relevant to the programme under accreditation)
95 | P a g e

Curriculum

The structure of the curriculum provides both breadth and depth across the range of engineering topics
implied by the title of the program.

The curriculum includes


The curriculum includes advanced mathematics, such as differential equations, linear algebra and
complex variables.
The curriculum also includes transform and partial differential equation and statistics and
Numerical methods which is relevant to the programme specific criteria based on the American
professional societies.
The detailed range of subjects implied under the programme is justified below with Humanities
and social sciences as a collective name for the academic disciplines based on Language, Maths
and Sciences.

C1.

Engineering Mechanics

C2

Manufacturing TechnologyI

C3

Engineering Thermodynamics

C4

Kinematics of Machinery

C5

Fluid Mechanics and Machinery

96 | P a g e

C6

Electrical Drives and control

C7

Heat and Mass transfer

C8

Manufacturing technology II

C9

Engineering Materials and Metallurgy

C10

Strength of Materials

C11

Electronics and Microprocessors

C12

Thermal Engineering

C13

Dynamics of Machinery

C14

Design of Machine elements

C15

Engineering Metrology and Measurements

C16

Applied Hydraulics and Pneumatics

C17

Gas Dynamics and jet propulsion

C18

Design of Transmission systems

C19

Finite Element analysis

C20

Automobile Engineering

C21

Mechatronics

C22

Computer integrated Manufacturing

C23

Power plant Engineering

C24

Engineering Economics and cost Analysis

C25

Total quality management

97 | P a g e

Curriculum
Sl.No
1

Mechanical Courses
Mathematics
Electrical

C1,C3,C7,C12,C17,C19,C23

2
3
4
5

C7,C21C23
Electronics
Thermal
Design
Production

C3,C7,C12,C17,C23
C13,,C14,C19,C22
C2,C8,C16,C19

3.2 State the components of the curriculum and their relevance to the POs and Total Marks 15.00 the PEOs
(15)
Programme curriculum grouping based on different components
Total
Course

Curriculum Content (% of total

Total number of

Component

number of credits of the programme )

contact hours

Number of

POs

PEOs

credits
a to
Mathematics

7.8

240.00

16.00

II,III,IV
k
a to

Science

17.15

435.00

40.00

I,II,III
k
a to

Computing

2.45

90.00

5.00

I,II,III,V
k
a to

Humanities

4.15

168.00

10.00

I,II,III
k
a to

Professional core

58.5

2460.00

114.00
k
a to

Electronics and
1.4

45.00

3.00

microprocessor
Electrical

I,II,III,IV,V
II,III,IV
k
a to

2.45

90.00

5.00

II,III
k
a to

Management
Electives

98 | P a g e

2.9
7.3

90.00
225.00

6.00
15.00

I,II,IV
k
a to k I,II,III,IV,V

3.3 State core engineering subjects and their relevance to Programme


Outcomes including design experience (30)
(Describe how the core engineering subjects in the curriculum provide the learning experience with the
complex engineering problems)
Achive
Expertise
Core Engineering

Program

ments

Outcomes

(Results

Course Outcomes
Subjects

(No.Staff handle
& Specialized)
in %)

1.

ME2201

1. To introduce the

MANUFACTURIN

students the concepts of

G TECHNOLOGY

basic manufacturing

processes and fabrication


techniques in metal
casting

99 | P a g e

a,c,g,h,i,j,k

2. To introduce the
students the concepts of
basic manufacturing
processes and fabrication

a,c,g,h,i,j,k

techniques in metal

metal joining
3. To impart knowledge
55.45

on constructional details,
principle of operation
and performance of

a,c,g,h,i,j,k

metal forming and


plastics
component manufacture.
1. To achieve an

4.
ME 2202

understanding of

ENGINEERING

principles of

THERMODYNAMI

thermodynamics and to
a,c,h,i,k

CS

be able to use it in

83.45

accounting for the bulk


behaviour of the simple
physical systems.
2. To provide in-depth
study of thermodynamic
principles,
thermodynamics of
state,basic
thermodynamic
relations, Principle of
100 | P a g e

a,c,h,i,k

Psychrometry&
Properties of pure
substances
3. To enlighten the basic
concepts of vapour

a,c,h,i,k

power cycles
1. To understand the
concept of machines,
a,c,h,i,k
mechanisms and related
terminologies
2. To analyse a
mechanism for
ME2203
7.
KINEMATICS OF
MACHINERY

displacement, velocity

a,c,h,i,k

and acceleration at any


point in a moving link
3. To understand the
theory of gears, gear

55.05

69.7

a,c,h,i,k

trains and cams


4. To understand the role

11.

of friction in drives and

a,c,h,i,k

ME2204 FLUID

brakes
1 The student is

a,c,g,h,i,k

MECHANICS AND

introduced to the

MACHINERY

mechanics of fluids
through a thorough
understanding of the
properties of the fluids.
The dynamics of fluids
is introduced through the
control volume approach
which gives an

101 | P a g e

integrated under
standing of the
transport of mass,
momentum and energy
2. The applications of the
conservation laws of
flow though pipes are

a,c,g,h,i,k

studied
3.The student is
introduced to the
a,c,g,h,i,k
hydraulics machines and
their performance.
1.To understand the
basic concept of Heat

a,c,g,h,i,k

transfer
2. To understand the
14. ME2251 HEAT AND

basic Theory of
a,c,g,h,i,k

MASS TRANSFER

conduction, convection
80.89

92.93

and radiation
3. To understand the

17.

basic concept of Mass

a,c,g,h,i,k

ME 2252

transfer
1. To understand the

a,c,g,h,i,k

MANUFACTURIN

concept and basic

G TECHNOLOGY

mechanics of metal

II

cutting, working of
standard machine tools
such as lathe, shaping
and allied machines,
milling, drilling and

102 | P a g e

allied machines, grinding


and allied machines and
broaching
2. To understand the
basic concepts of
computer numerical
a,c,g,h,i,k
control (CNC) machine
tool and CNC
programming.
3. To understand the
concept and basic
mechanics of metal
cutting, working of
a,c,g,h,i,k
standard machine tools
such as grinding and
allied machines and
20.

ME 2253

broaching
1. To impart knowledge

ENGINEERING

on the structure,

MATERIALS AND

properties, treatment,

METALLURGY

testing of metals and

a,c,h,i,k

non-metallic materials
2. To impart knowledge

95.02

on the structure,
properties, treatment,

a,c,h,i,k

testing of non-metallic
materials
3. To understand the
testing machines like
Brinel hardness,
103 | P a g e

a,c,h,i,k

Rockwell hardness and


Fatique testing
machines.
1. To gain knowledge of
simple stresses, strains
and deformation in

a,c,h,i,k

components due to
external loads.
2. To assess stresses and
deformations through
mathematical models of
23.

ME2254
STRENGTH OF
MATERIALSS

a,c,h,i,k

beams,twisting bars or
combinations of both.
3. Effect of component
dimensions and shape on
stresses and

95.69

73.9

a,c,g,h,i,k

deformations are to be
understood
4. The study would
provide knowledge for

a,c,g,h,i,k

use in the design courses


To integrate the
concepts, laws and
ME2301 THERMAL
27.

methodologies from the


ENGINEERING

a,c,h,i,k
first course in thermo
dynamics into analysis
of cyclic processes.

104 | P a g e

To apply the
thermodynamic concepts
into various thermal
a,c,g,h,i,k
application like IC
engines, Steam Turbines,
Compressors.
To study the
thermodynamic concepts
into thermal application

a,c,g,h,i,k

like Refrigeration and


Air conditioning systems
1.To understand the
method of static force
analysis and dynamic

a,c,g,h,i,k

force analysis of
mechanism
2. To study the
30.
ME2302
DYNAMICS OF
MACHINERY

undesirable effects of
a,c,g,h,i,k
unbalances in rotors and
engines
3. To understand the

79.7

concept of vibratory
a,c,g,h,i,k
systems and their
analysis
4. To understand the
33.
principles of governors
ME2303 DESIGN

a,c,g,h,i,k

and gyroscopes
4. 1. To familiarize the

34.
OF MACHINE
ELEMENTS

105 | P a g e

various steps involved in 5. a,c,g,h,i,k


the Design Process.

6.

7.

2. To understand the
principles involved in
evaluating the shape and
dimensions of a

a,c,g,h,i,k

component to satisfy
functional and strength
requirements.
8. 3. To learn to use

62.3

85.5

standard practices and


standard data using

9. a,c,g,h,i,k

catalogues of machine
components.
1.To know the
advantages and
applications of Fluid
a,c,h,i,k
Power Engineering and
Power Transmission
ME2305 APPLIED
37.

System
2. To learn the

HYDRAULICS
Applications of Fluid
AND
Power System in
PNEUMATICS

a,c,h,i,k
automation of Machine
Tools and others
Equipments
12. 3.To practice the
hydraulic and pneumatic 13. a,c,h,i,k

40.

ME2304

system design.
1. To understand the

ENGINEERING

basic principles of

METROLOGY

measurements.

106 | P a g e

a,c,h,i,k

2. To learn the various


linear and angular
measuring equipments,
AND
MEASUREMENTS

a,c,h,i,k
their principle of
operation and

85.5

92.75

92.75

applications.
3. To learn about various
methods of measuring

a,c,h,i,k

Mechanical parameters.
1.To understand the
basic difference between
a,c,h,i,k
incompressible and
ME2351 GAS
43. DYNAMICS AND

compressible flow
2.To understand the
phenomenon of shock
a,c,h,i,k

JET PROPULSION

waves and its effect on


flow.
3.To gain some basic
knowledge about jet
a,c,h,i,k
propulsion and
Rocket Propulsion
1.To gain knowledge on
the principles and
procedure for the design

ME2352 DESIGN
46.

OF

a,c,h,i,k
of power Transmission
components.

TRANSMISSION
SYSTEMS

2.To understand the


standard procedure
a,c,h,i,k
available for Design of
Transmission systems.

107 | P a g e

3.To learn to use


standard data and

a,c,h,i,k

catalogues.
1.To understand the need
for FEA study in

a,c,h,i,k

ME2353 FINITE
49.

ELEMENT

engineering applications.
2.To study one-

ANALYSIS

dimensional and 2D

a,c,h,i,k
91.3

95.65

95.58

analysis of elements
3.To study the dynamic
a,c,h,i,k
analysis using FEM
1.To understand the
construction and
working principle of

a,c,h,i,k

various parts of an
ME2354

automobile..
2.To have the practice

AUTOMOBILE

for assembling and

ENGINEERING

dismantling of engine

52.
a,c,h,i,k

parts and transmission


system
3.To study about the

55.

various alternative

a,c,h,i,k

ME 2401

energy sources.
1.To understand the

a,c,h,i,k

Mechatronics

interdisciplinary
applications of
Electronics, Electrical,
Mechanical and
Computer Systems for
the Control of

108 | P a g e

Mechanical systems.
2.To understand the
interdisciplinary
applications of
Electronics, Electrical,
a,c,h,i,k
Mechanical and
Computer Systems for
the Control of Electronic
Systems
3.To understand the
various stages in
a,c,h,i,k
designing mechatronics
system
1.To gain knowledge
about the basic
a,c,h,i,k
fundamental of CAD.
2.To gain knowledge on
ME 2402 Computer

how computers are

Integrated

integrated at various

Manufacturing

levels of planning and

58.
a,c,h,i,k

manufacturing
3.To understand

90.14

97.18

computer aided planning


a,c,h,i,k
and control and
computer monitoring.
1.To understand the
various components ,
61.

ME 2403 Power
operations and

a,c,g,h,i,k

Plant Engineering
applications of different
types of power plants.
109 | P a g e

2.To study the


economics of various

a,c,g,h,i,k

power plants.
1.To learn about the
basics of economics and
a,c,f,h,i,k
63.

MG 2451

cost analysis related to

Engineering

engineering.
2.To understand

Economics and Cost


replacement nad

a,c,f,h,i,k

Analysis

98.6

maintenance analysis
3.To understand the
a,c,f,h,i,k
concept of depreciation
3.4 Industry interaction/internship (10)
(Give the details of industry involvement in the programme such as industryattached laboratories and
partial delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students)

The intellectual exchange and development of ideas for industry institute interaction had explored
opportunities for higher learning.
Confidence building and personality development programs for the students in close coordination
with Training cell.
Development of abilities to effectively express with clarity in group discussions and for improving
upon students performance in interviews, and thus secure excellent placement in Companies of
repute.
To enlarge and spread the networking with Industries, meet their expectations and maximize career
opportunities for the students.
To provide the right job for the right man and vice versa and realize productivity enhancement for
both the individual and the industries.
To continuously assess topics and guide the students for pursuing higher studies and the choice of
Institution.
Students gain real time knowledge by visiting industries in different fields, students are able
to bridge gap between their curriculum and industries.

110 | P a g e

Guest lecturers given by Professors, Industry Expertise enhance the students knowledge in
booming areas.
To cater to the employer needs, variable sector specific skills, training requirements that improve the
individual performance are addressed. In connection with this to build up relationship with leading
mechanical hardware/ software industries MoUs have been signed. Through the platform of Industry
Academia Convergence, endeavors have been taken to conduct CAD/CAM, ROBOTICS.
We also encourage our students to complete certification programs as given by organizations such as,
BRITISH ENGLISH COURSE and others, because these courses are industrially relevant.
LIST OF INDUSTRIAL VISITS ARRANGED
Sl.N

YEAR/S

EM

NO OF
COMPANY NAME

LOCATION

DATE
DAYS

ACADEMIC YEAR 2014-2015


10.10.10 &
1.

IV/VII

2.

III/V

ARAI

PUNE

HYDRO POWER

4.
5.

1.

II/III

02

14.09.14 TO
KERALA

PLANT
3.

11.10.14

03
16.09.14

ASHOK LEYLAND

CHENNAI

05.11.14

01

WHEELS INDIA

SRIPERUMBUD

18.02.15 &

02

LTD
INTEGRAL COACH

UR

19.02.05
03.02.15 &

III/IV
II/IV

CHENNAI

02

FACTORY
ACADEMIC YEAR 2013-2014
HINDUSTAN

17.03.15

COCA-COLA

16.08.13

III/VI

CHENNAI

01

BEVERAGES
PVT.LTD
17.09.13 &
2.

II/III

CIPET

CHENNAI

HYUNDAI MOTOR
3.

II/IV

CHENNAI
INDIA

111 | P a g e

02
18.09.13
25.03.14 TO
03
27.03.14

ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013


21.08.12
1.

II/III

ASHOK LEYLAND

HOSUR

01

SCHWING
2.

II/III

CHENNAI

24.08.12

01
01

STETTER PVT LTD


3.

III/IV

ONGC

KARAIKAL

28.08.12

4.

III/IV

ASHOK LEYLAND

CHENNAI

14.09.12

5.

II/IV

WABCO TVS

CHENNAI

27.12.12

01

05.02.13

01

01

HYUNDAI MOTOR
6.

II/IV

CHENNAI
INDIA
ACADEMIC YEAR 2011-2012
NEYVELI LIGNITE
NEYVELI
CORPORATION
MADRAS

1.

II/III

2.

IV/VII

FERTILIZERS

II/IV &

LIMITED
SCHWING

III/VI

STETTER PVT LTD

3.

CHENNAI

23.09.11
01

23.08.11

01

03.02.11 &
CHENNAI

02
04.02.11

INPLANT TRAINING UNDERTAKEN


COMPANY/
Sl.N
NAME OF THE STUDENT

YEAR

INDUSTRY

DURATION

R. Udaya Prakash
V. Sri ram Kumar
R. Monish
M. Rahul
V. S. Sudarsan
M. Srivanth
S. Prbhakaran
K. Pravin

III

NAME
ICF

3rd Dec 2014

o
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
112 | P a g e

12th Dec
2014

9
10
11

P.M. Sivakumar
R. Santha Kumar
D. Sakthivel
2nd Feb 2015

12

S. Vignesh

13

P. Vignesh

14

J. Srinath

15
16
17

K. S. Rajesh
U. Sabarinathan
M. Raj Kumar

18

R. Narendhar

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

K. S. Rajesh
U. Sabarinathan
M. Rajkumar
S. Mohammed Siddhiqu
S. Sarath Babu
M. G. Ramakrishnan
T. Arun Kumar
Himanshu
E. Karthik

28

C. Dhayala Sankar

29
30
31

G. Dhanapal
S. Devarajan
Arunkumar Das

32

D. Aravindan

33

Mohmmed Ali

III

Royal Enfield

6th Feb
2015
9 Dec 2014
th

III

Ashok Leyland

-14th Dec
2014
18th Dec

III

TI Cycles

2013 24th
Dec 2014
26th June

Sri Krishna
2014 1st

III
Works

July 2014
07/02/2014
Goodwin
III

&
Motors
08/02/2014
06/02/2015

III

TAFE

to
08/02/2015
8th Dec 2013

III

Ashok Leyland
13th Dec

34

Atul

35

D. Aravindan

2013
09/12/2013
III

ICF

to
16/12/2013
06/02/2015

Sundaram
36

C. Sai Subramaniyan

II

to
Clayton Ltd

37

113 | P a g e

Vaisakh.H.N

II

Integral Coach

08/02/2015
08/12/2014

Factory

to

15/12/2014
10/12/2014
Integral Coach
38

Suraj.S

II

to
Factory

39

17/12/2014
June last

Sathyaprakash R C
Integral Coach

40
41

42

Sharath guru R

week 2014
II

Factory
(7 days)
08/02/2015

Sarath kumar S

Santhosh S

II

GoodWin

&

Motors

09/02/2015
(2 days)

LIST OF MoUs SIGNED


MOU
SL.NO

SIGNED

NAME OF THE INDUSTRY/COMPANY

Wear Cote Technologies

DATE
30.03.2015

Udvavisk Technologies

31.03.2015

Guruchandra Engineering

31.03.2015

UTL Technologies Limited

14.03.2015

Cutech Solutions India Pvt. Ltd

14.12.2013

Precision Equipments Pvt. Ltd

14.12.2013

Good Ocean Maritime Limited

29.07.2013

CADD Centre Training Service Pvt. Ltd

24.07.2013

KKM Soft Pvt. Ltd

24.07.2013

10.

