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T H E L OST L E M U R I A

W IT H

T W O M A PS

SH

D IS T R IB U T I O N OF
AT

D IFF E R E N T

O WIN G

A N D A R E AS

PE R I OD S

B!

A uthor

S C OT T E LL I OT
-

T he S tor y

"

A tla ntis.

U nive r se ,

TH E

O S O PH I CA L
:61,

e tc

O N DO N

an s

PU B L I S H I N G

NE W B ON D S T R E E T ,
1

0
9 4

Pla ce in the

S OCI E T!

The object of this pa per

is

much to

no t so

bring forwa rd

new a nd sta rtling inf orma tion a bout the l ost continent o f Lemuria
a nd

its inha bita nts,

from ge ol ogy
living

a nd

a nd

as

to esta blish by the evidence obta ina bl e

from the study of the rel a tive distribution

ext inct a nimals a nd pla nts

pro cesses of physica l evolution


st a

ted

e nce

in

the

Secret Doctr ine

to these now

t -U

bmerged

su

in

as

well as from the observed

the l ower kingdoms the


,

a nd

of

in

other works

l a nds

with

fa cts

re fer

( the

l Le mur ia

iLost

It is genera lly recognised by science tha t wha t is now dry


l a nd on the sur fa ce of o ur g lobe w as once the ocea n oor a nd
tha t wha t is no w the oce a n oor w as once dr y l a nd Geo l ogists
ha ve in some cases been a bl e to specify the e xa ct portions of the
ea rth s surfa ce where these subsidences a n d uphea va ls ha ve ta ken
pl a ce a nd a l thoug h the l ost continent of Atla ntis ha s so fa r re ceived
sca nt rec ognition from the worl d o f science the genera l co n ce nsus
of opinion h a s for l ong pointed to the existence a t some pre
histor ic time o f a vast southern co ntinent to which the na me
o f Lemuria h as been a ssigned
,

The history of the ea rth s devel opment


the distribution of la nd a nd wa ter on its

hows
sur fa ce
s

tha t
ever

us

is

cha nges of the ea rth s crust el eva tions a nd depr essions of


the ground ta ke pla ce everywhere sometimes more strongly
ma rked in o ne pl a ce sometimes in a nother
Even if they
ha ppen so sl owly tha t in the course of centur ies the sea shore
rises or sinks onl y a few inches or even onl y a few lines
st ill they neverthel ess e e c t grea t resul ts in the co urse of l ong

E vide nce
supplie d b
y
Ge o l o g y a nd
by th e

ha ve not been wa nting in the ea rth s history During the


co urse o f ma ny millions of yea r s ever since orga nic life existed
o n the ea rth l a nd a nd wa ter ha ve per petua ll y strug gl e d for
Continents a nd isl ands ha ve sunk into the se a a nd
suprem a c y
time

distribution
o i livin:
a nd e xtinc t

a nd

Pla n

new ones ha ve a risen o ut of its bosom La kes a nd seas ha ve been


sl owly ra ised a nd dried up a nd new wa ter basins ha ve a risen by
the sinking of the ground Peninsulas ha ve become isl a nds by
.

the wa ter The isl a nds of a n a rchipel a go ha ve


become the pea ks of a continuous chain of mountains by the
whol e oor of their se a being considera bly ra ised

la nd sinking into

Thus the Mediterra nea n a t one time w as a n inl a nd se a when


in the pl a ce of the St ra its of Gibral t a r a n isthmus conn ected
Engl a nd even during the more rec ent hist or y
Af rica with Spa in
o f the ea r th
when m a n al rea dy exist ed h as re pea tedl y be e n
connected with the Europ ea n co ntinent a n d been repe a tedly
N a y even Europe a nd North America ha ve
sepa ra t ed from it
bee n directly connected The South S e a a t one time formed a
l a rge Pa cic Continent a nd the numer ous littl e isl a nds whic h
now lie sca t tered in it were simply the highest pea ks o f the moun
tains cover ing tha t continent The India n Ocea n formed a co n
tinent which exte nded from the Sunda Isl a nds al ong the southern
coast of Asia to the east coast of Africa This l a rge con tinent
of former times Scl a ter a n Englishm a n h a s ca ll ed L emm ia from
the monkey e a nimal s which inha bited it a nd it is a t the sa me
time of grea t importa nce from being the proba bl e cra dl e of the
huma n ra ce which in a ll lik elihood here rst devel op ed o ut o f
!
a nthropoid a pes
The im porta nt proof which Alf red Wa ll a ce
h as furnished by the hel p of chorol ogica l fa cts th a t the prese nt
,

the

Indo

Ma l a ya n Archipela go comprising the

H a e c ke l is c o rr e ct
of

t h e h um a n

t h a t m a nkind

in

na t ur e

r a c e as

it

e n ug

h in his

no w e x ists ,

sur mise

l a rge isl a nds

t h a t L e m ur ia w a s t h e

but it w a s

no t o ut o f

de ve l op e d
A r e f e r e nce will be m a de l a t e r
whic h t h e Ant hr op oid a p e s r e al ly oc c up y
.

cr a

An t h r op oid

on

of

dl e

a pe s

t o t h e p osit ion

3
B o r neo ,

J a va

a nd

Suma tra

conn ected by Mal a cca

w as for merl y

tinent j ust mentioned The eas tern division on the other


ha nd th e Austro Ma l a ya n Archipel a go comprising Cel ebes
t he Mol uccas New Guinea Sol omon s Isl a nds etc w a s formerly
dire ctl y connected with A ustralia Both divisions were formerly
t wo continents sep a ra ted by a stra it but they ha ve now for the
most p a rt sunk bel o w th e l evel of t he se a Wa ll a ce sol ely on
the gr ound o f his a ccura te chorol ogical observa tio ns ha s been
a bl e in the most a ccur a te ma nner to determine the position o f
this former stra it the south end of which pa sses between Balij
co n

Th us ever sin ce liquid wa ter existed on the ea rth the boun


da rics o f wa ter a nd l a nd ha ve eternal ly cha nged a nd we m a y
a ssert tha t the outl in es of continents a nd isl a nds ha ve never
re m a ined for a n hour na y even for a minute exa ctly the sa me
Fo r th e wa ves eterna lly a nd per pet ua lly brea k o n the edge o f the
co a st a nd wha tever the l a nd in these pl a ces l oses in ext en t it
ga ins in other pl a ces by the a ccumul a tion of m ud which condenses
into solid stone a nd a ga in rises a bove the l evel o f the se a as new
Nothing c a n be more erroneo us tha n the idea of a r m
l a nd
a nd unchangea bl e outline of o ur continents such as is impressed
up on us in ea rl y youth by de fective l essons on geogra phy which
,

The na me Lemur ia as a bove sta ted was original ly a dopted


Mr Scla ter in rec og nition o f the fa ct tha t it wa s p r op a bly on
,

by

is undoubtedly a l e gitir t e
Th is writes A R Wa ll a ce
m
an d h ighl y proba bl e supp osition a nd it is a n exa mpl e o f the wa y
in which a study of the geogra phica l distribution o f
e na bl e us t o re construct the geogra phy o f a bygone
!

E r nst

Ha e ckel s Hist

o f_Cr e a t io n,

"

2n d e d
.

8 76 , Vo l

6
0
3
pp
.

62

[this co ntinent! repres ents wha t was proba bly a prima ry


zoolo gica l region in some past geolo gica l epoch ; but wha t th a t
e poch w a s a nd wha t were the l im its o f the region in question w e
a re quite una bl e to sa y
I f we a r e to supp ose tha t it comprise d
the whol e a rea now inha bited by Le muroid a nimals we must
ma ke it ext en d from West Africa to Bur ma h South Ch in a
"
a nd Cel ebes a n a r e a which it po ssibly did once occupy
It

We ha ve a l rea dy h a d occasion he elsewhere writes


to
re fer to a n a ncient connection bet ween this sub region (th e
!

of the Lemur ine typ e a nd some other curious a nities bet wee n
the two countries This view is supported by the ge ol ogy of
India which shows us Ceyl on a nd Sout h India consisting
mainly of gra nite a nd ol d meta morphic rocks whil e the grea te r
pa r t of th e peninsula is of tertia ry form a tion with a fe w
isola ted pa tches of sec onda r y rocks
It is evident there fore
tha t during much of the tertia r y per iod 1 Ceyl on a nd South
India were bounded on the north by a considera bl e ext ent of se a
a nd proba bl y formed pa rt of a n ext ensive Southern Continent
or grea t isla nd The very numerous a nd rema rka bl e cases of
,

'

tion with these isla nds which proba bly occurred a t a la ter per iod
When still l a t er the grea t pl a ins a nd ta bl ela nds o f H indostan
were formed and a pe rma nent la nd communica tion e ec t e d
s

Alfr e d R usse ll

T h e Ge og r a p h ica l D istr ibut ion

dy o f t h e r e l a t ions o f living a nd
"
c h a ng e s o f t h e E a r t h s S ur f a ce

w it h

a st u

t h e p ast
1 8 76
Vo l
.

l
$
1 y
'

by

Wa ll a ce

'

a c

6
pp 7 7

o n a nd

F a un as

Anim a l s

as e l u ci a t ing

L o ndon : M a cmill a n 8: Co

it is t r ue , h a ve be e n bound ed o n t h e nor th
e x t e nt o f se a , but t h a t w as a t a m uch e a r lie r da t e t h a n

S out h I

onside r a bl e

e x t inc t

of

ndia ,

forms were too well a da pted to l oca l conditions to be expell ed ;


so tha t it is a mong these group s a lone tha t we n d a ny considera bl e
number of wha t a re proba bly the rema ins o f the a ncient fa una
of a no w submerged Souther n Continent
Aft er sta ting tha t dur ing the whol e of the t e rtia ry a nd perha ps
dur ing much of the sec on da ry periods the grea t la nd masse s o f
the ea rth were proba bly situa t ed in the Norther n H e misphe re
W a lla ce proceeds In the Southern H e misphe re there a ppea r t o
ha ve been three considera bl e a nd very a ncient la nd ma sse s va r y
ing in ext ent from time to time but al wa ys keeping distinct fr om
ea ch other a nd re present ed more or less co mpl etely by Aust ra lia
South Af rica a nd South Amer ica of o ur time
Into these owed
succ essive wa ves of lif e a s they ea ch in turn beca me t e mpora rily
united with some p a rt o f the Nor thern l a nd 1
Al though a pp a rentl y in vindica tion of some co ncl usions of

'

continent his genera l rec ognition of the fa cts of subsiden ces


a nd uphea va ls of grea t portions of the ea rth s sur fa ce
as well
as the inf erences which he dra ws from the a cknowl edged rela tions
of liv ing a nd e xtin ct fa unas as a bove sta ted remain of co urse
unal tered
The following ext ra ct s from Mr H F Bl a ndford s most
interesting pa per rea d before a meeting of the Geol ogical Soc iety
deal s with the subjec t in still gr e a ter detail :
a

Wa ll a ce s
W
1 a ll a c e s

I H

se r ie s o f
se e

In dia

e tc

Ge og r a p hical D istr ibut ion,

F B la ndf or d

l
e
r
u
a
r
t
y
Q

0
4
4 5
53

Ge og r a p hic a l Dist r ibut ion,

a nd

0u th e

t h e fo r m er

r
o
u
J na l

of

th e

!
.

