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E.

Green
Student ID: 17685818

Understanding by Design Unit of Work


Title: What are the Main Natural and Human Features of Australia?
Year Level: Year 3

Teacher: Miss Green

Focus Curriculum Area (s): HASS and English

Duration: 3 Weeks

Knowledge

Skills (What are students expected to be able to do?)


UNDERSTANDING BY DESIGN STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE

(What are students expected to learn?)

HASS:
HASS:
Summative
Task
One:
Advertisement

Australias main natural and human features.

Identify and present current understanding of natural and

The
difference
between
natural
and
human
features.
human
landforms in a brainstorm.
Task description:

Develop a range of focus questions to investigate.

What is sustainability?
Students are required to choose a main natural or human feature of Australia. A variety of sources are to be used to search and

Record and translate selected information in different formats.

Actions humans can take to sustain natural and


select appropriate information for students to design and create an advertisement to persuade travellers to visit the landform.

Present findings in written and visual forms.


human features.
Students are to present their persuasive advertisement as a poster with a brief description of the place. The task is to be completed
English:
individually
and is due Wednesday, Week Two of the unit of work. English:

Text features and structure of a persuasive text.

Plan, draft and publish persuasive and informative texts for an


Assessment Criteria:
appropriate audience.

Text features and structure of an informative text.


on
Identify
and locate
a maincan
natural
or human
feature of
a map.key words and images used to persuade an audience.
- Choose
Key words
and images
persuade
an audience
to Australia

Use
- agree
Use and
a variety of print and digital resources. correct text structure and language features for persuasive
withcorrectly
the viewreference
presented.
attractions/activities
touriststext
can in
dothe
at the
and informative texts.
- ListHow
to create an informative
formlandform.
of a
- brochure/pamphlet.
Use correct text structure and language features of persuasive
texts.
Locate and collect information from a variety of sources.
- Use images to persuade audience.

Create a brochure.

How to create an advertisement to persuade an

Create an advertisement.
audience.

LEARNING OUTCOMES: What relevant goals will this unit of work address? Draw these out of the content descriptors and the
achievement standards.
Students will be able to:
1. Differentiate, locate and label each states capital city and Australias main natural and human features of Australia on a
Assessment
recording template:
map.
Natural or
Manmade Feature
of Australia
Persuasive
Posteran
Marking
Key
2. Search, select and reference
information
from a variety
of sources
to design
advertisement
to persuade a targeted
Student Name:
Date:
audience to visit a main natural or human feature of Australia..
Crawling
Walking
Jogging to inform the targeted
Running
3. Search, select and reference
information from a variety
of sources to create a brochure
audience
Page 1 of 14
about a chosen natural or human feature of Australia.
4. Identify and use appropriate text structure and langauge features of persuasive and informative texts.
5. List actions humans can take to sustain and preserve Australias natural and human features.

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Title

The title is too small and/or does


not describe the content of the
poster well.

Content

Content

Text Structure

Landform is not a main feature of


Australia. Poster does not state if
the feature is natural or manmade.
There is no more than 1 accurate
attraction/activity displayed on your
poster.

Title can be read from 1 metre


away and describes the content
well.
You have not included the location
of your landform on your poster or
it is incorrect.

Attractiveness

Title can be read from 2 metres


away and is quite creative.

You have mentioned the location of


your landform but have not used a
map to show where in Australia it
is.
Landform is a main feature of
Australia. You have also stated if it
is a natural or manmade feature.
There are 3-4 accurate
attractions/activities displayed on
your poster.

You have displayed the location of


your landform using a map of
Australia.

Uses simple, compound and


complex sentences to develop
ideas. Persuasive language has
been used for little effect.

Writes simple, compound and


complex sentences varying the
length and sentence beginnings.
Variation of persuasive language
has been used effectively.
Various references are identified
and include the title, author,
publisher, and year of the books.
Website included including
address, title, and year.
All images are related to the topic
and make it easier to understand.
All borrowed graphics have a
source citation.

No sources have been referenced.

Landform is a main feature of


Australia, but you have not
mentioned if it is natural or
manmade on your poster. There
are 2-3 accurate
attractions/activities displayed on
your poster.
Uses simple sentences, with little
variation in structure and/or length.
Attempted to use persuasive
language but has little to no effect
on the audience.
Sources are identified.

