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2016-2017 BME Unofficial Course Guide

~ Biomedical Engineering Student Advisory Board ~

2016-2017 BME Course Guide

bmedSAB

Letter from the Board


Dear Fellow Students,
The following document represents the advice, opinions, and experiences of the
members of the BME Student Advisory Board. While this guide is by no means official,
we do hope that it gives you insight into the nature of the classes you will be taking
while pursuing your BME degree. Furthermore, we hope this course guide serves as a
tool as you plan and decide your course schedule for the spring of 2017. The tips and
comments are written by fellow BME undergraduates who have recently taken these
courses. All course GPAs are easily accessible via SGAs Course Critique
(http://www.sga.gatech.edu/critique/). If you have any questions or concerns regarding
this publication or BME courses, you are welcome to contact your Student Advisory
Board representatives. Their contact information is given below. Alternatively, please
visit our website and fill out our comment form (http://www.gtbmedsab.org/contactus.html).
Sincerely,
Your BME Student Advisory Board (bmedSAB)
Chris Schenck, Chair (cschenck7@gatech.edu)
Anokhi Patel, Vice-Chair (anokhip4@gatech.edu)
Akram Khaja, Secretary & Treasurer (akramk426@gatech.edu)
Matthew Devlin, Industrial Relations Chair (mrdevlin@gatech.edu)
Greta Shallenberger, Events Coordinator (ges@gatech.edu)
Vaishnavi Andra, Communications Chair (vandra3@gatech.edu)
Kelly Pesson, Merchandise Chair (kpesson6@gatech.edu)
Renee Copeland (rcopeland23@gatech.edu)
Hyder Hasnain (hyder.hasnain19@gatech.edu)
Monali Shah (shahmonalin@gatech.edu)

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Table of Contents
BME Curriculum Flowchart...3
BME Prerequisite Chart.4
BMED 2210: CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES IN BME..5
BMED 2250: PROBLEMS IN BME...5
BMED 2310: PROBLEMS IN BME II6
BMED 3100: SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY..7
BMED 3110: QUANTITATIVE ENGINEERING PHYSIOLOGY LAB I..8
BMED 3310: BIOTRANSPORT.8
BMED 3400: INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS9
BMED 3520: BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS AND MODELING..10
BMED 3600: PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLULAR & MOLECULAR SYSTEMS...10
BMED 3610: QUANTITATIVE ENGINEERING PHYSIOLOGY LAB II...11
BMED 4602: SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT I.........11
BMED 4603: SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT II........12
BMED 4477: BIOLOGICAL NETWORKS AND GENOMICS......13
BMED 4500: CELL & TISSUE ENGINEERING LAB........13
BMED 4750: DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING PHYSICS.13
BMED 4751: INTRODUCTION TO BIOMATERIALS...14
BMED/ME 4757: BIOFLUID MECHANICS...15
BMED 4758: BIOSOLID MECHANICS..15
BMED 4765: DRUG DESIGN DEVELOPMENT & DELIVERY........16
BMED 4783: INTRO TO MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSING.......16
BMED 4813: INTRO TO BIOMED DATA SCIENCE.17
BMED 4813: CLINICAL OBSERVATION AND DESIGN EXPERIENCE....17
BMED 4833: INTRO TO SIGNALS, SYSTEMS, AND CIRCUITS......18
BMED 4833: NEUROPHYSIOLOGY.........19
BMED 4843: BME HEALTHREACH...20

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BME Curriculum Flowchart

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BME Prerequisite Chart

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BMED 2210: CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES IN BME


A study of mass, energy, and momentum balances applied to problems in biomedical engineering.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1211K and MATH 1552 (or MATH 1501)
Credit Hours: 4
Average GPA: 2.72
This class is designed to build your engineering toolkit. You will learn to tackle open-ended
problems and analyze complex systems by making realistic modeling assumptions and estimations,
seeking out necessary information, and applying the conservation principles of mass, energy and
momentum. The class consists of one lecture and two 2-hour problem-solving studio (PSS)
classes. In PSS, you will work with classmates to solve problems in class with the guidance of your
professor and TAs. This class will likely have regular homework and quizzes.
THE tip: Take advantage of PSS! The best way to be successful in this class is practice. PSS is an
extremely valuable opportunity to practice solving problems, while receiving real-time assistance
from your classmates, TAs, and professor. PSS is only as useful as you make it, so it is important
to do the reading and come prepared. The emphasis of this class is on problem-solving process, so
be sure that you follow the methodology taught in class and write down all of your work clearly so
that you communicate a systematic approach to the problem. If you are not confident in the
concepts, take advantage of office hours and FOCUS tutoring.
Recall: General chemistry (ideal gas law), linear algebra (solving systems of linear equations),
physics I (energy principles)
Spend your time working lots of problems. It is important to really understand each key concept
taught in the course, and to seek out help as needed. Homework will be very time consuming but it
is one of the best ways to practice problem-solving and gain confidence applying the concepts
learned in class.
Take Home: engineering problem solving skills, drawing a proper engineering diagram, estimation,
group work skills.