Vo l

1,

pp

Vo l ii
.

2 8 -9

155

or r e l a t ions o f t h e Pl a nt be a r in g
"
e x ist e n ce o f [a n I n do Oce a nic Cont ine nt
G e ol ogical S ocie t y , Vo l x x x i , 1 8 7 5 p p
a ge

a nd

The a nitie s between the fossils o f both a nima ls a nd pla nts


o f the I ndia n
a nd t hose
o f the Bea uf ort group of Afric a
Pa nch e ts a nd K a th mis a r e such as t o suggest the former
existence of a l a nd connexion between the tw o a reas But t h e
.

cea se with Per mia n a nd Tria ssic times The pl a nt beds of the U it e n
ha ge group ha ve furnished el even forms of pl a nts two of which
Mr Ta t e h as identied with India n Rajmah al pl a nts The
India n J urassic fossils ha ve yet to be described (with a few
exce pt ions) but it h as been st a t e d tha t Dr S t o lie zka w as much
struck with the a nities of cert a in of the ( hi t ch fossils to Afric a n
forms ; a nd Dr S to lie z ka a n d Mr Griesb a ch ha ve shown t ha t
the
o f the Cr et a ceous fossil s o f t h e U m t a fun i river in Na t a l
i
i
t
i
i
de
s
cr
bed
form
s
a
r
e
den
c
a
l
w
th
pec
e
s
i
s
ma jority (22 o ut of 3
)
5
from Southern India Now the pl an t bea ring series o f In dia an d
the Ka roo a nd pa rt of the Uit e nha ge forma t ion of A frica a r e in
a ll proba bility of fresh wa t er origin both in dic a t ing the exist ence
o f a l a rge l a n d a rea a roun d fr om the was t e of which these depo sits
t
i
r
i
u
s
e
der
ved
th
l
a
n
d
cont
i
n
u
o
be
ween
the
two
reg
o
n
s
W
as
i
s
(a
A nd is there a nything in the presen t physic a l geogra phy of the
India n Oce an which woul d sugg est its proba bl e position Further
wha t w as t h e connexion between this l an d a n d Austra lia which
we must equal ly a ssume to ha ve existed in Permian t imes
And l astly a r e there a ny peculia rities in t h e existing fa un a a nd
ora of India Africa a n d the intervening isl a nds which woul d
l end suppo rt t o the idea of a for mer connexion more direct tha n
tha t which no w exists bet ween A frica a nd South India a nd the
Mal a y peninsul a
The spec ul a t ion her e p ut for wa rd is no ne w
one It h a s leng I be e n a subject o f thought in the minds of some
India n a n d E ur op e a a a tur al ists a mong the for mer of whom
I m a y;mention my;br o th e r [M n Bl a ndf ord! a nd Dr S t o lie zka
.

the fa una s a nd o r a s o f pa st times no t l ess tha n on


t ha t existing commun ity of forms which h as l e d Mr Andrew Murra y
Mr Sea rl es V Wood j un a nd Professor H uxl ey t o infer the
existence of a Miocene cont inent occupying a pa rt of t h e India n
Ocea n Indeed a ll tha t I c a n pretend to a im a t in this pa per
is to endea vour to give some a dditiona l denition a nd extension
to the conception of it s geol ogical aspect
identity

of

With rega rd to the geogr a phical evidence a gl a nce a t the


m a p will show tha t from the neighbourhood of the West Coast
of India to tha t of the Seychell es Ma da gasc a r a n d the Ma urit ius
ext ends a line ai coral a tolls a nd ba nk s incl uding Ada s ba nk
t h e L a cca dives Mal dives th e Cha gos group a nd the S a ya de
M ulh a al l indic a t ing the existence of a submerged mountain
ra nge or ra nges The Seychell es too a r e mentioned by Mr
D a rwin a s r ising from a n extensive a nd t ol era bly l evel ba nk
ha ving a depth of bet ween 30 a n d 40 fa thoms so tha t a l t hough
now p a rtl y encircl ed by fringing reefs they m a y be rega rded a s
a virt ua l ext ension of the sa me submerged a xis
Further west
the Cosmol edo a nd Comoro Isl a nds consist of a tolls a n d isl a nds
a n d these bring us pr etty cl ose t o
su rrounded by b a rrier reefs
the present shores of Afr ica a nd Ma da gasc a r It seems a t l east
proba bl e tha t in this chain of a tolls ba nk s a nd ba rrier reefs we
ha ve in dica ted th e position of a n a ncient mounta in chain which
possibly formed th e ba ck bone of a tra ct of l a ter Pal a o zo ic
M esozoic a nd ea rl y Tertia ry l a nd being rel a t ed to it much as the
Alpine a nd H imal a ya n system is to the E uro pa o A sia tic con
tine nt a nd the Rocky Mountains a nd A ndes to the two Americas
A s it is desira bl e to designa te this Mesozoic l a nd by a n a me I
wo ul d pro pose tha t of Indo Ocea na [The na me given to it by
Mr Scl a ter viz Lemuria is however the o ne which h as been
most gen era lly a dopted ! Pro fessor H uxl ey h as suggest ed on
n
i
hi
l
u
n
l
i
s
i
n
l
l
gro
d
th
t
nd
conn
x
on
ex
ted
t
i
s
a
a
e
s
a
t
c
o
c
a
a
o
a
p
g
,

region (or ra ther between Abyssinia a nd India ) during the M io cene

epoch From ;wha t h as been sa id a bove it will be see n th a t I


!
inf er its exist ence from a fa r ea rlier da te
With rega rd to its
depr ession the only present evidence rel a tes to its nort hern
extremity a nd shows tha t it w as in this region l a ter tha n the
grea t tra p o ws of the D a kha n Th ese enormous shee ts of vol ca nic
rock a r e rema rka bly horizonta l to the east of the Ghats a n d the
S a ky adr i ra nge but to the west of this they be gin to d ip sea wa rds
so tha t the isl a nd of Bomba y is composed of the higher p a rt s of
t h e for ma tion
This in dica tes onl y tha t the depr ession to the
west wa rd h as ta ken pl a ce in Tertia r y times ; a nd to t ha t ex tent
Professor H ux l ey s inf erence t h a t it w as a ft er the M iocene period
is quite consisten t with the geo l ogical evidence
After proceeding a t some l ength to inst a nce the cl ose rel a tion
ship of ma n y of the fa una in the l a nds under considera tion
(Lion H yaena J a cka l Leopa rd Antelope Ga zel l e S a nd grouse
Indian Busta rd ma ny La nd Molusca a n d nota bly the Lemur
a nd the Sca l y Antea ter ) the writer procee ds a s foll ows
Pal ae ontol o gy physica l geogra phy a nd geol ogy equal l y
with the ascert a ined distr ibution of living a nimal s a nd pl a nts
o er thus their concurren t testimony to the for mer cl ose conne xion
of Africa a n d India in cluding the tropica l isla nds of the Indian
Ocea n This Indo Ocea nic l a nd a ppea rs to ha ve existed from
a t l ea st ea rl y Permia n times
proba bly (as Professor H uxl ey
h as pointed o ut ) up to t h e cl ose of the Miocene epoch ;1 a nd
South Af r ica a n d Peninsul a r India a r e the existing remna nts of
tha t a ncient l a nd It m a y no t ha ve been a bsolutely continuous
during the whol e of this l ong period Indee d the Creta ceous
.

'

r e f e r e n ce

da t e is t h e m or e

Pa r t s

L e m ur ia is

of

th e

to t h e m a p s w ill show t h a t M r
cor r e ct o f t h e t wo

B l a ndf or d

s e st im a t e

of

cont ine n t o f c

d t o h a ve

sa i

our se

t a ke n p l a ce

dur e d , but t h e dism e m be r m e n t o f


be f or e t h e be g inning o f t h e E o ce ne A g e
en

ra nge a nd the northern H imal a ya show tha t in the preceding


pe r iod the se a covered a l a rge pa rt of the present Indus ba sin
i
i
i
t
h
i
a
f
d
Tr
c
C
rbon
ero
t
more
recent
m
r
ne
a
s
s
u
s
a
n
s
i
ll
a
a
n
d
e
i
forma tions of the H imal a ya indica te t ha t from very ea rly tim es
till the uphea val of tha t grea t ch ain much of its present site
w as for a ges covered by the se a
To sum up the views a dva nced in this pa per
,

The pl a nt bea ring series of India ra nges from e a r l y


Per mia n to the la test J urassic tim es indica ting (except in a few
cases a nd l oca lly) the uninterrupted continuity of la nd a nd f resh
wa ter conditions These m a y ha ve preva il ed from much ea rlier
I st

In the ea rly Permia n as in the Po stp lio ce ne a g e a


c ol d clima te prevail ed down to l o w l a titudes a nd I a m in clined
to bel ieve in both hemispheres simul ta neously With the decreas e
of col d the ora a nd reptilia n fa una of Per mia n tim es were diuse d
to Af rica India a nd possibly Austra lia ; or the ora m a y h a v e
a nd ha ve been diuse d
e xisted in Austra l ia so mewh a t ea rlier
thence
f
r
i
d
i
a
t
r
In
So
th
c
A
tr
l
were
connec
ed
by
d
u
A
a
n
d
a
u
s
a
i
a
3
a n Indo Ocea nic Contine nt in the Per mia n epoch ; a nd the t wo
former countries rema ined connec t ed (wit h a t the utm ost onl y
Dur ing
short interruptions) up to the e nd of the Miocene period
the l a tter pa rt of the time this la nd w as al so connected with
M al a yana
i
t
h
r
In
common
w
th
so
me
pre
v
i
o
wr
i
te
I
con
s
i
de
r
s
u
s
4
tha t the po sition of this l and was dened by the ra nge of cora l
reefs a nd ba nks tha t now ex ist betwe en the Ara bia n se a a nd Ea s t
Africa ;
d
N
t
h
e
n
Up
to
the
of
the
u
mm
t
c
epoch
no
d
re
t
con
u
li
i
i
c
s
a nd

a nd

Wester n

A sia

II

the discussion which foll owed t h e rea ding of the pa per


Pr ofessor Ra msa y a greed with the a uthor in the belief in the
junct ion of Africa with India a nd Aust ra lia in geo l ogica l times
Mr Woodwa rd was pl ea sed to nd tha t the a uthor h a d a dded
fur ther evidence derived from the fossil ora of the mesozoic series
o f India in corrobora tion of the views of H uxl ey Scl a ter an d
o thers a s to the former existence of a n o ld submerged continent
Le m uria which D a r win s resea rches on coral ree fs h a d long
since foresha dowed
Of the v e now existing continents writ es Ernst H a eckel
"
The H istory of Crea tion
neither
in his grea t work
Aust ra lia nor America nor Europe c a n ha ve been this
l
m
a
n
a
a
v
home
of
or
the
so
c
a
l
ed
P
r
d
i
s
e
the
cr
e
a
l
r
i
m
a
a
dl
[
!
p
Most circumsta nces indica te Southern Asia
o f the huma n ra ce
Besides Southern Asia the onl y other
a s the l oca l ity in question
o f the n o w exist ing continents which might be viewed in this
But there a r e a number of circumsta n ces (e sp e c i
light is Af rica
a ll y chorol ogica l fa cts) which suggest tha t the primeva l home of
m a n w as a co ntinent now sunk bel ow the surfa ce o f the Indian
Oc ea n which extended al ong the south of Asia as it is a t present
i
i
i
a
l
i
n
i
t
prob
b
y
d
ect
conne
t
o
w
th
tow
r
the
e
t
n
r
c
a
a
n
d
d
s
a
s
a
s
)
(
fa r as Further India a nd the Sunda Isla nds ; towa rds the west
We
as fa r as Ma da ga sca r a n d the sout h ea st ern shores of Af rica
h a ve a lr ea dy mentioned tha t ma ny fa cts in a nima l a nd vegeta bl e
geog ra phy render the former existence of such a South Indian
co ntinent ver y proba bl e Scl a ter h a s given this c ontine nt the
na me of Lemuria from the semi a pes which were cha ra ct eristic
By assuming this Le muria t o ha ve been ma n s primaeva l
o f it
home we grea t ly fa cilit a te the expl a na tion of the geogra phical
In

