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Englishzine Juillet.

Englishzine Juillet.
Number #03 EZINE EXCELLERE 177
-April 2016.CHILE.

Edited by Alfred Juillet F.

Donate to

alfjuillet@yahoo.com In paypal.

Thanks you for your charity.

Contents:

CONTENTS:
I. FLYING SAUCER HISTORY 4-13
II. WORLD OPINION 14-27
III. SPACE TRAVEL AND THE UFO 28-39
IV. SPACE COMMUNICATION AND DETECTION 40-51
V. MARS-THE MYSTERY PLANET 52-61
VI THE WORLDWIDE ENIGMA 62-87
VII. CONTACT STORIES 88-111
VIII. NEW LIGHT ON THE UFO 112-117
IX. THE PROBLEMS TODAY 118-127
GLOSSARY OF UFO TERMINOLOGY 128

About the Author (


"Although a comparatively young man Max B. Miller has put in a world of objective flying
saucer research since he first became interested in the phenomena in 1947. He founded
Flying Saucers International in 1952 and still operates it as a non-profit investigative unit,
delving into all facets of Unidentified Flying Objects. Exhaustive research findings are
dispensed to the public through the quarterly publication "Saucers" which is believed to have
one of the largest circulations of its kind in the world. Currently Miller holds memberships in
many local and overseas UFO and space groups including: The British Interplanetary
Society, Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers, The Meteoritical Society, Civilian
Saucer Intelligence of New Zealand and associate member of the American Rocket Society."

About the Author:


Max Briant Miller (February 23, 1937 – January 17, 2011) was an American
journalist, photographer and film producer. His 1976 film Youthquake! won the
Golden Globe Award for Best Documentary Film at the 33rd Golden Globe Awards.

His father was producer and inventor Max O. Miller. He attended Los Angeles Valley
College, UCLA, and Sherwood Oaks College.

He became interested in UFOs as a boy and in 1952, at the age of 15, founded the
UFO research group Flying Saucers International and served as the editor of its
quarterly magazine Saucers. He was the author of two books on UFOs: Flying
Saucers: Fact Or Fiction? (1957) and Flying Saucers Pictorial (1967).

Miller wrote about cinema for American Cinematographer and other publications, and
since 1976 he owned and managed the LA based celebrity photo syndication agency
Fotos International. Since 1974 his images had been represented by Rex Features in
London and Keystone Press Agency in Canada. Also with Pictorial Parade, Archive
Photos, and Image Bank which are now part of Getty Images.
A longtime Hollywood Foreign Press Association member, Miller served on their board from
1974 to 1982, and became chairman of the HFPA board in 1976 as well as a second term.

Miller committed suicide by gun the day after the 68th Golden Globe Awards. According to TV

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Englishzine Juillet.

Guide, "Miller was depressed over his divorce and financial problems." Several
obituaries noted that Miller's photography company was denied a place on the red
carpet at that year's Golden Globes, where he had been a member for 44 years.

From an online obituary by Brad Elterman – Buzz Foto: “I met Max Miller around 1975 I
when I was a teenager just getting into the photo industry. This was a magical period to be
photographer covering Hollywood and pop culture. Max was full of stories about real
movie stars and I was all ears. He was a pioneer in photo syndication who traveled the
globe and knew the industry well. Fotos International and his wonderful number one
photographer Frank Edwards covered every inch of Hollywood. Max was on the guest list
for everything and magazines published volumes of his photos every week. With many of
the great publicists and fellow celebrity photographer now gone, I assume that the
business had changed for Max during the last few years. He came from an era where the
talent, the publicist and the magazines would treat the photographer with great respect.
Not only has the photo industry lost Max, but also the end of a great era.”

Playboy's Gahan Wilson is a collection of Gahan Wilson's cartoons from Playboy


magazine. It was first published in an oversized trade paperback format in 1973 by
Playboy Press with a cover price of $2.50.

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Englishzine Juillet.

From the front cover:


"More Than 220 Cartoons -- 120 In Full Color. From Playboy's Mirthful Master
Of The Macabre."

About The Author:


Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930) is an American author, cartoonist and
illustrator known for his cartoons depicting horror-fantasy situations.

Wilson was born in Evanston, Illinois. He has been married to author Nancy Winters
(née Nancy Dee Midyette) since 1966.