Images do not relate to the topic


OR several borrowed graphics do
not have a source citation.

All images relate to the topic. Most


borrowed graphics have a source
citation.

All images are related to the topic


and most make it easier to
understand. All borrowed graphics
have a source citation.

The poster is distractingly messy or


very poorly designed. It is not
attractive.

The poster is acceptably attractive


though it may be a bit messy.

The poster is attractive in terms of


design, layout and neatness.

Uses simple and run-on sentences.


No persuasive language has been
used.

References

Visual Images

Title can be read from 2 metres


away and describes content well.

References are clear and include


the title and the author of the book.
Websites listed.

You have included a main feature


of Australia and stated whether or
not it is natural or manmade. There
are at least 5 accurate
attractions/activities displayed on
your poster.

The poster is exceptionally


attractive in terms of design,
layout, and neatness.

Comments:
Feedback:
Informal - Throughout the construction of the students posters, the teacher will provide immediate feedback to the students based on
their product so far, offering guidance and suggestions where necessary.
Formal - At the end of the unit, students will receive their poster back with a completed rubric by the teacher attached. On the bottom of
the rubric the teacher will include a constructive comment about their overall performance.
Self-assessment:
Before students start their assessment task they will receive a copy of the rubric. As they develop their poster they are able to refer
back to their copy of the rubric as they please, allowing them to determine if they are happy with what they have got or if they need
to include more to achieve the grade they are aiming for. Before they hand their final product to the teacher everyone will sit down
with a rubric and highlight where they think they have achieved on the rubric based on what they see on their poster.
Page 2 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Summative Task Two: Brochure


Task description:
Now that students have persuaded travellers to visit their main Australian feature, they need to create a brochure to inform these
tourists about the landform they are visiting. For this task, students must research and select appropriate information about the
same main feature of Australia they chose for the previous assessment. The students brochures must include:
-

Title.
Description of the landform.
Interesting facts.
Location including map.
Weather.
Transportation (How to get there).
Recreation (Outdoor and indoor activities).
Actions tourists need to take to help protect and preserve their feature.
Pictures.

Information should be organised under headings for Interesting Facts, Location, Weather, Transport, Recreation and Sustainability.
This task is to be completed individually. The brochure is due at the end of the unit of work.
Assessment criteria:
-

The main natural or human feature of Australia is the same as the one on their poster or has changed to an Australian
landform if the one on their poster was not in Australia.
Use and correctly reference a variety of print and digital resources.
Includes information for each heading.
Lists action tourists need to take to protect the landform.
List and describe attractions/activities tourists can do at the landform.
Use correct text structure and language features for informative texts/brochures.
Include appropriate images.

Assessment recording template:


Travel Brochure Marking Key
Student Name:

Date:
Boarding

Headings

No headings have been included.

On the Runway
Some headings have been
included, but you have forgotten

Take Off!

Soaring

Most headings have been included


with matching information

You have included all the correct


headings and matching information
Page 3 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Spelling & Proofreading

Writing - Mechanics

Text Structure

Content - Accuracy

most of them. The information


does not match the headings.

underneath.

underneath.

Several spelling errors in the


brochure.

No more than 3 spelling errors


remain after one person other than
the typist reads and corrects the
brochure.

No more than 1 spelling error


remains after one person other
than the typist reads and corrects
the brochure.

No spelling errors remain after one


person other than the typist reads
and corrects the brochure.

There are several capitalization or


punctuation errors in the brochure
even after feedback from an adult.

There are 1-2 capitalization and/or


punctuation errors in the brochure
even after feedback from an adult.

Capitalization and punctuation are


correct throughout the brochure
after feedback from an adult.

Capitalization and punctuation are


correct throughout the brochure.

Uses simple and run-on sentences.


No technical or scientific language
has been used.

Uses simple sentences, with little


variation in structure and/or length.
Attempted to use technical and
scientific language.

Uses simple, compound and


complex sentences to develop
ideas. Correct technical and
scientific language has been used.

Writes simple, compound and


complex sentences varying the
length and sentence beginnings.
Variation of technical and scientific
vocabulary has been used.

Fewer than 80% of the facts in the


brochure are accurate.

89-80% of the facts in the brochure


are accurate.

99-90% of the facts in the brochure


are accurate.

All facts in the brochure are


accurate.

No actions listed or discussed.