In

b eque nt work

a su s

The Pedig ree of M a n


Vo l ii , pp 3
2 5 -6
.

!
,

eckel asse rts

12

the existence of Lemur ia a t some ea rly epoch of the ea rt h s


history as a n a cknowl e d ged fa ct
The foll owing quota tion from Dr H a rtl a ub s writings m a y
bring to a cl ose this portion of the evide nce in fa vour of the
"
exist ence of the l ost Le muria

Five a nd thirty yea rs a g o Isidore Ge o r o y St H il a ire


rema rked tha t if one h a d to cl a ssify the Isl a nd of Ma da gasca r
excl usively on zool ogica l considera tions a nd without re ference
to its geogra phical situa tion it coul d be shown to be ne ither
Asia tic no r Afr ica n but quite di er e nt from either a nd a l most
And this fourt h contine nt coul d be further
a four th con tine nt
proved to be as rega rds its fa una much m ore die r e nt from Afr ica
which lies so n ea r to it tha n from India which is so fa r a wa y
With these words the c orrec tness a nd pregna ncy of which la ter
investiga tions te nd to bring in to their ful l light the Fre nch
na tural ist rst sta ted the interest ing probl em for the solution of
which a n hypothesis bas ed on scientic knowl edge h as rece ntly
been p ropounded for this four th continent of Isidore Ge o r o y

is Scl a ter s
Le muria
tha t sunken l a nd which conta ining
pa rts of A frica must ha ve ext en ded fa r east wa rds over Southern
India a n d Ce yl on a nd the highest poin ts of which we recog nise
in the vol ca nic pea ks of Bourbon a nd Ma uritius a nd in the ce ntral

r a nge of Ma da g asc a r itself


the l ast resorts of the a l most ex tinct
.

E vide nce
o btained
fr o m
A r cha ic
R eco r ds
.

The fur ther evidence we ha ve with rega rd to Lemuria a nd


its inh a bit a nts h a s been obta ined from the sa me source a nd in
the sa me ma nner as tha t which resul ted in the writing o f the
S tor y of A tl a ntis
In this case a lso the a uthor h a s been p rivi
l e g e d to obta in copies of t wo ma ps one representing Lemuria
.

Dr G
.

Isl a nds,

Ha r t l a ub

se e

S e rie s, Vo l i ,
.

o h t h e Avif a un a

T h e I bis,
1 8 77 ,

4
33

3
.

ua r t e r l y

of

M a da g a sc a r

u
r
n
a
l
o
J

of

a nd

t h e M a sca r e n e

Or nit hol og y

Four t h

i
s
i
o
f
e
a
the
djo
i
i
nd
d
r
ng
the
p
r
od
th
t
cont
nent
l
a
n
n
u
i
a
s
)
(
g
grea test e xp a nsio n the other exhibiting its outlines af ter its
dismembermen t by g r ea t ca ta strophes but l ong before it s n a l

a nd

ever pr ofessed tha t the ma ps of Atl a ntis were correct


to a singl e de gr ee of l a titude or l ongitude but with the f a r grea ter
di cul ty of ob t a ining the inf orma tion in the present ca se it must
be sta ted t ha t still l ess must these ma ps of Lemuria be ta ke n as
In the former cas e there w a s a gl obe a
a bso l utely a cc ura te
goo d h as relie f in terra cotta a nd a well preserved m a p on pa rch
men t or skin of some sort to copy from In the present ca se
there w a s onl y a broken ter ra cot ta model a nd a very ba dl y
preser ved a nd crumpl ed m a p so tha t the diic ul ty of ca rr ying
b a ck the remembra nce of all the deta ils a nd conseq uently of
rep roducing ex a ct copies h as been fa r grea ter
It w a s

We were tol d tha t it w as by mighty Adepts in the da ys of


Atl a ntis tha t the Atl a ntea n ma ps were pr oduced but we a r e no t
a wa re whether t h e Lemuria n ma ps wer e fashion ed by some of the
divine inst ructor s in the da ys when Lemuria still existed or in
still l a ter da ys of the A tl a ntea n epoch
B ut whil e g ua rding a gainst over co nde n c e in the a bsol ute
a c c ura cy of the m a ps in question t h e tr a nscriber of the a rcha ic
origina ls bel ieves tha t they m a y in all importa nt pa rticul a rs
be ta ken as a pproxima tel y correct

A period spea king roughl y o i between four a nd v e million


l
li
i
n
a
s
s
n
e
a
r
s
prob
b
y
repre
ent
the
fe
of
the
co
t
ent
of
At
nt
for
i
l
a
s
y
it is a bout tha t time since the R m o a h a ls the rst sub ra ce of
t h e Fourth Root Ra ce who inh a bited Atl a ntis a rose on a portion
,

p ro m! .

R e m e m be ring ith a t in

the evol utiona ry process the gure four


in va ria bl y r epr esents not onl y t h e na dir of the cycl e but the
per iod of sh ortest dura tion whether in the case of a Ma nv a nta ra
,

Co ntine nt

a
n.

or of a ra ce it m a y be assumed tha t the number of millions of


yea rs assigna bl e as the life limit of the contin e nt of Le mur ia
must be ver y much gre a ter tha n tha t representing the lif e of
B ut in t he
Atl a ntis the cont inent of the Fourt h Root Ra ce
case of Le muria no da tes ca n be sta ted with even a pproxima te
a cc ura cy
Ge o l ogica l epochs so fa r as they a r e known to modern
science will be a better medium for contem pora ry refere nce a nd
they a l one will be de a lt with
B ut no t even geol ogica l epochs it will be observe d a r e
If however a n inf erence ma y be dr a wn
assigned t o the ma ps
from a ll the evidence before us it woul d seem proba bl e t ha t
the ol der of the two Lemuria n ma ps re presented the ea r th s
cong ura tion from the Permia n thr ough the Tria ssic a n d into
the J ura ssic epoch whil e the second m a p proba bly represe nts the
ea r th s congur a tion through the Creta ce o us a nd into the Eocene
period
From the ol der of the two ma ps it m a y be seen tha t t h e equa
t o ria l contin ent of L iam ur ia a t the time of its gre a test exp a nsion
nea rl y girdl ed the gl obe ext e nding a s it then did from the site
of the prese nt Ca pe Verd I sl a nds a few miles from the coas t o f
S ierra Leone in a south easterly direc tion t hrough Africa
Austra lia the Society Isl a nds a nd a ll t h e in tervening seas to a
point but a few mil es dista nt from a grea t isl a nd continent (a bout
t h e size of the p r esent South Americ a ) which sprea d over the t e
m a inde r of the P a cic Ocea n a nd in cl uded Ca pe H or n a nd pa rts
o f P a t a gonia
A rema r ka bl e fea ture in the second ma p of Lemuria is t h e grea t
l eng th a nd a t p a rts the extreme n a r rown ess of the st raits which
sep a ra ted the t w o grea t bl ocks of l a nd int o which the contin ent
h a d by this time been split a n d it will be observed tha t the stra its
a t present ex isting between the isl a nds of B a li a nd L o m bo c co
incide with a port ion of the stra its which the n divided these
,

The l a ps

15

contine nts It wil l a lso be se e n t ha t these stra its continued


in a nort herl y direc tion by the west not by the eas t coast of
Borneo as conjectured by Ernst H a eck el
With re ference to the distr ibution of fa una a nd ora a nd the
existe nce of so ma ny types common to India a nd Af rica al ike
pointed o ut by Mr Bl a ndf ord it will be observed tha t between
pa rts of India a n d grea t tra cts of Af rica there w a s direct l a nd
a nd tha t simil a r
c ommunica tion during the rst m a p period
communica tion w as p a rtia ll y ma intained in the second m a p
period a lso whil e a compa rison of t h e ma ps of Atl a ntis with
t hose of Lemuria will dem onstra te tha t continuous l a nd communi
ca t ion existed no w a t one epoch a nd no w a t a nother between
so ma ny di e r e n t p a rts of the ea r th s surfa ce a t present sep a ra ted
by se a tha t th e ex isting distr ibutio n of fa una a nd ora in the two
America s in Europe a nd in Ea ster n l a nds which h as been such
a puzzl e to n a t ural ists m a y with perfec t ease be a ccounted for
The isl a nd indica ted in t he ea rlier L iam ur ia n m a p as existing
to t h e north west of the extreme promontory of tha t continent
a nd d ue west of the present co a st of Sp a in w as proba bly a cen t re
from which procee ded during l ong a ges t h e distribut ion of fa una

For a nd this is a most interesting


a n d ora a bove referred to

fa ct it will be seen tha t this isl a nd must ha ve been the nucl eus
from rst to l a st of the subse quent grea t contine nt of Atla ntis
I t existed as we se e in these ea rliest Lemuria n times
It w as
joined in the secon d m a p period to l a nd which h a d previousl y
for med pa rt of the grea t Le mur ia n continent a nd indeed so
ma ny a ccretions of territory h a d it by this time received
tha t it might more a pp ropria tely be ca ll ed a continent tha n a n
isla nd
It w as the grea t mountainous reg ion of Atl a ntis a t its
prime whe n Atl a ntis embra ced grea t tra cts of l a nd which ha ve
now becom e No r th a nd South America It remained the moun
t a ino us region of Atl a ntis in its decade nce a nd of Ruta in the Ruta
t wo