Wilson's cartoons and illustrations are drawn in a playfully grotesque style and have a dark
humor that is often compared to the work of The New Yorker cartoonist and Addams Family
creator Charles Addams. But while both feature vampires, cemeteries and other traditional
horror elements in their work, Addams' cartoons are gothic, reserved and old-fashioned, while
Wilson's work is more contemporary, gross and confrontational, featuring atomic mutants,
subway monsters and serial killers. It could be argued that Addams' work was probably meant
to be funny without a lot of satirical intent, while Wilson often has a very specific point to make.

Wilson was inspired by the irreverent work of the various satiric Mad and Punch
cartoonists, as well as the science fiction monster films of the 1950s. His cartoons and
prose fiction have appeared regularly in magazines such as Playboy, Collier's, and
The New Yorker for almost 50 years. In addition to his cartoons for The Magazine Of
Fantasy & Science Fiction, he also wrote movie and book reviews for that publication.
From 1992 through end of publication, he prepared all the front covers for the annual
book Passport To World Band Radio. He has been a movie review columnist for The
Twilight Zone Magazine and a book critic for Realms Of Fantasy magazine.

His comic strip Nuts, which appeared in National Lampoon, was a reaction against
what he saw as the saccharine view of childhood in strips like Peanuts. His hero, The
Kid, sees the world as dark, dangerous and unfair—but also occasionally a fun place.
Wilson wrote and illustrated a short story for Harlan Ellison's anthology Again, Dangerous
Visions (1972). The "title" is a black blob, and the story is about an ominous black blob that
appears on the page, growing at an alarming rate. He has contributed short stories to other
publications as well; "M1" and "The Zombie Butler" both appeared in The Magazine Of
Fantasy & Science Fiction and were reprinted in Gahan Wilson's Cracked Cosmos (1975).

Wilson created a computer game, Gahan Wilson's The Ultimate Haunted House, with
Byron Preiss. The goal is to collect 13 keys in 13 hours from the 13 rooms of a house
by interacting in various ways with characters (two-headed monster, mad scientist,
vampiress), objects and the house itself.

Wilson wrote the 1992 animated short Diner.

In 2009, Fantagraphics Books released Gahan Wilson: 50 Years Of Playboy Cartoons,


a slipcased, three-volume collection of Wilson's cartoons and short stories for that
magazine. A collection of his work, Fifty Years Of Gahan Wilson, was published in
2010. Fantagraphics published a "complete" edition of Nuts in October 2011.

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In 2005, Wilson was recognized with Lifetime Achievement from the World Fantasy
Awards. He received the World Fantasy Convention Award in 1981 and the
National Cartoonists Society's Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005.

Wilson is the subject of a feature-length documentary film, Gahan Wilson: Born


Dead, Still Weird, directed by Steven-Charles Jaffe.

He was an influence on later alternative cartoonists, including Gary Larson, John


Callahan and Bill Plympton.

Playboy's Gahan Wilson is a collection of Gahan Wilson's cartoons from Playboy


magazine. It was first published in an oversized trade paperback format in 1973 by
Playboy Press with a cover price of $2.50.

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Englishzine Juillet.

About The Author:


Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930) is an American author, cartoonist and
illustrator known for his cartoons depicting horror-fantasy situations.

Wilson was born in Evanston, Illinois. He has been married to author Nancy Winters
(née Nancy Dee Midyette) since 1966.
Wilson's cartoons and illustrations are drawn in a playfully grotesque style and have a dark
humor that is often compared to the work of The New Yorker cartoonist and Addams Family
creator Charles Addams. But while both feature vampires, cemeteries and other traditional
horror elements in their work, Addams' cartoons are gothic, reserved and old-fashioned, while
Wilson's work is more contemporary, gross and confrontational, featuring atomic mutants,
subway monsters and serial killers. It could be argued that Addams' work was probably meant
to be funny without a lot of satirical intent, while Wilson often has a very specific point to make.

Wilson was inspired by the irreverent work of the various satiric Mad and Punch
cartoonists, as well as the science fiction monster films of the 1950s. His cartoons and
prose fiction have appeared regularly in magazines such as Playboy, Collier's, and
The New Yorker for almost 50 years. In addition to his cartoons for The Magazine Of
Fantasy & Science Fiction, he also wrote movie and book reviews for that publication.
From 1992 through end of publication, he prepared all the front covers for the annual
book Passport To World Band Radio. He has been a movie review columnist for The
Twilight Zone Magazine and a book critic for Realms Of Fantasy magazine.

