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INDIA ENVIRONMENT REPORT

Air Pollution Control and Opportunities in India

AIR POLLUTION IN INDIA

In India, air pollution is proving to be an issue of concern, not just an environmental issue but also a
public health issue. Rapid urbanisation and industrialisation with ongoing population explosion is
putting significant pressure on its infrastructure and natural resources. While industrial development
is contributing significantly to economic growth in India, environment has to pay a considerable cost
for this development.
According to a study done by environmental research centres at Yale and Columbia universities,
India has got worst air pollution in the entire world, beating China, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh.
Out of 132 countries whose environments were surveyed, India ranked last in the Air (effects on
human health) ranking.
Outdoor air pollution has become the fifth largest killer in India after high blood pressure, indoor air
pollution, tobacco smoking, and poor nutrition says a new set of findings of the Global Burden of
Disease report.
According to the Planning Commission of India, air quality has also deteriorated sharply carrying with
it concomitant health costs. For instance, according to a Planning Commission document, per capita
emission levels in Indias seven largest cities have been estimated to be at least three times higher
than the WHO standards. Air pollution levels were low in only three cities of the 127 cities
monitored by the Central Pollution Control Board under the National Air Quality Monitoring
Programme (2009).
In a recent World Bank report, India - An Analysis of Physical and Monetary Losses of Environmental
Health and Natural Resources published in June 2013, the total cost of environmental degradation
in India was pegged at about Rs. 3.75 trillion (US$80 billion) annually, equivalent to 5.7 percent of
GDP in 2009. Of this total, outdoor air pollution accounts for Rs. 1.1 trillion or 1.7 percent of GDP in
2009 followed by the cost of indoor air pollution at Rs. 0.9 trillion or 1.3 percent of GDP in 2009.
In India, air pollution is monitored for four air pollutants, which are sulphur dioxide (SO2), oxides of
nitrogen (NOx), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and respirable particulate matter (PM10).

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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MAIN REASONS FOR AIR POLLUTION IN INDIA

Air pollution and its resultant impacts in India can mainly be attributed to emissions from vehicular,
industrial and domestic activities.
India has witnessed an explosive growth of population and is expected to grow to 1.4 billion by the
year 2030, with over 590 million (approx 40%) of that population residing in the cities. The
population growth has mainly centred on cities with large scale migration of rural population in
search of livelihoods.
Following the trends of urbanization and population growth in Indian cities, there has been a sharp
growth in vehicles, resulting in vehicular emissions containing pollutants such as sulphur dioxide,
nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, lead, ozone, benzene, and hydrocarbons. Vehicular emission is
now considered as one of the major source of air pollution in the urban areas.
Apart from the volume of vehicles, the air pollution has been exacerbated by issues like poor quality
of fuel, including use of adulterated fuel; poor vehicle designs especially ones with two-stroke
engines; lack of mass transport systems in most Indian cities; and poor traffic management and road
conditions.
Industry also plays a major role in high levels of air pollution in India. While the Indian economy is
growing at a healthy rate, led by a robust performance of the industrial sector, the downside has
been the growing incidence of air pollution. These emissions are of two forms - solid particles (SPM)
and gaseous emissions (SO , NO , CO, etc.). Heavy polluting industries were identified which are
included under the 17 categories of highly polluting industries for the purpose of monitoring and
regulating pollution from them. These industries are:
1. Aluminium Smelter
2. Caustic Soda
3. Cement
4. Copper Smelter
5. Distilleries
6. Dyes & Dye Intermediates
7. Fertiliser
8. Integrated Iron & Steel
9. Tanneries
10. Pesticides
11. Petrochemicals
12. Drugs & Pharmaceuticals
13. Pulp & Paper
14. Oil Refineries
15. Sugar
16. Thermal Power Plants
17. Zinc Smelter
The Ministry of Environment and Forests has developed standards for regulating emissions for
various industries including thermal power stations, iron and steel plants, cement plants, fertilizer
plants, oil refineries, pulp and paper, petrochemicals, sugar, distilleries and tanneries.
India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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Out of these industries, the biggest source of air pollution in India is use of high ash coal in power
generation. In 2010 India had approximately 179 gigawatts (GW) of installed electric capacity. Coalfired power plants accounted for 53% and natural gas plants for 11% of installed capacity; however,
thermal power plants accounted for 83% of electricity generated (CEA 2010). Coal-fired power plants
in India are, in general, less efficient than their counterparts in developed countries. Indian coal also
has much lower heating value than coal mined in the US or China, resulting in more coal is used to
produce a kWh of electricity in India than in other countries.
The pollution intensity of Indian power plants (i.e., grams of pollutant per kWh) also depends on the
ash and sulphur content of the coal burned. Indian coal has high ash content, between 35 and 50%
by weight, and lower sulphur content, about 0.5% by weight. The high ash content of Indian coal
leads to high PM emissions. Although all coal plants in India have electrostatic precipitators (ESPs),
the high ash content of coal and its chemical composition reduce their removal efficiency. There is
also the problem of fly ash disposal. Approximately 100 million tons of fly ash is generated annually.
The ash is stored in ponds and poses a hazard to surface water sources from runoff and to ground
water from percolation.
Other major sources of air pollution in India are:

