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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT MM5004 (Operations Management) GENERAL MANAGEMENT (GM 3) August-November 2016 MASTER

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT MM5004 (Operations Management) GENERAL MANAGEMENT (GM 3) August-November 2016 MASTER OF

MM5004

(Operations Management)

GENERAL MANAGEMENT (GM 3)

August-November 2016

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

http://www.sbm.itb.ac.id/mba

Internationally accredited by

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG http://www.sbm.itb.ac.id/mba Internationally accredited by 1

CONTENTS

 

Page

Facilitator Profile

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3

Course Description

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3

Expected Learning Outcome …………………………

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Course Outline

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5

Learning Guidance

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6

Prerequisite

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6

Learning Method

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6

Presentation

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8

Attendance

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8

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9

Group Project Participation

…………………… Mid-Term Test and Final Examination …………………………

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9

10

Grading Policy

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10

Reading Materials

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11

Course Schedule

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11

List of Cases

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20

FACILITATOR PROFILES

Ir. Adirizal Nizar, MBA (AN)

E-mail: adirizal.nizar@sbm-itb.ac.id

Phone: 08111772841

Adirizal received his Bachelor degree in Industrial Engineering at Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB) and holds an MBA degree from University Southern of California (USC). He was theTechnical Director of PT Toyota-Astra Motor, a leading automotive company in Indonesia. He has more than 30 years of managerial experience in general and manufacturing management, specializing in production control, quality control, purchasing, engineering, and product development.

D. Ir. Aries F Firman, M.Sc., MBA (AF)

E-mail: aries.firman@sbm-itb.ac.id Phone: 08158767467

Aries received his bachelor degree majoring in Civil Engineering from Institute of Technology Bandung. He obtained master degree for MBA at University of Luton (U.K.) and doctor degree from Curtin University, Perth, Australia.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Operations management involves planning and controlling the processes used to produce the goods and services provided by an organization. In essence, it is the management of all activities related to doing the actual work of the organization. Managing these processes can be quite challenging they are often very complex, and can involve large numbers of people and facilities, huge volumes of materials and great distances. Managed well, an organization’s operations can be a key source of competitive advantage. They can play a critical role in facilitating an organization’s marketing strategy, and they can enable an organization to deliver its products or services with high quality at low cost. Managed poorly, operations can be a significant contributor to disappointing results. As a result, a fundamental understanding of operations management is important for all managers within an organization.

EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Specific objectives of the course are to:

a. Introduce you to the functional area of operations and to increase your awareness of how a firm’s operations interface with the other functional areas of the organization.

b. Familiarize you with the various issues and problems that traditionally arise in the management of operations within both manufacturing and service organizations.

c. Acquaint you with some of the terminology, modeling, and methodologies that often arise in the handling and resolution of these issues and problems.

After completing the course, participants are expected to:

1. Put operations management system in perspective by recognizing the inputs, transformation process, and desired outputs of a system.

2. Know how effective management of operations contributes to productivity improvement.

3. Know various functional areas of an organization and their critical integrated role in the performance of the organization.

4. Know the differences between manufacturing and service organizations.

5. Know the concept of competitive priorities and the primary ways business organizations compete globally.

6. Know the differences between various production systems in terms of production volume and customization.

7. Know the philosophical and statistical elements of total quality management (TQM) as well as the concepts of six sigma, continuous improvement, and business process reengineering.

8. Know the critical role of supply chain management in the competitiveness of the organizations.

9. Know the concept of inventory management and the differences between push and pull systems.

10. Be able to recognize operations management problems in practical settings such as real life operations problems and case studies.

11. Know how to set-up and use selected operations management techniques such as, break-even analysis, decision trees, project management (PERT/CPM), layout, queuing models, quality improvement tools, statistical control charts, and inventory management models.

COURSE OUTLINE

The course consists of the following modules:

1. Strategy: This module addresses the issues of operations strategy and competitiveness and how the field of operations management can provide direction in gaining and maintaining competitive advantage. Sessions include: introduction to the field, operations and supply strategy, product design.

2. Supply Chain Management: This module introduces the latest concepts of a supply chain strategy. Such ideas as of outsourcing, postponement, and product outsourcing are discussed. Decisions related to logistics, locations, and concept connections are very important part in supply chain management.