BMED 2250: PROBLEMS IN BME


Biomedical engineering problems from industrial and clinical applications are addressed and solved
in small groups using problem-based learning methods.
Prerequisites: BMED 2210
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.44
The class is divided into groups (~8 students) with an upperclassman BME student
assigned to oversee each group. Your team is given a complex, interdisciplinary problem to solve
during the semester. You must utilize proper research methods, while tracking all the research and
progress your team makes towards an innovative solution; your team then proceeds to formally
present your proposed solutions to other groups and facilitators. The resources and methods you
use to reach solutions may require independent research and inquiry. The formal presentation is

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followed by a thoroughly written technical report. Throughout this class, you can expect to receive
limited guidance from your facilitator and demonstrate strongly interdependent group work and
creative solutions.
THE tip: Be proactive and organized, speak up, take responsibility, and use the whiteboards! Keep
a thorough journal (annotated inquiry log) of all progress made throughout the semester, it will help
you in later classes and your group facilitator will check it often. Try to maintain good relationships
with your fellow group members; it will make the semester much smoother and form valuable
connections for future BME classes that allow you to choose your own group members.
Recall: Literature review skills (skim, scan, summarize), teamwork, and presentation skills. Often
people forget what a professional presentation looks like. Utilize resources from prior classes such
as MATLAB, differential equations, and statics.
Spend your time meeting with your team (in and out of class) and researching independently. It
helps to read articles and then summarize them; make copies of your summaries for your
teammates so the meetings can go more effectively and efficiently (as they will have something to
refer to when you speak). Make a regular schedule for group meetings, and make sure everyone
attends the group meetings! Tackle the problems as a team--this means speak up, listen attentively
and give feedback, take responsibility, engage and encourage your teammates, and be prepared to
work hard. Work to highlight everyones strengths, and dont be afraid to take on new roles or learn
challenging new skills. Communicate with your facilitator is the team where it needs to be? What
are some future improvements? What can you, as a member of the team, do better? Address team
problems early if you are having conflict, and get work done in advance to avoid scrambling at the
last minute. For group presentations, rehearse, rehearse, rehearse! You can never be over-prepared
for presentations.
Take Home: The most important skill you will learn in this class is how to approach and ill-defined
problem and arrive at a novel, informed solution. The team building, communication, and literature
review skills come in handy for future BME courses and are a great starting point for knowing what
direction you want to take with BME (research & development, statistical analysis, programming,
management, etc.). Getting to know a faculty member in a small team-setting is invaluable!

BMED 2310: PROBLEMS IN BME II


Biomedical engineering problems from industrial and clinical applications are addressed and solved
in small groups using problem-based learning methodologies in preparation for capstone design.
Prerequisite: BMED 2210 and BMED 2250 (or BMED 1300)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.30
This class is almost entirely focused on a semester team project encompassing the design
of a medical device, technical writing, CAD, and presentations. Weekly lectures provide information
about the design process that will help your team as the project moves forward. The project
requires excellent teamwork skills, delegation, and a strong awareness of individual team members
strengths and weaknesses. The first month of the class includes a large amount of skill-building
take home assignments, and the latter part of the class includes very little homework and is entirely
focused on the semester project.

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THE tip: Try to take the class with students you know you work well with! Start writing sections of
the report or conducting necessary research as soon as you start the project. Talk to your TA
outside of class so that she/he knows you're putting forth the effort. You will spend approximately
three weeks learning SolidWorks, but dont stop working on your project during this time (this is a
dangerous trap to fall into). Make sure to bring a portable mouse for any CAD modeling - it
becomes useful for shortcuts that significantly decrease the time you invest in one model!
Recall: BMED 2250 team skills, literature review, statics (COE 2001) for doing an engineering
analysis, presentations during the lecture period (incorporate whenever possible)
Spend your time making a shared calendar with due dates because the class is fast paced!
Focus on the rubrics as well as learning and refining SolidWorks skills for class, work, and your
resume. Keep your notebook updated ALWAYS because the notebook checks are unannounced!
Take Home: Presentation skills, SolidWorks skills, a background on the design iteration process
and medical device industry.