Emission from oil fired furnace/boiler


Emission from stone crusher, hot mix plants, lime kilns, foundry
Hospital waste incinerator
Emission from stationery DG sets/portable DG sets
Emission from diesel vehicles (bus and trucks)
Re-suspension of road dust
Indoor Air pollution due factors like combustion, building material, the ground under the
building, and biological agents
Burning of biomass/tyre, tube
Emission from waste oil reprocessing industries.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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AIR QUALITY IN INDIA

The Government has published the Revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards, 2009 (NAAQS2009) in the official Gazette on 16th November, 2009. These ambient air quality standards/ limits
provide a legal framework for the control and monitoring of air pollution.

* Annual Arithmetic mean of minimum 104 measurements in a year at a particular site taken twice a week 24 hourly at uniform interval.
** 24 hourly 08 hourly or 01 hourly monitored values, as applicable shall be complied with 98% of the time in a year. 2% of the time, they
may exceed the limits but not on two consecutive days of monitoring.

Detailed report on Environmental Standards for Ambient Air, Automobiles, Fuel, Industries and
Noise is available at
http://www.cpcb.nic.in/upload/NewItems/NewItem_194_PCLS_4_Environmental_Standards.pdf
The pollution control classification is given in the table below:
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Pollution
Level

Low (L)
Moderate (M)
High (H)
Critical (C)

Annual Mean Concentration Range (g/m3)


Industrial, Residential, Rural & others
Ecologically Sensitive Area
areas
SO2
NO2
PM10
SO2
NO2
PM10
0-25
0-20
0-30
0-10
0-15
0-30
26-50
21-40
31-60
11-20
16-30
31-60
51-75
41-60
61-90
21-30
31-45
61-90
>75
>60
>90
>30
>45
>90

Source: Central Pollution Control Board, 2010

The number and percentage of cities exceeding NAAQS (based on annual average data) is presented
in the table below
Cities with industrial, residential,
rural & commercial areas

Cities with sensitive area

SO2
> 50

NO2
> 40

PM10
> 60

SO2
> 20

NO2
> 30

PM10
> 60

Not Exceeding NAAQS

163 (99)

146 (88)

36 (22)

11 (92)

11 (92)

3 (23)

Exceeding NAAQS

1 (1)

19 (12)

131 (78)

1 (8)

1 (8)

10 (77)

Total Locations

164

165

167

12

12

13

Source: Analysis by the Central Pollution Control Board and Ministry of Environment and Forest with respect to National Ambient Air
Quality Standards (NAAQS) during 2010
Note: Figures in parenthesis indicate percentage

Considering residential/industrial/rural area, 19 cities (12% for NO2) and 131 cities (78% for PM10)
exceed NAAQS. Considering sensitive area, 1 (8%) city exceed NAAQS for SO2 and NO2 and 10 (77%)
cities exceed for PM10 respectively.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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Most Polluted Cities


The table below indicates Indias top 10 polluted cities with respect to three pollutants:

SO2

NO2

Rank

City

Lote (Maha)

28

High

35

Moderate

32

Moderate

32

Moderate

32

Moderate

31

Moderate

30

Moderate

Dehradun
(Uttarakhand
)
Jamshedpur
(Jharkhand)
Marmagao
(Goa)
Curchorem
(Goa)
Badlapur
(Maha)
Ulhasnagar
(Maha)
Ghaziabad
(UP)
Pune (Maha)

29

Moderate

10

Khurja (UP)