RoboSpecies Technologies Pvt. Ltd

24.07.2013

11.

Severn Glocon India Pvt. Ltd

26.06.2013

12.

CAD solutions

20.09.2012

3.5 Illustrate the measures and processes used to identify the curricular gaps to
(Details of the processes used to curricular gaps to the attainment of defined course outcomes and
programme.
114 | P a g e

PROGRAM STRUCTURE
The courses to be included in the fouryear degree program in engineering are categorized as given below.
General 510%
To cover this category one course in each of the areas shown below are included:

Language/Communications skills

Humanities and Social Sciences

Economics and Principles of Management

National Social Service(NSS) , National Entrepreneurship Network ( NEN) and Rural


Development( Kuttambakkam village)`

All these courses shall cover the basics only. Advanced courses if considered desirable shall be offered
from the time allotted in professional courses. For students deficient in English language, special courses
should be provided outside the normal contact time.
Basic Science 1525%
One course in each of the areas given below is incorporated to satisfy this component. :
I.
II.
III.
IV.

Computer Literacy with Numerical analysis


Mathematics
Physics
Chemistry

Engineering Sciences and Technical Arts 1525%


Minimum of one course in each of the areas as below is included in the curriculum:
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.

Engineering graphics
Workshop Practice
Fundamentals of computing and programming
Basic Electrical electronics Engineering
Computer practices lab I& II

115 | P a g e

VI.

Electrical device and control

VII.

electronics and microprocessor

Professional Subjects 5565%

Each engineering discipline has its own minimum number of core courses. Rest of the courses covers
professional subjects as per list suggested by experts, in line with the academics regulations of the
institution.

Wherever possible, about 10% Electives are made available to the students. In order to create a
variety of individual skill and profile there is a provision for some audit (noncredit) courses during
the degree program.

In the case of laboratory

practicals a more no of experiments is prepared, and every year new

experiments/modifications are introduced. A majority of experiments are openended to the extent


possible. The students are expected to work by themselves without the aid of technicians.

Further, there is a continuous evaluation in tutorials, practical work, and laboratory and project
assignments.

BASIC SCIENCES:

THEORY
1. MA2111 Mathematics I
2. PH2111 Engineering Physics I
3. CY2111 Engineering Chemistry I
4. GE2111 Engineering Graphics
5. MA2161 Mathematics II
6. PH2161 Engineering Physics II
116 | P a g e

7. CY2161 Engineering Chemistry II


8. MA 2211 Transforms and Partial Differential Equations
9. MA 2261 Probability and Random Processes
10. GE2211 Environmental Science and Engineering
LAB
1. Physics & Chemistry Laboratory I
2. GS2165 Physics & Chemistry Laboratory II
HUMANITIES:
THEORY
1. HS2111 Technical English I
2. HS2161 Technical English II
3. MG2351 Principles of Management

LABORATORIES
1. English Language Laboratory
2. GE2321 Communication Skills Lab

TECHNICAL PAPERS (CORE ENGINEERING)


THEORY
1. ME2151 Engineering Mechanics
2. ME2201 Manufacturing Technology I
3. ME2202 Engineering Thermodynamics
4. ME2203 Kinematics of Machinery
5. ME2204 Fluid Mechanics and Machinery
6. ME2205 Electrical Drives and control
117 | P a g e

7. ME2251 Heat and Mass transfer


8. ME2252 Manufacturing technology II
9. ME2253 Engineering Materials and Metallurgy
10. ME2254 Strength of Materials
11. ME2255 Electronics and Microprocessors
12. ME 2301 Thermal Engineering
13. ME2302 Dynamics of Machinery
14. ME2303 Design of Machine elements
15. ME2304 Engineering Metrology and Measurements
16. ME2305 Applied Hydraulics and Pneumatics
17. ME2351 Gas Dynamics and jet propulsion
18. ME2352 Design of Transmission systems
19. ME2353 Finite Element analysis
20. ME2354 Automobile Engineering
21. ME2401 Mechatronics
22. ME2402 Computer integrated Manufacturing
23. ME2403 Power plant Engineering
24. MG2451 Engineering Economics and cost Analysis
25. GE2022 Total quality management
26. GE2111 Engineering Graphics
27. GE2112 Fundamentals of Computing and Programming
28. GE2151 Basic Electrical & Electronics
LABORATORIES
1. ME2207 Manufacturing Technology labI
2. ME2208 Fluid Mechanics and Machinery laboratory
3. ME2209 Electrical Engineering laboratory
4. ME2258 Manufacturing Technology II
118 | P a g e

5. ME2256 Strength of materials lab


6. ME2257 Computer Aided Machine Drawing laboratory
7. ME2306 Thermal Engineering lab I
8. ME2307 Dynamics lab
9. ME2308 Metrology and measurement lab
10. ME2309 CAD/CAM lab
11. ME2355 Thermal Engineering lab II
12. ME2356 Design and Fabrication project
13. ME2404 Computer Aided simulation and Analysis laboratory
14. ME2405 Mechatronics lab
15. ME2452 Comprehension
16. ME2453 Project work
17. GE2116 Engineering Practices Laboratory
18. GE2115 Computer Practice Laboratory
19. ME2155 Computer Aided Drafting and Modelling

ELECTIVES PAPERS
1. ME2026 Unconventional Machining processes
2. ME2027 Process planning and cost estimation
3. ME2028 Robotics
4. ME2036 Production planning and control
5. ME2041 Advanced I.C Engines

119 | P a g e

3.6 Indicate the content beyond syllabus imparted for the attainment of the COs/POs (35)
(Details of the content beyond syllabus imparted for the attainment of the COs/POs. This information may
be provided course wise or module wise)
The following measures are implemented to bridge curriculum gap across the course in order to achieve the
POs.

For the candidates admitted in different categories, we are organizing the Leveling courses to
supplement the gap in their academic courses undergone at higher secondary school level and to

meet the university curriculum courses objectives.


Special training programs are conducted for biology, vocational students and interested students to

obtain the skills of basic computer knowledge.


The Lateral entry students joining second year of engineering stream coming from Polytechnics/Arts
& Science Colleges have lack of knowledge in Engineering Mathematics. Hence in order to
supplement the gap additional classes on engineering Mathematics are conducted for such students
beyond regular class hours. Periodical Mathematics classes are conducted to obtain an ability to
apply the knowledge of Computing and Mathematics appropriate to the discipline.

Communication classes are conducted for the Tamil medium and rural area students.

The department regularly arranges for guest lectures, seminars and workshops from well experienced
persons of industries and institutes and also organizes inplant training and industrial visits to bridge the
curriculum gaps.
Bridging Curriculum:

Special Engineering Mathematics Classes are organized for the Lateral Entry Students to enrich
their knowledge in engineering mathematics. Communication Skill Trainings are provided for the

students to communicate effectively in Interviews.


Guest Lectures and Seminars are arranged from all the Top Level Company Connoisseurs to deliver

the Current Scenario.


In plant Training and Industrial Visits are arranged.

120 | P a g e

Miniprojects are assigned to the students to make them


strong in technical skills. Involving the students to
conduct various technical events in the college.

Permit the students to participate various workshop, seminars, paper presentation in various technical
institutes.
3.7 Course Syllabi (5)
(Include, in appendix, a syllabus for each course used. Syllabi format should be consistent and shouldnt
exceed two pages.) The syllabi format may include:

Department, course number, and title of course

Designation as a required or elective course

Prerequisites

Contact hours and type of course (lecture, tutorial, seminar, project etc.)

Course Assessment methods (both continuous and semesterend assessment)

Course Outcomes

Topics covered

Text books, and/or reference material


File Name

Reg2008
Reg2013
4 Students Performance (100)
Admission intake in the programme

2014

2013

2015

-2014

240

180

237

182

ITEM

2011

2010

2009

-2012

-2011

-2010

120

60

60

60

123

59

56

60

2012-2013

Sanctioned Intake Strength


in the program (N)
Number of total admitted
121 | P a g e

students in first year minus


Number of students
migrated to other
programmes at the end of
st
1 year (N1)
Number of laterally
admitted students in 2

nd

NA

year in the same batch (N2)


Number of total admitted
students in the program (N1

21

10

16

182

144

69

72

65

237

+ N2)

4.1 Success Rate (30)


Provide data for the past seven batches of students

122 | P a g e

Year of Entry
(in

Number

of Number

of Number

of Number

of Number

reverse Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

successfully

successfully

successfully

completed

completed

completed

2nd year

3rd year

4th year

NA
47
45
44
45
36
37

NA
38
47
45
51
32

NA
65
55
55
56

chronological
order

successfully
Admitted in 1st
completed
year
1st year
+
Admitted
laterally in 2nd

2014 -2015
2013 -2014
2012 -2013
2011 -2012
2010 -2011
2009 -2010
2008 -2009
2007 -2008

year (N1 + N2)


237
182
144
69
72
65
65
66

NA
138
71
44
50
45
36
27

Success rate = 30 mean of success index (SI) for past three batches
SI = (Number of students who graduated from the
programme in the stipulated period of course duration)/
(Number of students admitted in the first year of that batch
and admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry)

LYG
Item

LYG
(2010

2008 -2009 2007 -2008

(2009 -2010)

2011)
Number

of

students

admitted

in

the

corresponding First Year + laterally admitted in

72

65

65

66

66

55

60

56

2nd year
Number of students who have graduated in 4
123 | P a g e

of

years
Success Index (SI)
0.91

0.85

0.92

0.85

Average SI

0.88

Success rate

26.47

124 | P a g e

125 | P a g e

4.2 Academic Performance (20)


Academic Performance = 2 * API
Where API = Academic Performance Index
= Mean of Cumulative Grade Point Average of all successful
Students on a 10 point CGPA System
OR
= Mean of the percentage of marks of all successful students / 10

Item

LYG

Approximating the API by the following mid-point 2012-13

LYG m1

LYG m2

2011-12

2010-11

analysis
9 < Number of students with CGPA < 10

8 < Number of students with CGPA < 9.0

11

11

7 < Number of students with CGPA < 8.0

29

18

27

6 < Number of students with CGPA < 7.0

21

26

18

5 < Number of students with CGPA < 6.0

Total

55

55

56

Mean of CGPA/Percentage of all the students (API)

7.21

7.23

7.38
14.76

Assessment= 2*API

14.42

14.46

Average assessment points

14.55

4.3 Placement and Higher Studies (30)


Assessment Points = 30 (x + 1.25y)/N
Where,
x = Number of students placed
y = Number of students admitted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks, and
126 | P a g e

N = Total number of students who were admitted in the batch including lateral entry subject to maximum
assessment points = 20

Item

LYG 2014- LYG 2013- LYG 2012- LYG2011-

2015
Number of admitted students corresponding to LYG 69.00

2014
72.00

2013
65.00

2012
66

including lateral entry (N)


Number of students who obtained jobs as per the 19

25

26

09

record of placement office (x1)


Number of students who found employment otherwise NA

09

04

08

at the end of the final year (x2)


Number of students who opted for higher studies with NA

07

03

01

34
17.81

30
15.57

17
8.29

valid qualifying scores/ranks (y)


x=x1+x2
Assessment points
Average assessment points 12.48

19
8.26*

4.4 Professional Activities (20)

Sl. No

Name of the Staff

Total Marks : 20.00

Designation
Faculty Membership Details
ISTE, SAE INDIA

Dr. R. Venkatasamy

Professor & Principal

Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

Professor

ISTE, SAE INDIA, ASME,


3
4
5
6
7
8

Dr. V. Muthukumar
Mr. R. Adalarasan
Mr. M. NareshBabu
Mr. N. Balaji
Mr. D. Somasundaram
Ms. N. Raja Rajeswari
127 | P a g e

Professor
Asso. Prof
Asso. Prof
Asso. Prof
Asso. Prof
Asso. Prof

IA ENGG
ISTE, SAE INDIA, IA ENGG
ISTE, IA ENGG
IA ENGG
SAE, ISTE , IA ENGG
IA ENGG
ISTE, IA ENGG

9.
10.
11.
12.

Mr. B. Gowthaman
Mr. Thileepan S
Mr. VijayaRajan V
Mr. M. Shanmugam

Asst. Prof(SG)
Asst. Prof (OG)
Asst. Prof (OG)
Asst. Prof (OG)

SFA
SAE INDIA, ASME, IEEE, IA ENGG
IA ENGG
IA ENGG

4.4.1 Professional societies / chapters and organizing engineering events (4)


(Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years).

SPONSORING

NAME OF THE

ACADEMIC
Sl.No

TITLE

PROFESSIONAL

EVENT

CO-

YEAR
BODY

ORDINATOR

Hospitality &
2014-2015

Logistics sponsorship

1.

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel/
SAE INDIA

(Proposed Activity)

for SUPRA

Mr.S.Thileepan

SAEINDIA 2015
Dr.B.K.Gnanavel/
2.

2014-2015

Convention Tier-I

SAE INDIA
Mr.S.Thileepan

Two-week workshop
3.

2013-2014

ISTE

Dr.G.Manimaran

ISTE

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel

on Fluid Dynamics
Two-week workshop
4.

2013-2014

on Engineering
Mechanics

128 | P a g e

Two-week workshop
5.

2012-2013

on Engineering

ISTE

Dr.N.Kulasekaran

Thermodynamics

4.4.2 Organisation of paper contests, design contests, etc. and achievements (4)
(Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years).
S.
Activity

Title

Date

No
Design & paper
1

DRESTEIN 2010

Sept

2010

DRESTEIN 2011

Sept 2011

DRESTEIN 2012

Sept 2012

contest
Design & paper
2
contest
Design & paper
3
contest
SAEINDIA Tier II
4

Design contest

Sept 2012
event

4.4.3 Publication of technical magazines, newsletters, etc (4)


(Instruction: The institution may list the publications mentioned earlier along with the names of the editors,
publishers, etc.).

To enhance the skills and knowledge of our students they are motivated to come forth with a
department magazine named MECHNOJET.

129 | P a g e

Volume1,issue1 4/8/2005

Volume1,issue2 24022006

Volume1,issue3 29092006

Volume1,issue4 15032007

4.4.4 Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs, and innovations (4)


(Instruction: The institution may specify the efforts and achievements.)

. Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs and innovations


Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs and innovations

The following students received an amount of Rs.25,00,000/- from Centre for Entrepreneur Development and
Incubation (CEDI) to start a company on their own.

Abinesh E
Adarsh L
Ashwin B
Avinash K

They have started a company named BLAER Motors Pvt.Ltd and they have also received the Best
Automotive startup 2014 Award by CII . They were awarded One lakh rupees as cash prize on 24 th November
2014.

E-CELL ACTIVITIES FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2014-2015


MARCH 2015

130 | P a g e

24-03-2015. An EDI-EDP orientation programme was conducted for 350 second year students by ICTACT.
From this programme 20 students will be selected for second phase training from that 2 students will be
selected. For the finalists all the support like Internship, Industrial mentorship etc will be provided by
ICTACT
Our college is a Joint organiser of DHON-15 (Demanding Hero for an Organization with Novel
Intelligence which is the acronym of DHONI15), a management game activity conducted by SURPRISE
SOLUTIONS. Totally 30 students are participating in this event.

FEBRURAY 2015
Our college has celebrated entrepreneurship week from 14th February to 21st February which is coordinated
by National Entrepreneurship Network. Our College has bagged National Championship Award for the
third consecutive year in that event
EVENTS CONDUCTED DURING E WEEK
14-02-2105
Event/Activity
S.No

Venue

Description
Name

1
Nalli
Inauguration

E-week inauguration

Arangam
Nalli
2

Cultural events like Dumb-Dance, Singing, quiz,


E-Carnival

Arangam
Saveetha
3

essay writing, Poetry writing will be conducted.


Munch with

Students spending a day with Experts for a mid-

mentors

day meal.

Engineering
College
Saveetha

Inauguration

Engineering

of Indian

College
Saveetha

Rally

An all India rally that covers miles for promoting


2

the awareness upon cancer.

7 | P aEngineering
131
ge
College

What an idea

A session for giving best ideas to the public for

sir ji!

starting up their own venture.

Event/Activity
S.No

Venue

Description
Name
A group of people creating awareness about

Marina
1

Indianisation

entrepreneurship by marching towards the

beach
sea.
A thriving program for the emerging
Marina
2

Bleach the beach

entrepreneurs in the cleantech and renewable

beach
energy space in India.
Entrepreneurship imports the richness of our
3

villages

E-buzz
soil to our metropolitan.
A team parade for visiting various Under the

Saveetha
4

Engineering
College

poverty line people in their areas and


Illusion India

recognize the children deprived of good


education and tie them up with some
educational trust.

132 | P a g e

S.No

Venue

Event/Activity

Description

MM

Name
E-Accolades

Felicitation of various entrepreneurs, for the

Convention
3

Centre
Saveetha

novelty in their work.


Frolic

Engineering

A session for students to share their ideas about


entrepreneurship to the non-teaching people.

College
4

Saveetha

Product

Inventive Brand new product will be advertised

engineering

Packaging

and marketed

college
Saveetha

E-Skit

A short drama sketch or piece of humorous writing,

Engineering
5

especially a parody about entrepreneurship.

College
MM

E-amma

Honouring parents who are entrepreneurs and who

Convention

E-appa

encourage their kids, at the drop of a hat to become

centre

133 | P a g e

entrepreneurs.

S. No

Venue

Event/Activity

Description

Name
2

Saveetha

EXIMIUS

Engineering
1

College
Saveetha

entrepreneurship.
Business Era

Engineering
3

College
NalliAranga

Construction

sites
Saveetha

Film Critics

College
Saveetha
engineering
college

134 | P a g e

Screening of an interesting movie to entertain the


audience.