3. Logistics and Distribution: This module is a high-level view of the latest concepts of global supply chain strategy. Logistics, distribution, and transportation are critical to success in running a global supply chain strategy.

4. Product and Service: Product development process, cost planning, value analysis/value engineering, and measuring product development performance.

5. Process Control: Among the most important decisions made by operations managers are those involving the design and improvement of the process for producing goods and services. These decisions include choice of process, analysis of flows through operations, and the associated job design in operations. This module is about designing, improving efficient processes and quality. While quality management is cross-functional in nature and involves the entire organization, operation has a special responsibility to produce a quality products and services for the customer. This requires the cooperation of the entire organization and careful attention to management.

6. Project Management: Management often involves juggling a portfolio of projects. There are many different types of projects ranging from the development of totally new products, revisions to old products, new marketing plans, and a vast array of projects for better serving customers and reducing cost. This module discusses the technical aspects of project scheduling, the people skills related to motivation, conflict resolution as key decision points occur in the project, and leading a team work in a project.

7. Scheduling: Scheduling decisions allocate available capacity or resources (equipment, labor, and space) to jobs, activities, tasks, or customers over time. Since scheduling is an allocation decision, it uses the resources made available by facilities decisions and aggregate planning.

8. Lean Operation: This module discusses the just in-in-time (JIT) philosophy along with its extension to service firms and lean thinking. JIT is called a philosophy because it goes far beyond inventory control and encompasses the entire system of production. JIT is an approach that seeks to eliminate all sources of waste in production activities by producing the right part at the right place at the right time. Lean thinking is an extension of JIT beyond production to design, distribution, supply chain, and services. It is important to understand JIT before discussing lean thinking.

9. Inventory Management: This module is important to understanding the purpose of inventory such as inventory costs, independent versus dependent demand, inventory control systems to control optimal stock and inventory cost are discussed.

10. Operation Planning: Running a business requires a great planning system. How many people should we hire to handle rush business session? How much inventory do we need? What should we produce today? Therefore, planning and controlling is the last and most constrained decision in the hierarchy of business decisions. Planning seeks to achieve several conflicting objectives: high efficiency, low inventories, and good customer service. This module focuses on problem solving in planning and controlling that can be applied to many business areas. To correctly treat the topic, the approach is, - first defining some basic issues about firms purpose, goals, and performance measures and then dealing with planning, providing buffer inventories, the influence of quality, and the interactions with marketing, and accounting. Quality is one of the four key objectives of operations, along with cost, flexibility, and delivery.

LEARNING GUIDANCE

PREREQUISITES

No prerequisites, aside from management experience, are required for this course.

LEARNING METHOD

The case method is used throughout the subject. Class members are encourages to incorporate concepts from assigned readings into their analysis of the case. Normally two teams will be assigned to present their findings for each case. All class members

are expected to have read each case and reflected upon the assigned questions, whether or not their team has been assigned the case. Syndicates should submit a brief written summary of their analysis and recommendations to the facilitator at the time case will be discussed in the Power Point format, with two slides printed on each page.

Comments on case analysis:

1. Approach. It is useful to begin a case analysis with a quick reading to gain an overall impression of scope and of the subject matter. The next reading should focus on absorbing details and facts in the case. Then development of a points

outline following the four component structure is often useful, particularly as it reveals important issues and types of appropriate analysis. Various kinds of analysis should then be undertaken.

2. Assumptions. If analysis cannot proceed because the assumptions on which it is based are not explicitly given in the case, it is often useful to create assumptions and state them explicitly. This can unblock analysis and lead to useful insights. Even if your assumptions are wrong, a good analysis which flows from them is better than no analysis at all! Also, be prepared to challenge executive opinions and beliefs about the nature of the problem given in the case and/or data that has been hastily compiled or based on poor research.

3. Integration. Effective integration means that the alternatives should all be clearly related to the identified problems, the issues should be critical to the alternatives chosen, and the conclusion should flow logically from the analysis. If alternatives are specified but not evaluated, the analysis is incomplete.

4. Alternatives. Try to select a set of alternatives that are relatively unique or allow distinctions in strategy. Alternatives which are too similar often lead to overlooking some important detail or restricting analysis unnecessarily.