BMED 3100: SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY


An introduction to human physiology emphasizing biomedical engineering approaches to the
understanding of basic organ function, disease states, and medical intervention.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1315 (or CHEM 2311) or Junior Standing
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.46
This class goes through the major body systems (circulatory, digestive, etc.), covering both
anatomy (structure) and physiology (function). You spend a few weeks on each system, and every 5
weeks or so youll be tested on these systems. Depending on the professor, you may do group
projects or create concept maps, but both will help you understand the concepts learned in a more
holistic sense. The class follows a lecture-based format.
THE Tip: Be a self-learner and go the extra mile to learn the material. Don't memorize facts;
understand the reasons behind any action. The material can be a lot at one time so keep up with
reading the text and ask questions if you dont understand something. Print out PowerPoints before
class and pay attention to the class lectures. Spend your lecture time writing something the
professor mentioned in class that is not mentioned on the slides.
Recall: Biology from high school and organic chemistry.
Spend your time... understanding how your professor will test. This may mean you need to really
focus on the book and not class notes or the opposite. This class will become immensely easier as
you begin to understand how and what to study. Dont be afraid to ask if the professor expects you
to memorize something or not - they will be honest.
Take Home: An understanding of human physiology and how complex systems work together.
This is very helpful for MCAT studying for premedical students. Basic concepts in this class will be
referred to in other courses (BMED 3110, BMED 3610, etc.)

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BMED 3110: QUANTITATIVE ENGINEERING PHYSIOLOGY LAB I


A hands-on lab providing an active-learning team environment to reinforce selected engineering
principles of physiology, emphasizing a quantitative model-oriented approach to physiological
systems.
Prerequisites: BMED 3400 and 3100 and BMED 2400 (or CEE/ISYE 3770)
Credit Hours: 2
Average GPA: 3.03
Students complete experiments using incomplete information and spend the majority of
their time working in groups to figure out how to go about setting up experiments and collecting
data. Expect to write technical reports and learn how to gather and analyze real biological data
using hardware and software. This class will give you the opportunity to learn how to problemsolve, work with a team, and write scientific reports. This is also a great opportunity to learn
LabVIEW, which teaches you how to program and collect data from a variety of devices.
THE tip: Decide on team members and register for the same class. This is a very time-consuming
class, so plan your schedule accordingly and make sure you get along with your group. The data
will be noisy, so be careful with all of your apparatus to not add even more noise. Follow rubrics
closely for papers and presentations. Carefully discuss statistical analysis for each project in
presentations and papers.
Recall: DSP (though taking this is not necessary for success in the course), statistics, some
biomechanics, CS 1371, and physiology (to a small extent).
Spend your time in lab. Become familiar with LabVIEW. You will regularly have to complete
experiments outside of scheduled lab times.
Take Home: LabVIEW skills, an ability to integrate biology and engineering concepts from multiple
classes to address a well-structured research question, the ability to properly utilize statistics to
analyze experimental data

BMED 3310: BIOTRANSPORT


Fundamental principles of fluid, heat, and mass transfer with particular emphasis on physiological
and biomedical systems.
Prerequisites: BMED 2210 and MATH 2551 (or MATH 2401) and MATH 2552 (or MATH 2403)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 2.67
Biotransport is the movement of mass, fluid or heat in physical systems. The focus is on
biomedical applications of transport--hence the title Biotransport. Fluid dynamics is one part of
what we study here, and blood vessel flow is the perfect example of this for them. But the mass
transfer topic is important in areas such as drug delivery and nutrient delivery to tissue-engineered
constructs. Heat transfer is important in areas such as cryoprotection of tissues. You must apply
fluid dynamics principles, such as Reynolds Transport Theorem and Navier-Stokes to solve
problems concerning drug delivery, blood vessel transport, etc. The class is taught in a Problem-

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Solving Studio setting, similar to that of BMED 2210. This involves working on problems with a
partner testing the concepts you've learned about in lecture.
The tip: This is a fast-paced class so practice, practice, practice! Do the frequent homework, go to
every PSS and/or PLUS session, attend office hours, and form study groups.
Recall: Differential Equations, Calculus III, BMED 3100, BMED 2210
Spend your time... doing all the problems you can get your hands on, including homework, sample
questions from lecture, and recitation. Understand all of the problems and approaches very well.
Utilize both TA and professor office hours.
Take Home: Understanding of fluid dynamic and mass transport problems as they relate to bodily
functions.