Civil-preneurs

To bring an exposure about entrepreneurship in

IP auction

construction sites.
An event to promote the business spirit by

Engineering
6

Implanting the idea of what the business is today


in young minds.

m
4

A symposium that is exclusively organised for

indulging in an IPL style auction where teams can


Frame it

did players in their given slot and quota.


A photography event

S.No

Venue

Event/Activity

Description

Nalliarangam

Name
Music Mania

Inter-College music gala organized for the

Public places

Lifeline

students to exhibit their talents.


Health check-up camps, for creating awareness

Saveetha

Alumni

about ones health, at various places in Chennai.


Homecoming of the alumni.

engineering

guested talk

college
Saveetha

3R-

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle to make the world a

Engineering

Management

better place to live in.

College
Saveetha

Innovation

A meritorious opportunity for the student ventures

Engineering

expo

to exhibit their innovative products.

College
Saveetha

Fling

Launching of a product by the entrepreneurs

Engineering

Outcomes

College

135 | P a g e

19-02-2015

S.N
o
1

Venue

Event/Activit

Description

Saveetha

y Name
Savee bazaar

An innovate campaign to extract breath-taking ideas for

Engineerin

entrepreneurship from college students.

g College
Nalli

Hit

the

The classical stage event assuming a particular scenario

arangam
Marina

hypothetical
Art on ground

unpremeditated.
Picture is worth a thousand words. A portrait made on

Beach
Saveetha

Yoga

the ground to promote entrepreneurship.


An Art that calms and replenishes your mind, Body and

Engineerin
5

g College
Saveetha

soul.
Blue Eyes

Knowing more about the grooming prospects of the

Engineerin
6

g College
Saveetha

advancing field of Bluetooth.


Crossfire

A dialect between two opposing teams sharing

Engineerin
S.No
1

g College
Nalli
Arangam

contrasting ideas and proving that they have a point.


Event/Activity Name Description
A day when our lady entrepreneurs plunge in

Venue
Women

Entrepreneurship

action in articulating the other women across

Saveetha

Alumni

the city.
A sports meet conducted for the alumni.

Engineering

meet

College
Saveetha

Eco-preneurs

Sports

Engineering
20-02-2015
College
4
Public place
6

Saveetha

clean society with Green environment.


Serve the needy

Planting the seed of entrepreneurship among

Start it up

unemployed bachelors.
A program conducted for students to bestow

Engineering
College
4
136
| PAnna
a g e nagar
tower park

Entrepreneurs are encouraged in creating a

their ideas for implementing their start ups.


STEP UP 15

Gathering people in public places and creating


mobs for attracting people.

21-02-2015
S.No

Venue

Event/Activity

Description

Saveetha

Name
Food Fest

A food festival where stalls would be

Engineering
2

College
Saveetha

137 | P a g e

put in the college premises.


Valedictory

E-Week valedictory function

Engineering
3

College
Saveetha

Report

Reports for the events and programmes

Engineering

preparation

that were conducted during E-Week will

College

Saveetha

be submitted to NEN.

Proof collection

Proofs for the events and programmes

Engineering

that were conducted during E-Week will

College

be submitted to NEN.

150 students from our college has attended the seminar on Entrepreneurship conducted by Madras Institute of
Technology Alumni Association. Our Principal Dr.R.Venkatasamy successfully coordinated the event
DECEMBER 2014
Our college in association with Anna University and Chennai Institute of Technology has organised one day
regional seminar on BUSINESS IS MY CAREER on 20th December, 2014. Our Principal
Dr.R.Venkatasamy has delivered key note address in that seminar. Around 150 students from our college
have participated in that event.

NOVEMBER-2014
01-11-14 and 02-11-14 Participated in the FDP on entrepreneurship conducted by EDI Chennai
14-11-2014 Faculty members has attended round table conference held at Great Lake Institute of
Management Chennai
20-11-2014 Orientation programme for slow learners from final year students conducted by INDIA Trust
Mr.Vijaya Kumar, motivated the students towards entrepreneurship
138 | P a g e

20-11-2014 Mr.Abhinay Reddy has taken a session on The Role and significance of ECELL to the I Year
students
21-11-2014 Students attended One Day Regional Seminar on Indian Securities Market-Entrepreneurship
Opportunities.
22-11-2014 Students participated in the e-Leaders meeting held at Ramachandra University
OCTOBER-2014
14-10-2014 All the ECELL coordinators attended webinar on Essentials of Mentoring
21-10-2014 One day Orientation programme about ECELL and Entrepreneurship was conducted
Mr.R..Elango, Ex President Kunthambakkam Panchayat was the Chief Guest
28-10-2014 Mr.Kabilan, Mr.Sudarson and Mr.Balaji have attended NEN Recognition Platforms : An Insight
held at LIBA Chennai

08-10-2014 Totally 15 students have attended Business Module workshop conducted by NEN at Sri
Ranmachandra Univeristy

SEPTEMBER-2014
02-09-2014- Participated in Student Entrepreneur- Support: High Impact Programs held at Anna
University Chennai
4.4.5 Publications and awards in interinstitute events by students of the programme of study (4)
(Instruction: The institution may provide a table indicating those publications, which fetched awards to
students in the events/conferences organised by other institutes. A tabulated list of all other student
publications may be included in the appendix.)
S.No
1
139 | P a g e

Activity
NIOT

Student
S.Thileepan

(IV

Date
Jan -2011

Title
Design

of

Best

Project

Award

MECH)

Autonomous

S.Yuva Narayanan (IV

Underwater vehicle

MECH)
M.D.Asjad

(IV

April 2011

MECH)
M.D.Kalimulla

(IV

MECH)
A.Shiva Ganesh (IV
MECH)
R.Gowtham
3

(IV

International

MECH)
Albert Fernandes (IV

Publication

MECH)
Shanmuga

Dec 2011

An

evolution

of

mechanical
priya(IV

properties

and

MECH)

micro structures of

R. Sudhir (IV MECH)

dispersion

R. Arunachalam (IV

strengthened

MECH)

6063 obtained by

Al

in-situ fabrication,
International
Journal of Design
and manufacturing
Technology 5 (2)
4

National

Krishna Priyan J (IV

Conference

MECH)
Karthikeyan

140 | P a g e

April 2010

1-5
An

experimental

analysis
U

(IV

on

frictional welment

MECH)

between AISI 304

Mohammed Affan (IV

and AISI M1020,

MECH)

Internation journal

of

Production

Technology

and

Management
research, 1(2) 795

April 2011

85
An

International

S.Thileepan

Experimental

Publication

S.Yuva Narayanan

Assessment of the

S.Jayakumar

Bond Strength of

S.Vasanthan

friction weldment
between AA-6061
and

AA-6351,

international
Journal

of

Production
Technology

and

Management
Research, 2(1) 6166
6

Paper

R. Pugazhendhi

September

K. Prabhakaran

2013

College
Onithopter

M.Anand Raj

September

Design

Design

Contest

K.V.Durgesh

2013

Ornithocopter

VIT Vellore
SSN College of

M.Anand Raj

August 2013

Solar

Engineering/IEE

G.Sivabalan

E Madras
Easwari

M.Gandhi
U. Arun Kumar Das

Presentation

Arunai
Engineering
7

9
141 | P a g e

Of

Innovation

Project
October

Paper Presentation

10

Engineering

S. Dhanapal

2014

SAE Tier II

College SAE
Journal

K. Jagan

June 2011

Wear

Publication

K. Nithin

characteristics

of

Al Alloy (LM4)
SiC

Particulate

Reinforced MMC,
International
Journal

of

Production
Technology

and

Management
11

Journal
Publication

D. Arunkumar

Dec 2011

Research Vol II
A
Study
on
Mechanical
Properties

of

Natural

Fibre

Reinforced
Laminates
Epoxy

of
(Ly556)

Polymer

Matrix

Composites,
International
Journal

of

Production
Technology
Management
Research Vol II

142 | P a g e

and

12

Paper

K.S.Rajesh

March 2015

Heat

pipe

Presentation

M.Rajkumar

electronic

U.Sabarinathan

cooling

for
device

5 Faculty Contributions (175)


List of Faculty Members:
(Instruction: The institution may complete this table for the calculation of the studentteacher ratio (STR).
Teaching loads of the faculty member contributing to the u programme only (2nd, 3rd, and 4th year) are
considered to calculate the STR.)
Year 2010-11
Number of

Holding
R

Distribution of
Highest

Date of
University

Member

graduat

an
&

Year of
Name of the faculty

research

teaching load

Qualification

Joining
ion

publications

incubant
D

Designation

in journals

unit

1st
U

Yr
.
Anna
Dr.B.K. Gnanavel

PhD

07/02/2
2011

University
Anna
Dr.V. Muthukumar

PhD
ME/M Tech

Associate

011
06/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
01/06/2

Professor

001

Associate

26/06/2

Professor

006

Associate

08/09/2

2011
University

R. Adalarasan

Professor

Annamalai

2000

Manomania
M Naresh Babu
N Balaji

143 | P a g e

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

m
Sundaraner
Annamalai

2002
2004

University
B. Gowatham

ME/M Tech

Annamalai

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

Edu &
ME/M Tech
Institute
Anna
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

010

Assistant

05/03/2

Professor

011

Assistant

20/06/2

Professor
Assistant

011
08/12/2

Professor
Assistant

010
02/07/2

Professor
Assistant

010
26/08/2

Professor
Assistant

010
22/09/2

Professor

006

2010
University
Anna

S.D.Sekar

Professor

2010
University
Anna

A. Muthu Krishnan

009
02/07/2

2004
University
Anna

M.Praveen

Professor
Assistant

2011
University
Andhra

T.S.A.Surya Kumari

009
14/09/2

2005
Research

V.Velmurugan

Professor
Assistant

2010
University
Dr. M.G.R

A. Pandiyan

007
25/02/2

2008
University
Anna

S. Sellakumar

Professor
Assistant
2009

University
Anna
M. Santhanakumar

008
24/08/2

2007

Anna
C.V. Agilan

Professor
Assistant

ME/M Tech

2004
University

02/01/2
Dr.R.Venkatasamy

PhD

IIT Delhi

1995

Professor
008

G. Manimaran

Anna
PhD

Associate

04/09/2

Professor

008

Associate

10/06/2

Professor

009

2013
University

G. Gobalarama
Anna
Subramaniyam

PhD

2012
University

144 | P a g e

For CAY 20112012

Number of

Holding
R

Distribution of
Name of the faculty

Highest

Member

Qualification

Date of
University

graduat

research

an
&

Year of

teaching load

ion

incubant
D

Designation
Joining

publications
in journals

unit

1st
U

Yr
.
Anna
Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

PhD

07/02/2
2011

University
Anna
Dr.V. muthukumar

PhD
ME/M Tech

Associate

011
06/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
01/06/2

Professor

001

Associate

26/06/2

Professor

006

Associate

08/09/2

Professor
Assistant

008
24/08/2

Professor
Assistant

007
25/02/2

Professor
Assistant

009
14/09/2

Professor
Assistant

009
02/07/2

Professor

010

Assistant

05/03/2

Professor

011

Assistant

20/06/2

Professor

011

Assistant

08/12/2

Professor

010

Assistant

02/07/2

Professor
Assistant

010
21/08/2

Professor
Assistant

011
26/08/2

Professor
Assistant

010
20/06/2

2011
University

R. Adalarasan

Professor

Annamalai

2000

Manomania
M Naresh Babu

ME/M Tech

2002

sundaraner
Annamalai
N Balaji

ME/M Tech

2004
University

B. Gowatham

ME/M Tech

Annamalai

2007

Anna
C.V. Agilan

ME/M Tech

2009
University
Anna

M. Santhanakumar

ME/M Tech

2008
University
Anna

S. Sellakumar

ME/M Tech

2010
University
Dr. M.G.R
Edu &

A. Pandiyan

ME/M Tech

2005
Research
Institute
Anna

V.Velmurugan

ME/M Tech

2011
University

T.S.A.Surya
Andhra
Kumari

ME/M Tech

2004
University
Anna

M.Praveen

ME/M Tech

2010
University
Anna

M.Kalpana

ME/M Tech

2011
University
Anna

A. Muthu Krishnan
A. Davis Gilbert

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

145 | P a g e

2010
University
Anna

2011

University

Professor

Dr.R.Venkatasamy
PhD
G. Manimaran

IIT Delhi

1995

Anna
PhD

011
02/01/2

Professor
Associate

008
04/09/2

Professor

008

Associate

10/06/2

Professor

009

2013
University

Holding

research

&

an

publications

R D

incubant

in journals

unit

G. Gobalarama
Anna
Subramaniyam

PhD

2012
University

For CAY 20122013


Name of the faculty

Highest

Member

Qualification

University

Year of
graduat

Designation

Date of

Distribution

Joining

teaching load

of

ion
1st

Yr

146 | P a g e

Number

of

Anna
Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

PhD

2011
University
Anna

Dr. V. Muthukumar

PhD
ME/M Tech

Associate

011
06/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
01/06/2

Professor

001
0

Associate

26/06/2

Professor

006

Associate

08/09/2

Professor
Assistant

008
24/08/2

Professor
Assistant

007
25/02/2

Professor
Assistant

009
14/09/2

Professor
Assistant

009
02/07/2

Professor

010
0

2011
University

R. Adalarasan

07/02/2
Professor

Annamalai

2000

Manomania
M Naresh Babu

ME/M Tech

2002

sundaraner
Annamalai
N Balaji

ME/M Tech

2004
University

B. Gowatham

ME/M Tech

Annamalai

2007

Anna
C.V. Agilan

ME/M Tech

2009
University
Anna

M. Santhanakumar

ME/M Tech

2008
University
Anna

S. Sellakumar

ME/M Tech

2010
University
Dr. M.G.R
Edu

A. Pandiyan

&

Assistant

05/03/2

Professor

011

Assistant

20/06/2

University

Professor

011

Andhra

Assistant

08/12/2

University

Professor

010

Dr.

Assistant

ME/M Tech

2005
Research
Institute
Anna

V.Velmurugan

ME/M Tech

2011

T.S.A.Surya
Kumari

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

2004
M.G.R

Edu
A. Pandiyan

&

Professor

Research
ME/M Tech

011

Institute
Anna

M. Kalpana
A.Anotony George

05/03/2

2005

Assistant

21/08/2

Professor
Assistant

011
11/07/2

Professor

012
11/07/2

Assistant

013
20/06/2

Professor
Assistant

011
30/10/2

Professor
Assistant

013
15/06/2

Professor
Assistant

012
19/07/2

Professor
Assistant

012
03/09/2

Professor
Assistant

012
25/09/2

Professor

012
02/01/2

008
04/09/2

2011
ME/M Tech

University
Anna
2012

Fernando
Dr.

University
PhD

IIT madras

2011

Professor

N.Kulasehakaran
Anna
A. Davis Gilbert

ME/M Tech

2011
University
Anna

K.Ganesan

ME/M Tech

2012
University
Anna

V.Subathra Devi

ME/M Tech

2010
University
Anna

C.Udayarauhanaik

ME/M Tech

2012
University
Anna

MohanaPrabhu

ME/M Tech

2011
University
Anna

Ranjith .V

ME/M Tech

2011
University

Dr.R.Venkatasamy
G. Manimaran

PhD

IIT Delhi

1995

Professor

PhD

Anna

2013

Associate

147 | P a g e

G.

University

Professor

008

Anna

Associate

10/06/2

Professor

009

Designation

Date of

Distribution

Joining

teaching load

Gobalarama

Subramaniyam

0
PhD

of

Number

Holding

research

&

an

publications

R D

incubant

in journals

unit

2012
University

For CAY 20132014

Name of the faculty

Highest

University

Year of

Member

Qualificati

graduat

on

ion
1st

Yr

02/01/2

.
0

Associate

008
06/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
01/06/2

Professor

001
0

Associate

26/06/2

Professor

006

Associate

08/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
03/06/2

Professor
Assistant

013
24/08/2

Professor
Assistant

007
25/02/2

Professor
Assistant

009
14/09/2

Professor

009

Dr.R.Venkatasamy
PhD

IIT Delhi

1995

Anna
Dr. V. Muthukumar

PhD

Professor

2011
University

ME/M
R. Adalarasan

Annamalai

2000

Tech
Manomania
ME/M
m

M Naresh Babu

2002

Tech
ME/M

Sundaraner
Annamalai

N Balaji

2004
Tech
ME/M

University
Anna

N Raja Rajeshwari

2004
Tech
ME/M

B. Gowatham

University
Annamalai

Tech
ME/M

2007

Anna

C.V. Agilan

2009
Tech
ME/M

University
Anna

M. Santhanakumar

2008
Tech

148 | P a g e

of

University

ME/M

Anna

V.Velmurugan

Assistant

20/06/2

Professor
Assistant

011
11/07/2

Professor
Assistant

012
03/06/2

Professor
Assistant

013
07/06/2

Professor

013
0

2011
Tech
ME/M

University
Anna

A.Antony George

2012
Tech
ME/M

D.Somasundaram

University
IIT Madras

Tech
ME/M

2003

Anna

P. Subburam

2013
Tech
ME/M

University
Vel Tech Dr.
R.R & Dr.

S.Shenbagaraman

Assistant

17/06/2

Professor

013

Assistant

05/07/2

Professor
Assistant

013
10/07/2

Professor

013
0

11/07/2

Assistant

013
03/06/2

Professor
Assistant

013
13/06/2

Professor

013
07/02/2

Associate

011
04/09/2

Professor
Assistant

008
02/07/2

Professor

010

2012
Tech

S.R
University

Thileepan.S

ME/M
VIT

VijayaRajan V

Tech
ME/M

2013

Anna
2013

Tech

ME/M

University

Anna

Radhika C

Assistant

08/07/2

Professor

013

Assistant

08/12/2

Professor

010

2013
Tech

University

ME/M

Andhra

T.S.A. Suriyakumari

2004
Tech
ME/M

University
Dr. M.G.R
Edu

A. Pandiyan

&

Assistant

05/03/2

Professor

011

2005
Tech

Research
Institute

Dr. N.Kulasehakaran

PhD

H.

IIT madras

2011

Dulsburg
M.Sc.