5. Do’s and Don’ts. You may find the following list of 12 Do’s and Don’ts in case analysis useful:

a. Be completed.

b. Avoid rehashing case facts.

c. Make reasonable assumptions.

d. Don’t confuse symptoms with problems

e. Don’t confuse opportunities with taking action.

f. Deal with objectives realistically.

g. Recognize alternatives.

h. Don’t be inflexible.

i. Discuss the pros and cons of each alternative.

j. Use financial and other quantitative information.

k. Reach a clear decision.

l. Make good use of evidence developed in your analysis.

Case analysis and discussion: Successful case analysis requires fresh perspectives and no prior knowledge of how the case was "solved" by the company or "analyzed" by other “experts”. It is fine (in fact, it is a good idea) to discuss case content with other

students in the same course section prior to coming to class; but you should not seek inside information on cases (e.g., through the library). You should not discuss cases with students who have taken the course in the past. Likewise, you should not reveal the outcomes of the case or case discussion with students who will encounter the case in the future (e.g., other sections who have not yet discussed the case).

PRESENTATION

Syndicates will be assigned to make presentations of their case analysis to the entire class randomly at the time of case will be discussed. Therefore all syndicates have to prepare for it appropriately.

The audience for the case presentations are the other members of the class. Please address your talk to them. The syndicates may make the presentation as a team, or assign a spokesperson to each case. In any case the syndicates should ensure that all team members have any equal opprotunity to participate in the presentations.

The criteria for measuring the effectiveness of presentations include:

Is the comment accurate? Reflecting case facts but not repeating them?

Does the comment add to our understanding of the problem situation or is it frivolous, an attempt to get “air time”?

Is the comment timely and linked to the comments of others?

Is the comment action oriented, or simply a descriptive statement?

Does the comment move the discussion along by giving a new perspective?

Does the comment reflect a concern for maintaining a constructive and comfortable classroom atmosphere?

Is the comment clear and concise or obscure and rambling?

Some specific case questions are usually provided to help you to prepare the case reports, but your own ideas and creativity are paramount. Keep the report concise. There is no need to summarise the case materials. Simply get to the main points and provide your analysis and/or recommendations with supporting justification.

ATTENDANCE

Attendance at each class session is expected. If at some point during the term you find that you cannot attend a particular session, you are responsible for obtaining any handouts, submitting any assignments, and mastering the material for that session. Missing a session necessarily impacts your class participation grade.

GROUP PROJECT

Each syndicate may conduct an investigation and analysis of operations strategy in a local organisation. Based on some actual work experiences of some member’s, or it can be based on a study of an operation management, you select an operation where your group will be allowed to independently collect data relevant to the object of visit. Limit your scope of your investigation so that it can be accomplished, analysed and reported within scheduled period.

A project report is then due on the last class of the semester and will be used as a final exam grading. The report should include, but not limited to, the following:

1. Organisation Profile

2. A brief summary of the operation under study. It would be more communicative if you describe this part in the flow chart format.

3. The major challenges/ problems in managing this specific operations.

4. A critical assesment of the operations/processes under study. How are the current operations being managed to meet certain aspects in the strategy map perspectives? What are the important competitive priorities? What the management has done and is doing to deliver this performance? Are they successful? Outline any existing problems in the operations and identify the potential causes of these problems. What strategy you choose to improve the situation?why and what be the potential impact? Are there any potential difficulties in implementation?

5. Overall, what have you learned in this project?

Each syndicate’s report will be graded for its professionalism, in addition to its content.it must be clear, concise and well organised. All reports must typewritten in double space or presented in Word Processor format. Provide title page with the report tittle with full names of each each team members, and include a one page abstract summarising the project. Make good use of exhibits such as tables and figures to support your analysis, when appropriate.The reports should be written in English and no more than 30 pages.

PARTICIPATION

Active participation is expected throughout the entire class and students should make thoughtful contributions to the discussion. Please note that frequency (i.e. quantity) of contributions in class is not a key criterion for effective class participation. The classroom should be considered a laobarory in which the student

can test his/her ability to convince peers of the correctness of one’s approach to complex problems and one’s ability to achieve the desired results by using that approach. Criteria that are yseful in measuring effective class participation include:

1. Is the participant a good listener?

2. Are the points that are made relevant to the discussion? Are they linked to the comments of others?

3. Do comments show evidence of incorporating the concepts from readings into the analysis of the case?

4. Is there a willingness to test new ideas, or are all comments ‘safe?’ (‘safe’ is defined as simply repeating case facts without analysis and conclusions).