His comic strip Nuts, which appeared in National Lampoon, was a reaction against
what he saw as the saccharine view of childhood in strips like Peanuts. His hero, The
Kid, sees the world as dark, dangerous and unfair—but also occasionally a fun place.
Wilson wrote and illustrated a short story for Harlan Ellison's anthology Again, Dangerous
Visions (1972). The "title" is a black blob, and the story is about an ominous black blob that
appears on the page, growing at an alarming rate. He has contributed short stories to other
publications as well; "M1" and "The Zombie Butler" both appeared in The Magazine Of
Fantasy & Science Fiction and were reprinted in Gahan Wilson's Cracked Cosmos (1975).

Wilson created a computer game, Gahan Wilson's The Ultimate Haunted House, with
Byron Preiss. The goal is to collect 13 keys in 13 hours from the 13 rooms of a house
by interacting in various ways with characters (two-headed monster, mad scientist,
vampiress), objects and the house itself.

Wilson wrote the 1992 animated short Diner.

In 2009, Fantagraphics Books released Gahan Wilson: 50 Years Of Playboy Cartoons,


a slipcased, three-volume collection of Wilson's cartoons and short stories for that
magazine. A collection of his work, Fifty Years Of Gahan Wilson, was published in
2010. Fantagraphics published a "complete" edition of Nuts in October 2011.

In 2005, Wilson was recognized with Lifetime Achievement from the World Fantasy
Awards. He received the World Fantasy Convention Award in 1981 and the
National Cartoonists Society's Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005.

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Englishzine Juillet.

Wilson is the subject of a feature-length documentary film, Gahan Wilson: Born


Dead, Still Weird, directed by Steven-Charles Jaffe.

He was an influence on later alternative cartoonists, including Gary Larson, John


Callahan and Bill Plympton.

New Worlds SF [v50, #163, June 1966] (3/6, 160pp+, pb, cover by Keith
Roberts) 2 · Here’s Your Chance... · Michael Moorcock · ed
4 · The God Killers [Part 1 of 2] · John Baxter · n.
66 · You: Coma: Marilyn Monroe · J. G. Ballard · ss Ambit
#27 1966 72 · The Gloom Pattern · Peter Tate · nv
102 · The Sub-liminal · Ernest Hill · ss
114 · What Passing Bells? · R. M. Bennett · nv
137 · World Of Shadows · Sydney J. Bounds · ss

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New Worlds [#189, April 1969] (5/-, 64pp+, large s/s, cover by Mervyn
Peake) 4 · A Boy And His Dog [Vic & Blood] · Harlan Ellison · nv
17 · The Ash Circus [Jerry Cornelius] · M. John Harrison · ss
23 · How The Sponsors Helped Out · Anthony Haden-Guest · pm; given as by
Anthony Hayden-Guest in the Table of Contents.
24 · Labyrinth · D. M. Thomas · pm
27 · The Beach Murders · J. G. Ballard · ss Rogue Feb/Mar 1966, as “Confetti
Royale” 32 · Inside · J. J. Mundis · ss
34 · For Czechoslovakia · George MacBeth · pm
37 · A Cure For Cancer [Part 2 of 4; Jerry Cornelius]· Michael Moorcock · n.

3. New Worlds No. 190 [1969-05.New Worlds Publishing] (64 pages) (salad) {CBR} (27.3
MB

New Worlds [#190, May 1969] (5/-, 64pp+, large s/s, cover by Gabi
Nasemann) 4 · The Moment Of Eclipse · Brian W. Aldiss · ss
13 · The Negotiators · Harvey Jacobs · ss Esquire Apr 1969;
revised 19 · The Responsive Environment · Charles Platt · ar
24 · A Cure For Cancer [Part 3 of 4; Jerry Cornelius]· Michael
Moorcock · n. 42 · Star · Libby Houston · pm

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42 · Alien Pomp... · Libby Houston · pm


43 · The Old Woman And The Sandwiches · Libby Houston ·
pm 43 · At the Sign Of The Times · Libby Houston · pm
44 · Manoeuvres · Libby Houston · pm
44 · Out Of · Libby Houston · pm
45 · The Hurt · Marek Obtulowicz · ss
53 · The Dreams Of The Computer · Dr. Christopher Evans & Jackie Wilson · ms

-dobate to ; alfjuillet@yahoo.com In paypal.