HiruPurushothaman
ME/M

2009
Essen
Anna

Logesh.G

2013
Tech

Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

University
Anna

PhD

2011
University
Anna

G. Manimaran
PhD
ME/M

Professor

2013
University
Anna

S. Sellakumar

2010
Tech

149 | P a g e

Professor

University

For CAY 20142015


Name of the faculty

Highest

Member

Qualification

University

Year of

Designation

graduat

Date of

Distribution

Joining

teaching load

of

ion

IIT Delhi

1995

PhD

2011
University
Anna

Dr. V. Muthukumar

PhD
ME/M Tech

ME/M Tech

Annamalai

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

Annamalai

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

IIT Madras

Yr

02/01/2

.
0

008
07/02/2

Associate

011
06/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
01/06/2

Professor

001
0

Associate

26/06/2

Professor

006

Associate

08/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
03/06/2

Professor
Assistant

013
24/08/2

Professor
Assistant

007
25/02/2

Professor
Assistant

009
14/09/2

Professor
Assistant

009
02/07/2

Professor
Assistant

010
20/06/2

Professor
Assistant

011
11/07/2

Professor
Assistant

012
03/06/2

Professor
Assistant

013
07/06/2

Professor

013
0

Professor
Professor

2003

ME/M Tech

2013
University
Vel Tech Dr.
R.R & Dr.

S.Shenbagaraman

unit

2012

Anna
P. Subburam

2011

University
D.Somasundaram

in journals

2010

University
Anna
A.Antony George

incubant

2008

University
Anna
V.Velmurugan

R D

2009

University
Anna
S. Sellakumar

publications

2007

University
Anna
M. Santhanakumar

an

2004

Anna
C.V. Agilan

&

2004

University
B. Gowatham

2002

University
Anna
N Raja Rajeshwari

research

2000

sundaraner
Annamalai
N Balaji

Holding

Manomania
M Naresh Babu

2011
University

R. Adalarasan

Anna
Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

of

1st

Dr.R.Venkatasamy
PhD

Number

ME/M Tech

Assistant

17/06/2

Professor

013

Assistant

05/07/2

Professor
Assistant

013
10/07/2

Professor
Assistant

013
08/07/2

Professor

013

2012
S.R
University

Thileepan.S
ME/M Tech
VijayaRajan V

VIT
Anna

ME/M Tech
Radhika C

2013

ME/M Tech

2013
University
Anna
University

150 | P a g e

2013

Anna
S. Elavarasan

ME/M Tech
University
Anna

A.Balaji

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
M.Sc
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

ME/M Tech

Rahman

ME/M Tech
Suriyakumari
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

S. Karthikeyan
University
Anna

ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

Krishna

University
Anna
ME/M Tech
ME/M Tech

G. Manimaran

RMIT

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
06/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
09/06/2

Professor

014
0

Assistant

30/06/2

Professor

014

Associate

08/12/2

Professor
Assistant

010
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Assistant

014
02/06/2

Professor
Associate

014
04/09/2

Professor
Associate

008
02/06/2

Professor

014
0

2014

Anna
2013
University
Bharathiyar
ME/M Tech

2000
University
Dr. M.G.R
Edu

A. Pandiyan

2104

PhD
S. Boopathy

2013

University
X. Fulbert xavier

2013
University
Anna

Satya

M.V.Manivannan

2013
ME/M Tech

Basina

014
02/06/2

2012
University
Anna

S.Sivananthan

Professor
Assistant

2010
University
Anna

A. Karthik

2004
University
Anna

Ajay John Paul

2014

University
Andhra

T.S.A.

2014
University
B.S. Abdur

H. Ravi Kumar

2014
University
Anna

P.L. Arun

2014
University
Anna

S Ragul

2011
University
Anna

T. Karthikeyan

2014
University
Tesside

G.L. Arumparithy

02/06/2

2014
University
Anna

M. Shanmugam

Assistant
2012

ME/M Tech

Associate

05/03/2

Professor

011

2005
Research
Institute

151 | P a g e

&

5.1 Student Teacher Ratio (STR) (20)

Total Marks : 19.67

STR is desired to be 15 or superior


Assessment

= 20 15/STR subject to

maximum assessment of 20 STR

(x + y + z)/N1
where, x = Number of students in 2nd
year of the programme

y =

Number of students in 3rd year of the


programme
z = Number of students in 4th year of the programme
N1 = Total number of faculty members in the programme (by considering fractional load)

Year
20112012
152 | P a g e

X
66

Y
66

Z
66

N1

X+Y+

14

Z
198

STR

Assessmen
t

14.14

20.0

0
20.0

20122013
69
20132014

14

2014-15

2
21

68

65

14

202

14.42
0
20.0

69

72

19

283

14.89
0
20.0

14
69

29

420

14.48
0
Average assessment

N = Maximum {N1, N2}


N1 = Total number of faculty members in the programme
(considering the fractional load) N2 = Number of faculty
positions needed for studentteacher ratio of 15

Year

Sanctioned Intake

Actual Admitted

N=Max.

2
13

(N1,N2)
13

20112012

180

19

1
13

20122013

180

8
20

13

13

13

240

2
28

20

19

20

20132014

5.2 Faculty Cadre Ratio (20)


Assessm

= 20 CRI

ent
where,

= Cadre ratio index

CRI
= 2.25 (2A + B)/N subject to
where, A

max. CRI = 1.0


= Number of professors in the

153 | P a g e

20.00

programme
= Number
of
B

associate

professors in the programme

Year

2010-

CRI

Assessment

1.0

20.0

0
1.0

0
20.0

2011
2011-

3
1

2012
2012-

4
1

0
1.0

0
20.0

0
1.0

0
20.0

2013
2013-

4
1

2014
2014-15

9
2

0
1.0

0
20.0

Average assessment 20.00

5.3 Faculty Qualifications (30)


Assessment
where, FQI

=
=

where,x
y
Z

Total Marks : 24.61

3 FQI
Faculty qualification index
(10x + 6y +2z0 )/ N2
such that,
x + y +z 0 N2 andz 0 z

=
=
=

Number of faculty members with PhD


Number of faculty members with ME/ M Tech
Number of faculty members with B.E/B.Tech

2010-2011

X
Y
2 1

20112012

1
1

2
1

20122013

Z
1

FQI
6.61

Assessment
19.84

3
1

6.57

19.71

4
1

19.71
6.57

20132014

2
1

4
1

6.42
19.26

7
154 | P a g e

2014-2015

6.41
19.24

Average assessment

19.552

5.4 Faculty Competencies correlation to Programme Specific Criteria (15)


(Provide evidence that programme curriculum satisfies the applicable programme criteria specified by the
appropriate American professional associations such as ASME, IEEE and ACM. You may list the
programme specific criteria and the competencies (specialisation, research publications, course
developments etc.,) of faculty to correlate the programme specific criteria and competencies.)

C1.

Engineering Mechanics

C2

Manufacturing TechnologyI

C3

Engineering Thermodynamics

C4

Kinematics of Machinery

C5

Fluid Mechanics and Machinery

C6

Electrical Drives and control

C7

Heat and Mass transfer

C8

Manufacturing technology II

C9

Engineering Materials and Metallurgy

155 | P a g e

C10

Strength of Materials

C11

Electronics and Microprocessors

C12

Thermal Engineering

C13

Dynamics of Machinery

C14

Design of Machine elements

C15

Engineering Metrology and Measurements

C16

Applied Hydraulics and Pneumatics

C17

Gas Dynamics and jet propulsion

C18 Design of Transmission systems


C19 Finite Element analysis
C20 Automobile Engineering
C21 Mechatronics
C22 Computer integrated Manufacturing
C23 Power plant Engineering
C24Engineering Economics and cost
Analysis
C25 Total quality management

156 | P a g e

5.5 Faculty as participants/ Resource persons in faculty development/training activities (15)

NAME OF THE
SL NO
FACULTY
1.

Dr. R.Venkatasamy

2.

Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

3.

Dr. V. Muthukumar

4.

Dr. G. Manimaran

5.

R. Adalarasan

157 | P a g e

Points
2011-12

(Maximum 5 for a faculty)


2012-13

2013-14

5
5

2014-15

6.

M Naresh Babu

7.

N Balaji

8.

N Raja Rajeshwari

9.

D Somasundaram

10.

B. Gowatham

11.

C.V. Agilan

12.

M. Santhanakumar

13.

S. Sellakumar

14.

V Velmurugan

15.

A Antony George

16.

P. Subburam

17.

S Shenbagaraman

18.

S Thileepan

19.

C Radhika

20.

V Vijaya rajan

21.

S. Elavarasan

22.

A.Balaji

23.

M. Shanmugam

24.

G.L. Arumparithy

25.

T. Karthikeyan

26.

S Ragul

27.

P.L. Arun

28.

H. Ravi Kumar
Sum
N

158 | P a g e

5
3

50

90

101

19

24

25

29

1.26

Assessment
=3*Sum/N

6.25

10.8

10.44
7.18

Average Assessment

5.6 Faculty Retention


Institute Marks : 12.10
Assessment = 3 RPI/N
where RPI = Retention
point index
Points assigned to all
faculty members
where points assigned to a faculty member = 1 point for each year of experience at the institute but not
exceeding 5.
Acade

No. of Faculties (Experience in the

mic

institution)
Le 1 2

23

34

45

No

ss

year

year

year

year

tha

mo

Year

RPI

Assessm

Retent

ent

ion
Point
Index
n 1

(wit

(wit

(wit

(wit

re

Ye

hin

hin

hin

hin

tha

ar

year

year

year

year

s)

s)

s)

s)

yea

0.00

3.00

2.00

3.00

rs
8.0

14

64.00

14.77

3.00

0
7.0

14.

57.00

13.15

2.00

0
7.0

00
19.

53.00

8.37

00

2011

0.0

-2012
2012

0
0.0

-2013
2013

0
10.

-2014

00

159 | P a g e

3.00
1.00

2.00
3.00

1.00
1.00

2014

11

29

68

-2015
Average Assessment

7.28
12.10

5.7 Faculty Research Publications (FRP) (20)


(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points depending upon the
quality of the research papers and books published in the past three years.)
Assessment of FRP = 4 (Sum of the research publication points scored by each faculty member)/N
The research papers considered are those (i) which can be located on the internet and/or are included in hardcopy volumes/proceedings, published by reputed publishers, and (ii) whether the faculty members
affiliation, in the published papers/books, is of the current institution.
Include a list of all such publications and IPRs along with details of DOI, publisher, month/year, etc.
NAME OF THE

FRP Points (

FACULTY

2011-12

(contributing

Maximum 5 for a faculty)


2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

to

FRP)
Dr. R.Venkatasamy

Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

Dr. V. Muthukumar

Dr. G. Manimaran

R. Adalarasan

5
5

M Naresh Babu
N Balaji

N Raja Rajeshwari

D Somasundaram
B. Gowatham
C.V. Agilan
M. Santhanakumar
160 | P a g e

S. Sellakumar
V Velmurugan
5

A Antony George
P. Subburam
S Shenbagaraman
S Thileepan
C Radhika
V Vijaya rajan
S. Elavarasan
A.Balaji
M. Shanmugam
G.L. Arumparithy
T. Karthikeyan
S Ragul
P.L. Arun
H. Ravi Kumar
Sum

25

30

35

30

19

24

25

29

5.26

5.6

4.13

Assessment

of

FRP=4*Sum/N
4.99

5.8 Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR) (10)

SL NO

NAME OF THE

161 | P a g e

FIPR Points (

Maximum 5 for a faculty)

FACULTY
(contributing

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

to

FIPR)
1.

Dr. R.Venkatasamy

2.

Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

3.

Dr. V. Muthukumar

4.

Dr. G. Manimaran

5.

R. Adalarasan

6.

M Naresh Babu

7.

N Balaji

8.

N Raja Rajeshwari

9.

D Somasundaram

10.

B. Gowatham

11.

C.V. Agilan

12.

M. Santhanakumar

13.

S. Sellakumar

14.

V Velmurugan

15.

A Antony George

16.

P. Subburam

17.

S Shenbagaraman

18.

S Thileepan

19.

C Radhika

20.

V Vijaya rajan

21.

S. Elavarasan

22.

A.Balaji

162 | P a g e

23.

M. Shanmugam

24.

G.L. Arumparithy

25.

T. Karthikeyan

26.

S Ragul

27.

P.L. Arun

28.

H. Ravi Kumar
Sum
N
Assessment

of

20

19

24

25

29

1.37

FRP=2*Sum/N
0.45

Average Assessment

5.9 Funded R&D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC) Work (20)

Total Marks: 10.36

(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum 5 points, depending upon the amount.
A suggested scheme is given below, for a minimum amount of Rs. 1 lakh:)

Name of faculty member FRDC points (Maximum 5 per faculty


S.No
1
2
3
4
5

(contributuing to FRDC)
Dr. R. Venkatasamy

members)
2012-2013
0

2013-2014
0

2014-2015
5

Dr. B.K. Gnanavel

Dr. V. Muthukumar

Mr. R. Adalarasan

Mrs. N. Raja Rajeswari

163 | P a g e

15

41

N
1
Assesment of FRDC =

4XSum /N

20

18.22

Mr. M. Santhanakumar

Mr. V. Velmurugan

Mrs. C. Radhika

Mr. G.L. Arumparithy


Dr. G. Manimaran

10

Sum

20

Average assesment = 19.41

LIST OF R&D PROJECTS

Sl.No

1.

TITLE

Design

and

development
Biodegradable

FUNDING

TOTAL

PRINCIPAL

AGENCY

COST

INVESTIGATOR/

Rs.50,000/-

CO INVESTIGTOR
Dr.V.Muthukumar/

Institution of

of

Engineers,

tibia

India(IEI)

STATUS

Approved

Dr.R.Venkatasamy

bone internal fixation


plate

using

CT/CAD/Additive
2.

Manufacturing
Design

and

Institution of

development

of

Engineers,

Biodigester

for

India(IEI)

Rs.15,000/-

Dr.R.Venkatasamy

Approved

Rs.20,000/-

Mr.R.Adalarasan/

Approved

effective food waste


3.

disposal
Investigation on solid

164 | P a g e

Institution of

state welding of hybrid

engineers,

Al6061/10%SiC/10%A

India(IEI)

l2O3
4.

metal

5.

matrix

composite
Faculty Development

Anna

Programme on Design

University

of

Mr.M.Santhanakumar

Rs.25,000/-

Dr.V.Muthukumar/

Grant

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel

received

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel/

Grant

Mrs.N.Raja Rajeswari

received

Dr.G.Manimaran

Grant

Transmission

System
Three days

seminar

Department

onHybrid Renewable

of

Energy

and

System

(HRES)

Rs.1,25,000/-

science

technology

Two-week

7.

on Fluid Mechanics
Two week workshop on

ISTE

Rs.50,000/-

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel

received
Grant

8.

Engineering Mechanics
Two-week workshop

ISTE

Rs.50,000/-

Dr.N.Kulasekharan

received
Grant

on
9.

10.

workshop

(DST-SERB)
ISTE

6.

Engineering

received

Thermodynamics
Faculty Development

Anna

Programme

on

University

Dynamics

of

Machinery
International
Conference-

Paper

Rs.70,000/-

Airfare & Visa

International

fees

Traveling

Kingdom

Support
Scheme
(ITS)

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel

Grant
received

DST-

Presentation-United

165 | P a g e

Rs.1,32,000/-

Dr.B.K.Gnanavel

Grant
recommen
deed

LIST OF CONSULTANCY PROJECTS

S.N

Academi

Type

o
1.

c Year
20142015

of

Agency

Principal Investigator

Project Title

project
Research

Guruchandra

Name
Dr.B.K.Gnanavel/

Mold & Die of

& Project

Engineering

Mr.G.L. Arumparithy/

components

Mrs.N.Raja Rajeswari/
2.

2014-

Research

Rajalakshmi

Mrs.C.Radhika
Dr.V.Muthukumar/

3.

2015
2014-

& Project
Research

Groups
Jeppiar

Mr.G.L.Arumparithy
Mr.R.Adalarasan/

analysis
Material

4.

2015
2014-

& Project
Research

Groups
Saveetha

Mr.G.L.Arumparithy
Mr.R.Adalarasan/

analysis
Minimum

2015

& Project

Dental

Mr.V.Velmurugan

Quantity

5.

2013-

Testing

2014

Tool

College

Requirement of

Sarrathi

Lubrication
Testing

Builders (P)

Dr.G.Manimaran

Assessment of R&D and Consultancy projects = 4 (Sum of FRDC by each faculty member)//N
Five points for funding by national agency,
Four points for funding by state agency,
Four points for funding by private sector, and
Two points for funding by the sponsoring trust/society.

of

Concrete cubes

Ltd.

