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GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

GENERAL

Abbreviation:
Alliteration:
Antonym:
Base form:
Draft:
Extension:
Fact:
Graphic organizer:
Headword:
Homograph:

Homonym:
Hyperbole:
Idiom:
Irony:
Metaphor:
Objective:
Onomatopoeia:
Paragraph:
Prefix:
Proverb:
Rhetorical question:
Root words:
Simile:
Subject:
Suffix:
Subjective:
Syllable:
Synonym:

short way of writing something: Mon. Monday.


placing words using the same consonant sounds close together to create an effect: a slow, slimy snail.
word which is opposite in meaning to another word: young old, push pull.
(also known as infinitive form) form of verb listed in the dictionary: go, play, see (often includes the word to: to go, to see).
a version of a piece of writing: a first draft is a piece which you intend to improve. You can also say: a final draft.
extra detail frequently contained in a sentence: I saw my friend sitting in the bus.
piece of information which is accepted as true and can be proved.
tool used for planning, e.g. a spider diagram.
a word listed in a dictionary followed by an explanation of what it means.
word which is spelt the same as another word but has a different meaning and a different pronunciation: I will wind in the kite.
The wind is blowing too hard.
word which sounds the same as another word but has a different spelling and meaning: I have two sisters. I have a brother too.
words which exaggerate to produce an effect: I was scared to death.
group of words which has a special meaning: He was so angry he hit the roof.
form of humour where words mean the opposite of what is said, e.g. The news that we were to have a test filled us with delight.
a description of something as if it was another thing: The setting sun was a ball of flame.
a response based on fact, not influenced by personal feelings.
words in which the meaning and the sound match: fizz, splash.
a group of sentences on the same topic.
group of letters which goes at the beginning of a word and changes its meaning: honest- dishonest.
short statement giving advice or stating the truth. Honesty is the best policy.
question which does not require an answer: We all know what that means, dont we?
form of a word which is the base for other words, e.g. trust (distrust).
a comparison of one thing to another: The setting sun was as red as fire. He could swim like a fish.
the part of a sentence that performs the action: The Principal arrived.
group of letters which goes at the end of a word and changes its meaning: care careless.
a personal response, not based on facts.
part of a word containing one vowel sound: son (1syllable), mo/ther 2 syllables).
word which has a similar meaning to another word: He raced down the road. He ran down the road.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Fantasy:
Fiction:
Formal language:
Informal language:
Narrative:
Plot:
Predicate:
Reported speech:
Resolution:
Topic sentence:

story which is very different from real life, such as science fiction.
books and stories about imaginary events and people.
style used when speaking or writing to people we do not know well, or when we want to show respect.
the type of language we use when we are speaking to people we know well in an everyday situation.
writing which tells a story or gives account of events.
story of a play or film.
part of a sentence which comes after the subject: My friends felt very sorry for me.
the words that someone said when they are reported to another person: She said that she was hungry.
how problems are solved at the end of a story.
sentence which introduces the topic of the paragraph.

ENGLISH LITERATURE

Imagery:
Metre:
Rhythm:
Stanza:

words used in literature to create an image of something, e.g. metaphors, similes.


the way in which the sounds in a poem are stressed.
the beat of lines of poetry.
set of lines in a poem.

LANGUAGE & LITERATURE

Atmosphere:
Audience:
Dialogue:
Figurative language:
Implied meaning:
Mood:
Personification:
Setting:
Theme:
Tone:

feeling created by a piece of writing: The first scene of the play creates a mysterious atmosphere.
people who watch or listen to a performance or read a piece of writing.
words spoken by actors in films and plays.
language that uses words in a way which makes descriptions interesting, e.g. using similes and metaphors.
something which is suggested without being said directly.
the atmosphere created in a story or poem. To determine mood, ask yourself What did the writer want me to feel?
writing about a thing as if it was a person: The wind whispered in my ear.
the background to a story or play that tells where and when it happens.
main subject of a piece of writing.
the writers mood or attitude.

Source: English Matters Students Book 2