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Adverbs of frequency

always
usually
often
sometimes
1. before the main verb.
e.g. Peter usually has an art class on Fridays.
2. after the verb be.
e.g. Tina is always late for school

never

Prepositions of time
at
at six o'clock / at half past two, etc. at noon / at night / at midnight / at the
weekend
in
in the morning / afternoon / evening, etc. in May / in the summer, etc.
in my free time
on
on Monday / on Friday morning / afternoon, etc.
on weekdays

Some / Any / No ( not any ) / Every


We use some:
with plural countable nouns and with uncountable nouns.
in affirmative sentences.
e.g. There are some great computer games in this shop.
in questions when we offer something politely.
e.g. Would you like some cake?
We use any:
with plural countable nouns and with uncountable nouns.
in questions.
e.g. Have you got any mobile phones?
in negative sentences.
e.g. I haven't got any DVDs.
We use no (not any):
with plural countable nouns and with uncountable nouns.
in affirmative sentences to give a negative meaning.
e.g. There is no (not any) milk in the fridge.
We use every:
with singular countable nouns.
e.g. Every family in this town has got a car.
Compounds of some , any , no and every
some
any
every
People
someone
anyone
everyone
Somebody
anybody
everybody
Things
something
anything
everything
Places
somewhere
anywhere
everywhere

no
no one
nobody
nothing
nowhere

These compounds always go with singular verbs.


e.g. Someone is in the house.
These compounds are used in the same way as some, any, no and every, but they
are not followed by a noun.

e.g. I can't find my MP3 player anywhere .

Quantifiers (much, many, a lot of, lots of, a few, a little)


Much
We use much with uncountable nouns in questions
and in negative sentences.
e.g. There isn't much cheese in the fridge. Let's get some.
Many
We use many with plural countable nouns, usually in
questions and in negative sentences.
e.g. Are there many students in the classroom? ( Yes, there are.)
A lot of / lots of
We use a lot of and lots of with uncountable and plural countable nouns, usually in affirmative
sentences.
e.g. There are a lot of sausages on the table. / There's a lot of spaghetti on the plate
A few / few
We use a few with plural countable nouns in affirmative sentences.
e.g. There are a few oranges in the fridge
A little / little
We use a little with uncountable nouns in affirmative sentences.
e.g. I've got a little meat. Let's make a meat pie.

Future be going to
We use the Future ' be going to ' :
for plans and actions that we intend to do in the future.
e.g. I'm going to travel to Spain next summer.
for predictions based on evidence.
e.g. Look at those clouds! It's going to rain
Time expressions
tomorrow / tonight
etc.
in an hour/a year, etc.

next month/year/week/Tuesday, etc.

this weekend/week/month,

soon

Future ' will '


We use the Future 'will' for:
on-the-spot decisions that we make at the moment of speaking. e.g. I like this dress. I'll buy
it.
predictions, usually with the verbs think and believe. e.g.' I think Jane will come to the party
with Andy.
offers. e.g. Don't worry I'll take out the rubbish for you.
warnings and threats. e.g. Don't do that again or I'll tell your parents.
promises. e.g. I'll do my homework, Mum. , promise.
requests. e.g. Will you help me do this exercise, please?
Time Expressions
tomorrow, tonight, next month / year / week / Monday, etc.
in an hour / year, etc., this weekend / week / month, etc., soon

adjectives

easy

intelligent beautiful
interesting
fun
save
frightening

difficult cheap
bored/boring

expensive comfortable modern


tall

awful

safe

excited/ exciting

enjoying

clean/dirty

clever

funny

silly

good at

long

nervous
thirsty/hungry
disappointed
scared/ scary
furious
hate
difficult
embarrassed
excited
smart
cute
bad at
shocked
exciting salty
important
easy
spicy
boring
interesting
surprised high low
active
sweet bitter
lazy
outgoing
polite
rude
wet / dry mad angry
hot
heavy /light big
chubby
pretty
sleepy
old/new
ugly
awful short young
slow
fast large wide thin
thick far near tired
strong
worried useful
important late early