BMED 3400: INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS


An introduction to the basic concepts and methods in biomechanics, including statics, deformable
bodies, and rigid body dynamics.
Prerequisites: MATH 2552 (or MATH 2403) and COE 2001
Credit Hours: 4
Average GPA: 2.91
This course will expand on the principles of statics (COE 2001) by presenting concepts in
the mechanics of materials under static conditions (deformable bodies), as well as the dynamics of
rigid bodies. After completing this course, students will be able to analyze problems in biomedical
engineering by applying simple models of material deformation and rigid body dynamics. This may
be useful in modelling forces and moments in the musculoskeletal system, understanding
intracellular forces, or generating design criteria for medical devices. This class will likely be taught
in a traditional lecture format, with regular homework and quizzes.
THE tip: Use the homework as an opportunity to practice solving problems and apply the principles
taught in lecture. This class emphasizes problem-solving process, so be sure to think critically
about problems and systematically apply the concepts and problem-solving methodology taught in
class.
Recall: Statics, integral calculus
Spend your time working on problems from the homework and other available practice
problems
Take Home: Analysis of deformable bodies and rigid body dynamics, application of simple models,
applying mechanical analysis to biomedical engineering systems.

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BMED 3520: BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS AND MODELING


Basic concepts, modeling tools and analysis techniques for the study of biochemical, bioelectrical
and biomedical systems.
Prerequisites: BMED 3100 and BMED 2210 and MATH 2552 (or MATH 2403)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 2.93
In this course, you learn about how to model biological systems. You learn the math behind
the models (differential equations and linear algebra), how to use PLAS and Matlab to model
complicated systems, and when it is appropriate to use each method. During lecture, your
professor may set aside a day every week to work on problems in class. This is a great time to
apply the concepts and skills you have learned that week.
THE Tip: Start practicing early. Be familiar with the software and ready to ask specific questions.
The better you understand the concepts and software, the easier (and more useful) the studio
section is. Take the time to review the math concepts that are mentioned in class.
Recall: DSP and differential equations, Laplace transforms, Linear Algebra.
Spend your time working on the recitation section, reading the textbook.
Take Home: Different approaches to model complex systems and computational tools to perform
such modeling.

BMED 3600: PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLULAR & MOLECULAR SYSTEMS


In depth cell and molecular physiology focused on cellular responses to stimuli, including cell
organization/reorganization, membrane transport/kinetics, cell signaling/molecular biology,
mechanobiology and energy requirements.
Prerequisites: BMED 3100
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.04
This class teaches you basic mammalian cell anatomy and cellular level mechanisms. A few
of the topics covered in this class include transcription/translation, cell growth and death, structure
and function of cell membranes, the cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix. Topics including
biotechniques, microscopy, DNA/RNA probes, and others will also be covered. In addition to
regular exams, you work with a team on two projects each with a paper and presentation
component. For each project, you will be assigned a specific portion of the cell or a specific topic
to explore such as using cytoskeleton components for cancer detection or cancer treatment. These
may include describing experimental setups.
THE tip: Test material comes nearly all from lecture, so you should attend lecture. Use the textbook
to reinforce your knowledge and gain a better understanding. Dont wait until the night before to
review articles and finish your group papers (the professor will know and your grade will suffer).
Work on your writing skills; you will be expected to write scientific papers and proposals. Think

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carefully through experimental setups and how you may collect/visualize data. Hone your group
working skills a positive, hard-working, meticulous, and cooperative attitude will take you a long
way. Talk to your TA and ask for review sessions if you feel uncertain about any class material.
Keep in mind some professors may talk about their own research, and anything they say is fair
game on a test.
Recall: BMED 2250, Biology, BMED 3100
Spend your time reviewing lecture slides for the tests and doing a literature review for your
assigned project (paper and presentation). Communicate with your team and meet often.
Take Home: Important cell biology concepts, writing proposals, experimental setup, reading,
reviewing, critiquing papers and incorporating relevant information.