166 | P a g e

wear

5.10 Faculty Interaction with Outside World (10)


Name

of

faculty

Total Marks : 8.55

member FIP

(contributing to FIP)
2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015

Dr.R.Venkatasamy
Dr.B.K.Gnanavel
Dr.V.Muthukumar
Dr.G.Manimaran
Dr. N. Kulasekharan
Mr.R.Adalarasan
Mr.M.NareshBabu
Mr.N.Balaji
Mr. S. Boopathy
Mrs.N.RajaRajeswari
MR.P. Kumaran
MR. A. Muniappan
MS.T.S.A. Suriyakumari
Mr. A. Pandiyan
Mr.D.Somasundaram
Mr.C.V.Agilan
Mr.B.Gowthaman
Mr.M.Santhanakumar
Mrs.M.Kalpana
Mr.M.Praveen
Dr. G.Gopala

3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
0

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
0
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
3
0
0
0

Ramasubramaniyam
Mr.S.Sellakumar
Mr.V.Velmurugan
Mr.A.Antony Fernado George
Mr.S.Shenbagaraman
Mr.P.Subburam
Mr.S.Thileepan
Mr.V.VijayaRajan
Mrs.C.Radhika
Mr.S.Elavarasan
Mr.T.Karthikeyan
Mr.G.Arumparithy
Mr.M.Shanmugam
Mr.A.Balaji
Mr.S.Ragul
Mr.P.LArun
Mr.H.Ravi Kumar
Mr. Ajay John Paul
Mr. A. Karthik
Mr. S. Karthikeyan
Mr. X. Fulbert Xavier
Mr. Basina Satya Krishna
Mr. M.V.Manivannan
Mr. S.Sivananthan

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

167 | P a g e

M Mohanaprabhu
V Ranjith
H Hirupurushotman
G Logesh
A Davis Gilber
SUM

0
0
0
0
0
21

0
0
0
0
0
27

0
0
0
0
0
48

0
0
0
0
0
63

0
0
0
0
0
84

N
Assessment of FIP

13
3.2

14
3.8

14
6.85

19
6.63

29
5.79

(Instruction: A faculty member gets maximum five interaction points, depending upon the type of
institution or R&D laboratory or industry, as follows)

FIP = Faculty interaction points


Assessment = 2 (Sum of FIP by each faculty member)/N
Five points for interaction with a reputed institution abroad, institution of eminence in India, national
research laboratories.
Three points for interaction with institution/industry (not covered earlier).
Points to be awarded, for those activities, which result in joint efforts in publication of books/research
paper, pursuing externally funded R&D / consultancy projects and/or development of semester long course
/ teaching modules.
Average assessment

6 Facilities and Technical Support (125)


6.1 Classrooms in the Department (30)
Description of classrooms, faculty rooms, seminar, and conference halls:
168 | P a g e

8.55

Room

No. of

Shared/
Usage

description
MECH GF

Rooms
1

Rooms Equipped with PC, Internet,


Capacity

Exclusive
Class Room

Exclusive

etc.
CCD Camera, Smart board, speakers,
70

LH 2
CSE 4F LH

Internet and Benches


1

Class Room

Exclusive

72

Smart board, speakers and Benches

Class Room

Exclusive

70

Smart board, speakers and Benches

Class Room

Exclusive

72

Smart board, speakers and Benches

Class Room

Exclusive

72

Smart board, speakers and Benches

Class Room

Exclusive

72

Smart board, speakers and Benches

Exclusive

140

Board, Benches

Exclusive

70

Board, Benches

Excluusive

70

Board, Benches

1
CSE 4F LH
2
CSE 4F OW
LH 1
CSE 4F OW
LH 2
CSE 4F OW
LH 3
MECH FF

Drawing Room /
1

DH
ADMIN 4F

Tutorial Room
Drawing Room /
1

LH1
ADMIN 4F

Tutorial Room
Drawing Room /
1

OW LH2
MECH GF

Tutorial Room
CCD Camera, Smart board, speakers,
1

Seminar Hall

Exclusive

120

LH 1
EEE GF LH

Internet and Benches


CCD Camera, Smart board, speakers,
1

1
MECH GF

Seminar Hall

Exclusice

Equipped
5

HOD Office

Exclusice

Equipped with PC, Internet, etc.

1
1
1

Professor Room
Professor Room
Professor Room
Associate

Exclusice
Exclusice
Exclusice

1
1
1

Equipped
Equipped
Equipped

Shared

Equipped

Shared

Equipped

Shared

Equipped

F.R
MECH GF

Professor Room
Associate
1

F.R
MECH GF

Professor Room
Associate
1

169 | P a g e

10

Waiting Room

F.R

120
Internet and Benches

Conference hall,

CH
MECH GF
F.R
CSE 4F F.R
CSE 4F F.R
CSE 4F F.R
MECH GF

Exclusive

Professor Room

Assistant
CSE 4F F.R

Equipped

Shared

Equipped

Shared

Equipped

Shared

Equipped

Shared

Equipped

Professsor Room
Assistant

ADMIN 4F
1
F.R
ADMIN 4F

Professsor Room
Assistant
1

F.R
ADMIN 4F

Professsor Room
Assistant
1

F.R
ADMIN 4F

Professsor Room
Assistant
1

F.R

Shared

Professsor Room

6.1.1 Adequate number of rooms for lectures (core/electives), seminars, tutorials, etc., for
the program (10)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

The department has adequate number of class rooms for teaching both core and elective subjects. Also it
has the provision to conduct seminars, tutorials, etc for the program
6.1.2 Teaching aids multimedia projectors, etc (15)
(Instruction: List the various teaching aids available)

All the class rooms of the department is equipped with the following facilities
1. CCD Camera,
2. Smart board with system,
3. Speakers,
4. Wi-Fi connection and multimedia projector

6.1.3 Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambience, and
such other amenities/facilities (5)
170 | P a g e

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the inspection
thereof.)

All the class rooms facilitated with fully air conditioned with well-conditioned tables and chairs. The class
rooms are very spacious with enough lighting and acoustics.

6.2 Faculty Rooms in the Department (20)


6.2.1 Availability of individual faculty rooms (5)
(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

The HOD and all the professors are provided with individual room with attached rest room facilities.
Similarly two associate professors in a single room and other category staffs are provided 3 in single room.
6.2.2 Room equipped with white/black board, computer, Internet, and such other amenities/facilities (10)
(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table)

1. The individual rooms are equipped with computer and internet and two chairs for discussing with others.
2. All the staff rooms are having enough number of fans and lighting facilities.
3. The entire campus is having provided with Wi-Fi connection.

6.2.3 Usage of room for counseling/discussion with students (5)


(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the inspection
thereof.)

The department has a separate room for discussion and counseling with students. It is equipped with good
number of chairs for discussion and a separate table and chair for a counselor for meeting the students
individually
The following table is required for the subsequent criteria.
171 | P a g e

6.3 Laboratories in the Department to meet the Curriculum Requirements and the POs (60)

Laboratory description Exclusive

Space, number

Number

in the curriculum

of students

of

Quality

experimen

instruments

use / shared

Laboratory
of manuals

ts
As
Dynamics Laboratory

Exclusive

35

12

per

Anna

University
norms.
As per

Available
Anna

Manufacturing
Shared

35

07

University

Available

Laboratory I
norms.
As per

Anna

Manufacturing
Shared

35

10

University

Available

Laboratory II
norms.
As per
Thermal Laboratory I

Shared

35

10

University
norms.
As per

Thermal Laboratory II

Shared

35

11

Available
Anna

University
norms.
As per

Fluid

Anna

Available
Anna

Mechanics
Shared

35

10

University

Shared

35

13

norms.
As per

Available

Laboratory
Strength of Materials
Laboratory
172 | P a g e

University

Anna Available

norms.
Metrology

and

Measurements

As
Exclusive

35

12

Laboratory

per

Anna

University
norms.
As per

Available
Anna

Mechatronics
Shared

35

10

University

Available

Laboratory
norms.
As per
Engineering

Anna

Practice
Shared

35

07

University

Available

Laboratory
norms.
As per
CAD Laboratory

Exclusive

35

10

University
norms.
As per

CAM Laboratory

Shared

35

12

University
norms.

173 | P a g e

Anna
Available
Anna
Available

6.3.1

Adequate, well-equipped laboratories to meet the curriculum requirements and the POs (20)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

All the labs in the department are highly equipped and air conditioned with lab components to meet the
curriculum as well as POs. The space and lighting of each lab is designed as per the AICTE guidelines.

S.NO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

174 | P a g e

CURRICULAM LAB DESCRIPTION


Engineering Workshop Practice Lab
Manufacturing Technology Lab I
Manufacturing Technology Lab II
Strength of Materials Lab
Fluid Mechanics & Machinery Lab
Thermal Engineering Lab I
Thermal Engineering Lab II
Metrology & Measurements Lab
CAD/CAM Lab
Dynamics Lab
Mechatronics Lab

SATISFYING POs
a,c,d,e,f,i,j,k
a,b,c,d,e,g,j,k
a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,k
a,b,d,e,f,j,k
a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,k
a,b,c,d,e,g,h,j,k
a,b,c,d,e,g,h,j,k
b,c,d,e,g,h,j,k
a,b,c,d,e,g,h,j
a,b,d,e,g,h
b,c,d,e,g,h,i,j,k

6.3.2 Availability of computing facilities in the department (15)


(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

The department has well equipped computing facility with internet connection.
S.No
1
2
3

Lab name
CAD Laboratory
CAM Laboratory
Mechatronics Laboratory

Number of systems
76
04
12

6.3.3 Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours
(15)
(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

I.

All the labs are provided with lab technicians for doing curriculum based experiments and it is
opened from 8.30 AM to 3.30PM on all working days.

II.

CAD lab opened for hostel students to do the various exercise after the regular class hour from
3.30 p.m to 4.30 p.m

III.

The ROBOTICS lab and MEMS design Centre is opened for the students to do the experiments
and projects
all working days.

175 | P a g e

beyond the curriculum for their self-development from 8.30 AM to 8.30 PM on

6.3.4 Equipment to run experiments and their maintenance, number of students per experimental setup, size
of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc (10)
(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

For Hardware Lab, Enough number of equipment is available for doing experiments and periodic
maintenance of the components is done by the vendors on request. All the labs are well spaced as per
AICTE norms and three students per batch to do each experiments.

For Software Lab, Each student is given with separate computer for doing experiments. All the
computers are loaded with licensed software required to meet the curriculum and maintained by
centralized system admin team.

6.4 Technical Manpower Support in the Department (15)

6.4.1 Availability of adequate and qualified technical supporting staff for programmespecific laboratories (10)

Exclusi

Other

Name of the

Designati

pay

ve /

Date of

QUALIFICATI

technical staff

on

scale

shared

joining

ON

work
Lab

Rs.120

Instructor

00

Mr.S.Vijayan

technical Responsibil
skills

ity

gained
Equipme To maintain
20/11/20

Shared

ITI(Fitter)

nts

Laboratory

05
Servicing Equipments
Equipme To maintain

Mr. N.Sathish

Lab

Rs.500

Kumar

Assistant

09/07/20
Shared

ITI(Fitter)

nts

Laboratory

12
Servicing Equipments
Equipme To maintain

Lab

Rs.700

Mr. A.Iyappan

07/08/20 ITIMechanic
Shared

Assistant

nts
12

Laboratory

Diesel
Servicing Equipments

176 | P a g e

Equipme To maintain
Mr.Vigneshwar

Lab

Rs.650

an

Assistant

03/06/20
Shared

DME

nts

Laboratory

13
Servicing Equipments
Equipme To maintain

Mr.K.Shoban

Lab

Rs.650

25/0620
Shared

Babu

Assistant

DAE

nts

Laboratory

14
Servicing Equipments
Equipme To maintain

Lab

Rs.650

Mr.R.Ananthan

11/07/20
Shared

Assistant

DME

nts

Laboratory

14
Servicing Equipments
Equipme To maintain

Lab

Rs.650

Mr.U.Mohanraj

24/09/20
Shared

Assistant

DME

nts

Laboratory

14
Servicing Equipments

CNC-

Equipme

CNC -

nts

VMC

Servicing

Operator

Rs.650 Exclusi 03/11/20


Mr.P.Sathish

10th

VMC
0

ve

14

Operator

Taking care
Office
Ms.S.M.Kalaia

P.A to

rasi

HoD

Rs.650 Exclusi 03/11/20

of office
B.E

ve

Assistanc

14

work
e

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)

Qualified technical supporting staff are available for all the three labs as mentioned
in the previous table.
6.4.2 Incentives, skillupgrade, and professional advancement (5)
(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)
Incentives will be based on their effective & involved performance of the technicians.

177 | P a g e

The management allows the person to upgrade their skills as well as


higher studies by providing OD and other needs. They are also motivated
to attend technical seminars, workshops to upgrade their skill set.
7 Academic Support Units and TeachingLearning Process (75)
Students Admission
Admission intake (for information only)
(Instruction: The intake of the students during the last three years against the sanctioned capacity may be
reported here.)
2013
ITEM

2014 2015

2011

2010

2009

-2012

-2011

-2010

2012-2013
-2014

Sanctioned Intake
Strength in the program

240

180

120

60

60

60

237

182

123

59

56

60

NA

21

10

16

237

182

144

69

72

65

(N)
Number of total
admitted students in
first year minus
Number of students
migrated to other
programmes at the end
st
of 1 year (N1)
Number of laterally
admitted students in
nd

year in the same

batch (N2)
Number of total
admitted students in the
program (N1 + N2)

178 | P a g e

Admission quality (for information only)


Divide the total admitted ranks (or percentage marks) into five or a few more meaningful ranges
(Instruction: The admission quality of the students in terms of their ranks in the entrance examination may
be presented here.)
Tabular data for estimating student teacher ratio and faculty qualification for first year common courses)

Rank Range
Above 90
8190
7180
6170
5160

2013-

2012-

2014
94
36
38
8
6

2013
61
26
21
4
11

20142015
110
40
55
19
13

20112012

20102011

31
11
13
01
00

28
12
10
05
01

List of faculty members teaching first year courses:


(Instruction: The institution may list here the faculty members engaged in first year teaching along with
other relevant data.)

Highest

Distribution

Name of the faculty

Date of
Qualificatio Designation

Member

Department

of teaching

Joining
n

load
Asst.Professo

Mr.M.Ramesh Kumar

M.Phil.

17/09/2013

S&H

50

50

02/07/2008

S&H

100

01/06/2012

S&H

100

r
Asst.Professo
Mrs.Ruby Thomas

M.Phil.

Dr.M.Priya

Ph.D.,

179 | P a g e

r
Professor

Asst.Professo
Mrs.L.Sangeetha

M.Phil.

02/07/2012

S&H

100

24/08/2012

S&H

100

30/08/2012

S&H

100

25/06/2012

S&H

100

03/09/2007

S&H

100

02/09/2009

S&H

100

27/08/2012

S&H

100

26/08/2010

S&H

50

50

09/06/2008

S&H

50

50

19/06/2009

S&H

100

10/06/2013

S&H

100

12/06/2013

S&H

100

15/07/2013

S&H

100

05/07/2013

Mechanical

50

50

10/07/2013

Mechanical

50

50

08/07/2013

Mechanical

50

25

50

25

50

50

50

r
Asst.Professo
Mr. V. Sivakumar

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Mr. P. Chandra Sekar

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Mr.S.Vadivel

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Mrs.B.Yamini

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Dr. K. Murugavel

Ph.D.,
r
Asst.Professo

Ms. R. Sangeetha Rani

M.Phil.

Dr.Rosalia H. Bonjour

Ph.D.,

Mrs.Collin P Rayen

M.Phil.

r
Professor
Associate
Professor
Asst.Professo

Mrs.V. Hemalatha

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Dr. R. Arun Balaji

Ph.D.,
r
Asst.Professo

Mr.G.Babu.

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Mrs.C.SAVEETHA

M.Phil.
r
Asst.Professo

Mr.THILEEPAN S

M.Tech
r
Asst.Professo

Mr.Vijaya Rajan V

M.E
r
Asst.Professo

Mrs.RADHIKA C

M.E
r
Asst.Professo

Mr.BHARATHIRAJA.N

M.E

Computer
02/08/2010

r
Dr. S.Godfrey Winster
Mr.V. Perumal
180 | P a g e

Ph.D.,
M.E

Professor
Associate

Science
Computer
01/06/2009
09/06/2008

Science
Computer

Professor
Asst.Professo
Mr. B. SakthiSaravanan

M.E

Science
Information
10/11/2008

r
Asst.Professo
Mrs.M. Malathi

M.E

07/06/2012

M.E

03/06/2013

M.E

10/06/2013

Ph.D.,
subramaniyan
Mr.Mohana Prabu.M

50

50

50

50

50

Instrumentation
Electronics and

r
Associate

Dr.G.Gopala rama

50
Instrumentation
Electronics and

r
Asst.Professo
Mrs.N.Sangeetha

50

Technology
Electronics and

r
Asst.Professo
Mr.M.Arivalagan

50

Instrumentation
10/06/2009

Mechanical

50

25

03/09/2012

Mechanical

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

Professor
Asst.Professo
M.E
r
Electrical and
Associate

Mr.G.Maheswaran

M.E

05/10/2007

Electronics

Professor
Engineering
Electrical and
Asst.Professo
Mr.S. Joyal Isac

M.E

03/06/2013

Electronics

r
Engineering
Electronics and

Asst.Professo
Mrs.A.Hema Malini

M.E

23/06/2008
r

Mrs.S. Joshibha

Communication
Electrical and

Asst.Professo
M.E

Ponmalar

16/06/2010

Engineering
Computer

Asst.Professo
Mr.D.Ramalingam

Electronics

r
M.E

01/06/2012
r

Science
Electrical and

Asst.Professo
B.Pandyselvi

M.E

15/06/2013

Electronics

r
Engineering
7.1 Academic Support Units (35)
7.1.1 Assessment of First Year Student Teacher Ratio
(FYSTR) (10) Data for first year courses to calculate
Year

the FYSTR
No. of students(approved intake strength)

181 | P a g e

No. of faculty

FYSTR

Assessment=(10 x 15)/

members(considering
10))
fractional load)
2011
60

10

120

5.5

10

240

10

8
6
Average assessment

10

2012
2012
2013
2013
2014
2014-15

300

10

7.1.2 Assessment of Faculty Qualification Teaching First Year Common Courses (15) Institute Marks : 13.04
Assessment of qualification = 3 (5x + 3y + 2z0)/N,
where x + y + z0 N and z0 Z x = Number of faculty
members with Ph
y = Number of faculty members with
ME/MTech/NET Qualified/MPhil
z = Number of faculty members with
BE/BTech/MSc/MCA/MA
N = Number of faculty members needed for FYSTR of 25
Year
20112012
20122013
20132014

X Y
2 14
4 12
5 18

Z N
0 8
0 11
0 14

Assessment of faculty qualification


13.5
12.55
13.07

Average assessment

182 | P a g e

13.04

7.1.3 Basic science/engineering laboratories (adequacy of space, number of students per batch, quality and
availability of measuring instruments, laboratory manuals, list of experiments) (8)
(Instruction: The institution needs to mention the details for the basic science/engineering laboratories for
the first year courses. The descriptors as listed here are suggestive in nature.)
Laboratory

Space, number of

description

students

Quality of

Laboratory

instruments

manuals

Good

Available

Good

Available

Good

Available

Software Used Type of experiments


Welding,
Basic Machining
Sheet Metal Work,
Engineering
practices

Machine assembly
30 students

NIL

laboratory

practice,
Plumbing Works,
Buildings,
Gate calculation,
wiring
Volumetric
experiments,

Chemistry

74 * 30' , 30

Instrumentation
NIL

Lab

students

Technique ( potentio
meter, conducto
meter, PH)
aerial, Electronics

29 m * 8 m 30
Physics Lab

NIL
students

183 | P a g e

experiment

Microsoft word,
Windows 7 OS,
Micro Excel,
Computer

Package :
30 students

Practice lab

Microsoft

Good

Available

Good

Available

MSOffice,Turbo
Powerpoint, C
C

Computer

program
Drawing of curves

Aided

like parabola, spiral,

Engineering

30 students

AUTOCAD

involute using

Drawing

Bspline or cubic

Laboratory

spline

7.1.4 Language laboratory (2)


(Instruction: The institution may provide the details of the language laboratory. The descriptors as listed
here are not exhaustive).
Language

Space, number

Software

Quality of
Type of experiments

Laboratory

of students

Used

Guidance
instruments

Listening
comprehension,readin
g
comprehension,
Communication
speaking,
skills

20 * 18, 30 no of

Development

students

Globerina

Resume or report
preparation, letter

lab
writing, presentation
skills, soft skills,
group discussion,
interview skills

184 | P a g e

Good

Monitoring

7.2 Teaching Learning Process (40)


7.2.1 Tutorial classes to address student questions: size of tutorial classes, hours per subject given in the
timetable (5)
(Instruction: Here the institution may report the details of the tutorial classes that are being conducted on
various subjects and also state the impact of such tutorial classes).