5. Do comments clarify or build upon the important aspects of earlier comments and lead to a clearer statement of the concepts being covered and the problems being addressed?

MID-TERM TEST AND FINAL EXAMINATION

The mid-term test and final examination will be in class according to the schedule issued by the program. The work should be completed on 3 hours. Plagiarism or using someone else to complete this exam are forbidden.

GRADING POLICY

Grading of this course is based on whether or not participant’s performance meets the module standards for completion and proficiency in the subject materials.

Your final grade will be weighted as follows:

Aspect

%

Description

Attendance and Participation

40%

Individual grade by facilitator

Group Project

20%

Team grade by facilitator

Mid-term Test

20%

Individual grade by facilitator

Final Examinantion

20%

Individual grade by facilitator

READING MATERIALS

Required Text Books (pocket books):

Operations and Supply Chain Management (13 th edition 2011) by F. Robert Jacobs, and Richard B. Chase (JC)

Reference books and recommended reading:

Designing and Managing the Supply Chain (3 rd edition 2008) by David Simchi- Levi, Philip Kaminsky, Edith Simchi-Levi (SKS)

The Toyota Way, by Jeffrey Liker

Supplemental texts and helpful websites (Data and Internet):

HBS Toolkit - Basic Operations Self-Instructional Workbook

(http://hbswk.hbs.edu/archive/1460.html)

Production and Operations Management Society (www.poms.org)

Supply Chain and Operations Management Glossary (business.tepper.cmu.edu/files/supplychainandoperationsmanagementglossary.p df)

Operations Management Glossary

(webuser.bus.umich.edu/Organizations/rpa/GlossaryMay02.pdf)

Operations Management (www.managementhelp.org/ops_mgnt/ops_mgnt.htm)

Process Mapping (http://csob.berry.edu/faculty/jgrout/processmapping/index.html)

Open Online Courses: Process Improvement (http://gunston.gmu.edu/healthscience/)

COURSE SCHEDULE

Course Code

Credit

 

MM5004

Hours

GENERAL MANAGEMENTMBA-3, 2016

3 SKS

Course Title

OPERATION MANAGEMENT

Module 1:

 

Monday, 22 Aug. 2016

STRATEGY

08.00-09.30

Session 1: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Operations and Supply Chain Management

2. Issues Covered: Introduction to the field, Operation and Supply Management, Historical Development

3. Reading: JC, Ch.1 (p.38)

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussion

   

5.

Guiding questions for discussion:

 

a. What factors account for the resurgence of interest in OM today?

b. What is operation and supply strategy?

c. How to evaluate operation performance?

09.45-11.15

Session 2 (Case): Adirizal Nizar

1

Topic: TOYOTA AVANZA, The Rollout

2

Issues covered: The identification of a market opportunity in multipurpose vehicle 4X2 segment in Indonesia. Toyota Astra Motor had to capture the customers expectation in order to develop a new vehicle were directed to represent concept of advanced & modern styling, fun to drive & ride, economical, multipurpose, and minivan body

3

Objective: To learn market and customer expectation analysis in order to develop new product Avanza.

4

Activity: Lecturing and discussion.

5

Case: IBCC, Case No. 003-03-07-07

11.15 12.45

Session 3: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Strategy and Sustainability

2. Issues Covered: How to setting broad policies and plans for using the resources of a firm to best support its long term competitive strategy. A firm’s operations and supply strategy is comprehensive through its integration with corporate strategy.

3. Reading: JC, Ch.2 (p.56)

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussion

Module 2:

 

Monday, 29 Aug. 2016

 

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

08.00-09.30

Session 4: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Introduction Supply Chain Management

2. Issues Covered: Definition of SCM, Key observation, Development of chain, Global SCM, Uncertainty & Risk Factors, Evolution of SCM, Complexity of SCM.