I O

Daitya epoch a nd it pra ctica ll y constituted the isl a nd of


Po se ido nisthe l a st remna nt of the contin e nt of Atl a ntis th e
nal submerge nce of which took pl a ce in the yea r 95 64 B c
A comp a rison of the two ma ps here given al ong with t h e four
ma ps of Atl a ntis will a lso show tha t Austr al ia a nd New Z eal an d
Ma da ga sca r pa rts of Soma l ila nd the south of Afri ca a nd the
extreme southern portion of Pa t a gonia ar e l a nds which h a ve
l
i
t
n
i
a
a
l
i
ex
ed
thro
u
gh
the
nter
v
e
ng
c
t
trophe
s
nce
a
s
o
b
b
l
i
s
s
a
r
y
p
the ea rl y da ys of the Lemur ia n period The sa me m a y be said of
the southern pa rts of India a nd Ce yl on wit h the exce ption in the
ca se of Ce yl on of a tempora ry submergence in the Ruta a nd
Daitya epoch
It is true there a r e a lso rema ins still e xisting of the even ea rlier
H yperborea n continent a nd they of course a r e the ol dest known
These a r e Gr eenl a nd Icel a nd
l a nds on the fa ce of the ea rth
Spitzbergen the most nort herly pa rts of Norwa y a nd Sweden
a nd the extr eme north ca pe of Siberia
J a pa n is sh own by the ma ps to ha ve been a bove wa te r whether
as a n isl a nd or a s pa rt of a continent since the da te of the sec on d
Spa in too h as doubtl ess existed sin ce tha t time
L emuria n m a p
Spa in is ther efore with the ex ception of the most nor therl y pa r ts
of Norwa y a n d Sweden pr o ba bly the ol dest l a nd in Europe
The in determina t e cha r a cter of th e sta tements j ust ma de is
rendered nec essa r y by o ur knowl edge tha t there did occur sub
side nc e s a nd uphea va ls of die r e n t portions of the ea rth s surfa ce
during the a ges which l a y between the periods r epr ese nt ed by the
l ma ps
Fo r te x a m p l e f so o n a ft er the da te of the second Lemuria n m a p
we
r e inf o r m e d tha t the whol e Ma l a y Peninsul a w as submerged
a
f j Z
a n d r em a ined so for a l ong time but a subsequent uphea v a l of
t ha t region must ha ve t a ken pl a ce before the da te of the rst
Atl a nt e a n m a p for wha t is no w the Mal a y Peninsul a is ther e
a nd

'

"

5
5
5 03

m
o

w5
w
a

33
3
8
3

8
0

3
.

w
o
u

s
a

a3

u
o

m5

w2

5
a

o
o

a
m
b
o

a
u
a

a
o

8
2

8 2
38 3

3 m

3
3
8
3
9
5
w

2
5

H
a

8
0

v
a

336
3
m
3
.

c
u
u

3
3m
.

2
m

u 35 3
3

mw3

mu

8n
o

8
8

u
s
e

n
d

t n

3
5

u3

m3

c
o

ta

3A

3
8

3m
3
m 3
c
u

c
o

v
a

s
m

3
m

mh

5
5 3

5
0

m8

a
g

b
e

n
n

3
3
3
0

50
0

c
a
s

s
a

sixty v e

eleto of
feet l ong which h a d been discovered in
t he Oolite deposit in t h e sout hern p a rt of the U nited S t a tes of
A merica
A s it is written in t h e st a nzas of the a rchaic Book of Dzy a n
Animal s with bones dra gons of the deep a n d ying sa r p as were
a dded to the cr ee ping things
They tha t creep o n the ground got
w ings
They of the l ong necks in the wa ter be c a me th e pro
ge n itors of the fowls of the a ir
Moder n science records her
endorsemen t
The cl ass of birds as al rea dy rem a rked is so
cl ose l y a llied t o Reptil es in interna l structure an d by embryonal
devel opmen t tha t they undo ubt dl y origin a ted o ut of a bra nch
e
of this cl ass
The deriva tion of birds from reptil es
r st took pl a ce in the Mesolithic epoch a nd this moreover pro
b a bl y during the
In the vegeta bl e kingdom this epoch a lso sa w t h e pin e a nd the
p al m t ree gra dua ll y displ a ce the gia nt t r ee fe r ns In the l a t er
da ys of the Mesolit hic epoch ma mma l s for t h e r st time ca me in t o
existence but the fossil re m ains of the ma mmoth a nd mast odon
which were the ir ea r liest representa tives a r e chiey found in th e
subsequen t st ra t a of t h e Eocen e a n d Miocene times
Before ma king a ny ref erence to wha t must even a t this ea r ly The H uman
m dom
da te be ca lled the huma n kingdom it must be st a ted t ha t none
of those who a t the prese nt da y c a n l a y cl a im to even a mode
ra te a mount of menta l or spirit ua l cul ture ca n ha ve lived in t hese
a ges
It w a s onl y with the a dven t of t h e l as t three sub ra ces of
this Third Root Ra ce tha t the l ea s t progressed of t h e r st gr oup
of the Lun a r Pitris bega n to ret urn to in ca r na tion whil e th e
most a dva nce d a mong t he m did no t ta ke birth till the ea r ly
sub ra ces of the At l a n t ea n period
Indeed Le muria n m a n during a t l ea st the rst ha lf of the
r a ce
must be rega rded ra ther as a n a nimal destined to rea ch
sk

'

'

r n st

H a e cke l

Hist or y

of

Cr e a t ion ,

Vo l ii , pp
.

2 2 6 -7

20

huma nity tha n a s huma n a ccording to o ur understa nding of t h e


term ; for though the second a nd third groups of Pitr is w h o
constitu ted t h e inha bita nts of L emuria during its rst four sub
ra ces h a d a chieved sufcient se lf consciousness in the L una r
Ma nva nta ra to die r e ntia t e them from the a nima l kingdom
they ha d no t yet received the Divine Spa rk which shoul d endo w

them with mind a nd individua lity in other words ma ke them


,

The evol ution of this Lem uria n ra ce ther efore constitut e s


one of t h e most obscure as well as o ne of t he most interest ing
sl stonoy
I n "
cha pters of ma n s development for during this pe riod no t onl y
did he rea ch true huma nity but his body underwent the g rea tes t
physica l cha nges whil e the processes of reproduction were twice
a l tered
In ex p l a n a tion of t h e surprising st a tements which will ha ve
to be ma de in reg a rd to the size a n d consistency of ma n s body
a t this ea r l y period it must be remembered tha t whil e the a nim a l
vegeta bl e a n d mineral kingdoms pursued the nor mal course o n
this th e fourt h globe during the Fourth Round of this Ma nva nt a ra
it w as ordained tha t huma nity shoul d r un over in ra pid succession
the va r ious sta ges through which it s evolution ha d passed durin g
the previous rounds of the prese nt Ma nva nta ra Thus the bodies
of t h e First Root R a ce in which these a l most mindl ess be ings were
dest ined t o gain e xp e rience woul d ha ve a ppea red to us as giga ntic

pha ntoms ii in deed we coul d ha ve seen them a t a ll for their


bodies were for med of as t r a l ma t ter The astra l forms of the First
Root Ra ce were t hen gra dua lly envel oped in a more phys ica l
B ut though the Se cond Root Ra ce m a y be ca ll ed
ca sing

physica l their bodies being compo sed of ether they woul d


ha ve been equa lly inv isibl e to eyesight a s it a t present exists
It w a s we a r e tol d in order tha t the M a nn a nd t he Beings
who aided him might t a ke mea ns for improving the physica l t ype
,

21

hum a nity tha t this epitome of the process of evolution was


o rd a ined
The highest de v elopment which the type ha d so
fa r rea ched w as the huge a p e l ik e cr ea ture which h a d existed o n
t h e three physica l pl a nets Ma r s the Ea rt h a n d Mer cury in the
Third Round On the a rriva l of the h uma n life wa ve o n the Ea rth
in t his the Four th Round a certa in number na tura ll y of these a p e

r
like c rea t ures we e found in occupa tion the residuum l ef t o n
t h e pl a net during its period o f obscura tion
These of course
j oin ed the in coming huma n stre a m as soon as the ra ce beca me
full y physica l Their bodies m a y no t then h a ve bee n a bsolutel y
disc a rde d they m a y ha ve been utilized for purposes of r e inca m a
tion for t h e most ba ckwa rd entities but it w a s a n improvemen t
o n this t ype which w as required a nd this w as most eas ily a chieved
by th e Ma nu through work ing o ut on the a stra l pl a ne in the rst
ins ta nce the a rchity pe origina ll y for med in the mind of the Logos
Fr om t h e Et heric Second Ra ce then w as evol ved the Third
the Lemu ria n Their bodies ha d be c ome ma teria l being com
posed o f th e gases liquids a nd solids which const itute the three
l owest sub divisions of the physica l pl a ne but the gases a n d
liquids still predomina ted for as yet their vertebra te struct ure
h a d n o t solidied in t o bones such as ours a nd they coul d not
theref ore sta n d erec t
Their bones in fa ct were plia bl e as t h e
bon es of young infa nts no w a r e It w as not until the middl e
of t he Lemuria n period tha t ma n devel oped a solid bony st ructure
To ex p l a in t h e possibility of the process by which the etheric
form evol ved into a morephysica l form a nd the soft bonedphysical
for m ul t ima tel y deve loped in to a structure such as m a n possesses
!
to da y it is o nl y necessa ry t o re fer to the per ma ne nt physica l a tom
Cont a ining as it does the essence of a ll the forms through which
of

is

Fo r

f ur t he r

a cc

oun t

of

t h e p e r m a ne nt a t oms o n a ll t h e p l a ne s, a nd
in t he m w it h r e f e r e n c e t o t h e p r oce sse s o f

t h e p o t e n t ia lit ie s co nt a in e d

de a t h a n d t e bir t h , se e
M a n s Pl a c e in U nive r se

!
.

pp

6
8
0
7

22

m a n h as

pa ssed on the physica l pla ne it conta ined consequentl y


the potential ity of a ha rd boned physica l structure such as h a d
been a tta ined dur ing the course of the Third Round a s well as th e
pote ntia lity of a n etheric form a nd al l the p h a se s which lie between
for it must be remembered tha t the physica l pl a ne consists o f
four gra des of ether as well a s t h e gase s liquids a n d solids which
so ma n y a r e a p t to rega r
i
a
l
one
con
t
t
t
ng
the
phy
c
i
i
a
s
s
u
s
a
l
d
Thus ever y sta ge of the devel opme nt w as a n a tura l process fo r
it w as a process which h a d been a ccomplished in a ges l ong past
a n d all tha t w as n eeded w as for the M a nn a nd the Beings wh o
a ided him to ga ther round t h e perma ne nt a tom t h e a ppropria te
kind of ma tt er
The orga ns of vision of these crea tures before they
devel oped bones were of a rudimenta ry na ture a t l east such
w as the condit ion of t h e two eyes in fron t wit h which they
B ut there w a s a
sought
fo r their food upon the ground
third e ye a t the ba ck of the hea d the a trophied remn a nt of which
of which is no w known a s the pine al gl a nd This a s we know
is no w a centre sol el y of a st ral vision but a t the epoch of which
we a r e spea king it w as the chief centr e n o t onl y of a stra l but of
physical sight Refer ring t o reptil es which ha d beco me extinct
Pr ofessor R a y L a nk ester in a recent l ecture a t the Royal I nstit u
tion is re ported to ha ve dra wn spec ial a t tention to the size o f
the pa rietal fora men in the skull which showe d tha t in the ich
t hy osa urs t h e p a riet al or pin ea l eye o n the top of the hea d must
ha ve been ve ry l a rge
I n this respec t he went on to sa y m a n
for we h a d l ost th e
kind were in ferior to these big se a liza rds
third eye which mig ht be st udied in the com mon liza rd or bett er
in the grea t bl ue liza rd of the Sou th of Fra nce
Somewha t bef or e t h e middl e of t h e Lemuria n period pr oba bl y
during t h e evol ution of the third sub ra ce t h e giga ntic gel a tinous
,