29

Moderate

3
4
5
6
7
8

(g Classificat
/m3 ion
)
60
High

City

Howrah
(WB)
Barrackpo
re (WB)
Badlapur
(Maha)
Ulhasnag
ar (Maha)
Asansol
(WB)
Durgapur
(WB)
Sankrail
(WB)
Raniganj
(WB)
Kolkata
(WB)
Delhi (UT)

PM10

(g
/m3
)
75

Classifi City
cation

(g Classifi
/m3 cation
)
308 Critical

Critical

Gwalior (MP)

74

Critical

302

Critical

73

Critical

290

Critical

68

Critical

West
Singhbhum
(Jharkhand)
Ghaziabad
(UP)
Raipur (CG)

289

Critical

66

Critical

Delhi (UT)

261

Critical

66

Critical

261

Critical

65

Critical

Yamunanaga
r (Haryana)
Usgao (Goa)

245

Critical

63

Critical

237

Critical

62

Critical

231

Critical

55

High

Jharia
(Jharkhand)
Khanna
(Punjab)
Alwar
(Rajasthan)

225

Critical

Source: Central Pollution Control Board, 2010


Note: The respective states have been mentioned in brackets. The abbreviation is given below:
CG Chhattisgarh; Maha Maharashtra; UP Uttar Pradesh; MP Madhya Pradesh; UT Union Territory WB West Bengal

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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Most Polluted States


The table below indicates Indias top 5 polluted states with respect to the three pollutants:

SO2
Rank

State

1
2
3
4
5

NO2
Class
ificat
ion
Low
Low
Low
Low

State

Jharkhand
Maharashtra
Gujarat
Goa

(g
/m3
)
23
17
15
14

Haryana

14

Low

Uttar
Pradesh

West Bengal
Delhi
Jharkhand
Maharashtra

PM10

(g
/m3
)
64
55
39
31

Classificat
ion

State

Critical
High
Moderate
Moderate

30

Moderate

Delhi
Jharkhand
Punjab
Uttar
Pradesh
Haryana

(g
/m3
)
261
193
187
181

Classifi
cation

171

Critical

Critical
Critical
Critical
Critical

Source: Central Pollution Control Board, 2010

Air Pollution in Metropolitan Cities (population 1 million; Census 2001)


The table below shows the number of metropolitan cities with low, moderate, high & critical air
quality
Number of Metropolitan Cities (population > 1 million)
Pollution
Cities with industrial, residential,
Cities with sensitive area
Level
rural & commercial areas
SO2
NO2
PM10
SO2
NO2
PM10
Low (L)
32
9
0
1
0
0
Moderate (M)
2
20
2
0
1
0
High (H)
0
3
8
0
0
0
Critical (C)
0
2
24
0
0
1
Total Cities
32
34
34
1
1
1
Source: Central Pollution Control Board, 2010

With respect to SO2 revels all the cities except Jamshedpur and Pune are in the low category and all
are within the prescribed standard. As for NO2, the 2 cities in critical category are Asansol and
Kolkata. With respect to PM10, the 24 cities in critical category are Vijayawada, Patna, Delhi,
Ahmedabad, Rajkot, Vadodara, Faridabad, Dhanbad, Jamshedpur, Bhopal, Indore, Jabalpur, Mumbai,
Nagpur, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jaipur, Agra, Allahabad, Kanpur, Lucknow, Meerut, Varanasi, Asansol
and Kolkata.
Of the 35 metropolitan cities 5 (15%) and 32 (94%) cities exceed the NAAQS with respect to NO2 and
PM10 in the residential / industrial / rural / commercial areas. None of the cities exceed the
standard limit with respect to SO2.
It is observed Ammonia (NH3) is within NAAQS in six metro cities. With respect to Ozone (O3) the
values at Delhi are within NAAQS, however in case of PM2.5 and Carbon monoxide (CO) with respect
to Delhi the value observed is mostly above the NAAQS.
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Trends
An analysis of ten years data reveals a decreasing trend of SO2. This may be attributed to various
interventions that have taken place in recent years such as reduction in sulphur in diesel, use of
cleaner fuel such as CNG in metro cities, change in domestic fuel from coal to LPG etc. NO2
concentration has remained more or less stable over the years despite increase in sources like
vehicles. The reason for this may be various intervention measures that have taken place such as
improvement in vehicle technology and other vehicular pollution control measures like alternate
fuel etc. PM10 concentration shows fluctuating trend. Vehicular emissions are a major source of
PM10. Increasing number of vehicles may be a reason for this trend. The other reasons being
emission from gensets, small scale industries, biomass incineration, suspension of traffic dust,
natural dust, commercial and domestic use of fuel etc.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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AIR POLLUTION CONTROL IN INDIA