From the first page:


"Among the well-known contributors to Click's Cartoon Annual:
F. O. Alexander, Harry Algus, Peter Arno, Joe Ash, C. W. Anderson, Fred Balk, M. K. Barlow,
Ken Barker, Frank Beaven, M. Berry, Jess Benton, Henry Boltinoff, Bo Brown, Bru, Gene Carr,
Bill Champe, Roland Coe, Lloyd Coe, "Margot" Cook, Jimmy Caborn, ''Arlan'' Crandall, B.
Currie, Abner Dean, Gregory d'Alessio, R. C. Dell, Rodney deSarro, Frank Dobias,
Coutney Dunkel, Eric Ericson, R. L. Epstein, Herc Ficklen, Francois, Martin Garrity,
Thurston Gentry, Dave Gerard, Ken Gunall, Irv Hagglund, Ned Hilton, D. Humne, Ed
Hunter, Art Jackson, Louis Jamme, Harvey Johnson, Will Johnson, Kay Kararra, Jette
Keate, Reamer Keller, George Kerr, L. Lartar, Bandel Linn, "Medill" Loebner, George
Mabie, Gregor Macgregor, Ty Mahon, Paul McCarthy, Dorothy McKay,
Robinson McKee, Gene McNerney, John Miller, Jack Morley, Wade Monroe, Ed Nofziger,
Ted O'Loughlin, J. A. Patterson, Mal Pearlman, Ted Petok, Louis Priscilla, William V.
Porcelli, Bernard Potter, Robinson, Henry Roesler, The Four Roth Bros. (I. Rior, Ben Roth,
Al Ross, and Salo Roth), G. Phil Rosa, John Rosol, Barbara Shermund, Adolph Schus,
George Shellhase, Hal Shennan, Mel Soderlund, William Spaar, Stan Stamaty, Jack Starr,
Chas. Strauss, Kirk Stiles, George Swanson, Lee Thomas, B. F. Thompson, Merrylen
Townsend, James Trembath, Trent, Buford Tune, Ans Turner, Don Ulsh, W. Von Riegen,
Harry Weinert, Wenzel, Ed Wheelan, Fritz Wilkinson, Rod Willard, G. Wolfe, Alex
Young, C. K. Weil, E. Zlatos."

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About Click magazine:


Click was a tabloid magazine which was owned and operated by Moses ["Moe"] Louis
Annenberg (1877-1942), owner of Triangle Publications and publisher of the The Philadelphia
Inquirer newspaper. The name "Triangle" referred to his three most lucrative holdings,
Nationwide Racing News Service, The Daily Racing Form, and The Philadelphia Inquirer.
Triangle Publications also produced Detective & Murder Mysteries, Official Detective, Quick,
The Radio Guide, and Screen Guide. When Triangle first published Screen Guide, Moses
Annenberg sought to boost circulation by featuring sensational nude photographs of pin-up
models, for which the magazine was banned in several States and Canada.

In 1937 Triangle published Click Magazine, which was fashioned after Look and Life, but unlike
those magazines also featured occasional nude pin-ups along with sensationally gruesome
photographs of sex crime scenes. The editor Emile Gauvreau (1891-1956) later recalled, "I was
part of that strange race of people aptly described as spending their lives doing things they detest
to make money they don't want to buy things they don't need to impress people they don't like."

On August 11, 1939 the same District Attorney and Federal Judge who had historically
convicted Al Capone of tax evasion, brought similar charges against Moses Annenberg.

On April 20, 1940 Moses Annenberg was convicted to serve three years in Federal prison
and to pay a fine of $8,000,000, which was the largest such penalty in U.S. history.

Before incarceration he installed his son Walter Annenberg (1908-2002) as business


successor to assure smooth continuity to the operation of his vast empire.

On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor an America went to war.
Joseph Ottenstein spearheaded a public relations campaign to demand the release of
Moses Annenberg on patriotic grounds, "In this war period he would be serving the
country better at his desk as publisher of his big Philadelphia newspaper than in prison."