Or g a n: of
mm

.J

The

S t a nda r d

8th

an

1 904 .

to solidify a nd the soft boned limbs devel oped


into a bon y structure
These primitive crea tures were now a bl e
t o sta nd upright a nd the two eyes in the fa ce gra dua ll y beca me
t h e chief organ s of physica l sight though the third eye still t e

body bega n sl owl y

did till

the very end of the Lemurian epoch It of cour se r e


ma ined a n a ctua l or ga n a s it still is a pot en tial focus of psychic
v ision
This psychic vision continued t o be a n a ttribute of t h e
ra ce not onl y th r oughout the whol e Lemu ria n period but well
into the da ys of Atl a ntis
A curious fa ct to note is tha t when the ra ce rst a tta ined the
u
l
i
r
i
i
i
we
r
of
t
a
nd
ng
mov
ng
p
ght
po
t
on
they
co
d
o
d
s
i
i
n
u
s
a
n
a
n
p
.

m ay

be a ccounted for not only by the ca pa city for vision possess ed


by the third e y e but doubtl ess al so by the curious pr ojection a t
the hee l s which will presentl y be referred to
The foll owing is a descr iption of a m a n who bel onged

H is
l
a
to one of the
ter sub ra ces pr ob a bly the fth
sta ture w as giga n t ic
somewhere be tw e en tw e l ve a nd ftee n
feet
H is skin w as very da rk being of a yell owish brown
H e h a d a l ong l ower j a w
col our
a
stra nge l y a ttened
fa ce ey es sma ll but piercing a nd se t curiousl y fa r a p a rt so tha t
he coul d se e sidewa ys as well a s in front whil e the eye a t the ba ck

of the hea d o u which pa rt of the hea d no hair of course grew


ena bled him to se e in tha t direction a lso H e h a d no forehea d
but there seemed t o be a r oll of esh where it shoul d ha ve been
The hea d sl oped b a ckwa rds a nd upwa r ds in a r a ther curious w a y
Th e a r ms a nd l egs (especia ll y the former ) were l onger in proportion
t ha n ours a nd coul d not be perfec tl y stra ightened either a t
el bows or kn ees t h e ha n ds a nd feet were enormous a nd the heels
pr ojected ba ckwa rds in a n ungainl y w a y The gure w as dra ped
in a l oose robe of skin something like rhinoceros hide but more
,

De scr iptio n

24

y proba bly the skin of so me a nimal of which w e now know


onl y through its fossil rem a ins Round his hea d on whic h the hair
w as quite short w as twisted a nother piec e of skin to which wer e
a t ta ched ta ssels of bright r e d bl ue a nd other col ours
In his
l eft ha nd he hel d a sha rpened st a which w as doub tl ess used for
def ence or a tta ck
I t w as a bout the height of h is o wn body viz "
twelve t o fteen feet In his right ha nd w as twist ed the end of a
l ong rope ma de of so me sort of creeping pl a nt by which he l e d
a huge a nd hideous reptil e somewha t resemblin
g the Pl esiosa urus
The L e muria ns a ctua ll y domestica ted these crea tures a nd tr a ined
th em t o empl oy their str ength in hunting other a nimal s The
a ppea ra nce of the m a n ga ve a n unpl ea sa nt sensa tion but he w as
no t entirel y uncivil ised being a n a ver a ge common pl a ce speci
men o f his d a y
Ma ny wer e even l ess huma n in a ppea ra nce tha n the indiv idua l
here described but th e seventh sub ra ce devel oped a superior
typ e th ough very un like a ny liv ing men of the presen t t ime
Whil e ret a ining th e proj ecting l ower j a w the thick hea vy lips
the a ttened fa ce a nd the unca nny l ookin g eyes they h a d by this
time devel oped something whic h might be ca lled a fore hea d
whil e the curious projection of the hee l h a d be en considera bly
reduce d In one bra nc h of this seventh sub ra ce the hea d might

be described as a l mo st e gg sha ped the sma ll end of th e egg


being uppermo st with the eyes wide a pa rt a nd very n ea r the top
The sta ture h a d pe rceptibly decr eased a nd the a ppea ra nce of
the ha nds fee t a nd limbs genera ll y h a d bec ome more like those
of t h e negr oes of tod a y These peopl e devel oped a n importa nt
a n d l ong l asting civilisa tion ,a nd for thousa nds of yea rs domina ted
most of th e other t r ibes who dwel t on the vast Lemuria n co n
t ine n t a nd even a t the end when ra cia l deca y see med to be over
t a king them they secured a nother l ong l ea se of life a nd powe r by

inter ma rr ia ge with the R m o a h a ls the rst sub ra ce of the


sc a l

26

Sexua l or a mphigonic propa ga tion (Amphigonia ) is the usua l


method of propa ga tion a mong a ll higher a nima ls a nd pl a nts
I t is evident tha t it h as onl y devel oped a t a ver y l a te perio d
of the ea rth s history from no n sexual pr opa ga tio n a nd a ppa
r e nt ly in the rst insta nce from the meth od of prop a ga tion by
I n a ll t h e chief forms of no n sexual
germ cells

prop a ga tion mentioned a bove in ssion in the forma tion of

buds germ buds a nd germ ce lls the se pa ra ted cell or gr oup o f


cell s w as a bl e by itself t o devel op into a new individua l but in the
ca se of se xual pr op a ga tion th e cell must rst be fr uctie d by
The fr uctifying sperm must rst
a not her genera tive subst a nc e
mix wit h the germ ce ll (the e gg ) before the l a t t er c a n devel op in to
These t w o gener a t ive substa nces the sperm
a ne w individual
a nd t h e egg a r e e ither produced by o ne a nd the sa me individual
herma phrodite (H erma phroditismus) or by tw o differ ent indiv i
dual s (sex ua l sepa ra tion)
Th e simpl er a nd mo r e a ncien t form of se xua l pro pa ga tion
It occurs in the grea t
is through doubl e se xed in dividual s
ma jority of pl a nts but onl y in a min ority of a nima ls for exa mpl e
in the ga rden sn a ils l ee ches ea rth wor ms a nd ma ny o ther worms
Every singl e individua l a mong herma phr odites produces within

I n most of the
itsel f ma t erial s of both sexes eggs a nd sperm
higher pl a n ts every bl ossom cont a ins both the mal e orga n
d
r
l
d
a
n
a
l
a
s
a
d
t
me
nther
the
fem
e
o
g
n
ty
e
ge
m
a
n
r
n
a
n
s
a
s
)
(
)
(
Every ga r den sna il produces in one p a rt o f its sexua l gl a nd eggs
Ma ny herma phr odites c a n fr uctify
a nd in a nother pa rt sperm
th emsel ves in others however reciproca l fr uc tica tio n of both
herma phrodit es is necessa ry for ca using the development of the
eggs This l a t t er ca se is ev identl y a tra nsition to sex ua l se pa ra
tion
Sexua l sepa ra tion which cha ra cterises the more complica ted
of the tw o kin ds of sexua l reproduction h as evidently been
.

27

d evel oped

from the condition of herma ph roditism a t a l a te period


o f th e org a nic history of th e worl d
It is a t present the univer sal
m ethod of prop a ga tion of the higher a nim a ls
s o c a ll ed virgina l reproduc t ion (Pa rthen ogenes is) o e rs a n in ter
e sting form of tra nsition from sexua l reproduct ion to the no n
s e xua l forma tion of germ cells whic h most resembl es it
I n this ca se germ cells which otherwise a ppea r a nd a r e formed
e x a ctl y like e gg cel ls become ca p a bl e of devel oping themse l ves
into ne w in div idua l wit hout requiring the fruct ifying se e d
s
T h e most r ema rka bl e a nd the most inst r uctive of the die r e nt
r
h
e
n
n
a
t
t
i
c
n
r
o
e
e
a
e
u
phe
omen
f
rn
i
s
hed
by
tho
e
c
e
wh
ch
a
s
i
n
i
as
s
p
g
t h e sa me g e r m c e lls a cc ording as they a r e f r uc t ie d or no t p r o
d uce di e r e n t kinds of individua ls
Among o ur common honey
bees a ma l e individua l (a drone ) a rises o ut of th e eggs of the
if
h
u
t
h
e
een
egg
not
be
n
d
fem
e
q
een
or
a
s
e
f
r
u
c
t
i
a
a
l
e
a
u
q
(
working bee ) if t h e egg h a s bee n fr uc t ie d It is evident fr om
t his tha t in rea lit y there exists no wide c hasm betw een sexual
a n d no n se x u a l reproduction but tha t bot h modes of reproduction
directl y
a re
Now t h e interesting fa ct in connect ion wit h the evolution of
T hird R a ce m a n on Lemuria is tha t his mode of reproduction
r a n th rough phas es whic h were cl osel y an a l ogous wit h some of
t h e processes a bove described
Swea t bo m egg bo m a nd A n
d r o g yne a r e the t erms used in the Secr et Doct rin e
Alm o st se x l ess in its ea rly beginnings it beca me bise xual
very gra dua lly of c ourse The passa ge from
o r a ndrogynous
t h e forme r t o the l a tter t ra nsfor ma t ion requir ed numberl ess
i
hi
i
l
ene
on
d
r
g
w
ch
the
mp
e
ce
ll
t
h
a
t
u
ed
from
the
t
i
u
i
n
s
s
s
r
a
s
g
e a r lie st p a r e nt (the tw o in o ne ) rst devel oped in to a b isexua l
being ; a nd then t h e cell becoming a regul a r egg ga ve forth a
The Third Ra ce ma nkind is the most m ys
unisexua l crea t ure
.

'

E rnst

H a e cke l s

The

Hist or y

of

Cr e a t ion ,

a nd e d

Vo l i , pp
.