BMED 3610: QUANTITATIVE ENGINEERING PHYSIOLOGY LAB II


This lab provides an active-learning team environment, incorporating common cell/molecular
biology techniques, to reinforce selected engineering principles in an in vitro cell culture setting.
Prerequisites: BMED 2310 (or BMED 2300) and BMED 3310 (or BMED 3300) and BMED 3110 and
BMED 3600
Credit Hours: 2
Average GPA: 3.13
This course is the second of the two lab classes that are required for all BMEs. Class is
divided into groups of 3-4 in a lab of about 20-30 people. The team must perform 3 experiments
throughout the semester, the last of which is completely novel and could fit within the scope of a
journal publication. This is also a great course to prepare for industry research as it gives hands-on
wet lab experience.
THE tip: Make sure that your group is composed of people you want to work with and make sure
that their schedules match yours enough to put in the lab time.
Recall: Problem solving skills, cancer biology from 3600, and any wet lab research experience is a
huge bonus.
Spend your time in the lab, in the lab, in the lab
Take Home: This class teaches experimental design and execution, particularly useful for those
pursuing wet lab research in industry or academia.

BMED 4602: SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT I


Team-oriented design project in biomedical engineering, incorporating engineering standards and
realistic design constraints. Includes introduction to relevant regulatory, intellectual property, and
business management topics.
Prerequisites: BMED 3610 and BMED 2310 (or BMED 2300)
Credit Hours: 2
Average GPA: 3.28

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This class involves picking a project idea and mentor in the first week and then spending
the semester designing the project. The course focuses on engineering design specifications, initial
prior art, design concepts and a plan of action for 4602. This course serves as the planning and
initial design stage for a complete biomedical design project. You'll work in groups of 3-4 students
and have a project adviser. You will develop a project plan and, eventually, a design for a device
that fills a need in the biomedical industry. You will write several papers outlining your objectives,
needs, and plans.
THE tip: Find motivated teammates prior to the beginning of the class who have similar interests,
but different skill sets and points of view so that you can find a project you are all passionate about.
Recall: EVERYTHING! Technical instruction is minimal; classroom-based instruction is focused on
the real-world, professional aspects of project development most students are unfamiliar with.
Youve learned everything you need for this course already, now its time to apply it.
Spend your time talking with your mentor about ideas and formulating realistic plans for the next
semester. Do not waste time during group meetings. Meet 2-3 hours a week with your group and
work on the next assignment. Planning and working closely with your team to define and develop
goals now will REALLY help during 4602.
Take Home: This class gives a great idea of teamwork, the design iteration process, and a glimpse
at what industry might be like for you it also lays the necessary foundation for work in 4603.

BMED 4603: SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT II


Continuation of a team-oriented design experience initiated in BMED 4602 Capstone Design.
Includes more advanced relevant regulatory such as intellectual property, and business
management topics.
Prerequisites: BMED 4602
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.69
This course is offered as an elective in order to provide students an opportunity to further
develop their 4602 project. Each team will prototype the design, test it, and write a 510(k), among
others things. At the end of the course, you will present a functional prototype to your classmates,
instructors, advisors, and potential future employers!
THE tip: Make a Gantt chart right at the beginning so that your team doesnt lose any steam from
4602
Recall: BMED 4602 mostly. Youre continuing your senior design project and pushing it past the
initial prototyping phases.
Spend your time Maintaining good documentation and building a network. It really helps to
monitor your own progress and makes it easier to progress if there are team communication issues.
For the network, there are SO many great people willing to help on your project on and off campus.
Take Home: If you arent turning your project into a startup, then you have an amazing
technical/team project to talk about in interviews. There are also the occasional job offer that can
come from the network youve cultivated throughout the project.

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BMED 4477: BIOLOGICAL NETWORKS AND GENOMICS


Introduction to modeling of biological networks involved in gene regulation, cell signaling, and
metabolism. Students will learn mathematical modeling of cellular processes using genomic data.
Prerequisites: BMED 3520 and BMED 2400 (or CEE/ISYE 3770)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 2.92 (last time taken was Spring 2014)
Biological Networks and Genomics introduces OMICS data types and data production
techniques while teaching experimental methods for discovering network structures. These include
finding structural patterns in random networks and making random graph network models.
Additionally, RNA-seq will be used for measuring gene expression while discovering transcriptional
networks and synthetically designing gene circuits.