Moses Annenberg's health declined to an extreme extent, while serving his three-
year sentence in Lewisburg Pennsylvania State Prison, until doctors urged his early
release for medical treatment on June 3, 1942. He traveled to the Mayo Clinic in
Minneapolis for an emergency brain operation.

Moses Annenberg died at the age of sixty-five on July 20, 1942.

His son Walter Annenberg lead Triangle Publications to even greater prosperity and
became one of America's most outstanding charitable and political donors, by which
leverage he forged advantageous connections to Republican Presidents Richard
Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George Bush.

Enjoy!

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E
n

.
Englishzine Juillet.

Evergreen Review was a U.S.-based literary magazine, known for its experimental fiction,
which was founded by Barney Rosset, publisher of Grove Press. It existed in print from 1957
through 1973, and was re-launched online in 1998. It began as a quarterly in a trade
paperback format (not unlike so many other literary quarterlies of the day), later changing into
a full-sized, glossy magazine, and finally to a mass-market paperback format.

This is a scan of the final issue (and the only issue to my knowledge which has been scanned). It
includes a reprint of a story by J. G. Ballard and an article which discusses Ballard's fiction and
reviews his book Love & Napalm: Export U.S.A. (which was published in 1972 by Grove Press).

From the back cover:


"INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

THE LOST ONES, the first work of longer fiction by Samuel Beckett to be published
since he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969. Writes Joseph McElroy
in The New York Times Book Review: "Beckett's work continues to be one of the
signal modern ventures in concentrated attention. THE LOST ONES suggests even
more warmly what a great writer Beckett is."

Is Yevgeny Yevtushenko really the knight in shining armor of Soviet Liberalism, or


does he serve some other, more devious purpose? Dotson Rader punctures the myth
of the latest darling of American Liberalism.
Writing about black artists and entertainers has become big business--for white writers, that
is. But they all miss the point, says Cecil Brown, in an interview with Aretha Franklin.

'Dear Hef: That's a pretty spastic operation you got going at Bunny Heaven in
Great Gorge, where you pay guys to water the plastic bushes and a Playmate
might even let you buy her a chocolate milk.' An eyewitness report from admirer
Peter Tauber of Hefner's newest Playboy Club Hotel in New Jersey.

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PLUS: fiction by J.G. Ballard and articles by Jerome Tarshis and Parker Tyler."

CONTENTS:
In This Issue 4
Letters to the Editor 6
Notes From The Underground - Dotson Rader 16
Report From Bunny Hollow / article - Peter Tauber
29 The Lost Ones / fiction - Samuel Beckett 41
Lafayette Park Place / poem - Andrew Hoyem 65
God's Spies / story - David Kleinbard 67
Some Recent Fiction / poem - Al Young
83 Photographs - Dudley Gray 89
Is Man A Clown? Is Fellini? And What's A Clown? / article - Parker
Tyler 98 Yevgeny Yevtushenko: The Cold Warrior As Poet / article -
Dotson Rader 125 Poem - Ellen Cooney 135
Krafft-Ebing Visits Dealey Plaza: The Recent Fiction Of J.G. Ballard / article -
Jerome Tarshis 137
Facing South / poem - Paul Blackburn 143
The Assassination Of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Considered As A Downhill Motor Race /
fiction - J. G. Ballard 149 (Originally published in New Worlds And SF Impulse, March 1967)
The Philosophy Of Jive / article - Cecil
Brown154 Cover painting by Susan Wainer

About Evergreen Review:


Evergreen Review debuted pivotal works by Samuel Beckett, Jorge Luis Borges,
Charles Bukowski, William Burroughs, Marguerite Duras, Jean Genet, Allen
Ginsberg, Gunter Grass, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, Henry Miller, Pablo Neruda,
Vladimir Nabokov, Frank O’Hara, Kenzaburo Oe, Octavio Paz, Harold Pinter, Susan
Sontag, Tom Stoppard, Derek Walcott and Malcolm X. United States Supreme Court
Justice William O. Douglas wrote a controversial piece for the magazine in 1969.
Kerouac and Ginsberg regularly had their writing published in the magazine.
Although primarily a literary magazine, Evergreen Review always contained numerous illustrations.
In its early years, these included a small number of cartoons. By the mid-1960s, many illustrations
and photographs were of an erotic nature, including a serialized graphic novel, The Adventures Of
Phoebe Zeit-Geist by writer Michael O'Donoghue and artist Frank Springer. It was later published
as a Grove Press hardcover in 1968 and trade paperback in 1969.