3. Reading: SKS, Ch.1. (p.1)

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussions

09.45-11.15

Session 5 (Case): Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Crocs: Revolutionizing an Industry's Supply Chain Model for Competitive Advantage

2. Description: Discusses the astounding growth of Crocs, Inc., a manufacturer of plastic shoes, from 2003 through early 2007. Much of the company's growth was made possible by a highly flexible supply chain which enabled Crocs to build additional product within the selling season. The normal model used within the fashion

industry was to take orders well in advance of each selling season and produce to those orders, with relatively little additional production. If demand was far in excess of this production, there would be stock outs and the company would lose the ability to capture revenue for that season. The product might, or might not, be in fashion the following year, when production would again be based on pre-season orders. Crocs' ability to build additional shoes within the season enabled it to take advantage of strong customer demand, resulting in the company filling in-season orders totaling many times that of the initial pre-booked

orders.

3. Objective: To illustrate use of supply chain management as a central factor in a company's strategy, and examine the uses of in-sourcing and out-sourcing and the factors involved in constructing a flexible supply chain to address a global market.

4. Case: Crocs: Revolutionizing an Industry's Supply Chain Model for Competitive Advantage[Stanford University Case No. GS57]

5. Activity: Group and Class Discussion

6. Guiding questions for discussion:

a. What are Croc’s core competencies?

b. How do they exploit these competencies in the future?

c. How should Crocs plan its production an inventory?

11.15-12.45

Session 6: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Global Logistics and Risk Management

2. Issues Covered: Highlights the changing nature of resources and problems facing supply chain design, and need for supply chains to continually evolve. As market condition, customer bases, supply sources, technology, and competitive environment change, a supply chain

needs to evolve itself to meet the new challenges

3. Objective: To foster an understanding of the requirement for continual change of supply chains in a continually changing world

4. Reading: SKS, Ch.10 (p.312)

5. Activity: Group and class discussions

Module 3:

 

Monday, 5 Sep. 2016

 

LOGISTICS AND DISTRIBUTION

11.15-12.45

Session 7: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Location, Logistic, and Distribution

2. Issues Covered: Evaluation related to storage-handling system, supply chain collaboration, technological and economic success.

3. Reading: JC, Ch.12 (p.432)

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussions

9.45 -11.15

Session 8 (Case): Adirizal Nizar

1

Topic: Adani Agri Logistics Limited: Blocking The Grain Drain

2

Description:. Adani Agri Logistics Limited (AALL) was established 2005 to execute a national project for bulk handling of food grains through a public-private partnership (PPP) with the Food Corporation of India (FCI). Under this arrangement, the FCI supplied the food grain to AALL, who then acted as custodian until delivery at the various public distribution points. The case illustrates how supply chain technology can provide a useful solution to a sector marred with inefficiencies in a developing country with emerging economy.

3

Objective: This case can be used as an effective supplementary tool in courses on supply cahin operation strategy

4

Case: Adani Agri Logistics Limited: Blocking The GrainDrain[Ivey, Case No. W14072]

5

Activity: Group and Class Discussion

Module 4:

 

Monday, 19 Sep. 2016

 

PRODUCT AND SERVICE

08.00 09.30

Session 9: AdirizalNizar

1. Topic: Product and Service Design

2. Issues Covered: Product development process, cost

planning, value analysis/value engineering, and measuring product development performance.

3.

Reading: JC, Chp.3 (p.74)

4.Activity: Lecturing and discussion

09.45-11.15

Session 10 (Case): AdirizalNizar

1. Topic: Project Dreamcast: Serious Play at Sega Enterprises Ltd. (A)

2. Issues Covered: Sega Enterprises, one of the leading Japanese suppliers of videogames and consoles, has experienced a series of successes and setbacks in the global home videogames market. The fierce competition between Sega, Nintendo, and Sony is a battle for standards and profits. Central to Sega’s growth, which has been funded the company’s development of its next generation home videogame console, the Dreamcast platform. Because its previous console, Sega Saturn, was a financial disaster, senior management has focused on learning from past mistakes and doing everything right on its new Dreamcast development.

3. Objective: To enable a close look at product development and market launch strategies in an extremely competitive environment. Introduce to the importance of managing networks of suppliers, 3 rd party developers, distributors, retailers and customers during product development. Design product launch and marketing strategies. Identify and manage the operational issues of bringing products to market.