Provision

of

tutorial

classes

timetable(Yes/No)
Tutorial sheets provided(Yes/No)
Tutorial classes taken by:

in Yes
Yes
Facu

lty
Number of tutorial classes per subject per 1
week:
Number of students per tutorial class:
60
Number of subjects with tutorials: 1st year........... 2nd year........... 3rd year........... 4th year...............
1 st year 6 2 nd Year 6 3 rd Year 6 4 th Year 6

7.2.2 Mentoring system to help at individual levels (5)


(Instruction: Here the institution may report the details of the mentoring system that has been developed
for the students for various purposes and also state the efficacy of such system).
Mentoring System
Type of Mentoring

Yes
Career
Advancem

Number of faculty mentors


Number of students per mentor
Frequency of meeting

ent
8
30
1/week

7.2.3 Feedback analysis and reward / corrective measures taken, if any (5)
185 | P a g e

(Instruction: The institution needs to design an effective feedback questionnaire. It needs to justify that the
feedback mechanism it has developed really helps in evaluating teaching and finally contributing to the
quality of teaching).
Feedback collected for all courses(Yes/No) Yes
Specify the feedback collection process
Feedback is collected thrice per semester as follows 1) Within 15 days of commencement of class 2) Middle
of the semester 3) End of the semester (Online feedback)
Percentage of students participating 95
Specify the feedback analysis process
Students are briefed about the feedback systems and also informed about the availability of Performa in
the department. All the students collect the form, fill it up and hand it over to the HOD. Class discussion,
speed of teaching, teachers contribution in improving the academic performance, teachers presence,
punctuality, awareness, issuing of study materials, books for reference, evaluated answer scripts and
adequate time for discussions in class. Based on this, the level of the metrics is assessed as Excellence,
Good, Average, Satisfactory and Poor. Hard Copy: Students are asked to give the hard copy of feedback
about the faculties immediately after 2025 days of the semester start. Specifying their names in the
feedback form is optional. They are asked to write a general feedback with the subject code mentioned in
the paper. Web based: At the end of the semester all the students are given a login link to choose the
semester and subjects which will be followed by a table of 10 items to be rated according to their
satisfaction in the individual subjects. This consolidated rating is kept for evaluation of the individual
faculties. This procedure is basically followed to fulfill the need of the students as well as to maintain the
ISO standards. Feedback is consolidated and if the standard is not satisfied it is informed to the concerned
staff by HOD. Staff has to confirm the improvement within the stipulated time period. The comments are
analyzed by the concerned HOD and are discussed with the concerned faculty individually. Suggestions
for improvement in teaching performance are given if required.

Basis of reward / corrective measures, if any

186 | P a g e

The following faculty members have got best teacher award from our institution. 1. Dr.V.Muthukumar
2.Mr. R.Adalarasan 3. Mr. S.D.sekar The following faculty members have produced 100 % result so they
got award from our institution. 1 . Dr.V.MUTHUKUMAR 2. Mr.R.Adalarasan 3. Dr.G.Manimaran 4.
Mr.M.Naresh Babu 5. Mr.N.Balaji 6. Mr. M.Santhanakumar 7.Ms. S.Sellakumar 8.Mr. V.Velmurugan
9.Mrs. Kalpana.M 10.Mrs. V.Subathra Devi
Number of corrective actions taken in the last three years

NIL

The feedback is collected through questionnaire, one for each category, namely alumni, parents and
industry. The procedure for collection of the feedback is highlighted below.

Feedback is obtained from alumni during alumni association meetings, alumni get together
and also during visit of alumni to the institution. Parents meeting is held at the beginning of
every academic year during which the parents express their difficulties and also give

suggestions for improvement of facilities in the college and hostel.


Feedbacks from employers/ Industries are obtained every year in a standard format through
questionnaire.

The comments of the above feedback are considered during the revision of curriculum, expanding the
laboratories, etc

7.2.4 Scope for selflearning (5)

187 | P a g e

(Instruction: The institution needs to specify the scope for selflearning / learning beyond syllabus and
creation of facilities for selflearning / learning beyond syllabus.)

Selflearning facilities such as seminar arrangements, miniprojects, assignments, etc., are provided
in the students. For this, books, periodicals, magazines, video films, etc., are made available to the
students to learn by themselves and acquire necessary knowledge.
Students are encouraged to give seminars on topics beyond syllabi.
Students work on mini projects, the topics of which are beyond the syllabi, and collect information by
selflearning and complete the project.
In all subjects, assignments / presentation are compulsory and due weightage is given to assignment /
presentations in the continuous assessment.
Offered WiFi facility towards promotion and motivation students for selflearning.
Specify selflearning mode and modules NPTEL and 3DM
7.2.5 Generation of selflearning facilities, and availability of materials for learning beyond syllabus (5)
(Instruction: The institution needs to specify the facilities for selflearning / learning beyond syllabus.)

Selflearning facilities such as seminar arrangements, miniprojects, assignments, etc., are provided
in the students. For this, books, periodicals, magazines, video films, etc., are made available to the
students to learn by themselves and acquire necessary knowledge.
Students are encouraged to give seminars on topics beyond syllabi.
Students work on mini projects, the topics of which are beyond the syllabi, and collect information by
selflearning and complete the project.
In all subjects, assignments / presentation are compulsory and due weightage is given to assignment /
presentations in the continuous assessment.
Offered WiFi facility towards promotion and
motivation students for selflearning. Specify selflearning mode and modules NPTEL and 3DM
188 | P a g e

The possibilities of selflearning and that too beyond syllabus, the motivation of the students, etc., are
described below. The library is open up to 6 pm. The provision has been made to stock materials of interest
in the library for the benefit of students. They are encouraged by faculty to visit library regularly and make
best use of them. Further, stands have been provided in the library to display popular newspapers, so that
students on seeing them in their close vicinity are tempted to browse through them during break hours.
Students are motivated to participate and to present papers in conferences organised by other
colleges.
Industry executives give special lectures on specific topics which motivate students in self

learning.
Students are motivated to participate in the competitions organized by industries.
Value added courses are conducted on various topics during the extended weekdays.
Industrial visits help the students to learn by themselves.
InPlant Training exposed the students to learning by themselves many new areas beyond the
syllabi.

Robotics, Mat lab, Oracle, Campus Connect, Skilledge, British English Curriculum, SIMULIA, E
Cell.
Students are advised to write the SAE test, GATE, AMCAT which makes them eligible for IT and
Core companies.
Students are motivated to conduct a national level technical symposium every year (DRESTEIN Dream,
Contest, Compete, and Win) with all the events organized by them.
The following flexibility features are there in the undergraduate engineering curriculum for the benefit
of students with varied interests, aspirations, and goals.

Electives are provided to the students in different subjects and selected as per ones own liking and
interest.
Student can choose a maximum of two electives per subject.

189 | P a g e

In the senior classes, the students are expected to choose advanced topics related to the subject
matter of each subject and make a presentation of their learning which enhance the selflearning
and communication skills.
In order to get exposed to the industrial practices a series of lectures by industry experts are
arranged.
7.2.6 Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell (5)
(Instruction: The institution may specify the facility and management to facilitate career guidance
including counselling for higher studies, industry interaction for training/internship/placement,
Entrepreneurship cell and incubation facility and impact of such systems)

Provision has been made in the time table in the eighth semester, titled as Comprehensive Hour in which
objective type questions are distributed to the students and they are encouraged to answer them. This is
aimed as preparation for embarking upon higher studies. Whenever students approach any faculty with a
specific request for advice on higher studies they are guided appropriately. Further details are given below.
Information on further studies, competitive exams are posted on college portal.
Senior faculty members of the department provides recommendation letters to deserving
meritorious students of the respective department who get admission in top foreign universities
and the details are available in the department.
In some departments around 10% of the students go for higher studies with one or two years of
industrial experience.
We invite alumni to campus to participate in discussions on career opportunities and postgraduate study, and
we also manage a network of alumni career advisors who have agreed to interact with the students regularly.
A Placement and Training cell is available in the campus to guide the students in seeking jobs in various
industries situated across the country. The details about this arrangement and its activities are given below
This Placement cell functions under the guidance of Principal, placement officer and a placement
coordinator and coordinates with various industries, schedules placement activities and also
arranges for industrial training for students during vacations.
190 | P a g e

Students are trained on personality development and improvement in


effective communication by specialist in the field. Almost 80% of the
eligible students are placed through Placement and Training cell at the end
of their course.

Entrepreneurship Cell is available by which students are encouraged to submit their innovative
research or entrepreneurship proposals. SEC has launched a committee named as Ecell to impart
entrepreneurship skills on its students. The below stated are entrepreneurship initiatives and events
conducted, 1. On the month of AUGUST 2010 the student members of ecell conducted events such
as word hunt and quiz for the college students
2. Shops were also launched by ecell SEC members.
The Entrepreneurship Cell activities encompass all the eight departments in the Institute.
Entrepreneurship awareness camps are held regularly.
The students projects support schemes are available.
Efforts &Achievements:
1. E week was conducted on FEB2011, the following are the activities done on Eweek
a. Ecell student members of SEC conducted marathon to preach entrepreneurship.
b. Ecell student members gave lecture to Thiru.V.KA school students on entrepreneuring skills.
c. Sa..VE..mall was organized by ecell members, running food courts.
d. Guest lecture on entrepreneurship was given by Mr.KarthikeyanChairman of 2019.com
e. A 2day workshop was attended by SEC volunteers at SSN college of Engg on entrepreneurship.
f. Eday celebrations at MOP vaishnova was attended by SEC students followed by winning certificates
& prices.

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g. E week has been celebrated and the college has won the overall National Entrepreneur Network
(NEN) Championship award in Tamilnadu.
7.2.7 Cocurricular and Extracurricular Activities (5)
(Instruction: The institution may specify the Cocurricular and extracurricular activities, e.g., NCC/NSS,
cultural activities, etc)

The College has a Special Programme Officer who was trained at the Madras School of Social Work. The
main objective of the NSS is to "Serve the downtrodden in the society" and "Personality Development
through Community Service"
The Following activities are conducted in regular activities

1. Independence Day Celebration


2. General Orientation Program
3. Library Cleaning Program
4. Road Safety Program
5. NSS Day Celebration @ Madras School of Social Work
6. Visit to children home
7. National Educational Day Celebration
8. Awareness on Transgender
9. Guest Lecture on Stress Relief
10. Republic Day Celebration
11. Tree Plantation
12. Attend the Youth Health Mela @ Valluvar Kottam
13. NSS Day Celebration @ Womens Christian College Chennai
14. Campus Cleaning
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15. Blood Donation Camp


16. Awareness on Eco friendly life

The following activites are conducted during the special camp


1. Play Ground Marking and Cleaning for School Children
2. Tree Plantation Conducted for the Village Peoples
3. Awareness on Power Saving and Need of Blood donation
4. Conuct medical camp for Village people
5. Sports activities for School Children Cultural
6. Sports activities for Men and Women

Different clubs such as Achievers Club, SAE Club, Robotics club, British English Curriculum club etc., are
available for the students to enroll themselves and to participate in different extracurricular activities.
7.2.8 Games and Sports facilities, and qualified sports instructors (5)
(Instruction: The institution may specify the facilities available and their usage in brief)

The Institution is playing a paramount role in fostering the importance of Sports and Games to the
students. The college is consistently organizing various indoor and outdoor Sports and Games to
bring sportsmen from all institutions and stands apart with its unique success in CoCurricular
activities.
o A striking feature of the college sports activities is exclusive ground for Outdoor Games like
Cricket, Football, Hockey, Hand ball, Basketball, Ball Badminton, Kabadi, CoCo, Tennis etc.
are being trained in our college playground.

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There are many well trained players actively participating in all sports and games. Faculty members also get
themselves involved in various Sports and Games every year. Every year a Grand Sports Day Celebration is
being conducted to encourage the students. Our Institution plays a vital role in nurturing the students in
Academics and Extra Curricular activities.

SPORTS EVENT PARTICIPATED / PRIZES WON Details


Our college entered the 2nd round in Anna University Inter zonal khokho Tournament on 6th, 7th
August 2010 at SEC,Mr.Rajesh of MECH III year was the captain of team
Mr.Venkatesh,Mr.vinothkumar of MECH IV year combined football team won silver medal in
Anna University Interzonal Tournament on 28 th,29th August 2011 at V.R.S Engineering college
villupuram.
Mr.Visaagan MECH III year of won SILVER medal in 400*100M Relay event in state level
Athletic meet at sankara university kancheepuram on 8th march 2011.
Our college students Mr.Vignesh , 1st year Mechnical won the Bronze medal in 400m, and
Mr.Saravanan won the Bronze Medal in long jump in state level athletic meet .The events organized
by the chengalpattu Medical College on 8th SEP 2011.
Our college students Mr.Venkatesh, Mr.Vinoth kumar of Mech final year were part of the Anna
University combined Foot Ball team and won silver medal at Anna University Interzonal Foot ball
Tournament held on 28th and 29th AUGUST 2011 at V.R.S Engg.College, Villupuram.
The events were Athletics, 400mV.vignesh from MechII year won Gold medal, and also won Bronze
medal for 100m, 1500m Mr.sabarinathan from MechIII year won bronze medal, 400m . Totally 10
students participated and 2 Gold medals, 2 silver medals, 1 bronze medal were won by our
students.Team members: Mr.vigneshMechII, Mr.VishalMechII,, Mr.sibirajMechII,Mr.Mugamathu
fahimII

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kabaddi tournament held on 20th ,21st feb 2013, organized by, Jaimathaajee College of Engineering at
kanchepuram Team members: Mr.pozhil,Mech II,Mr,saparinathan,Mech III,Mr.srimugavannan
MechII
Our college kabaddi (men) team got won 3rd place in Jaimathaajee Team members: Mr.vignesh MechII,Mr.selvaganeshMechI

8 Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources (75)


8.1 Campus Infrastructure and Facility (10)
8.1.1 Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (4)

(Instruction: Specify distinct features)

Facilities available:
RO Plant: Maintained by Saveetha maintenance department
Sewage Treatment Plant: Maintained by Saveetha maintenance department
Genset: 750KVA (500KVA + 250KVA) Maintained
by Saveetha maintenance department Intercom:
Intercom

connections

maintained

by

college

intercom centre Air conditioners: Maintained by


Saveetha maintenance department.
Distinct Features:
Maintenance cell is in place to take care of civil,
electrical and furniture routine Checkups and repairs.
Schedule of routine inspection and
checkups is prepared. Central
complaint eportal is available for
maintenance Minor repairs are
carried out by maintenance staff.
Major repairs are outsourced.
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Maintenance cell meets once in a month to take


review and discuss any major problems.
Routine cleaning of premises including toilet blocks.
Routine cleaning of water tanks, coolers and filters is carried out.
8.1.2 Hostel (boys and girls), transportation facility, and canteen (2)
Hostels

No. of students accommodated

No. of rooms

Hostel for Boys:


Hostel for Girls:

262

480

185

275

Availability of transport facilities:


Yes

Availability of canteen facilities: Yes


8.1.3 Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water, and security (4)
(Instruction: Specify the details of installed capacity, quality, availability, etc.)

Main Power Supply:

High tension supply with Max. Demand 500 KVA


Stand by Power Supply:
Sl.No
1
2
3
4

Equipment
Capacity
Generator
500 KVA + 250KVA
UPS
10 KVA
UPS for Computer labs 20 KVA
UPS
0.5 KVA

Nos.
2
2
14
20

Telecom: BSNL
4lines

Water

supply:
Raw Water: 1,40,000 Litre storage sump feed from 3Nos of bore well
Drinking water: 750LPH RO plant (for engineering hostel)

8.2 Organization, Governance, and Transparency (10)


8.2.1 Governing body, administrative setup, and functions of various bodies (2)
(Instruction: List the governing, senate, and all other academic and administrative bodies their
memberships, functions, and responsibilities frequency of the meetings and attendance therein, in a
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tabular form. A few sample minutes of the meetings and action taken reports should be annexed.) A brief
description of the administrative structure and responsibilities are given below.