In order to prevent, control and abate air pollution, Government of India has enacted Air (Prevention
and Control of Pollution) Act in 1981. According to Section 2(b) of Air (Prevention and control of
pollution) Act, 1981 air pollution has been defined as the presence in the atmosphere of any air
pollutant. As per Section 2(a) of Air (Prevention and control of pollution) Act, 1981 air pollutant has
been defined as any solid, liquid or gaseous substance *(including noise)+ present in the atmosphere
in such concentration as may be or tend to be injurious to human beings or other living creatures or
plants or property or environment.
Central Pollution Control Board initiated National Ambient Air Quality Monitoring (NAAQM)
programme in the year 1984 with 7 stations at Agra and Anpara. Subsequently the programme was
renamed as National Air Quality Monitoring Programme (NAMP).
The objectives of the NAMP are as follows:

To determine status and trends of ambient air quality;


To ascertain whether the prescribed ambient air quality standards are violated;
To Identify Non-attainment Cities;
To obtain the knowledge and understanding necessary for developing preventive and
corrective measures;
To understand the natural cleansing process undergoing in the environment through
pollution dilution, dispersion, wind based movement, dry deposition, precipitation and
chemical transformation of pollutants generated.

The program currently has 560 ambient air quality monitoring stations covering 223 cities, towns
and industrial areas in 26 States and five Union Territories. The organisational structure of air quality
monitoring is shown below

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Under NAMP three criteria pollutants viz. PM10 (Particulate Matter having an aerodynamic
diameter less than or equal to 10 m), Sulphur dioxide (SO2) and Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are
identified for regular monitoring at all locations. Additional parameters like Carbon monoxide (CO),
Ammonia (NH3), Lead (Pb) and Ozone (O3) are monitored at selected locations. The other
parameters as notified in revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) are PM2.5
(Particulate Matter having an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 m), Benzo(a)pyrene
{B(a)P}, Arsenic (As) and (Ni) are slowly being added in monitoring network under NAMP.
Various other initiatives have also been taken for control of air pollution from vehicles, industries
and other sources.

Automobile Pollution Control


Automobile Pollution Control initiatives includes enforcement of a variety of control measures
ranging from notification of advanced Euro-IV equivalent emission norms and commensurate fuel
for new vehicles to stricter exhaust emission limits for in-use vehicles. It also involves augmentation
of infrastructures for alternative fuels and mass transits and other urban planning and management
options.
Various initiatives in alternative fuels are being explored, mainly in Bio-fuels such as Ethanol and
Biodiesel.

Industrial Pollution Control


Industries have been directed to install necessary pollution control equipment in a time bound
manner and legal action has been initiated against the defaulting units. Industries are encouraged to
use cleaner technologies and low waste or zero waste technologies to reduce waste generation and
emissions of pollutants. Some of these are: technologies for removal of SO2 from flue gas; NOx
removal technologies; characterization of fabric filter dust collector; evaluation of technologies of
different types of fluidized bed combustion boilers; evaluation of clean coal technologies; and
optimization of combustion efficiency and control of emissions from small boilers. 24 critically
polluted areas have been identified and action plan have been formulated for restoration of
environmental quality in these areas.
Development of guidelines for treatment and disposal of hazardous waste for minimum
contaminants before disposal and environmental impact assessment has been undertaken in various
states of the country.
Environmental audit in the form of environmental statement has been made mandatory for all
polluting industries. Preparation of zoning Atlas has been taken up for setting of industries based on
environmental considerations.
Environmental regulations also requires power plants (coal based) located beyond 1000 kms from
the pit-head to use low ash content coal (not exceeding 34%). Power plants located in the sensitive
areas are also required to use low ash coal irrespective of their distance from pit heads.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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Emission Trading Scheme


The Ministry of Environment and Forests has initiated an important project to design and evaluate a
pilot emissions trading scheme (ETS) for particulate matter from stationary sources, being launched
in three states: Gujarat, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu wherein the Central Pollution Control Board is
working as Nodal Agency for overall implementation of the program.
This involves Emission Trading using Particulate Matter as marker pollutant from industrial point
sources. Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) is being used for real time assessment of
emission concentration vis--vis emission load. This will help to gather real time information on
pollution load from the stationary sources and ensure the implementation of the regulation more
transparently and effectively.