1-2 actions for sustainability have


been listed with an brief
explanation for why people need to
be sustainable.

3-4 actions for sustainability are


listed with a good explanation for
why people need to be sustainable.

5 or more actions for sustainability


have been listed with an excellent
explanation for why people need to
be sustainable.

No sources have been referenced.

Sources are identified.

References are clear and include


the title and the author of the book.
Websites listed.

Various references are identified


and include the title, author,
publisher, and year of the books.
Website included including
address, title, and year.

Graphics do not go with the


accompanying text or appear to be
randomly chosen.

Graphics go well with the text, but


there are too few and the brochure
seems \"text-heavy\".

Graphics go well with the text, but


there are so many that they distract
from the text.

Graphics go well with the text and


there is a good mix of text and
graphics.

Actions to Take

References

Visual Images
Comments:
Feedback:

Peer Assessment/Feedback - Students will receive feedback not only from the teacher but also from their peers. Students will assess two
other peers work using the rubric provided by the teacher. Afterwards the students will write a positive comment for their two peers on
the bottom of the rubric.
Informal - Students will also receive verbal feedback and over the shoulder marking from the teacher throughout the writing components
Page 4 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

of the unit of work while students create their brochure.


Formal - The teacher will also use the rubric to record student achievement and provide constructive written comments on the bottom of
the rubric.
Self-assessment:
Students will use their writing checklists provided at the beginning of the year to continually check their spelling and grammar
throughout the writing process. Students will also assess their performance and mark their brochure using the rubric provided by
their teacher to determine what areas need improving.
Other
-

Types of Assessment and Recording Formats Throughout the Unit of Work:


Anecdotal notes using Confer
Traffic Lights
Student Conferences
Group Conferences
Observations
Brainstorms

UNDERSTANDING BY DESIGN STAGE 3: PLAN LEARNING EXPERIENCES AND INSTRUCTION

Page 5 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

What events will help students:


Learning Experiences

Assessment For/As
Learning (Formative
Assessment)

Resources

Week One

Lesson 1
English

Lesson 2
English

Lesson 3
Geograp
hy

Persuasive Texts
What is a persuasive text? Conduct a teacher-led, whole
class brainstorm about what the students already know
about persuasive texts (including text and language
features).
Modelled Reading Read My Favourite Animal using the
stages of pre-reading, reading, and after reading.
As a class, create a word wall using emotive and technical
words from the text. Discuss how the words make the
children feel.
Modelled Reading Read The worlds best animal isusing
the stages of pre-reading, reading and after reading.
What is the text structure of a persuasive text? Refer back
to the class brainstorm about persuasive texts. Ask the
students what text structures (if any) are listed on the
brainstorm. As a class identify these text features in the text
you just read.
Modelled Writing Using the persuasive planning map,
model how to complete it by using the ideas in the text you
read.
Using the persuasive planning map, students plan their own
persuasive text using the same prompt as the class text:
The worlds best animal is Encourage the use of emotive
language.
Main Natural and Manmade Features of Australia
Define Natural and Manmade Features in groups of 3
students write down a definition for natural features and
manmade features. After 3 minutes come together and
share each definition. Create one whole class definition for

Brainstorm is used as
a diagnostic
assessment to
determine what the
students already
know about the
elements of
persuasive texts.

The brainstorm and


defining activity are
used as diagnostic
assessments to
determine what
students already

Butcher paper
Interactive Whiteboard
(IWB)
Cardboard strips for word
wall
My Favourite Animal https://www.qcaa.qld.edu
.au/downloads/p_10/napl
an_lit_sample_favouritea
nimal.pdf
The worlds best animal
is https://www.qcaa.qld.edu
.au/downloads/p_10/napl
an_lit_sample_bestanimal
.pdf
Persuasive Planning Map
for IWB http://www.readwritethink
.org/files/resources/intera
ctives/persuasion_map/
A4 print out of persuasive
planning map for
students.
HASS Workbooks
Copy of outline of
Australia map for each
student
Butcher paper
Page 6 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Lesson 4
English

Lesson 5
English

Lesson 6
Geograp
hy

each term and write them on cardboard strip to display.