19

38
-

28

t e rio us

the hither to devel oped v e Ra ces The mystery


of the H o w of the genera tion of the distinct se xes must of
course be very obscure her e as it is the business of a n e m bryo l o
gist a n d a spe cia lis t the prese nt work giving onl y fa int outlines
of th e process But it is evident tha t the units of th e Third Ra ce
huma nity bega n to sepa ra te in their pre na t a l shells or egg s
a nd to issue o ut of them as distinct ma l e a nd fem a l e b a bes a ges
a fter the a ppe a ra nce of its early progenitors
A nd as time roll ed
o n its geol ogical per iods the n ewly born sub ra c es bega n to l ose
the ir na tal ca pa cities Towa rd th e end of the fourth subr a ce
th e ba be l ost its fa cul ty of wal king as soon as libera ted from its
she ll a n d by the end of th e fth ma nkin d w as bor n under the sa me
conditions a nd by the sa me identica l process as o ur histor ica l
genera tions This required of course mill ions of yea rs
It m a y be as well a gain t o repea t tha t the a l most min d
l ess crea tur es who in ha bited such bodies as ha ve
been
the Lemu ria n
a bove desc ribed during the ea rly sub ra ces of
period c a n sca rcely be rega r ded as compl etely huma n
I t w as onl y a fter the se p a ra tion of the sex es when th eir
bodies ha d become densel y physica l th a t t hey bec a me huma n
eve n in a ppea ra nc e !It must be r emembe r ed tha t the bein gs
we a r e spea king of though embra cing the secon d a nd thir d
i
n
l
u
a
i
s
l
i
ro
p
of
the
u
n
r
P
tr
m
u
s
t
a
l
s
o
h
a
ve
be
e
a
rge
y
recr
t
ed
u
s
L
g
from the a nimal kingdom of tha t (the L una r ) Ma nva nta ra Th e
degra ded remn a nts of th e Third Root Ra ce who still inha bit
t h e ea rth m a y be recogn ise d in the a bor igines of Austra lia t he
Anda ma n Isl an de rs some hill tribes of India the Tierra de l
Fue g a ns the Bushmen of Africa a nd some other sa va ge t ribe s
The en tities no w inha biting these bodies must ha ve bel onged t o
It
t h e anima l kingdom in t h e ea rly pa rt of this Ma nva nta r a
w a s prob a bly during the evolution o f the Le muria n ra ce a n d
of

a ll

L e mur ia n
R a ces still
I nh a bitl ng
th e E ar th
.

Th e e cr e t
S
j.

1 97

29

be fore the door w as shut on the entities thronging up fr om


be l ow th a t these a tt a ined the huma n kingdom
The sha meful a cts of the mindl ess men a t the rst se pa ra tion
o f the se xes h a d best be referred t o in the words of the sta n zas
No commenta ry is needed
o f the a rch a ic Book of Dzy a n
During th e Third Ra ce the bon el ess a nimal s grew a nd
ch a nged they beca me a nimal s with bones their cha yas bec a me
,

S in o f th o
Mindl ess
.

The an imal s sepa ra ted rst They bega n to bree d The


two fol d m a n se pa ra t ed al so H e sa id L e t us as they ; l e t us
They did
u nite a nd ma ke crea tures!
And those tha t h a d no spa rk t ook huge sh e a nima ls unto
them They bega t upon them dumb ra ces Dumb th ey were
B ut their tong ues untied
The tongues of th eir
t hemsel ves
progeny rem a ined still Monster s they bred A ra ce of cr ooked
r e d h a ir covered monsters going on a ll fours
A dumb ra ce t o
a
i
k eep the sha me untol d
And
nc
ent
omment
ry
dd
a
n
c
a
a
s
(
w hen the Third sepa ra ted a nd fell in to sin by breeding men
these (the animal s) beca me ferocious a nd men a nd
a nim al s
th ey mutua ll y destructive Till then there w as no sin no life
.

See in g which t h e Lhas who h a d not buil t men wept


,

is Ka r ma

sa

ying

Let us dwell in the others Let us tea ch them better


l est worse shoul d ha ppen
They did
Then a ll men beca me endowed with Ma nas They sa w
t h e sin of the mindl ess
The a n a tomica l resembla nce between M a n a nd the higher
Ape so frequentl y cited by Da rwinists a s pointing to some a nces
tor common t o both presents an interesting probl em the proper
so l ution of which is to be so ught for in the esoteric expl a na tion
o f the genesis of the pithecoid stocks
.

Orlzl n ol tho
a nd

tho
A nthro potll

Now we ga ther from th e Secr et Doctrine tha t the desceu


dan ts of these semi huma n mon sters described a bove as
min dl ess
origin a t ing in t h e sin of th e
ha ving thro ugh l ong
centu ries dwindl ed in size a n d bec ome mor e densel y physica l
cul min a t ed in a r a c e of A pes a t th e t ime of the Miocene perio d
from which in t he ir turn a r e descended the p ith ec o ids of
to da y With these Apes of t h e Mio cene period however the

r
Atl a ntea ns of t ha t a g e enewed t h e sin of the m indl ess
this
time with full r esp o nsibilit y a nd t h e resul t a nts of their crime
a r e the species of Apes no w kn own as Anthr opoid
We a r e given t o un der st a nd tha t in th e coming Sixt h Root
Ra ce th ese a nthr opoids will ob t a in huma n inc a rna tion in the
bodies doubtl ess of the l owest ra ces t hen ex ist ing upon ea rth
Tha t pa rt of the Le muria n con tinen t where the sepa ra tion
of the se x es t ook pl a ce a nd wher e both the fourth a nd the f th
sub ra ces our ished is t o be found in the ea r lie r of the t wo
ma ps I t l a y to th e eas t of th e mount a in ous regio n of which t h e
pr esent Isl a n d of Ma da gasca r formed a pa r t a nd t hus occupied
a cent ral po sit ion a r ound t h e sma ll er of the t w o grea t l a kes
i
n
t
a
n
D
m
n
ed
the
z
of
z
bove
q
o
ed
the
s
t
a
t
s
a
s
u
t
e
s
a
n
a
A
o
!
y
Or lxl n
33mm! of tha t epoch even though th e v h a d bec ome comple tely
physica l st ill r ema ined speechl ess
Na t ura ll y the a stral
a nd etherial a nc est ors of this Thir d Root R a ce h a d no n ee d
t o produce a series of sounds in o r der t o convey t heir thoughts
living as t hey did in a stra l a n d etherial c on ditions but when m a n
beca me physic a l he coul d no t for l ong rema in dumb We a r e
tol d tha t the soun ds which t hese primitive men m a de t o ex press
In
t heir t houghts were a t rst composed ent ir e ly of vowel s
the sl ow c our se of evol ut ion th e consona n t soun ds gra dua lly
c a me in t o use but t h e devel opmen t of l a ngua ge f r om rst to l a st
o n th e cont in ent of W ur ia never rea ched beyon d the mono
,

Vo l ii , pp 6 8 3a nd 6 8 9
.

3
r

yll a bic phas e The Chin ese l a ngua ge of to da y is the sol e grea t

t h e whol e
lin eal descen da nt of a n cien t Lemur ia n speech fo r
huma n ra c e w as a t t ha t time of o n e l a ng ua ge a n d of o ne lip 1
I n H umbol dt s cl a ssica tion of l a ng ua ge t h e Chin e se as we
kno w is c a ll ed t h e isol a ting as dist inguished from the mor e highly
evolved a ggl utina tive a n d the still mor e highly evol ved ine ction a l
Rea ders of t h e S tor y of A tl a ntis m a y r emember tha t ma ny die r
ent la ngua ges were devel oped on th a t cont inent but a ll belonged
t o t h e a ggl utin a tive or as M ax M iill e r prefers t o ca ll it the
co mb
ina to r y typ e whil e the still higher devel opment of in e ctio n a l
sp eech in t h e Ar ya n a n d Semit ic tongues w a s reserved for o ur
o wn e r a of the Fift h Root R a ce

The rst inst a nce of sin the rst t a king of life quoted The r un
Ta king of
a bove from a n o l d comment a ry o n the st a nzas of Dzy a n m a y
mo
be ta ken as indica tive of th e a t titude which w as th en ina u
e
h
e
d
betwee
n
t
h
h
m
a
n
a
n
d
t
e
m
k
gdom
w
hi
ch
u
r
u
a
t
a
n
i
a
l
i
n
a
n
d
g
h a s since a tt a ined such a wful p r op ort ions no t onl y be tween
m e n a nd a nimal s but bet ween the die r e nt r a ces of m e n th em
sel v es
A nd this open s up a m ost in ter est ing a venue of thought
Th e fa ct tha t Kings a nd Emper or s c onsider it necessa ry or
a ppr opria t e o n a ll st a t e occ a sions t o a ppe a r in the ga r b of o ne
of the ght ing b r a nch es of their se r v ic e is a signica nt in dica
tion of the a potheosis r ea ch ed by t h e c omba tive qua lit ies in m a n
The cus t om doubtl ess c omes down from a t ime when th e King
wa s the wa rrior chief an d when h is kingship w as a ckn owl edged
so l el y in virt ue of his be ing the chief wa rrior
B ut no w tha t the
Fift h Root R a ce is in as cendency whose chief cha ra cter istic a n d
function is the devel opment of intell ect it might ha ve been
ex p ected tha t the domin a nt a tt ribut e of the Fourth Root R a ce
'

'

m ust , how e ve r , be not e d t h a t t h e Chine se pe op le a re m a inl y


d e sce n de d f r om th e fo ur t h o r T ur a nia n sub r a c e o f t h e F our t h R oo t R a c e
It

S e cr e t D oct r ine ,

Vo l ii , p
.

1 98

2
3

woul d ha ve been a l ittl e l ess conspicuousl y p a ra ded But the


e r a of o ne ra ce over l a ps a noth er a n d th ough as we kn ow the
l ea ding ra ces of the worl d a ll bel ong to th e Fifth Root R a ce the
vast ma jo rity of its inha bita n ts stil l bel ong to the Fourth a nd
it woul d a ppea r th a t the Fifth Root R a ce h as no t yet outst r ipped
Fourth Ra c e cha ra cteristics fo r it is by innitely sl ow degrees
tha t ma n s evolution is a ccomplished
It will be interesting here to summ a rise the history of this
strife a nd bl oodshed from its genesis during these fa r o a ges
.

From the informa tion pl a ced before the writ er it woul d seem
tha t t h e a nta gonism betw een men a nd anima l s w a s devel oped
With th e evolution of ma n s physica l body suita bl e food
rst
for tha t body na tura lly beca me a n urgent need so th a t in a ddition
to the a nt a gonism brought a bout by t h e necessit y of self de fen c e
a ga inst the now ferocious an imal s the desire of food al so urged
men to their sl a ughter a nd as we ha ve seen a bove one of th e
rst uses they ma de of the ir buddin g menta lity w as to tra in
a nima l s to a c t as hunters in the cha se
The el ement of strife ha ving once been kindl ed men soon
bega n to use wea pons of o en c e a ga inst ea ch other Th e ca uses
of a ggression were na tura lly the sa me as those which exist to da y

object by one of his fellows w a s suicie nt in ducement for a m a n to


No r w as strife limited to singl e a cts
a ttempt to t a ke it by force
of a gg ression A s a mong sa va ges to da y b a nds of ma ra uders
woul d a tta ck a nd pill a ge th e communities who dwel t a t a dista nce
from their own vill a ge But to this e xtent onl y we a r e tol d
w as wa rfa re orga nised on Lemur ia even down t o the e n d of it s
seventh sub ra ce
It w as reserq for the Atl a ntea ns to devel op th e prin cipl e

of strife on orga nised lines to coll ect a n d to dr ill a rmies a n d t o


.

