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MODERNIZED:

THE KING'S INDIAN DEFENSE

Dejan Bojkov

ETROPOLITAN
ETROPOLITAN

METROPOLITAN CHESS PUBLISHING

First Published in the US by Metropolitan Chess Publishing 2014 Copyright© 2014 Dejan Bojkov First Edition

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without written permission from the Publisher.

ISBN- 13:

978-0-9856281-0-9

ISBN- 10:

0985628103

Cover by Elena Rose Dadural Edited by Lawrence Stevens Printed in the US by Lone Star Press

Metropolitan Chess Publishing is an imprint of Metropolitan Chess, Inc

Metropolitan Chess, Inc., PO Box 25 1 12, Los Angeles, CA 90025-0 1 12 email: info@metrochessla.com website: www.metrochessla.com

METROPOLITAN CHESS PUBLISHING

Commissioning Editor: Ankit Gupta Editor-in-Chief: Lawrence Stevens

Assistant Editor: Alej andro Ruiz, Jr.

Contents

Contents Introduction 5 1 The Classical Variation 15 1a Flexibility in the Classical Variation 17 1b

Introduction

5

1 The Classical Variation

15

1a Flexibility in the Classical Variation

17

1b

The Gligoric System

67

1c The Exchange System

91

1d The Petrosian System

107

2 The Samisch Variation

121

3 The

Four Pawns Attack

189

4 The Averbakh System

213

5 The Bagirov Line

237

6 The Fianchetto System

273

Solutions to the Exercises

307

Symbols

!!

Good move Excellent move

?

Bad move Blunder Deserves attention Dubious

??

!?

?!

#

Checkmate

D

Forced; the only move Unclear position

oo

=

Equal position

;!;

Slight advantage for White

+

Slight advantage for Black

±

Distinct advantage for White

+

Distinct advantage for Black

+-

White is winning

-+

Black is winning

t

with the initiative

with the attack insufficient compensation for the material

sufficient compensation for the material with counterplay with the idea better is Novelty Time pressure

Introduction

Introduction D ear reader, you are holding in your hands a book on my beloved opening,

D ear reader, you are holding in your hands a book on my beloved opening, the King's Indian Defense. I started playing this line in my youthful

days after reading the fa mous book by David Bronstein about the Interzonal

tournament in Zurich-Neuhausen 1953 . It was the time when the defense appeared in elite tournaments and never left.

I witnessed Garry Kasparov's glorious career and followed his final match against his great rival Anatoly Karpov when Kasparov did not fear to use the KID and even won the match. My passion for the King's Indian remains undiminished all these years . For some people it is a religion. Many of my fr iends have tried to convince me that this opening is positionally unsound. White is taking more space and controls the center better. I strongly disagree. The KID is fo unded on strong fu ndamentals; the center is temporarily given up but can later be attacked and destroyed, while Black's control of key squares can compensate for his lack of space. Have a look at the following example:

for his lack of space. Have a look at the following example: Skembris · Van Wely

Skembris · Van Wely

Skei 1993

at the following example: Skembris · Van Wely Skei 1993 White indeed has more space, but

White indeed has more space, but his position is strategically lost. His gain of space has opened up some weaknesses in his camp, specifically the d4 square. At the same time,

is well

covered by the

unreachable by the white knight .

14.a3 c5/

This fixes the white pawns on the color of Black's own bishop, and pre­ pares a standard knight maneuver.

15. b5 Nc 7 16 . Be2

Of no relief is 16 .Nxe5 due to

is

the analogous square on d5

black

pieces

and

Re6 17. Ng4 f5 18.Ne3 f4 19.Nd5

Nxd5 20.cxd5 Rxe4++, while 16.Rdl Re6 17. Rd8+ only helps Black to

Kg7

proceed with his idea:

16

17

18.Be2 Re7+.

16 Re6 17. 0-0-0 ReB+

with his idea: 16 17 18.Be2 Re7+. 16 Re6 17. 0-0-0 ReB+ White can do nothing

White can do nothing to fa ce the establishment of the black knight on d4 . After this, Black can either prepare the f5 breakthrough, or he

can even open the position on the queen's flank at the proper moment. Probably not fa miliar with this game from two months before, Polgar,

with 17

threw away the edge. Now White uses the open a-file to release the pressure. 19.Kb2 Re7 20.Rd6 Ne8 2l.Rd5 axb5 22.axb5 b6 23.Ral Rxal 24.Kxal f6 25.Rd8 Bb7 26.Nd2 f5 27.exf5 gxf5 .

Kg7 18.a4 a6, rushed and

The game was later drawn, Huebner­ Polgar, Biel Interzonal 1993 .

18. Rhe1 f6 19. Rd6 Kf7 20.Nd2

Ke 7 21.Rd3 Ne 6 22.g3 h5 23. h4 Nd4 24 .Nf1 b6 25. Ne3 Bb7 26 .(3

Kd6, answer-

28.Nd5

Rxf2+.

26 Rg8 27.Bd1 Kd6 28. Rd2

Raf8 29 . a4 f5 30 . exf5 gxf5 31.(4

Probably more stubborn is 3l.g4 hxg4 32.fxg4 f4 33.Nf5+ Rxf5 34.gxf5

e4+.

31 Rxg3 32. Nc2

Better was 32.fxe5+, which is an­

swered by 32

f3 35.Bg4+ Kxe5 36.Nf5+ Kf4-+.

32 Be4 33.fxe5+ Kxe5 34.Nxd4

cxd4 35. Bxh 5 Rh8 36.Bf7 Rxh4

37. Kb2 Rhh3 38. c5 bxc5 39. a5

Ra3 40. a6 Ra4 41. Be8 c4 42. Rf2 Rb3+ 0-1

Ke 6 33.Rf2 f4 34.Bxh5

ing

If26.Nd5+ then 26

27. Nxf6

with

27

Rf8

I n order to better understand the King's Indian Defense, one needs to appreciate the importance of

Black's dark-squared bishop. This mighty piece on the long diagonal is the pride and the joy of any KID player. The black squares are the territory of the second player, yet the bishop might in fa ct not even be needed for the second player to demonstrate this:

Naumkin - Smirin Is chia 1995
Naumkin - Smirin
Is chia
1995

Qhl#.) 18

Ng3+ 19.hxg3 Qxf8

20.Nfl Qh6+ 21.Nh2 Kg7-+

1995 Qhl#.) 18 Ng3+ 19.hxg3 Qxf8 20.Nfl Qh6+ 21.Nh2 Kg7-+ And now if 22.Bfl then 22

And now if 22.Bfl then 22 23.Kxh2 Rh8 mate.

Qxh2+

17

Qxg5 18. Nfl

If 18.Bfl then

18

Kg7!?

intend-

ing

Rh8.

18

(5�

With

the

attack.

The

outcome

of

Black's idea is very impressive, and the position of his pieces on the king's flank is quite fr ight ening.

19. exf5

Nh3+

Not

19.Qcl

Nf4

20.g3

Here, Ilya Smirin introduced a

21.Kg2 f4+.

fabulous novelty, based on his deep

19

gxf5

20. a3 a41

understanding of the position:

Energetic play on both flanks!

15

Bf6l!N 16. Bxh6

If 20

Nf4 then 21 .g3.

Rejecting the offer would not save

21.

b4

White fr om probl ems: 16 .a3 Bg5

Or 21.bxa4!?

17.Bf2? Bxd2 18.Qxd2 Nxb3+.

21

Nb3+

16 Bg5/

The point behind Black's maneu­ ver. Without the black-squared bish­ op, White can do nothing to control his dark-squared perimeter.

17. Bxg5

The exchange is poison, as Black will mate on the dark squares:

17.Bxf8? Be3+ 18.Khl (Also mating

is 18. Kfl Qh4 19. Ndl Ng3+ 20. hxg3

Smirin's inspired play has given him the advantage, which he later converted into a full

Smirin's inspired play has given him the advantage, which he later converted into a full point on move 47.

As we have seen, the positional pawn sacrifice is one of the strategi­ cal ideas to prove superiority on the dark squares. However, we also have another strong weapon in our arsenal, the attack with opposite-colored bishops:

Kamsky - Kasparov

Ma nila (o l) 1992

bishops: Kamsky - Kasparov Ma nila (o l) 1992 Kamsky has an extra pawn, but it's

Kamsky has an extra pawn, but it's no consolation. The open files and diagon als, and above all the fa ct that

Black is using one extra piece at least (the bishop!) in the attack, makes his position resignable.

31. Qe2

If all the white pawns leave the black squares, White will have no

control over them: 31.b3 Rc8 32.Kc2

Rxc4+! 33 .bxc4 Rb2+-+.

31 Qa7 32. Rcl

34.Kc2

RaB 33. b3 Bf4

Rxc4+! 33 .bxc4 Rb2+-+. 31 Qa7 32. Rcl 34.Kc2 RaB 33. b3 Bf4 34 Re7 in

34

Re7

in

trading his bishop for a rook!

35. Qd3 Qc5 36.Rbl Re3 37. Qd4

Ra2+ 38.Kdl

Rxb2+

Kasparov

is

not

interested

It's

Qd4 Ra2+ 38.Kdl Rxb2+ Kasparov is not interested It's mate after 38.Rb2 39.Qxb2 Be5 40.Qa2 Rc3+.

mate

after

38.Rb2

39.Qxb2 Be5 40.Qa2 Rc3+.

38 Rxf3

There

were

38

other

Re8!?

41.Rxc3

wins

as

well,

Qb4

42.Kcl

for

40.Qc3

Rel mate.

example

Qxc3

39.Rd3

Rd2+

Qgl+

41.Kc2 Qxh2+ 0-1

You will have noticed that the attack was conducted mainly on the squares of the color of the black bishop.

39. Qxf4

Rxf4

40. Rxa2

In the KID, players are not afraid to sacrifice material, even for strate­ gical purposes. You saw what Smirin did in his game against Naumkin. Here is an example of a successful blockade:

Kotov - Gligoric

Candidates To urnament 1953

blockade: Kotov - Gligoric Candidates To urnament 1953 Svetozar Gligoric was one of the leading forces

Svetozar Gligoric was one of the leading forces behind the KID all his life. In this game he demonstrated a remarkable idea.

ll

14.Ngl

e4! 12.fxe4 (4! 13. Bf2 Nd7!

Not 14.e5?! Nxe5 15. Bxh7+ Kh8t

16.0-0-0 Qg5

17.Kbl

Qxg2

18.Ne4

Nf6

19.Rhgl

Qf3

20. Nxf6

Rxf6

21.Nc3 Qh5 22 .Be4 Bg4+.

14

Qg5 15. Bfl Ne 5';.