What are some main features of Australia? As a class
brainstorm the main features/places the students think of
when they hear the word Australia. Encourage students to
think about other places other than capital cities (i.e. Uluru,
Great Barrier Reef)
Using a T-chart sort each main feature on the brainstorm
into either human feature or natural feature.
Map each feature on a map of Australia. An atlas can be
used after students have tried their best without one.
Students read The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry in
their guided reading groups.
Students then deconstruct the text and break it down to
magnify the text structure of persuasive texts.
Highlight emotive words in text.
Add any new emotive or interesting words to word wall.
Use a dictionary to find and write the definition of any
unknown words.
Persuasive Poster
In groups of three, students are to choose two posters used
to persuade people to travel from the pile at the front of the
class and explore the features of each poster. Use a Venn
diagram to record the differences and similarities of each
other.
In their groups discuss which features/techniques are more
appealing and persuasive and decide which poster has
persuaded their group to travel there.
Choose Main Natural or Manmade Feature
Watch Natural and Human Features of Australia on YouTube.
As a class classify the places in the video as a natural or
human feature.
Give each student a copy of the rubric for Summative
Assessment Task One - Natural or Manmade Feature of
Australia Persuasive Poster Marking Key. Go through this as
a class.

know about natural


and manmade
features of Australia.

2 x Cardboard strips

Group student

conferences.
Make anecdotal notes
using Confer app

Copy of The Great Kapok


Tree by Lynne Cherry for
each student.

Traffic Light system to


determine who
understands, who

sort of understands
but not too sure, and
who does not
understand at all.
Observations
Anecdotal Notes

Old travel posters from


travel agencies
Venn Diagram for each
student

Observations during
whole class.

Natural and Human


Features of Australia https://www.youtube.com
/watch?v=nkPA564R81I
IWB
iPads
Books
Magazines
Page 7 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Lesson 7
English

Lesson 8
English

Students research main natural or human features of


Australia and choose one that interests them and they
would like to research more. Once students have chosen tell
the teacher which Australian feature it is so they can record
it next to students name so no one is doing the same place.
Allow students to begin their research on their landform
using iPads, books and magazines.
Design Your Persuasive Poster
Students write and edit their sentences/paragraphs for their
poster. Must check with teacher for approval.
Students design the layout of their poster on an A4 page in
their English books.
Students must include exact text they intend to use and
draw in outlines of where images will go. Student
conferences to discuss with teacher their plan and what
information students intend to include.
Students begin writing final copy of text for poster.
Week Two
Students continue to write their final copies of text for their
posters.
Construct poster by cutting, gluing and decorating.

Lesson 9
English
Lesson
10
English

Students use this lesson to self-assess their persuasive


posters using the rubric provided in Lesson 6.
Use the remainder of the lesson to finish any incomplete
parts of the poster and fix any necessary components.
Persuasive Posters are Due Today!
Informative Texts
What is an Informative text? Conduct a teacher-led, whole
class brainstorm about what the students already know
about informative texts (including text and language
features).
Modelled Reading Display on the IWB and read the
informative text teacher has created.
As a class, create a new word wall next to the persuasive

Student conferences.

Natural or Manmade
Feature of Australia
Persuasive Poster
Marking Key

A3 paper
English Books

English Books
A3 poster card
Scissors, glue textas,
pencils
Natural or Manmade
Feature of Australia
Persuasive Poster
Marking Key
Informative text teacher
has created
Cardboard strips for word
wall
Butcher paper
IWB

Self-Assessment of
Persuasive Poster

Summative
Assessment for
Persuasive Poster
Diagnostic
Brainstorm of
informative texts to
determine current
level of knowledge
and understanding

Page 8 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Lesson
11
Geograp
hy

text word wall using technical and scientific words from the
text.
Students use dictionary to define the technical and scientific
term sin their English books.
Sustainability
What is Sustainability? - Conduct a teacher-led, whole class
brainstorm about what the students already know about
sustainability.
What can we do to be more sustainable/help protect our
country? add to the brainstorm any ideas students come
up with.
Take a scenario and in groups of three students are to
discuss what actions they can take to be sustainable in their
scenario.

of the concept.