Proposed National-level Working Groups


The Ministry of Environment & Forest (MoEF) has also suggested creating six national-level working
groups, to be housed in the respective thematic ministries, to provide sectoral recommendations.
These working groups are:

Group for working on road quality improvement and minimizing re-suspension of road dust,
development of progressive vehicle exhaust norms, etc
Thematic Ministry- Ministry of Road Transport & Highways.
Group on improvement of fuel quality.
Thematic Ministry- Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas.
Group to deal with old vehicles, retrofitting of pollution control devices, scrap policy,
inspection & maintenance issues, etc.
Thematic Ministry - Ministry of Heavy Industries.
Group on industrial activities: industrial action plan implementation.
Thematic Ministry- Ministry of Commerce & Industry (Department of Industrial Policy &
Promotion).
Group on traffic management use of IT in traffic management, guidelines for minimizing/
synchronization traffic signals, providing adequate parking, parking fee structure, etc.
Thematic Ministry- Ministry of Home Affairs.
Group on construction activities - prepare and supervise implementation of guidelines on
cleaner construction projects.
Thematic Ministry - Ministry of Urban Development

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AIR POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT MARKET IN INDIA


There is a growing awareness in India about the hazards of air pollution, and is acting as a driver for
the growth of air pollution control equipment (APCE). Industries ranging from power plants to
cement manufacturing units are investing in new technologies to curb emissions. According to an
analysis by Frost & Sullivan, the APCE segment in India is expected to grow from US$ 300 million
(2008 market size) to almost US$ 700 million by 2013. The market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR
of 14.2 per cent from 2012 to 2017.
The market for air pollution control equipment is mainly driven by the regulations. Key user
segments are power, cement and steel and these sectors account for 85.0 per cent of the total
market. Investments in these user segments are also providing the necessary impetus for market
growth.
Indian Governments Power for All by 2012 programme and the proposed ultra mega power
projects is expected to increase the demand for APCE. With increasingly strong enforcement of
emission control norms, we expect a growing demand for:
-

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) for Particulate Matter (PM) in light of
Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) that is being piloted in India.
Electrostatic precipitators (ESP)
Stack air quality monitoring equipment
Wet Scrubbers
Mechanical Dust Collectors
Bag Filters
Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD)
Analyzers and monitors such as CO Analyzer, NOx Analyzer, SO2 Analyzer, O3 Analyzer, BTX
Analyzer, PM Monitor (TSP, PM10, PM2.5)
Meteorological Stations
Portable Calibration Unit & Multi Calibration System for the station
Monitoring station
Day light & night visible data display system
Clean coal technologies
Technologies to help by-product recovery and reuse

Challenges
Major challenges include price pressures from unorganized players and lack of product knowledge
for various production processes. Major participants find it extremely difficult to match prices
offered by small participants, especially in product categories such as mechanical dust collectors and
wet scrubbers (WS).
As the manufacturing technology for bag filters (BF) and WS is less complex compared to that of ESP
and FGD, many participants are encouraged to foray into this product line. However, market
fragmentation allows customers the upper hand in these product lines, intensifying price sensitivity.
Lack of product knowledge among small participants is also an issue. They do not have the requisite
knowledge of the application of APCE products in relation to the characteristics of emissions
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generated by various end-user industries. The use of wrong materials for construction of APCE
reduces both quality and efficiency. Such products fall prey to frequent failures causing downtime
and violation of air pollution control norms, eroding customer confidence considerably.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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KEY METHODS OF DOING BUSINESS


A new entrant to the Indian market can decide on one of the following options depending on the
expected volume of business, the nature of business, market potential and its long-term strategy for
the Indian market. These are:
-

To appoint a Distributor/representative
Open a Liaison Office
Open a Branch Office
Joint Venture / Wholly Owned Subsidiary

Besides the above referred options, a number of Environment sector specific market entry strategies
and operational strategies are adopted. Some of the most common ones are listed below:
-

Consortium arrangements - for bids to large PSU projects/ donor agency-supported projects.
Strategic partnering with industry associations and jointly investing in demonstration plants,
especially for new technologies.
Participation in Seminars, Workshops and Conferences and Training Programmes - especially
for consultancy, training and software; technology providers also find this as a useful entry
strategy.