Rxf6 21.Nc3 Qh5 22 .Be4 Bg4+. 14 Qg5 15. Bfl Ne 5';. Thanks to the pawn

Thanks to the pawn sacrifice, Black has managed to build a strong central position. Gligoric does not stop so soon, though.

16.Nf3

18. 0-0-0 Nf6 19. h3 Bd7

Qe7

1 7.Nxe5

Qxe5

a6!? 20.Bd3

b5

2l.cxb5 axb5 22.Bxb5 Ba6

2l.a4

axb5 22.Bxb5 Bd7 23.Rhel Bxb5

24.Nxb5 Nh5t.

20 . Bd3 a6 21. N bl! (3 !?

Another plan is 19

Bd7

21.Rel

19

b5!?

(20.a4!?

Also

Nh5t)

a6

20

20.cxb5

is 19 Bd7 21.Rel 19 b5!? (20.a4!? Also Nh5 t ) a6 20 20.cxb5 Kotov was

Kotov was threatening to bring his knight into the action via d2 and f3, and Gligoric is not afraid of sacri­ ficing another pawn!

Also possible was 2l Rae8!? followed by:

a) 22.Nd2 Ba4! 23.b3 (23. Qxa4

24.Nbl Bd7 25.Rdel

b5=.

Nh5

Ng3

24.Nf3 Qh5 25.Rhgl b5+t.

.Be8!? 22.Nd2

Nxe4!) 23

Qal+

b) 22.Rdel

23.Nd2

Another idea is 2l

Ba4! 23.b3 (if23. Qxa4 then 23

Nxe4)

Qal+

26.e5!? Bxe5

Rg8oo.

23

24.Nbl

Be8!

27. Bxh7+

25.Bel

Kh8

Nd7

28. Bd3

22.gxf3 Nh5 23. Nd2 Nf4

27. Bxh7+ 25.Bel Kh8 Nd7 28. Bd3 22.gxf3 Nh5 23. Nd2 Nf4 The outcome of Black's

The outcome of Black's strategy:

his pieces on the freed f4 and e5 squares are dominating the position and the long diagonal is in complete control. White's pieces lack air because of their own pawns. Black has rich compensation for the pawns and went on the attack after

24. Bfl b5!

We are much obliged to the Yu­ goslavian GM for another powerful idea, the positional exchange sacri­ fice:

Avery Gligoric

USA 1971

exchange sacri­ fice: Avery • Gligoric USA 1971 21 Rf4! "I found this move easily over

21

Rf4!

"I found this move easily over the board. The exchange sacrifice solves all Black's strategical problems. It introduces into the action the passive bishop on g7 and the knight, and Black even gets some material compensation for the exchange." Needless to say, this pattern is now commonly recognized by any chess player.

this pattern is now commonly recognized by any chess player. 22. Bxf4 exf4 23. Nd3 Qxg5+

22. Bxf4

exf4

23. Nd3

Qxg5+

24.Rc2

Not 24. Nxf4? Bh6 .

24 Rf8 25. Kdl a3! 26.Ncl Ba4

The game was eventually drawn

27.Nb3 Bb2

 

at move 41.

With the idea 28

Bxb3

29. axb3

 

a2.

28.Rxb2

 
 

If

28.Rc6

then

28

Bxb3+!

29.axb3 Qe5 30.Rxa6 Bc3+.

28 axb2

Nf6

33.Kbl g5-+

29. Qxb2 RbB! 30. Qd2

Qe5

31.Kcl

Bxb3

32. axb3

34 .Rc1 g4 35. Rc7 Nh71 36. Ka2 h41 39. Bf3 Qd4 40. Rc4 Qe3

34 .Rc1 g4 35. Rc7 Nh71 36. Ka2

h41

39. Bf3 Qd4 40. Rc4 Qe3 0-1

Rf8

Ng5

37. Qe2

38.fxg4

The strategic ideas in the King's Indian Defense can be the subject of another complete book, so rich in ideas is the KID! I will just mention the pawn chains. The situation of the pawns, especially in the positions with the closed center, obliges both sides to play on their flanks. For White this is usually the queen's flank where he has the better quality pawns, thanks to the wedge on d5, while Black attacks the king­ side. In these double-edged situations . the main question is "Who is fa ster?", and an experienced KID player is not afraid of sacrificing material.

W e have seen the sacrifices of the pawn(s) and the exchange, but Black can also sacrifice:

I) A Piece

Miroshnichenko - Bojkov

European Individual Chess Championship, Plovdiv 2008

Bojkov European Individual Chess Championship, Plovdiv 2008 It seems as if I need to retreat, after

It seems as if I need to retreat, after which White will most proba­ bly smash me on the queenside. But I know that King's Indian players do not retreat.

Nc xe4! 13. Ndxe4 Nx e4

14.Nxe4 f5 15.Nc3 f4 16.Bd2 e4 1 7. 0-0 e3 18.Be1 axb4 19.axb4 Rxa1 20. Qxa1

12

20 (8! 21.gxf8 Bh8 With lively doubled-edged play. The game ended in a draw, which

20

(8!

21.gxf8 Bh8

With lively doubled-edged play. The game ended in a draw, which satisfied both opponents.

2) ARook

Rg7- +) 23 25.Rf2 D

Nxg2! 28.Kxg2 Rg7+-+) 24

now:

Nh5 24.B f2 (2 4. Bh2 Be3+

27.Qel

Qh4 26.Nd3 Ngf4

Ngf4 and

Nxe2+

27.Kh2

29. Kg2

KhB-+) 28

30.Nd3 Qc8+ 3l.Kh4 (31.Kh2 Nxfl+

32.Khl Nfg3+ 33. Bxg3 Nxg3+ 34. Kgl

33.N el

h5!-+.

Nhg 3! 29. Rxf7 Kxf7

Bxg3 30. Qe8+ R{B 31. Qe6+

25.Rc7?

Ba4!

26 .Qxa4

(28.g3

Bf4+

28.Kh3

Qh4+

Ke 7!-+) 3l

Nxfl

32.g4

Nd2

25.Nd3!:

26.Kxg2 Rg7+

27.Kh2 Ng3 ! 28.Bxg3 Qg5 29.Rg1D

Qh5+ 30.Kg2 Be3 3l.Rhl Rxg3+

32.Kxg3 Qg5+ 33 .Kh2 Qh4+ 34.Kg2 Qg5+ 35.Kh2 Qh4+=.

Rg7 26.Nxf4 Bxf4

27.g4!

(27.Rc7? Ng3! 2B.Rxd7 Qh4

a)

25

Nxg2

b) 25

 

29.

Rxg7+ Kxg 7 30. B xa7 Nx e2+!

Piket - Kasparov

31.

Qxe2 Bh2+-+)

27

Bxcl

28.Qxcl

Tilburg 1989

31. Qxe2 Bh2+-+) 27 Bxcl 28.Qxcl Tilburg 1989 Nf4 29.Qe3 h5!+. 21 Nh 5! 20 g8!

Nf4 29.Qe3 h5!+.

21

Nh 5!

27 Bxcl 28.Qxcl Tilburg 1989 Nf4 29.Qe3 h5!+. 21 Nh 5! 20 g8! Time is more

20

g8!

Time

is

more precious

than

the

material!

 

22.Kh1D

21.Nxa8?

Here are some beautifullines giv­ en by Kasparov's trainer:

2l .hxg3 fx g3 ! 22.B xg3 Bh6 !

23.Nxa8!

24.dxe6

(23.Ne6

Bxe6

Qh4 23 .h3 Bxh3 24.gxh3

Qxh3 25.Rf2 gxf2+ 26.Kxf2 Nh4 27.Bfl Qh2+ 28.Ng2 Rg7-+.

22.Bxa7

22 gxf2

Qxa8 25. Bc4 a6!

28. Rxf2 Ng3+! 24. Kgl

Black took over the initiative, and his opponent could not adjust to the situation and

Black took over the initiative, and his opponent could not adjust to the situation and lost quickly:

26. Qd3?!

Other moves lose, too: 26.hxg3 fxg3 27.Rb2 Qd8 28.Kfl Bh6 29.Ke2

3) A Queen!

Kramnik - Kasparov

Munich Intel Express blitz '5 1994

Kramnik - Kasparov Munich Intel Express blitz '5 1994 12 Nfxe4! ! Qg5-+.   Kasparov had

12 Nfxe4! !

Qg5-+.

 

Kasparov had prepared this line

 

And 26.Nd3 Qa7 27.Nc5 Bb5!

especially for the blitz match with

(27

dxc5

28.d6

cxb4

29. Qd5

NhB

Kramnik.

30.

Qxe5 Qe3 31. RdJ oo) 28.B xb5

axb5

13. Bxd8

Nx c3

14.Qel

Rfxd8

29. hxg3

fx g3

30. Rfc2

dxc5

3l .bxc5

15.Rcl ?!

Nf4-+.

 

15.Nbl! is the only move to test

26

Qa7 27. b5

Black's idea.

If 27. Rcc2

then

27

Be7 threaten­

It is not a big surprise that

ing 28

Bh4.

Kramnik did not orient himself well

27

axb5 2B. Bxb5 Nhl!

0-1

 

enough with less than five minutes on ·the clock. Nevertheless, even against best play Black has good compensation for the queen.

15 Nx a2 16.Ral Nb4 17.B dl e4

18.Rbl ReB 19. Qe3 (5

With all his pieces beautifully placed, Black is indisputably better, and went on to win!

With all his pieces beautifully placed, Black is indisputably better, and went on to win!

20. h4

Rf8

21.g3

Rae8

22.Kg2

Nbd3

23. Rgl

(4

24.gxf4

Rxf4

25. h5 g5 26. Rfl Rh4 27.Rhl Rf4

28. Rfl Ref8 29.(3 Rh4 30.fxe4

Nf4 +

33. Rcl Rh3 34. Nf3

Rxe3 36. Nxd7 Nh3+ 37. Kg2 Rxfl

38. Kxfl g3 39. Kg2 Nf4 + 0-1

g4 35. Nxe5

Nx e5

31 .Kgl

Nc d3

32 . e 5

L et's stop here to take a breath! Mr. Kasparov's play in this game

was extreme, as usual, just like our defense. You will see more of these ideas in this book and will learn other things as well. The chapters feature the most important systems for White which you are most likely to fa ce. Ea ch chapter includes memory markers, important positions and ideas that were explained in the text, which will help you to memorize the key positions. My practice as a trainer has taught me that no book is complete without a set of exercises to help you confirm your knowledge.· Therefore, at the end of each chapter there are many puzzles, both tactical and strategical! Welcome to your remarkable jour­ ney in the King's Indian Defense!