Lesson
12
English

Lesson
13
English

Lesson
14
Geograp
hy

Display another informative text teacher has created on the


whiteboard. Read to students and then referring back to
brainstorm for What is an informative text? deconstruct
the structure of the text.
Explicitly explain the structure of an informative text.
Exploring Brochures
Explicitly go through the content of a brochure for students.
Show students a brochure and deconstruct the brochure in
relation to informative text structure.
In pairs, students choose two zip lock bags with
deconstructed brochures in them. They are to work together
to help reconstruct the brochure into its original form. When
they have finished one, students move onto the second
brochure.
Highlight factual information and technical or scientific
words (add these words to the word wall)
Give each student a copy of the rubric for Summative
Assessment Task Two Travel Brochure Marking Key. Go
through this as a class.
In pairs, students choose an intact brochure diferent to what

The brainstorm

activity is used as a
diagnostic
assessment to
determine what
students already
know about
sustainability and
the actions they
can take to be
sustainable.

Group conferences
Anecdotal notes on
Confer

Butcher paper
Scenarios

IWB
Informative text

One intact brochure.


Deconstructed brochures
in zip lock bags

Intact brochures
Books
Magazines
iPads
Page 9 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Lesson
15
Geograp
hy

Lesson
16
English
Lesson
17
Geograp
hy

Lesson
18
English
Lesson
19
English
Lesson
20
English
Lesson

they had in Lesson 13 and highlight the headings and other


key aspects that match what is required of them based on
the rubric.
Give students who did not include a main natural or human
feature of AUSTRALIA time to find a new one. Teacher
should assist these children to find an appropriate landform.
Spend remainder of lesson researching information for
travel brochure using iPads, books and magazines.
Week Three
Continue researching information for assignment while
teacher walks around and conducts student conferences.

Students translate their current collected data into correct


sentence and text structure for an informative text.
After they have drafted and edited their information,
students can start to create their final copy in their
brochure.
Continue researching information for assignment while
teacher walks around to the remainder of the students they
did not see in Lesson 15 to continue conducting student
conferences.
Students translate the remainder of their collected data into
correct sentence and text structure for an informative text.
After they have drafted and edited their information,
students can continue to add this into their brochure as
their final piece.
Students continue to complete their brochure using correct
text and language features for informative texts.

Students use this lesson to self-assess their travel brochure


using the rubric provided in Lesson 14.
Use the remainder of the lesson to finish any incomplete
parts of the brochure and fix any necessary components.
Information Brochures are Due Today!

Student conference

Student conference

Travel Brochure Marking


Key

Books
Magazines
iPads
A4 coloured paper

Books
Magazines
iPads

Students Travel
Brochures

Students Travel
Brochures.
Natural or Manmade
Feature of Australia
Persuasive Poster
Marking Key
Travel Brochure Rubric

Self-Assessment of
Travel Brochure

Peer Assessment

Page 10 of 14

E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

21
English

Peer assess two other students Travel Brochures using the


rubrics.
In whole class discussion at the end of the lesson recall text
structure and language features of both informative and
persuasive texts.
Recall the definition for:
- Natural feature
- Human Feature
- Sustainability

Summative
Assessment for
Travel Brochure

JUSTIFICATION FOR UNIT OF WORK

This unit of work for English and humanities and social sciences (HASS), has been designed for a Year Three classroom. The duration of
this unit of work has been designed to be implemented over three weeks, based on the length of each lesson to be roughly 50 minutes.
Throughout each week of learning, students are to participate in at least five English lessons and two geography lessons, totaling twenty-one
lessons. The big idea of this unit of work is for students to explore the main natural and human features of Australia through inquiry and to record
their learning by creatively constructing a persuasive poster and an informative brochure. Persuasive and Informative texts are also key concepts
students explore throughout the unit of work.
During the three-week block students explore a variety of aspects incorporated in the Year Three English and HASS curriculum. Through a
series of English lessons students will develop a deeper understanding and knowledge of how to organise content using the appropriate text
structure and language features to persuade and inform familiar and unfamiliar audiences. Students will also plan, edit and publish their own

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E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