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PRESIDENT CHAIRMAN
The Institute shall have a President Chairman who by virtue of his office will be the Head of the Institute
and shall when present, preside over the convocations of the Institute. The power is conferred on the
President to nominate persons to authorities the PresidentChairman shall to the extent necessary nominate
persons to represent the various interests for the furtherance of the objectives of the Institute.

DIRECTOR
The Director shall be whole time officer of the Institute and shall be appointed by the President
i. The Director shall be Principal and Executive Officer of the Institute and shall exercise general
supervision or control over the affairs of the Institute and implement the decisions of the Institute.
ii. The Director may, if he is of the opinion that immediate action is called for on any matter / exercise any
power conferred upon any authority of the Institute under the Rules and Regulations / Bye laws, take
such action and shall report to the concerned authority on the action taken by him on such matters.
Provided that if the authority concerned as mentioned in clause
(ii) above is of the opinion that such action ought not to have been taken, it may refer the matter
to the President whose decision thereon shall be final.
Provided further that any person in the service of the Institute is aggrieved by the actions taken
by the Director under the said clause, he shall have the right to appeal against such action to the
Board of Management within 30 days from the date on which such actions is communicated to
him and there upon the Board of Management may confirm, modify or reverse the action taken
by the Director.
iii. The Director, unless otherwise provided, shall be the Exofficio Chairman of the Board of Management,
the Academic Council and the Finance Committee.
iv. It shall be the duty of the Director to ensure that the Memorandum of Association, the Rules, Byelaws
and Regulations of the Institute are clearly observed and implemented and he shall have all the
necessary powers in this regard.
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v. The Director shall exercise general control over the affairs of the Institute and shall be mainly
responsible for implementation of the decisions of the various authorities of the institute.
vi. All powers relating to the proper maintenance and discipline of the Institute shall be vested in the
Director. vii. The Director shall exercise such other powers and perform such other functions as may be
prescribed by the Rules and Byelaws and Regulations. viii. The Director shall exercise all other powers
as may be delegated to him by the Board of Management. ix. The Director shall have the power to re delegate some of his powers to any of his subordinate officers with concurrence and approval of the
Board of Management.
x. The Director shall have the power to convene or cause to be convened meetings of the various bodies of
the Institute.

PRINCIPAL
i.

The Principal of the College or any other designation as given by the Byelaws.

ii.

Shall be responsible to the Director for the academic activities.

iii.

Shall be responsible for the inter campus collaboration and coordination of the academic
functions, maintaining and updating the academic standards, constant review of the
educational programmes and progress and for the due observance of the statutes and
Regulations relating to the Faculty.

iv.

Shall formulate and present policies to the Board of Studies for the

v.
vi.

consideration on matters relating to the Faculty.


Shall preside over the Board of studies of the Faculty.
Shall be responsible for the regularity and attendance of the students. vii. Shall be responsible
for maintaining the discipline of the students in the College. In this regard, he shall coordinate
with the college disciplinary team.

vii.

Shall conduct periodical meetings with the Faculty to review the progress of their work, to discuss
their problems and to suggest the possible solutions.

viii.
ix.

Shall coordinate with the Department of Examinations in the conduct of the examinations.
Shall be the Exofficio chief warden of the Hostels to look after administration of the Hostels and the
needs of the residents.

200 | P a g e

DEAN
i.

Functions as principal in the absence of Principal.

ii.

Responsible independently for the duties delegated by the principal

iii.

Carries out operational activities under the directions of the principal iv. Inputs regarding the
updation/revision/introduction of new course from the Department will be passed to the principal of the
college

iv.

Faculty programmes/recruitment and internal promotions recommendations are forwarded to


the principal through the HOD of the department.

v.

. Budgetary requirements of the Departments will be forwarded to the principal through the
Department HOD

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS (HODs) AND THEIR FUNCTIONS


i. Each Department shall have a head who will be the senior most Professor of the Department.
ii. The Head shall be selected in accordance with the rules and regulations by the Selection Committee.
iii. The Heads shall be responsible to the principal of the College and Dean in discharging their duties and
functions. iv. Shall prescribe the work to the staff members of the Department as per the norms and
regulations.
v. Shall be the authority for sanctioning leave etc. to the members of staff of the Department.
vi. Shall conduct the model examination periodically. vii. Shall consolidate the internal
assessment marks of the students of the Department and communicate them to the department
of Examinations. viii. Shall conduct, review meetings with the staff of the Department to
assess the work done.
ix. Shall be responsible for maintaining the discipline and standard of the Department.
x. Shall be responsible for improving the results of the Department.
Authority and Responsibility of Faculty
Roles of the faculty

201 | P a g e

Faculty in a department is called upon


to perform following roles:
i. Teacher
ii. Academic administrator
iii. General administrator
iv. Researcher
As a teacher the faculty prepares the lesson plan, the course file, handles the classes and carries out the
prescribed assessment process.
As an academic administrator, the faculty carries out the works related to faculty development programs,
preparation of reports for specific tasks. Depending on his/her seniority and qualification he acts as
convener/coordinator for faculty development programs.
As a general administrator, the faculty acts as class in charges, counselors, Lab in charges, Class committee
chairman/members, Time table committee members and as members of various taskspecific committees.
As a researcher, the faculty member through guiding project works or continuing with work already done
during his/her postgraduate project work, carry out academic research and publish/present papers. Further
the faculty initiates proposals for sponsored research. Some faculty members also carry out consultancy
work making use of available facilities.
In order to ensure consistency in the teaching learning process every faculty member prepares a course file
on the course allotted to him/her for handling. The course file contains a lesson plan, notes on lesson,
assignment/test/model examination questions and the scheme of evaluation, key to the university
examination question paper, previous year questions asked in the end semester university examination.
This course file is the evidence to the preparedness and competence of the faculty member. Further the
faculty member should maintain the attendance and assessment register wherein he/she records the
presence/absence of the students in the classes handled by him/her. This register also contains information
on the students performance in the tests, assignments and model examinations. There is a provision in the
register to record the attentiveness of the student in the classes which is measured by the quality of notes
being taken by the students during the lecture.
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The head of the department or the designated senior faculty visits the classes when a class is in
progress especially if the faculty member happens to be an inexperienced one , observes the way the class is
handled and offers suggestions for improvement (in private).
At the end of the semester the students grade the faculty members who have handled classes for them in a
prescribed format which is evaluated through a software and assigned an overall grading to the faculty. This
assessment of faculty by the students enables he/she to weed out shortcomings in his/her teaching.

8.2.2 Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc (2)
(Instruction: List the published rules, policies, and procedures year of publications and state the extent of
awareness among the employees/students. Also comment on its availability on Internet, etc.)

1. The working hour for the staff members is from 8.15 a.m. to 3.40 p.m.
2. However, the staff members can put the attendance in the Biometric machine upto 8.30 a.m.
3. Staff members are eligible for two late comings in a month, i.e., upto 8.40 a.m.
4. Staff members are eligible for two onehour permission in a month, either from 8.30 a.m. to 9.30 a.m.
in the morning or 2.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. in the evening.
5. Staff members, who are coming after 8.30 a.m., should sign in the register at the security gate.
6. Halfaday leaves means either from 8.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. or from 12.00 Noon to 3.30 p.m.
7. Staff members should mark the attendance in the Biometric machine, whenever they come in and go
out of the campus.
8. Staff members should get the gate pass, when they avail halfaday leave / one hour permission in the
afternoon session and submit the gate pass in security.
9. DRESS CODE: All the male staff members should come in formal dress with shoes and tie. All the
female staff members should come in sarees only. All the staff members should wear their ID cards.
10. Staff members can use the cell phones only inside the staff room. Staff members should not use cell
phones in the corridors, class rooms, laboratories, etc.
11. A Class advisor shall be allotted to a particular class. He / She should maintain the full details of the
students.
203 | P a g e

12. The Class advisor should update the students address, whenever it changes.
13. The Class advisor shall keep the academic records of students and the same shall be handed over to
HOD whenever required.
14. The Class advisor should contact the parents periodically to inform about the students attendance and
performance.
15. Staff members should be present at the respective classes five minutes before the scheduled time.
16. Those in the class should come out only when the staff member for the next period reaches the class
room.
17. If the staff for the next period does not turn up to the class, class representative should be sent to the
class advisor for alternate arrangements.
18. At any point of time, the staff member should not leave the students alone in the class during the
working hours.
19. Those taking the first hour should monitor the students for proper dress code and ID and they should
regulate the previous day absentees.
20. Class advisor should verify every day whether the first hour class is engaged duly or not. In their
absence, HODs should discharge this duty.
21. The corrected answer sheets and marks list should be handed over to the class advisor within 2 days
after the test.
22. The class advisor should submit the consolidated marks sheet to HOD / Principal within 2 days after
the last examination.
23. The details of students performance in the respective tests and cumulative attendance should be sent
to their Parents within one week after examinations.
24. Detailed lesson plan should be given to the students in the first class of the course.
25. Log books should be verified by the HODs after the tests and examinations. HODs should get
signature from the Principal.
26. Students should not be sent out for drinking water, bringing chalk, etc. during class time.
27. The last hour class should be left only after 3.30 p.m.

204 | P a g e

28. Inside the bus, the staff members should verify whether the students are coming with proper dress.
They are also responsible for the general behavior of the students in the bus.
29. When a staff member takes leave, he / she should make alternate arrangement only with the staff
taking for the particular class.
30. All the staff should complete the whole syllabus before the stipulated time.
31. All staff members should practice and maintain ISO 9001:2000 standards.
32. When the staff members apply for the leave/permission over phone due to unavoidable
circumstances, they should inform before 8.30 a.m. to their respective
33. HODs.

The rules and policies regarding recruitment and promotion are as per AICTE and University norms.
The AICTE pay scales are implemented.
Additional increments are given to staff members who excel in academics and

research.

Recruitment Procedure:
The advertisement is published in leading newspapers.
Selection committee duly appointed by management conducts the interviews.
The eligible and selected candidate names are
recommended for approval. The appointment
is done after the due approval from the
management.
8.2.3 Decentralization in working including delegation of financial power and grievance redressal system (3)

205 | P a g e

(Instruction: List the names of the faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various
responsibilities. Specify the mechanism and composition of grievance redressal system, including faculty
association, staff union, if any.)

The following different committees are formed for decentralization of various works in the college.
Planning and monitoring committee:

Members
Dr. R. Venkatasamy
Prof. R.

Profession
Principal, SEC

Designation
Chairman

DeanICT, SEC

Member

FacultyResearch & Development

Member

FacultyResearch & Development

Member

Products President

Member

Dheenadayalu
Dr. A.R.
Lakshmanan
Dr. P.Valarmathie
Mr. C. V. Karthick
Narayanan
Group of Companies
Mr. V. Nagendran

Proprietor

Member

Kingsway
Arct. J. Raja Singh
Consultants

Roles and Responsibilities:

To review the academic and other related activities of the college.


To review the students and faculty development programs.

206 | P a g e

Member

To visualize and formulate perspective plans for the development and growth of the college.
To formulate Master Plan for campus development, facilitating implementation of the provision of the

perspective plan.
To draw new schemes of development for the college.
To plan for resource mobilization through industry interaction, consultancy and extramural funding.
To promote research and extension activities in the college campus.
To promote teaching innovations and student placement programs.

To plan for sustaining the quality of education, quality improvement and accreditation of the college.

To recommend schemes to promote participation of academic departments in


Community development activities in the region.

To consider such other activities for furtherance of academic excellence.

Discipline and Welfare Committee:


S.No

Name

Category
Coordinato

1.

Dr. R. Ramesh (ECE)


r
Dr. K.N. Marimuthu

2.
3.

Member
(Chemistry)
Mr. A. Vijayaraj (IT)
Mr. S. Godfrey

4.

Member
Member

Winster (CSE)
Ms. K. Sangeetha
5.

Member
(CSE)
Ms. C. Sheeba Joice

6.

Member
(ECE)
Ms. Joshiba

7.

Member
Ponmalar (EEE)
Mr. M. Naresh Babu

8.

Member
(Mech)
Ms. G. Geetha

9.

Member
(Maths)
Ms. Michael Maria

10.
11.

207 | P a g e

Member
Dhas (MBA)
Ms. G. Gayathri (MCA)

Member

Roles and Responsibilities:

To examine / inquire and recommend punishments / remedial measure in the cases of:

Malpractices in examinations

Indiscipline in the college campus and hostel premises.

Complaints of ragging

Complaints of eveteasing and harassment of weaker


sections

Any other activity that may damage the discipline


and harmony of the college

To visit periodically the campus of the college,


including the hostels to

To recommend improvements in amenities and maintenance of students facilities.

Grievance redressal committee:


No
1.

Name

Category

Ms. Monica P.Suresh

Phone no.

E.Mail ID

9444554628

monicasrsh@yahoo.co.in

9940682201

panchayat@yahoo.com

Chairman
Mr. R. Elango

Social

2.
Activist
3.

Dr. P. Raj Kumar

Member

9841675969

raniha@gmail.com

4.

Dr. P. Valarmathi

Member

9962786766

Valarmathi_p@rediffmail.com

5.

Dr. P. Latha

Member

9551919425

Kr_lat@yahoo.com

6.

Ms. J. Jayalakshmi

Member

9003060702

jjayamail@yahoo.com

7.

Mr. R. Adalarasan

Member

9444108703

adalnol@yahoo.co.in

8.

Ms. S. Bharathi

Member

9444823039

bharathimuhesh@gmail.com
anandanworld@gmail.com

Mr. Anandan
9.

Member
Viswanathan

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9710424424

Vhema_vengl@yahoo.co.in
10.

Ms. V. Hemalatha

Member

8124600415

Member

9710782995

merlininbamalar@yahoo.com

Ms. T. Merlin
11.
Inbamalar
12.

.Mr. M. Naveen Kumar

Member

8939199504

naveenzion@gmail.com

13.

Mr. S. Ilavarasan

Member

9894514170

Ilavarasan.sargunan@gmail.com

14.

Mr. S. Sellakumar

Member

9486932452

Sellakumar.s@gmail.com
M_svelu1946@yahoo.co.in

15.

.Prof. M. Singaaravelu

Member

9840300108

16.

Ms. C. Priya

Member

9841738106

Pri.gcbabu@gmail.com
praveenkumarsunil@yahoo.com
17.

Mr. S. Praveen Kumar

Member

9894921193

Roles and Responsibilities:

Student Grievance Redressal Committee shall hear complaints and

appeals arising from the policies on: Evaluation and assessment


Academic programs
Student progress
Appeals arising from higher degree research studies.
Student admission Breaches of academic integrity Problems arising in the context of their
association with the institute, including those involving faculty misconduct in an instructional
setting Administrative operations or decisions relating to academic matters. Other policies, not
listed above, which provide for scope to the Grievance Appeals Committee.

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Jurisdiction: The committee is charged with hearing those student grievances


related to faculty misconduct in the performance of his or her duties in an
instructional setting. It should be understood, however, that certain cases do
not fall

under the jurisdiction GAC, but are subject to special

investigatory Procedures:

Cases involving sexual harassment or sexual misconduct cases involving


discrimination on the basis of race, color, age, national origin, religion,
gender, sexual orientation, disability, or any other protected status and cases
involving allegations of fraud or plagiarism in research.

The grievance once received, the convener shall be responsible for the
distribution of a copy of the grievance to the other members of the Grievance
Appeal Committee.

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Asst.Prof(OG)/Mech.
Mr. S. Chandramouli

12
13
14

9789815363

Asst.Prof (OG)/MBA
Mr. S.Sella Kumar

9486932452

Asst.Prof (OG)/ Mech.


Ms. Aruna Devi

9789244094

Asst.Prof (OG)/ CSE.

Member / Vigilance Squad


Member / Vigilance Squad
Boys Hostel Warden
Member / Vigilance Squad
Girls Hostel Warden

Roles and Responsibilities:

Goal: Ragging of any kind is declared as a criminal offence and is strictly

banned in the campus, hostels as per Supreme Court directions.


Ragging need to be perceived as failure to inculcate human values.

To enquire about complaints of ragging and give punishment


as per guidelines issued by Govt. authorities. To visit
periodically canteens, hostels etc.to see if there is any
harassment of juniors / other students

Examination Cell
Name of the Staff

Department

Mr. V.Loganathan

Assistant Professor

(SG)/ MCA

Mr.J.Anish Kumar

Assistant Professor

(SG)/EEE

Mr.N.Bharathiraja

Assistant Professor

(OG)/CSE

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Mr.M.Praveen

Assistant

Professor
-

Ms.V.N.Jayamani

(OG)/ECE

Assistant Professor

(OG)/Mathematics

Roles and Responsibilities:

To conduct University Theory and Practical Examinations,


Internal and Model Examinations for the students.

To Monitor and Co ordinate the Question paper settings,


Evaluation process and Result analysis

To maintain the records and correspondence with university.

Research Committee:
Name of the Staff
Prof. B K Gnanavel
Dr.Alex Noel
Mr. A. Arun
Mr. K. Sureshkumar
Ms. B.Pandyselvi
Ms. Kanchana
Mr. N. Balaji
Ms. M. Nagalatha
Dr. K. Murugavel

Designation
Professor/Mech.
Associate Prof/ECE
Associate Professor/ECE
Assistant Professor (SG)/IT
Assistant Professor (SG)/EEE
Assistant Professor (SG)/EEE
Assistant Professor (SG)/Mech
Assistant Professor (SG)/MBA
Assistant Professor (OG)/Physics

Category
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member

Roles and Responsibilities:

To Involve in Research and Development activities and provide guidelines for the Ph.D candidates.
To Develop and coordinate strategies for maximizing the facultys success in gaining external

research funding.
To organize programs for students from various national and international research
institutes to provide an exposure and guide them in doing their projects.

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To encourage and motivate the faculty members in various research and development activities.