Chapter 1

The Classical Variation

Chapter 1 The Classical Variation l.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2

l.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 e5

T he Class ical Va riation is by fa r the most popular reply to our beloved defense. White is doing everything right. He occupies the center, he

develops his knights first, he develops the king's bishop next, and he is ready to castle; It's a truly classical approach, and it's no wonder that it is the main weapon that you might fa ce when playi ng the KID.

Chapter la

Flexibility in the Classical Variation

Chapter la Flexibility in the Classical Variation l.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3

l.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 e5 7.0-0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.(3 c6

In the late nineteenth century, positions where one side abandons the center were considered to be dangerous and even lost for that side. The KID was an irregular (and wrong!) opening, according to the Classical Chess School.

T hen came Aaron Nimzowitsch who, together with the other "hy­

per-modernists", gave new meaning and understanding to positions with the so-called small center. This pawn structure in the Classical arises after the moves:

l.d4 d6 2.Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 g6 4.Nc3 Bg7 5. e4 0-0 6.Be2 e5 7. 0-0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.{3 c6 (see the above

diagram). Black has released the tension in the center and given his opponent both the territory and the fr eedom to develop comfortably. White's advantages are obvious, and Black has a backward pawn on d6 which seems to be well controlled by the white pawn bind on c4 and e4. The

first player just needs to finish his development, bring the cl bishop to a good position (and there is plenty of choice on the c. diagonal!), place the queen on d2, connect the rooks, bring them to the center, and his advantage will be beyond any doubt. For many years, this position was not considered to be worth playing as Black. After all, he does not really have a direct attack against the king, nor are there any obvious targets to hit. Enough talking, let's have a look at the new games which changed the attitude towards the line! I start with two games by Viorel Bologan, the Moldavian player known for his uncompromising style.

The main line:

ll.Bg5

1 Fier - Bologan

Aeroflot Op en, Mo scow 2011

l.d4 d6 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 g6 4.Nc3

0- 0

Bg 7 5. e4 0-0 6. Be2 e5 7.

exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.f3 c6 lO. Khl

Nb d7 1 1.Bg5

6. Be2 e5 7. exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.f3 c6 lO. Khl Nb d7 1 1.Bg5 The

The main line in this variation. White tries to permanently stop Black's main counterattacking re­ source d6-d5 while finishing his development. Still, there are other ideas for Black .

ll

Qb6

Black targets both the knight on d4 and the pawn on b2 , forcing White to retreat the knight to a worse position. It was because of this idea that Bologan decided to give the line a new try.

12.Nb3

Six months prior to this game Bologan suffered a defeat after the tricky 12.Na4 . His opponent Alexander Beliavsky managed to extract some advantage fr om the opening. However, Black had ways of improving his play:

12 .••Qc7!? 13 .Qd2 and now:

a6?! This is a bit slow, and

one should be aware of a typical combination in White's arsenal:

14.Nc3 b5 15.cxb5 axb5 16.Racl

Qb6

17. Nxc6! Qxc6 18.Nxb5 Qb6 19. Nc7± .

Watch out for this idea!

b) Instead, Postny suggests the

idea 13

dxc5 15.Nb3 b600•

White has a pawn majority on the kingside, but Black has counterplay on the dark squares, and the Knight is misplaced on b3. 12 •••Qa5 This is what Bologan chose against Beliavsky, and as we shall see, things are good for Black here as well. We look at two moves:

15.Radl Nfd7oo) 14

(with the threat Nc3xb5!) 16

a) 13

Nc5!

14 .Nxc5 (or 14.Nc3 a5

a) 13.Bd2 is the old move in the position, when Black is doing

Qe5 and

generally fine after both 13

13

Qc7:

Black is doing Qe5 and generally fine after both 13 13 Qc7: 14 .Bc3 Qe7 The

14 .Bc3 Qe7 The

knight on a4 and the bishop on c3 do not really seemed improved, to say the least. 15.Qd2 Ne5 16.b3 d5! 17.cxd5 cxd5 18.Bb5 Bd7 19.Bxd7 Qxd7 20.exd5 Qxd5 and we see Black taking over the initiative in Bilobrk-Saric, Split 201 1.

al)

13

Qe5

a2)

13

Qc7

14 .Be1 a6

15.Rc1 c5!

Another option for Black to begin active play is to advance this c-pawn and win the d4 square for the knight.

16 .Nc2 Ne5 17. Nc3 Bd7 18 .Qd2

(The seemingly dangero us 18.{4 Nc 6

weakens

Black is fine after 19.Bf3 Nd4 20.Nxd4

and

the

e4 pawn

instead,

cxd4

Rad8

19.Bh4 Bc6 20. Rfd1 b5!? 21 .cxb5 axb5 22 .Bxb5 Bxb5 23.Nxb5 Qb6 24.Nca3

2l. Qxd4

Nxe4+Z.)

18

(19

b2 11)

Nxe4

18

Bg4

19.Qd2

? 20.Nxe4+-) 20.e5±.

Rh5

Rxe4 19.Bxd7 Nxd7

20.Nxe4 dxe4 21.Ne6 Nf6 22.Nxg7

Kxg7 23 .Qb3 and Black didn't get sufficient compensation for the exchange in Beliavsky-Bologan, J S ibenik 2010. Even if he can survive this we do not play the KID to suffer for a draw.

met

b212) 18

b22) Note

that

14

Qb4?

is

and here the active 24

d5!

would

by

15.Nc2 ! and the b2 pawn is taboo:

have given fa ntastic compensation to

15

Qxb2??

16 .Na4+-.

Black after 25.Bxf6 Qxf6 26.exd5 Qh4

b23) Instead, Black needed to

with the threat Bg7-h6-f4! Instead,

24

was the game continuation

in Ruzele-Siepelt, Berlin 1994.

Rd7

b)

13. Bf4N

continuation in Ruzele-Siepelt, Berlin 1994. Rd7 b) 13. Bf4N that Beliavsky had prepared for the game.

that

Beliavsky had prepared for the game.

the

This

was

novelty

b1) Now one possibility is

13

Qc7 14 .Qd2 (B lack

will achieve

a

standard break after

14 .Nc3 Nh5

Nh5 15.Be3 Nc5

16 .Nc3 a5 17.Nb3:t.

Ne5 is best in the

above diagram. Now, after 14 .Nc3:

b2 1) The central release which

d5?!

15.cxd5 cxd5 16.Bb5 Bd7 17.Bxe5 Rxe5 18.f4 and now:

Bologan tried did not work: 14

15.Be3 {5+Z.) 14

b2) But 13

play 14

Nc5

Qb6 !? 15 .Qd2 Nfd7 16 .Be3

(or

17.Nc2

a5

lB.Rabl

17.Qc2

B{B) 17

12

a5

Ned7

18.Rad1 a5oo.

Black wins space on the queen's flank with tempos.

13. Qd2

We will look at 13.Na4 Qb4 in the next game, Eljanov-Bologan, S ibenik

2010.

13

queen.

From here it can be transferred to either the king's or queen's flank!

15.Nd4

15.Nc1?! is too slow, and Black can perform the desired central break

after

16.Rb1 Be6 17.b3

axb3 18.axb3 d5t, in Sharavdorj­

Shimanov, Moscow 2011.

a4

14.Be3 Qd8!

square

for

The best

the

15

Ne5

15

Nc5

Thanks to the beautiful pawn on a4 , the knight on c5 is really hand­

Thanks to the beautiful pawn on a4 , the knight on c5 is really hand­

some. Please note that whenever this knight occupies the c5 square, we usu­ ally start playing on the king's flank, discarding our plans for a central strike with d6-d5.

and

Also

possible

are

15

Nb6

15

Qa5!?.

16. Rfdl

16.Rabl!? is an alternative for

Nfd7 17.b4 axb3

18.axb3 Be5 19.b4 Ne6 20.f4 Black

Bxd4!

White. Still, after 16

can trade a pair of pieces: 20

(But not 20

Nf6 23 .Bf3 ReB 24. RfdH, when White stabilizes the situation and enjoys his

extra sp ace, in Goganov- Shimanov, St. Petersburg 2011.) 2l.Bxd4 Nxd4

22.Qxd4 Ra3. With fewer pieces on the board White's space advantage is not so obvious, and Black can gradu­ ally equalize: 23.Ral Rxal 24.Rxal Qf6 25.Qe3 Qe7 26.Qd3 Nf6 27.Ra8 Bg4=, Bologan. 16.b4 is an aggressive try for the first player. Pay close attention to the following model game, as Black

manages to achieve all the ideas that

he wants: 16

18.Rxal Nh5 ! Opening the road for

the queen! 19.Bdl f5!

axb3 17. axb3 Rxa l

Bg7

21.Nxe6Rxe6 22.Bd4

queen! 19.Bdl f5! axb3 17. axb3 Rxa l Bg7 21.Nxe6Rxe6 22.Bd4 The central strike! 20.b4 Ne6?

The central strike! 20.b4 Ne6? Fighting for the dark squares! 2l.Ra8? Nxd4 22.Bxd4 Bxd4 23 .Qxd4 Qh4! And now a small winning combination is inevitable: 24.Qd2 Ng3+ 25.Kgl Qxh2+! 26.Kxh2 Nfl+ 27.Kgl Nxd2+, with a good extra pawn in Smith­ Shimanov, Stockholm 2010.

Nfd7 ! welcom­

If 16.Nc2 then 16 ing 17.Qxd6? a3 !.

16

Nfd7

17.Rabl

With 17.Bfl White can try to defend the king's flank in advance.

A semi-provoking move, as

Black would love to see the white pawn advance to f4, leaving it.s

colleague on e4 vulnerable.

17

Be5

advance to f4, leaving it.s colleague on e4 vulnerable. 17 Be5 20 Chapter la: Flexibility in

We show two possibilities:

b) 19.Bf2

18.Qf2!? stops Qd8-h4 and is probably White's best try. Still, the

situation

ities for both sides after 18

(18

makes sense as well, since the white queen has left the center.) 19.Rel Nf6

Qa5!? with the threat a4-a3

Qe7

is fu ll of life and pos sibil­

20.Radl Bd7 21.h3 Nh5 22.Nde2 and here is a strong blockading move

22

g5!

Nh5 22.Nde2 and here is a strong blockading move 22 g5! \ After Qe7-f6 and eventually

\

After Qe7-f6 and eventually a4- a3 , Black seems in good control of

the situation. Instead, the youngest

b6

23.g4 Nf6? 24.Bxc5! bxc5 25.f4 Bxc3 26.Nxc3±, in Reinderman-Nyzhnyk, Wijk aan Zee 2012.

Qa5

GM in the world preferred 22

18.Rabl ('!?' D. Mozetic.) 18

a) 19.Qc2 Qb4 20.Ncb5 Qa5 21.Nc3 Qb4 22.Nce2 Nf8! Remember this pattern - Black is taking care of the strong d4 Knight! 23 .Qcl Nfe6 24 .Nc2 Qa5=, Khalifman-Kokarev,

Dagomys 2009.