BMED 4500: CELL & TISSUE ENGINEERING LAB


The principles of cell and tissue engineering will be presented as a laboratory course to give
students a hands-on experience. Cell engineering topics include receptor/ligand interactions, cell
cycle/metabolism, cell adhesion, cellular mechanics, cell signal transduction, and cell transfection.
Tissue engineering topics include applications, biomaterials/scaffolds and cells for reparative
medicine, bioreactors and bioprocessing, functional assessment, in vivo issues.
Prerequisites: BMED 3610
Credit Hours: 2
Average GPA: 3.69
This course teaches many of the fundamentals of cellular and tissue engineering. For tissue
culture, concepts of growth and differentiation of cell/tissue cultures, cell cycle and metabolism,
receptor-ligand interactions, cell adhesion, and cell migration are taught. The tissue engineering
part focuses on biomaterials for tissue engineering, cells for repair, bioreactors and bioprocessing,
functional assessments, host integration, and regulatory and ethical issues.
THE tip: Come prepared to lab. The lab component is 6 hours but can be completed with proper
preparation

BMED 4750: DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING PHYSICS


Physics and image formation methods for conventional X-ray, digital X-ray CT, nuclear medicine,
and magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.
Prerequisites: BMED 3110
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 2.86

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Students will study conventional planar imaging, digital x-ray imaging, computed
tomography, nuclear medicine imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound
imaging. The hope is for students to understand the imaging methods and the interactions between
tissue and components of the imaging system and to gain a full picture of modern imaging device
application in the medical industry. Students must step back to the fundamentals of mathematics
and physics to begin to analyze image data.
THE tip: Attend every class and study the lectures and assignments. Ask lots of questions of the
professor and other students about the class material you don't understand.
Recall: Everything in this class is based on general knowledge regarding physics and image
formation methods for conventional imaging systems.
Spend your time studying lecture notes and assignments and asking questions.
Take Home: If you're interested in the field of medical imaging, this class will help you gain basic
knowledge about the various imaging systems. It's also good for pre-med students.

BMED 4751: INTRODUCTION TO BIOMATERIALS


Introduction to different classes of biomaterials (polymers, metals, ceramics) and physiological
responses to biomaterial implantation. Topics include material properties, host response, and
biomaterial characterization techniques.
Prerequisites: MSE 2001
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 2.71
Introduction to different classes of biomaterials (polymers, metals, ceramics) and
physiological responses to biomaterial implantation. Topics include material properties, host
response, and biomaterial characterization techniques. This class focuses on memorizing facts and
graphs about different materials used in the body for engineering and healthcare purposes, and
how the body physiologically responds to these materials. Notes are often hand-written in class, so
class attendance very important. Exam format is free response (short answer), very similar to the
format seen in MSE 2001.
THE tip: Memorization, memorization, memorization. Attend class every day, take notes extensively
and diligently, ask questions at review sessions prior to exams. Make flashcards of key processes
and vocabulary, and pay close attention to spelling!
Recall: MSE 2001, BMED 3100
Spend your time reviewing your class notes and running through flashcards.
Take Home: This class is critical for anyone planning to work in the medical device industry.
Understanding the clinical impact of the materials you select is extremely important.

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BMED/ME 4757: BIOFLUID MECHANICS


Introduction to the study of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. Emphasis on modeling and the
potential of flow studies for clinical research applications.
Prerequisites: BMED 3310 (or BMED 3300)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.30
Introduction to the study of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. Emphasis on modeling
and the potential of flow studies for clinical research application. Become well-versed in heart
physiology and flow and attempts to current technology to improve weak or diseased
hearts/vessels. Class format was loose and Dr. Yoganathan often delegates lectures to the TAs, so
be prepared to handle last minute changes in organizations and assignments.
THE tip: Attend recitation and lecture. Read the text and similar texts. Learn heart anatomy and
blood flow early on it will help you visualize everything from the start.
Recall: Fluids, calculus, and physiology
Spend your time reviewing lecture notes, heart anatomy, and reading the text. Start early on the
final project.
Take Home: Knowledge on the cardiovascular system great for pre-meds and those interested in
medical device industry.

BMED 4758: BIOSOLID MECHANICS


The mechanics of living tissue, e.g., arteries, skin, heart muscle, ligament, tendon, cartilage, and
bone. Constitutive equations and some simple mechanical models, mechanics of cells, and
applications.
Prerequisites: BMED 3400
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.04
In this course, students will learn how to perform tensor algebra operations and employ
index notation to manipulate expressions containing scalar, vector, and second-order tensors.
Students will further investigate the various definitions of stress and strain to identify the 3D states
under different loading scenarios. This class will delineate the general mechanical characteristics of
different biological materials and identify appropriate theoretical frameworks to perform stress
analysis. To be prepared for this class, one must be able to apply the basics of classical physics,
including conservation of mass, linear angular momentum, energy, and entropy inequalities in order
to determine material parameters for biological tissues modeled simplified to basic MSE materials.
THE tip: Take good, legible, and organized notes in class. Do the homework assignments carefully.
When studying for the exam, try redoing the homework problems and in-class examples.
Recall: BMED 3400 and matrix algebra
Spend your time... doing problems and in-class examples

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Take Home: What viscoelasticity is and how to approach analyzing the mechanical properties of
soft tissues (both experimentally and analytically).