3
4
But

mm

! ,

now the re occurred a n event pr egna nt with consequence s


the most momentous in t h e hist ory of t h e huma n ra ce A n even t
too full of mystical import fo r its n a rra tion brings in to view
Beings who bel onged to ent irel y differ en t systems of evolut ion
a nd who neverthel ess ca me a t t his epoch t o be a sso cia ted wit h
o ur huma nit y
.

The l a ment of t h e Lhas who h a d no t buil t m e n a t seeing


t heir future a bodes de l e d is a t rst sight fa r from intellig ibl e
Though the descent of t hese Beings into huma n bo dies is no t the
chief event to which we ha ve t o r efer some expl a na t ion of it s
ca use a nd its resul t must rst be a tt empted Now we a r e given
to understa nd tha t these L ha s were t h e highl y evol ved huma nit y
of some syst em of evol ution whic h h a d r un its course a t a period
in th e innite l y fa r o p a st
They h a d rea ched a high st a ge of
devel opment o n their cha in of worlds a nd since it s dissolution
h a d pa ssed t h e interve ning a ges in t h e bliss of some Nir va nic
c ondition
B ut t heir ka rma now necessit a t ed a r et ur n t o som e
el d of a ct ion a nd of physica l ca uses a nd as they h a d n o t yet
fully l ea rnt the l esson of compa ssion the ir tempor a ry ta sk no w
l a y in bec oming guides a nd tea chers of t he Lemuria n r a ce who
then r equired a ll the help a nd g uida nce th ey coul d get
,

But
t a r ily

other Bein gs al so took up the t ask in th is ca se

v o l un

These ca me from the scheme of evolut ion which h a s


Venus as its o ne physical pl a net Tha t scheme h as al r ea dy
rea ched th e Seventh Round of its pl a nets in its Fifth M a nva n t a ra
it s huma nity therefore sta nds a t a fa r hig her l eve l than ordin a ry
ma nkind on t his ea rt h h as yet a tta ined They a r e divine whil e
we a r e onl y huma n
The Lemuria ns a s we ha ve seen were
It w as to
t hen merely o n the verge of a tta ining tr ue ma nhood

th e educa tion of o ur infa nt huma nity


supply a t empora ry need
th a t these divine Beings ca me as we possibly l ong a ges
hence m a y simil a rly be ca ll ed to give a helping ha nd to the beings
.

3
5
t gg l ing up to ma nhood o n the J upiter or the Sa t urn ch ain
Under t heirguida nce a nd inuence th e Le mur ia ns ra pidl y a dva nced
in men tal gr ow th
The stir ring of their minds wit h feelings of
l ove a nd rev eren ce for th ose whom they fel t to be innitely wiser
grea ter t han themse l ves na tura ll y r esul ted in e o r ts
a nd
of im ita tion a nd so the necessa ry a dva nce in menta l growth was
a chieved whic h tra nsf or med the higher menta l shea th into a
vehicl e ca pa bl e of car r ying over the hum an cha ra cteristics from

s ru

whic h endowed the recipient with individual im morta lity A s


Then a ll men be
e x pressed in the a rchaic sta nzas of Dzy a n
ca me endowed with Ma nas
A g rea t distinction however must be noted between the
c o ming of the e xal ted Beings from the Venus schem e a n d tha t of
t h ose described as t h e highl y evol ved huma nity of some previous
The former as we ha ve seen were under
sy st em of ev ol ution
n o ka rmic imp ulse
They ca me as men t o live a nd work a mong
th em but they were not required to a ssume their physical limita
tions be ing in a posit ion to provide a ppropria te veh icles for
.

The L ha s o n the other ha nd h a d a ctua lly to be born in


Bett er woul d it ha ve
t h e bo dies of th e ra ce a s it then ex isted
bee n both fo r them a nd for t h e ra ce if there h a d been no hesita tion
o r del a y on the ir pa rt in t a king up t heir K a rmic t ask for the sin
o f the mindl ess a nd a ll its consequen ces woul d ha ve been a voided
T heir t ask too woul d ha ve been a n ea sier one for it consisted
n o t onl y in a cting as gu ides a nd te a c hers but in improving the

in short in evol ving o ut of the half huma n half


r a c ia l t ype
a nim a l form then e x isting ith e physical body of the m a n to be
.

be remem bered tha t up to this t ime the Lemuria n


o f t h e second a nd thir d gr oups of the Luna r Pitris
r a c e c o nsist e d z
[
z
But no w t h a t they were a pproa ching the l evel rea c hed on the
I t im ust
'

6
3
L una r

hain by the rst group of Pitris it bec a me necessa ry for


t hese a g a in t o return to inca r na tion a nd this t hey did a ll th rough
t h e f t h sixt h a nd sevent h sub ra ces (in deed some did not ta ke
birth til l the Atl a ntea n period) so tha t the impetus g iven to the
prog ress of the ra ce w as a cumul a tive force
c

to the a rts ta ught by them c omes to o ur a id in the consider a tion


of the history of this ea rl y ra ce
Under the guida nce of the ir divine tea cher s the peopl e
bega n to l ea rn th e use of r e a nd the mea ns by which it coul d
be obta ined a t rst by friction a nd l a ter on by t he use of ints
a nd iron
They were ta ught to expl ore for metal s to smel t a n d
to moul d them a nd instea d of spea rs of sha rpened wood they
no w bega n to use spea rs tipped with sha rp ened metal
Th ey wer e al so ta ught to dig a nd till the ground a nd to cul ti
va te the see ds of wil d gra in til l it improved in typ e This cul ti
va tion ca rried o n th rough the vast a ges whic h ha ve since el a psed
h as resul ted in the evol ution of the va r ious cereal s whic h we now

s
po sess ba rl ey oa ts maize mill et etc But a n ex ception must
her e be noted Whea t w as not evol ved upon this pl a net like the
ot her cereal s It w a s a gift of the divine beings who brought
it from Venus rea dy for the food of m a n
Nor w as whea t their
onl y gift
The one a nima l for m whose type h as not been
evol ved on o ur chain of worl ds is th a t of the be e It too w as
brought from Venus
o f spinning
The Lemuria ns no w al so bega n to l ea rn the a r t z
These
a nd wea ving fa brics with which to cl othe themsel ves
were ma de of the c oa rse ha ir of a spec ies of a nima l now extinct
but which bore some resembl a nce to th e ll a mas of tod a y t h e
We ha ve se en
a ncestors of which t hey m a y possibly h a ve been
.

The A rts
nam e d

3
7
obes of skin stripped from the bea st s he h a d slain These skins
h e still con tinued to wea r on the col der pa rts o f the continent
but he no w l ea rnt to cur e a nd dress th e skin in some r ude fashion
One of the rst things the peopl e were ta ug ht was the use
o f r e in the prepa ra tion o f their food a nd whet her it w as the
esh of anima ls they sl ew or the pounded gra ins o f whea t their
modes of cooking wer e cl osely a nal o gous to those -we hea r of as
r

to the gift of whea t so ma rvell ously brought from Venus the


divine r ul ers doubtless realised th e a dvisa bility o f a t once pro
c u ring suc h food for the peopl e for they must ha ve known tha t
it woul d ta ke ma ny genera t ions befor e the cul t iva tion of t h e
,

Rude a nd ba rbar ous as were the peopl e during the period of


t h e f th a nd sixth sub ra ces such of them a s h a d the pr ivil ege
-

inspired
t oo,

with such feelings o f reverence a nd worship as helped to


th em o ut of their sa va ge condit ion The consta nt inux
of more intelligent beings from the rst group o f the Luna r

t he

l ift

tta inment of a more civil ised sta te


Dur ing the l a ter pa rt o f the sixt h an d the seventh sub
r a ce they l ea rnt to buil d grea t cities
These a ppea r to ha ve
bee n of
cycl opea n ar chitect ure corresponding with the
i
i
n
i
a
f
o
s
o
i
u
i
l
g
nt
c
bod
e
the
r
ce
The
r
t
c
t
e
were
b
t
i
s

s
a
g
t ha t ex tended mounta inous region of the continent whic h
included as will be seen in the rst ma p the present Isl a nd of
M a da ga sca r
Another grea t city is described in the Secr et
Doctrine
as ha ving bee n entirely buil t o f bl ocks of l a va
I t l a y so me 3
0 mil es west o f the present Ea ster Isla n d a nd
.

Vo l ii , p 31 7
.

a nd

S ta tus:

8
3

it w as

b equentl y destroyed by a series of vol ca nic eruptions

i
i
l
The g ga nt c sta tues of Easter Is a nd mea suring as most of them

i
n
i
a
u
do bo t 27 feet
he ght by 8 feet a cross t he shoul der s were
proba bly in tended to be representa tive no t onl y of the fea tures
but of the height of those who ca rved them or it m a y be
of their a ncestors for it w as proba bly in the l a ter a ges of the
It will be
L e nmr o Atl a ntea ns tha t the sta tues were erected
observ ed tha t by the second m a p period the continent of which
Eas ter Isl a nd formed a pa rt h a d been broken up a nd Eas ter
Isl a nd itsel f h a d bec ome a comp a ra tivel y sma ll isl a nd though
of considera bly grea ter dimensions tha n it reta ins to da y
Civilisa tions of compa ra tive import a nce a rose o n die r e nt
pa rts of the continent a nd the grea t isl a nds where the inh a bita nts
buil t cities a nd dwel t in settl ed communities but l a rge tr ibes
who were a l so p a rtia ll y civil ise d continued to l ea d a noma dic a nd

i
n
l
t
r
i
r
c
hi
l
a
e
wh
i
l
e
other
p
rt
of
the
nd
m
ny
c
e
a
a
li
f
a
s
a
a
a
s
s
;
p

the l east a ccessibl e as in o ur o wn times were peopled by tribes


of extremely l o w type
R elig ion
With so primitive a ra ce of men a t the best t he re w as
but l ittl e in the sha pe of re ligion tha t they coul d be t a ught
Simpl e rul es of conduct a nd the mo st el emen ta r y prece pts of
mora lity were a ll tha t t hey wer e tted to understa nd or to
pra ctise During the evolution of the seven th sub ra ce it is
true tha t their divine instr uctors t a ught them some primitive
form of worship a nd impa rted the knowl edge of a Supreme Being
whose symbol w a s represented as th e S un
Unlike th e subsequent fa te of Atla ntis which w a s sub
Destr uc
tion of
uria
n tinen t
i
merged
by
gre
t
d
the
co
of
Lem
at
a l wa ves
the
perished by volca nic a ction It w as ra ked by the burn
001m m
ing ashes a nd the red hot dust from numberl ess vol ca noes
Ea r thqua kes a nd vol ca nic eruptions it is tr ue heral ded ea ch o f
t h e grea t ca tastrophes which overtook Atl a ntis but when t h e
su s