23 .Qcl Nfe6 24 .Nc2 Qa5=, Khalifman-Kokarev, Dagomys 2009. Now Black, with 19 Nf8 , intended

Now Black, with 19

Nf8 , intended

to first deal with White's d4 knight,

and then advance the f-pawn. 20.b4 axb3 2l.axb3 Qb4 22.Bel Nfe6 23.Nc2 Qb6 led to a complex position with mutual chances.

White, however, committed a characteristic mistake, 24.Bf2?, and was punished in a typical, tactical

Bxc3! 25.Qxc3 Nxe4!

way: 24

26.Bxb6 Nxc3, winning a pawn in

Bosiocic-Cvitan, Split 201 1.

17

Be5

Nxc3, winning a pawn in Bosiocic-Cvitan, Split 201 1. 17 Be5 Provoking White's next move. Unclear

Provoking

White's

next

move.

Unclear is 17

Qa5oo.

18.(4

The careless 18.b4?! axb3 19.axb3

This move drives away the bishop from its active location, but weakens the e4 pawn. A safer alternative is 18.Bf2 Qe7 19. Bfl . However, after the already

Nf8 ! 20.b4 axb3

standard idea 19

2l.axb3:

a) 2l

Ra3

22 .Qc2 Nfe6 23.Nde2

Nf4? ! (Only this is a mistake.

Better

was 23 Qf6!?"?.) 24. Nxf4 Bxf4 25 .b4 Ne6 26.Rd3:t, Van Wely- Shchekachev, Bastia 2010. b) Black could have solved all his problems with the other typical

22.Nde2

blockading idea: 2l

Qf6 23 .b4 Na4 24.Nxa4 Rxa4 25.Be3 g5 =.

Nfe6

idea: 2l Qf6 23 .b4 Na4 24.Nxa4 Rxa4 25.Be3 g5 =. Nfe6 Note the ideal position

Note the ideal position of the black pieces. The bishop on e5 is a monster! 18.g3 is another solid but innocuous attempt. Black equalizes

after

19. Bg5 f6 20.B e3 Nf8 2l.b4 axb3 22. axb3 Nfe6 23.Nc2 Qg7 24 .b4 f5 25.Nd4 Nxd4 26.Bxd4 Bxd4 27.Qxd4 Na4=, Polishchuk-Opryatkin, 2007/ Corr 2011.

18

Qe7

(unclear is

18

Qa5oo)

is strongly met with 19

Qh4!t.

18 Qe7 (unclear is 18 Qa5oo) is strongly met with 19 Qh4!t. It is worth studying

It is worth studying this position

for a while using Mozetic's notes:

a) Now 20.h3? weakens the black

squares: 20

Nf6-+ .

b) 20.Bgl is no better: 20

Nf6!

(20

now:

Bf4! might be even stronger) and

bl)

2l .g4 Bxg4! 22.fxg4 Nfxe4-+ .

b2) 2l .b4? Nh5 22.g4 Ne6!

Ng3+

24.Kg2 Nxe2 25.Nxe2 Bxe6t.

b3) 21.Qel! is White's best try,

but he is still worse after 21 22.Rxel Ra3+.

c) After 20.f4 Bg7 2l.Bf3 Nf6,

Black's pieces have arrived on the battlefield with great effect, and the first player is in trouble: 22.Bf2

.Qxel

23.Nxe6 (or 23.gxh5 Nxd4) 23

(n ot 22.g3?! Qh3 +, weak squares.) 22

and now :

Nxd4) 23 (n ot 22.g3?! Qh3 +, weak squares.) 22 and now : and g4 and

and g4 and e4 are

Qh6

23.Rel Ng4

cl) 24. Bgl? Bxd4 25.Qxd4 Qxf4+. 20 Qf8 c2) 24. Bg3 Ne5! (24 Ra3 might
cl) 24. Bgl? Bxd4 25.Qxd4 Qxf4+. 20 Qf8 c2) 24. Bg3 Ne5! (24 Ra3 might

cl)

24. Bgl? Bxd4 25.Qxd4 Qxf4+.

20

Qf8

c2)

24. Bg3 Ne5! (24

Ra3 might

Bologan decides to play for a

be even better.) 25.Be2 Ned3 ! 26. Bxd3

win. Alternatively, a relatively safe

Bxd4:

equality would be reached after

c21)

27.b4? Ra3.

20

Nb6!?

21.b3 h5 (also possible is

c22) 27.Bc2 Qg7 28.Ne2 Bf6!

21 axb3

22.axb3 Ra3 23.Bf2 Nbd7

(28

Nxe4 ??

29. Nxd4!+ -)

29. Qxd6

24. Qc2 h5+t) 22.f5 axb3 23.axb3 Ra3

(29.Ngl

Bc3)

29

Nxe4

30.Bxe4

24.Bg5 Qe5 25.Nce2 Nbd7oo.

Rxe4+ with the bishop pair and the

better game. c23) 27.Ne2 Bf6t.

c3) 24. Bxg4 Bxg4+. Black was

better and managed to convert his

advantage in Ligterink-Mozetic, Tilburg 1993.

18 Bg 7 19. Bf3 Qe7

is

using the half-open e-file!

20. Rel

The

threat

is

f7-f5 .

Black

21. b4 axb3 22. axb3 Ra3

opponent

by hitting the vulnerable e4 pawn:

torture

Black can

his

22

Nf6

23.Bgl

(23. Qc2 Bg4 24. b4

Ne 6= Bologan.) 23

25.fxe5 Bxf3 (25

27.Nxf3

Bg4 24.e5 dxe5

Bh6 26. Qc2 Bxf3

Nfd7

2B. RbdH,

Postny.)

26.Nxf3 RedS =.

23.

b4

Bh6 26. Qc2 Bxf3 Nfd7 2B. RbdH, Postny.) 26.Nxf3 RedS =. 23. b4 Chapter la: Flexibility

28

Nb 6/ The King's Indian Sp irit!

33.Rxf7! Be6! 34.Rxf8+ Qxf8�, with the remark:

Black sacrifices a piece for only two pawns. However, these pawns

will be well supported by both bish­ ops and the heavy pieces.

24.Nxa4

Also possible is 23 Rxa4 25.Qc2;!;.

Na4

24.

26.

bxc5 Nx c4 25. Qd8 Nxe8 Qxe8 dxc5 27.Nde2 c4

28.Nxc3 b5

29.Ral Rxal 30.Rxal b4 3l.Na4 c4

32.Qb6 Be6 33.Nc5;!;, Bologan.

28. Qcl g511

Better than 27

Bxc3

Be6 33.Nc5;!;, Bologan. 28. Qcl g511 Better than 27 Bxc3 Absolutely gorgeous! Black clears the way

Absolutely gorgeous! Black clears the way for the bishop, so that no one will disturb it on e5!

29.fxg5

29.g3 b5 highlights the weak­ ened third rank, while 29.e5 gxf4 30.Ne4 Rxe5 31.Qxc4 Be6 32.Qc2 Qe7 33.Nxf4 Ba2 34.Rb2 Bd5�, given by Bologan, leads to a complete mess.

29 Be5 80.Bh5

Also unclear would be 30.Ndl Qc5 3l.Ng3 b5 32.Nf5 c3 33.Nh6+ Kg7 34.Ne3 Be6 35.Re2 b4 36.Bg4 b3 37.Bxe6 fx e6 38.Qdl Bd4oo.

80

Rb8

Bologan gives the

following line: 3l.Rfl Rf8 32.Qd2 b5

After 30

Qc5

gives the following line: 3l.Rfl Rf8 32.Qd2 b5 After 30 Qc5 "You might be laughing, but

"You might be laughing, but despite the fa ct that Bl ack is a piece down, and does not have a single pawn to compensate for it, I would still prefer to have Black here!" Indeed, the beautiful bishops in the center, which control everything, make even the materialistic machine respect the position, and carefully assess it as equal!

81.Ndl Rxbl 82. Qxbl b5 88.Ne8 Be6 84.Nf5/ Ra8

it as equal! 81.Ndl Rxbl 82. Qxbl b5 88.Ne8 Be6 84.Nf5/ Ra8 2 4 Chapter la:

35. Qdl

One wild line is 35.Ned4 Bxf5 36.Nxf5 Ral 37.Qxal Bxa l 38.Rxal b4 39.Be2! c3 40.Bc4 Qb8 4l.Bb3 c5 42.e5 c4 43.Bxc4 c2 44.h3 Qa7 45.Rcl Qd7 46.Nh6+ Kg7 47.Bb3 Qd2 48.Rxc2 Qel+ 49.Kh2 Qxe5+ 50.g3 Qxg5 5l.Nxf7 Qe3=.

35 c5?

Both opponents went into time

trouble, with unavoidable mistakes.

36.Qxal

Bxal 37.Rxal Qd8 38 .h4 b4 39.Nh6+ Kf8 40.Nxf7 Qb6 4l.Ne5 b3 42. Nf4 Ke7 43.Nxe6 b2 44.Rbl Qe3 45.Nd4 Qcl+ 46.Rxcl bxclQ+ 47.Kh2 c5 48.g6 hxg6 49.Nxg6+ Kf7 50.Nf4+ Kg8 5l.Nde2 Qel 52 .Nd5=.

Better

was

35

Ral

36.

Nh6+

36.Rfl!±.

36

Kh 8?

Qd6

39.Nxe 6+ fx e6 40.Q f2 Rf8 4l.Nf7 c3

42 .Qh4 Qd4 43 .Nxe5 Qxe5 44. Bg4 h5

45 .gxh6+ Kh8 46.h3

37. Rfl Qe7

36

Kg7

37.Qd2

b4

38. Nf4

Rf6oo.

.gxh6+ Kh8 46.h3 37. Rfl Qe7 36 Kg7 37.Qd2 b4 38. Nf4 Rf6oo. 38. Qd2 Fier

38. Qd2

Fier misses a golden opportunity:

38.Nxf7+ Bxf7 39.Bxf7 Ral 40.Ncl Qxg5 4l.g3+-.

38 b4 39.Nf4 c3 40. Qcl c2

Or

40

b3

4l.Nxe6

b2

42 .Nxf7+

Qxf7

43 .Bxf7

bxclQ

44.Rxcl

c2

45.Nxc5 Bb2 46 .Rel

Bxcl=.