BMED 4765: DRUG DESIGN DEVELOPMENT & DELIVERY


Introduction to the pharmaceutical development process, including design of new drugs, synthesis
and manufacturing issues, and methods for delivery into the body.
Prerequisites: CHEM 3511 or CHEM 4511
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.13
In this class, students will be introduced the pharmaceutical development process. There
are 5-6 homeworks, a few exams, and a final presentation on a drug design/development/delivery
system assigned to you. Students should expect to investigate three case studies throughout the
whole course. This course demonstrates an appreciation for critical issues, analysis performance,
and quantitative calculations related to drug design. This class integrates concepts and
demonstrates an appreciation for the interdependence of drug design, development, and delivery.
THE tip: Success is highly dependent on the final exam which is solely based on the presentation
section by the student projects at the end of the semester. Pay attention in class, and the
homeworks and exams and youll be fine.
Recall: Biochemistry
Spend your time... Reviewing lecture notes & working on the final presentations
Take Home: Knowledge of pharmaceutical industry, spring break trip to Puerto Rico, networking
with industry and professors.

BMED 4783: INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSING


A study of mathematical methods used in medical image acquisition and processing. Concepts,
algorithms, and methods associated with acquisition, processing, and display of two- and threedimensional medical images are studied.
Prerequisites: ECE 2026 and BMED 2400 (or CEE/ISYE 3770)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.03
A study of mathematical methods used in medical image acquisition and processing.
Concepts, algorithms, and methods associated with acquisition, processing, and display of twoand three dimensional medical images are studied. Learn tips and tricks for manipulating images
with a focus on MRI and CAT scan data.
THE tip: Pay heavy attention & take great notes. Tests come from problems he works during class.
Recall: CS 1371 and DSP
Spend your time...reviewing problems from class.

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Take Home: general computer programming skills, refresh & solidify DSP, & a great prep for 3520.

BMED 4813: BIOMEDICAL DATA SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


A survey of programming languages and techniques to better understand and process data.
Prerequisites: CS 1371
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.81
In this course, students will learn a variety of programming languages and understanding
data processing within each one. At the end of this course, students will have a better
understanding of which language is best for each challenge. The course does not have exams, but
rather two weekly assignments that foster understanding of the material. To be prepared for this
class, one must be able to apply the basics of computer science, basic calculus (think derivatives),
and follow along in class.
THE tip: You MUST follow along in class on your own computer. Often, the homework assignment
builds right off of the in-class work.
Recall: CS logic
Spend your time...doing the homework, its the only graded part
Take Home: Confidence in several programming languages and a better sense of evaluating trends
within data.

BMED 4813: CLINICAL OBSERVATION AND DESIGN EXPERIENCE


Exposure to clinical environment and research design in medicine. Students will collect research
data and identify and enroll patients in ongoing research studies while learning observational skills to
solve problems in the clinical environment.
Prerequisites: At least 100 credit hours before registration
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.70
This class provides exposure to the clinical environment and research design in medicine.
Students will primarily observe the conditions in the hospitals at Emory Midtown, Grady, or Emory
Main, and Kaiser Permanente to look for potential problems and improvements in safety,
environment, devices, and more. Students go on two shifts a week (one at Grady, and the other at
any of the other locations) for about 3 hours each shift in pairs. During the shifts, students are
required to keep detailed observations in their composition notebooks. The course may also have
students helping in research data collection by timing certain processes or doing other activities
such as enrolling patients in research studies. Additionally, there are lectures and small group
activities to learn to carefully observe the environment and apply techniques to help solve clinical
problems. Lectures may cover a range of topics from interesting procedures/processes observed in

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the hospital to demonstrations of common procedures. Grading comes from notebook checks,
papers and presentations, and other assignments.
THE tip: Do not miss your shifts.
Recall: BMED 2250 and BMED 2310 Spend your time keeping a comprehensive and extensive
notebook of all the observations you experience while observing in the hospital. Show up to class
and enjoy lectures. They usually will be on relevant topics to the healthcare setting.
Take Home: This class is geared towards NON pre-medical students who may continue to work on
a project for senior design. It is not strictly a shadowing class! Take this class if you are interested
in learning and evaluating the treatment of patients in a clinical setting. This class primarily explores
potential redesigns and improvements related to the hospital.