4. Activity: Group and Class Discussion

5. Case: Project Dreamcast: Serious Play at Sega Enterprises Ltd. (A), [HBS, 9-600-028]

6. Guiding questions for discussion:

 

How to characterize the competitive dynamics in the videogame industry? What the differences and the similarities of the development process of the Saturn and Dreamcast game platforms

Module 5:

 

PROCESS CONTROL

Monday, 26 Sep. 2016

 

08.00-09.30

Session 11: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Process Analysis& Quality Improvement

2. Issues Covered: Process Analysis, Process Flowcharting, Measuring Process Performance, and Job Design

3. Reading: JC, Ch.5 (p.142), Ch.9 (p.320)

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussions

09.45-11.15

Session 12 (Case): Adirizal Nizar

1.

Topic: Forefront Mfg.: Production Processes and Change Management in Mainland China

2.

Issues Covered: ForeFront Wood Products Mfg., produces and inefficiencies resulting from its processes and its culture. ForeFrontHoldings, plan an IPO and it has recently hired a new operation manager, Michael Li, who has the mandate to turn the factory around. The case describes the firm’s manufacturing and management the processes. Many issues are described, including high cost, low yields, unreported defects and equipments that fails to operate near its rated capacity.

3.

Objective: To introduce the major structural and systems dimensions of operations and to challenge student to develop coherent, plausible action pals that address root causes of the company’s problems and avoid to creating new problems

4.

Case: Ivey, case no. 906D20

5.

Activity: Group and class discussions

Monday, 3 Oct. 2016

MID-TERM TEST

09.00-12.00

Adirizal Nizar

Module 6:

 

Monday,10 Oct. 2016

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

08.00-09.30

Session 13: Aries Firman

1. Topic: Basic Principals of Project Management

2. Issues Covered: Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), Project management application.

3. Reading: PMBOK, 3 rd edition

 

4.

Activity: Lecturing and discussions

09.45-11.15

Session 14: (Case): Aries Firman

1

Topic: South American Adventures Limited

2

Case outline: A couple who began to encounter problems in their start-up company had been introduced to the concept of project management. They were unsure how relevant project management to their context.

3

Case objectives: - To illustrate the application of project management in a start-up company and to suggest possible improvements as to solve current issues and problems

4

Activity: Group and Class Discussion

11.15 12.45

Session 15: Aries Firman

1. Topic: Project Stakeholders Management

2. Issues Covered: How to setting broad policies and plans for using the resources of a firm to best support its long term competitive strategy. A firm’s operations and supply strategy is comprehensive through its integration with corporate strategy.

3. Reading: PMBOK, 5th edition

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussion

Module 7:

 

Monday, 17 Oct. 2016

 

SCHEDULING

08.00-09.30

Session 16: Aries Firman

1. Topic: Project Time Management

2. Issues Covered: Scheduling methods, Relationship between time and cost.

3. Reading: M. Field & L. Keller, Project Management, 1998, Chp.3,5.

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussions

09.45-11.15

Session 17 (Case): Aries Firman

1 Topic: Project evaluation & Scheduling at MMW

2 Case outline: The shipment of major equipments to Central Kalimantan faced serious delays due to various

reasons. Original schedule can no longer be kept so that the project manager must be able to analyze the situation.

3 Case objectives: - To understand how incorrect scheduling would impact the overall project performance and get the insights on all the crucial factors to secure smooth completion of the project

4 Activity: Group and Class Discussions

Module 8:

 

Monday, 24 Oct. 2016

LEAN OPERATION

08.00-09.30

Session 18: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Lean, Toyota Production System

1. Issues Covered: Lean production defined, Lean Implementation and Requirements. Implementation of JIT-Just In Time in all aspect of production system and improvement management

2. Objective: To introduce just in time philosophy as the main part of lean production. To learn JIT and TPS-Toyota Production System as a core tools of productivity improvement, this production system has been adopted by many of companies currently

3. Reading: JC, Ch.13 (p.452) JL, The Toyota Way

4. Activity: Lecturing and discussion

09.45-11.15

Session 19 (case): Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Toyota Motor Manufacturing, USA, Inc.

2. Issues Covered: On May 1, 1992, Doug Friesen, manager of assembly for Toyota's Georgetown, Kentucky, plant, faces a problem with the seats installed in the plant's sole product--Camrys. A growing number of cars are sitting off-line with defective seats or are missing them entirely. This situation is one of several causes of recent overtime, yet neither the reason for the problem nor a solution is readily apparent. As the plant is an exemplar of Toyota's famed production system (TPS), Friesen is determined that, if possible, the situation will be resolved using TPS principles and tools. Students are asked to suggest what action(s) Friesen should take and to analyze whether Georgetown's current handling of the

 

seat problem fits within the TPS philosophy.