There are a number of International aid funded projects in the sector. World Bank, Asian
Development Bank, DFID and other international donor agencies as well as the Ministry of
Environment & Forests in India may be contacted for project details.
More detailed information on Doing Business India is available on the UKTI website.
While this report provides an overview of E-waste market in India, for more detailed and bespoke
research, please contact our Environment and Water Team members. UKTI can assist you on every
step of the exporting journey. Whatever stage of development your business is at, we can give you
the support that you need to expand and prosper.
Through a range of unique services, including participation at selected trade fairs, outward missions
and providing bespoke market intelligence, we can help you crack foreign markets and get to grips
quickly with overseas regulations and business practice. Detailed information on various UKTI
Services is provided at UKTIs website.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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Key Stakeholders & Contacts


The Ministry of Environment & Forests
The Central Pollution Control Board
The State Pollution Control Boards
Toxic Links

www.moef.nic.in
www.cpcb.nic.in
www.toxicslink.org

Sources of information
-

Ministry of Environment & Forests


Central Pollution Control Board
European Business and Technology Centre
Centre for Science and Environment
Frost & Sullivan

Important Events

IFAT India - http://www.ifat-india.com/


Power-Gen India and Central Asia - http://www.power-genindia.com/index.html#pgica_2
Clean India - http://www.cleanindiapulire.com/waste-management-recycling-pavilion/
Resource India Expo - http://www.resourceindiaexpo.com/
Municipalika - http://www.municipalika.com/municipalika/index.html
Intec - http://www.intec.codissia.com/

Performance & Impact Monitoring Survey (PIMS)


UK Trade & Investment (UKTI) is striving to provide the highest quality service to all its clients, and
greatly values feedback from the businesses it has helped. In order to achieve this, UKTI has
commissioned an independent market research specialist, OMB Research, to conduct surveys on its
behalf. The interviews invite clients to provide frank views on both the quality and usefulness of the
support provided. These surveys are conducted under the market research code of conduct, which
means that all of the survey responses are strictly confidential, and reported to UKTI only in
anonymised aggregate form.
UKTI uses the findings from these surveys to help drive quality and satisfaction improvement and to
inform the focus of its trade services, to ensure they are meeting the needs of UK exporters as
effectively as possible. As you are a recipient of this report, you may be contacted by OMB research
and asked to take part in the survey. Participation in the surveys is voluntary, but as this evidence is
so important to informing UKTI policy development, we very much hope you will be able to take
part.

India Environment Report: Air Pollution Control & Opportunities in India

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CONTACT FOR THIS REPORT


UKTI team based in India will be able to providing bespoke information on feasibility of your
product/service in the market; opportunities, prospects and evaluation of market-entry strategies
through Overseas Market Introduction Services (OMIS). For more information, please contact:
Rishikesh Chanda, Senior Trade & Investment Adviser
UK Trade & Investment, India
Tel: +91 33 2288 5172
Email: rishikesh.chanda@fco.gov.uk
Dipankar Chakraborty, Trade & Investment Adviser
UK Trade & Investment, India
Tel: +91 33 2288 5172
Email: dipankar.chakraborty@fco.gov.uk

UK Trade & Investment


UK Trade & Investment is the government organisation that helps UK-based companies succeed in
the global economy. We also help overseas companies bring their high quality investment to the
UKs dynamic economy acknowledged as Europes best place from which to succeed in global
business.
UK Trade & Investment offers expertise and contacts through its extensive network of specialists in
the UK, and in British embassies and other diplomatic offices around the world. We provide
companies with the tools they require to be competitive on the world stage.
Apart from Overseas Market Introduction Service (OMIS), UKTI assists UK exporters through the
Export Marketing Research Scheme (EMRS) and Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP). EMRS provides
independent advice, at no charge, on carrying out marketing research and may provide for a grant of
up to 50% of the cost of conducting market research. TAP supports UK SMEs to exhibit at overseas
trade fairs, funds promotional activity to enhance UK exhibitor groups at those events and can
provide assistance for businesses who buy speaker time at international conferences to promote
their goods or services.

www.ukti.gov.uk

Whereas every effort has been made to ensure that the information given in this document is accurate, neither UK Trade & Investment
nor its parent Departments (the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office) accept liability
for any errors, omissions or misleading statements, and no warranty is given or responsibility accepted as to the standing of any individual,
firm, company or other organisation mentioned.
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