BMED 4833: INTRO TO SYSTEMS, SIGNALS, AND CIRCUITS


Introduction to basic concepts of signals, circuits, and systems and their biomedical applications.
This course can substitute for ECE 3710 + 3741 in the BME required curriculum

Prerequisites: PHYS 2212 and (MATH 2403 or 2552)


Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed to introduce you to the basic concepts of signals, circuits, and
systems, which can be very useful if you plan on taking depth elective courses cross listed with
ECE (bioinstrumentation, electrophysiology, etc). You will learn about circuit elements, circuit
analysis, Fourier transformations, linear systems analysis, and about the biomedical applications of
all these different topics. Some topics of this class overlap with classes such as ECE 3710/3741
(Circuits and Electronics) and ECE 2026 (Intro to Digital Signal Processing), but are discussed in
this class in terms of BME applications. The class is taught as a lecture, where the professor first
explains concepts and then works through problems on the board. Outside of class, you will work
with a partner on a hands-on project every week, where you will you use either the NI MyDAQ or
MATLAB to answer a series of questions and demo your work to the TAs during office hours.
Grading is based on these projects, 2 midterms, and the final.
THE tip: Work through practice problems on your own to make sure that youre understanding the
concepts that are discussed in lecture. Since there are no assigned homework problems, it can be
easy to fall behind. The textbook is a great resource in this class, as it has a lot of worked out
problems that are helpful in making sure you are keeping up.
Recall: Physics 2, statistics (variance, correlation), MATLAB
Spend your time working through practice problems from the book and actually reading through
the book. Go to office hours if you have any questions. The weekly projects vary in difficulty, but are
generally not very time consuming.
Take home: Understanding of circuit analysis, basic concepts of signal processing

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BMED 4833: NEUROPHYSIOLOGY


An in depth study of neurophysiology focused on cellular mechanisms, integration, and regulation.
Prerequisites: BMED 3100, CHEM 1211K, and MATH 1552 (or MATH 1501)
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 3.55
This course covers the foundational concepts of neurophysiology and the experimental
evidence behind those concepts. Topics include neuron physiology, synaptic transmission,
cognition, perception, movement, arousal, emotion, homeostasis, development, language, learning,
and memory. The class is extremely fast paced with one class period covering 1-3 chapters of the
book. However, the class is focused on the big picture, so it is important to not get caught up in the
detail of the textbook. A lot of material is covered, and you do not need to know everything to
succeed. Your final grade is either an average of the three semester exams or the final, which is
optional.
THE tip: Keep up with the reading material and focus on the big picture. Try to connect the
concepts from different sections together as you go.
Recall: Electrophysiology from BMED 3100
Spend your time reading the textbook
Take Home: Obtain a broad overview of everything involved in neurophysiology.

BMED 4843: BME HEALTHREACH


Students will create interactive teaching modules to explain math and science concepts to
hospitalized children. This course involved direct patient interaction and teaching of modules
developed by students.
Prerequisites: BMED 2250
Credit Hours: 3
Average GPA: 4.00
In this course, students create educational activities to teach pediatric patients and K-12
students about math and science concepts through the lens of their disease. This class is a 2+
semester commitment. During the first semester as a junior member, students create and refine
activities and participate in pop-up service activities at local schools and hospitals. You will use
your 2250 PBL skills while working in groups to create the activities as well as when you are
presenting your activities. You will use your 2310 skills when creating basic prototypes of your
activities each week. During the second semester as a senior member, students have weekly
shifts at Childrens Healthcare of Atlanta (Egleston or Hughes-Spalding) where they do the activities
with the patients.
THE tip: When designing activities, think about it from the patients perspective - are your activities
fun for various ages/educational levels of children? When going to the hospital, be sure to be
respectful and considerate of the patients, their parents, and all hospital employees.

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Recall: BMED 2250 and BMED 2310


Spend your time brainstorming creative ways to teach topics which may be new to the
patients/students, while also linking them to a specific disease model. Its always better to have a
quality activity that took more time to make, rather than a boring activity that was easy to make.
Take Home: Learn how to summarize BME knowledge into easy-to-understand terms that children
can understand. Learn how to teach basic math and science topics

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