3. Learning Objective: 1) Provide comprehensive knowledge on Toyota Production System, 2) Exercise advanced root cause analysis, and 3) Demonstrate the totality of manufacturing, especially the link between production control and quality control.

4. Activity: Group Discussion and class discussions

5. Case: Toyota Motor Manufacturing, U.S.A., Inc. [Harvard Case No. 9-693-019]

6. Guiding questions for discussion: (i) As Doug Friesen, what would you do to address the seat problem? Where would you focus your attention and solution efforts? (ii) What options exist? What would you recommend? Why? (iii) Where, if at all, does the current routine for handling defective seats deviate from the principles of the Toyota Production System?

11.15-12.45

Session 20: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: JIT and Toyota Production System

2. Description: Implementation of JIT-Just In Time in all aspect of production system and improvement management

3. Objective: To learn JIT and TPS-Toyota Production System as a core tools of productivity improvement

4. Reading: JL, The Toyota Way

5. Activity: Lecturing and discussions

Module 9:

 

Monday, 31 Oct. 2016

INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

08.00-09.30

Session 21: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Inventory Control

2. Issues Covered: Definition and propose of inventory, Inventory cost, Inventory systems

3. Reading:JC, Ch.17 (p.590)

4. Activity: Lecturing and class discussions

09.45-11.15

Session 22 (Case): Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Daikin Industries

2. Issues Covered: Shiga Factory of Daikin Industries Residential Air Conditioning was confronted by the

prospect of an unseasonably cold summer. This was at a time when Shiga Factory had large quantities of its products in inventory in anticipation of strong summer sales. Option describe in this case include reducing the number of models, building a lower cost factory outside Japan, or exiting the business.

3. Objective: To introduce the operation management and strategy including value stream mapping, coping with extreme demand, seasonality, postponement strategies, and supply chain collaboration.

4. Activity: Group and Class Discussion

5. Case: Daikin Industries [Ivey Case No. 9B04D018]

6. Guiding questions for discussion: what is the assessment of the problems?, what are the strengths and weaknesses of Shiga Factory relative to the competition?, what short-term and long-term actions would you recommend and would you justify them?

Module 10:

 

Monday, 7 Nov. 2016

 

OPERATION PLANNING

08.00-09.30

Session 23: Adirizal Nizar

1. Topic: Sales and Operations Planning

2. Issues cover: What is sales and operations planning activities, Aggregate operation plan, and Aggregate planning techniques

3. Reading:JCA, Ch.16 (p.514)

4. Activity: Lecturing and class discussions

09.45-11.15

Session 24: (Case): AdirizalNizar

1.

Topic: McDonald’s Corporation

2.

Issues Covered: McDonald's is rightly seen as one of the great growth stories in American business history. The company offered outstanding consistency, service speed, and price to its customers. But in the 1990 growth stalled. New competitors entered, and were apparently better able than McDonald’s to react to shifting customer preference. Can McDonald’s meet this challenge while keeping its operations system intact?

3.

Objective: To explore challenges that will often face a company relying upon standardization and simplification to support rapid growth. Discussion

begins by detailing how an effective operating system can simultaneously be made consistent with marketplace strategy.

4. Activity: Group and class Discussions

5. Case: McDonald's Corp. [HBS Case No. 9-693-028]

Monday, 14 Nov. 2016

FINAL EXAMINATION Adirizal Nizar

09.00-12.00

List of Cases

1. TOYOTA AVANZA, the Rollout [IBCC, Case No. 003-03-07-07]

2. South America Adventure Unlimited

3. Project Evaluation & Scheduling at MMW [Case center, OM-2-0016]

4. Project Dreamcast: Serious Play at Sega Enterprises Ltd. (A) [HBS, Case No. 9-600-

028]