The first issue in 1957 featured an essay by Jean-Paul Sartre and an interview with
the great New Orleans jazz drummer Baby Dodds. It also included a story of Samuel
Beckett's Dante And The Lobster, the first of his many appearances in Evergreen's
pages; these continued through the last issue published.

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The second issue was a landmark. A banner across the cover declared "San Francisco Scene,"
and inside held the first collection of work by the new Beat writers - including Lawrence
Ferlinghetti, Gary Snyder, Michael McClure, Philip Whalen, Jack Kerouac (before the publication
of On The Road and Allen Ginsberg, whose HOWL had already been published as a pamphlet by
Ferlinghetti's press, City Lights, and was confiscated by customs officials and faced trial for
obscenity in San Francisco. The issue brought the Beats and Evergreen Review to the forefront of
the American stage. Subsequent issues presented some of the best and most provocative literary
writing of the time; William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch was excerpted side by side with C. Wright
Mills and a section from Paul Goodman's Growing Up Absurd; Edward Albee's first play, Zoo
Story, appeared next to Camus' appeal against capital punishment; a portion of Jean Genet's Our
Lady Of The Flowers ran in the same number as an essay by Octavio Paz. LeRoi Jones (Amirari
Baraka), John Rechy, Robert Coover, Frank O' Hara,

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Richard Brautigan, Hubert Selby, Jr., Kenneth Koch, and Terry Southern were
among those who appeared regularly.
As the fifties turned into the sixties, and the Beat Scene grew into the counterculture, Evergreen
grew as well, always one step ahead of the pack. Timothy Leary, Abbie Hoffman, and the Fugs
shared pages with Jack Kerouac, Mailer, Beckett, and Burroughs, and essays propounding
psychedelic and Black Power appeared between cartoons by Tomi Ungerer, Kliban, and Sine.
Michael O'Donoghue (later of National Lampoon and Saturday Night Live fame) became a regular
contributor and created the classic commix satire Phoebe Zeit-Geist. Politics, sex, and art always
went together. Then Hon. Gerald R. Ford denounced the magazine on the floor of Congress for
printing a lampoon of Richard Nixon beside the photo of a nude. In 1968 Evergreen Review #51,
featuring "The Spirit Of Che" and with a Paul Davis portrait of Che Guevera on the cover so
inflamed anti-Castro Cubans that they bombed Evergreen offices.

Evergreen published writing that was literally counter to the culture, and if it was sexy, so
much the better. In the context of the time, sex was politics, and the powers-that-be made
the suppression of sexuality a political issue. The court battles that Grove Press fought for
the legal publication of Lady Chatterly's Lover, Tropic Of Cancer, and Naked Lunch, and
for the legal distribution of the film I Am Curious: Yellow, spilled onto the pages of
Evergreen Review, and in 1964, an issue of Evergreen itself was confiscated in New York
State by the Nassau County District Attorney on obscenity charges.

All of this was done on a shoestring budget by a tiny staff. Barney Rosset started the
magazine with editor Don Allen and Fred Jordan, who was nominally the business manager in
its early days. Richard Seaver joined the editorial team with the ninth issue, and Don Allen
stepped back to become a contributing editor. Publication increased from quarterly to
bimonthly to, in the late sixties, monthly, and the format changed from trade paperback to a
full-sized, glossy magazine attaining a subscription base of some 40, 000 copies and a
newsstand circulation of 1000,000. The final issue, number 96, came out in 1973. Evergreen
was more than another literary magazine. It was the voice of a movement that helped to
change the attitudes and prejudices of the culture at large through the language of art - and
succeeded. It was always damn the torpedoes and full speed ahead.

The original Evergreen Review ceased publication in 1973, but the magazine was
revived in 1998 in an online edition edited by founder Barney Rosset and Astrid Rosset.
The online edition features flashbacks to previous Evergreen Review editions, as well as
debuts by contemporary writers such as Dennis Nurkse, Giannina Braschi, and Regina
Dereiva. ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Sata Illustrated was a science fiction fanzine by Bill Pearson and Dan Adkins. It was
published first by Dan Adkins (when he was in the Air Force and was base illustrator and
was bored…) and then by Bill Pearson and Dan Adkins and later by Bill Pearson alone.