persuasive poster and informative brochure. Students will experience giving and receiving feedback to and from their peers, while also providing
feedback to themselves through self-assessment.
Meanwhile, students will also explore, locate and map main natural and human features of Australia, including the capital cities. Students
will acquire a number of skills associated with the HASS curriculum, including selecting, interpreting and translating information from a variety of
sources. Using the information the students find, they will learn how to present the information in both written and visual forms. Students will also
explore the actions people can take to sustain a specific place.
Throughout the entire course of the unit of work, students are expected to actively contribute in all class and group discussions.
The three-week unit of work was created using the increasingly popular approach to planning, Understanding by Design (UbD). The UbD
approach to planning for student learning encourages teachers to plan from the bottom, up. The experts who created the UbD approach, Wiggins
and McTighe (as cited in Readman & Allen, 2013), believe educators should firstly, decide the intended learning outcomes based on the
appropriate curriculum documents for the year level. After the intended learning outcomes have been identified, the assessment tasks are then
created and designed, reflecting the intended learning outcomes (Readman & Allen, 2013). Once the teacher has designed the assessment tasks,
they can continue to plan their teaching and learning activities to align and support the progression of student achievement towards the learning
outcomes and develop a deeper understanding and knowledge that will prepare students for the assessment tasks (Readman & Allen, 2013). By
following the UbD approach, it is almost certain that everything will align correctly and effectively, ensuring students are learning exactly what they
need to and each learning activity will reflect the criteria assessed in the summative assessment tasks. Therefore, the UbD approach is extremely
beneficial for effective student and teacher learning if completed correctly.
A number of diagnostic and formative assessments have been included throughout the unit of work. Diagnostic assessments have been
used as assessments for learning to assess what students already know about certain topics, to be able to modify and adapt the learning activities
to suit the students current knowledge of the task. Diagnostic assessments allow the teacher to move ahead in the unit if the students show a
deeper understanding that what the teacher was expecting, or to go back and create new lessons that better suit the level of knowledge students
have.

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E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

Formative assessments have been used throughout the entire unit of work. The formative assessments have been used to help determine
how the students are progressing and what I can do to help them continue building a deeper understanding of the key concepts. The formative
assessments also allow myself to reflect on my teaching practices and whether they are effectively enhancing student learning or not.
Using a variety of assessments and recording formats creates more reliable evidence. By including a range of different types and formats of
assessments and records, a range of evidence about students understanding, knowledge and skills is able to be collected and used for reporting.
Both summative assessment tasks allow students to delve into the real world and draw knowledge and context from a variety of sources
about real world issues. The knowledge and key concepts students have explored throughout the learning activities are able to be connected and
applied to the real world of tourism and Australia. Students will be able to walk away from the assessment tasks with a deeper understanding of the
multiple purposes persuasive and informative texts serve and how it helps them in the real world. The assessment tasks are rich with content and
ways for students to showcase their knowledge they have acquired over the three weeks. The poster allows students to express their creativity as
they get to decide how they can capture their audiences attention and how to persuade them to visit their chosen landform.
The feedback I plan to give my students throughout the unit of work allows me to focus on each individual students needs and allow us to
work collaboratively to create learning goals to be reached throughout the unit of work. Student conferences allow me to meet with individual
students and determine their strengths and weaknesses and how we can work together to improve them.
The feedback students receive at the end of the assessment tasks provides students with an understanding of their overall achievement.
The key learning tasks included within the unit of work have each been designed to reflect the intended learning outcomes and assessment
criteria in some way. The idea of the unit of work was to move forward the level of student thinking and understanding they have. Each lesson
reflects on the previous and the HASS and English lessons come together to create summative assessment tasks reflecting the deep learning that
has taken place over the three weeks. Students will read a variety of texts both at their level of reading and at a higher level of reading through
shared/modelled reading. Students will work as a class, in groups and individually to develop ideas and understandings on their own, but also by
bouncing their ideas off one another in order to develop their higher order thinking skills and a deeper understanding of the key concepts.
Reporting student achievement or lack thereof, can be a difficult task. However, according to Readman and Allen (2013), steps can be taken
to achieve an effective approach to reporting to parents. Firstly, providing evidence to support comments is an important principle. Secondly, the
audience of whom you are reporting to is essential to consider. Thirdly, the purpose of reporting must be considered. Lastly, teachers must think
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E. Green
Student ID: 17685818

about the three lines of communication and how they wish to report back to parents and carers. The three lines of communication being; one-way,
teacher-parent conference, or teacher-student-parent conference.
The information collected throughout the three-week block unit of work will be kept and assembled as work examples for students individual
portfolios. The portfolios will be used to help conduct a teacher-student-parent conference. Through a student-led conversation between them,
their teacher and the parent, students can explain the two summative pieces of work and what they did to achieve their final products. The marking
process can also be explained by the student with necessary guidance by the teacher. Together the teacher and student work together to discuss
and explain the evidence that support the students progression of learning to the childs parent/s.

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