5. Forefront Manufacturing: Production Processes and Change Management in Mainland China [Ivey, Case No. 906D20]

6. Crocs: Revolutionizing and Industry’s Supply Chain Model for Competitive Advantage [Stanford Case No. GS-57]

7. Toyota Motor Manufacturing, U.S.A., Inc. [HBS, Case No. 9-693-019]

8. Daikin Industries [Ivey, Case No. 9B04D018]

9. Adani Agri Logistics Limited: Blocking The Grain Drain [Ivey, Case No. W14072]

10. McDonald’s Corporation [HBS, Case No. 9-693-028]

MM5004 Operation Management-30 sessions GM-3, Aug-Nov 2016

Monday, 22 Aug. 2016 Modul-1: STRATEGY

 

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-1

Operations and Supply Chain Mgt Break Case: Toyota Avanza Operation Strategy

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.1 (p.38)

09.30-09.45

 

09.45-11.15

S-2

Adirizal Nizar

IBCC, 003-03-07-07 JC, Chp.2 (p.56)

11.15-12.45

S-3

Adirizal Nizar

Monday, 29 Aug. 2016 Modul-2: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-4

Intro Supply Chain Management Break Case: Crocs: Revolutionizing an Industry's

Adirizal Nizar

SKS, Chp.1. (p.1)

09.30-09.45

 

09.45-11.15 S-5

Supply Chain Model for Competitive Adv.

Adirizal Nizar

Stanford Uni., GS57 SKS, Chp.10 (p.312)

11.15-12.45

S-6

Global Logistic & Risk Management

Adirizal Nizar

Monday, 5 Sep. 2016 Modul-3: LOGISTICS AND DISTRIBUTION

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30 S-7

Logistics, Distribution, and Transportation Break Case: Adani Agri Logistics Limited

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.12 (p.432)

09.30-09.45

 

09.45-11.15

S-8

Adirizal Nizar

Ivey, W14072

Monday, 19 Sep. 2016 Modul-4: PRODUCT AND SERVICE

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-9

Product and Service Design

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.3 (p.74)

09.30-09.45

Break S-10 Case: Project Dreamcast at Sega (A)

 

09.45-11.15

Adirizal Nizar

HBS, 9-693-028

Monday, 26 Sep. 2016 Modul-5: PROCESS CONTROL

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30 S-11 Process Analysis & Quality Improvement 09.30-09.45 Break 09.45-11.15 S-12 Case: Forefront Mfg.: Production Processes and Change Mgt in China

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.5 (p.142), Chp.9 (p.320)

Adirizal Nizar

Ivey, 906D20

Monday, 3 Oct. 2016 MID-TERM

 

09.00-12.00

Mid-Term Examination

Adirizal Nizar

Class room, Open book

Monday, 10 Oct. 2016 Modul-6: PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30 S-13 Basic Principal of Project Management

Aries Firman

PMBOK, 5th edition

09.30-09.45

Break Case: South America Adventure Ltd Project Stakeholders Management

 

09.45-11.15

S-14

Aries Firman

11.15-12.45

S-15

Aries Firman

PMBOK, 5th edition

Monday, 17 Oct. 2016 Modul-7: SCHEDULING

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-16

Project Time Management

Aries Firman

Field&Keller,chp.3,5

09.30-09.45 Break 09.45-11.15 S-17 Case: Project evaluation & Scheduling at MMW

Aries Firman

Case centre, OM-2-0016

Monday, 24 Oct. 2016 Modul-8: LEAN OPERATION

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-18

Lean, Toyota Production System Break Case: Toyota Motor Mfg, USA, Inc. JIT and Toyota Production System

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.13 (p.452), JL, TYT Way

09.30-09.45

 

09.45-11.15

S-19

Adirizal Nizar

HBS, 9-693-019 JL, The Toyota Way

11.15-12.45

S-20

Adirizal Nizar

Monday, 31 Oct. 2016 Modul-9: INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-21

Inventory Control Break Case: Daikin Industries

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.17 (p.590)

09.30-09.45

 

09.45-11.15

S-22

Adirizal Nizar

Ivey, 9B04D018

Monday, 7 Nov. 2016 Modul-10: OPERATION PLANNING

Lecturer

Reading

08.00-09.30

S-23

Sales and Operations Planning Break Case: McDonald's Corp.

Adirizal Nizar

JC, Chp.16 (p.564)

09.30-09.45

 

09.45-11.15

S-24

Adirizal Nizar

HBS – 9698079

Monday,14 Nov. 2016 FINAL EXAMINATION

 

09.00-12.00 Final Examination

Adirizal Nizar

Class room, Open book