41.Nxe6

43.Rxal clQ+!

clQ 47.Rxcl

Bxal

Ral

42. Qxal

Bxcl=. 41.Nxe6 43.Rxal clQ+! clQ 47.Rxcl Bxal Ral 42. Qxal 44.Nxf7+ Kg8 45.Rfl b3 47. Bf7+

44.Nxf7+ Kg8 45.Rfl

b3

47. Bf7+ Kh8 48.g6 Qf6 49.g7+ Qxg7 50.Nxg7 b2 !! 5l.Nd3 blQ 52 .Ncl

(45.Nh6+=)

Or 43

Qa7

45

Qe7

46.Ne5

Kxg7 with good chances for a draw, according to Bologan.

44.Rxcl fxe6 45.Ral Qf8

It's

also

a draw after 45

Kg7·

46.h4

Qb7

47. Rdl

Qc7

48.Ral

Qb7=.

46.Nf7+ Kg 7 47. R a7 b3 48.Nh6+ Kh 8 49. Nf7+ Kg 7 50. Nh6+ Kh B

*·*

Who would not like to give this line a try after such a start?!

2 EJjanov - Bologan

Croation Team Championships, S ibenik 2010

l.d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg 7 4.e4 d6 5. Nf3 0-0 6. Be2 e5 7. 0- 0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9. f3 c6 lO . Khl Nbd7 11.Bg5

Eljanov

also

goes

for

the

main

line against Black's setup.

ll

Qb6 12. Nb3 a5

the main line against Black's setup. ll Qb6 12. Nb3 a5 13.Na4 And here, instead of

13.Na4

And here, instead of allowing the a-pawn to advance, he tries to force the queen's retreat with tempo. The drawback of this move is that the knight is misplaced on the edge of the board, and does not sufficiently control the center.

Note that White cannot take the d-pawn: 13.Qxd6? a4 14 .c5 Qb4 15.Qd4 Qxd4 16.Nxd4 Nxe4 17.Nxe4 Bxd4+. 13 .Qd2 was the course of the pre­ vious game, Fier-Bologan, Moscow

2011.

13 Qb4 14.Ncl

A more or less forced retreat, as the alternative 14.Nd4? saw White

suffer after 14

16 .Nb3 a4 17. Nc1 Qxb2 18.Nd3 Qd4, with an extra pawn and better

Nc5! 15.Nxc5 dxc5

position for Black in Blees-Brendel, Krumbach 1991.

14

Nc5

Definitely playable, and Black en­ joys a good game after this move. However, fr om a theoretical point

of view, Black's problems are easily

solved with the

standard 14 .•. d5!

problems are easily solved with the standard 14 .•. d5! White's knight on a4 is too

White's knight on a4 is too fa r away fr om the central battle , and Black

equalizes easily, at the very least. We look at several replies:

After 15.Nd3 Qe7 16.cxd5 cxd5 17.e5 Nxe5 18.Nb6 Rb8 19.Nxd5 Qd8 20.N3f4 h6 2l.Bxf6 Bxf6 22.Nxf6+ Qxf6=, Black even managed to win this position, in Shneider-Buturin, Kiev 1986. 15.a3 does not have the desired effect, as the queen can step into the

Qe7

bishop pin for a moment: 15

16.exd5 cxd5 17.Bh4 (1 7.cxd5 Qe5

dxc4

18.{4 Qxd5 19. Qxd5 Nxd5+) 17

18.Bxc4 Ne5 19.Bb5 Bd7 20.Qe2?! Bxb5 2 l .Qxb5 Qd7, and Black is already much better. Just compare the coordinated black pieces to white's, which are scattered around, in Ruzele-Ivanchuk, Sochi 1986. 15.cxd5 cxd5 and now there are

fu rther branche s:

a) 16 .exd5 Nc5 17. Nd3 , when

Black has a pleasant choice between

Qxa4

18.Nxc5 Qxd 1 19.Bxd 1 Nxd5 = Pane­

lo- Grigore, Sitges 2005, and the rec�

ommendation by Eljanov : 17

18.Bxd3 Nxd5 19.a3 Qd6 20. Bc4 Be6, with excellent play for Black.

Nxd3!

immediate equality with 17

b) 16. Bxf6 Nxf6 (B lack can also

Bxf6

17.a3 Q{B 18.Qxd5 RdB�.) 17.Nd3 (17.exd5? suddenly loses material

18. b3 Bxa4 19. bxa4

after

sacrifice a pawn with 16

17

Bd7

Qd4 18.e5 Nd7 19.f4 f6 !

The King's Indian bishop needs air. 20.B f3 fx e5 2l.N xe5 Qxd 1 22.R axd 1

Qb2 -+) 17

Nxe5 23.fxe5 Bxe5=, and Black's two bishops will secure equality.

15. Nd3!N

and Black's two bishops will secure equality. 15. Nd3!N This move is a novelty and the

This move is a novelty and the first choice of the engines. White needs to trade his opponent's active pieces at once . Anything else will pass the initiative to Black. 15.Nxc5 also trades pieces, but provides time for Black to create con­ crete threats: 15 .•. Qxc5 16.Qd2

Black to create con­ crete threats: 15 .•. Qxc5 16.Qd2 16 Qb4! and now: a) After

16

Qb4!

and now:

a) After 17. Rd1 (Bologan) 17

Nd7, only Black can be better, or

even 17

b) 17.Qc2 d5 18.cxd5 cxd5 19.Nd3

Qd4+.

Please note that the immediate 16•••d5? is premature: 17.cxd5 cxd5

18.Nd3 Qf8 19.e5 Nd7 20.f4±, Roed­ er-Burgess, Vienna 1990.

d5!?

Qf8 19.e5 Nd7 20.f4±, Roed­ er-Burgess, Vienna 1990. d5!? with the initiative. 15 Qxa4 16 .

with the initiative.

15

Qxa4 16 . b3 Nfxe4! !

1990. d5!? with the initiative. 15 Qxa4 16 . b3 Nfxe4! ! Spectacular and in the

Spectacular and in the spirit of the KID. Bologan sacrifices his queen for just two minor pieces and a pawn, but will enjoy great activity. Note that 16••• Qa3? loses the queen after 17.Bcl.

A less brave man would prefer

another attractive sacrifice after

17.axb3 Qxal 18 .Qxal

Nxe4!

16

Nxb3!

sacrifice after 17.axb3 Qxal 18 .Qxal Nxe4! 16 Nxb3! 19.Qcl Nxg5 20.Qxg5 Rxe2 with much more

19.Qcl Nxg5 20.Qxg5 Rxe2

Qxal 18 .Qxal Nxe4! 16 Nxb3! 19.Qcl Nxg5 20.Qxg5 Rxe2 with much more material to compen­

with much more material to compen­ sate for the queen. The most likely out­ come is a draw: 21 .Qd8+ Bf8 22.Nf2

(or 22.h4 Re7! with the key defensive resource given by Eljanov: 23.h5 Rd7

24.Qe8 Re7 25.Qd8 Rd7=) 22

a4

(also

good is 22

Re6

23.Ne4oo). Now:

a) Either

a

perpetual

after

(24

25.Nf6 + Kg7

23 .bxa4 Rxa4 24.Ne4 Be6

Rxe4 !? 25.fxe4 Be6�)

26.Ne8+ Kg8 27.Nf6+=,

b) Or a different perpetual with 23.Ne4 axb3 24.Nf6+ Kg7 25.Nh5+ gxh5 26.Qg5+ Kh8 27.Qf6+ Kg8

28.Qg5+=.

17. bxa4

Kg7 25.Nh5+ gxh5 26.Qg5+ Kh8 27.Qf6+ Kg8 28.Qg5+=. 17. bxa4 17 Nc3 The point behind Black's

17

Nc3

The point behind Black's idea. He wants the e2 bishop, not the one on g5 .

18.Rbl

Less

good

is

17

Nxg5?!

Bf5 19.Nxc5 (after 19.g4!? Bxd3 20.Bxd3 Nh3 2l. Qd2 Be5�, "White

can hardly crack the black-squared

blockade)

Bxa2

21.Nxd6 RedS 22 .c5 Ne6 23 .Qc2 Bd5 24.Bc4 Bxc4 25.Qxc4;!;.

18.Qcl!

The only move. Everything else loses material:

18.Qc2? Rxe2 19.Bd2 Bf5-+. 18.Qel?! Rxe2 19.Nxc5 Rxel 20.Raxel Bf5 21.Nxb7 d5t.

18 Nx e2 19. Qa3

19

Bxbl

20.Nxb7

Rxel 20.Raxel Bf5 21.Nxb7 d5t. 18 Nx e2 19. Qa3 19 Bxbl 20.Nxb7 28 Chapter la:
19 Be6! I suspect that Bologan did not even consider throwing away his bishop for

19 Be6!

I suspect that Bologan did not even consider throwing away his

bishop for the miserable rook on

al!

f5 22.Qb2 would see White consolidating, and building an attack on the dark squares.

20.Nxc5

dxc5

22 .Qxc5 Ba6iii, where the white rooks

are out of play.

20.Rxal b6 2l.Nf2

19

Bxal

Or

20.Rael

Bxc4

2l.Nxc5

20 dxc5

21. Qd3

The position is extremely messy, and difficult for both players. Some further lines prove that Black has enough compensation:· 21.Qb3 is a line given by Bologan

Nd4 21

24.Racl Bxa2 25 .Qd7 c4iii.

And the line 21.Qxc5 is provided

22 .Qd6 Bxc4

by Eljanov: 21

22.Qxb7 Bxc4 23. Rfel Ne6

Bd4

23.Rabl (also 23. Qc7 b5! and 23.Rael

c5! 24.{4 Re4 25.{5 RaeB

initiative)

the

with

Rac8

25.Qd7 b4 26.Rbdl Be6 27.Qd6 Bg7

28.Qb6 h6! and now:

a) 29.Bd2 Bxa2 30.Qxa5 b3iii with

eompensation.

23

b5!

24.Qxc6

b) 29.Bh4 Nc3 30.Rdel Ra8iii.

c) 29. Rdel Bxa2

b5! 24.Qxc6 b) 29.Bh4 Nc3 30.Rdel Ra8iii. c) 29. Rdel Bxa2 30. Bf6 The b-pawn becomes

30. Bf6 The b-pawn becomes too dangerous, so White hurries to

31.Qxf6

trade bishop!;!. 30

Re6 32 .Qb2 Bc4iii. and once again, White's rooks are kept out of play.

21 Nc3!

Once again scorning the rook.

.Bxal 22.Rxal

Nd4 23. Bf6± should be avoided!

22.Rae1

Bxf6

Indeed, the line 21

Bf6± should be avoided! 22.Rae1 Bxf6 Indeed, the line 21 22 Nx a2 The other pawn

22 Nx a2

The other pawn was also yummy:

22

25.cxb5 Nb6 26.bxc6 Rxc6 27.Qb5 Rac8 28.Qxa5 c4 29.Rbl Nd7 30.Qa7 Nf8iii. In fa ct, it is only Bl ack who can

Nxa4 23 .Qb3 b5! 24. Rxe6 Rxe6

play for a win here!