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The first issue appeared in 1956. It was reproduced using a ditto machine. Sata featured
weird fiction, comics, and illustrations, with an emphasis on lots of Illustrations, since both
editors were artists. After 6 issues had been released Adkins left the zine and Pearson
carried on without him. 15 issues were released, the last in February 1964.

Contributors included Richard Bassford, Roger Benson, Roger Brand, Ray


Capella, Tom Conroy, Alan Dodd, Claude Hall, Roy Krenkel, and others.

Fiction was by Bob Leman, Charles L. Morris, and Bob Warner, among others. Articles
were by Larry Shaw among others.

Artwork was contributed by Esmond Adams, George Barr, Robert E. Gilbert, Larry
Ivie, Ken Kellard, Bill Pearson, Andy Reiss, and others.

Letters came from Harvey Kurtzman, among others.

On his website, Steve Stiles writes; "Perhaps few people remember Dan's activities
in s.f. fanzine fandom, but in the late fifties he and Bill Pearson were producing the
most attractive dittoed fanzine, Sata Illustrated, that I've ever seen --a fanzine that
was instrumental in getting me into fandom."

CONTENTS (Compiled from the magazine):


Sata Illustrated [v01n12, May, 1960] (William E. Pearson; Phoenix,
AZ, 28pp) 1 • The Temple • George Barr • poem Illus. by George Barr
4 • Troublesome Guatocat On Boondock Planet • Clod Hall [pseudonym of Claude
Hall] • ss Illus. by Dan Adkins
9 • The Painting • Bob Warner • ss
13 • Fantasia • Illustration by Dave Prosser
14 • The Editorial: A Legion Of Sterile Women Cry...Help! •
15 • Book 4: The Witches' Sabbath, Chapters VII and VIII • anonymous • serial
18 • Particularly Meticulously • Raymond Wallace • column Illustrated by George Barr
18 • More Mouldy Mush? • Esmond Adams • column Illustrated by George Barr & Dan Adkins

Enjoy!

'''''''''''''''
The Wild Shore was Kim Stanley Robinson's first novel and the first volume in his "Orange
County" post-apocalyptic trilogy. It was originally published in paperback in March 1984 by Ace

Página 16
E
u
i
l
l
e
t
.

Books
as the
inaugu
ral
volum
e in its
new
series
of Ace
Scienc
e
Fiction
Specia
ls,
edited
by
Terry
Carr.

From
Locus:
"The
Wild
Shore
(Ace 0-
441-
88870-
4, Mar
’84
[Feb
’84],
$2.95,
371pp,
pb)
[Orang
e
County
] Sf
novel,
first of
the
revived
Ace
Scienc
e
Fiction
Special
s
edited
by
Terry
Carr. A
first
novel.
Slow
but
excelle
ntly
written
post-
holoca
ust
Califor
nia
coast
novel.
(EAL)"

From
the
back
cover:
"Seven
teen-
year-
old
Henry
wanted
to help
make
Americ
a great
again
[Gee
that
sounds
familiar
- now
where
have I
heard
that
line
before?
], like it
had
been
sixty
years
ago,
before
all the
bombs
went
off: But
for the
people
of
Onofre
Valley
just
survivin
g was
challen
ge
enough
. Then
one
day the
world
came
to
Henry
in the
shape
of two
men
who
said
they
represe
nted
the
Americ
an
Resista
nce ..."

"For
sever
al
years
now
I've
been
callin
g
Robin
son
one
of the
most
promi
sing
young
writer
s in
our
field
or
any
other.
When
The
Wild
Shore
appe
ars,
I'll
have
to
drop
those
patro
nizing
words
young
and
promi
sing;
it will
be
evide
nt
then
to
every
one
who
has
the
pleas
ure of
readi
ng it
that
he is
simpl
y one
of our
best
writer
s." —
Gene
Wolfe
.

"We
are
witness
ing the
emerge
nce of
a
powerf
ul new
talent."

Damon
Knight.