3
9
l an d h a d

bee n sha ken a nd rent th e se a r ushed in a nd compl eted


the work a nd most of the inha bita nts per ished by drowning
T h e Le m uria ns o n the ot her ha nd met their doom chiey by
r e or suo ca tio n
Another ma rked contra st between the fa te
o f L emuria a nd Atl a ntis w a s tha t whil e four grea t c a t as trophes
c ompl eted the des truction of the l a tter the former w as sl owl y
ea ten a wa y by in ter nal res fo r from the time when the disin
t e g r a t ing process bega n towa rds t h e end of the rst m a p period
there w a s no cessa tion from the ery a ctivit y a nd whet her in
one pa rt of the contin en t or a n ot her th e vol ca nic a ction w a s
in cessa nt whil e the inva ria bl e sequence w as the subsiden ce a nd
total disa ppea ra nce of the l a nd j ust a s in t h e case of Kra ka toa
,

3
So cl osel y a na l ogous w as th e eruption of Mount Pe l ee which
Pierre th e ca pit a l of Ma rtinique
c a used the des t ruction of St
a bout t w o yea rs a g o t o the whol e series of vol ca nic c a t as t r ophes
o n the con tinent of k m ur ia
tha t the descript ion of the former
i
i
n
t
r
i
ven
by
ome
of
the
s
u
r
v
i
vor
m
be
of
e
e
s
t
An
mmen
s
e
s
s
a
y
g
bl a c k cl oud h a d su dde nl y burst for th from the cr a ter of Mont
P el ! e a n d r ushed wit h t err ic vel ocity upon the city destroying

e v er ything
houses a nd veget a tion a like tha t
inh a bit a nts
it found in its pa th
In two o r t hree minut es it passed ove r
a n d the city w as a bl a zing pyre of ruins
I n both isl a nds [M a r
t inique a nd S t Vin cent! t h e eruptions were cha ra cterised by t h e
s udden discha rge of immense qua n t ities of red hot dust mixed
w ith stea m which owed down the steep hill sides with a n ever
increasing vel ocit y
I n St Vin cent this h a d ll ed ma ny va ll eys
t o a dept h of betwee n 1 00 feet a nd 2 00 fee t a nd mon ths a fter t h e
e r uptions w as st ill very hot a nd the hea vy ra ins which then fell
t hereo n ca used enormous expl osions producing cl ouds of stea m
a n d dust t h a t shot upw a rds to a height of from I 5 00 feet to
Ca pta in
2 000 f eet a nd ll ed the r ivers with bl a ck boil ing mu
in

1 88

o
4

Freema n of the Rodda m then described a thrilling e x p e r i


ence which he a nd his pa rty h a d a t Ma rt inique One night
when they we re l ying a t a nchor in a l ittl e sl oop a bout a mil e from
S t Pierre the mountain expl oded in a w a y tha t w a s a pp a rentl y
a n exa ct repetition of the origina l eruption
It w a s no t entirel y
without wa rning ; hence they were ena bl ed to sa il a t once a m il e
or two further a wa y a nd thus proba bly sa ved their l ives In
t h e da rkness they sa w the summit gl ow with a br ight red light
then soon with l oud deton a tions grea t red hot stones were
projected int o the a ir a nd roll ed down the slope s A few minutes
l a ter a prol onged rumbling noise w as hea r d a nd in a n inst a nt
w as foll owed by a red hot a va l an che of dus t which r ushed o ut
of the cra t er a nd rolled down the side wit h a terric speed which
they estima ted a t a bout 1 00 mil es a n hour with a tempera ture
of I oo o cen tigr a de A s to the proba bl e expl a na tion of these
phenomena no la va he said h a d been see n to o w from eithe r
of t he vol ca noes but onl y stea m a nd n e hot dust The vol ca noes
were therefore of the expl o sive typ e an d from a ll his observa
tions he h a d concl uded tha t the a bsence of l a va o ws w a s due to
the ma terial within the cra ter being pa rtly sol id or a t l east
highl y viscous so tha t it coul d not o w like a n ordina ry la va
Since his return this theo ry h a d received striking con
strea m
r m a tio n for it w as no w known tha t within th e cra ter of Mont
Pel! e the re w a s no l a ke of mol ten l a va but tha t a solid pill a r o f
red hot rock w as sl owly rising upwa rds in a grea t conical sha r p
pointed hil l until it might n a ll y ov ertop th e o l d summ it of the
mounta in It w as n ea rly 1 000 fee t high a nd sl owly grew as it
w a s forced upwa rds by pressure from ben ea th whil e every now
a nd t hen expl osions of stea m took pl a ce disl o dg ing l a rge piece s
from its summit or its sides Stea m w a s se t free within this ma ss
as it cool ed a nd th e rock then p a ssed into a da n ge r ous a nd highl y
expl osive condition such tha t a n expl osion must sooner or l a ter
!

42
Pounding

In concl uding this sketch a reference to the process by


which th e Fourth Root Ra ce w a s b r ought into existence will
a ppr opria tel y bring t o a n end wha t we know of t h e sto r y of
Lemuria a nd link it on to tha t of At l a n t is
It m a y be remembered from previous writings o n t h e subj ec t
tha t it w as from t h e fth or Semitic sub ra ce of the Fourth Root
Ra ce t ha t w a s chosen the nucl eus des tined to become o ur grea t
Fift h or Ar ya n Root Ra ce It w as n o t however un til the time
of th e sev e nth sub ra ce o n Lemur ia tha t huma nity w a s suic ie n tl y
devel oped physiol ogica ll y to wa rra nt th e choice of individua ls
t t o become the pa ren ts of a new Root Ra ce
So it w a s fro m
t h e sev enth sub ra ce tha t t h e segreg a tion w a s e e c t e d
The col ony w a s rst set tl ed o n l a nd which occupied the site of th e
pr esent Asha ntee a nd Western Nigeria A refer ence to the second
m a p will show t his as a promontory l ying to the north west of
the isl a nd cont in ent which embra ced the Ca pe of Good H op e
a nd pa rts of western Afric a
H a v ing been g ua rded fo r genera
tions fr om a ny a dmixture with a l ower type the col ony gr a dua ll y
incr eased in numbers a n d t h e time ca me when it w a s rea dy t o
receive a nd t o ha nd o n the ne w impulse to physica l heredit y
which t he M an n w a s destin ed t o impa rt
Students of Theo sophy a r e a wa re tha t up t o t h e presen t d a y
n o o ne be l onging to o ur huma nit y h as been in a position to under
ta ke t h e exa l ted o ce of M a nn tho ugh it is sta ted tha t t h e
founding of the coming Sixth Root Ra ce will be entrusted to t h e

guida nce of o ne of o ur Ma sters of Wis dom o ne who whil e


bel onging to o ur huma nity h a s neverthel ess rea ched a mos t
e x a l ted l evel in t h e Divin e H iera rchy

I n t h e case we a r e consider ing the founding of the Fourth

Root Ra ce it w as o ne of t he Adepts from Venus who undertook


the duties of the M a nn Na tura ll y he bel onged to a very high
orde r for it must be under stood tha t th e Beings who ca me f rom
,

Ru e

43

rul ers a nd tea chers of o ur inf a n t hum a nity


It is t his circumsta nce which
did n o t a ll st a n d a t the sa me l evel
fu r n ishes a reason fo r the rema rka bl e fa ct t ha t m a y in concl usion

t
ted
n a mel y tha t there existe d in Lemuria a Lodge of
be s a
I n it ia tion
N a tura lly it w as no t fo r t h e ben et of t h e L e muria n A I od M
I ma
' tgn
the L odge w as founded Such of them as were
r a c e th a t
it is true ta ught by t h e Adept
s uf cien t l y a dva nce d were
Gu rus but the instruction they r equired w as limite d to
t h e expl a na tion of a few physical phenomena , such as t h e fa ct
th a t t h e ea rth moves round t h e sun or to t h e expl a na tion of the
d i e r e nt a pp ea ra nce which physical objects assumed for them
w hen subjected al tern a tel y to their physic a l sight a nd their
a stra l vision
It w as of course for the sa ke of t hose who whil e en dowed
w ith the stupendous power s of t ra nsferring t heir consc iousness
f ro m t h e pl a net Venus t o this o ur ea rth a nd of pr oviding for
t heir use a n d t heir wor k whil e her e a ppropria te vehicl es in
w hich t o function were y e t pursuin g t h e course of their o wn

e v o l ut io n i
For t heir sa ke it w a s for the sa ke of t hose who
h a ving en t ered the Pa th h a d onl y rea ch ed t h e l ower gra des
t h a t t his L odge of Init a tion w as founded
i
Though a s we know t h e goa l of normal evol ut ion is grea ter
a n d more gl orious tha n c a n
from o ur present sta ndpoint be
well ima gined it is by no mea ns syn onymous wit h tha t expa nsion
o f consciousness which combin ed wit h a nd a l one ma de possibl e
by the purica tion a n d ennobl emen t of cha ra cte r constitute the
h eights to which the P a thwa y of Initia tion l ea ds
Venus system

th e

as

he ig hts r e a c he d by t he m wil l n d t he ir p a r a ll e l w he n o ur hum a nit y


w ill , c oun t l e ss a e ons he n c e , h a ve r e a ch e d t h e S ix t h R o und o f o ur c ha in o f
w or l ds, a nd t h e sa m e t r a nsce n de n t p ow e r s wil l be t h e p ossession o f or dina r y
m a nkind in t h ose f a r o ff a g e s
T he

44

The invest iga tion ! into wha t constitutes this purica tion
a nd ennobl ement o f cha ra cter a nd the endea vour to rea lise wha t
,

ha ve bee n writt en of elsewher e


Sume c it now to point o ut tha t the founding of a Lodge o f
Initia tion for the sa ke of Beings who ca me from a nother scheme
of evolution is a n indica tion of th e unity of objec t a nd of a im
in the government a nd the g uidan ce of al l the schemes of e v o l u
tion brought into existence by o ur Sola r Logos Apa rt from t h e
normal course in o ur o wn sc heme there is we know a P a th by
which H e m a y be direc tl y rea ched which ev er y so n of m a n in
h is progress t hrough the a ges is privil eged to hea r o f an d to
trea d if he so chooses
We nd tha t this w as so in the
.

Ve nus

sch e m e a lso , a nd

w e m a y p r e sum e it is

or

will be

so

in al l

the schemes which form pa rt of o ur Sol a r system This P a th is


the P a th of Initia tion a nd the end to which l ea ds is th e sa me
for a ll a nd tha t end is Union with Go d
.