23.Re3 h6 24.Bh4

pawns

after 24. Bf4 Nb4 25 .Qe2 b5!.

24 Nb4!

Black's

also start

rolling

Also

possible

is

24

Nc3 !?

with

counterplay.

25. Qe2 b5 26. cxb5

30.Qb5 RedS 3l.Rcl Nb4 32 .c7 Rd5 33.Qb7 Rc500•

29 Rec8 30. Bg3!

Black's position has improved significantly in the last moves, and Eljanov hurries to get rid of the black-squared monster.

Similar is

26.axb5

cxb5

27.cxb5

30

Rxc6 31. Be5 Bxe5

 

Nd5.

Unfortunately,

31

.Bf8

can

26 Nd5 27.Ra3 c4 ?!

 

be answered with 32. Raxc3 Nxc

33.Rxc3±.

Overambitious.

A neat continuation is

27

cxb5!

32. Qxe5 c2

 

28.axb5 (or 28. Qxb5 c4 29. Qxc4

 

Ne3 30.Qcl Nxfl 31. Qxfl RabB with

initiative) 28

Nb6 29.Rel a4 30.Qc2

Bd4 31 .h3 Bb3 32.Rxe8+ Rxe8

Ne3 30.Qcl Nxfl 31. Qxfl RabB with initiative) 28 Nb6 29.Rel a4 30.Qc2 Bd4 31 .h3

33.Rxb3 axb3 34.Qxb3 Ra8 35.Kh2 c4 with counterplay - Eljanov.

28. bxc6?!

 

Returning the favor. Better was 28 .Qxc4! cxb5 29.Qxb5 Reb8 30.Qe2 Rb2 3l.Qdl±.

28

c3

Now the position is more or less balanced. White will need to give up some

Now the position is more or less balanced. White will need to give up some material for the c2 passer, and the resources of both sides will be exhausted.

33. h4 Nb4

 

Or 33

Rac8

34 .h5 g5 35.Kh2 Nf4

36.Re3 Rc5 37.Qb2 Bf5 38 .Qb6 Be6=.

34.

36.

Rc3 Rxc3 35. Qxc3 ReS

Qd2 h5 37.Kh2 Bf5

Much more subtle than 28

Bf8

30.Raal

Rxc6

Rec8

3l.Rxc4

29.Rcl

Nc3

32.Rxc3

Rxc3

33. Bf6

Rc4

34.Bb2±.

 

29.

Rcl

If

29.Bg3

then

29

Rac8!

(29

Rec8 30. Qb5 c2 3l. Rcl Nb4

32 .c7 Bb2 is refut ed wit h 33. Rxc2 !)

30. Qb5 c2 3l. Rcl Nb4 32 .c7 Bb2 is refut ed wit h 33. Rxc2
38.g4! The only way to generate counter­ play, but a sufficient one. 38 Bh5 Analysis

38.g4!

The only way to generate counter­ play, but a sufficient one.

38

Bh5

Analysis shows that Black cannot win:

40. Qg5

hxg4

39.fxg4

Bxg4

Be6 41 .h5 Na2 42 .Qe5 Nxcl

43.h6 Kf8 44.Qd6+ KgS 45 .Qe5=.

Bd1 41 .Qe7 Nd3 42 .Qd7

Nxcl 43.QxcS+ Kg7 44.Qc3+ Kh7

45.Qc7=.

40

Also, 40

49. Kg3

Nf5 + 50. Kf4 Nxh4 51 .a6 Bd5 52.Ke5 Bf3 53.Kd6

47

Nd 6

48. Rb8+

Kg 7

It's also a draw after 53.a7 g5

54.Rb3 Ng6+ 55.Kd6 Be4 56.Rb6 BaS 57.RbS Bf3 5S.Rb5 g4 59.Rg5

BaS

f3 63.Kf5 Kh7 64. Kg4 Ne5+ 65.Kf4

Nc6=.

60. Rxg4 f5 61.Rgl f4 62 .Ke6

53

g5 54. a7 g4 55. Rb3
g5
54. a7
g4
55. Rb3

g3

56. Rxf3 Nxf3 57. a8Q g2

41.Qxa5Na2

 

58. Qa1+

Kg8.

59. Qa8+

Kg 7

No

better

was

41

Nd3

42 .Qa6

60.

Qa1+

Kg8

61. Qa8+

Kg 7

Rc3 43.Qf6=.

42.Qa6 Bg4 ?!

draw

with

Nxcl 45.Qd4+ KgS 46 .Qxc3 Bdl

47.QcS+=.

43.Qxc8+

Suddenly, Bologan needs to show some technique to prove the draw. He does it successfully, though.

44. Rxc2'! Be6 45.Rb2

Nc3 46.a5 Ne4 47.Rb5

Bologan proves the draw after 47.a6 Bd5 4S.Rb5 Bc6 49.RbS+ Kg7 50.a7 g5 51.RcS Bb7 52.h5 Nf6 53.RbS Be4 54.Rb5 Nxh5 55.Rxg5+ Kh6 56.Re5 BaS 57.ReS Bc6 5S.RcS

Be4=.

43 Bxc8

44 .Qd5

It was

42

time

Rc3

to

accept

the

43 .QaS+

Kg7

62. Qa1+ Kg8 63. Qa8+ Kg 7 %-%

Aggressive

development:

ll.Bf4

3 Premnath - Kokarev

Mumbai Mayor's Cup 2010

l.d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg 7 4.e4 0-0 5. Be2 d6 6. Nf3 e5 7. 0- 0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.(3 c6 lO. Khl Nb d7 11.Bf4

Nf3 e5 7. 0- 0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.(3 c6 lO. Khl Nb d7 11.Bf4 The

The most aggressive way to develop the bishop. White seemingly wins a tempo. However

ll

Nh 5!

12 .Qd2 is a playable

alternative, but Black can and should

show activity at once.

12. Bxd6

The only way to prove that White's previous move was not a mere waste of time is to accept the sacrifice . Altern atively, 12.B e3?! f5 (w orth

considering

and

.Qh4!?) 13.Qd2 f4 14.Bf2 Be5? saw Black achieving a comfortable

position in Lautier-Piket, Adelaide

ll

.Ne5

are

both

12

a5!?

1988.

12

Qf6!

Adelaide ll .Ne5 are both 12 a5!? 1988. 12 Qf6! Two white pieces are hanging, so

Two white pieces are hanging, so the knight needs to retreat.

13.Nc2

The other retreat can be met in the same way: 13.Nb3 Nf4! threatening Nf4xe2 , after which the bishop on d6 or the pawn on b2 will suffer. We discuss fo ur continuation s:

14.c5 a5 15.a4 Ne5 16.g3 Nxe2

Be6!?) with

17.Qxe2 Qe6! (or

the idea 18.Nd4 Qc4 19.Bxe5 Qxe2

20.Ncxe2 Rxe5 21.Racl f5 22.exf5

Bxf5iii.

Qc4 19.Bxe5 Qxe2 20.Ncxe2 Rxe5 21.Racl f5 22.exf5 Bxf5iii. The bishop pair compensates for the missing

The bishop pair compensates for the missing pawn, with interest.

Nxe2 !

This bishop is also a good piece!

14.Rel is best met with 14

! This bishop is also a good piece! 14.Rel is best met with 14 32 Chapter

(better than 14

Be6 17. BfH Loehr-Schmitt, Germany

1991) 15.Rxe2 Ne5 16.c5 b6 with counterplay. 14.Rbl a5!� creates the threat a5 -a4-a3 .

Fi nally, after 14.B:x:f4 Qxf4

15.c5 b6 16. Qc2

Ne5

Qc7, with the idea

of a5-a4 -a3, also provides enough

compensation for Black.) 16.Qe3

f5 17.g3 Qe7 18.c5 Nf6 , Black has sufficient compensation for the sacrificed pawn. The e4�pawn is

always a target , and

bi shops also

The fu rther course of this game shows that it is only Black who can play fo r a win.

I am giving the next few moves

so that you can see how this position

is handled by a grandmaster. 19.Bc4+ Kh8 20. Rae1 fx e4 2l.Nxe4 Bh3 22.Rf2 Nxe4 23.fxe4 Rad8 24. Rf7 Qe5 25.Bfl Bc8 26.Rf2 Be6 27.Qf4 Rd7 28.Qxe5 Bxe5 29.Kg2 Kg7 30.Rc2 RedS 3l.Bc4 Bg4 32.Be2 Be6 33.Bc4 Bxc4 34.Rxc4 Bxb2+, Franco Ocampos-Damljanovic, San Sebastian 1994.

13 Nf4 14. c5

brings joy to Black.

15.Qc1 Qh4 (15

the

pair

of

With the white knight on c2 , Black has one more idea up his sleeve. Kokarev had pleasant experience after 14.B:x:f4 Qxf4 15 .g3 Qh6 16.Qc1 Qxc1 17. Raxcl f5�. Aupov-Kokarev, Kazan 2001. As in the game Franco Ocampos-Damljanovic, it is only Black who can play for the win. Lerner-Kuzmin, Alushta 1992 ,

continued

be 14.Rel)

Ne5

16.Ne3 Be6 17.c5 b6 18.Ned5 cxd5 19.Bxe5 Qxe5 20.exd5 Qf5 2l.dxe6 Rxe6 22 .cxb6 axb6 23.Rxe6 Qxe6

24.Qd2 Qc4 25.a3 Bxc3 Y:.!-¥2.

14.Rf2

14

(similar

would

Nxe2

15.Rxe2

14

Nx c5 /

Y:.!-¥2. 14.Rf2 14 (similar would Nxe2 15.Rxe2 14 Nx c5 / A typical trick, which might

A typical trick, which might work in many cases for Black.

15.Bxc5?

White · is fr ustrated, and gives up too quickly. Correct is 15.e5! Now Black can choose equality with 15 •••R:x:e5!? 16. Bxe5 Qxe5 17.Qd8+ Bf8 18.Rf2 Rb8 19.Qd4 Qc7�, with a nice bishop and a pawn for the exchange:

Qc7�, with a nice bishop and a pawn for the exchange: Also possible, on Black's last

Also possible, on Black's last move,

Qxd4

20.Nxd4 Nfe6 2l.Nxe6 Bxe6�. Or instead, Black can choose complications with 15•••Qg5 16.g3

was the queen trade 19

Bh3 (or 16

Nxe2

17. Qxe2 b6 18.f4-t.

but Black definitely has compensa­

tion) 17. Bxc5 and now:

a) Bad would be 17

Rad8 18.Ne4

Qf5 due to Postny's suggestion:

a1)

all) not 19

19.Bd6!