Placement Committee:
Name of the Staff

Designation

Category

Prof. A.Gandhi

Professor&Head/MBA

Institute Industry Coordinator,

Mr. S.Sasikumar
Mr. R. Senthil Kumar
Mr. K. Sharath Kumar
Mr. G. Manimaran
Mr. N. Velmurugan
Mr. D. Reethish

Associate Professor/CSE
Associate Professor/EEE
Associate Professor/IT
Associate Professor/Mech
Assistant Professor (SG)/MCA
Assistant Professor (SG)/CSE

Head Placement, Training


Member
Member
Member
Member
Member
Member

Mr. M. Prakash

Assistant Professor (OG)/CSE

Member

Mr. S.Praveen Kumar


Mr. A. Nandhini

Assistant Professor (OG)/ECE


Assistant Professor (OG)/ECE

Member
Member

Mr. A. Anupama Juliet

Assistant Professor(OG)/MBA

Member

Roles and Responsibilities:

To maintain the data base of final year.

213 | P a g e

News Letter Committee


Synapse (Special Course)
National Service Scheme / Youth Red Cross / Red Ribbon Club
Infosys Campus connect (Foundation Courses)
Infosys Campus Connect (Soft Skill)
Alumni Association
ROBOTICS Club
Achievers Club
ISTE Chapter
CSIStudents Chapter
Microsoft IT Academy

IEEE Chapter

The Principal will take the final decision based on the recommendation of above committee members
whenever issue arises

8.2.4 Transparency and availability of correct/unambiguous information (3)


(Instruction: Availability and dissemination of information through the Internet. Information provisioning
in accordance with the Right to Information Act, 2005).

YES, Available in intranet

8.3 Budget Allocation, Utilisation, and Public Accounting (10)


Summary of current financial years budget and the actual expenditure incurred
(exclusively for the institution) for three previous financial years.
(Instruction: The preceding list of items is not exhaustive. One may add other relevant items if applicable.)
Budgeted in

Expenses in

Expenses in

Expenses in

20132014
400
30
70
10

20132014
350
20
60.12
9.8

20122013
331.52
19.55
58.67
8.8

20112012
518.87
14.15
57.49
22.05

Item
Infrastructure builtup
Library
Laboratory equipment
Laboratory consumables
214 | P a g e

Teaching and nonteaching


staff salary
R&D
Training and Travel
Hostel &Service
Student activities
Miscellaneous Expenses
Total

1000

999.50

999.42

610.73

22
6
400
50
30
2018

20.28
5.15
380.12
50
27.35
1922.32

22.35
4.69
374.36
50.28
27.35
1896.99

20
13.78
367.65
5.45
26.7
1656.87

8.3.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (4)


(Instruction: Here the institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over the years was adequate.)

Budget allocated was adequate since the budget has been prepared according to the last years budget and
actual expenditures incurred and the cost of the budgeted items during the Current Financial Year.
8.3.2 Utilisation of allocated funds (5)
(Instruction: Here the institution needs to state how the budget was utilised during the last three years.)

Every financial year i.e., 1st April of the current year to the 31st March of the succeeding year, the budgetary
requirements are projected. The budget is prepared based on the followings major heads.
1. New lab equipment
2. Software acquisition/ updating
3. Hardware requirements
4. Library book purchase
5. Consumables
6. Equipment maintenance
215 | P a g e

7. Conduct of faculty development programs


8. Infrastructure for new programs/courses
9. Expenditure to be incurred by faculty for attending conferences, workshops etc., for presenting papers
in conferences and for publishing papers in journals.
10. Allocation for research projects
To fund the abovementioned requirements, provision is made in the program budget. The budget is initiated
at the department level and sent to the Principal for further scrutiny and approval. The process may also
involve, the Director further interacting with the Principal and the HOD and effecting necessary changes in
the requirement before final approval.

8.3.3 Availability of the audited statements on the institutes website (1)


(Instruction: Here the institution needs to state whether the audited statements are available on its website.)

Yes, It is available college website


8.4 Programme Specific Budget Allocation, Utilization (10)
Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1
and CFYm2 (exclusively for this programme in the department):
Items

Budgeted in
CFY
2015-2016

Budgeted in
CFY
2014-2015

Actual
expenses in
CFY
2014-2015

Budgeted in
CFYm1
2013-2014

Actual
Expenses
in CFYm1
2013-2014

Laboratory
equipments

2,06,44,250/
-

59,55,000/-

36,50,145/-

1,26,11,350/-

69,12,599/-

Software

15,00,000/-

9,02,000/-

4,50,464/-

37,00,000/-

6,45,015/-

Laboratory
consumables

3,17,671/-

2,74,500/-

79,620/-

2,09,200/-

29,000/-

Maintenance &
spares

4,93,500/-

8,67,000/-

1,80,100/-

4,45,500/-

35,298/-

Training and
travel

1,00,000/-

6,00,000/-

76,000/-

40,000/-

10,000/-

216 | P a g e

Miscellaneous
expenses

2,06,000/-

13,00,000/-

9,40,500/-

1,00,000/-

75,500/-

Total

2,32,61,421/
-

98,98,500/-

53,76,829/-

1,71,06,050/-

77,07,415/-

8.4.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (5)


(Instruction: Here the institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over the years was adequate.)

Budget allocated was adequate since the budget has been prepared according to the last years budget and
actual expenditures incurred and the cost of the budgeted items during the Current Financial Year.

8.4.2 Utilisation of allocated funds (5)


(Instruction: Here the institution needs to state how the budget was utilized during the last three years.)

Every financial year i.e., 1st April of the current year to the 31st March of the succeeding year, the budgetary
requirements are projected. The budget is prepared based on the followings major heads.
1. New lab equipment
2. Software acquisition/ updating
3. Hardware requirements
4. Library book purchase
5. Consumables
6. Equipment maintenance
7. Conduct of faculty development programs
8. Infrastructure for new programs/courses
9. Expenditure to be incurred by faculty for attending conferences, workshops etc., for presenting papers
in conferences and for publishing papers in journals.
10. Allocation for research projects
To fund the abovementioned requirements, provision is made in the program budget. The budget is
initiated at the department level and sent to the principal for further scrutiny and approval. The process
217 | P a g e

may also involve, the Director further interacting with the principal and the HOD and effecting necessary
changes in the requirement before final approval.

8.5 Library (20)


8.5.1 Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a qualified librarian and other staff,
library automation,

online access, networking, etc (5)


(Instruction: Provide information on the following
items).
Library Services
Carpet area of library (in m2)
Reading space (in m2)
Number of seats in reading space
Number of users (issue book) per day
Number of users (reading space) per day

Yes
1200
400
120
100
150
a) During working day, b) weekend and c)

Timings: During working day, weekend, and


vacation a) 8.00am to 6.00pm b)
vacation
8.00am to 4.00pm c) 8.0
Number of library staff
4
Number of library staff with degree in Library
3
Management Computerization for search, indexing, issue/return records Bar coding used : YES
Library services on Internet/Intranet INDEST or other similar membership Archives : YES

Computerization for search, indexing, issue/return records: YES


Barcoding used: YES
Lib services on internet/intranet: YES
INDEST or other similar membership: YES
218 | P a g e

Archives: Available in reception


8.5.2 Titles and volumes per title (4)
Year
Number Of New Number

Of

New Number Of New Volumes Added

2011-

Titles Added
250

Editions Added
740

2483

2012
2012-

310

520

3109

2013
2013-

459

229

1930

2014
8.5.3 Scholarly journal subscription Institute Marks : 3.00
(3)

No. of Total Technical Journals subscribed


YearNo. of Technical Magazines/Periodicals
Scholarly Journal Titles(in originals, re
In Hardcopy In Softcopy
20132014
7
49
233
74
20122013
6
62
2247
62
20112012
5
57
2247
62
20102011
6
68
219
68

8.5.4 Digital Library (3)


Digital Library Services

Yes

Availability of digital library contents (If available, then mention number of


332
courses, number of ebooks, etc. Availability of an exclusive
server)
Availability of an exclusive server

No (shared)

Availability over Intranet/Internet

Yes

Availability of exclusive space/room Yes


Number of users per day

8.5.5 Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals, and miscellaneous contents


219 | P a g e

(5)
Year

Book

2011 8,48,813.00
2012
2012 8,59,568.00
2013
2013 8,49,983.00
2014
8.6

Expenditure (in Rs.)


Magazines/Journals
Magazines/Journals
(for
(for Contents
Misc.
hard copy subscription)
soft copy subscription)
1,23,655.00

12,90,277.00

1,80,000.00

1,38,020.00

16,83,591.00

2,78,269.00

1,45,761.00

9,67,634.00

2,30,615.00

Comments, If Any
Book rack, Binding, News
paper
Book rack, Binding, News
paper
Book rack, Binding, News
paper

(5)

Total Marks5.00
:

8.6 INTERNET DETAILS


(Instruction: The institute may report the availability of Internet in the campus and its quality of service.)
Internet Services
Name of the Internet provider
Available bandwidth
Access speed
Availability of Internet in an exclusive lab
Availability in most computing labs
Availability in departments and other units
Availability in faculty rooms
Institutes own email facility to faculty/students
Security/privacy to email/Internet users
8.7 Safety Norms and Checks (5)
8.7.1 Checks for wiring and electrical installations for

Yes
BSNL
5 MBPS
5 MBPS
CAD lab
CNC lab, Mechatronics lab
HOD room and faculty room
Yes
Yes
Proxy setting
Total Marks : 5.00
Institute Marks : 1.00

leakage and earthing (1)

CHECKS ON SAFETY NORMS


S.NO
1
2
3
4

Details of Check
All electrical equipments and
installations are

Frequency

Half yearly
checked at start of semester
All electrical & mechanical
machines are inspected at start Quarterly
& mid semester
Fire extinguishers are
recharged after expiry date of
Half yearly
Constituents
Earthlings are checked for
Annually
conductivity

8.7.2 Firefighting measurements: Effective safety arrangements with emergency / multiple


220 | P a g e

exits and ventilation/exhausts in


auditoriums and large classrooms/laboratories, firefighting equipment and training,
availability of water, and such other facilities
(1)

Fire Safety norms and checks:


Sufficient fire extinguishers are provided.
Electrical equipments:

Electricity Generator housed out of institute building.


MCBs are used at all electrical installations. Sufficient Earth connections are provided.

Workshops:

All rotating part machines are provided with protective guards.


List of Dos and Donts displayed for students information. It has been made mandatory to wear
aprons.

8.7.3 Safety of civil structure (1)


Earthquake resistance: The building has been designed
to resist earthquake Noncombustible materials used for
construction and staircase walls.
Exit signs and floor indication boards are fixed at strategic locations.
All passageways are 3 m wide and staircase width is minimum 1.7 m and 4.8m

8.7.4 Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other activities (2)


(Instruction: The institution may provide evidence that it is taking enough measures for the safety of the
civil structures, fire, electrical installations, wiring, and safety of handling and disposal of hazardous
substances. Moreover, the institution needs to show the effectiveness of the measures that it has developed
to accomplish these tasks.)

Fire extinguisher is provided.


Posters for proper use are displayed.

221 | P a g e

Separate room for storing and preparing


of
hazardous chemicals. Safe disposal of
chemicals.

8.8 Counselling and Emergency Medical Care and Firstaid (5)


8.8.1 Availability of counselling facility (1)
(Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here.)

Students are not only monitored academically, we also have mentors to


monitor the students activities personally and help them to overcome their

personal issues and counsel them to concentrate over the academics.


This counseling helps the students to share their issues, needs and get proper
guidance from the mentors and also motivates them for further excellence in
academics.

8.8.2 Arrangement for emergency medical care (2)


(Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here.)
Saveetha medical college and hospital, Thandalam
St. Joseph Hospital, Thirumazhisai
Vee Care Sundar Hospital, Poonamallee.
Number of Medical practitioners: 2
Number of nursing staff: 5

8.8.3 Availability of firstaid unit (2)


(Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here.)
222 | P a g e

First aid kits are available in each department and in each lab.
Though the required medical facilities available in college, the Saveetha medical college and hospital provide
all other distinguished facilities which is located 50m from the college.

9. Continuous Improvement (100)


This criterion essentially evaluates the improvement of the different indices that have already been discussed
in earlier sections.
Improvement in Success Index of Students (5)
From 4. 1
a, b and c are the success indices which correspond to LYGm2, LYGm1 and LYG respectively.
Assessment = (ba) + (cb) + (a+b+c)x(5/3)
Items
Success

2010 -2011(c)
0.91

20092010(b)
0.85

20082009(a)
0.92

Assessment
4.45

Index

9.1

Improvement in Academic Performance Index of Students (5)

9.2

From 4. 2

a, b and c are calculated respectively for LYGm2, LYGm1 and LYG by dividing the API values, obtained
from the criterion 4.2, by 10. The maximum value of a, b, and c should not exceed one.
Assessment = (ba) + (cb) + (a+b+c)x(5/3)
223 | P a g e

Items
API

2010 -2011(c)
0.70

20092010(b)
0.72

20082009(a)
0.72

Assessment
3.56

9.3 Improvement in StudentTeacher Ratio (10)


9.4 From 5.1
a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2, CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the
STR values, obtained from the criterion 5.1 by 20. The maximum value of a, b, and c
should not exceed one.
Assessment = (ba) + (cb) + (a+b+c)x(5/3)
Items
STR

2014 -2015(c)
0.724

20132014 (b)
0.744

20122013 (a)
0.721

9.4 Enhancement of Faculty Qualification Index (10)


From 5.3

a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2,


CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the FQI values,
obtained from the criterion 5.3 by 10. The maximum
value of a, b, and c should not exceed one.

Assessment = (ba) + (cb) + (a+b+c)x(5/3)


224 | P a g e

Assessment
3.65

Items
2014 -2015(c)
FQI
0.64
Consultancy Work (20)

20132014 (b)
0.642

20122013 (a)
0.65

Assessment
3.20

From 5.7 & 5.9


a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2,
CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the
FRP and FRDC values, obtained
from the criterion 5.7 and 5.9 by
20 . The maximum value of a, b,
and c should not exceed one.
Assessment = (ba) + (cb) + (a+b+c)x(10/3)
9.5 Improvement in Faculty Research Publications, R&D Work and
Items
FRP
FRDC

2014 -2015(c)
0.30
0.91

225 | P a g e

20132014 (b)
0.357
1

20122013 (a)
0.375
1

Assessment
4.81
0.96

9.6 Continuing Education (10)


In this criterion, the institution needs to specify the contributory efforts made by the faculty members by
developing course/laboratory modules, conducting shortterm courses/workshops, etc., for continuing
education during the last three years.

Any Other

Usage
Target

Module

Contributory Developed/Organi

and
Duration

Description

Institute/Indus

Resource Persons

Audien

zed By

Citation,e
ce

try

tc
MHRD, IIT

Prof.Suman
20.05.20

Bombay

Chakraborty,

Faculty

14 to
Fluid mechanics

IIT Bombay

& Saveetha

Prof.S.K.Som,

member AVIEW

30.05.20
Engineering

Prof.Sandipan Ghosh

14
College

Modic
Dr.R.Velraj,
Mr.Narayan,

NATIONAL

Faclty
Dr.K.Srinivasa Reddy,

SEMINAR ON

19.02.20
Department of

Saveetha

Science &

Engineering

Technology

Colege

HYBRID

member
Shri.Raju Abraham,

14 to

RENEWABLE

21.02.20

ENERGY

PPT,

&

Video

Mr.R.Karthikeyan,
Mr.S.Selvakumar,
14

Student
Mr.C.Nallasivan,

SYSTEM

s
Mr.G.Arumaipathy,

One Day

Society of

Workshop on Kuli Mechanical


Engineers

226 | P a g e

Saveetha

30.03.20

Mr.Sathish Selvaraj
Mr. B. Balaji, Mr. N.

Engineering

14

Kiran, Mr. Raja

College

Faclty

PPT,

member
&
s
Student

Video

s
EMERGING
Faculty
TRENDS IN
member
DESIGN

Society of

Saveetha
27.03.20 Dr.V.SUNDARESWAR

THERMAL AND

Mechanical
Engineers

PPT,

&

Video

Engineering
14

MANUFACTURI

AN

College
Student

NG (ETDTM
s
2014)
MHRD, IIT
25.11.20
Bombay
Engineering

Prof. Mandar M.

Faculty

13 to
IIT Bombay

& Saveetha

Mechanics

Inamdar, Prof. Sauvik member AVIEW


05.12.20

Engineering

Banerjee,

13
College
Faculty
08.03.20 BVSS Prasd, Karthick member
Recent trends in

Society of

Saveetha
13 to

Gas turbine

Mechanical

Srinivasan, B.V.N.

Engineers

PPT,

&

Video

Engineering
09.03.20 Ramakumar, M.Ashock

Technology

College
13

Kumar

Student
s
Faculty

Matlab and its

member
Society of

Saveetha

Mechanical

Engineering

Engineers

College

applications in

18.08.20

Mechanical
Engineering

PPT,

&

Video

Prof. D.Vijayan
12

Student
s

227 | P a g e

9.7 New Facility Created

New Analyze were Purchased


Edge Cam software were renewed as per the latest update
New CNC machines were purchased
Micro Wind Mill were Installed in our Mechanical Department
Nano Fluids Lab were installed our Mechanical Department
Cryogenic
Bio Mechanics MEMS
Cable Mechanics
Friction Stir Welding

Pipe Bending

9.8 Overall Improvements since last accreditation, if any, otherwise, since the
commencement of the programme (20)

Specify the overall improvement:

228 | P a g e

Specify

the Improvement

Strenghths/Weakness
2014 -2015

20132014

Contributed By

List the PO(s), which are Comments,

Brought In
Advance

Saveetha

strengthened
a,c,e,k

Manufacturing

Engineeting

Center
College
Composite Material Saveetha
Lab

20122013

20112012

Center

Indusrty
a,b,c,e

Engineeting
College
For Digital Saveetha

Manufacturing

Engineeting

Nano Fluids Lab

College
Saveetha

20102011

Cable
Lab

Engineeting
College

229 | P a g e

Interact with
Indusrty

a,b,k

Interact with
Indusrty

a,b,c,e

Engineeting
College
Mechanics Saveetha

if any
Interact with

Interact with
Indusrty

a,b,c,e

Interact with
Indusrty