The
Ace
Sci
enc
e
Ficti
on
Spe
cial
s
are
a
fifte
en-
yea
r-
old
trad
ition
with
us;
und
er
the
brilli
ant
edit
ors
hip
of
Terr
y
Car
r,
the
line
is
dedi
cate
d to
publ
ishi
ng
the
best
in
Sci
enc
e
Ficti
on.
The
origi
nal
Spe
cial
s
incl
ude
d
The
Left
Han
d Of
Dar
kne
ss
and
Isle
Of
The
Dea
d—
now
me
et
the
sup
erst
ars
of
the
futu
re,
in
the
Ne
w
Ace
Sci
enc
e
Ficti
on
Spe
cial
s."

About
The
Author:
Kim
Stanle
y
Robins
on
(born
March
23,
1952)
is an
Americ
an
writer
of
specul
ative
scienc
e-
fiction.
He has
publish
ed
ninetee
n
novels
and
numer
ous
short
stories
but is
best
known
for his
Mars
trilogy.
Many
of his
novels
and
stories
have
ecologi
cal,
cultural
and
politica
l
themes
runnin
g
throug
h them
and
often
feature
scienti
sts as
heroes
.
Robins
on has
won
numer
ous
awards
includi
ng the
Hugo
Award
for
Best
Novel,
the
Nebula
Award
for
Best
Novel
and
the
World
Fantas
y
Award.
Robins
on's
work
has
been
labeled
by the
Atlantic
as "the
gold-
standa
rd of
realisti
c, and
highly
literary,
scienc
e-
fiction
writing"
.
Accord
ing to
an
article
in the
New
Yorker,
Robins
on is
"gener
ally
ackno
wledge
d as
one of
the
greate
st
living
scienc
e-
fiction
writers.
"

Enjoy!
Página 17
Note: Great Science-Fiction Stories About The Moon is the title as it reads on the
title page (and in WorldCat). The dust jacket title is Great Science Fiction Stories
About The Moon, without the hyphen, but going by bibliographic rules, we should
always go by the title page's version.

CONTENTS:
Great Science-Fiction Stories About The Moon ed. T. E. Dikty (Fredrick Fell,
1967, hc) Earth’s Natural Satellite · T. E. Dikty · in
Table of Comparisons: Earth And Moon · [Misc.] · ms
Significant Events In Lunar Exploration · [Misc.] · ms
Moon Prospector [Lensmen] · William B. Ellern · nv Analog April 1966
The Reluctant Heroes · Frank M. Robinson · nv Galaxy January 1951
Glimpses Of The Moon · Wallace West · nv Analog June 1965
The Pro · Edmond Hamilton · ss F&SF October 1964
Honeymoon In Hell · Fredric Brown · nv Galaxy November 1950
Via Death [Via] · Eando Binder · ss Thrilling Wonder Stories August 1938, as by
Gordon A. Giles
Trends · Isaac Asimov · ss Astounding July
1939 Glossary · [Misc.] · ms

About The Editor:


Thaddeus Maxim Eugene (Ted) Dikty (June 16, 1920 – October 11, 1991) was an editor who
also played a role as one of the earliest science fiction anthologists, and as a publisher.

In 1947, Dikty joined Shasta Publishers as managing editor. With E. F. Bleiler he


started the first "Best of the Year" science fiction anthologies, called The Best
Science Fiction, which ran from 1949 until 1957.
In 1953, he married writer Julian May, whom he had met at a science fiction convention in Ohio.
Both of them worked for Chicago-area publishers; in 1957 the two started Publication Associates,
an editorial service which created books (from writing to completion of bound copies) for specialty
children's publishers who sold primarily to the school and library markets: May did the writing,
and Dikty served as designer and producer. In the early 1970s Dikty and partners started a small
press, FAX Collector's Editions, which reprinted selected pulp-era (and

Página 18
Englishzine Juillet.

earlier) SF stories and novels, and had some commercial success with reprints of work
by Robert E. Howard (creator of Conan the Barbarian).

In 1976, after the family had moved to West Linn, Oregon, Dikty founded the
specialty publisher Starmont House, which published non-fiction about the science
fiction field. At the time of his death in 1991 at the age of 71, Dikty and May had
moved in Mercer Island, Washington; his daughter, Barbara Dikty, had already been
made President of Starmont House, Inc. by then.

In September 2013, he was posthumously named to the First Fandom Hall of


Fame in a ceremony at the 71st World Science Fiction Convention.

Enjoy!

0000000

Página 19