Bxe5 20.Ne3 Qc8

2l.Nc4 Bg2+ 22.Kg1 Bd4+ 23.Rf2 +-.

a12) nor 19

Bxfl 20.Qxfl Nxe2

21.Qxe2+-.

a13) 19

Bg2+

20.Kg1 Bxfl

2l.Bxfl Bxe5 22.Nd4 Nh3+ 23.Bxh3 Qxh3 24.Bxe5 Rxe5 25 .Qe1!±. a2) Much worse was 19. Nd4? Bg2+ 20.Kg1 Nxe2+ 2l.Kxg2 Nxd4 22.Nd6? Rxd6 23.Bxd6 Nc2 24.Qe2 Nxa1 25.Rxa1 Qe6 26.Qd3 Bxe5 27.Re1 Rd8 28.Rxe5 Qxe5 0-1,

Karolyi-Watson, Kecskemet 198 8.

Rd8 28.Rxe5 Qxe5 0-1, Karolyi-Watson, Kecskemet 198 8. One more mistake gives Black t chance to

One more mistake gives Black t chance to increase his advantage.

24

g51

25.Qe5

Not 25 .Qe3? c5-+.

b)

However, a playable alternative

Also

insufficient

is

25.Qc1

is 17

Nxe2

18.Qxe2

Bxfl

19. Rxfl

26.Bg1 Bg7-+.

 

Qxe5 20.Qf2 with approximate

equality.

18.Bd6

Bg2+ 19.Kg1 Nxe2+ 20.Kxg2 Nxc3 2l.bxc3 Qxc3 22.Bf4 Rad8

23.Re1D (not 23. Qcl Re2+ 24.Rf2 Qxc2 25. Qxc2 Rxc2 26. Rxc2 Bxal-+)

23

pieces to compensate for the piece.

Qc4 with two pawns and active

c) Or the wild 17

Qxe5!?

15

Qg51+

Double attack. Black recovers the pawn, and has the bishop pair for fr ee.

16.g3 Nxe2 17.Be3 Nxc3 18. bxc3

Qe7

Or 18

Qa5!?

19.Bd4 Bh3 20.Rel Rad8 21. Qe2

RedS

Rd7

Bf8

22. Qe3

23. Re2

25 Qxe5 26. Bxe5 Rdl+ 27.Rx•

Rxdl+ 28. Rel Rd2

Qe3 23. Re2 25 Qxe5 26. Bxe5 Rdl+ 27.Rx• Rxdl+ 28. Rel Rd2 The bishops triumph!

The bishops triumph!

24. Qf4

29.

Ne3 Rxa2 30. Kgl B,

31.

Bxg7 Kxg7 32.(4 gxf4 33.g"

a5 34.e5 a4 35.c4 a3 36. c5 R

37.Nc4 Rg2+ 38. Khl a2 39. Rc2 40.(6+ Kh6 41.Nd6 Be6 0-

36. c5 R 37.Nc4 Rg2+ 38. Khl a2 39. Rc2 40.(6+ Kh6 41.Nd6 Be6 0- 34

The prophylactic

ll.Nc2

4 Kovalenko - Kokarev

RUS Cup final 2011

J. d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 8.Nc8 Bg 7 4.e4 d6 5. Be2 0- 0 6. Nf8 e5 7. 0-0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.f8 c6 lO. Khl Nbd7 11.Nc2

6. Nf8 e5 7. 0-0 exd4 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.f8 c6 lO. Khl Nbd7 11.Nc2 White prophylactically

White prophylactically retreats the knight to c2 . His idea is to step away from the vulnerable central square, and to unblock the queen's file, thus hoping to prevent the d6-d5 thrust. Additionally; the c2 -knight wants to be transferred to e3, or to support a bishop on e3.

ll

Nb 6

All these considerations, though,

are overpowered by the fa ct that White loses precious time. Therefore, we should try to prepare d6-d5

note also that the

retreat of the d4 Knight has left the

e6 square in Black's hands, and the bishop would not mind arriving there with a tempo.

at once. Ple ase

ll

Ne5

is not the best square

for the knight , as the line 12 . Be3 ·

Be6 13 .b3 d5?! 14 . B d4 !± proves

that this piece is vulnerable in the center, encouraging the e- and f- pa wns to adva nce. White' s last move in this line is an improvement on 14 .exd5?! cxd5 15 .c5 Nh5 16.Qd2 Nc6 =, Pavlovic-Sedlak, Mataruska Banja 2008.

12. Bg5

Insisting on his idea to stop d6 - d5 forever. As usual, though, this

bishop has a wide choice of squares for development:

12.Bf4 should be met with

12

13 Nh5! and now :

Be6

13 .Na3

(or

13.Ne3

d5=)

a) It appears that the d6 pawn is

poisoned: 14 . Bxd6 NcB! 15.Bb4 Qg5

16.Qcl

the d6 pawn is poisoned: 14 . Bxd6 NcB! 15.Bb4 Qg5 16.Qcl and now comes the

and now comes the combination:

16 Ng3+!

Bd4+ 19. Rf2 a5+ suddenly trapping

the bishop!

b) 14 .Be3 Qh4? gaining counter­

play with the idea 15.Qxd6? Rad8 16.Qc5 Ng3++.

The other bishop development cannot prevent d6-d5: 12.Be3 Be6

17.hxg3 Qh5+ 18.Kgl

Nh5!?, first provoking

some weaknesses on the king's flank,

13.g4 Nf6 14. Qd2 Be6 with counter­ play.) 13.b3:

(I also like 12

a)

And now Black should not

b2) 14. Nd4

Rad8

15.a4

d5

waste any time, but strike at once

16.cxd5?!

(16.a5f;t,)

16

Bxd5

with 13

d5!

at once 16.cxd5?! (16.a5f;t,) 16 Bxd5 with 13 d5! For example: Nfd7 16.f4 f6 17.exf6 Nxf6

For example:

Nfd7

16.f4 f6 17.exf6 Nxf6 18.R c1 (18.Bd4

a1)

14 .cxd5

cxd5

15.e5

Ne4

19.Nxe4 dxe4 20.Bxg 7 Kxg7=)

18 Rc8 19. Bd4 Ne4 20.Bxg7 Kxg7

2l .Qd4+ Qf6=.

a2) Yu rtaev also proved decent compensation after 14 .exd5:

simplest:

15.c5 Nfd7 ! The point behind Black's

break! 16.Qd2 (16.Bd4 fails due

a21) Now

14

cxd5

is

17.Bxg7

Kxg 7 18.Qd4+ Qf6 19.Qxc5 RacB +)

to a small trick: 16

Nxc5

16

a22) Yu rtaev continued instead

with 14

Nfd7 17. Bxb6 Qxb6 18.Na4 Qd6 19.Rb1 Be5 and Black even won in

Moskalenko-Yu rtaev, Frun ze 1987. Watch out for this name, we shall hear more about him later!

b) Also pos sible, though, is

13

b1) 14.Qd2 d5 15.cxd5 cxd5 16.e5 Nfd7 17.f4 f6 18.exf6 Nxf6 19.Bd4 Ne4 is a somewhat better version for White than the lin e fr om above, but still close to equality.

Rc8+t.

Bf5!? 15. Bd4 c5 16 .Bxc5

Qe7 instead:

(16

Nfxd5!

17.exd5

Nx d5

18 .Nxd5

Bxd5+) 17. a5 Nc8= in Chuchelov­ Hoehn, Porz 1990.

12

Be6

Natural, but not best. And the direct 12

not

well supported, and should be refuted

after 13.cxd5 (or 13.c5 Nbd7 14.exd5 Nxc5 15.dxc6 Qxdl 16.Raxdl bxc6 17.Nd4;t Lev -Rechlis, Te l Aviv 1989)

d5?!

is

13

cxd5

14.a4!±

Bl ack

needed

fi rst

to

put

the

question to the bishop: 12

h6!

fi rst to put the question to the bishop: 12 h6! and after 13.Bh4, only now

and after 13.Bh4, only now proceed

with 13 The additional moves

h7-h6 and Bg5 -h4 provide us with the option to chase away the bishop with g6-g5 with tempo at the right moment, thus supporting the d6-d5 advance. a) Now, there is another cunning

idea by Yu rtaev. 14 .Ne3 is met with

Be6.

14

g5!

cunning idea by Yu rtaev. 14 .Ne3 is met with Be6. 14 g5! 3 6 Chapter
and d6-d5 on the next move . We look at two tries by White: a1)

and d6-d5 on the next move . We look at two tries by White:

a1) 15. Bg3 d5 16.cxd5 cxd5 17. Nb5

(1Zexd5?! allows Black to seize the

18.Nexd5 Nxd5

19.Nxd5 Qxd5+.) 17 18. Bd6

Nxd6!?

21.exd6 gxf4 22.Rxf4 Qg5 might

Qg5 22.Rf3 Nxd6

23.exd6 Be5?, and Black was fine in

Thoma-Pachmann, Prague 1995.

cxd5

17. Nf5 Bxf5 18.exf5 Nc4 led to an interesting and double-edged battle:

19.Bxc4 dxc4 20.Qa4 Qc8 21 .Rad1 a6 22.Rd6 b5 23 .Qc2 Re5 24.g4 Qb7 25.Bd4 Nxg4 26.Rb6 Qd 7 27.Bxe5 Nxe5�, in Thorhallsson- Comas Fabrego, Arnhem 1988 , which ended successfully for Black.

transpose.) 21. Rxf4

Rd7 19.e5 NeB 20.f4 gxf4 (20

initiative: 17

Nfxd5

Re7

a2) 15.Bf2

d5

16.cxd5

b) 14.b3 is the other way to protect the pawn, and this is where Yurtaev's bomb explodes:

b1) 14

Nxe4!

!

this is where Yurtaev's bomb explodes: b1) 14 Nxe4! ! Absolutely brilliant! 15.Bxd8 Nxc3 16.Qd2 Raxd8

Absolutely brilliant! 15.Bxd8 Nxc3 16.Qd2 Raxd8 17. Rae1 c5! Now White won't be able to meet d6-d5 with c4- c5 (Postny). 18.Ne3 d5! Black has two minor pieces and a pawn for the queen, but the activity of those piec­ es is so great that White was relieved to escape with a draw after 19.cxd5 Nbxd5. And now:

bll) 20.Bc4 Nb4 21.Qf2 b5 22.Bxe6 Nd3 23 .Qh4 Nxe1 24.Rxe1 Rd4 25.Bg4 h5+. b12) 20.Nxd5 Rxd5 21.Qc1 b5 22.f4 Rdd8 23 .Qa3 Nxe2 24.Rxe2 c4

25.bxc4:

Rxd5 21.Qc1 b5 22.f4 Rdd8 23 .Qa3 Nxe2 24.Rxe2 c4 25.bxc4: lh-lh, Huzm an-Yu rt aev,
Rxd5 21.Qc1 b5 22.f4 Rdd8 23 .Qa3 Nxe2 24.Rxe2 c4 25.bxc4: lh-lh, Huzm an-Yu rt aev,

lh-lh, Huzm an-Yu rt aev, Tashkent

winning

1987.

has

White

no

chances against Black's powerful pair of bishops.

so

bad here, either. Black needs to be careful, though: 15.Bf2 d5 16.exd5

idea as

lB.Rcl

above!

cxd5 17.c5 Nfd7 !? The same

b2) However,

14

g5

is

not

(but

not

17

Nbd7

a6 19.Na4 ReB 20.Nd4 Ne 5 21.Nb6 Rc7 22 .b 4t. Ko zul- Strikovic, Yerevan

1996) 18.cxb6!? Bxc3 19.bxa7 Bxal 20.Qxal b6�. White certainly has compensation, but we have an extra exchange. Still, attacking is much more fun than defending, therefore check out what Yu rtaev did instead! Now back to our game:

check out what Yu rtaev did instead! Now back to our game: 13. Ne3 This move

13. Ne3

This move does not pose any prob­ lems for Black. The bad news comes after 13.b3!t.

when White stabilizes the situation and Black finds it hard to advance in

the center: 13

cxd5 16.e5 Nfd7 17.f4 a6 (17 {6

1B.Bd3! underlines the fact that the g6 pawn is loose now!) 18. Bd4± ,

14.Be3 d5?! 15.cxd5

h6

Grigore-Larios Crespo, Benasque 1999. Also strong is 18.Nd4±.

15.Bf2

d51= 16. cxd5 cxd5 17. e5 Nfd7 18.Nexd5 Nx d5 19.Nxd5 Nx e5+

13

h6

14.Bh4

g5

17. e5 Nfd7 18.Nexd5 Nx d5 19.Nxd5 Nx e5+ 13 h6 14.Bh4 g5 Black has every

Black has every reason to play for a win. His bishops are much better than their counterparts. Still, we do not always manage to wi n our better positions, and this game was one of those examples.

20.Nc3 Qa5 21. Qc2 Rac8 22. Rfdl

Nc4 23.Bxc4 Rxc4

24. Racl Rec8

25.

Bel

b5 26.a3

Qb6

27. Qd2

aS

28. Bf2

Qb7

29. Ne4

Rxcl

30.

Rxcl

Rxcl+

31. Qxcl

Qd5

32.

Bel b4 33. axb4 axb4 34. Bxb4

Bxb2 35. Qel Be5 36.Bc3 Bxc3

37.Nxc3=

33. axb4 axb4 34. Bxb4 Bxb2 35. Qel Be5 36.Bc3 Bxc3 37.Nxc3= White has defended well,

White has defended well, and the game should now end in a draw. It seems, though, that time trouble

took its toll in the later stage of the game.

37 Qd4 38.Ne4 Kg 7 39. h4

Bf5?! 40. hxg5 Bxe4 41.gxh6+ Kxh6 42.fxe4 Kg5 43.Qg3+ Kf6

44.Qf4+ Ke 6 45.Qf5+ Ke 7 46. Kh2 Qe3 47.g3 Qd2+ 48. Kh3 Qh6+

49.Kg4 Qhl 50. Qe5+

Qg2 52.Kf6 Qa2 53. Qd5+ Qxd5

Kxd5

56.Kf6 Ke4 57.g 4 Kf4 58 .g 5 Ke4 59.g6 Kd4 60.g7 Ke4 61.g8Q Kd4

62.Qb3 Ke4 63. Qc4+

54.exd5 Kd6 55. Kxf7

Kd7 51 . Kg5

1-0

The acid test:

ll.Be3

5 Kramnik - Ponomariov

Dortmund SuperGM 2011

l.d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg 7 4.e4 d6 5. Be2 0-0 6. Nf3 e5 7. 0-0

exd4

Ponomariov wants to surprise his mighty opponent and chooses this rare and fr esh line.

8.Nxd4 ReB 9.{3 c6 lO.Khl Nbd7

this rare and fr esh line. 8.Nxd4 ReB 9.{3 c6 lO.Khl Nbd7 ll.Be3 Still, Kramnik shows

ll.Be3

Still, Kramnik shows some quality prep, and this line might be Black's main source of concern nowadays. De spite the fa ct that the bishop stays on the file of the e8 rook, it is surprisingly difficult for Black to make use of this. White has one more prophylactic retreat in his disposal, ll.Nb3 . But here, the knight simply invites the black a-pawn to advance with tempo,

a5. Note that the

starting with

ll

pawn on d6 is not delicious at all :

12.Q xd6 a4 13.N d2 (E ven worse is

13.Nd4 ? Nh5 14.Nc2 Be5 15. Qd2 Qh4

16.{4 Ng3+

17.Kgl Nx{l +.J

13

Ne5

14 . Qxd8

Rxd8 ,

and

Black

has

fu ll

Ne5 14 . Qxd8 Rxd8 , and Black has fu ll Chapter la: Flexibility in the

compensation for the sacrificed pawn. White is underdeveloped, and the positional threat of a4-a3 with the bishop ranging on the long diagonal cannot be prevented so easily. One sample line is: 15.f4 Nd3 16 .Bxd3 Rxd3 17.e5 a3 ! 18.exf6?! axb2 19.Bxb2 Rxd2 20.Bcl Rc2+.

Qf8, trying to make use of his black­ squared bishop, for example: 16.Nd5 Re6 17.Bb5 a6 18.Ba4 Nc5 19.Nc7 Rd6 20.Nxa8 Rxdl 2l.Raxdl Bf6=. a2) Still, White had other ways of

improving his position. There is also the ambitious 13.Nxd5 cxd5 14.Nb5

dxe4

Re7 16.fxe4t., and White will use the

(or

14

Nb 6

15. Bf4!)

15.Nd6

f-file for his major pieces and the c4 square for his bishop to attack the
f-file for his major pieces and the c4
square for his bishop to attack the
most important f7 pawn, as in De
Ve rdier -Sc hutz, Sweden 2009.
b)
If 12
cxd5,
there is once again
the very unpleasant 13.Ndb5! The
knight is headed for d6. 13
dxe4
(13
Nb 6 14.a4 Be6 15.e5 Nfd7 16.{4±,
Petkov-
Gajewski, Plovd i v 2008) and
now:
bl) The f7 pawn can become vul­
nerable after White plays 14 .Bf4!
bll) 14
Nh5?
(15
Re6
16. Bc4 ±)
15.Bd6! Qh4
16 . Nc7 Be5
Now back to our game:
(16
Re5
17. Qe1+-) 17.Bxe5 Rxe5

ll

a6

This was prepared by Ponomariov at home. Black takes control over the b5 square and intends to play b7-b5 or d6-d5 in the future. Black has alternatives, though. Of course, Black's initial reaction

d5?! Beware !

For the time being, White has a pull

here. 12.cxd5 and now:

but

Black is not better after either of the

main replies 13.exd5 and 13.Nxd5:

al) 13.exd5 Rxe3 14.dxc6 Black has some compensation for the pawn, but it's quite obvious that the first player is not risking much, and can

play for a win in a relatively easy way.

bxc6!

ReB

The best for Black now is 14

is to look at d6-d5: ll

a) 12

Nxd5

The best move,

(better

16.Bb5 Qxd1 17.Raxd1 R{Bt., Djukic­ Strikovic, Brezovica 1988) 15.Nxc6

than

14

Nb6

15.Nc2

18.Nxa8 Ng3+ 19.Kgl Nxfl 20.Qxfl

Rh5 2l.h3+-.

Nc5 15.Nc7 Bf5 16 .Qxd8

Raxd8 17.Nxe8 Rxe8. The exchange is stronger here, as White can make

use of the open files for his Rooks, in Rakhma nov-Kokarev, Voronezh

2010.

b2) Or even after White instead plays the aggressive 14.fxe4 Nxe4

15.R xf7 !

16.Bc4++-) 16.Qb3 Kh8 17.Rxg7

Kxg7 18.Qxc3+ Nf6 19. Bf3 , White has excellent compensation for the exchange (Postny). Ponomariov liked the Grischuk­

style provoking idea of ll

Nh5 ,

but I am not quit e convinced after

12 .g4! Nhf6 13 .Qd2 h5 14 .g5 Nh7 15.Nb3 Qe7 16 . Radl Be5 17.f4!:

b12) 14

Nxc3

(n ot

15

Kxf7 ??

This pawn sacrifice is something that we should always be afraid ofl White does not

This pawn sacrifice is something that we should always be afraid ofl White does not mind investing some material in order to gain Black's dark-squared bishop, and we agree!

17 Bxc3

18.Qxc3± and now:

a) 18

Qxe4+

19.Bf3

Qxe3

(19

Qe7

20. Rfel

QfB�) 20.Rdel Qxc3

2l.Rxe8+ Nhf8 22 .bxc3±.

b)

18

Nc5

19.Nxc5

dxc5

20. e5±

(our f7 pawn will be safe now!), and d6, too. We look at two possibilities:

a) The prophylactic 12.Nc2 can be

met with 12 Be6 13 .b3 d5 (13

14.Bd4 Ne5) 14 .cxd5 cxd5 15.e5 Nfd7 16.f4 f6�. b) The only game played in this

line continued 12 .Qd2 d5

Ng4!?

The only game played in this line continued 12 .Qd2 d5 Ng4!? and now: or 20.Bd3

and now:

or 20.Bd3 ! ?±.

bl)

13.cxd5 cxd5 14.exd5 (This time

However, Black can still prepare

14.Ndb5

is

not

threatening Nb5-d6,

the d6-d5 advance with ll

Nb6!?

and can

be

met simply

with

14

a6

 

15.Na3

Bd7=.)

14

Nfxd5

15.Nxd5

14 a6   15.Na3 Bd7=.) 14 Nfxd5 15.Nxd5 The knight move not only opens the diagonal

The knight move not only opens the diagonal of the light-squared bishop and controls the d5 square, it has two ad ditional fu nction s: control over c4

Nxd5=, and Black was at least equal

in Zielinski-Curic, Duisburg 2004. Further tests will reveal how good Black's resources are in this line. The other attempts do not promise anything either:

14.c5 Nc4

15.Bxc4 dxc4 16.Ndb5 Qxd2 17.Bxd2 Rd8= and Black can even hope to make use of his bishop pair in the long run.

b3) Or the immediate 13 .c5 Nbd7 14.exd5 Nxd5 15.Nxd5 cxd5 16.b4 Qe7 17.Bf2 a5�. Another interesting and typical